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Sample records for assay mimics physiological

  1. Fluorescent competitive assay for melamine using dummy molecularly imprinted polymers as antibody mimics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Xin-wei; JIN Mao-jun; ZHENG Lu-fei; ZHANG Yan-xin; SHE Yong-xin; LIU Guang-yang; ZHAO Feng-nian; WANG Jing; WANG Shan-shan; JIN Fen; SHAO Hua

    2016-01-01

    A lfuorescent competitive assay for melamine was ifrst developed utilizing dummy molecularly imprinted polymers (DMIPs) as artiifcial antibodies. This method is based on the competition between lfuorescent substances and the unlabeled analyte for binding sites in synthesized DMIPs and the decreased binding of lfuorescent substances to DMIPs due to increased concentrations of melamine in the solutions. DMIPs for melamine were synthesized under a hot water bath in the pres-ence of the initiator azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) using 2,4-diamino-6-methyl-1,3,5-triazine (DAMT) as a dummy template, methacrylic acid (MAA) as a functional monomer, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as a crosslinking agent. The adsorption capacity and selectivity of DMIPs for melamine were evaluated by the isothermal adsorption curve and Scatchard analysis. The evaluation results showed that the synthesized DMIPs had speciifc recognition sites for melamine and the maximum adsorption amount was 1066.33 μg g–1. Later, 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinyl) amino lfuorescein (DTAF) with a triazine ring, which slightly resembles melamine, was selected as the lfuorescent substance. The lfuorescent competitive assay using DMIPs as the antibody mimics was ifnaly established by selecting and optimizing the reaction solvents, DMIPs amount, DTAF concentration, and incubation time. The optimal detection system showed a linear response within range of 0.05–40 mg L–1 and the limit of detection (LOD) was 1.23 μg L–1. It was successfuly applied to the detection of melamine in spiked milk samples with satisfactory recoveries (71.9 to 86.3%). According to the comparative analysis, the result of optimized lfuorescent competitive assay revealed excelent agreement with the HPLC-MS/MS result for melamine.

  2. Integrating microbial physiology and physiochemical principles in soils with the MIcrobial-MIneral Carbon Stabilization (MIMICS model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. Wieder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous modeling efforts document divergent responses of microbial explicit soil biogeochemistry models when compared to traditional models that implicitly simulate microbial activity, particularly following environmental perturbations. However, microbial models are needed that capture current soil biogeochemical theories emphasizing the relationships between litter quality, functional differences in microbial physiology, and the physical protection of microbial byproducts in forming stable soil organic matter (SOM. To address these limitations we introduce the MIcrobial-MIneral Carbon Stabilization (MIMICS model. In MIMICS, the turnover of litter and SOM pools are governed by temperature sensitive Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the activity of two physiologically distinct microbial functional types. The production of microbial residues through microbial turnover provides inputs to SOM pools that are considered physically or chemically protected. Soil clay content determines the physical protection of SOM in different soil environments. MIMICS adequately simulates the mean rate of leaf litter decomposition observed at a temperate and boreal forest sites, and captures observed effects of litter quality on decomposition rates. Initial results from MIMICS suggest that soil C storage can be maximized in sandy soils with low-quality litter inputs, whereas high-quality litter inputs may maximize SOM accumulation in finely textured soils that physically stabilize microbial products. Assumptions in MIMICS about the degree to which microbial functional types differ in the production, turnover, and stabilization of microbial residues provides a~mechanism by which microbial communities may influence SOM dynamics in mineral soils. Although further analyses are needed to validate model results, MIMICS allows us to begin exploring theoretical interactions between substrate quality, microbial community abundance, and the formation of stable SOM.

  3. Dexamethasone mimics aspects of physiological acclimatization to 8 hours of hypoxia but suppresses plasma erythropoietin

    OpenAIRE

    LIU, CHUN; Croft, Quentin P P; Kalidhar, Swati; Jerome T Brooks; Herigstad, Mari; Smith, Thomas G.; Dorrington, Keith L.; Robbins, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Dexamethasone ameliorates the severity of acute mountain sickness (AMS) but it is unknown whether it obtunds normal physiological responses to hypoxia. We studied whether dexamethasone enhanced or inhibited the ventilatory, cardiovascular, and pulmonary vascular responses to sustained (8 h) hypoxia. Eight healthy volunteers were studied, each on four separate occasions, permitting four different protocols. These were: dexamethasone (20 mg orally) beginning 2 h before a control period of 8 h o...

  4. Polyacrylic acid-coated cerium oxide nanoparticles: An oxidase mimic applied for colorimetric assay to organophosphorus pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Xiang; Xue, Shi-Fan; Deng, Jingjing; Zhang, Min; Shi, Guoyue; Zhou, Tianshu

    2016-11-15

    It is important and urgent to develop reliable and highly sensitive methods that can provide on-site and rapid detection of extensively used organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) for their neurotoxicity. In this study, we developed a novel colorimetric assay for the detection of OPs based on polyacrylic acid-coated cerium oxide nanoparticles (PAA-CeO2) as an oxidase mimic and OPs as inhibitors to suppress the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Firstly, highly dispersed PAA-CeO2 was prepared in aqueous solution, which could catalyze the oxidation of TMB to produce a color reaction from colorless to blue. And the enzyme of AChE was used to catalyze the substrate of acetylthiocholine (ATCh) to produce thiocholine (TCh). As a thiol-containing compound with reducibility, TCh can decrease the oxidation of TMB catalyzed by PAA-CeO2. Upon incubated with OPs, the enzymatic activity of AChE was inhibited to produce less TCh, resulting in more TMB catalytically oxidized by PAA-CeO2 to show an increasing blue color. The two representative OPs, dichlorvos and methyl-paraoxon, were tested using our proposed assay. The novel assay showed notable color change in a concentration-dependent manner, and as low as 8.62 ppb dichlorvos and 26.73 ppb methyl-paraoxon can be readily detected. Therefore, taking advantage of such oxidase-like activity of PAA-CeO2, our proposed colorimetric assay can potentially be a screening tool for the precise and rapid evaluation of the neurotoxicity of a wealth of OPs. PMID:27208478

  5. A novel circular invasion assay mimics in vivo invasive behavior of cancer cell lines and distinguishes single-cell motility in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classical in vitro wound-healing assays and other techniques designed to study cell migration and invasion have been used for many years to elucidate the various mechanisms associated with metastasis. However, many of these methods are limited in their ability to achieve reproducible, quantitative results that translate well in vivo. Such techniques are also commonly unable to elucidate single-cell motility mechanisms, an important factor to be considered when studying dissemination. Therefore, we developed and applied a novel in vitro circular invasion assay (CIA) in order to bridge the translational gap between in vitro and in vivo findings, and to distinguish between different modes of invasion. Our method is a modified version of a standard circular wound-healing assay with an added matrix barrier component (Matrigel™), which better mimics those physiological conditions present in vivo. We examined 3 cancer cell lines (MCF-7, SCOV-3, and MDA-MB-231), each with a different established degree of aggressiveness, to test our assay's ability to detect diverse levels of invasiveness. Percent wound closure (or invasion) was measured using time-lapse microscopy and advanced image analysis techniques. We also applied the CIA technique to DLD-1 cells in the presence of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lipid that was recently shown to stimulate cancer cell colony dispersal into single migratory cells, in order to validate our method's ability to detect collective and individual motility. CIA method was found to be highly reproducible, with negligible levels of variance measured. It successfully detected the anticipated low, moderate, and high levels of invasion that correspond to in vivo findings for cell lines tested. It also captured that DLD-1 cells exhibit individual migration upon LPA stimulation, and collective behavior in its absence. Given its ability to both determine pseudo-realistic invasive cell behavior in vitro and capture subtle

  6. Radioisotopic techniques for the study of reproductive physiology in domestic animals: 1. Assay procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent introduction of tracer techniques, such as competitive protein binding assay and radioimmunoassay for measuring peripheral blood plasma levels of hormones in the ng and pg range in large domestic animals, has greatly increased our knowledge of the reproductive physiology of these species. The development of these competitive radioassay techniques has allowed assays to be carried out on small amounts of plasma which, in turn, has allowed serial sampling of blood to be done in the same animal; the result has been a better understanding of the dynamics of reproductive endocrine function. The assay procedures have allowed the processing of large numbers of samples which enables the cost of each analysis to be of reasonable price. It is also worth emphasizing that no radioactive material has to be administered to the animal that is undergoing investigation. The application of competitive radioassay techniques for the measurement of oestrone, oestradiol, progesterone, testosterone and prostaglandins is discussed. These hormones are of significance for the understanding of reproductive procedures in large domestic animals. (author)

  7. Antioxidant activity evaluation by physiologically relevant assays based on haemoglobin peroxidase activity and cytochrome c-induced oxidation of liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mot, Augustin C; Bischin, Cristina; Muresan, Bianca; Parvu, Marcel; Damian, Grigore; Vlase, Laurian; Silaghi-Dumitrescu, Radu

    2016-06-01

    Two new protocols for exploring antioxidant-related chemical composition and reactivity are described: one based on a chronometric variation of a haemoglobin ascorbate peroxidase assay and one based on cytochrome c-induced oxidation of lecithin liposomes. Detailed accounts are given on their design, application, critical correlations with established methods and mechanisms. These assays are proposed to be physiologically relevant and bring new information regarding a real sample, both qualitative and quantitative. The well-known assays used for evaluation of antioxidant (re)activity are revisited and compared with these new methods. Extracts of the Hedera helix L. are examined as test case, with focus on seasonal variation and on leaf, fruit and flower with respect to chromatographic, spectroscopic and reactivity properties. According to the set of assays performed, winter are the most antioxidant, followed by summer leaves, and then by flowers and fruits. PMID:26208459

  8. Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  9. Genetic and Physiological Analyses of Barley Lesion Mimic Mutant bspl1%大麦类病斑突变体 bspl 1的遗传及生理生化分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙扬; 陆文怡; 张艳; 王广洋; 孙佳丽; 薛大伟; 张晓勤

    2014-01-01

    对甲基磺酸乙酯(EMS)诱变大麦品种ZJU3获得的一个类病斑突变体(bspl1)进行了遗传和生理分析。遗传分析结果显示,该表型由隐性单基因控制;苗期叶片生理生化分析表明,bspl1中SOD、POD以及CAT的活性较野生型ZJU3均明显升高。通过比较bspl1和野生型ZJU3在生理生化水平上的差异,推测类病斑的产生与叶片中活性氧的堆积相关。%Barley lesion mimic mutant bspl1,which is derived from Ethylmethylsulfone mutagenesis of ZJU3 ,is made genetic and physiological analysis .The genetic analysis indicates that the phenotype of bspl1 is controlled by a recessive monogene .The physiological and biochemical analyses of seedling leaves show that the activity of SOD ,POD and CAT in bspl1is significantly higher than that in wild type ZJU3 .The results demonstrate that the lesion appearance of bspl1is related with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in leaves .

  10. Sequential, solid-phase assay for biotin in physiologic fluids that correlates with expected biotin status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest in accurate measurement of biotin concentrations in plasma and urine has been stimulated by recent advances in the understanding of biotin-responsive inborn errors of metabolism and by several reports describing acquired biotin deficiency during parenteral alimentation. This paper presents a biotin assay utilizing radiolabeled avidin in a sequential, solid-phase method; the assay has increased sensitivity compared to previous methods (greater than or equal to 10 fmol/tube), correlates with expected trends in biotin concentrations in blood and urine in a rat model of biotin deficiency, and can utilize commercially available radiolabeled avidin

  11. Ultrasensitive detection in optically dense physiological media: applications to fast reliable biological assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveeva, Evgenia G.; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Berndt, Klaus W.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Goldys, Ewa; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2006-02-01

    We present a novel approach for performing fluorescence immunoassay in serum and whole blood using fluorescently labeled anti-rabbit IgG. This approach, which is based on Surface Plasmon-Coupled Emission (SPCE), provides increased sensitivity and substantial background reduction due to exclusive selection of the signal from the fluorophores located near a bio-affinity surface. Effective coupling range for SPCE is only couple of hundred nanometers from the metallic surface. Excited fluorophores outside the coupling layer do not contribute to SPCE, and their free-space emission is not transmitted through the opaque metallic film into the glass substrate. An antigen (rabbit IgG) was adsorbed to a slide covered with a thin silver metal layer, and the SPCE signal from the fluorophore-labeled anti-rabbit antibody, binding to the immobilized antigen, was detected. The effect of the sample matrix (buffer, human serum, or human whole blood) on the end-point immunoassay SPCE signal is discussed. The kinetics of binding could be monitored directly in whole blood or serum. The results showed that human serum and human whole blood attenuate the SPCE end-point signal and the immunoassay kinetic signal only approximately 2- and 3-fold, respectively (compared to buffer), resulting in signals that are easily detectable even in whole blood. The high optical absorption of the hemoglobin can be tolerated because only fluorophores within a couple of hundred nanometers from the metallic film contribute to SPCE. Both glass and plastic slides can be used for SPCE-based assays. We believe that SPCE has the potential of becoming a powerful approach for performing immunoassays based on surface-bound analytes or antibodies for many biomarkers directly in dense samples such as whole blood, without any need for washing steps.

  12. Antimicrobial activities of squalamine mimics.

    OpenAIRE

    Kikuchi, K.; Bernard, E M; Sadownik, A; Regen, S L; Armstrong, D

    1997-01-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial properties of compounds with structural features that were designed to mimic those of squalamine, an antibiotic isolated from the stomach of the dogfish shark. The mimics, like squalamine, are sterol-polyamine conjugates. Unlike squalamine, the mimics were simple to prepare, at high yield, from readily available starting materials. Several squalamine mimics showed activity against gram-negative rods, gram-positive cocci including methicillin-resistant Staphyl...

  13. Can physiological endpoints improve the sensitivity of assays with plants in the risk assessment of contaminated soils?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gavina

    Full Text Available Site-specific risk assessment of contaminated areas indicates prior areas for intervention, and provides helpful information for risk managers. This study was conducted in the Ervedosa mine area (Bragança, Portugal, where both underground and open pit exploration of tin and arsenic minerals were performed for about one century (1857-1969. We aimed at obtaining ecotoxicological information with terrestrial and aquatic plant species to integrate in the risk assessment of this mine area. Further we also intended to evaluate if the assessment of other parameters, in standard assays with terrestrial plants, can improve the identification of phytotoxic soils. For this purpose, soil samples were collected on 16 sampling sites distributed along four transects, defined within the mine area, and in one reference site. General soil physical and chemical parameters, total and extractable metal contents were analyzed. Assays were performed for soil elutriates and for the whole soil matrix following standard guidelines for growth inhibition assay with Lemna minor and emergence and seedling growth assay with Zea mays. At the end of the Z. mays assay, relative water content, membrane permeability, leaf area, content of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids, malondialdehyde levels, proline content, and chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm and ΦPSII parameters were evaluated. In general, the soils near the exploration area revealed high levels of Al, Mn, Fe and Cu. Almost all the soils from transepts C, D and F presented total concentrations of arsenic well above soils screening benchmark values available. Elutriates of several soils from sampling sites near the exploration and ore treatment areas were toxic to L. minor, suggesting that the retention function of these soils was seriously compromised. In Z. mays assay, plant performance parameters (other than those recommended by standard protocols, allowed the identification of more phytotoxic soils

  14. Replacing animal experiments in developmental toxicity testing of phenols by combining in vitro assays with physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strikwold, Marije

    2016-01-01

    Many efforts have been undertaken over the past decades to develop in vitro tests for a wide range of toxicological endpoints as an alternative to animal testing. The principle application of in vitro toxicity assays still lies in the hazard assessment and the prioritisation of chemicals for further

  15. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mimic syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) misdiagnosis has many broad implications for the patient and the neurologist. Potentially curative treatments exist for certain ALS mimic syndromes, but delay in starting these therapies may have an unfavorable effect on outcome. Hence, it is important to exclude similar conditions. In this review, we discuss some of the important mimics of ALS. PMID:27326363

  16. Activity, polypeptide and gene identification of thylakoid Ndh complex in trees: potential physiological relevance of fluorescence assays

    OpenAIRE

    Serrot, Patricia H.; Sabater, Bartolomé; Martín, Mercedes

    2012-01-01

    Three evergreen (Laurus nobilis, Viburnum tinus and Thuja plicata) and two autumnal abscission deciduous trees (Cydonia oblonga and Prunus domestica) have been investigated for the presence (zymogram and immunodetection) and functionality (post-illumination chlorophyll fluorescence) of the thylakoid Ndh complex. The presence of encoding ndh genes has also been investigated in T. plicata. Western assays allowed tentative identification of zymogram NADH dehydrogenase bands corresponding to the ...

  17. Replacing animal experiments in developmental toxicity testing of phenols by combining in vitro assays with physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Strikwold, Marije

    2016-01-01

    Many efforts have been undertaken over the past decades to develop in vitro tests for a wide range of toxicological endpoints as an alternative to animal testing. The principle application of in vitro toxicity assays still lies in the hazard assessment and the prioritisation of chemicals for further toxicity testing. The in vitro toxicity outcomes are hardly used in quantitative risk assessment of chemicals, for example to predict health-based guidance values like an acceptable or tolerable d...

  18. Antimicrobial activities of squalamine mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, K; Bernard, E M; Sadownik, A; Regen, S L; Armstrong, D

    1997-07-01

    We investigated the antimicrobial properties of compounds with structural features that were designed to mimic those of squalamine, an antibiotic isolated from the stomach of the dogfish shark. The mimics, like squalamine, are sterol-polyamine conjugates. Unlike squalamine, the mimics were simple to prepare, at high yield, from readily available starting materials. Several squalamine mimics showed activity against gram-negative rods, gram-positive cocci including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, and fungi. Some had little or no hemolytic activity. The hydrophobicity of the sterol backbone and the length and the cationic charge of the side chains appeared to be critical determinants of activity. One of the squalamine mimics, SM-7, was bactericidal against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and S. aureus; its activity was decreased by divalent or monovalent cations and by bovine serum albumin. Subinhibitory concentrations of SM-7 markedly enhanced the antimicrobial activity of rifampin against gram-negative rods. These results suggest that the compounds may disrupt an outer membrane of gram-negative rods. Squalamine mimics are a new class of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents. The antagonism of their activity by serum and albumin and their hemolytic properties may limit their use as systemic agents. The squalamine mimics, because of their potencies, broad spectra of antimicrobial activity, and potential for systemic toxicity, appear to be good candidates for development as topical antimicrobial agents. PMID:9210661

  19. Validation of a Fecal Glucocorticoid Assay to Assess Adrenocortical Activity in Meerkats Using Physiological and Biological Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heistermann, Michael; Santema, Peter; Dantzer, Ben; Mausbach, Jelena; Ganswindt, Andre; Manser, Marta B.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, glucocorticoid (i.e. GC) levels have been associated with specific life-history stages and transitions, reproductive strategies, and a plethora of behaviors. Assessment of adrenocortical activity via measurement of glucocorticoid metabolites in feces (FGCM) has greatly facilitated data collection from wild animals, due to its non-invasive nature, and thus has become an established tool in behavioral ecology and conservation biology. The aim of our study was to validate a fecal glucocorticoid assay for assessing adrenocortical activity in meerkats (Suricata suricatta), by comparing the suitability of three GC enzyme immunoassays (corticosterone, 11β-hydroxyetiocholanolone and 11oxo-etiocholanolone) in detecting FGCM increases in adult males and females following a pharmacological challenge with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and biological stimuli. In addition, we investigated the time course characterizing FGCM excretion, the effect of age, sex and time of day on FGCM levels and assessed the potential effects of soil contamination (sand) on FGCM patterns. Our results show that the group specific 11β-hydroxyetiocholanolone assay was most sensitive to FGCM alterations, detecting significant and most distinctive elevations in FGCM levels around 25 h after ACTH administration. We found no age and sex differences in basal FGCM or on peak response levels to ACTH, but a marked diurnal pattern, with FGCM levels being substantially higher in the morning than later during the day. Soil contamination did not significantly affect FGCM patterns. Our results emphasize the importance of conducting assay validations to characterize species-specific endocrine excretion patterns, a crucial step to all animal endocrinology studies using a non-invasive approach. PMID:27077741

  20. Quantitation of human complement fragment C4asub(i) in physiological fluids by competitive inhibition radioimmune assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described to quantitate complement fragment C4asub(i) in human plasma, synovial fluid, and urine. Samples are first precipitated with 50% saturated (NH4)2SO4 to remove cross-reactive macromolecules C4 and pro-C4. Whereas greater than 97% of C4 is removed by this precipitation step, 88% C4asub(i) remains in solution. Second, the concentration of C4asub(i) in supernatant fractions is determined by double antibody competitive inhibition radioimmunoassay. C4a was recently completely sequenced (Moon et al., 1981) and is readily available as a pure standard. Examination of the specificity of this method confirmed it was indeed specific for C4a antigenicity. Immunochemically depleted C4-deficient plasma and inulin-activated reconstituted C4-deficient plasma exhibited less than 0.1% of the immunoreactivity of untreated plasma. In addition, good agreement was observed in analyses of aggregated IgG activated serum between the experimentally determined concentration of C4asub(i) and that expected from the initial concentration of C4. As a result, recovery and measurement of C4asub(i) in physiological fluids with this method appear both quantitative and specific. Based on results from 17 adult volunteers, the average concentration of C4asub(i) in normal plasma is 488 ng/ml. Interestingly, significant correlation could not be demonstrated between the levels of C4 and C4asub(i) in normal plasma. The mean concentration of C4asub(i) in human urine is 0.5 ng/ml. (Auth.)

  1. Activity, polypeptide and gene identification of thylakoid Ndh complex in trees: potential physiological relevance of fluorescence assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrot, Patricia H; Sabater, Bartolomé; Martín, Mercedes

    2012-09-01

    Three evergreen (Laurus nobilis, Viburnum tinus and Thuja plicata) and two autumnal abscission deciduous trees (Cydonia oblonga and Prunus domestica) have been investigated for the presence (zymogram and immunodetection) and functionality (post-illumination chlorophyll fluorescence) of the thylakoid Ndh complex. The presence of encoding ndh genes has also been investigated in T. plicata. Western assays allowed tentative identification of zymogram NADH dehydrogenase bands corresponding to the Ndh complex after native electrophoresis of solubilized fractions from L. nobilis, V. tinus, C. oblonga and P. domestica leaves, but not in those of T. plicata. However, Ndh subunits were detected after SDS-PAGE of thylakoid solubilized proteins of T. plicata. The leaves of the five plants showed the post-illumination chlorophyll fluorescence increase dependent on the presence of active Ndh complex. The fluorescence increase was higher in autumn in deciduous, but not in evergreen trees, which suggests that the thylakoid Ndh complex could be involved in autumnal leaf senescence. Two ndhB genes were sequenced from T. plicata that differ at the 350 bp 3' end sequence. Comparison with the mRNA revealed that ndhB genes have a 707-bp type II intron between exons 1 (723 bp) and 2 (729 bp) and that the UCA 259th codon is edited to UUA in mRNA. Phylogenetically, the ndhB genes of T. plicata group close to those of Metasequoia, Cryptomeria, Taxodium, Juniperus and Widdringtonia in the cupresaceae branch and are 5' end shortened by 18 codons with respect to that of angiosperms. PMID:22324908

  2. Mimic of OSU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ohio State University research reactor (OSURR) is undergoing improvements in its research and educational capabilities. A computer-based digital data acquisition system, including a reactor system mimic, will be installed as part of these improvements. The system will monitor the reactor system parameters available to the reactor operator either in digital parameters available to the reactor operator either in digital or analog form. The system includes two computers. All the signals are sent to computer 1, which processes the data and sends the data through a serial port to computer 2 with a video graphics array VGA monitor, which is utilized to display the mimic system of the reactor

  3. Chronic Anorexia Nervosa: Medical Mimic

    OpenAIRE

    Borson, Soo; Katon, Wayne

    1981-01-01

    While anorexia nervosa is typically construed as an acute, dramatic disorder of younger women, long-term follow-up studies indicate that morbidity is chronic or relapsing in 30 percent to 50 percent of cases and sometimes leads to death. In older patients or those with atypical clinical features or obscure complications, chronic starvation may mimic other diseases, and rigid adherence to current diagnostic criteria may impede recognition and appropriate treatment. Anorexia nervosa should be v...

  4. A Batesian mimic and its model share color production mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David W.KIKUCHI; David W.PFENNIG

    2012-01-01

    Batesian mimics are harmless prey species that resemble dangerous ones (models),and thus receive protection from predators.How such adaptive resemblances evolve is a classical problem in evolutionary biology.Mimicry is typically thought to be difficult to evolve,especially if the model and mimic produce the convergent phenotype through different proximate mechanisms.However,mimicry may evolve more readily if mimic and model share similar pathways for producing the convergent phenotype.In such cases,these pathways can be co-opted in ancestral mimic populations to produce high-fidelity mimicry without the need for major evolutionary innovations.Here,we show that a Batesian mimic,the scarlet kingsnake Lampropettis elapsoides,produces its coloration using the same physiological mechanisms as does its model,the eastern coral snake Micrurus fulvius.Therefore,precise color mimicry may have been able to evolve easily in this system.Generally,we know relatively little about the proximate mechanisms underlying mimicry.

  5. Microengineered peripheral nerve-on-a-chip for preclinical physiological testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huval, Renee M; Miller, Oliver H; Curley, J Lowry; Fan, Yuwei; Hall, Benjamin J; Moore, Michael J

    2015-05-21

    The use of advanced in vitro testing is a powerful tool to develop predictive cellular assays suitable for improving the high attrition rates of novel pharmaceutical compounds. A microscale, organotypic model of nerve tissue with physiological measures that mimic clinical nerve compound action potential (CAP) and nerve fiber density (NFD) tests may be more predictive of clinical outcomes, enabling a more cost-effective approach for selecting promising lead compounds with higher chances of late-stage success. However, the neurological architecture, physiology, and surrounding extracellular matrix are hard to mimic in vitro. Using a dual hydrogel construct and explants from rat embryonic dorsal root ganglia, the present study describes an in vitro method for electrophysiological recording of intra- and extra-cellular recordings using a spatially-controlled, microengineered sensory neural fiber tract. Specifically, these 3D neural cultures exhibit both structural and functional characteristics that closely mimic those of afferent sensory peripheral fibers found in vivo. Our dual hydrogel system spatially confines growth to geometries resembling nerve fiber tracts, allowing for a high density of parallel, fasciculated neural growth. Perhaps more importantly, outputs resembling clinically relevant test criteria, including the measurement of CAP and NFD are possible through our advanced model. Moreover, the 3D hydrogel constructs allow flexibility in incorporated cell type, geometric fabrication, and electrical manipulation, providing a viable assay for systematic culture, perturbation, and testing of biomimetic neural growth for mechanistic studies necessitating physiologically-relevant readouts. PMID:25850799

  6. Cognitive impairments may mimic delusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eterović, Marija; Kozarić-Kovačić, Dragica

    2015-12-01

    Delusions are often recognized as key to the concept of psychosis. What is delusion is one of the basic questions of psychopathology. The common denominator of definitions of delusions is the divergence between the strong conviction in the delusional belief and superior evidences to the contrary which are continually ignored. An implicit, sustainably unspoken assumption is that the person with delusional belief has cognitive capacities to process the (counter-)arguments relevant to their delusion. However, individual's cognitive capacities are not being emphasized when delusions are evaluated. Moreover, the impact of cognitive decline on formation of delusions is neglected, both in theory and practice. We elaborate that cognitive deficits may facilitate, oppose, or mimic delusions. We focus on the last, which can lead to diagnosing as delusion what could be explained by cognitive decline and better called pseudo-delusion. The risk is significant when cognition is impaired, as in demented people; an issue which has not yet been debated. True delusions are incompatible with person's cognitive capacities, i.e., if we take into account person's cognitive status, we still cannot understand how the person holds the strange belief with an extraordinary conviction. Pseudo-delusions would be beliefs, thoughts or judgments that at first seem delusional (they are false, subculturally atypical beliefs that are strongly maintained in the face of counterargument), but lose the essence of delusions after we take cognitive impairment into account. Pseudo-delusions could actually be explained or understood by person's cognitive impairments, they "fit into" them. The reported reality-based contents of delusions in the elderly, poor response to antipsychotics and lack of association with early or family history of psychiatric disorders could in part be accounted for by the bias of misdiagnosing the cognitive impairment as the delusion. Not recognizing that the cognitive impairment

  7. Angiogenesis Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Dhanya K; Kujur, Praveen K; Singh, Rana P

    2016-01-01

    Neoangiogenesis constitutes one of the first steps of tumor progression beyond a critical size of tumor growth, which supplies a dormant mass of cancerous cells with the required nutrient supply and gaseous exchange through blood vessels essentially needed for their sustained and aggressive growth. In order to understand any biological process, it becomes imperative that we use models, which could mimic the actual biological system as closely as possible. Hence, finding the most appropriate model is always a vital part of any experimental design. Angiogenesis research has also been much affected due to lack of simple, reliable, and relevant models which could be easily quantitated. The angiogenesis models have been used extensively for studying the action of various molecules for agonist or antagonistic behaviour and associated mechanisms. Here, we have described two protocols or models which have been popularly utilized for studying angiogenic parameters. Rat aortic ring assay tends to bridge the gap between in vitro and in vivo models. The chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay is one of the most utilized in vivo model system for angiogenesis-related studies. The CAM is highly vascularized tissue of the avian embryo and serves as a good model to study the effects of various test compounds on neoangiogenesis. PMID:26608294

  8. Construction of Large-Volume Tissue Mimics with 3D Functional Vascular Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tae-Yun; Hong, Jung Min; Jung, Jin Woo; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    We used indirect stereolithography (SL) to form inner-layered fluidic networks in a porous scaffold by introducing a hydrogel barrier on the luminal surface, then seeded the networks separately with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human lung fibroblasts to form a tissue mimic containing vascular networks. The artificial vascular networks provided channels for oxygen transport, thus reducing the hypoxic volume and preventing cell death. The endothelium of the vascular networks significantly retarded the occlusion of channels during whole-blood circulation. The tissue mimics have the potential to be used as an in vitro platform to examine the physiologic and pathologic phenomena through vascular architecture. PMID:27228079

  9. Construction of Large-Volume Tissue Mimics with 3D Functional Vascular Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Yun Kang

    Full Text Available We used indirect stereolithography (SL to form inner-layered fluidic networks in a porous scaffold by introducing a hydrogel barrier on the luminal surface, then seeded the networks separately with human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human lung fibroblasts to form a tissue mimic containing vascular networks. The artificial vascular networks provided channels for oxygen transport, thus reducing the hypoxic volume and preventing cell death. The endothelium of the vascular networks significantly retarded the occlusion of channels during whole-blood circulation. The tissue mimics have the potential to be used as an in vitro platform to examine the physiologic and pathologic phenomena through vascular architecture.

  10. Carbocyclic Carbohydrate Mimics as Potential Glycosidase Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanefjord, Mette; Lundt, Inge

    functionalities was introduced by either epoxidation or dihydroxylation of 7. Finally, reduction of the lactone ring led to the sugar mimics 8. The synthesis of several isomers of 8 will be presented. [1] a) Kleban, M. ; Hilgers, P. ; Greul, J.N. ; Kugler, R.D. ; Li, J. ; Picasso, S. ; Vogel, P. ; Jäger, V. Chem...

  11. Disuse osteoporosis: Mimic of neoplastic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disuse osteoporosis, a common sequela to immobilization, consists of bony changes that may mimic neoplastic disease. This paper describes the different types of cortical and medullary demineralization that can be manifested radiologically and the histophatologic basis for these alterations. Six cases are included that exemplify these changes, and comparison is made with multiple myeloma. (orig.)

  12. Anatomy & Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review ...

  13. Methotrexate induced leucoencephalopathy: A stroke mimic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar D Gosavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With increasing usage of thrombolysis in the treatment of acute ischemic strokes within 4.5- hour window, it is becoming more important to recognize stroke mimics. Though the incidence of stroke mimics being thrombolysed is less than 3%, it is essential to diagnose them so as to avoid wrong thrombolytic treatment which carries potential complications of bleeding. We describe the case of a 17 year old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, who developed stroke like episodes on two consecutive challenges with a chemotherapeutic regime which included intravenous and intrathecal methotrexate. She had MRI changes consistent with acute ischemic stroke on both occasions. Her deficits recovered completely and spontaneously, as did the MRI changes. She did not have any further episodes when methotrexate was excluded from the chemotherapeutic regime.

  14. Non-invasive monitoring of physiological stress in the Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla): validation of a fecal glucocorticoid assay and methods for practical application in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutt, Kathryn; Setchell, Joanna M; Heistermann, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Enzymeimmunoassays (EIAs) allow researchers to monitor stress hormone output via measurement of fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGCMs) in many vertebrates. They can be powerful tools which allow the acquisition of otherwise unobtainable physiological information from both captive animals and wild animals in remote forest habitats, such as great apes. However, methods for hormone measurement, extraction and preservation need to be adapted and validated for field settings. In preparation for a field study of Western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in the Central African Republic we used samples from captive gorillas collected around opportunistic stressful situations to test whether four different glucocorticoid EIAs reflected adrenocortical activity reliably and to establish the lag-time from the stressor to peak excretion. We also validated a field extraction technique and established a simple, non-freezer-reliant method to preserve FGCMs in extracts long-term. We determined the rate of FGCM change over 28 days when samples cannot be extracted immediately and over 12h when feces cannot be preserved immediately in alcohol. Finally, we used repeat samples from identified individuals to test for diurnal variation in FGCM output. Two group-specific assays measuring major cortisol metabolites detected the predicted FGCM response to the stressor reliably, whereas more specific cortisol and corticosterone assays were distinctly less responsive and thus less useful. We detected a lag time of 2-3 days from stressor to peak FGCM excretion. Our field extraction method performed as well as an established laboratory extraction method and FGCMs in dried extracts stored at ambient temperatures were as stable as those at -20 °C over 1 yr. Hormones in non-extracted feces in alcohol were stable up to 28 days at ambient temperatures. FGCMs in un-fixed gorilla feces deteriorated to almost 50% of the original values within 6h under field conditions. We detected no diurnal

  15. Identification of Stroke Mimics in the Emergency Department Setting

    OpenAIRE

    W. Oliver Tobin; Joseph G. Hentz; Bobrow, Bentley J.; Demaerschalk, Bart M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Previous studies have shown a stroke mimic rate of 9%–31%. We aimed to establish the proportion of stroke mimics amongst suspected acute strokes, to clarify the aetiology of stroke mimic and to develop a prediction model to identify stroke mimics. Methods This was a retrospective cohort observational study. Consecutive “stroke alert” patients were identified over nine months in a primary stroke centre. 31 variables were collected. Final diagnosis was defined as “stroke”...

  16. Ultrasonic propagation in cortical bone mimics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the velocity and attenuation characteristics of ultrasonic waves in cortical bone and bone mimics is important for studies of osteoporosis and fractures. Three complementary approaches have been used to help understand the ultrasound propagation in cortical bone and bone mimics immersed in water, which is used to simulate the surrounding tissue in vivo. The approaches used were Lamb wave propagation analysis, experimental measurement and two-dimensional (2D) finite difference modelling. First, the water loading effects on the free plate Lamb modes in acrylic and human cortical bone plates were examined. This theoretical study revealed that both the S0 and S1 mode velocity curves are significantly changed in acrylic: mode jumping occurs between the S0 and S1 dispersion curves. However, in human cortical bone plates, only the S1 mode curve is significantly altered by water loading, with the S0 mode exhibiting a small deviation from the unloaded curve. The Lamb wave theory predictions for velocity and attenuation were then tested experimentally on acrylic plates using an axial transmission technique. Finally, 2D finite difference numerical simulations of the experimental measurements were performed. The predictions from Lamb wave theory do not correspond to the measured and simulated first arrival signal (FAS) velocity and attenuation results for acrylic and human cortical bone plates obtained using the axial transmission technique, except in very thin plates

  17. A clinically isolated syndrome: butterfly glioma mimic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramshekhar Menon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The report explores a unique and treatable "butterfly"- glioma mimic and the neuroimaging characteristics that help to diagnose this entity. A 35-year-old patient presented with subacute-onset, progressive frontal lobe dysfunction followed by features of raised intracranial pressure. Neuroimaging features were consistent with a "butterfly" lesion that favored the possibility of a gliomatosis cerebri with significant edema and marked corpus callosum and fornix thickening. Contrast-enhanced and perfusion images revealed a confluent tumefactive lesion with a characteristic "broken-ring" pattern of enhancement, mass-effect and low perfusion; features favoring an alternative inflammatory pathology. This was peculiar as calloso-forniceal involvement of this nature has not been previously reported in inflammatory demyelinating mass lesions. This was confirmed as a tumefactive demyelination on histopathology. Following treatment, on clinical and imaging follow-up, significant resolution was evident suggesting a monophasic illness. This case highlights the stringent clinico-radiological-pathological approach required in the evaluation and management of butterfly lesions despite the striking imaging appearances. Tumefactive demyelination in this patient represents a clinically isolated syndromic presentation of an inflammatory pathology that can resemble gliomatosis cerebri. These "butterfly"-glioma mimics are scarcely reported in the literature, are eminently treatable with variable prognosis and prone for relapse.

  18. Daughters mimic sterile neutrinos (almost!) perfectly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since only recently, cosmological observations are sensitive to hot dark matter (HDM) admixtures with sub-eV mass, mhdmeff < eV, that are not fully-thermalised, Δ Neff < 1. We argue that their almost automatic interpretation as a sterile neutrino species is neither from theoretical nor practical parsimony principles preferred over HDM formed by decay products (daughters) of an out-of-equilibrium particle decay. While daughters mimic sterile neutrinos in Neff and mhdmeff, there are opportunities to assess this possibility in likelihood analyses. Connecting cosmological parameters and moments of momentum distribution functions, we show that—also in the case of mass-degenerate daughters with indistinguishable main physical effects—the mimicry breaks down when the next moment, the skewness, is considered. Predicted differences of order one in the root-mean-squares of absolute momenta are too small for current sensitivities

  19. Syndromes that Mimic an Excess of Mineralocorticoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbadin, Chiara; Armanini, Decio

    2016-09-01

    Pseudohyperaldosteronism is characterized by a clinical picture of hyperaldosteronism with suppression of renin and aldosterone. It can be due to endogenous or exogenous substances that mimic the effector mechanisms of aldosterone, leading not only to alterations of electrolytes and hypertension, but also to an increased inflammatory reaction in several tissues. Enzymatic defects of adrenal steroidogenesis (deficiency of 17α-hydroxylase and 11β-hydroxylase), mutations of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and alterations of expression or saturation of 11-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome, Cushing's syndrome, excessive intake of licorice, grapefruits or carbenoxolone) are the main causes of pseudohyperaldosteronism. In these cases treatment with dexamethasone and/or MR-blockers is useful not only to normalize blood pressure and electrolytes, but also to prevent the deleterious effects of prolonged over-activation of MR in epithelial and non-epithelial tissues. Genetic alterations of the sodium channel (Liddle's syndrome) or of the sodium-chloride co-transporter (Gordon's syndrome) cause abnormal sodium and water reabsorption in the distal renal tubules and hypertension. Treatment with amiloride and thiazide diuretics can respectively reverse the clinical picture and the renin aldosterone system. Finally, many other more common situations can lead to an acquired pseudohyperaldosteronism, like the expansion of volume due to exaggerated water and/or sodium intake, and the use of drugs, as contraceptives, corticosteroids, β-adrenergic agonists and FANS. In conclusion, syndromes or situations that mimic aldosterone excess are not rare and an accurate personal and pharmacological history is mandatory for a correct diagnosis and avoiding unnecessary tests and mistreatments. PMID:27251484

  20. Identification and Genetic Mapping of a Lesion Mimic Mutant in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jian-yang; CHEN Sun-lu; ZHANG Jian-hui; DONG Yan-jun; TENG Sheng

    2012-01-01

    A lesion mimic stripe mutant,designated as Ims1 (lesion mimic stripe 1),was obtained from the M2 progeny of a 60Co Y-radiation treated japonica rice variety Jiahua 1.The Ims1 mutant displayed propagation type lesions across the whole growth and developmental stages.Physiology and histochemistry analysis showed that the mutant exhibited a phenotype of white stripe when grown under high temperature (30 ℃),and the lesion mimic caused by programmed cell death under low temperature (20 ℃).The genetic analysis indicated that this lesion-mimic phenotype is controlled by a single locus recessive nuclear gene.Furthermore,by using simple sequence repeat markers and an F2 segregating population derived from two crosses of Ims1 × 93-11 and Ims1 × Pei'ai 64S,the Ims1 gene was mapped between markers Indel1 and MM0112-4 with a physical distance of 400 kb on chromosome 6 in rice.

  1. Representing life in the Earth system with soil microbial functional traits in the MIMICS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieder, W. R.; Grandy, A. S.; Kallenbach, C. M.; Taylor, P. G.; Bonan, G. B.

    2015-06-01

    Projecting biogeochemical responses to global environmental change requires multi-scaled perspectives that consider organismal diversity, ecosystem processes, and global fluxes. However, microbes, the drivers of soil organic matter decomposition and stabilization, remain notably absent from models used to project carbon (C) cycle-climate feedbacks. We used a microbial trait-based soil C model with two physiologically distinct microbial communities, and evaluate how this model represents soil C storage and response to perturbations. Drawing from the application of functional traits used to model other ecosystems, we incorporate copiotrophic and oligotrophic microbial functional groups in the MIcrobial-MIneral Carbon Stabilization (MIMICS) model; these functional groups are akin to "gleaner" vs. "opportunist" plankton in the ocean, or r- vs. K-strategists in plant and animal communities. Here we compare MIMICS to a conventional soil C model, DAYCENT (the daily time-step version of the CENTURY model), in cross-site comparisons of nitrogen (N) enrichment effects on soil C dynamics. MIMICS more accurately simulates C responses to N enrichment; moreover, it raises important hypotheses involving the roles of substrate availability, community-level enzyme induction, and microbial physiological responses in explaining various soil biogeochemical responses to N enrichment. In global-scale analyses, we show that MIMICS projects much slower rates of soil C accumulation than a conventional soil biogeochemistry in response to increasing C inputs with elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) - a finding that would reduce the size of the land C sink estimated by the Earth system. Our findings illustrate that tradeoffs between theory and utility can be overcome to develop soil biogeochemistry models that evaluate and advance our theoretical understanding of microbial dynamics and soil biogeochemical responses to environmental change.

  2. SOX10 mutations mimic isolated hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingault, V; Faubert, E; Baral, V; Gherbi, S; Loundon, N; Couloigner, V; Denoyelle, F; Noël-Pétroff, N; Ducou Le Pointe, H; Elmaleh-Bergès, M; Bondurand, N; Marlin, S

    2015-10-01

    Ninety genes have been identified to date that are involved in non-syndromic hearing loss, and more than 300 different forms of syndromic hearing impairment have been described. Mutations in SOX10, one of the genes contributing to syndromic hearing loss, induce a large range of phenotypes, including several subtypes of Waardenburg syndrome and Kallmann syndrome with deafness. In addition, rare mutations have been identified in patients with isolated signs of these diseases. We used the recent characterization of temporal bone imaging aspects in patients with SOX10 mutations to identify possible patients with isolated hearing loss due to SOX10 mutation. We selected 21 patients with isolated deafness and temporal bone morphological defects for mutational screening. We identified two SOX10 mutations and found that both resulted in a non-functional protein in vitro. Re-evaluation of the two affected patients showed that both had previously undiagnosed olfactory defects. Diagnosis of anosmia or hyposmia in young children is challenging, and particularly in the absence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), SOX10 mutations can mimic non-syndromic hearing impairment. MRI should complete temporal bones computed tomographic scan in the management of congenital deafness as it can detect brain anomalies, cochlear nerve defects, and olfactory bulb malformation in addition to inner ear malformations. PMID:25256313

  3. Mycosis Fungoides mimic chronic eczema? Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Andruszkiewicz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycosis fungoides (MF is the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma [1]. Because of its great variety of clinical features and nonspecific histological findings (especially in early stages has been named the "great imitator "and can induce many wrong diagnosis [2,3]. Mycosis fungoides (MF, is an epidermotropic lymphoma included as an indolent form in the recent WHO/EORTC classification. From a clinical point of view, the classic disease progression usually is slow and takes over years or even decades, and characterized by the evolution from patches to more infiltrated plaques and eventually to tumours or erythroderma. However, the analysis of the MF disease course has been greatly impaired by the rarity of the disease, thus data about the time course of disease progression and pattern of relapse during time are not well known [4,5]. Therefore very often Mycosis fungoides is misdiagnosed as chronic eczema [6]. MF can also mimic: vitiligo [6], alopecia-Areata [7], ecchymosis [8].

  4. Rowing Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinks, W. L.

    This review of the literature discusses and examines the methods used in physiological assessment of rowers, results of such assessments, and future directions emanating from research in the physiology of rowing. The first section discusses the energy demands of rowing, including the contribution of the energy system, anaerobic metabolism, and the…

  5. Designed biomaterials to mimic the mechanical properties of muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Shanshan; Dudek, Daniel M; Cao, Yi; Balamurali, M M; Gosline, John; Li, Hongbin

    2010-05-01

    The passive elasticity of muscle is largely governed by the I-band part of the giant muscle protein titin, a complex molecular spring composed of a series of individually folded immunoglobulin-like domains as well as largely unstructured unique sequences. These mechanical elements have distinct mechanical properties, and when combined, they provide the desired passive elastic properties of muscle, which are a unique combination of strength, extensibility and resilience. Single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies demonstrated that the macroscopic behaviour of titin in intact myofibrils can be reconstituted by combining the mechanical properties of these mechanical elements measured at the single-molecule level. Here we report artificial elastomeric proteins that mimic the molecular architecture of titin through the combination of well-characterized protein domains GB1 and resilin. We show that these artificial elastomeric proteins can be photochemically crosslinked and cast into solid biomaterials. These biomaterials behave as rubber-like materials showing high resilience at low strain and as shock-absorber-like materials at high strain by effectively dissipating energy. These properties are comparable to the passive elastic properties of muscles within the physiological range of sarcomere length and so these materials represent a new muscle-mimetic biomaterial. The mechanical properties of these biomaterials can be fine-tuned by adjusting the composition of the elastomeric proteins, providing the opportunity to develop biomaterials that are mimetic of different types of muscles. We anticipate that these biomaterials will find applications in tissue engineering as scaffold and matrix for artificial muscles. PMID:20445626

  6. Physiological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physiological characteristics of man depend on the intake, metabolism and excretion of stable elements from food, water, and air. The physiological behavior of natural radionuclides and radionuclides from nuclear weapons testing and from the utilization of nuclear energy is believed to follow the pattern of stable elements. Hence information on the normal physiological processes occurring in the human body plays an important role in the assessment of the radiation dose received by man. Two important physiological parameters needed for internal dose determination are the pulmonary function and the water balance. In the Coordinated Research Programme on the characterization of Asian population, five participants submitted data on these physiological characteristics - China, India, Japan, Philippines and Viet Nam. During the CRP, data on other pertinent characteristics such as physical and dietary were simultaneously being collected. Hence, the information on the physiological characteristics alone, coming from the five participants were not complete and are probably not sufficient to establish standard values for the Reference Asian Man. Nonetheless, the data collected is a valuable contribution to this research programme

  7. Mathematical physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Sneyd, James

    2009-01-01

    There has been a long history of interaction between mathematics and physiology. This book looks in detail at a wide selection of mathematical models in physiology, showing how physiological problems can be formulated and studied mathematically, and how such models give rise to interesting and challenging mathematical questions. With its coverage of many recent models it gives an overview of the field, while many older models are also discussed, to put the modern work in context. In this second edition the coverage of basic principles has been expanded to include such topics as stochastic differential equations, Markov models and Gibbs free energy, and the selection of models has also been expanded to include some of the basic models of fluid transport, respiration/perfusion, blood diseases, molecular motors, smooth muscle, neuroendrocine cells, the baroreceptor loop, turboglomerular oscillations, blood clotting and the retina. Owing to this extensive coverage, the second edition is published in two volumes. ...

  8. Physiological breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew; Langridge, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Physiological breeding crosses parents with different complex but complementary traits to achieve cumulative gene action for yield, while selecting progeny using remote sensing, possibly in combination with genomic selection. Physiological approaches have already demonstrated significant genetic gains in Australia and several developing countries of the International Wheat Improvement Network. The techniques involved (see Graphical Abstract) also provide platforms for research and refinement of breeding methodologies. Recent examples of these include screening genetic resources for novel expression of Calvin cycle enzymes, identification of common genetic bases for heat and drought adaptation, and genetic dissection of trade-offs among yield components. Such information, combined with results from physiological crosses designed to test novel trait combinations, lead to more precise breeding strategies, and feed models of genotype-by-environment interaction to help build new plant types and experimental environments for future climates. PMID:27161822

  9. Regulatory Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  10. Plant physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Duca, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This book covers all aspects of plant physiology: plant cell physiology, water regime of plants, photosynthesis, mineral nutrition, plant respiration, plant growth and development, movements in plants, signal perception and transduction etc. It focuses on the fundamental principles of plant physiology and biochemistry from the molecular level to whole plants, on the mechanisms of plant-environment interactions. The book is intended for students (biologists, physiologists, biochemists, biophysicists, ecologists, geneticists), teachers and researchers. Particular emphasis is given to recent research advances made on national and international levels, as well as to personal experimental results of the author that are relevant for a deeper understanding of processes and for practical implementation of gained knowledge. An essential amount of illustrative material (graphics, images, schemes, illustrations) completes the text and supplies additional information in an accessible manner. At the end of each chapter...

  11. MIMIC; An Applied General Equilibrium model for The Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Graafland, J.J.; Mooij, Ruud De

    1998-01-01

    textabstractMIMIC is CPB’s applied general equilibrium model for the Dutch economy. The model is designed to help Dutch policymakers investigate the structural labormarket implications of changes in the systems of taxation and social insurance. MIMIC combines a rich theoretical framework based on modern economic theories, a firm empirical foundation, and an elaborate description of the actual tax and social insurance systems in the Netherlands. The theoretical foundation of the model implies ...

  12. Aggressive mimics profit from a model–signal receiver mutualism

    OpenAIRE

    Karen L. Cheney; Isabelle M. Côté

    2007-01-01

    Mimetic species have evolved to resemble other species to avoid predation (protective mimicry) or gain access to food (aggressive mimicry). Mimicry systems are frequently tripartite interactions involving a mimic, model and ‘signal receiver’. Changes in the strength of the relationship between model and signal receiver, owing to shifting environmental conditions, for example, can affect the success of mimics in protective mimicry systems. Here, we show that an experimentally induced shift in ...

  13. Synthetic Protocells to Mimic and Test Cell Function

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jian; Sigworth, Fred J.; LaVan, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic protocells provide a new means to probe, mimic and deconstruct cell behavior; they are a powerful tool to quantify cell behavior and a useful platform to explore nanomedicine. Protocells are not simple particles; they mimic cell design and typically consist of a stabilized lipid bilayer with membrane proteins. With a finite number of well characterized components, protocells can be designed to maximize useful outputs. Energy conversion in cells is an intriguing output; many natural ...

  14. Artificial enzyme mimics for catalysis and double natural enzyme co-immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohua; Zhang, Zhujun; Li, Yongbo

    2014-02-01

    This work presents a new chemiluminescent (CL) probe array assay. The new type CL probe array is based on enzyme mimics of Co3O4-SiO2 mesoporous nanocomposite material, which not only have an excellent catalytic effect on the luminol-H2O2 CL reaction in an alkaline medium but also can be used for the immobilization of enzymes. The linear range of the lactose concentration is 3.0 × 10(-7) to 1.0 × 10(-5) g mL(-1) and the detection limit is 6.9 × 10(-8) g mL(-1). β-Galactosidase and glucose oxidase were selected as a model for enzyme assays to demonstrate the applicability of Co3O4-SiO2 mesoporous nanocomposite material in multienzyme immobilization. The novel bifunctional CL probe array has been successfully applied to the determination of lactose in milk. PMID:24293256

  15. A double diastereoselective Michael-type addition as an entry to conformationally restricted tn antigen mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydillo, Carlos; Navo, Claudio D; Busto, Jesús H; Corzana, Francisco; Zurbano, María M; Avenoza, Alberto; Peregrina, Jesús M

    2013-11-01

    A totally stereocontrolled C-Michael addition of serine-equivalent C-nucleophiles to tri-O-benzyl-2-nitro-d-galactal was used as the key step to synthesize several pyrano[3,2-b]pyrrole structures. These scaffolds could be regarded as conformationally restricted Tn antigen mimics, as we have demonstrated by biological assays. The pyranose rings retain their (4)C1 chair conformation, as shown by molecular modeling and NMR spectroscopy. The expected bioactivity was established by a competition-tailored enzyme-linked lectin assay using both soybean and Vicia villosa agglutinins as model lectins. The facile described synthetic route and the strategic combination of computational and experimental techniques to reveal conformational features and bioactivity demonstrate the prepared glycomimics to be promising candidates for further exploitation of this scaffold to give glycans for lectin blocking and vaccination. PMID:24083620

  16. Hormone assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved radioimmunoassay is described for measuring total triiodothyronine or total thyroxine levels in a sample of serum containing free endogenous thyroid hormone and endogenous thyroid hormone bound to thyroid hormone binding protein. The thyroid hormone is released from the protein by adding hydrochloric acid to the serum. The pH of the separated thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone binding protein is raised in the absence of a blocking agent without interference from the endogenous protein. 125I-labelled thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone antibodies are added to the mixture, allowing the labelled and unlabelled thyroid hormone and the thyroid hormone antibody to bind competitively. This results in free thyroid hormone being separated from antibody bound thyroid hormone and thus the unknown quantity of thyroid hormone may be determined. A thyroid hormone test assay kit is described for this radioimmunoassay. It provides a 'single tube' assay which does not require blocking agents for endogenous protein interference nor an external solid phase sorption step for the separation of bound and free hormone after the competitive binding step; it also requires a minimum number of manipulative steps. Examples of the assay are given to illustrate the reproducibility, linearity and specificity of the assay. (UK)

  17. Environmental physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summaries of research projects conducted during 1978 and 1979 are presented. Subject areas include: the effects of environmental pollutants on homeostasis of the hematopoietic system; pollutant effects on steroid metabolism; pollutant effects on pulmonary macrophages; effects of toxic gases on lung cells; the development of immunological methods for assessing lung damage at the cellular level; the response of erythropoietin concentration to various physiological changes; and the study of actinide metabolism in monkey skeletons

  18. Non-invasive monitoring of physiological stress in the Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) : validation of a fecal glucocorticoid assay and methods for practical application in the field.

    OpenAIRE

    Shutt, K.; Setchell, J. M.; Heistermann, M

    2012-01-01

    Enzymeimmunoassays (EIAs) allow researchers to monitor stress hormone output via measurement of fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGCMs) in many vertebrates. They can be powerful tools which allow the acquisition of otherwise unobtainable physiological information from both captive animals and wild animals in remote forest habitats, such as great apes. However, methods for hormone measurement, extraction and preservation need to be adapted and validated for field settings. In preparation for ...

  19. Molecular mimics of the tumour antigen MUC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharappel C James

    Full Text Available A key requirement for the development of cancer immunotherapy is the identification of tumour-associated antigens that are differentially or exclusively expressed on the tumour and recognized by the host immune system. However, immune responses to such antigens are often muted or lacking due to the antigens being recognized as "self", and further complicated by the tumour environment and regulation of immune cells within. In an effort to circumvent the lack of immune responses to tumour antigens, we have devised a strategy to develop potential synthetic immunogens. The strategy, termed mirror image phage display, is based on the concept of molecular mimicry as demonstrated by the idiotype/anti-idiotype paradigm in the immune system. Here as 'proof of principle' we have selected molecular mimics of the well-characterised tumour associated antigen, the human mucin1 protein (MUC1 from two different peptide phage display libraries. The putative mimics were compared in structure and function to that of the native antigen. Our results demonstrate that several of the mimic peptides display T-cell stimulation activity in vitro when presented by matured dendritic cells. The mimic peptides and the native MUC1 antigenic epitopes can cross-stimulate T-cells. The data also indicate that sequence homology and/or chemical properties to the original epitope are not the sole determining factors for the observed immunostimulatory activity of the mimic peptides.

  20. Novel Metal Ion Based Estrogen Mimics for Molecular Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, Raghavan

    2006-01-30

    The overall objective of the SBIR Phase I proposal is to prepare and evaluate a new class of {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 94m}Tc containing estrogen-like small molecules ('estrogen mimics') for SPECT or PET molecular imaging of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) tumors. In this approach, the metal ion is integrated into the estrone skeleton by isosteric substitution of a carbon atom in the steroidal structure to give new class of mimics that are topologically similar to the native estrogen (Fig. 1). Although both N{sub 2}S{sub 2} and N{sub 3}S mimics 1 and 2 were considered as target structures, molecular modeling study revealed that the presence of the acetyl group at position-15 in the N{sub 3}S mimic 2 causes steric hinderance toward binding of 2 to SHBG. Therefore, initial efforts were directed at the synthesis and evaluation of the N{sub 2}S{sub 2} mimic 1.

  1. A PC-based graphical simulator for physiological pharmacokinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, D R; Stanski, D R; Ebling, W F

    1995-04-01

    Since many intravenous anesthetic drugs alter blood flows, physiologically-based pharmacokinetic models describing drug disposition may be time-varying. Using the commercially available programming software MATLAB, a platform to simulate time-varying physiological pharmacokinetic models was developed. The platform is based upon a library of pharmacokinetic blocks which mimic physiological structure. The blocks can be linked together flexibly to form models for different drugs. Because of MATLAB's additional numerical capabilities (e.g. non-linear optimization), the platform provides a complete graphical microcomputer-based tool for physiologic pharmacokinetic modeling. PMID:7656558

  2. Designed ankyrin repeat proteins: a new approach to mimic complex antigens for diagnostic purposes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Hausammann

    Full Text Available Inhibitory antibodies directed against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII can be found in patients with acquired and congenital hemophilia A. Such FVIII-inhibiting antibodies are routinely detected by the functional Bethesda Assay. However, this assay has a low sensitivity and shows a high inter-laboratory variability. Another method to detect antibodies recognizing FVIII is ELISA, but this test does not allow the distinction between inhibitory and non-inhibitory antibodies. Therefore, we aimed at replacing the intricate antigen FVIII by Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (DARPins mimicking the epitopes of FVIII inhibitors. As a model we used the well-described inhibitory human monoclonal anti-FVIII antibody, Bo2C11, for the selection on DARPin libraries. Two DARPins were selected binding to the antigen-binding site of Bo2C11, which mimic thus a functional epitope on FVIII. These DARPins inhibited the binding of the antibody to its antigen and restored FVIII activity as determined in the Bethesda assay. Furthermore, the specific DARPins were able to recognize the target antibody in human plasma and could therefore be used to test for the presence of Bo2C11-like antibodies in a large set of hemophilia A patients. These data suggest, that our approach might be used to isolate epitopes from different sets of anti-FVIII antibodies in order to develop an ELISA-based screening assay allowing the distinction of inhibitory and non-inhibitory anti-FVIII antibodies according to their antibody signatures.

  3. Exercise physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    The passing of Professor Bengt Saltin on September 12, 2014 truly marks the end of an era. As editor of the Journal of Applied Physiology and one of Bengt’s many collaborators and colleagues, I wanted the Journal to celebrate his many seminal contributions by means of an Editorial. Professor Bent...... Kiens, who is both a colleague of Bengt’s and a Consulting Editor for the Journal, was asked to write it. Thanks to Bente and her colleagues for the impossible task of distilling an enormous body of work into about 1,000 words. Peter Wagner, Editor...

  4. Occupational physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Toomingas, Allan; Tornqvist, Ewa Wigaeus

    2011-01-01

    In a clear and accessible presentation, Occupational Physiology focuses on important issues in the modern working world. Exploring major public health problems-such as musculoskeletal disorders and stress-this book explains connections between work, well-being, and health based on up-to-date research in the field. It provides useful methods for risk assessment and guidelines on arranging a good working life from the perspective of the working individual, the company, and society as a whole.The book focuses on common, stressful situations in different professions. Reviewing bodily demands and r

  5. Protein-carbohydrate complex reveals circulating metastatic cells in a microfluidic assay

    KAUST Repository

    Simone, Giuseppina

    2013-02-11

    Advances in carbohydrate sequencing technologies reveal the tremendous complexity of the glycome and the role that glycomics might have to bring insight into the biological functions. Carbohydrate-protein interactions, in particular, are known to be crucial to most mammalian physiological processes as mediators of cell adhesion and metastasis, signal transducers, and organizers of protein interactions. An assay is developed here to mimic the multivalency of biological complexes that selectively and sensitively detect carbohydrate-protein interactions. The binding of β-galactosides and galectin-3 - a protein that is correlated to the progress of tumor and metastasis - is examined. The efficiency of the assay is related to the expression of the receptor while anchoring to the interaction\\'s strength. Comparative binding experiments reveal molecular binding preferences. This study establishes that the assay is robust to isolate metastatic cells from colon affected patients and paves the way to personalized medicine. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Radioreceptor assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioreceptor assay (RRA) is an analytical method using the specific interaction of some pharmaceuticals and endogenic substances (ligands) with specific receptors present in certin tissues of living organisms. RRA uses the principle of isotope dilution. The method is described in detail of the preparation of receptors, samples and radioligands, conditions of incubation, the separation of free and bound radioligand, and the mathematical evaluation of RRA. The sensitivity of RRA is measured in units to tens of pg. The specificity of RRA relates to a group of substances with similar pharmacological effect. RRA may be used for identifying neuroleptics, antidepressants, anxiolytics, ergot alkaloids, beta blockers, anticholinergic drugs, certain hormones and neuropeptides. (M.D.)

  7. Environmental physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Section 3 of this annual report the Environmental Physiology Group reports progress in several areas of research: a study of erythropoietin biogenesis and regulation of hematopoesis; the in vitro production of erythropoietin by cloned lines of erythroleukemic cells; endocrine interactions with lung tissue, and hormonal changes in response to ozone exposure; an in vitro cell culture technique for the detection and enumeration of thymic lymphocyte progenitors in the bone marrow of experimental animals; the study of magnetic field bioeffects; the study of actinide element distribution and retention in primates; and a comparison of the efficiencies of various chelating agents in facilitating the removal of Pu-238 from the skeleton, the liver, and the whole body

  8. Physiological Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eric D.

    The analysis of physiological sound in the peripheral auditory system solves three important problems. First, sound energy impinging on the head must be captured and presented to the transduction apparatus in the ear as a suitable mechanical signal; second, this mechanical signal needs to be transduced into a neural representation that can be used by the brain; third, the resulting neural representation needs to be analyzed by central neurons to extract information useful to the animal. This chapter provides an overview of some aspects of the first two of these processes. The description is entirely focused on the mammalian auditory system, primarily on human hearing and on the hearing of a few commonly used laboratory animals (mainly rodents and carnivores). Useful summaries of non-mammalian hearing are available [1]. Because of the large size of the literature, review papers are referenced wherever possible.

  9. In vitro permeation models for healthy and compromised skin: The Phospholipid Vesicle-based Permeation Assay (PVPA) for skin applications

    OpenAIRE

    Engesland, André

    2015-01-01

    In vitro models with the ability to estimate drug penetration through healthy and compromised skin may reduce animal testing of drugs and cosmetics to a minimum. The phospholipid vesicle based permeation assay (PVPA) is based on a tight barrier composed of liposomes mimicking cells. It was originally made to mimic the intestinal epithelial barrier and in this project further developed to mimic the stratum corneum barrier of the skin. The lipid composition was changed to better mimic the lipid...

  10. Solid-phase-supported synthesis of morpholinoglycine oligonucleotide mimics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana V. Abramova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An efficient solid-phase-supported peptide synthesis (SPPS of morpholinoglycine oligonucleotide (MorGly mimics has been developed. The proposed strategy includes a novel specially designed labile linker group containing the oxalyl residue and the 2-aminomethylmorpholino nucleoside analogues as first subunits.

  11. Synthesis of aminocyclopentanols: a-D-galacto configured sugar mimics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøjstrup, Marie; Lundt, Inge

    2005-01-01

    Four aminocyclopentanols, as mimics of putative intermediates in hydrolysis of a-D-galactosides, have been synthesized through a number of stereoselective transformations, using the cis-fused cyclopentane-1,4-lactone (1R, 5S, 7R, 8R)-7,8-dihydroxy-2-oxabicyclo[3.3.0]oct-3-one 1 as a chiral buildi...

  12. Measurement and analysis of associated mimic muscle movements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guodong Feng; Yuan Zhuang; Zhiqiang Gao

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To measure movements of markers over the primary site and associated mimic muscles in certain facial expressions, for evaluating facial paresis and synkinesis. Methods:Participants included 22 normal subjects aged 45e66 years. Maximum shift (Smax) and velocity (Vmax) were measured using a custom-designed 3-D dynamic quantitative analysis system of facial motion (3-D ASFM) based on motion capture technology. Measures were taken from peri-oral muscles during forceful brow raising and tight eye closure, and from muscles around the eye during grinning, right/left/bilateral mouth corner raising and smiling. Results: 1) During forceful brow raising, Smax was 3.65e4.46 mm for markers over perioral muscles, with the marker over the nasolabial fold showing a Vmax greater than others (60.60 mm/s on left and 62.70 mm/s on right). 2) In tight eye closure, Smax of perioral muscle markers was 1.58e1.92 mm, with Vmax being 11.40e14.76 mm/s. 3) In grinning, the largest eye muscle marker Smax was seen at the lower lid (3.93 mm on left and 4.15 mm on right) and the smallest at the inner canthus (1.59 mm on left and 1.53 mm on right), with the largest Vmax seen at the upper lid and smallest also at the inner canthus (11.71 mm/s on left and 11.09 mm/s on right). 4) In smiling, the largest non-oral Smax and Vmax were seen at the upper lid (3.05 mm and 36.14 mm/s on left and 2.53 mm and 28.90 mm/s on right) and the smallest also at the inner canthus (0.69 mm and 7.22 mm/s on left and 0.77 mm and 7.80 mm/s on right). 5) In right mouth corner raising, Smax and Vmax at lateral and medial canthus and at lower lid were greater on right than left, while those at upper lid and brow were slightly greater on left than right. 6) In left mouth corner raising, Smax and Vmax at lateral canthus and upper and lower lids were greater on left than right. Conclusions:There are no absolute immobile points on the face when making facial expressions. In addition to the primary movement site, there

  13. Space Physiology within an Exercise Physiology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jason R.; West, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Compare and contrast strategies remain common pedagogical practices within physiological education. With the support of an American Physiological Society Teaching Career Enhancement Award, we have developed a junior- or senior-level undergraduate curriculum for exercise physiology that compares and contrasts the physiological adaptations of…

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of nonionic substrate mimics of UDP-Galp as candidate inhibitors of UDP galactopyranose mutase (UGM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppala, Ramakrishna; Borrelli, Silvia; Slowski, Kathryn; Sanders, David A R; Ravindranathan Kartha, K P; Pinto, B Mario

    2015-05-01

    The synthesis of 1-[5-O-(α-D-galactopyranosyl)-D-glucityl]pyrimidine-2,4(3H)-dione and 1-[(5-O-(β-D-galactopyranosyl)-D-glucityl]pyrimidine-2,4(3H)-dione as non-ionic substrate mimics of UDP-Galp are described. UDP-Galp is a precursor of Galf, which is a primary component of the cell-wall glycans of several microorganisms. The interconversion of UDP-Galp and UDP-Galf is catalyzed by UDP galactopyranose mutase (UGM); its inhibition comprises a mode of compromising the microorganisms. The nonionic polyhydroxylated chain was intended to mimic the ionic pyrophosphate group and the ribose moiety in UDP-Galp and increase the bioavailabilities of the candidate inhibitors. Inhibition assays with UGM of Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed only weak inhibition of the enzyme by these compounds. PMID:25819094

  15. Radiopharmaceutical assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the laws in force, radiopharmaceuticals for human use must be among other features, non-pyrogenous and non-toxic. For this reason pyrogenity and toxicity assays are carried out. Pharmacokinetic studies may also be necessary in some cases. Products currently made at the Radiopharmaceutical Center, new products designed for certification and raw materials used to manufacture the above, were tested. A total 342 pyrogenity and toxicity tests, and four pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in 1996. To determine pyrogenity, the temperature animals were measured following intravenous administration of radiopharmaceuticals concerned: sodium pertechnetate, colloidal gold and sodium orthoradiohippurate from current production; pharmaceutic components of several new products, i.e. technetium generator, fibrinogen and microspheres. A total 327 products were tested, 96 percent of which met the requirements. To determine toxicity, the probit method was used, consisting of the administration of radiopharmaceutical doses for seven straight days, and checking for lethal effects. An overall 15 tests were carried out and 80 percent of products tested were found certifiable. Pharmacokinetic tests consisted of tropism on target organs and biodistribution in several organs using the tomographic method. (author)

  16. Varroa destructor changes its cuticular hydrocarbons to mimic new hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Conte, Y; Huang, Z Y; Roux, M; Zeng, Z J; Christidès, J-P; Bagnères, A-G

    2015-06-01

    Varroa destructor (Vd) is a honeybee ectoparasite. Its original host is the Asian honeybee, Apis cerana, but it has also become a severe, global threat to the European honeybee, Apis mellifera. Previous studies have shown that Varroa can mimic a host's cuticular hydrocarbons (HC), enabling the parasite to escape the hygienic behaviour of the host honeybees. By transferring mites between the two honeybee species, we further demonstrate that Vd is able to mimic the cuticular HC of a novel host species when artificially transferred to this new host. Mites originally from A. cerana are more efficient than mites from A. mellifera in mimicking HC of both A. cerana and A. mellifera. This remarkable adaptability may explain their relatively recent host-shift from A. cerana to A. mellifera. PMID:26041867

  17. Design of Robotic Arm Control System Mimics Human Arm Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Salam Al-Ammri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a control system to make the robotic hand mimic human hand motion in real time and offline mode. The human hand tracking system is a wearable sensing arm (potentiometers used to determine the position in space and to sense the grasping task of human hand. The maskable sensing arm was designed with same geometrical arrangement of robotic hand that needs to be controlled. The control software of a robot was implemented using Visual Basic and supported with graphical user interface (GUI. The control algorithm depends on joint to joint mapping method to match between the motions at each joint of portable sensing arm with corresponding joint of a robot in order to make the robot mimic the motion.

  18. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E; Minei, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the respon...

  19. Synthesis, Polymerization, and Analysis of Triazole Macroplasticizers as Phthalate Mimics

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Elliot Michael

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of styrene, acetate, and acrylate derivatives bearing the 1,2,3-triazole-4,5-dicarboxylate moiety through Cu-free Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions are presented.Following synthesis, the monomers were copolymerized with styrene and n-butylacrylate via nitroxide mediated radical polymerization (NMP) methodology to affordthese triazole macroplasticizers to act as phthalate mimics. The copolymers were thenblended in 20%, 40%, and 60% synthetic copolymer – PVC ratios to be analyzed byd...

  20. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Mimics a Conduction Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Marrakchi, S.; Kammoun, I.; S. Kachboura

    2014-01-01

    Background. It is important to recognise Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome in electrocardiograms (ECG), as it may mimic ischaemic heart disease, ventricular hypertrophy, and bundle branch block. Recognising WPW syndrome allows for risk stratification, the identification of associated conditions, and the institution of appropriate management. Objective. The present case showed that electrophysiological study is indicated in patients with abnormal ECG and syncope. Case Report. A 40-year-old ...

  1. MIMIC-III, a freely accessible critical care database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alistair E W; Pollard, Tom J; Shen, Lu; Lehman, Li-Wei H; Feng, Mengling; Ghassemi, Mohammad; Moody, Benjamin; Szolovits, Peter; Celi, Leo Anthony; Mark, Roger G

    2016-01-01

    MIMIC-III ('Medical Information Mart for Intensive Care') is a large, single-center database comprising information relating to patients admitted to critical care units at a large tertiary care hospital. Data includes vital signs, medications, laboratory measurements, observations and notes charted by care providers, fluid balance, procedure codes, diagnostic codes, imaging reports, hospital length of stay, survival data, and more. The database supports applications including academic and industrial research, quality improvement initiatives, and higher education coursework. PMID:27219127

  2. 4'-Alkoxy oligodeoxynucleotides: a novel class of RNA mimics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liboska, Radek; Snášel, Jan; Barvík, I.; Buděšínský, Miloš; Pohl, Radek; Točík, Zdeněk; Páv, Ondřej; Rejman, Dominik; Novák, Pavel; Rosenberg, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 24 (2011), s. 8261-8267. ISSN 1477-0520 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0193; GA AV ČR KAN200520801; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06061 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : 4'-alkoxy oligothymidylates * modified oligonucleotides * oligonucleotide hybridisation * RNA mimics Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  3. Should hunting mortality mimic the patterns of natural mortality?

    OpenAIRE

    Bischof, Richard; Mysterud, Atle; Swenson, Jon E

    2008-01-01

    With growing concerns about the impact of selective harvesting on natural populations, researchers encourage managers to implement harvest regimes that avoid or minimize the potential for demographic and evolutionary side effects. A seemingly intuitive recommendation is to implement harvest regimes that mimic natural mortality patterns. Using stochastic simulations based on a model of risk as a logistic function of a normally distributed biological trait variable, we evaluate the validity of ...

  4. Rupture of Plantaris Muscle - A Mimic: MRI Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T N Gopinath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Calf muscle trauma commonly involves the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. Plantaris muscle is a vestigial muscle coursing through the calf. Similar clinical features may be seen with injury to the plantaris muscle. It can also mimic other conditions like deep vein thrombosis, rupture of Baker′s cyst, and tumors. MRI is helpful in identifying and characterizing it. We report two cases of ruptured plantaris muscle seen on MRI.

  5. Rupture of Plantaris Muscle - A Mimic: MRI Findings

    OpenAIRE

    T N Gopinath; J Jagdish; Krishnakiran, K.; Shaji, P C

    2012-01-01

    Calf muscle trauma commonly involves the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. Plantaris muscle is a vestigial muscle coursing through the calf. Similar clinical features may be seen with injury to the plantaris muscle. It can also mimic other conditions like deep vein thrombosis, rupture of Baker′s cyst, and tumors. MRI is helpful in identifying and characterizing it. We report two cases of ruptured plantaris muscle seen on MRI.

  6. MIMIC-III, a freely accessible critical care database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alistair E.W.; Pollard, Tom J.; Shen, Lu; Lehman, Li-wei H.; Feng, Mengling; Ghassemi, Mohammad; Moody, Benjamin; Szolovits, Peter; Anthony Celi, Leo; Mark, Roger G.

    2016-01-01

    MIMIC-III (‘Medical Information Mart for Intensive Care’) is a large, single-center database comprising information relating to patients admitted to critical care units at a large tertiary care hospital. Data includes vital signs, medications, laboratory measurements, observations and notes charted by care providers, fluid balance, procedure codes, diagnostic codes, imaging reports, hospital length of stay, survival data, and more. The database supports applications including academic and industrial research, quality improvement initiatives, and higher education coursework. PMID:27219127

  7. Molecular mechanical properties of short-sequence peptide enzyme mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsukasa; Vo Ngo, Bao C; Xiao, Leyang; Arya, Gaurav; Heller, Michael J

    2016-03-01

    While considerable attempts have been made to recreate the high turnover rates of enzymes using synthetic enzyme mimics, most have failed and only a few have produced minimal reaction rates that can barely be considered catalytic. One particular approach we have focused on is the use of short-sequence peptides that contain key catalytic groups in close proximity. In this study, we designed six different peptides and tested their ability to mimic the catalytic mechanism of the cysteine proteases. Acetylation and deacylation by Ellman's Reagent trapping experiments showed the importance of having phenylalanine groups surrounding the catalytic sites in order to provide greater proximity between the cysteine, histidine, and aspartate amino acid R-groups. We have also carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to determine the distance between these catalytic groups and the overall mechanical flexibility of the peptides. We found strong correlations between the magnitude of fluctuations in the Cys-His distance, which determines the flexibility and interactions between the cysteine thiol and histidine imidazole groups, and the deacylation rate. We found that, in general, shorter Cys-His distance fluctuations led to a higher deacylation rate constant, implying that greater confinement of the two residues will allow a higher frequency of the acetyl exchange between the cysteine thiol and histidine imidazole R-groups. This may be the key to future design of peptide structures with molecular mechanical properties that lead to viable enzyme mimics. PMID:25921736

  8. Physiological and Immunological Regulations in Caenorhabditis elegans Infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivamaruthi, Bhagavathi Sundaram; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2014-03-01

    Studies pertaining to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection by utilizing model systems failed to mimic the essential aspects of immunity induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, as the determinants of innate immunity are distinct. The present study investigated the physiological and innate immune responses of S. Typhi infected Caenorhabditis elegans and also explored the Ty21a mediated immune enhancement in C. elegans. Ty21a is a known live vaccine for typhoidal infection in human beings. Physiological responses of C. elegans infected with S. Typhi assessed by survival and behavioral assays revealed that S. Typhi caused host mortality by persistent infection. However, Ty21a exposure to C. elegans was not harmful. Ty21a pre-exposed C. elegans, exhibited significant resistance against S. Typhi infection. Elevated accumulation of S. Typhi inside the infected host was observed when compared to Ty21a exposures. Transcript analysis of candidate innate immune gene (clec-60, clec-87, lys-7, ilys-3, scl-2, cpr-2, F08G5.6, atf-7, age-1, bec-1 and daf-16) regulations in the host during S. Typhi infection have been assessed through qPCR analysis to understand the activation of immune signaling pathways during S. Typhi infections. Gene silencing approaches confirmed that clec-60 and clec-87 has a major role in the defense system of C. elegans during S. Typhi infection. In conclusion, the study revealed that preconditioning of host with Ty21a protects against subsequent S. Typhi infection. PMID:24426167

  9. Activity assay of membrane transport proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Xie

    2008-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins are integral membrane proteins and considered as potential drug targets. Activity assay of transport proteins is essential for developing drugs to target these proteins. Major issues related to activity assessment of transport proteins include availability of transporters,transport activity of transporters, and interactions between ligands and transporters. Researchers need to consider the physiological status of proteins (bound in lipid membranes or purified), availability and specificity of substrates, and the purpose of the activity assay (screening, identifying, or comparing substrates and inhibitors) before choosing appropriate assay strategies and techniques. Transport proteins bound in vesicular membranes can be assayed for transporting substrate across membranes by means of uptake assay or entrance counterflow assay. Alternatively, transport proteins can be assayed for interactions with ligands by using techniques such as isothermal titration calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, or surface plasmon resonance. Other methods and techniques such as fluorometry, scintillation proximity assay, electrophysiological assay, or stopped-flow assay could also be used for activity assay of transport proteins. In this paper the major strategies and techniques for activity assessment of membrane transport proteins are reviewed.

  10. Pattern Differences of Small Hand Muscle Atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Mimic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Fang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The different patterns of small hand muscle atrophy between the ALS patients and the patients with mimic disorders presumably reflect distinct pathophysiological mechanisms underlying different disorders, and may aid in distinguishing between ALS and mimic disorders.

  11. Flat lizard female mimics use sexual deception in visual but not chemical signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Martin J; Webb, Jonathan K; Keogh, J Scott

    2009-05-01

    Understanding what constrains signalling and maintains signal honesty is a central theme in animal communication. Clear cases of dishonest signalling, and the conditions under which they are used, represent an important avenue for improved understanding of animal communication systems. Female mimicry, when certain males take on the appearance of females, is most commonly a male alternative reproductive tactic that is condition-dependent. A number of adaptive explanations for female mimicry have been proposed including avoiding the costs of aggression, gaining an advantage in combat, sneaking copulations with females on the territories of other males, gaining physiological benefits and minimizing the risk of predation. Previous studies of female mimicry have focused on a single mode of communication, although most animals communicate using multiple signals. Male Augrabies flat lizards adopt alternative reproductive tactics in which some males (she-males) mimic the visual appearance of females. We experimentally tested in a wild population whether she-males are able to mimic females using both visual and chemical signals. We tested chemical recognition in the field by removing scent and relabelling females and she-males with either male or female scent. At a distance, typical males (he-males) could not distinguish she-males from females using visual signals, but during close encounters, he-males correctly determined the gender of she-males using chemical signals. She-males are therefore able to deceive he-males using visual but not chemical signals. To effectively deceive he-males, she-males avoid close contact with he-males during which chemical cues would reveal their deceit. This strategy is probably adaptive, because he-males are aggressive and territorial; by mimicking females, she-males are able to move about freely and gain access to females on the territories of resident males. PMID:19324828

  12. IgG4-Associated Cholangitis Can Mimic Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Zaydfudim, Victor M.; Andrew Y Wang; de Lange, Eduard E.; Zhao, Zimin; Moskaluk, Christopher A.; Bauer, Todd W.; Adams, Reid B

    2015-01-01

    IgG4-associated cholangitis can mimic hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Previously reported patients with IgG4-associated cholangitis mimicking cholangiocarcinoma had elevated serum IgG4 levels and long-segment biliary strictures. However, in the absence of other diagnostic criteria for malignancy, IgG4-associated cholangitis should remain a consideration among patients with normal serum IgG4 and a hilar mass suspicious for cholangiocarcinoma. The presence of a hilar mass and a malignant-appearing bi...

  13. Chimpanzees and humans mimic pupil-size of conspecifics

    OpenAIRE

    Kret, M. E.; Tomonaga, M; Matsuzawa, T.

    2014-01-01

    Group-living typically provides benefits to individual group members but also confers costs. To avoid incredulity and betrayal and allow trust and cooperation, individuals must understand the intentions and emotions of their group members. Humans attend to other's eyes and from gaze and pupil-size cues, infer information about the state of mind of the observed. In humans, pupil-size tends to mimic that of the observed. Here we tested whether pupil-mimicry exists in our closest relative, the c...

  14. Gastric xenon trapping mimicing COPD: Recognition using an effervescent agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trapping of xenon 133 in the stomach due to gas swallowing can mimic xenon 133 retention in the left lower lobe due to obstructive lung disease on pulmonary ventilation/perfusion studies. In such cases, ingestion of sodium citrate-bicarbonate-simethicone crystals, which form CO2 gas on contact with water, can distend the xenon-containing stomach and allow clear delineation of its gastric location. This approach is useful in selected cases and may help avoid false-positive diagnoses of obstructive airways disease. (orig.)

  15. MIMiC IMRS and IMRT delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiosurgery is a single application of high radiation dose to a stereotactically defined target volume. Treatment delivery involves multiple stereotactically targeted, arced fields. The goal of radiosurgery is to deliver a high dose to the target while sparing the normal tissue just a few millimeters away.We will present the first experience of planning, verification and realization of treatment with a new treatment and navigation system for IMRS and IMRT as well as present the first comparison of these methods. 1. Introduction. Since 1993, the stereotactic radiosurgery on linac is used at St. Elisabeth Cancer Institute in Bratislava. Until September 2006 we have treated 870 patients with primary brain tumours, metastases, recurrences and AV malformations with Leibinger stereotaxy circular collimators system on Clinac 600C/D of Varian accelerator. Since May 2005 we have been using also a Nomos MIMiC (with BEAK) stereotaxy IMRS and IMRT delivery system with Corvus treatment planning system and Autocrane positioning of cauch. Till September 2006 we have treated 36 patients with MIMiC and five patients with 120 MLC Milenium. 2. Method. 2.1. Navigation and immobilization equipment. For the reason of continuity, for stereotactic immobilization at STRS we use Leibinger system with autocrane mowing system on Clinac 600C/D and for IMRT thermoplastic masks. 2.2. MiniMLC MIMiC with active monitor. MiniMLC MIMiC is attached to the gantry of linac. It is used for dynamic arc IMRS and IMRT. The device consists of 20 pairs of leaves 1 cm wide in two rows, with pneumatic control of the position of each leaf by the active monitor according to the data for a given treatment from the treatment planning system transferred on a floppy disc. Each leaf has its own position control. The active monitor also contains a system for angle gantry detection with an accuracy of 0.1 deg.. Taking into account the position of gantry and data in memory, it opens or closes the respective

  16. Joint Mechanism That Mimics Elastic Characteristics in Human Running

    OpenAIRE

    Takuya Otani; Kenji Hashimoto; Takaya Isomichi; Masanori Sakaguchi; Yasuo Kawakami; Hun-Ok Lim; Atsuo Takanishi

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of human running has revealed that the motion of the human leg can be modeled by a compression spring because the joints of the leg behave like a torsion spring in the stance phase. In this paper, we describe the development of a joint mechanism that mimics the elastic characteristics of the joints of the stance leg. The knee was equipped with a mechanism comprising two laminated leaf springs made of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic for adjusting the joint stiffness and a worm gear in...

  17. Superparamagnetic nanotraps containing MIP based mimic lipase for biotransformations uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nanoparticle comprises a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle core conjugated with trimethoxylsilyl propylmethacrylate (TMSPM) and methacryloylamido serine (MASE), methacryloylamido histidine (MAH), methacryloylamido glutamic acid (MAGA) monomers, and p-nitrophenyl palmitate (p-NPP) which is a substrate of lipase as a template molecule, which enables the creation of lipase active region. The resulting hybrid superparamagnetic nanotraps are magnetically separable, highly active, and stable under harsh conditions. In this study, the advantages of high selectivity of molecular imprinting technique have used to get mimic lipase for the synthesis of methyl jasmonate and methyl oleate.

  18. Use of a continuous multistage bioreactor to mimic winemaking fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Clement, Tiphaine; Perez, Marc; Mouret, Jean-Roch; Sablayrolles, Jean-Marie; Camarasa, Carole

    2011-01-01

    Continuous fermentation set-ups are of great interest for studying the physiology of microorganisms. In winemaking conditions, yeasts go through a growth phase and a stationary phase during which more than half of the sugar is fermented. A comprehensive study of wine-yeast physiology must therefore include yeasts in a non-growing phase. This condition is impossible to achieve within a chemostat, which led us to design a multi-stage fermentation device. In this study, we evaluated the ability ...

  19. Cell Migration and Invasion Assays as Tools for Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren I. Hulkower

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration and invasion are processes that offer rich targets for intervention in key physiologic and pathologic phenomena such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. With the advent of high-throughput and high content imaging systems, there has been a movement towards the use of physiologically relevant cell-based assays earlier in the testing paradigm. This allows more effective identification of lead compounds and recognition of undesirable effects sooner in the drug discovery screening process. This article will review the effective use of several principle formats for studying cell motility: scratch assays, transmembrane assays, microfluidic devices and cell exclusion zone assays.

  20. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Mimics a Conduction Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marrakchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is important to recognise Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome in electrocardiograms (ECG, as it may mimic ischaemic heart disease, ventricular hypertrophy, and bundle branch block. Recognising WPW syndrome allows for risk stratification, the identification of associated conditions, and the institution of appropriate management. Objective. The present case showed that electrophysiological study is indicated in patients with abnormal ECG and syncope. Case Report. A 40-year-old man with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome was presented to emergency with syncope. A baseline ECG was a complete right branch block and posterior left hemiblock. He was admitted to the cardiac care unit for pacemaker implantation. The atypical figure of complete right branch block and posterior left hemiblock was thought to be a “false positive” of conduction abnormality. But the long anterograde refractory period of the both accessory pathway and atrioventricular conduction may cause difficulty in diagnosing Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, Conclusion. A Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome may mimic a conduction disease. No reliable algorithm exists for making an ECG diagnosis of a preexcitation syndrome with conduction disorders. This can lead to diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas in the context of syncope.

  1. Synthetic protocells to mimic and test cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Sigworth, Fred J; LaVan, David A

    2010-01-01

    Synthetic protocells provide a new means to probe, mimic and deconstruct cell behavior; they are a powerful tool to quantify cell behavior and a useful platform to explore nanomedicine. Protocells are not simple particles; they mimic cell design and typically consist of a stabilized lipid bilayer with membrane proteins. With a finite number of well characterized components, protocells can be designed to maximize useful outputs. Energy conversion in cells is an intriguing output; many natural cells convert transmembrane ion gradients into electricity by membrane-protein regulated ion transport. Here, a synthetic cell system comprising two droplets separated by a lipid bilayer is described that functions as a biological battery. The factors that affect its electrogenic performance are explained and predicted by coupling equations of the electrodes, transport proteins and membrane behavior. We show that the output of such biological batteries can reach an energy density of 6.9 x 10(6) J m(-3), which is approximately 5% of the volumetric energy density of a lead-acid battery. The configuration with maximum power density has an energy conversion efficiency of 10%. PMID:20217710

  2. Induction and analysis of rice lesion mimic mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lesion mimic mutant of rice (Oryza sativa L.), named as cer1, was induced from a japonic rice variety Katy with 1.0% ethyl methane-sulfonate (EMS) treatment. Phenotype of mutant was comparatively characterized along with the original parent Katy. The height, the number of tillers, one-thousand-grain weight of mutant was significantly reduced than those of Katy. Genetic analysis indicated that the mutation is controlled by single recessive gene. Lesion mimic phenotype of LmmKaty was rapidly induced by virulent M. grisea isolates or by avirulent isolates only at high levels of inoculum. Autofluorescence (a sign of an active defense response) was visible under ultraviolet light 24 h after localized inoculation in the incompatible interaction whereas, autofluorescence was not evident in the compatible interaction. Autofluorescence was also observed in LmmKaty 20 h after pathogen inoculation, thus indicating that rapid cell death is a mechanism of LmmKaty to restrict pathogen invasion. Rapid accumulation of defense related (DR) gene transcripts, phenylalanine ammonia lyase and β-glucanase, was observed beginning at 6 h and was obvious at 16 h and 24 h in an incompatible interaction. Rapid transcript accumulation of PR-1 and chitinase had occurred by 24 h after inoculation in an incompatible interaction. Accumulation of these transcripts was delayed in a compatible interaction. These results indicate that host active defense responses occur 24 h after pathogen inoculation and that LmmKaty exhibits enhanced resistance to M. grisea. (author)

  3. Novel β-amyloid aggregation inhibitors possessing a turn mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Yoshio; Miyamoto, Naoko; Kiso, Yoshiaki

    2015-04-01

    Amyloid β peptide, the main component of senile plaques found in the brain of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients, is a molecular target for AD therapeutic intervention. A number of potential AD therapeutics have been reported, including inhibitors of β-secretase, γ-secretase, and Aβ aggregation, and anti-amyloid agents, such as neprilysin, insulin degrading enzyme (IDE), and Aβ antibodies. Recently, we reported potent small-sized β-secretase (BACE1) inhibitors, which could serve as anti-AD drugs. However AD is a progressive disorder, where dementia symptoms gradually worsen over several decades, and therefore may require many years to get cured. One possible way to achieve a greater therapeutic effect is through simultaneous administration of multiple drugs, similar to those used in Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART) used to treat AIDS. In order to overcome AD, we took a drug discovery approach to evaluate, novel β-amyloid aggregation inhibitors. Previously, we reported that a tong-type compound possessing a turn mimic as the inhibitor of HIV-1 protease dimerization. Oligomerized amyloid β peptides contain a turn structure within the molecule. Here, we designed and synthesized novel β-amyloid aggregation inhibitors with a turn-mimic template, based on the turn conformer of the oligomerized amyloid β peptides. PMID:25736996

  4. Synchrotron radiation - a perfect mimic of star light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotrons are an ideal solar mimic (or more generally a mimic of star light). Continuously tuneable from the IR to the VUV (and beyond into the X ray region) they produce light beams with intensities compatible with sunlight, not the multiphoton processes induced by lasers, and therefore have become a standard tool in environmental studies. In this talk I will review how synchrotron facilities have been used to study the photochemical processes in the Earth's stratosphere that lead to ozone formation, and its destruction by CFCs and other anthropogenic pollutant sources and how by exploring the VUV-vis spectroscopy the role of chemical species in both ozone depletion and global warming is being evaluated and used to suggest new more environmental friendly chemical for industry. Synchrotrons may also be used to study the biological effects of environmental change for example by exploring the effect of enhanced UV levels due to loss of stratospheric ozone (the so called ozone hole). Synchrotron radiation may be used to explore the effects of enhanced UV levels of plants and the mechanisms leading to skin cancers, the latter by studying DNA damage. In this talk I will discuss recent experiments using synchrotron radiation to explore DNA damage and what such experiments tell us about mechanisms involved

  5. De novo design of protein mimics of B-DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Deniz; Bianco, Piero R; Kumar, Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Structural mimicry of DNA is utilized in nature as a strategy to evade molecular defences mounted by host organisms. One such example is the protein Ocr - the first translation product to be expressed as the bacteriophage T7 infects E. coli. The structure of Ocr reveals an intricate and deliberate arrangement of negative charges that endows it with the ability to mimic ∼24 base pair stretches of B-DNA. This uncanny resemblance to DNA enables Ocr to compete in binding the type I restriction modification (R/M) system, and neutralizes the threat of hydrolytic cleavage of viral genomic material. Here, we report the de novo design and biophysical characterization of DNA mimicking peptides, and describe the inhibitory action of the designed helical bundles on a type I R/M enzyme, EcoR124I. This work validates the use of charge patterning as a design principle for creation of protein mimics of DNA, and serves as a starting point for development of therapeutic peptide inhibitors against human pathogens that employ molecular camouflage as part of their invasion stratagem. PMID:26568416

  6. Selective Mimics of Strigolactone Actions and Their Potential Use for Controlling Damage Caused by Root Parasitic Weeds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kosuke Fukui; Shinsaku Ito; Tadao Asami

    2013-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a novel class of plant hormones and rhizosphere communication signals,although the molecular mechanisms underlying their activities have not yet been fully determined.Nor is their application in agriculture well developed.The importance of plant hormone agonists has been demonstrated in both basic and applied research,and chemicals that mimic strigolactone functions should greatly facilitate strigolactone research.Here,we report our discovery of a new phenoxyfuranone compound,4-Br debranone (4BD),that shows similar activity to that of the major strigolactone (SL) analog GR24 in many aspects of a biological assay on plants.4BD strongly inhibited tiller bud outgrowth in the SL-deficient rice mutant d10 at the same concentration as GR24,with no adverse effects,even during prolonged cultivation.This result was also observed in the Arabidopsis thaliana SL-deficient mutants max1,max3,and max4.However,the application of 4BD to the Arabidopsis SL-insensitive mutant max2 induced no morphological changes in it.The expression of SL biosynthetic genes was also reduced by 4BD treatment,probably via negative feedback regulation.However,in a seed germination assay on Striga hermonthica,a root parasitic plant,4BD showed far less activity than GR24.These results suggest that 4BD is the first plant-specific strigolactone mimic.

  7. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tapanee Hongratanaworakit

    2004-01-01

    The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow pot...

  8. Caloric restriction mimetics: natural/physiological pharmacological autophagy inducers

    OpenAIRE

    Mariño, Guillermo; Pietrocola, Federico; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient depletion, which is one of the physiological triggers of autophagy, results in the depletion of intracellular acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) coupled to the deacetylation of cellular proteins. We surmise that there are 3 possibilities to mimic these effects, namely (i) the depletion of cytosolic AcCoA by interfering with its biosynthesis, (ii) the inhibition of acetyltransferases, which are enzymes that transfer acetyl groups from AcCoA to other molecules, mostly leucine residues in cellul...

  9. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  10. A Photoisomerizing Rhodopsin Mimic Observed at Atomic Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Meisam; Berbasova, Tetyana; Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Borhan, Babak; Geiger, James H

    2016-07-20

    The members of the rhodopsin family of proteins are involved in many essential light-dependent processes in biology. Specific photoisomerization of the protein-bound retinylidene PSB at a specified wavelength range of light is at the heart of all of these systems. Nonetheless, it has been difficult to reproduce in an engineered system. We have developed rhodopsin mimics, using intracellular lipid binding protein family members as scaffolds, to study fundamental aspects of protein/chromophore interactions. Herein we describe a system that specifically isomerizes the retinylidene protonated Schiff base both thermally and photochemically. This isomerization has been characterized at atomic resolution by quantitatively interconverting the isomers in the crystal both thermally and photochemically. This event is accompanied by a large pKa change of the imine similar to the pKa changes observed in bacteriorhodopsin and visual opsins during isomerization. PMID:27310917

  11. Magnetic Tunnel Junction Mimics Stochastic Cortical Spiking Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Panda, Priyadarshini; Wijesinghe, Parami; Kim, Yusung; Roy, Kaushik

    2016-01-01

    Brain-inspired computing architectures attempt to mimic the computations performed in the neurons and the synapses in the human brain in order to achieve its efficiency in learning and cognitive tasks. In this work, we demonstrate the mapping of the probabilistic spiking nature of pyramidal neurons in the cortex to the stochastic switching behavior of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction in presence of thermal noise. We present results to illustrate the efficiency of neuromorphic systems based on such probabilistic neurons for pattern recognition tasks in presence of lateral inhibition and homeostasis. Such stochastic MTJ neurons can also potentially provide a direct mapping to the probabilistic computing elements in Belief Networks for performing regenerative tasks. PMID:27443913

  12. Three mimic mutants for reclining foliage in common bean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two new mutants for the reclining foliage (RF) character were induced by treating seed of dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) breeding lines B-351 and 182-1 with 20 krad of .gamma.-radiation. These two mutants were shown to be monogenic and recessive. Allelism tests between the common RF gene rf and the two new mimic mutants for RF indicated that each of the three mutants has an independent locus. The symbols rf2 and rf3 were given to the new mutants. F2 data from the allelism tests showed that the rf2 stock carries a recessive epistatic gene in that does not affect rf2 but suppresses expression of rf and rf3. The rf locus was shown to be independent of the Sur locus for RF in linkage group VII

  13. Approaches to mimic the metallic sheen in beetles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Aggerbeck, Martin; Nielsen, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A range of different beetles exhibits brilliant colours and metallic sheen. One of the most spectacular species is the Plusiotis resplendens from Central America with gold metal appearance. The beetle shells are made from chitin and have a number of unique properties that apart from spectacular...... aesthetic effects include metal sheen from non-metal surfaces combined with electric and thermal insulation. The reflection mechanism has been studied by a number of authors and is well understood. Basically there are 2 different reflection principles. One is the multilayer reflector where alternating...... layers have high and low refractive index. The other is the Bouligand structure where birefringent chiral nanofibres are organised in spiral structures. The paper describes work done to explore different approaches to mimic these structures using polymer based materials and production methods that are...

  14. Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula: Imaging features and its mimics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeog, Ying; Ting, David Yen; Hsu, Hui Ling; Huang, Yen Lin; Chen, Chi Jen; Tseng, Ting Chi [Dept. of Radiology, aipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-15

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is the most common spinal vascular malformation, however it is still rare and underdiagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging findings such as spinal cord edema and dilated and tortuous perimedullary veins play a pivotal role in the confirmation of the diagnosis. However, spinal angiography remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of SDAVF. Classic angiographic findings of SDAVF are early filling of radicular veins, delayed venous return, and an extensive network of dilated perimedullary venous plexus. A series of angiograms of SDAVF at different locations along the spinal column, and mimics of serpentine perimedullary venous plexus on MR images, are demonstrated. Thorough knowledge of SDAVF aids correct diagnosis and prevents irreversible complications.

  15. Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula: Imaging features and its mimics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is the most common spinal vascular malformation, however it is still rare and underdiagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging findings such as spinal cord edema and dilated and tortuous perimedullary veins play a pivotal role in the confirmation of the diagnosis. However, spinal angiography remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of SDAVF. Classic angiographic findings of SDAVF are early filling of radicular veins, delayed venous return, and an extensive network of dilated perimedullary venous plexus. A series of angiograms of SDAVF at different locations along the spinal column, and mimics of serpentine perimedullary venous plexus on MR images, are demonstrated. Thorough knowledge of SDAVF aids correct diagnosis and prevents irreversible complications

  16. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Novel Auxin Mimic Herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do-Thanh, Chi-Linh; Vargas, Jose J; Thomas, Joseph W; Armel, Gregory R; Best, Michael D

    2016-05-11

    Due to the key roles of auxins as master regulators of plant growth, there is considerable interest in the development of compounds with auxin-like properties for growth management and weed control applications. Herein, we describe the design and multistep synthesis of ten compounds bearing combinations of functional groups commonly associated with auxin-type properties. Following synthesis, these compounds were tested against multiple weed species as well as sweet corn. In general, while these structures were not quite as active as commercial auxin mimic herbicides, multiple compounds exhibited broadleaf weed activity with concurrent selectivity in sweet corn (Zea mays L. var. saccharum). In addition, differential results were observed upon subtle changes to structure, providing insights into the structural properties required for activity. PMID:27086840

  17. Magnetic Tunnel Junction Mimics Stochastic Cortical Spiking Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Panda, Priyadarshini; Wijesinghe, Parami; Kim, Yusung; Roy, Kaushik

    2016-07-01

    Brain-inspired computing architectures attempt to mimic the computations performed in the neurons and the synapses in the human brain in order to achieve its efficiency in learning and cognitive tasks. In this work, we demonstrate the mapping of the probabilistic spiking nature of pyramidal neurons in the cortex to the stochastic switching behavior of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction in presence of thermal noise. We present results to illustrate the efficiency of neuromorphic systems based on such probabilistic neurons for pattern recognition tasks in presence of lateral inhibition and homeostasis. Such stochastic MTJ neurons can also potentially provide a direct mapping to the probabilistic computing elements in Belief Networks for performing regenerative tasks.

  18. SIRT1 Gain of Function Does Not Mimic or Enhance the Adaptations to Intermittent Fasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Boutant

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction (CR has been shown to prevent the onset of insulin resistance and to delay age-related physiological decline in mammalian organisms. SIRT1, a NAD+-dependent deacetylase enzyme, has been suggested to mediate the adaptive responses to CR, leading to the speculation that SIRT1 activation could be therapeutically used as a CR-mimetic strategy. Here, we used a mouse model of moderate SIRT1 overexpression to test whether SIRT1 gain of function could mimic or boost the metabolic benefits induced by every-other-day feeding (EODF. Our results indicate that SIRT1 transgenesis does not affect the ability of EODF to decrease adiposity and improve insulin sensitivity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that SIRT1 transgenesis and EODF promote very distinct adaptations in individual tissues, some of which can be even be metabolically opposite, as in brown adipose tissue. Therefore, whereas SIRT1 overexpression and CR both improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, the etiologies of these benefits are largely different.

  19. SIRT1 Gain of Function Does Not Mimic or Enhance the Adaptations to Intermittent Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutant, Marie; Kulkarni, Sameer S; Joffraud, Magali; Raymond, Frédéric; Métairon, Sylviane; Descombes, Patrick; Cantó, Carles

    2016-03-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to prevent the onset of insulin resistance and to delay age-related physiological decline in mammalian organisms. SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase enzyme, has been suggested to mediate the adaptive responses to CR, leading to the speculation that SIRT1 activation could be therapeutically used as a CR-mimetic strategy. Here, we used a mouse model of moderate SIRT1 overexpression to test whether SIRT1 gain of function could mimic or boost the metabolic benefits induced by every-other-day feeding (EODF). Our results indicate that SIRT1 transgenesis does not affect the ability of EODF to decrease adiposity and improve insulin sensitivity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that SIRT1 transgenesis and EODF promote very distinct adaptations in individual tissues, some of which can be even be metabolically opposite, as in brown adipose tissue. Therefore, whereas SIRT1 overexpression and CR both improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, the etiologies of these benefits are largely different. PMID:26923584

  20. A miniature mimic of host defense peptides with systemic antibacterial efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oligomers of acylated lysines (OAKs) are synthetic mimics of host defense peptides (HDPs) with promising antimicrobial properties. Here we challenged the OAK concept for its ability to generate both systemically efficient and economically viable lead compounds for fighting multidrug-resistant bacteria. We describe the design and characterization of a miniature OAK composed of only 3 lysyls and 2 acyls (designated C12(ω7)K-β12) that preferentially targets gram-positive species by a bacteriostatic mode of action. To gain insight into the mechanism of action, we examined the interaction of OAK with various potential targets, including phospholipid bilayers, using surface plasmon resonance, and Langmuir monolayers, using insertion assays, epifluorescence microscopy, and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, in a complementary manner. Collectively, the data support the notion that C12(ω7)K-β12 damages the plasma-membrane architecture similarly to HDPs, that is, following a near-classic 2-step interaction including high-affinity electrostatic adhesion and a subsequent shallow insertion that was limited to the phospholipid head group region. Notably, preliminary acute toxicity and efficacy studies performed with mouse models of infection have consolidated the potential of OAK for treating bacterial infections, including systemic treatments of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Such simple yet robust chemicals might be useful for various antibacterial applications while circumventing potential adverse effects associated with cytolytic compounds.

  1. Physiological effects in aromatherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapanee Hongratanaworakit

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of aromas on humans are divided into physiological and psychological effects. The physiological effect acts directly on the physical organism, the psychological effect acts via the sense of smell or olfactory system, which in turn may cause a physiological effect. This paper reviews on the physiological effects which are used for the evaluation of the effects of aromas. Physiological parameters, i.e. heart rate blood pressure, electrodermal activity, electroencephalogram, slow potential brain waves (contingent negativevariation, and eye blink rate or pupil functions, are used as indices for the measurement of the aroma effects

  2. The endemic mimic: blastomycosis an illness often misdiagnosed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradsher, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    One of the endemic fungi, Blastomyces dermatitidis, can cause epidemics of infection with multiple persons involved in a point source outbreak but more commonly causes sporadic cases of infection within the areas of endemicity. Blastomycosis can present as an acute pneumonia which is often misdiagnosed as acute pneumococcal pneumonia or the infection may present as a chronic pneumonia along with weight loss, night sweats, hemoptysis, and a lung mass suggesting tuberculosis or carcinoma of the lung. Extrapulmonary infection with B. dermatitidis is protean with many different manifestations. Most commonly, skin or subcutaneous lesions are found with either a verrucous or warty appearance or in an ulcerative form. Cases have been misidentified as keratoacanthoma, pyoderma gangrenosum, carcinoma, or as Weber-Christian panniculitis if there are nodular subcutaneous lesions. Essentially any site or organ can have lesions of disseminated blastomycosis. In our series, cases of laryngeal carcinoma, adrenal insufficiency, thyroid nodules, granulomatous hypercalcemia, abnormal mammograms thought to represent breast carcinoma, otitis media with cranial extension, immune thrombocytopenic purpura, and hemolytic anemia of unknown cause have been misdiagnosed and blastomycosis subsequently identified as the cause. This infection causes manifestations which mimic many other more commonly diagnosed conditions and must always be considered by clinicians practicing in the endemic region. PMID:25125734

  3. Chimpanzees and humans mimic pupil-size of conspecifics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariska E Kret

    Full Text Available Group-living typically provides benefits to individual group members but also confers costs. To avoid incredulity and betrayal and allow trust and cooperation, individuals must understand the intentions and emotions of their group members. Humans attend to other's eyes and from gaze and pupil-size cues, infer information about the state of mind of the observed. In humans, pupil-size tends to mimic that of the observed. Here we tested whether pupil-mimicry exists in our closest relative, the chimpanzee (P. troglodytes. We conjectured that if pupil-mimicry has adaptive value, e.g. to promote swift communication of inner states and facilitate shared understanding and coordination, pupil-mimicry should emerge within but not across species. Pupillometry data was collected from human and chimpanzee subjects while they observed images of the eyes of both species with dilating/constricting pupils. Both species showed enhanced pupil-mimicry with members of their own species, with effects being strongest in humans and chimpanzee mothers. Pupil-mimicry may be deeply-rooted, but probably gained importance from the point in human evolution where the morphology of our eyes became more prominent. Humans' white sclera surrounding the iris, and the fine muscles around their eyes facilitate non-verbal communication via eye signals.

  4. Planetary nebulae and their mimics: the MASH-MEN Project

    CERN Document Server

    Boissay, Rozenn; Frew, David J; Bojicic, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The total number of true, likely and possible planetary nebulae (PN) now known in the Milky Way is about 3000, approximately twice the number known a decade ago. The new discoveries are a legacy of the recent availability of wide-field, narrowband imaging surveys, primarily in the light of H-alpha. The two most important are the AAO/UKST SuperCOSMOS H-alpha survey - SHS and the Isaac Newton photometric H-alpha survey - IPHAS, which are responsible for most of the new discoveries. A serious problem with previous PN catalogues is that several different kinds of astrophysical objects are able to mimic PN in some of their observed properties leading to significant contamination. These objects include H II regions and Stromgren zones around young O/B stars, reflection nebulae, Wolf-Rayet ejecta, supernova remnants, Herbig-Haro objects, young stellar objects, B[e] stars, symbiotic stars and outflows, late-type stars, cataclysmic variables, low redshift emission-line galaxies, and even image/detector flaws. PN catal...

  5. A MIMIC approach to modeling the underground economy in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David Han-Min; Lin, Jer-Yan; Yu, Tiffany Hui-Kuang

    2006-11-01

    The size of underground economy (UE) expansion usually increases the tax gap, impose a burden on the economy, and results in tax distortions. This study uses the MIMIC approach to model the causal variables and indicating variables to estimate the UE in Taiwan. We also focus on testing the data for non-stationarity and perform diagnostic tests. By using annual time-series data for Taiwan from 1961 to 2003, it is found that the estimated size of the UE varies from 11.0% to 13.1% before 1988, and from 10.6% to 11.8% from 1989 onwards. That the size of the UE experienced a substantial downward shift in 1989 indicates that there was a structural break. The UE is significantly and positively affected by such casual variables as the logarithm of real government consumption and currency inflation, but is negatively affected by the tax burden at 5% significant level. Unemployment rate and crime rate are not significantly correlated with the UE in this study.

  6. UNUSUAL CLINICAL CASES THAT MIMIC ACUTE DISSEMINATED ENCEPHALOMYELITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Özgür; Yürekli, Vedat Ali; Gencpinar, Pinar; Karaali, Kamil; Gümüş, Hakan; Okuyaz, Çetin; Hazar, Volkan; Haspolat, Şenay

    2015-09-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an immune-mediated monophasic inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system which poses a diagnostic challenge. We report on six cases of different etiologies that mimicked the clinical and radiologic findings of ADEM. The cases were collected from four different reference hospitals in Turkey. The same radiologist from the Akdeniz University Faculty of Medicine examined the magnetic resonance images of all patients. Three (50%) patients had antecedent infections. Initial symptoms of the patients were as follows: fever in 50%, altered consciousness in 33.3% and convulsions in 16.7% of patients. Neurologic examination showed long tract signs in 83.3%, ataxia in 50% and altered consciousness in 50% of patients. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed lymphocytic pleocytosis only in case 6. Four patients received steroid pulse therapy and one of these initially underwent intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. The patients' definitive diagnoses were as follows: paraspinal neuroblastoma-associated paraneoplastic syndrome; histiocytic sarcoma; mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes; and cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy in one patient each, while two patients had hemophagocytic syndrome. The present case series demonstrated difficulties in diagnosing ADEM while revealing extremely rare disorders that mimic ADEM radiologically and clinically. PMID:26666111

  7. Mimic therapeutic actions against keloid by thermostatted kinetic theory methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianca, Carlo; Riposo, Julien

    2015-08-01

    This paper deals with the modeling of a wound-healing disease under a therapeutic action by employing the methods of the thermostatted kinetic theory for active particles. In particular, in order to test therapeutic actions against keloid formation and the possible development of a cancer, an external force field coupled to a Gaussian thermostat is introduced into a mathematical model recently proposed. Specifically the model depicts the competition of the immune system cells with a virus, the mutated fibroblast cells, and the cancer cells. Employing a computational analysis, the effects of three different external forces mimic therapeutic actions are analyzed: A vaccine for the virus, the PUVA therapy for the keloid and a vaccine for the cancer. The results are in agreement with the evidence that the sole action of the immune system is not sufficient to obtain a total depletion of keloid thus requiring the definition of a therapy. Further refinements and developments of the model are also discussed in the paper.

  8. Joint Mechanism That Mimics Elastic Characteristics in Human Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Otani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of human running has revealed that the motion of the human leg can be modeled by a compression spring because the joints of the leg behave like a torsion spring in the stance phase. In this paper, we describe the development of a joint mechanism that mimics the elastic characteristics of the joints of the stance leg. The knee was equipped with a mechanism comprising two laminated leaf springs made of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic for adjusting the joint stiffness and a worm gear in order to achieve active movement. Using this mechanism, we were able to achieve joint stiffness mimicking that of a human knee joint that can be adjusted by varying the effective length of one of the laminated leaf springs. The equation proposed for calculating the joint stiffness considers the difference between the position of the fixed point of the leaf spring and the position of the rotational center of the joint. We evaluated the performance of the laminated leaf spring and the effectiveness of the proposed equation for joint stiffness. We were able to make a bipedal robot run with one leg using pelvic oscillation for storing energy produced by the resonance related to leg elasticity.

  9. Accumulation of murine amyloid-β mimics early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Markus; Bracke, Alexander; Avchalumov, Yosef; Schumacher, Toni; Hofrichter, Jacqueline; Paarmann, Kristin; Fröhlich, Christina; Lange, Cathleen; Brüning, Thomas; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Pahnke, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Amyloidosis mouse models of Alzheimer's disease are generally established by transgenic approaches leading to an overexpression of mutated human genes that are known to be involved in the generation of amyloid-β in Alzheimer's families. Although these models made substantial contributions to the current knowledge about the 'amyloid hypothesis' of Alzheimer's disease, the overproduction of amyloid-β peptides mimics only inherited (familiar) Alzheimer's disease, which accounts for mild cognitive impairment. Using behavioural tests, electrophysiology and morphological analyses, we compared different ABC transporter-deficient animals and found that alterations are most prominent in neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice. We show that these mice have a reduced probability to survive, show increased anxiety in new environments, and have a reduced working memory performance. Furthermore, we detected morphological changes in the hippocampus and amygdala, e.g. astrogliosis and reduced numbers of synapses, leading to defective long-term potentiation in functional measurements. Compared to human, murine amyloid-β is poorly aggregating, due to changes in three amino acids at N-terminal positions 5, 10, and 13. Interestingly, our findings account for the action of early occurring amyloid-β species/aggregates, i.e. monomers and small amyloid-β oligomers. Thus, neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice present a new model for early effects of amyloid-β-related mild cognitive impairment that allows investigations without artificial overexpression of inherited Alzheimer's disease genes. PMID:25991605

  10. Schwannoma in Sellar Region Mimics Invasive Pituitary Macroadenoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiangyi; Wu, Huanwen; Ma, Wenbin; Li, Yongning; Yang, Yi; Xing, Bing; Wei, Junji; Yao, Yong; Gao, Jun; Lian, Wei; Xu, Zhiqin; Dou, Wanchen; Ren, Zuyuan; Su, Changbao; Wang, Renzhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In central nervous system, schwannomas, as ubiquitous tumors, mostly originate from sensory nerves like auditory and trigeminal nerves. However, intrasellar schwannomas are extremely rare. They are often misdiagnosed as pituitary adenomas. We report a rare case of schwannoma in the sellar region—a challenging diagnosis guided by clinical presentations, radiological signs, and postoperative pathological test. We represent a 65-year-old woman who had suffered from headaches, hypothyroidism, and visual disturbance. Her MRI revealed an abnormal sellar region mixed-signal mass lesion with suprasellar, left parasellar, and sellar floor invasiveness. We present detailed analysis of the patient's disease course and review relevant literatures. Written informed consent was obtained from the patient for publication of this article. A copy of the written consent is available for review by the editors of MEDICINE. Because this article does not involve any human or animal trials, there is no need to conduct special ethic review and the ethical approval is not necessary. When surgically treated, her specimen revealed a typical histopathology pattern of schwannoma. The patient's symptoms improved a lot after surgery and he continues to be under observation. Despite its rarity, intrasellar schwannoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sellar lesions that mimic pituitary adenomas. PMID:26945398

  11. miR156a Mimic Represses the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Human Nasopharyngeal Cancer Cells by Targeting Junctional Adhesion Molecule A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhong Tian

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been documented as having an important role in the development of cancer. Broccoli is very popular in large groups of the population and has anticancer properties. Junctional adhesion molecule A (JAMA is preferentially concentrated at tight junctions and influences cell morphology and migration. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is a developmental program associated with cancer progression and metastasis. In this study we aimed to investigate the role of miRNAs from broccoli in human nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC. We demonstrated that a total of 84 conserved miRNAs and 184 putative novel miRNAs were found in broccoli by sequencing technology. Among these, miR156a was expressed the most. In addition, synthetic miR156a mimic inhibited the EMT of NPC cells in vitro. Furthermore, it was confirmed that JAMA was the target of miR156a mimic as validated by 3' UTR luciferase reporter assays and western blotting. Knockdown of JAMA was consistent with the effects of miR156a mimic on the EMT of NPC, and the up-regulation of JAMA could partially restore EMT repressed by miR156a mimic. In conclusion, these results indicate that the miR156a mimic inhibits the EMT of NPC cells by targeting the 3' UTR of JAMA. These miRNA profiles of broccoli provide a fundamental basis for further research. Moreover, the discovery of miR156a may have clinical implications for the treatment of patients with NPC.

  12. Hyperechoic caudate nuclei: a potential mimic of germinal matrix hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. We have encountered bilateral hyperechoic foci in the region of the germinal matrix on cranial sonograms in neonates that have an appearance similar to germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH), but are unusual either due to the age of the patient at presentation or to the evolution of the foci on follow-up. We believe that these findings represent hyperechoic caudate nuclei (HCN) rather than GMH. Objective. To demonstrate that bilateral HCN can be seen on cranial sonography in neonates and can mimic bilateral GMH. Materials and methods. The cranial sonograms were reviewed in nine neonates (three term and six premature) who had HCN identified on at least one sonographic examination. CT (two patients) and MR (one patient) studies were also reviewed, as well as the neuropathological examination in one patient who died and had an autopsy. The patients' medical records were reviewed to identify any clinical markers for significant risk of perinatal ischemia. Results. There was clinical evidence for risk of ischemia in five of the nine neonates. All nine patients had bilateral HCN on the initial or follow-up studies. Small cysts were seen sonographically in two patients. CT was normal in one patient and revealed a small unilateral focus of increased attenuation in one infant (very small compared to the bilateral HCN). MR was normal in one patient. Histopathological examination of the brain was normal in the one patient who died and had an autopsy. Conclusion. Hyperechoic caudate nuclei can occur in neonates either as a normal finding, or possibly related to ischemia, and should not always be attributed to GMH. (orig.)

  13. Chewing over physiology integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkader, Fernando; Azevedo-Martins, Anna Karenina; Miranda, Manoel de Arcisio; Brunaldi, Kellen

    2005-03-01

    An important challenge for both students and teachers of physiology is to integrate the different areas in which physiological knowledge is didactically divided. In developing countries, such an issue is even more demanding, because budget restrictions often affect the physiology program with laboratory classes being the first on the list when it comes to cuts in expenses. With the aim of addressing this kind of problem, the graduate students of our department organized a physiology summer course offered to undergraduate students. The objective was to present the different physiological systems in an integrated fashion. The strategy pursued was to plan laboratory classes whose experimental results were the basis for the relevant theoretical discussions. The subject we developed to illustrate physiology integration was the study of factors influencing salivary secretion. PMID:15718383

  14. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-21

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Such tests are most often used to explore antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin system as well as a hybridization based assay. The agglutination systems are prone to selftermination of the linking analyte, prone to active site saturation and loss of agglomeration at high analyte concentrations. We investigated the molecular target/ligand interaction, explaining the common agglutination problems related to analyte self-termination, linkage of the analyte to the same bead instead of different microbeads. We classified the agglutination process into three kinds of assays: a two- component assay, a three-component assay and a stepped three- component assay. Although we compared these three kinds of assays for recognizing DNA and protein molecules, the assay can be used for virtually any molecule, including ions and metabolites. In total, the optimized assay permits detecting analytes with high sensitivity in a short time, 5 min, at room temperature. Such a system is appropriate for POC testing.

  15. Development of extremely sensitive radiometric enzyme assays

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Stanislav; Soukup, Tomáš

    Bratislava: Slovenská technická univerzita, 2012, s. 231-235. ISBN 978-80-227-3722-7. [Priemyselná toxikológia 2012 /32./. Svit, Vysoké Tatry (SK), 20.06.2012-22.06.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA304/08/0256 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : enzyme activity * radiometric assay * thyroid hormones Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  16. Advances in physiological computing

    CERN Document Server

    Fairclough, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    This edited collection will provide an overview of the field of physiological computing, i.e. the use of physiological signals as input for computer control. It will cover a breadth of current research, from brain-computer interfaces to telemedicine.

  17. Phun Week: Understanding Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limson, Mel; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2009-01-01

    Topics such as sports, exercise, health, and nutrition can make the science of physiology relevant and engaging for students. In addition, many lessons on these topics, such as those on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems, align with national and state life science education standards. Physiology Understanding Week (PhUn…

  18. Reproduction, Physiology and Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter focuses on the reproduction, physiology, and biochemistry of the root-knot nematodes. The extensive amount of information on the reproduction and cytogenetics of species of Meloidogyne contrasts with the limited information on physiology, biochemistry, and biochemical pathways. In commo...

  19. Radioreceptor opioid assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioreceptor assay is described for assaying opioid drugs in biological fluids. The method enables the assay of total opioid activity, being specific for opioids as a class but lacking specificity within the class. A radio-iodinated opioid and the liquid test sample are incubated with an opiate receptor material. The percentage inhibition of the binding of the radio-iodinated compound to the opiate receptor is calculated and the opioid activity of the test liquid determined from a standard curve. Examples of preparing radio-iodinated opioids and assaying opioid activity are given. A test kit for the assay is described. Compared to other methods, this assay is cheap, easy and rapid. (U.K.)

  20. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  1. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  2. Tricyclic antidepressant radioreceptor assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A receptor assay for tricyclic antidepressants described here is based on the ability of these drugs to compete with [3H]-3-guinuclidnyl benzilate (3H-QNB) for binding to muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain membranes. The assay is sensitive, in that it can detect, for example, 2ng/ml nortriptyline in plasma. Seven plasma samples from depressed patients treated with nortriptyline were assayed with the radioreceptor and gas liquid chromatographic methods, and the results from these two methods were almost identical. This assay should be used cautiously, if at all, in patients treated with other drugs that have potent anticholinergic effects. (Auth.)

  3. Four-dimensional characterization of thrombosis in a live-cell, shear-flow assay: development and application to xenotransplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald G Harris

    Full Text Available Porcine xenografts are a promising source of scarce transplantable organs, but stimulate intense thrombosis of human blood despite targeted genetic and pharmacologic interventions. Current experimental models do not enable study of the blood/endothelial interface to investigate adhesive interactions and thrombosis at the cellular level under physiologic conditions. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a live-cell, shear-flow based thrombosis assay relevant to general thrombosis research, and demonstrate its potential in xenotransplantation applications.Confluent wild-type (WT, n = 48 and Gal transferase knock-out (GalTKO, which resist hyperacute rejection; n = 11 porcine endothelia were cultured in microfluidic channels. To mimic microcirculatory flow, channels were perfused at 5 dynes/cm2 and 37°C with human blood stained to fluorescently label platelets. Serial fluorescent imaging visualized percent surface area coverage (SA, for adhesion of labeled cells and total fluorescence (a metric of clot volume. Aggregation was calculated by the fluorescence/SA ratio (FR. WT endothelia stimulated diffuse platelet adhesion (SA 65 ± 2% and aggregation (FR 120 ± 1 a.u., indicating high-grade thrombosis consistent with the rapid platelet activation and consumption seen in whole-organ lung xenotransplantation models. Experiments with antibody blockade of platelet aggregation, and perfusion of syngeneic and allo-incompatible endothelium was used to verify the biologic specificity and validity of the assay. Finally, with GalTKO endothelia thrombus volume decreased by 60%, due primarily to a 58% reduction in adhesion (P < 0.0001 each; importantly, aggregation was only marginally affected (11% reduction, P < 0.0001.This novel, high-throughput assay enabled dynamic modeling of whole-blood thrombosis on intact endothelium under physiologic conditions, and allowed mechanistic characterization of endothelial and platelet interactions. Applied to

  4. Proteasome Assay in Cell Lysates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) mediates the majority of the proteolysis seen in the cytoplasm and nucleus of mammalian cells. As such it plays an important role in the regulation of a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes including tumorigenesis, inflammation and cell death (Ciechanover, 2005; Kisselev and Goldberg, 2001). A number of recent studies have shown that proteasome activity is decreased in a variety of neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and stroke as well as during normal aging (Chung et al., 2001; Ciechanover and Brundin, 2003; Betarbet et al., 2005). This decrease in proteasome activity is thought to play a critical role in the accumulation of abnormal and oxidized proteins. Protein clearance by the UPS involves two sequential reactions. The first is the tagging of protein lysine residues with ubiquitin (Ub) and the second is the subsequent degradation of the tagged proteins by the proteasome. We herein describe an assay for the second of these two reactions (Valera et al., 2013). This assay uses fluorogenic substrates for each of the three activities of the proteasome: chymotrypsin-like activity, trypsin-like activity and caspase-like activity. Cleavage of the fluorophore from the substrate by the proteasome results in fluorescence that can be detected with a fluorescent plate reader.

  5. Transformation optics that mimics the system outside a Schwarzschild black hole

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Huanyang; Miao, Rong-Xin; Li, Miao

    2009-01-01

    We applied the transformation optics to mimic a black hole of Schwarzschild form. Similar properties of photon sphere were also found numerically for the metamaterial black hole. Several reduced versions of the black hole systems were proposed for easier implementations.

  6. The Physiologically Difficult Airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrod M. Mosier

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Airway management in critically ill patients involves the identification and management of the potentially difficult airway in order to avoid untoward complications. This focus on difficult airway management has traditionally referred to identifying anatomic characteristics of the patient that make either visualizing the glottic opening or placement of the tracheal tube through the vocal cords difficult. This paper will describe the physiologically difficult airway, in which physiologic derangements of the patient increase the risk of cardiovascular collapse from airway management. The four physiologically difficult airways described include hypoxemia, hypotension, severe metabolic acidosis, and right ventricular failure. The emergency physician should account for these physiologic derangements with airway management in critically ill patients regardless of the predicted anatomic difficulty of the intubation.

  7. Reproduction, physiology and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter summarizes fundamental knowledge and recent discoveries about the reproduction, physiology and biochemistry of plant-parasitic nematodes. Various types of reproduction are reviewed, including sexual reproduction and mitotic and meiotic parthenogenesis. Although much is known about the p...

  8. Renal Physiology of Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Katharine L.; Lafayette, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy involves remarkable orchestration of physiologic changes. The kidneys are central players in the evolving hormonal milieu of pregnancy, responding and contributing to the changes in the environment for the pregnant woman and fetus. The functional impact of pregnancy on kidney physiology is widespread, involving practically all aspects of kidney function. The glomerular filtration rate increases 50% with subsequent decrease in serum creatinine, urea, and uric acid values. The thresho...

  9. Engineered Three-Dimensional Liver Mimics Recapitulate Critical Rat-Specific Bile Acid Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Detzel, Christopher J.; Kim, Yeonhee; Rajagopalan, Padmavathy

    2010-01-01

    A critical hepatic function is the maintenance of optimal bile acid (BA) compositions to achieve cholesterol homeostasis. BAs are rarely quantified to assess hepatic phenotype in vitro since existing analytical techniques have inadequate resolution. We report a detailed investigation into the biosynthesis and homeostasis of eight primary rat BAs in conventional in vitro hepatocyte cultures and in an engineered liver mimic. The three-dimensional (3D) liver mimic was assembled with layers of pr...

  10. Cell Migration and Invasion Assays as Tools for Drug Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Hulkower, Keren I.; Herber, Renee L.

    2011-01-01

    Cell migration and invasion are processes that offer rich targets for intervention in key physiologic and pathologic phenomena such as wound healing and cancer metastasis. With the advent of high-throughput and high content imaging systems, there has been a movement towards the use of physiologically relevant cell-based assays earlier in the testing paradigm. This allows more effective identification of lead compounds and recognition of undesirable effects sooner in the drug discovery screeni...

  11. CPTAC Assay Portal: a repository of targeted proteomic assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Halusa, Goran; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Sharma, Vagisha; MacLean, Brendan; Yan, Ping; Wrobel, John; Kennedy, Jacob; Mani, DR; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Meyer, Matthew R.; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Abbateillo, Susan E.; Boja, Emily; Carr, Steven A.; Chan, Daniel W.; Chen, Xian; Chen, Jing; Davies, Sherri; Ellis, Matthew; Fenyo, David; Hiltket, Tara; Ketchum, Karen; Kinsinger, Christopher; Kuhn, Eric; Liebler, Daniel; Lin, De; Liu, Tao; Loss, Michael; MacCoss, Michael; Qian, Weijun; Rivers, Robert; Rodland, Karin D.; Ruggles, Kelly; Scott, Mitchell; Smith, Richard D.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Townsend, Reid; Whiteley, Gordon; Wu, Chaochao; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Zhen; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2014-06-27

    To address these issues, the Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has launched an Assay Portal (http://assays.cancer.gov) to serve as a public repository of well-characterized quantitative, MS-based, targeted proteomic assays. The purpose of the CPTAC Assay Portal is to facilitate widespread adoption of targeted MS assays by disseminating SOPs, reagents, and assay characterization data for highly characterized assays. A primary aim of the NCI-supported portal is to bring together clinicians or biologists and analytical chemists to answer hypothesis-driven questions using targeted, MS-based assays. Assay content is easily accessed through queries and filters, enabling investigators to find assays to proteins relevant to their areas of interest. Detailed characterization data are available for each assay, enabling researchers to evaluate assay performance prior to launching the assay in their own laboratory.

  12. Plasma insulin profiles after subcutaneous injection: how close can we get to physiology in people with diabetes?

    OpenAIRE

    Home, P D

    2015-01-01

    Many people with diabetes rely on insulin therapy to achieve optimal blood glucose control. A fundamental aim of such therapy is to mimic the pattern of ‘normal’ physiological insulin secretion, thereby controlling basal and meal‐time plasma glucose and fatty acid turnover. In people without diabetes, insulin release is modulated on a time base of 3–10 min, something that is impossible to replicate without intravascular glucose sensing and insulin delivery. Overnight physiological insulin del...

  13. Transgenic Animal Mutation Assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Chen; Ph.D.D.A.B.T.

    2005-01-01

    @@ The novel transgenic mouse and rat mutation assays have provided a tool for analyzing in vivo mutation in any tissue, thus permitting the direct comparison of cancer incidence with mutant frequency.

  14. The neutral comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The single-cell gel electrophoresis (or comet) assay is a rapid and sensitive fluorescence microscopic method that is used for the detection of DNA damage at the individual cell level. Comet assay under neutral conditions allows the detection of DNA double-strand breaks, considered to the biologically relevant radiation-induced lesion. In this report we describe modifications of the neutral comet method and its use for studying DNA damage and its repair in irradiated human lymphocytes. (author)

  15. Transfection of microRNA mimics should be used with caution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Yong eJin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Transient transfection of chemically synthesized microRNA (miRNA mimics is being used extensively to study the functions and mechanisms of endogenous miRNAs. However, it remains unclear whether transfected miRNAs behave similarly to endogenous miRNAs. Here we show that transient transfection of miRNA mimics into HeLa cells by a commonly used method led to the accumulation of high molecular weight RNA species and a two to three hundred fold increase in mature miRNA levels. In contrast, expression of the same miRNAs through lentiviral infection or plasmid transfection of HeLa cells, transgenic expression in primary lymphocytes, and endogenous overexpression in lymphoma and leukemia cell lines did not lead to the appearance of high molecular weight RNA species. The increase of mature miRNA levels in these cells was below ten fold, which was sufficient to suppress target gene expression and to drive lymphoma development in mice. Moreover, transient transfection of miRNA mimics at high concentrations caused non-specific alterations in gene expression, while at low concentrations achieved expression levels comparable to other methods but failed to efficiently suppress target gene expression. Small RNA deep sequencing analysis revealed that the guide strands of miRNA mimics were frequently mutated, while unnatural passenger strands of some miRNA mimics accumulated to high levels. The high molecular weight RNA species were a heterogeneous mixture of several classes of RNA species generated by concatemerization, 5’- and 3’-end tailing of miRNA mimics. We speculate that the supraphysiological levels of mature miRNAs and these artifactual RNA species led to non-specific changes in gene expression. Our results have important implications for the design and interpretation of experiments primarily employing transient transfection of miRNA mimics.

  16. Various clinical conditions can mimic Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in pediatric patients in endemic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Soner S; Kara, Duygu; Fettah, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a tick-borne disease with high mortality. Many disorders can mimic CCHF. It is important to recognize the condition and to perform differential diagnosis in endemic countries. Twenty-one children aged 18 years or less with a preliminary diagnosis of CCHF were retrospectively evaluated. Real-time PCR and a confirmatory indirect immunofluorescence assay for negative results were performed. The diagnoses determined that 9 patients had (42.9%) CCHF; 7 patients had (33.3%) viral upper respiratory tract infections (URTI); 2 patients had (9.5%) brucellosis; 1 patients had (4.7%) periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome episode; 1 patient had (4.7%) cerebral palsy, diabetes insipidus, acute gastroenteritis, and hypernatremic dehydration; and 1 patient had (4.7%) cellulitis after a tick bite. The mean age of patients with CCHF was greater than that of the other patients (116.1±53.6 vs. 94.1±52.1 months, p=0.02). Seventeen (81%) of the children included had a history of tick bites, 2 (9.5%) had a history of contact with a patient with CCHF, and 2 (9.5%) had no exposure, but were living in an endemic region. Three patients had an underlying disorder: cerebral palsy and diabetes insipidus, epilepsy, or PFAPA. All of the children experienced fever. Other frequent symptoms were malaise, diarrhea, vomiting, and abdominal pain, but none of these differed statistically between the patient groups. CCHF patients had a longer mean duration of symptoms (10.56±1.42 vs. 6.75±3.62 days, p=0.008) and a longer mean length of hospitalization (8.00±2.08 vs. 3.58±1.56 days, p<0.001) than the other patients. At laboratory examination, patients with CCHF had statistically significant lower leukocyte and platelet counts, more prolonged coagulation parameters, and greater AST, ALT, LDH, and CK levels than the other patients. No mortality or complications occurred in the study. Both infectious causes, such as

  17. Plant Physiology and Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taiz, Lincoln; Zeiger, Eduardo; Møller, Ian Max;

    widely used upper-division plant biology textbook. In the Sixth Edition, the Growth and Development section (Unit III) has been reorganized and expanded to present the complete life cycle of seed plants from germination to senescence. In recognition of this enhancement, the text has been renamed Plant......Throughout its twenty-two year history, the authors of Plant Physiology have continually updated the book to incorporate the latest advances in plant biology and implement pedagogical improvements requested by adopters. This has made Plant Physiology the most authoritative, comprehensive, and...... Physiology and Development. As before, Unit III begins with updated chapters on Cell Walls and Signals and Signal Transduction. The latter chapter has been expanded to include a discussion of major signaling molecules, such as calcium ions and plant hormones. A new, unified chapter entitled Signals from...

  18. Human physiology in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernikos, J.

    1996-01-01

    The universality of gravity (1 g) in our daily lives makes it difficult to appreciate its importance in morphology and physiology. Bone and muscle support systems were created, cellular pumps developed, neurons organised and receptors and transducers of gravitational force to biologically relevant signals evolved under 1g gravity. Spaceflight provides the only microgravity environment where systematic experimentation can expand our basic understanding of gravitational physiology and perhaps provide new insights into normal physiology and disease processes. These include the surprising extent of our body's dependence on perceptual information, and understanding the effect and importance of forces generated within the body's weightbearing structures such as muscle and bones. Beyond this exciting prospect is the importance of this work towards opening the solar system for human exploration. Although both appear promising, we are only just beginning to taste what lies ahead.

  19. Cardio-vascular safety beyond hERG: in silico modelling of a guinea pig right atrium assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenu, Luca A; Teisman, Ard; De Buck, Stefan S; Sinha, Vikash K; Gilissen, Ron A H J; Nijsen, Marjoleen J M A; Mackie, Claire E; Sanderson, Wendy E

    2009-12-01

    As chemists can easily produce large numbers of new potential drug candidates, there is growing demand for high capacity models that can help in driving the chemistry towards efficacious and safe candidates before progressing towards more complex models. Traditionally, the cardiovascular (CV) safety domain plays an important role in this process, as many preclinical CV biomarkers seem to have high prognostic value for the clinical outcome. Throughout the industry, traditional ion channel binding data are generated to drive the early selection process. Although this assay can generate data at high capacity, it has the disadvantage of producing high numbers of false negatives. Therefore, our company applies the isolated guinea pig right atrium (GPRA) assay early-on in discovery. This functional multi-channel/multi-receptor model seems much more predictive in identifying potential CV liabilities. Unfortunately however, its capacity is limited, and there is no room for full automation. We assessed the correlation between ion channel binding and the GPRA's Rate of Contraction (RC), Contractile Force (CF), and effective refractory frequency (ERF) measures assay using over six thousand different data points. Furthermore, the existing experimental knowledge base was used to develop a set of in silico classification models attempting to mimic the GPRA inhibitory activity. The Naïve Bayesian classifier was used to built several models, using the ion channel binding data or in silico computed properties and structural fingerprints as descriptors. The models were validated on an independent and diverse test set of 200 reference compounds. Performances were assessed on the bases of their overall accuracy, sensitivity and specificity in detecting both active and inactive molecules. Our data show that all in silico models are highly predictive of actual GPRA data, at a level equivalent or superior to the ion channel binding assays. Furthermore, the models were interpreted in

  20. MIMIC II: a massive temporal ICU patient database to support research in intelligent patient monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, M.; Lieu, C.; Raber, G.; Mark, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Development and evaluation of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) decision-support systems would be greatly facilitated by the availability of a large-scale ICU patient database. Following our previous efforts with the MIMIC (Multi-parameter Intelligent Monitoring for Intensive Care) Database, we have leveraged advances in networking and storage technologies to develop a far more massive temporal database, MIMIC II. MIMIC II is an ongoing effort: data is continuously and prospectively archived from all ICU patients in our hospital. MIMIC II now consists of over 800 ICU patient records including over 120 gigabytes of data and is growing. A customized archiving system was used to store continuously up to four waveforms and 30 different parameters from ICU patient monitors. An integrated user-friendly relational database was developed for browsing of patients' clinical information (lab results, fluid balance, medications, nurses' progress notes). Based upon its unprecedented size and scope, MIMIC II will prove to be an important resource for intelligent patient monitoring research, and will support efforts in medical data mining and knowledge-discovery.

  1. A bioconjugate approach toward squalamine mimics: Insight into the mechanism of biological action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Hua; Shao, Xue-Bin; Moellering, Robert; Wennersten, Christine; Regen, Steven L

    2006-01-01

    A short and efficient synthesis has been devised for a family of squalamine mimics, based on the use of cholic acid, deoxycholic acid, lithocholic acid, putrescine, and spermine as starting materials. Those mimics that contain two facially amphiphilic sterol-spermidine conjugates show strong antibacterial activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive bacteria; their corresponding activities against a broad spectrum of Gram-negative bacteria are relatively moderate. Larger mimics, containing four such sterol-spermidine conjugates, exhibit very weak activities. Reversal of the pendent spermidine moiety and a putrescine linkage on the A- and D-rings had little consequence on the antibacterial activity for the most active of the squalamine mimics, which contained two sterol-polyamine units; similar results were obtained with squalamine mimics made from only one sterol unit. Detailed structure-activity measurements, in combination with kinetic studies carried out using liposomes as model membranes, support a mechanism of action involving noncovalent dimers as ion transporting species, most probably via the formation of pores or channels. PMID:17105239

  2. Assay method and compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods are described for measuring catecholamine levels in human and animal body fluids and tissues using the catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT) radioassay. The assay involves incubating the biological sample with COMT and the tritiated methyl donor, S-adenosyl-L-methionine(3H)-methyl. The O-methylated (3H) epinephrine and/or norepinephrine are extracted and oxidised to vanillin-3H which in turn is extracted and its radioactivity counted. When analysing dopamine levels the assay is extended by vanillin-3H and raising the pH of the aqueous periodate phase from which O-methylated (3H) dopamine is extracted and counted. The assay may be modified depending on whether measurements of undifferentiated total endogenous catecholamine levels or differential analyses of the catecholamine levels are being performed. The sensitivity of the assay can be as low as 5 picograms for norepinephrine and epinephrine and 12 picograms for dopamine. The assemblance of the essential components of the assay into a kit for use in laboratories is also described. (U.K.)

  3. Physiology and behaviour of marine Thioploca

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgslund, Signe; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Kuenen, Gijs; Gallardo, Victor Ariel; van de Vossenberg, Jack; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Holmkvist, Lars; Arning, Esther; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2009-01-01

    Among prokaryotes, the large vacuolated marine sulphur bacteria are unique in their ability to store, transport and metabolize significant quantities of sulphur, nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon compounds. In this study, unresolved questions of metabolism, storage management and behaviour were add...... adaptation to infrequent high sulphate reduction rates in the seabed. The physiology and behaviour of Thioploca are summarized and the adaptations to an environment, dominated by infrequent oxygen availability and periods of high sulphide abundance, are discussed.......Among prokaryotes, the large vacuolated marine sulphur bacteria are unique in their ability to store, transport and metabolize significant quantities of sulphur, nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon compounds. In this study, unresolved questions of metabolism, storage management and behaviour were...... reduce nitrate to ammonium and we found that dinitrogen was not produced, neither through denitrification nor through anammox activity. Unexpectedly, polyphosphate storage was not detectable by microautoradiography in physiological assays or by staining and microscopy. Carbon dioxide fixation increased...

  4. Physiology of Breastfeeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    This powerpoint presentation summaries physiology of lactation and the impact of a variety of clinical practices on lactation from delivery through weaning. Factors that inhibit lactogenesis stage II are explained, including retained placenta, excess blood loss during delivery, and hypoplastic brea...

  5. Starting Physiology: Bioelectrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Vander

    2015-01-01

    From a Cartesian perspective of rational analysis, the electric potential difference across the cell membrane is one of the fundamental concepts for the study of physiology. Unfortunately, undergraduate students often struggle to understand the genesis of this energy gradient, which makes the teaching activity a hard task for the instructor. The…

  6. Renal physiology of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Katharine L; Lafayette, Richard A

    2013-05-01

    Pregnancy involves remarkable orchestration of physiologic changes. The kidneys are central players in the evolving hormonal milieu of pregnancy, responding and contributing to the changes in the environment for the pregnant woman and fetus. The functional impact of pregnancy on kidney physiology is widespread, involving practically all aspects of kidney function. The glomerular filtration rate increases 50% with subsequent decrease in serum creatinine, urea, and uric acid values. The threshold for thirst and antidiuretic hormone secretion are depressed, resulting in lower osmolality and serum sodium levels. Blood pressure drops approximately 10 mmHg by the second trimester despite a gain in intravascular volume of 30% to 50%. The drop in systemic vascular resistance is multifactorial, attributed in part to insensitivity to vasoactive hormones, and leads to activation of the renin-aldosterone-angiostensin system. A rise in serum aldosterone results in a net gain of approximately 1000 mg of sodium. A parallel rise in progesterone protects the pregnant woman from hypokalemia. The kidneys increase in length and volume, and physiologic hydronephrosis occurs in up to 80% of women. This review will provide an understanding of these important changes in kidney physiology during pregnancy, which is fundamental in caring for the pregnant patient. PMID:23928384

  7. The Face of Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul White

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the relationship between the physiology of the emotions and the display of character in Victorian Britain. Charles Bell and others had begun to link certain physiological functions, such as respiration, with the expression of feelings such as fear, regarding the heart and other internal organs as instruments by which the emotions were made visible. But a purely functional account of the emotions, which emerged through the development of reflex physiology during the second half of the century, would dramatically alter the nature of feelings and the means of observing them. At the same time, instinctual or acquired sympathy, which had long underpinned the accurate reading of expressions, became a problem to be surmounted by new 'objectively'. Graphic recording instruments measuring a variety of physiological functions and used with increasing frequency in clinical diagnostics became of fundamental importance for tracing the movement of feelings during the period prior to the development of cinematography. They remained, in the form of devices such as the polygraph, a crucial and controversial means of measuring affective states, beneath the potentially deceptive surface of the body.

  8. Tailing cDNAs with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase in RT-PCR assays to identify ribozyme cleavage products.

    OpenAIRE

    Albuquerque-Silva, J; Houard, S.; Bollen, A.

    1998-01-01

    Polytailing a cDNA with terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TdT) results in the addition of a homopolymeric sequence at its 3'-end. Here we describe the use of tailing in competitive RT-PCR assays to evaluate cleavage efficiency of ribozymes. Using a system that perfectly mimics intracellular cleavage, we were able to detect as few as 1% of cleaved moieties. Furthermore, employing primers overlapping the junction between tails and the cleaved RNA moiety in non-competitive assays, the sensit...

  9. Rover waste assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched {sup 235}U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for {sup 137}Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Rover waste assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched 235U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for 137Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Avian reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the many physiological factors associated with egg production , fertility, incubation, and brooding in nondomestic birds is limited. Science knows even less about reproduction in most of the 238 endangered or threatened birds. This discussion uses studies of nondomestic and, when necessary, domestic birds to describe physiological control of reproduction. Studies of the few nondomestic avian species show large variation in physiological control of reproduction. Aviculturists, in order to successfully propagate an endangered bird, must understand the bird's reproductive peculiarities. First, investigators can do studies with carefully chosen surrogate species, but eventually they need to confirm the results in the target endangered bird. Studies of reproduction in nondomestic birds increased in the last decade. Still, scientists need to do more comparative studies to understand the mechanisms that control reproduction in birds. New technologies are making it possible to study reproductive physiology of nondomestic species in less limiting ways. These technologies include telemetry to collect information without inducing stress on captives (Howey et al., 1987; Klugman, 1987), new tests for most of the humoral factors associated with reproduction, and the skill to collect small samples and manipulate birds without disrupting the physiological mechanisms (Bercovitz et al., 1985). Managers are using knowledge from these studies to improve propagation in zoological parks, private and public propagation facilities, and research institutions. Researchers need to study the control of ovulation, egg formation, and oviposition in the species of nondomestic birds that lay very few eggs in a season, hold eggs in the oviduct for longer intervals, or differ in other ways from the more thoroughly studied domestic birds. Other techniques that would enhance propagation for nondomestlc birds include tissue culture of cloned embryonic cells, cryopreservation of embryos

  12. Genomic and physiological perspectives on bioremediation processes at the FRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, Erick; Leigh, Mary Beth; Hemme, Christopher; Gentry, Terry; Harzman, Christina; Wu, Weimin; Criddle, Craig S.; Zhou, Jizhong; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James M.

    2006-04-05

    A suite of molecular and physiological studies, including metal reduction assays, metagenomics, functional gene microarrays and community sequence analyses were applied to investigate organisms involved in bioremediation processes at the ERSP Field Research Center and to understand the effects of stress on the makeup and evolution of microbial communities to inform effective remediation strategies.

  13. Graphene–palladium nanowires based electrochemical sensor using ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}–graphene quantum dots as an effective peroxidase mimic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weiyan; Yang, Hongmei; Ma, Chao; Ding, Ya-nan [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Ge, Shenguang [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Yu, Jinghua [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Yan, Mei, E-mail: chm_yanm@126.com [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2014-12-10

    Highlights: • The nanohybrid ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs was developed by assembling the GQDs on the ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} through a photo-Fenton reaction. • The ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs exhibited higher peroxidase-like activity and better stability than each individual and HRP. • An electrochemical sensor was fabricated using ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs nanohybrid as a mimic enzymatic to detect DNA. • Graphene and Pd nanowires were modified on the glassy carbon electrode, which improved the electronic transfer rate. - Abstract: We proposed an electrochemical DNA sensor by using peroxidase-like magnetic ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}–graphene quantum dots (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs) nanohybrid as a mimic enzymatic label. Aminated graphene and Pd nanowires were successively modified on glassy carbon electrode, which improved the electronic transfer rate as well as increased the amount of immobilized capture ssDNA (S1). The nanohybrid ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs was prepared by assembling the GQDs on the surface of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} through a photo-Fenton reaction, which was not only used as a mimic enzyme but also as a carrier to label complementary ssDNA (S3). By synergistically integrating highly catalytically activity of nano-sized GQDs and ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, the nanohybrid possessed highly-efficient peroxidase-like catalytic activity which could produce a large current toward the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} for signal amplification. Thionine was used as an excellent electron mediator. Compared with traditional enzyme labels, the mimic enzyme ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs exhibited many advantages such as environment friendly and better stability. Under the optimal conditions, the approach provided a wide linear range from 10{sup −16} to 5 × 10{sup −9} M and low detection limit of 6.2 × 10{sup −17} M. The remarkable high catalytic capability could allow the nanohybrid to replace conventional peroxidase-based assay systems. The new, robust and convenient assay systems

  14. Neutral Comet Assay

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The Comet assay (or Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis assay) is a sensitive technique to detect DNA damage at the level of an individual cell. This technique is based on micro-electrophoresis of cells DNA content. Briefly, cells are embedded in agarose, lysed and submitted to an electric field, before the staining step with a fluorescent DNA binding dye. Damaged DNA (charged DNA) migrates in this field, forming the tail of a “comet”, while undamaged DNA remained in the head of the “comet”. The ...

  15. Lateral flow strip assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Robin R.; Benett, William J.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  16. Automated phantom assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes an automated phantom assay system developed for assaying phantoms spiked with minute quantities of radionuclides. The system includes a computer-controlled linear-translation table that positions the phantom at exact distances from a spectrometer. A multichannel analyzer (MCA) interfaces with a computer to collect gamma spectral data. Signals transmitted between the controller and MCA synchronize data collection and phantom positioning. Measured data are then stored on disk for subsequent analysis. The automated system allows continuous unattended operation and ensures reproducible results

  17. Evaluating minimalist mimics by exploring key orientations on secondary structures (EKOS)☟

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Dongyue; Ko, Eunhwa; Perez, Lisa M.; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Burgess, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Peptide mimics that display amino acid side-chains on semi-rigid scaffolds (not peptide polyamides) can be referred to as minimalist mimics. Accessible conformations of these scaffolds may overlay with secondary structures giving, for example, “minimalist helical mimics”. It is difficult for researchers who want to apply minimalist mimics to decide which one to use because there is no widely accepted protocol for calibrating how closely these compounds mimic secondary structures. Moreover, it is also difficult for potential practitioners to evaluate which ideal minimalist helical mimics are preferred for a particular set of side-chains. For instance, what mimic presents i, i+4, i+7 side-chains in orientations that best resemble an ideal α-helix, and is a different mimic required for a i, i+3, i+7 helical combination? This article describes a protocol for fitting each member of an array of accessible scaffold conformations on secondary structures. The protocol involves: (i) use quenched molecular dynamics (QMD) to generate an ensemble consisting of hundreds of accessible, low energy conformers of the mimics; (ii) representation of each of these as a set of Cα and Cβ coordinates corresponding to three amino acid side-chains displayed by the scaffolds;(iii) similar representation of each combination of three side-chains in each ideal secondary structure as a set of Cα and Cβ coordinates corresponding to three amino acid side-chains displayed by the scaffolds; and, (iv) overlay Cα and Cβ coordinates of all the conformers on all the sets of side-chain “triads” in the ideal secondary structures and express the goodness of fit in terms of root mean squared deviation (RMSD, Å) for each overlay. We refer to this process as Exploring Key Orientations on Secondary structures (EKOS). Application of this procedure reveals the relative bias of a scaffold to overlay on different secondary structures, the “side-chain correspondences” (eg i, i+4, i+7 or i, i+3

  18. Estimating the size of non-observed economy in Croatia using the MIMIC approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vjekoslav Klarić

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a quick overview of the approaches that have been used in the research of shadow economy, starting with the definitions of the terms “shadow economy” and “non-observed economy”, with the accent on the ISTAT/Eurostat framework. Several methods for estimating the size of the shadow economy and the non-observed economy are then presented. The emphasis is placed on the MIMIC approach, one of the methods used to estimate the size of the nonobserved economy. After a glance at the theory behind it, the MIMIC model is then applied to the Croatian economy. Considering the described characteristics of different methods, a previous estimate of the size of the non-observed economy in Croatia is chosen to provide benchmark values for the MIMIC model. Using those, the estimates of the size of non-observed economy in Croatia during the period 1998-2009 are obtained.

  19. Antimicrobial Effects of Novel Triple Antibiotic Paste–Mimic Scaffolds on Actinomyces naeslundii Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Maria T.P.; Ryan, Stuart J.; Münchow, Eliseu A.; Kamocka, Maria M.; Gregory, Richard L.; Valera, Marcia C.; Bottino, Marco C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Actinomyces naeslundii has been recovered from traumatized permanent teeth diagnosed with necrotic pulps. In this work, a triple antibiotic paste (TAP)–mimic scaffold is proposed as a drug-delivery strategy to eliminate A. naeslundii dentin biofilm. Methods Metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and minocycline were added to a polydioxanone (PDS) polymer solution and spun into fibrous scaffolds. Fiber morphology, mechanical properties, and drug release were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy, microtensile testing, and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Human dentin specimens (4 × 4 × 1 mm3, n = 4/group) were inoculated with A. naeslundii (ATCC 43146) for 7 days for biofilm formation. The infected dentin specimens were exposed to TAP-mimic scaffolds, TAP solution (positive control), and pure PDS (drug-free scaffold). Dentin infected (7-day biofilm) specimens were used for comparison (negative control). Confocal laser scanning microscopy was done to determine bacterial viability. Results Scaffolds displayed a submicron mean fiber diameter (PDS = 689 ± 312 nm and TAP-mimic = 718 ± 125 nm). Overall, TAP-mimic scaffolds showed significantly (P ≤ .040) lower mechanical properties than PDS. Within the first 24 hours, a burst release for all drugs was seen. A sustained maintenance of metronidazole and ciprofloxacin was observed over 4 weeks, but not for minocycline. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated complete elimination of all viable bacteria exposed to the TAP solution. Meanwhile, TAP-mimic scaffolds led to a significant (P < .05) reduction in the percentage of viable bacteria compared with the negative control and PDS. Conclusions Our findings suggest that TAP-mimic scaffolds hold significant potential in the eradication/elimination of bacterial biofilm, a critical step in regenerative endodontics. PMID:25917945

  20. Self-Sufficient Formaldehyde-to-Methanol Conversion by Organometallic Formaldehyde Dismutase Mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Waals, Dominic; Heim, Leo E; Vallazza, Simona; Gedig, Christian; Deska, Jan; Prechtl, Martin H G

    2016-08-01

    The catalytic networks of methylotrophic organisms, featuring redox enzymes for the activation of one-carbon moieties, can serve as great inspiration in the development of novel homogeneously catalyzed pathways for the interconversion of C1 molecules at ambient conditions. An imidazolium-tagged arene-ruthenium complex was identified as an effective functional mimic of the bacterial formaldehyde dismutase, which provides a new and highly selective route for the conversion of formaldehyde to methanol in absence of any external reducing agents. Moreover, secondary amines are reductively methylated by the organometallic dismutase mimic in a redox self-sufficient manner with formaldehyde acting both as carbon source and reducing agent. PMID:27380865

  1. Radioreceptor assay for epidermal growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An established cell line of human lung fibroblasts with a high number of surface receptors for mouse epidermal growth factor (mEGF) was used to deveop a simple and highly sensitive radioreceptor assay for EGF. 125I-Labeled mEGF competed mole for mole with unlabeled mEGF for specific receptors. Optimal range for discriminating EGF concentrations in body fluids and tissue extracts by a competitive binding assay was between 5 and 100 ng/ml. Interassay correlation of variation was 8.47% and the recovery of highly purified mEGF added to serum and urine samples was greater than 95%. Human serum and amniotic fluids contained about 24 and 4 ng/ml, respectively, of mEGF equivalents. Concentrations of mEGF in mouse urine and serum were highly variable and were 2- to 10-fold greater than that previously detected by radioimmune assay. Hypophysectomy nearly abolished submaxillary mEGF content in both male and female mice, but testosterone treatment of hypophysectomized animals restored normal concentrations of mEGF to the glands. mEGF added to culture medium disappeared with time as a function of the number of cellular EGF receptors indicating cellular degradation of the growth factor. The radioreceptor assay for EGF is based on the close biologic relationship between the cell receptor site and the native hormone and should prove to be a useful complementary tool to characterize the physiological role of EGF

  2. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis S; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  3. Instrument for assaying radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Farfan, Eduardo B.

    2016-03-22

    An instrument for assaying radiation includes a flat panel detector having a first side opposed to a second side. A collimated aperture covers at least a portion of the first side of the flat panel detector. At least one of a display screen or a radiation shield may cover at least a portion of the second side of the flat panel detector.

  4. Rosmarinic acid is a homoserine lactone mimic produced by plants that activates a bacterial quorum-sensing regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Ortega, Alvaro; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a bacterial communication mechanism that controls genes, enabling bacteria to live as communities, such as biofilms. Homoserine lactone (HSL) molecules function as quorum-sensing signals for Gram-negative bacteria. Plants also produce previously unidentified compounds that affect quorum sensing. We identified rosmarinic acid as a plant-derived compound that functioned as an HSL mimic. In vitro assays showed that rosmarinic acid bound to the quorum-sensing regulator RhlR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and competed with the bacterial ligand N-butanoyl-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL). Furthermore, rosmarinic acid stimulated a greater increase in RhlR-mediated transcription in vitro than that of C4-HSL. In P. aeruginosa, rosmarinic acid induced quorum sensing-dependent gene expression and increased biofilm formation and the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and elastase. Because P. aeruginosa PAO1 infection induces rosmarinic acid secretion from plant roots, our results indicate that rosmarinic acid secretion is a plant defense mechanism to stimulate a premature quorum-sensing response. P. aeruginosa is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects plants and animals; therefore, identification of rosmarinic acid as an inducer of premature quorum-sensing responses may be useful in agriculture and inform human therapeutic strategies. PMID:26732761

  5. Investigation of the Efficacy of Transdermal Penetration Enhancers Through the Use of Human Skin and a Skin Mimic Artificial Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, Boglárka; Vizserálek, Gábor; Berkó, Szilvia; Budai-Szűcs, Mária; Kelemen, András; Sinkó, Bálint; Takács-Novák, Krisztina; Szabó-Révész, Piroska; Csányi, Erzsébet

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of promising penetration enhancers through the use of 2 different skin test systems. Hydrogel-based transdermal formulations were developed with ibuprofen as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Transcutol and sucrose esters were used as biocompatible penetration enhancers. The permeability measurements were performed with ex vivo Franz diffusion cell methods and a newly developed Skin Parallel Artificial Membrane Permeability Assays (PAMPA) model. Franz diffusion measurement is commonly used as a research tool in studies of diffusion through synthetic membranes in vitro or penetration through ex vivo human skin, whereas Skin PAMPA involves recently published artificial membrane-based technology for the fast prediction of skin penetration. It is a 96-well plate-based model with optimized artificial membrane structure containing free fatty acid, cholesterol, and synthetic ceramide analog compounds to mimic the stratum corneum barrier function. Transdermal preparations containing 2.64% of different sucrose esters and/or Transcutol and a constant (5%) of ibuprofen were investigated to determine the effects of these penetration enhancers. The study demonstrated the good correlation of the permeability data obtained through use of human skin membrane and the in vitro Skin PAMPA system. The Skin PAMPA artificial membrane serves as quick and relatively deep tool in the early stages of transdermal delivery systems, through which the enhancing efficacy of excipients can be screened so as to facilitate the choice of effective penetration components. PMID:26886318

  6. The evolutionary pathway from a biologically inactive polypeptide sequence to a folded, active structural mimic of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanwar, Nisha; Roberts, Gareth A; Cooper, Laurie P; Stephanou, Augoustinos S; Dryden, David T F

    2016-05-19

    The protein Ocr (overcome classical restriction) from bacteriophage T7 acts as a mimic of DNA and inhibits all Type I restriction/modification (RM) enzymes. Ocr is a homodimer of 116 amino acids and adopts an elongated structure that resembles the shape of a bent 24 bp DNA molecule. Each monomer includes 34 acidic residues and only six basic residues. We have delineated the mimicry of Ocr by focusing on the electrostatic contribution of its negatively charged amino acids using directed evolution of a synthetic form of Ocr, termed pocr, in which all of the 34 acidic residues were substituted for a neutral amino acid. In vivo analyses confirmed that pocr did not display any antirestriction activity. Here, we have subjected the gene encoding pocr to several rounds of directed evolution in which codons for the corresponding acidic residues found in Ocr were specifically re-introduced. An in vivo selection assay was used to detect antirestriction activity after each round of mutation. Our results demonstrate the variation in importance of the acidic residues in regions of Ocr corresponding to different parts of the DNA target which it is mimicking and for the avoidance of deleterious effects on the growth of the host. PMID:27095198

  7. The Matrigel Cytokine Assay

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Ole Audun Haabeth, Bjarne Bogen & Alexandre Corthay ### Abstract Cytokines represent a diverse group of soluble proteins that play a key role in a number of physiological processes, including regulation of both the innate and adaptive immune responses. Cytokines are generally secreted in small amounts, and are relatively unstable. Therefore, detection and measurement of cytokine local concentrations in a tissue extracellular matrix can be challenging. To investigate cytok...

  8. PHYSIOLOGIC PATTERNS OF SLEEP ON EEG, MASKING OF EPILEPTIFORM ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yu. Glukhova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiologic patterns of sleep on EEG can sometimes be similar to epileptiform activity and even to the EEG pattern of epileptic seizures, but they have no connection to epilepsy and their incorrect interpretation may lead to overdiagnosis of epilepsy. These sleep patterns include vertex transients, K-complexes, hypnagogic hypersynchrony, 14 and 6 Hz positive bursts, wicket-potentials, etc. The main distinctive features of acute physiological phenomena of sleep unlike epileptiform activity are stereotyped, monomorphic morphology of waves, which frequently has rhythmic, arcuate pattern, often with change of lateralization, mainly dominated in the first stages of sleep (N1-N2, with their reduction in the deeper stages and transition to delta sleep (N3. The correct interpretation of physiological sharp-wave phenomena of sleep on EEG requires considerable training and experience of the physician. Our review includes a variety of physiological sleep patterns, which can mimic epileptiform activity on EEG, their criteria of diagnostic with demonstration of own illustrations of EEG.

  9. A novel nitrogen-dependent gene associates with the lesion mimic trait in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesion mimic (LM) refers to hypersensitive reaction-like (HRL) symptoms that appears on leaf tissue in the absence of plant pathogens. In a wheat line P7001, LM showed up on the leaves under the 0 g nitrogen (N) treatment, but disappeared when sufficient N was supplied, suggesting that LM is N-respo...

  10. The role of the hipermobile mimic muscules of midle face on the postrhinoplastic results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayk D. Yenokyan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In article questions of influence of mimic muscles on the remote results ринопластических operations are considered. Use Botox (botulotoxin type A for improvement of results rhinoplasties.

  11. Multifunctional and stable bone mimic proteinaceous matrix for bone tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Won, J. E.; Yun, Y. R.; Jang, J. H.; S. H. Yang; Kim, J. H.; W. Chrzanowski; Wall, I. B.; Knowles, J. C.; Kim, H. W.

    2015-01-01

    Biomaterial surface design with biomimetic proteins holds great promise for successful regeneration of tissues including bone. Here we report a novel proteinaceous hybrid matrix mimicking bone extracellular matrix that has multifunctional capacity to promote stem cell adhesion and osteogenesis with excellent stability. Osteocalcin-fibronectin fusion protein holding collagen binding domain was networked with fibrillar collagen, featuring bone extracellular matrix mimic, to provide multifunctio...

  12. Unleashing a “True” pSer-Mimic in the Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Panigrahi, Kaushik; Nelson, David L.; Berkowitz, David B.

    2012-01-01

    In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Arrendale and coworkers demonstrate a new prodrug strategy for intracellular delivery of an α, α-(difluoromethylene)phosphonate phosphoserine mimic. The deprotected pseudo-phosphopeptide releases the pro-apoptotic FOXO3a-transcription factor from its 14-3-3-adaptor protein complex, resulting in leukemic cell death.

  13. Unmasking Hyperthyroidism in the Elderly: How to distinguish hyperthyroidism from conditions that mimic the symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Michael; Isenberg, Yoel; Bain, Jerald

    1992-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism in the elderly can mimic symptoms suggestive of aging or concomitant illnesses. The disease can cause serious problems and disabilities in older individuals. A strong sense of suspicion, the appropriate use of screening tests, and, when indicated, more definitive investigations usually results in the accurate diagnosis of a condition for which there is effective treatment.

  14. Dual isotope assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dual isotope assays for thyroid function are performed by carrying out a radio-immunoassay for two of thyroxine (T4), tri-iodothyronine (T3), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroxine binding globulin (TBG), by a method wherein a version of one of the thyroid components, preferably T4 or T3 is labelled with Selenium-75 and the version of the other thyroid component is labelled with a different radionuclide, preferably Iodine-125. (author)

  15. Automated uranium assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise, timely inventories of enriched uranium stocks are vital to help prevent the loss, theft, or diversion of this material for illicit use. A wet-chemistry analyzer has been developed at LLL to assist in these inventories by performing automated analyses of uranium samples from different stages in the nuclear fuel cycle. These assays offer improved accuracy, reduced costs, significant savings in manpower, and lower radiation exposure for personnel compared with present techniques

  16. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler; Huffnagle, Ian; Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 μg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 μg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  17. Radioisotopic techniques for the study of reproductive physiology in domestic animals: 2. Physiological implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopic techniques have been important for studying endocrinological reproductive function in domestic animals. Normal physiological events in which hormone determination has been useful for elucidation of basic concepts include the ovulatory process, cyclic regression of the corpus luteum, hormone requirements for the manifestation of sexual receptivity, establishment of pregnancy and the termination of gestation (parturition). Hormone assays have been useful for understanding the mechanism by which intra-uterine infusion and/or prostaglandin administration in both the cow and the mare shortens the oestrus cycle, namely, through the initiation of regression of the corpus luteum. Endocrine assay has also been valuable in understanding the physiology of premature parturition (abortion), as well as the abnormal prolongation of gestation. Practical uses for hormone assays include the identification of prolonged luteal syndromes such as occur in the mare, cyclic ovarian activity in the absence of sexual receptivity, and follicular or luteal cysts as well as the determination of pregnancy (progesterone in milk or blood) about three weeks post-breeding. (author)

  18. Conservation physiology of marine fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian; Peck, Myron A.; Antognarelli, Fabio;

    2012-01-01

    At the end of May, 17 scientists involved in an EU COST Action on Conservation Physiology of Marine Fishes met in Oristano, Sardinia, to discuss how physiology can be better used in modelling tools to aid in management of marine ecosystems. Current modelling approaches incorporate physiology to...

  19. Disagreement between Human Papillomavirus Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Preisler, Sarah; Ejegod, Ditte Møller;

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the disagreement in primary cervical screening between four human papillomavirus assays: Hybrid Capture 2, cobas, CLART, and APTIMA. Material from 5,064 SurePath samples of women participating in routine cervical screening in Copenhagen, Denmark, was tested with the four...... assays. Positive agreement between the assays was measured as the conditional probability that the results of all compared assays were positive given that at least one assay returned a positive result. Of all 5,064 samples, 1,679 (33.2%) tested positive on at least one of the assays. Among these, 41......-65 years (n = 2,881), 23% tested positive on at least one assay, and 42 to 58% of these showed positive agreement on any compared pair of the assays. While 4% of primary screening samples showed abnormal cytology, 6 to 10% were discordant on any pair of assays. A literature review corroborated our findings...

  20. The emergence of Applied Physiology within the discipline of Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Charles M

    2016-08-01

    Despite the availability and utilization of the physiology textbooks authored by Albrecht von Haller during the 18th century that heralded the modern age of physiology, not all physicians or physiologists were satisfied with its presentation, contents, or application to medicine. Initial reasons were fundamental disagreements between the "mechanists," represented by Boerhaave, Robinson, and von Haller, and the "vitalists," represented by the faculty and graduates of the Montpellier School of Medicine in France, notably, Bordeu and Barthez. Subsequently, objections originated from Europe, United Kingdom, and the United States in publications that focused not only on the teaching of physiology to medical and secondary students, but on the specific applications of the content of physiology to medicine, health, hygiene, pathology, and chronic diseases. At the turn of the 20th century, texts began to appear with applied physiology in their titles and in 1926, physician Samson Wright published a textbook entitled Applied Physiology that was intended for both medical students and the medical profession. Eleven years later, physicians Best and Taylor published The Physiological Basis of Medical Practice: A University of Toronto Texbook in Applied Physiology Although both sets of authors defined the connection between applied physiology and physiology, they failed to define the areas of physiology that were included within applied physiology. This was accomplished by the American Physiological Society (APS) Publications Committee in 1948 with the publication of the Journal of Appplied Physiology, that stated the word "applied" would broadly denote human physiology whereas the terms stress and environment would broadly include work, exercise, plus industrial, climatic and social factors. NIH established a study section (SS) devoted to applied physiology in 1964 which remained active until 2001 when it became amalgamated into other SSs. Before the end of the 20th century when

  1. In Silico Modeling of Gastrointestinal Drug Absorption: Predictive Performance of Three Physiologically Based Absorption Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Erik; Thörn, Helena; Tannergren, Christer

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) drug absorption is a complex process determined by formulation, physicochemical and biopharmaceutical factors, and GI physiology. Physiologically based in silico absorption models have emerged as a widely used and promising supplement to traditional in vitro assays and preclinical in vivo studies. However, there remains a lack of comparative studies between different models. The aim of this study was to explore the strengths and limitations of the in silico absorption models Simcyp 13.1, GastroPlus 8.0, and GI-Sim 4.1, with respect to their performance in predicting human intestinal drug absorption. This was achieved by adopting an a priori modeling approach and using well-defined input data for 12 drugs associated with incomplete GI absorption and related challenges in predicting the extent of absorption. This approach better mimics the real situation during formulation development where predictive in silico models would be beneficial. Plasma concentration-time profiles for 44 oral drug administrations were calculated by convolution of model-predicted absorption-time profiles and reported pharmacokinetic parameters. Model performance was evaluated by comparing the predicted plasma concentration-time profiles, Cmax, tmax, and exposure (AUC) with observations from clinical studies. The overall prediction accuracies for AUC, given as the absolute average fold error (AAFE) values, were 2.2, 1.6, and 1.3 for Simcyp, GastroPlus, and GI-Sim, respectively. The corresponding AAFE values for Cmax were 2.2, 1.6, and 1.3, respectively, and those for tmax were 1.7, 1.5, and 1.4, respectively. Simcyp was associated with underprediction of AUC and Cmax; the accuracy decreased with decreasing predicted fabs. A tendency for underprediction was also observed for GastroPlus, but there was no correlation with predicted fabs. There were no obvious trends for over- or underprediction for GI-Sim. The models performed similarly in capturing dependencies on dose and

  2. A robust electrochemiluminescence immunoassay for carcinoembryonic antigen detection based on a microtiter plate as a bridge and Au@Pd nanorods as a peroxidase mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Pang, Xuehui; Wu, Dan; Ma, Hongmin; Yan, Zhaoqing; Zhang, Jiatao; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    The common drawbacks of most traditional electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunoassays are the strict storage conditions for the ECL electrode and the steric hindrance caused by bovine serum albumin and antigen. The strict storage conditions require that the modified electrode must be stored at 4 °C before measurement, which may cause the degradation of protein molecules and low reproducibility as the time goes by. The steric hindrance can hinder electron transfer between the electrode and the electrochemical active substance unable to transmit proteins on the electrode surface. The current study takes a 96-well microtiter plate (MTP) as a bridge for analyte pre-treatment and Au@Pd nanorods as a peroxidase mimic to assemble a simple and robust ECL immunoassay. Advantages of such assay include not only high sensitivity but also robust detection circumstance. We demonstrated the method by detecting carcinoembryonic antigen from human serum and obtained a good detection limit of 3 fg mL(-1). PMID:26609799

  3. Addressing the Glycine-Rich Loop of Protein Kinases by a Multi-Facetted Interaction Network: Inhibition of PKA and a PKB Mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, Birgit S; Hardegger, Leo A; Asraful, Alam K; Lund, Bjarte A; Dumele, Oliver; Harder, Michael; Kuhn, Bernd; Engh, Richard A; Diederich, François

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases continue to be hot targets in drug discovery research, as they are involved in many essential cellular processes and their deregulation can lead to a variety of diseases. A series of 32 enantiomerically pure inhibitors was synthesized and tested towards protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase B mimic PKAB3 (PKA triple mutant). The ligands bind to the hinge region, ribose pocket, and glycine-rich loop at the ATP site. Biological assays showed high potency against PKA, with Ki values in the low nanomolar range. The investigation demonstrates the significance of targeting the often neglected glycine-rich loop for gaining high binding potency. X-ray co-crystal structures revealed a multi-facetted network of ligand-loop interactions for the tightest binders, involving orthogonal dipolar contacts, sulfur and other dispersive contacts, amide-π stacking, and H-bonding to organofluorine, besides efficient water replacement. The network was analyzed in a computational approach. PMID:26578105

  4. Vasogenic shock physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiria Gkisioti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sotiria Gkisioti, Spyros D MentzelopoulosDepartment of Intensive Care Medicine, University of Athens Medical School, Evaggelismos General Hospital, Athens, GreeceAbstract: Shock means inadequate tissue perfusion by oxygen-carrying blood. In vasogenic shock, this circulatory failure results from vasodilation and/or vasoplegia. There is vascular hyporeactivity with reduced vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to α1 adrenergic agonists. Considering vasogenic shock, one can understand its utmost importance, not only because of its association with sepsis but also because it can be the common final pathway for long-lasting, severe shock of any cause, even postresuscitation states. The effective management of any patient in shock requires the understanding of its underlying physiology and pathophysiology. Recent studies have provided new insights into vascular physiology by revealing the interaction of rather complicated and multifactorial mechanisms, which have not been fully elucidated yet. Some of these mechanisms, such as the induction of nitric oxide synthases, the activation of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels, and vasopressin deficiency, have gained general acceptance and are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of vasodilatory shock. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the pathogenesis of vasogenic shock.Keywords: nitric oxide synthases, KATP channels, vasopressin, H2S, vasoplegic syndrome

  5. Amphiphilic polymeric micelles as microreactors: improving the photocatalytic hydrogen production of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase mimic in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Wen, Min; Feng, Ke; Liang, Wen-Jing; Li, Xu-Bing; Chen, Bin; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2016-01-11

    An amphiphilic polymeric micelle is utilized as a microreactor to load a hydrophobic [FeFe]-hydrogenase mimic in water. The local concentration enhancement and strong interaction between the mimic and the photosensitizer as well as the water-mediated fast proton migration caused by the microreactor improve photocatalytic hydrogen production remarkably in water. PMID:26442776

  6. Synthetic surfactant containing SP-B and SP-C mimics is superior to single-peptide formulations in rabbits with chemical acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Frans J; Hernández-Juviel, José M; Gordon, Larry M; Waring, Alan J

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chemical spills are on the rise and inhalation of toxic chemicals may induce chemical acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Although the pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS is well understood, the absence of specific antidotes has limited the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Objectives. Surfactant inactivation and formation of free radicals are important pathways in (chemical) ALI. We tested the potential of lipid mixtures with advanced surfactant protein B and C (SP-B and C) mimics to improve oxygenation and lung compliance in rabbits with lavage- and chemical-induced ALI/ARDS. Methods. Ventilated young adult rabbits underwent repeated saline lung lavages or underwent intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid to induce ALI/ARDS. After establishment of respiratory failure rabbits were treated with a single intratracheal dose of 100 mg/kg of synthetic surfactant composed of 3% Super Mini-B (S-MB), a SP-B mimic, and/or SP-C33 UCLA, a SP-C mimic, in a lipid mixture (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight), the clinical surfactant Infasurf(®), a bovine lung lavage extract with SP-B and C, or synthetic lipids alone. End-points consisted of arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance, and protein and lipid content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Potential mechanism of surfactant action for S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA were investigated with captive bubble surfactometry (CBS) assays. Results. All three surfactant peptide/lipid mixtures and Infasurf equally lowered the minimum surface tension on CBS, and also improved oxygenation and lung compliance. In both animal models, the two-peptide synthetic surfactant with S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA led to better arterial oxygenation and lung compliance than single peptide synthetic surfactants and Infasurf. Synthetic surfactants and Infasurf improved lung function further in lavage- than in chemical-induced respiratory failure, with the difference probably due to greater capillary-alveolar protein

  7. Synthetic surfactant containing SP-B and SP-C mimics is superior to single-peptide formulations in rabbits with chemical acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans J. Walther

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chemical spills are on the rise and inhalation of toxic chemicals may induce chemical acute lung injury (ALI/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Although the pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS is well understood, the absence of specific antidotes has limited the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Objectives. Surfactant inactivation and formation of free radicals are important pathways in (chemical ALI. We tested the potential of lipid mixtures with advanced surfactant protein B and C (SP-B and C mimics to improve oxygenation and lung compliance in rabbits with lavage- and chemical-induced ALI/ARDS. Methods. Ventilated young adult rabbits underwent repeated saline lung lavages or underwent intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid to induce ALI/ARDS. After establishment of respiratory failure rabbits were treated with a single intratracheal dose of 100 mg/kg of synthetic surfactant composed of 3% Super Mini-B (S-MB, a SP-B mimic, and/or SP-C33 UCLA, a SP-C mimic, in a lipid mixture (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight, the clinical surfactant Infasurf®, a bovine lung lavage extract with SP-B and C, or synthetic lipids alone. End-points consisted of arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance, and protein and lipid content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Potential mechanism of surfactant action for S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA were investigated with captive bubble surfactometry (CBS assays. Results. All three surfactant peptide/lipid mixtures and Infasurf equally lowered the minimum surface tension on CBS, and also improved oxygenation and lung compliance. In both animal models, the two-peptide synthetic surfactant with S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA led to better arterial oxygenation and lung compliance than single peptide synthetic surfactants and Infasurf. Synthetic surfactants and Infasurf improved lung function further in lavage- than in chemical-induced respiratory failure, with the difference probably due to greater capillary

  8. Radiorespirometic assay device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiorespirometic assay device is described in which the presence of microorganisms in a sample is determined by placing the sample in contact with a metabolisable radioactive labelled substrate, collecting any gas evolved, exposing a photosensitive material to the gas and determining if a spot is produced on the material. A spot indicates the presence of radioactivity showing that the substrate has been metabolized by a microorganism. Bacteria may be detected in body fluids, hospital operating rooms, water, food, cosmetics and drugs. (U.K.)

  9. Radon assay for SNO+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+

  10. Radon assay for SNO+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumleskie, Janet [Laurentian University, Greater Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  11. Network Physiology reveals relations between network topology and physiological function

    CERN Document Server

    Bashan, Amir; Kantelhardt, Jan W; Havlin, Shlomo; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; 10.1038/ncomms1705

    2012-01-01

    The human organism is an integrated network where complex physiologic systems, each with its own regulatory mechanisms, continuously interact, and where failure of one system can trigger a breakdown of the entire network. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse systems with different types of interactions is a challenge. Here, we develop a framework to probe interactions among diverse systems, and we identify a physiologic network. We find that each physiologic state is characterized by a specific network structure, demonstrating a robust interplay between network topology and function. Across physiologic states the network undergoes topological transitions associated with fast reorganization of physiologic interactions on time scales of a few minutes, indicating high network flexibility in response to perturbations. The proposed system-wide integrative approach may facilitate the development of a new field, Network Physiology.

  12. Physiology for engineers applying engineering methods to physiological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chappell, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to qualitative and quantitative aspects of human physiology. It looks at biological and physiological processes and phenomena, including a selection of mathematical models, showing how physiological problems can be mathematically formulated and studied. It also illustrates how a wide range of engineering and physics topics, including electronics, fluid dynamics, solid mechanics and control theory can be used to describe and understand physiological processes and systems. Throughout the text there are introductions to measuring and quantifying physiological processes using both signal and imaging technologies. Physiology for Engineers describes the basic structure and models of cellular systems, the structure and function of the cardiovascular system, the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart and provides an overview of the structure and function of the respiratory and nervous systems. It also includes an introduction to the basic concepts and applications of reacti...

  13. Canberra waste assay systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canberra Industries, Inc. (USA) offers complete solutions and turnkey systems for qualifying and quantifying drums of radioactive waste. Different Waste Assay Systems are available for low-, medium-, and high activity barrels. Such systems scan the segments of the drums. The gamma-emitting nuclides present in the radioactive waste are identified from the spectra of the gamma-rays emitted and their activities are quantified. The spectrum of each segment of the waste container is analysed separately and the results are summed for total drum inventory reporting. The Waste Assay specific Canberra software is an easy-to-use menu driven program. It offers automatic procedures for routine work but interactive mode is also available to investigate particular cases. The way of analysis and the format and contents of the report can be customized. Additional Quality Control program module monitors system parameters. The measured and calculated values of each waste container are saved into a relational database. Canberra offers mathematical efficiency calibration services for different drum types, with different waste densities and different activities. This new theoretical approach of efficiency calibration eliminates the need of calibration drums, thus saving costs. For field applications Canberra developed a portable In-Situ Object Counting System. This system determines efficiency calibration for any kind of objects after the user enters its size and density, furthermore the type of shielding and the distance between the detector and the object. (author)

  14. Mouse models rarely mimic the transcriptome of human neurodegenerative diseases: A systematic bioinformatics-based critique of preclinical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Terry C; Li, Matthew D; Mehta, Swapnil; Awad, Ahmed J; Morgan, Alexander A

    2015-07-15

    Translational research for neurodegenerative disease depends intimately upon animal models. Unfortunately, promising therapies developed using mouse models mostly fail in clinical trials, highlighting uncertainty about how well mouse models mimic human neurodegenerative disease at the molecular level. We compared the transcriptional signature of neurodegeneration in mouse models of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD), Parkinson׳s disease (PD), Huntington׳s disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to human disease. In contrast to aging, which demonstrated a conserved transcriptome between humans and mice, only 3 of 19 animal models showed significant enrichment for gene sets comprising the most dysregulated up- and down-regulated human genes. Spearman׳s correlation analysis revealed even healthy human aging to be more closely related to human neurodegeneration than any mouse model of AD, PD, ALS or HD. Remarkably, mouse models frequently upregulated stress response genes that were consistently downregulated in human diseases. Among potential alternate models of neurodegeneration, mouse prion disease outperformed all other disease-specific models. Even among the best available animal models, conserved differences between mouse and human transcriptomes were found across multiple animal model versus human disease comparisons, surprisingly, even including aging. Relative to mouse models, mouse disease signatures demonstrated consistent trends toward preserved mitochondrial function protein catabolism, DNA repair responses, and chromatin maintenance. These findings suggest a more complex and multifactorial pathophysiology in human neurodegeneration than is captured through standard animal models, and suggest that even among conserved physiological processes such as aging, mice are less prone to exhibit neurodegeneration-like changes. This work may help explain the poor track record of mouse-based translational therapies for neurodegeneration and provides a path

  15. Loss of a neural AMP-activated kinase mimics the effects of elevated serotonin on fat, movement, and hormonal secretions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Cunningham

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is an evolutionarily conserved master regulator of metabolism and a therapeutic target in type 2 diabetes. As an energy sensor, AMPK activity is responsive to both metabolic inputs, for instance the ratio of AMP to ATP, and numerous hormonal cues. As in mammals, each of two genes, aak-1 and aak-2, encode for the catalytic subunit of AMPK in C. elegans. Here we show that in C. elegans loss of aak-2 mimics the effects of elevated serotonin signaling on fat reduction, slowed movement, and promoting exit from dauer arrest. Reconstitution of aak-2 in only the nervous system restored wild type fat levels and movement rate to aak-2 mutants and reconstitution in only the ASI neurons was sufficient to significantly restore dauer maintenance to the mutant animals. As in elevated serotonin signaling, inactivation of AAK-2 in the ASI neurons caused enhanced secretion of dense core vesicles from these neurons. The ASI neurons are the site of production of the DAF-7 TGF-β ligand and the DAF-28 insulin, both of which are secreted by dense core vesicles and play critical roles in whether animals stay in dauer or undergo reproductive development. These findings show that elevated levels of serotonin promote enhanced secretions of systemic regulators of pro-growth and differentiation pathways through inactivation of AAK-2. As such, AMPK is not only a recipient of hormonal signals but can also be an upstream regulator. Our data suggest that some of the physiological phenotypes previously attributed to peripheral AAK-2 activity on metabolic targets may instead be due to the role of this kinase in neural serotonin signaling.

  16. [Physiological behavior of Cantilever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeldman, I; Frugone, R; Vládilo, N T

    1990-11-01

    The prosthetic rehabilitation is common of the integral treatment of patients that integral treatment of patients that have lost one or several dental pieces as a consequence of periodontal diseases. It has been demonstrated that plural fixed prothesis to extention, plovide a distribution pattern and magnitude of favourable forces to the periodontal during the different functions of the stomathologic apparatus, that justify rehabilitation based to it patients periodontically affected. The physiological behaviour of cantilever was basically analized on report on different investigation studies performed on patients periodontically diminis hed treated with plural fixed prothesis of crossed are with two unit or bilateral vear cantilever units, dento supported or fixed in place on implants. It is important to emphasize that favourable results previously analized in base to this type of rehabilitation in its different varieties have been obtained through record done on patients in which considerations of indications, design and occlusion stability have been optimized. PMID:2075270

  17. Home geriatric physiological measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an ageing society, the elderly can be monitored with numerous physiological, physical and passive devices. Sensors can be installed in the home for continuous mobility assistance and unobtrusive disease prevention. This review presents several modern sensors, which improve the quality of life and assist the elderly, disabled people and their caregivers. The main concept of geriatric sensors is that they are capable of providing assistance without limiting or disturbing the subject's daily routine, giving him or her greater comfort, pleasure and well-being. Furthermore, this review includes associated technologies of wearable/implantable monitoring systems and the ‘smart-house’ project. This review concludes by discussing future challenges of the future aged society. (topical review)

  18. [The physiology of erection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hora, M; Vozeh, F

    1997-06-12

    The majority of contemporary knowledge on the physiology of erection was assembled during the past thirty years. Today we consider erection as a multifactorial process. Mechanically it can be compared to an electromechanically controlled hydraulic system. Its function is conditioned by a number of mutually coordinated processes. As to nervous processes they include autonomous (parasympathetic and sympathetic) innervation, as well as somatic innervation (sensory and motor pathways). The control function is exerted by spinal as well as cerebral centres. As to mediators, in particular acetylcholine, nitrous oxide (NO) released from the endothelium are involved, noradrenaline, VIP (vasoactive intestinal polypeptide), CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide) and prostaglandins. The most important roles in the phase of erection are played by nitrous oxide and VIP. Erection can be either reflex erection, psychogenic or nocturnal or morning. It usually takes place in six stages (at rest, latent, the tumescence stage, complete erection, rigid erection and subsequently the stage of detumescence). Except for neurohumoral mechanisms an essential prerequisite for the development of erection are the arterial supply of the genital and the so-called venoocclusive mechanism. Erection takes the following course (simplified): erotogenic stimuli lead to the stimulation of the parasympathetic nerve-->vasodilating substances are released-->the s inusoids are filled with blood (tumescence stage)-->the venoocclusive mechanism starts to work: thus complete erection occurs. Then the contractions of the musculature of the perineum compress the proximal portions of the corpora cavernosa: this leads to rigid erection. Detumescence which occurs as a rule after ejaculation) is due to released noradrenaline (active stage) and the reduced tonus of the smooth muscles of the blood vessels (released endothelin and neuropeptide Y). Knowledge of the physiological mechanisms of erection made clinical

  19. Adding a Lysine Mimic in the Design of Potent Inhibitors of Histone Lysine Methyltransferases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yanqi; Ganesh, Thota; Horton, John R.; Spannhoff, Astrid; Liu, Jin; Sun, Aiming; Zhang, Xing; Bedford, Mark T.; Shinkai, Yoichi; Snyder, James P.; Cheng, Xiaodong (Emory); (Kyoto); (Texas)

    2010-07-19

    Dynamic histone lysine methylation involves the activities of modifying enzymes (writers), enzymes removing modifications (erasers), and readers of the histone code. One common feature of these activities is the recognition of lysines in methylated and unmethylated states, whether they are substrates, reaction products, or binding partners. We applied the concept of adding a lysine mimic to an established inhibitor (BIX-01294) of histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferases G9a and G9a-like protein by including a 5-aminopentyloxy moiety, which is inserted into the target lysine-binding channel and becomes methylated by G9a-like protein, albeit slowly. The compound enhances its potency in vitro and reduces cell toxicity in vivo. We suggest that adding a lysine or methyl-lysine mimic should be considered in the design of small-molecule inhibitors for other methyl-lysine writers, erasers, and readers.

  20. Recent advances in design, synthesis and bioactivity of paclitaxel-mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guan; Qu, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Dan; Chen, Xing-Xiu; Tian, Xin-Chuan; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Xian-Li

    2016-04-01

    Taxane-type anticancer drugs, including paclitaxel and its semi-synthetic derivatives docetaxel and cabazitaxel, are widely applied to chemotherapy of malignancy like breast cancer, ovarian cancer, non-small cell lung cancer and prostate cancer. However, their clinical applications are generally limited by scarce natural resources, various side effects and multidrug resistance. Therefore, it is significant to develop paclitaxel-mimics with simplified structure, fewer side effects and improved pharmaceutical properties. Based on our investigation on chemistry of paclitaxel, the current review summarized the most recent advances in the design, synthesis and biological activities of paclitaxel-mimics, which could be appealing to researchers in the field of medicinal chemistry and oncology. Meanwhile, smart design, interesting synthesis and potential bioactivities of these novel compounds may also provide valuable reference for the wider scientific communities. PMID:26906104

  1. Analysis of Air Pollution Impact Factors in China: A MIMIC Modeling Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Gao; Lei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the impact factors on air pollution in terms of CO2, SO2 and NOx emissions simultaneously in China and compare changes in air pollution across provinces from 1998 to 2011 using a Multiple Indicators and Multiple Causes Model (MIMIC) within a Structural Equation Model (SEM) framework. Our findings reveal that GDP per capita and total population have the largest impacts on air pollution, followed by energy intensity, foreign direct investment, population density, a...

  2. Construction of collagen scaffolds that mimic the three-dimensional architecture of specific tissues.

    OpenAIRE

    Faraj, K.A.; Kuppevelt, A. H. M. S. M.; Daamen, W.F.

    2007-01-01

    Every tissue and organ has its own 3-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrix (ECM) organization. Cells in a 3D bioscaffold for tissue engineering typically align new ECM components according to the bioscaffold provided. Therefore, scaffolds with a specific 3D structural design resembling the actual ECM of a particular tissue may have great potential in tissue engineering. Here, we show that, using specific freezing regimes, 3D scaffolds that mimic the 3D architecture of specific tissues can be ...

  3. The Design of In Vitro Liver Sinusoid Mimics Using Chitosan–Hyaluronic Acid Polyelectrolyte Multilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yeonhee; Larkin, Adam L.; Davis, Richey M.; Rajagopalan, Padmavathy

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between hepatocytes and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) are essential for the development and maintenance of hepatic phenotypic functions. We report the assembly of three-dimensional liver sinusoidal mimics comprised of primary rat hepatocytes, LSECs, and an intermediate chitosan–hyaluronic acid polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM). The height of the PEMs ranged from 30 to 55 nm and exhibited a shear modulus of ∼100 kPa. Hepatocyte–PEM cellular constructs exhibited stable ...

  4. An Intraductal Human-in-mouse Transplantation Model Mimics the Subtypes of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ

    OpenAIRE

    Behbod, Fariba; Kittrell, Frances S; LaMarca, Heather; Kerbawy, Sofia; Heestand, Jessica C; Young, Evelin; Mukhopadhyay, Purna; Yeh, Hung-Wen; Allred, D. Craig; Medina, Daniel; Edwards, David; Hu, Min; Polyak, Kornelia; Rosen, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Human models of noninvasive breast tumors are limited, and the existing in vivo models do not mimic inter- and intratumoral heterogeneity. Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is the most common type (80%) of noninvasive breast lesions. The aim of this study was to develop an in vivo model whereby the natural progression of human DCIS might be reproduced and studied. To accomplish this goal, the intraductal human-in-mouse (HIM) transplantation model was developed. The resulting model...

  5. Race-Related Cognitive Test Bias in the ACTIVE Study: A MIMIC Model Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Aiken Morgan, Adrienne T.; Marsiske, Michael; Dzierzewski, Joseph; Jones, Richard N.; Whitfield, Keith E.; Johnson, Kathy E.; Cresci, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated evidence for race-related test bias in cognitive measures used in the baseline assessment of the ACTIVE clinical trial. Test bias against African Americans has been documented in both cognitive aging and early lifespan studies. Despite significant mean performance differences, Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes (MIMIC) models suggested most differences were at the construct level. There was little evidence that specific measures put either group at particular a...

  6. Independent monitor unit calculation for intensity modulated radiotherapy using the MIMiC multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A self-consistent monitor unit (MU) and isocenter point-dose calculation method has been developed that provides an independent verification of the MU for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using the MIMiC (Nomos Corporation) multileaf collimator. The method takes into account two unique features of IMRT using the MIMiC: namely the gantry-dynamic arc delivery of intensity modulated photon beams and the slice-by-slice dose delivery for large tumor volumes. The method converts the nonuniform beam intensity planned at discrete gantry angles of 5 deg. or 10 deg. into conventional nonmodulated beam intensity apertures of elemental arc segments of 1 deg. This approach more closely simulates the actual gantry-dynamic arc delivery by MIMiC. Because each elemental arc segment is of uniform intensity, the MU calculation for an IMRT arc is made equivalent to a conventional arc with gantry-angle dependent beam apertures. The dose to the isocenter from each 1 deg. elemental arc segment is calculated by using the Clarkson scatter summation technique based on measured tissue-maximum-ratio and output factors, independent of the dose calculation model used in the IMRT planning system. For treatments requiring multiple treatment slices, the MU for the arc at each treatment slice takes into account the MU, leakage and scatter doses from other slices. This is achieved by solving a set of coupled linear equations for the MUs of all involved treatment slices. All input dosimetry data for the independent MU/isocenter point-dose calculation are measured directly. Comparison of the MU and isocenter point dose calculated by the independent program to those calculated by the Corvus planning system and to direct measurements has shown good agreement with relative difference less than ±3%. The program can be used as an independent initial MU verification for IMRT plans using the MIMiC multileaf collimators

  7. Pattern Differences of Small Hand Muscle Atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Mimic Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Fang; Ming-Sheng Liu; Yu-Zhou Guan; Hua Du; Ben-Hong Li; Bo Cui; Qing-Yun Ding

    2016-01-01

    Background:Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and some mimic disorders,such as distal-type cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA),Hirayama disease (HD),and spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) may present with intrinsic hand muscle atrophy.This study aimed to investigate different patterns of small hand muscle involvement in ALS and some mimic disorders.Methods:We compared the abductor digiti minimi/abductor pollicis brevis (ADM/APB) compound muscle action potential (CMAP) ratios between 200 ALS patients,95 patients with distal-type CSA,88 HD patients,43 SBMA patients,and 150 normal controls.Results:The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly higher in the ALS patients (P < 0.001) than that in the normal controls.The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly reduced in the patients with distal-type CSA (P < 0.001) and the HD patients (P < 0.001) compared with that in the normal controls.The patients with distal-type CSA had significantly lower APB CMAP amplitude than the HD patients (P =0.004).The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio was significantly lower in the HD patients (P < 0.001) than that in the patients with distal-type CSA.The ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio of the SBMA patients was similar to that of the normal controls (P =0.862).An absent APB CMAP and an abnormally high ADM/APB CMAP amplitude ratio (>4.5) were observed exclusively in the ALS patients.Conclusions:The different patterns of small hand muscle atrophy between the ALS patients and the patients with mimic disorders presumably reflect distinct pathophysiological mechanisms underlying different disorders,and may aid in distinguishing between ALS and mimic disorders.

  8. A scale-down mimic for mapping the process performance of centrifugation, depth and sterile filtration

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, A; Kenty, B.; Mollet, M.; Hwang, K.; S Rose; Goldrick, S.; Bender, J; Farid, S. S.; Titchener-Hooker, N.

    2016-01-01

    In the production of biopharmaceuticals disk-stack centrifugation is widely used as a harvest step for the removal of cells and cellular debris. Depth filters followed by sterile filters are often then employed to remove residual solids remaining in the centrate. Process development of centrifugation is usually conducted at pilot-scale so as to mimic the commercial scale equipment but this method requires large quantities of cell culture and significant levels of effort for successful charact...

  9. Reproducing a Prospective Clinical Study as a Computational Retrospective Study in MIMIC-II

    OpenAIRE

    Kury, Fabrício S. P.; Huser, Vojtech; Cimino, James J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we sought to reproduce, as a computational retrospective study in an EHR database (MIMIC-II), a recent large prospective clinical study: the 2013 publication, by the Japanese Association for Acute Medicine (JAAM), about disseminated intravascular coagulation, in the journal Critical Care (PMID: 23787004). We designed in SQL and Java a set of electronic phenotypes that reproduced the study’s data sampling, and used R to perform the same statistical inference procedures. All produ...

  10. The impact of the U.S. MIMIC program on MMIC technology and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Eliot D.

    1994-01-01

    The primary objective of the U.S. Department of Defense Microwave and Millimeter Wave Monolithic Integrated Circuits (MIMIC) program is the development of high performance, affordable, and available microwave and millimeter wave technology for building electronic systems. This paper describes the advances made under program sponsorship, during the past six years, in the areas of material growth, computer aided design capabilities, microwave monolithic integrated circuit (MMIC) manufacturing, ...

  11. V. S. Naipaul’s The Mimic Men: Disillusionment with the Metropolis, Cosmopolitanism and Colonial Education

    OpenAIRE

    Weiwei Xu

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to identify the disillusionment with metropolitan-centred cosmopolitanism in Naipaul’s The Mimic Men. The immigrants are chosen as the focal point to reveal the dissociation between them and the metropolis. Examining Naipaul’s description of the immigrant population’s metropolitan life, I contend that the cosmopolitan ideology is in stark contrast with the reality of coexistence, intermingling and hybridisation. Mere coexistence of people of heterogeneous cultural, national, r...

  12. Mapping charge to function relationships of the DNA mimic protein Ocr

    OpenAIRE

    Kanwar, Nisha

    2014-01-01

    This thesis investigates the functional consequences of neutralising the negative charges on the bacteriophage T7 antirestriction protein ocr. The ocr molecule is a small highly negatively charged, protein homodimer that mimics a short DNA duplex upon binding to the Type I Restriction Modification (RM) system. Thus, ocr facilitates phage infection by binding to and inactivating the host RM system. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of reducing the negative charge o...

  13. Settlement pattern of Posidonia oceanica epibionts along a gradient of ocean acidification: an approach with mimics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. DONNARUMMA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Effects of ocean acidification (OA on the colonization/settlement pattern of the epibiont community of the leaves and rhizomesof the Mediterranean seagrass,Posidoniaoceanica, have been studied at volcanic CO2vents off Ischia (Italy, using “mimics”as artificial substrates. The experiments were conducted in shallowPosidoniastands (2-3 m depth, in three stations on the northand three on the south sides of the study area, distributed along a pH gradient. At each station, 4 rhizome mimics and 6 artificialleaves were collected every three months (Sept 2009-Sept 2010. The epibionts on both leaf and rhizome mimics showed clearchanges along the pH gradient; coralline algae and calcareous invertebrates (bryozoans, serpulid polychaetes and barnacles weredominant at control stations but progressively disappeared at the most acidified stations. In these extremely low pH sites theassemblage was dominated by filamentous algae and non calcareous taxa such as hydroids and tunicates. Settlement pattern onthe artificial leaves and rhizome mimics over time showed a consistent distribution pattern along the pH gradient and highlightedthe peak of recruitment of the various organisms in different periods according to their life history.Posidoniamimics at theacidified station showed a poor and very simplified assemblage where calcifying epibionts seemed less competitive for space. Thisprofound difference in epiphyte communities in low pH conditions suggests cascading effects on the food web of the meadow and,consequently, on the functioning of the system

  14. Tunable Molecular MoS2 Edge-Site Mimics for Catalytic Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Benjamin R; Polen, Shane M; Click, Kevin A; He, Mingfu; Huang, Zhongjie; Hadad, Christopher M; Wu, Yiying

    2016-04-18

    Molybdenum sulfides represent state-of-the-art, non-platinum electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). According to the Sabatier principle, the hydrogen binding strength to the edge active sites should be neither too strong nor too weak. Therefore, it is of interest to develop a molecular motif that mimics the catalytic sites structurally and possesses tunable electronic properties that influence the hydrogen binding strength. Furthermore, molecular mimics will be important for providing mechanistic insight toward the HER with molybdenum sulfide catalysts. In this work, a modular method to tune the catalytic properties of the S-S bond in MoO(S2)2L2 complexes is described. We studied the homogeneous electrocatalytic hydrogen production performance metrics of three catalysts with different bipyridine substitutions. By varying the electron-donating abilities, we present the first demonstration of using the ligand to tune the catalytic properties of the S-S bond in molecular MoS2 edge-site mimics. This work can shed light on the relationship between the structure and electrocatalytic activity of molecular MoS2 catalysts and thus is of broad importance from catalytic hydrogen production to biological enzyme functions. PMID:27022836

  15. Analyzing Protein-Phosphoinositide Interactions with Liposome Flotation Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Ricarda A; Scacioc, Andreea; Schalk, Amanda M; Krick, Roswitha; Thumm, Michael; Kühnel, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Liposome flotation assays are a convenient tool to study protein-phosphoinositide interactions. Working with liposomes resembles physiological conditions more than protein-lipid overlay assays, which makes this method less prone to detect false positive interactions. However, liposome lipid composition must be well-considered in order to prevent nonspecific binding of the protein through electrostatic interactions with negatively charged lipids like phosphatidylserine. In this protocol we use the PROPPIN Hsv2 (homologous with swollen vacuole phenotype 2) as an example to demonstrate the influence of liposome lipid composition on binding and show how phosphoinositide binding specificities of a protein can be characterized with this method. PMID:26552682

  16. Mesothelioma patient derived tumor xenografts with defined BAP1 mutations that mimic the molecular characteristics of human malignant mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and evaluation of new therapeutic approaches for malignant mesothelioma has been sparse due, in part, to lack of suitable tumor models. We established primary mesothelioma cultures from pleural and ascitic fluids of five patients with advanced mesothelioma. Electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry (IHC) confirmed their mesothelial origin. Patient derived xenografts were generated by injecting the cells in nude or SCID mice, and malignant potential of the cells was analyzed by soft agar colony assay. Molecular profiles of the primary patient tumors, early passage cell cultures, and patient derived xenografts were assessed using mutational analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and IHC. Primary cultures from all five tumors exhibited morphologic and IHC features consistent to those of mesothelioma cells. Mutations of BAP1 and CDKN2A were each detected in four tumors. BAP1 mutation was associated with the lack of expression of BAP1 protein. Three cell cultures, all of which were derived from BAP1 mutant primary tumors, exhibited anchorage independent growth and also formed tumors in mice, suggesting that BAP1 loss may enhance tumor growth in vivo. Both early passage cell cultures and mouse xenograft tumors harbored BAP1 mutations and CDKN2A deletions identical to those found in the corresponding primary patient tumors. The mesothelioma patient derived tumor xenografts with mutational alterations that mimic those observed in patient tumors which we established can be used for preclinical development of novel drug regimens and for studying the functional aspects of BAP1 biology in mesothelioma. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1362-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  17. CoCl2, a mimic of hypoxia, induces formation of polyploid giant cells with stem characteristics in colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Lopez-Sánchez

    Full Text Available The induction of polyploidy is considered the reproductive end of cells, but there is evidence that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs contribute to cell repopulation during tumor relapse. However, the role of these cells in the development, progression and response to therapy in colon cancer remains undefined. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the generation of PGCCs in colon cancer cells and identify mechanisms of formation. Treatment of HCT-116 and Caco-2 colon cancer cells with the hypoxia mimic CoCl2 induced the formation of cells with larger cell and nuclear size (PGCCs, while the cells with normal morphology were selectively eliminated. Cytometric analysis showed that CoCl2 treatment induced G2 cell cycle arrest and the generation of a polyploid cell subpopulation with increased cellular DNA content. Polyploidy of hypoxia-induced PGCCs was confirmed by FISH analysis. Furthermore, CoCl2 treatment effectively induced the stabilization of HIF-1α, the differential expression of a truncated form of p53 (p47 and decreased levels of cyclin D1, indicating molecular mechanisms associated with cell cycle arrest at G2. Generation of PGCCs also contributed to expansion of a cell subpopulation with cancer stem cells (CSCs characteristics, as indicated by colonosphere formation assays, and enhanced chemoresistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin. In conclusion, the pharmacological induction of hypoxia in colon cancer cells causes the formation of PGCCs, the expansion of a cell subpopulation with CSC characteristics and chemoresistance. The molecular mechanisms involved, including the stabilization of HIF-1 α, the involvement of p53/p47 isoform and cell cycle arrest at G2, suggest novel targets to prevent tumor relapse and treatment failure in colon cancer.

  18. FLUIDICS DEVICE FOR ASSAY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for use in performing assays on standard laboratory solid supports whereon chemical entities are attached. The invention furthermore relates to the use of such a device and a kit comprising such a device. The device according to the present invention is...... adapted to receive one or more replaceable solid support(s) (40) onto which chemical entities (41) are attached, said device comprising a base (1, 60, 80, 300, 400, 10, 70, 140, 20, 90, 120, 150, 30, 100), one or more inlet(s) (5), one or more outlet(s) (6). The base and the solid support (40) defines......, when operatively connected, one or more chambers (21) comprising the chemical entities (41), the inlet(s) (5) and outlet(s) (6) and chambers (21) being in fluid connection. The device further comprise means for providing differing chemical conditions in each chamber (21)....

  19. Assay of oestrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A particular problem with the direct radioimmunoassay of unconjugated oestriol in pregnancy is caused by the increased amount of steroid-binding proteins present in pregnancy serum and plasma. The steroid-binding proteins react with oestriol and 125I-labelled oestriol during the assay procedure and the steroid-protein bound 125I-labelled oestriol is precipitated along with the antibody-bound 125I-labelled oestriol by the ammonium sulphate solution separation system. A novel method is described whereby progesterone (1-20 μg/ml) is used to block the action of steroid-binding proteins in pregnancy serum and plasma samples, thus minimizing interference in a direct radioimmunoassay for unconjugated oestriol using a specific anti-oestriol serum. (U.K.)

  20. MR features of physiologic and benign conditions of the ovary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In reproductive women, various physiologic conditions can cause morphologic changes of the ovary, resembling pathologic conditions. Benign ovarian diseases can also simulate malignancies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can play an important role in establishing accurate diagnosis. Functional cysts should not be confused with cystic neoplasms. Corpus luteum cysts typically have a thick wall and are occasionally hemorrhagic. Multicystic lesions that may mimic cystic neoplasms include hyperreactio luteinalis, ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, and polycystic ovary syndrome. Recognition of clinical settings can help establish diagnosis. In endometrial cysts, MRI usually provides specific diagnosis; however, decidual change during pregnancy should not be confused with secondary neoplasm. Peritoneal inclusion cysts can be distinguished from cystic neoplasms by recognition of their characteristic configurations. Ovarian torsion and massive ovarian edema may mimic solid malignant tumors. Recognition of normal follicles and anatomic structures is useful in diagnosing these conditions. In pelvic inflammatory diseases, transfascial spread of the lesion should not be confused with invasive malignant tumors. Radiologic identification of abscess formation can be a diagnostic clue. Many benign tumors, including teratoma, Brenner tumor, and sex-cord stromal tumor, frequently show characteristic MRI features. Knowledge of MRI features of these conditions is essential in establishing accurate diagnosis and determining appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  1. Two-tiered keratinocyte assay: IL-18 production by NCTC2544 cells to determine the skin sensitizing capacity and an epidermal equivalent assay to determine sensitizer potency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teunis, Marc; Corsini, Emanuela; Smits, Mieke;

    2012-01-01

    the use of animals. The aim of the EU FP6 Integrated Project Sens-it-iv was to develop and optimize an integrated testing strategy consisting of in vitro, human cell based assays which will closely mimic sensitization mechanisms in vivo. These assays should be an alternative approach to the LLNA. The...... alternative method to the LLNA. Both assays are based on the use of human keratinocytes, which have been shown, over the last two decades, to play a key role in all phases of skin sensitization. First, 4 known chemicals were tested during a transferability study in which 6 laboratories participated. Three......At present, the identification of potentially sensitizing chemicals is carried out using animal models. However, it should be very important, both from ethical and economic point of view, to discriminate allergy and irritation events, and to classify sensitizers according to their potency, without...

  2. Long-term physiological alterations and recovery in a mouse model of separation associated with time-restricted feeding: a tool to study anorexia nervosa related consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Zgheib

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anorexia nervosa is a primary psychiatric disorder, with non-negligible rates of mortality and morbidity. Some of the related alterations could participate in a vicious cycle limiting the recovery. Animal models mimicking various physiological alterations related to anorexia nervosa are necessary to provide better strategies of treatment. AIM: To explore physiological alterations and recovery in a long-term mouse model mimicking numerous consequences of severe anorexia nervosa. METHODS: C57Bl/6 female mice were submitted to a separation-based anorexia protocol combining separation and time-restricted feeding for 10 weeks. Thereafter, mice were housed in standard conditions for 10 weeks. Body weight, food intake, body composition, plasma levels of leptin, adiponectin, IGF-1, blood levels of GH, reproductive function and glucose tolerance were followed. Gene expression of several markers of lipid and energy metabolism was assayed in adipose tissues. RESULTS: Mimicking what is observed in anorexia nervosa patients, and despite a food intake close to that of control mice, separation-based anorexia mice displayed marked alterations in body weight, fat mass, lean mass, bone mass acquisition, reproductive function, GH/IGF-1 axis, and leptinemia. mRNA levels of markers of lipogenesis, lipolysis, and the brown-like adipocyte lineage in subcutaneous adipose tissue were also changed. All these alterations were corrected during the recovery phase, except for the hypoleptinemia that persisted despite the full recovery of fat mass. CONCLUSION: This study strongly supports the separation-based anorexia protocol as a valuable model of long-term negative energy balance state that closely mimics various symptoms observed in anorexia nervosa, including metabolic adaptations. Interestingly, during a recovery phase, mice showed a high capacity to normalize these parameters with the exception of plasma leptin levels. It will be interesting therefore to

  3. Physiology of vitreous surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefánsson, Einar

    2009-02-01

    Vitreous surgery has various physiological and clinical consequences, both beneficial and harmful. Vitrectomy reduces the risk of retinal neovascularization, while increasing the risk of iris neovascularization, reduces macular edema and stimulates cataract formation. These clinical consequences may be understood with the help of classical laws of physics and physiology. The laws of Fick, Stokes-Einstein and Hagen-Poiseuille state that molecular transport by diffusion or convection is inversely related to the viscosity of the medium. When the vitreous gel is replaced with less viscous saline, the transport of all molecules, including oxygen and cytokines, is facilitated. Oxygen transport to ischemic retinal areas is improved, as is clearance of VEGF and other cytokines from these areas, thus reducing edema and neovascularization. At the same time, oxygen is transported faster down a concentration gradient from the anterior to the posterior segment, while VEGF moves in the opposite direction, making the anterior segment less oxygenated and with more VEGF, stimulating iris neovascularization. Silicone oil is the exception that proves the rule: it is more viscous than vitreous humour, re-establishes the transport barrier to oxygen and VEGF, and reduces the risk for iris neovascularization in the vitrectomized-lentectomized eye. Modern vitreous surgery involves a variety of treatment options in addition to vitrectomy itself, such as photocoagulation, anti-VEGF drugs, intravitreal steroids and release of vitreoretinal traction. A full understanding of these treatment modalities allows sensible combination of treatment options. Retinal photocoagulation has repeatedly been shown to improve retinal oxygenation, as does vitrectomy. Oxygen naturally reduces VEGF production and improves retinal hemodynamics. The VEGF-lowering effect of photocoagulation and vitrectomy can be augmented with anti-VEGF drugs and the permeability effect of VEGF reduced with corticosteroids

  4. Nitrite disrupts multiple physiological functions in aquatic animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2003-01-01

    Nitrite is a potential problem in aquatic environments. Freshwater fish actively take up nitrite across the gills, leading to high internal concentrations. Seawater fish are less susceptible but do take up nitrite across intestine and gills. Nitrite has multiple physiological effects. Its uptake is...... at the expense of chloride, leading to chloride depletion. Nitrite also activates efflux of potassium from skeletal muscle and erythrocytes, disturbing intracellular and extracellular K+ levels. Nitrite transfer across the erythrocytic membrane leads to oxidation of haemoglobin to methaemoglobin (met...... nitrite-induced vasodilation (possibly via nitric oxide generated from nitrite) that is countered by increased cardiac pumping to re-establish blood pressure. Nitrite can form and/or mimic nitric oxide and thereby interfere with processes regulated by this local hormone. Steroid hormone synthesis may be...

  5. In vivo preclinical evaluation of the accuracy of toroidal-shaped HIFU treatments using a tumor-mimic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pig is an ideal animal model for preclinical evaluation of HIFU treatments, especially in the liver. However, there is no liver tumor model available for pigs. In this work, we propose to study an in vivo tumor-mimic model as a tool for evaluating if a sonographycally guided HIFU treatment, delivered by a toroidal-shaped device dedicated for the treatment of liver metastases, is correctly located in the liver. One centimeter tumor-mimics were created in liver tissues. These tumor-mimics were detectable on ultrasound imaging and on gross pathology. Two studies were carried out. First, an in vivo study of tolerance at mid-term (30 days, 10 pigs) revealed that tumor-mimics are suitable for studying HIFU treatments at a preclinical stage, since local and biological tolerances were excellent. The dimensions of the tumor-mimics were reproducible (diameter at day 0: 9.7 ± 2.0 mm) and were the same as a function of time (p = 0.64). A second in vivo study was carried out in ten pigs. Tumor mimics were used as targets in liver tissues in order to determine if the HIFU treatment is correctly located in the liver. A procedure of extensive HIFU ablation using multiple HIFU lesions juxtaposed manually was then tested on eight tumor-mimics. In 88% of the cases (seven out of eight), tumor-mimics were treated with negative margins (≥1 mm) in all directions. On average, negative margins measured 10.0 ± 6.7 mm. These tumor-mimics constitute an excellent reference for studying in vivo the accuracy of HIFU therapy in the liver.

  6. In vivo preclinical evaluation of the accuracy of toroidal-shaped HIFU treatments using a tumor-mimic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N' Djin, W A; Melodelima, D; Parmentier, H; Chapelon, J Y [Inserm, U556, Lyon, F-69003 (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon, F-69003 (France); Rivoire, M [Institute of Experimental Surgery-Centre Leon Berard, Lyon, F-69008 (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon, F-69003 (France)], E-mail: apoutou.ndjin@inserm.fr

    2010-04-21

    The pig is an ideal animal model for preclinical evaluation of HIFU treatments, especially in the liver. However, there is no liver tumor model available for pigs. In this work, we propose to study an in vivo tumor-mimic model as a tool for evaluating if a sonographycally guided HIFU treatment, delivered by a toroidal-shaped device dedicated for the treatment of liver metastases, is correctly located in the liver. One centimeter tumor-mimics were created in liver tissues. These tumor-mimics were detectable on ultrasound imaging and on gross pathology. Two studies were carried out. First, an in vivo study of tolerance at mid-term (30 days, 10 pigs) revealed that tumor-mimics are suitable for studying HIFU treatments at a preclinical stage, since local and biological tolerances were excellent. The dimensions of the tumor-mimics were reproducible (diameter at day 0: 9.7 {+-} 2.0 mm) and were the same as a function of time (p = 0.64). A second in vivo study was carried out in ten pigs. Tumor mimics were used as targets in liver tissues in order to determine if the HIFU treatment is correctly located in the liver. A procedure of extensive HIFU ablation using multiple HIFU lesions juxtaposed manually was then tested on eight tumor-mimics. In 88% of the cases (seven out of eight), tumor-mimics were treated with negative margins ({>=}1 mm) in all directions. On average, negative margins measured 10.0 {+-} 6.7 mm. These tumor-mimics constitute an excellent reference for studying in vivo the accuracy of HIFU therapy in the liver.

  7. DOSHIC PHYSIOLOGY OF SKIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivprasad Chiplunkar

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The balance of dosha  represents the healthy state and imbalance will cause various diseases. In normalcy doshas will be performing their own functions and individual doshas will be having their own specific sites. By telling the various sthana of each dosha, different function that is taken up by individual dosha in different sites has been highlighted.By mentioning ‘sparshanendriyam’ as one of the sthana of vata dosha the sensory functions of skin to vata dosha has been emphasised. By mentioning ‘sparshanam’ as one of the sthana of pittadosha, the function of colouring/pigmentation of skin, which is majorly carried out  by melanocytes by secreting melanin pigment has been highlighted. Meda is one among the sthanas of kapha dosha; this can be considered as the adipose tissue of skin/below skin. Since sweda is mala of meda it can be also considered as the secretions from the eccrine glands.With respect to skin, sensory functions, both tactile and thermal is carried out by vata dosha more specifically vyana vata, pigmentation to the skin carried out by meloncytes by secreting melanin, it is nothing but function of pitta dosha more specifically brajaka pitta with the help of udana vata and finally production of sweat in sweat glands is the function of kapha. So there is the need for further study and research regarding the sthanas of all three doshas in different structures/organs in the body and its physiology.

  8. Polyamines in plant physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galston, A. W.; Sawhney, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The diamine putrescine, the triamine spermidine, and the tetramine spermine are ubiquitous in plant cells, while other polyamines are of more limited occurrence. Their chemistry and pathways of biosynthesis and metabolism are well characterized. They occur in the free form as cations, but are often conjugated to small molecules like phenolic acids and also to various macromolecules. Their titer varies from approximately micromolar to more than millimolar, and depends greatly on environmental conditions, especially stress. In cereals, the activity of one of the major polyamine biosynthetic enzymes, arginine decarboxylase, is rapidly and dramatically increased by almost every studied external stress, leading to 50-fold or greater increases in putrescine titer within a few hours. The physiological significance of this increase is not yet clear, although most recent work suggests an adaptive, protective role. Polyamines produced through the action of ornithine decarboxylase, by contrast, seem essential for DNA replication and cell division. The application of exogenous polyamines produces effects on patterns of senescence and morphogenesis, suggesting but not proving a regulatory role for polyamines in these processes. The evidence for such a regulatory role is growing.

  9. Physiology in Modelica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Mateják

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Modelica is an object-oriented language, in which models can be created and graphically represented by connecting instances of classes from libraries. These connections are not only assignments of values; they can also represent acausal equality. Even more, they can model Kirchhoff’s laws of circuits. In Modelica it is possible to develop library classes which are an analogy of electrical circuit components. The result of our work in this field is Physiolibrary (www.physiolibrary.org – a free, open-source Modelica library for human physiology. By graphical joining instances of Physiolibrary classes, user can create models of cardiovascular circulation, thermoregulation, metabolic processes, nutrient distribution, gas transport, electrolyte regulation, water distribution, hormonal regulation and pharmacological regulation. After simple setting of the parameters, the models are ready to simulate. After simulation, the user can examine variables as their values change over time. Representing the model as a diagram has also great educational advantages, because students are able to better understand physical principles when they see them modeled graphically.

  10. Lung physiology and anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the factors influencing respiration and presents the physiological principles that provide the basis for pulmonary function measurements and for the procedures used in pulmonary nuclear medicine. Respiration is defined as the consumption of O/sub 2/ and the production of CO/sub 2/ at the cellular level, and by extension in common usage the term refers to the entire process leading to gas exchange between the body and the environment. Gas exchange in man can be divided into three principal, but interdependent, functional components: (1) that concerned with the volume and and distribution of air flow within the lungs; (2) that concerned with the volume and distribution of blood flow through the pulmonary circulation; and (3) that concerned with the diffusion of O/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/ across the air-blood barrier. The air-blood barrier in the terminal respiratory units is the site at which inspired fresh air (ventilation) is brought into contact with the film of blood flowing through the pulmonary capillaries (perfusion)

  11. PathogenMip Assay: A Multiplex Pathogen Detection Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Akhras, Michael S.; Sreedevi Thiyagarajan; Villablanca, Andrea C.; Davis, Ronald W; Pål Nyrén; Nader Pourmand

    2007-01-01

    The Molecular Inversion Probe (MIP) assay has been previously applied to a large-scale human SNP detection. Here we describe the PathogenMip Assay, a complete protocol for probe production and applied approaches to pathogen detection. We have demonstrated the utility of this assay with an initial set of 24 probes targeting the most clinically relevant HPV genotypes associated with cervical cancer progression. Probe construction was based on a novel, cost-effective, ligase-based protocol. The ...

  12. Deriving stress from peripheral physiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, J.J.G.; Van Dooren, M.; Van Beek, W.H.M.; Dijk, E.O.; Ouwerkerk, M.; Westerink, J.H.D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We set up an experiment to explore whether peripheral physiological parameters are capable of reflecting human (short term) stress. Methods For 30 participants, we measured peripheral physiology (SCR, ECG, RSP, TEMP, EMG) during several tasks (3 relaxing, 3 physically stressful, 3 mental

  13. Non-invasive physiological measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book discusses the diagnostic techniques of nondestructive type for monitoring the physiology of various organ systems. The topics covered are: non-invasive assessment of gastric activity; uterine activity, intestinal activity; monitoring of fetal cardiovascular system and bilirubin physiology of infants. Respiratory system of infants is monitored and ultrasonography of heart is discussed

  14. Causality in physiological signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Andreas; Kraemer, Jan F; Penzel, Thomas; Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Kurths, Jürgen; Wessel, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Health is one of the most important non-material assets and thus also has an enormous influence on material values, since treating and preventing diseases is expensive. The number one cause of death worldwide today originates in cardiovascular diseases. For these reasons the aim of understanding the functions and the interactions of the cardiovascular system is and has been a major research topic throughout various disciplines for more than a hundred years. The purpose of most of today's research is to get as much information as possible with the lowest possible effort and the least discomfort for the subject or patient, e.g. via non-invasive measurements. A family of tools whose importance has been growing during the last years is known under the headline of coupling measures. The rationale for this kind of analysis is to identify the structure of interactions in a system of multiple components. Important information lies for example in the coupling direction, the coupling strength, and occurring time lags. In this work, we will, after a brief general introduction covering the development of cardiovascular time series analysis, introduce, explain and review some of the most important coupling measures and classify them according to their origin and capabilities in the light of physiological analyses. We will begin with classical correlation measures, go via Granger-causality-based tools, entropy-based techniques (e.g. momentary information transfer), nonlinear prediction measures (e.g. mutual prediction) to symbolic dynamics (e.g. symbolic coupling traces). All these methods have contributed important insights into physiological interactions like cardiorespiratory coupling, neuro-cardio-coupling and many more. Furthermore, we will cover tools to detect and analyze synchronization and coordination (e.g. synchrogram and coordigram). As a last point we will address time dependent couplings as identified using a recent approach employing ensembles of time series. The

  15. Label-acquired magnetorotation for biosensing: An asynchronous rotation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, Ariel, E-mail: hecht@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); Kinnunen, Paivo, E-mail: pkkinn@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States); McNaughton, Brandon, E-mail: bmcnaugh@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States); Kopelman, Raoul, E-mail: kopelman@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents a novel application of magnetic particles for biosensing, called label-acquired magnetorotation (LAM). This method is based on a combination of the traditional sandwich assay format with the asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) method. In label-acquired magnetorotation, an analyte facilitates the binding of a magnetic label bead to a nonmagnetic solid phase sphere, forming a sandwich complex. The sandwich complex is then placed in a rotating magnetic field, where the rotational frequency of the sandwich complex is a function of the amount of analyte attached to the surface of the sphere. Here, we use streptavidin-coated beads and biotin-coated particles as analyte mimics, to be replaced by proteins and other biological targets in future work. We show this sensing method to have a dynamic range of two orders of magnitude.

  16. Effectiveness of a large mimic panel in an existing nuclear power plant central control board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We conducted the analysis of the nuclear power plant (NPP) operators' behaviors under emergency conditions by using training simulators as a joint research project by Japanese BWR groups for twelve years. In the phase-IV of this project we executed two kinds of experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of the interfaces. One was for evaluations of the interfaces such as CRTs with touch screen, a large mimic panel, and a hierarchical annunciator system introduced in the newly developed ABWR type central control board. The other was that we analyzed the operators' behaviors in emergency conditions by using the first generation BWR type central control board which was added new interfaces such as a large display screen and demarcation on the board to help operators to understand the plant. The demarcation is one of the visual interface improvements and its technique is that a line enclosing several components causes them to be perceived as a group.The result showed that both the large display panel Introduced in ABWR central control board and the large display screen in the existing BWR type central control board improved the performance of the NPP operators in the experiments. It was expected that introduction of the large mimic panel into the existing BWR type central control boards would improve operators' performance. However, in the case of actual installation of the large display board into the existing central control boards, there are spatial and hardware constraints. Therefore the size of lamps, lines connecting from symbols of the pumps or valves to the others' will have to be modified under these constraints. It is important to evaluate the displayed information on the large display board before actual installation. We made experiments to solve these problems by using TEPCO's research simulator which is added a large mimic panel. (author)

  17. In Vivo Evaluation of Lung Microwave Ablation in a Porcine Tumor Mimic Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the microwave ablation of created tumor mimics in the lung of a large animal model (pigs), with examination of the ablative synergy of multiple antennas. Fifty-six tumor-mimic models of various sizes were created in 15 pigs by using barium-enriched minced collected thigh muscle injected into the lung of the same animal. Tumors were ablated under fluoroscopic guidance by single-antenna and multiple-antenna microwaves. Thirty-five tumor models were treated in 11 pigs with a single antenna at 75 W for 15 min, with 15 measuring 20 mm in diameter, 10 measuring 30 mm, and 10 measuring 40 mm. Mean circularity of the single-antenna ablation zones measured 0.64 ± 0.12, with a diameter of 35.7 ± 8.7 mm along the axis of the antenna and 32.7 ± 12.8 mm perpendicular to the feeding point. Multiple-antenna delivery of 75 W for 15 min caused intraprocedural death of 2 animals; modified protocol to 60 W for 10 min resulted in an ablation zone with a diameter of 43.0 ± 7.7 along the axis of the antenna and 54.8 ± 8.5 mm perpendicular to the feeding point; circularity was 0.70 ± 0.10. A single microwave antenna can create ablation zones large enough to cover lung tumor mimic models of ≤4 cm with no heat sink effect from vessels of ≤6 mm. Synergic use of 3 antennas allows ablation of larger volumes than single-antenna or radiofrequency ablation, but great caution must be taken when 3 antennas are used simultaneously in the lung in clinical practice.

  18. Settlement pattern of Posidonia oceanica epibionts along a gradient of ocean acidification: an approach with mimics

    OpenAIRE

    L. DONNARUMMA; Lombardi, C.; COCITO, S; Gambi, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Effects of ocean acidification (OA on the colonization/settlement pattern of the epibiont community of the leaves and rhizomesof the Mediterranean seagrass,Posidoniaoceanica, have been studied at volcanic CO2vents off Ischia (Italy), using “mimics”as artificial substrates. The experiments were conducted in shallowPosidoniastands (2-3 m depth), in three stations on the northand three on the south sides of the study area, distributed along a pH gradient. At each station, 4 rhizome mimics and ...

  19. Small-Molecule CD4-Mimics: Structure-Based Optimization of HIV-1 Entry Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Bruno; Liang, Shuaiyi; Park, Jongwoo; Schön, Arne; Courter, Joel R; LaLonde, Judith M; Wendler, Daniel J; Princiotto, Amy M; Seaman, Michael S; Freire, Ernesto; Sodroski, Joseph; Madani, Navid; Hendrickson, Wayne A; Smith, Amos B

    2016-03-10

    The optimization, based on computational, thermodynamic, and crystallographic data, of a series of small-molecule ligands of the Phe43 cavity of the envelope glycoprotein gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has been achieved. Importantly, biological evaluation revealed that the small-molecule CD4 mimics (4-7) inhibit HIV-1 entry into target cells with both significantly higher potency and neutralization breadth than previous congeners, while maintaining high selectivity for the target virus. Their binding mode was characterized via thermodynamic and crystallographic studies. PMID:26985324

  20. Free medial meniscal fragment which mimics the dislocated bucket-handle tear on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkmen, Faik; Korucu, Ismail Hakkı; Sever, Cem; Demirayak, Mehmet; Goncü, Gani; Toker, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    The bucket-handle meniscal tear is a specific type of meniscal injuries which has specific signs on MRI. An attached fragment displaced away from the meniscus with any type of tear causes bucket-handle tear of the meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most commonly used diagnostic tool for meniscal injuries. We present a case of free medial meniscal fragment which mimics the dislocated bucket-handle tear on MRI. The presence of "fragment within the intercondylar notch sign" and "the absence of the bow tie sign" may be an indication of a free meniscal fragment. This should be considered during diagnosis. PMID:25002980

  1. Free Medial Meniscal Fragment Which Mimics the Dislocated Bucket-Handle Tear on MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faik Türkmen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The bucket-handle meniscal tear is a specific type of meniscal injuries which has specific signs on MRI. An attached fragment displaced away from the meniscus with any type of tear causes bucket-handle tear of the meniscus. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is the most commonly used diagnostic tool for meniscal injuries. We present a case of free medial meniscal fragment which mimics the dislocated bucket-handle tear on MRI. The presence of “fragment within the intercondylar notch sign” and “the absence of the bow tie sign” may be an indication of a free meniscal fragment. This should be considered during diagnosis.

  2. Cassava biology and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawy, Mabrouk A

    2004-11-01

    Cassava or manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz), a perennial shrub of the New World, currently is the sixth world food crop for more than 500 million people in tropical and sub-tropical Africa, Asia and Latin America. It is cultivated mainly by resource-limited small farmers for its starchy roots, which are used as human food either fresh when low in cyanogens or in many processed forms and products, mostly starch, flour, and for animal feed. Because of its inherent tolerance to stressful environments, where other food crops would fail, it is often considered a food-security source against famine, requiring minimal care. Under optimal environmental conditions, it compares favorably in production of energy with most other major staple food crops due to its high yield potential. Recent research at the Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT) in Colombia has demonstrated the ability of cassava to assimilate carbon at very high rates under high levels of humidity, temperature and solar radiation,which correlates with productivity across all environments whether dry or humid. When grown on very poor soils under prolonged drought for more than 6 months, the crop reduce both its leaf canopy and transpiration water loss, but its attached leaves remain photosynthetically active, though at greatly reduced rates. The main physiological mechanism underlying such a remarkable tolerance to drought was rapid stomatal closure under both atmospheric and edaphic water stress, protecting the leaf against dehydration while the plant depletes available soil water slowly during long dry periods. This drought tolerance mechanism leads to high crop water use efficiency values. Although the cassava fine root system is sparse, compared to other crops, it can penetrate below 2 m soil,thus enabling the crop to exploit deep water if available. Leaves of cassava and wild Manihot possess elevated activities of the C4 enzyme PEP carboxylase but lack the leaf Kranz anatomy typical of C4

  3. A radium assay technique using hydrous titanium oxide adsorbent for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As photodisintegration of deuterons mimics the disintegration of deuterons by neutrinos, the accurate measurement of the radioactivity from thorium and uranium decay chains in the heavy water in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is essential for the determination of the total solar neutrino flux. A radium assay technique of the required sensitivity is described that uses hydrous titanium oxide adsorbent on a filtration membrane together with a β-α delayed coincidence counting system. For a 200 tonne assay the detection limit for 232Th is a concentration of ∼3x10-16 g Th/g water and for 238U of ∼3x10-16 g U/g water. Results of assays of both the heavy and light water carried out during the first 2 years of data collection of SNO are presented

  4. Can artificial reefs mimic natural reef communities? The roles of structural features and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkol-Finkel, S; Shashar, N; Benayahu, Y

    2006-03-01

    In light of the deteriorating state of coral reefs worldwide, the need to rehabilitate marine environments has greatly increased. Artificial reefs (ARs) have been suggested as a tool for reef conservation and rehabilitation. Although successions of AR communities have been thoroughly studied, current understanding of the interactions between artificial and natural reefs (NRs) is poor and a fundamental question still to be answered is that of whether AR communities can mimic adjacent NR communities. We suggest three alternative hypotheses: Neighboring ARs and NRs will (1) achieve a similar community structure given sufficient time; (2) be similar only if they possess similar structural features; (3) always differ, regardless of age or structural features. We examined these hypotheses by comparing the community structure on a 119-year old shipwreck to a neighboring NR. Fouling organisms, including stony and soft corals, sponges, tunicates, sea anemones and hydrozoans were recorded and measured along belt transects. The ahermatypic stony coral Tubastrea micrantha dominated vertical AR regions while the soft corals Nephthea sp. and Xenia sp. dominated both artificial and natural horizontal surfaces. Our results support the second hypothesis, indicating that even after a century an AR will mimic its adjacent NR communities only if it possesses structural features similar to those of the natural surroundings. However, if the two differ structurally, their communities will remain distinct. PMID:16198411

  5. The supramolecular organization of self-assembling chlorosomal bacteriochlorophyll c, d, or e mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochum, Tobias; Reddy, Chilla Malla; Eichhöfer, Andreas; Buth, Gernot; Szmytkowski, Jedrzej; Kalt, Heinz; Moss, David; Balaban, Teodor Silviu

    2008-09-01

    Bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) c, d, and e are the main light-harvesting pigments of green photosynthetic bacteria that self-assemble into nanostructures within the chlorosomes forming the most efficient antennas of photosynthetic organisms. All previous models of the chlorosomal antennae, which are quite controversially discussed because no single crystals could be grown so far from these organelles, involve a strong hydrogen-bonding interaction between the 3(1) hydroxyl group and the 13(1) carbonyl group. We have synthesized different self-assemblies of BChl c mimics having the same functional groups as the natural counterparts, that is, a hydroxyethyl substituent, a carbonyl group and a divalent metal atom ligated by a tetrapyrrole. These artificial BChl mimics have been shown by single crystal x-ray diffraction to form extended stacks that are packed by hydrophobic interactions and in the absence of hydrogen bonding. Time-resolved photoluminescence proves the ordered nature of the self-assembled stacks. FT-IR spectra show that on self-assembly the carbonyl frequency is shifted by approximately 30 cm(-1) to lower wavenumbers. From the FT-IR data we can infer the proximal interactions between the BChls in the chlorosomes consistent with a single crystal x-ray structure that shows a weak electrostatic interaction between carbonyl groups and the central zinc atom. PMID:18755898

  6. Lanolin-derived lipid mixtures mimic closely the lipid composition and organization of vernix caseosa lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissmann, Robert; Oudshoorn, Marion H M; Kocks, Elise; Hennink, Wim E; Ponec, Maria; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2008-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to use semi-synthetic lipid mixtures to mimic the complex lipid composition, organization and thermotropic behaviour of vernix caseosa (VC) lipids. As VC shows multiple protecting and barrier supporting properties before and after birth, it is suggested that a VC substitute could be an innovative barrier cream for barrier deficient skin. Lanolin was selected as the source of the branched chain sterol esters and wax esters--the main lipid classes of VC. Different lipid fractions were isolated from lanolin and subsequently mixed with squalene, triglycerides, cholesterol, ceramides and fatty acids to generate semi-synthetic lipid mixtures that mimic the lipid composition of VC, as established by high-performance thin-layer chromatography. Differential scanning calorimetry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy investigations revealed that triglycerides play an important role in the (lateral) lipid organization and thermotropic behaviour of the synthetic lipid mixtures. Excellent resemblance of VC lipids was obtained when adding unsaturated triglycerides. Moreover, these lipid mixtures showed similar long range ordering as VC. The optimal lipid mixture was evaluated on tape-stripped hairless mouse skin in vivo. The rate of barrier recovery was increased and comparable to VC lipid treatment. PMID:18655769

  7. Intact Rapid Facial Mimicry as well as Generally Reduced Mimic Responses in Stable Schizophrenia Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechko, Natalya; Pagel, Alena; Otte, Ellen; Koch, Iring; Habel, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous emotional expressions (rapid facial mimicry) perform both emotional and social functions. In the current study, we sought to test whether there were deficits in automatic mimic responses to emotional facial expressions in patients (15 of them) with stable schizophrenia compared to 15 controls. In a perception-action interference paradigm (the Simon task; first experiment), and in the context of a dual-task paradigm (second experiment), the task-relevant stimulus feature was the gender of a face, which, however, displayed a smiling or frowning expression (task-irrelevant stimulus feature). We measured the electromyographical activity in the corrugator supercilii and zygomaticus major muscle regions in response to either compatible or incompatible stimuli (i.e., when the required response did or did not correspond to the depicted facial expression). The compatibility effect based on interactions between the implicit processing of a task-irrelevant emotional facial expression and the conscious production of an emotional facial expression did not differ between the groups. In stable patients (in spite of a reduced mimic reaction), we observed an intact capacity to respond spontaneously to facial emotional stimuli. PMID:27303335

  8. Pancreatic and peri-pancreatic lesions mimic pancreatic islet cell tumor in multidetector computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Hua-dan; LIU Wei; XIAO Yu; SUN Hao; WANG Xuan; LEI Jing; JIN Zheng-yu

    2011-01-01

    Objective This pictorial review aimed to summarize the most possible differential diagnosis of pancreatic islet cell tumor (PICT).Data sources Data used in this review were mainly from Medline and Pubmed in English. And all clinical images in this review were from Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China.Study selection Cases of pancreatic cystadenoma, solid pseudo-papillary tumor of the pancreas, pancreatic metastasis, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, para-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, Castleman disease, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, splenic artery aneurysm and accessory spleen were selected in this pictorial review for differential diagnosis of PICT.Results Careful analysis of imaging features and correlation with the clinical manifestations may allow a more specific diagnosis. It is also important that the radiologist is familiar with the anatomic variants and disease entities which mimic pancreatic islet cell tumor in order to avoid an improper treatment protocol.Conclusions Many congenital anatomic variants or other pancreatic and peri-pancreatic diseases may mimic MDCT appearance of pancreatic islet cell tumor. Radiological, clinical and pathological characteristics should be considered for the final diagnosis.

  9. Low energy photon mimic of the tritium beta decay energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malabre-O'Sullivan, Neville

    Tritium is a radioactive hydrogen isotope that is typically produced via neutron interaction with heavy water (D2O), producing tritiated water (DTO). As a result of this, tritium accounts for roughly a third of all occupational exposures at a CANDU type nuclear power plant. This identifies a need to study the biological effects associated with tritium (and low energy electrons in general). However, there are complications regarding the dosimetry of tritium, as well as difficulties in handling and using tritium for the purposes of biophysics experiments. To avoid these difficulties, an experiment has been proposed using photons to mimic the beta decay energy spectrum of tritium. This would allow simulation of the radiation properties of tritium, so that a surrogate photon source can be used for biophysics experiments. Through experimental and computational means, this work has explored the use of characteristic x-rays of various materials to modify the output spectrum of an x-ray source, such that it mimics the tritium beta decay spectrum. Additionally, the resultant primary electron spectrum generated in water from an x-ray source was simulated. The results from this research have indicated that the use of characteristic x-rays is not a viable method for simulating a tritium source. Also, the primary electron spectrum generated in water shows some promise for simulating tritium exposure, however further work must be done to investigate the slowing down electron spectrum. Keywords: Tritium, MCNP, low energy electrons, biophysics, characteristic x-rays.

  10. Comprehending body language and mimics: an ERP and neuroimaging study on Italian actors and viewers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Mado Proverbio

    Full Text Available In this study, the neural mechanism subserving the ability to understand people's emotional and mental states by observing their body language (facial expression, body posture and mimics was investigated in healthy volunteers. ERPs were recorded in 30 Italian University students while they evaluated 280 pictures of highly ecological displays of emotional body language that were acted out by 8 male and female Italian actors. Pictures were briefly flashed and preceded by short verbal descriptions (e.g., "What a bore!" that were incongruent half of the time (e.g., a picture of a very attentive and concentrated person shown after the previous example verbal description. ERP data and source reconstruction indicated that the first recognition of incongruent body language occurred 300 ms post-stimulus. swLORETA performed on the N400 identified the strongest generators of this effect in the right rectal gyrus (BA11 of the ventromedial orbitofrontal cortex, the bilateral uncus (limbic system and the cingulate cortex, the cortical areas devoted to face and body processing (STS, FFA EBA and the premotor cortex (BA6, which is involved in action understanding. These results indicate that face and body mimics undergo a prioritized processing that is mostly represented in the affective brain and is rapidly compared with verbal information. This process is likely able to regulate social interactions by providing on-line information about the sincerity and trustfulness of others.

  11. Mouse models of liver fibrosis mimic human liver fibrosis of different etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Allyson K; Maroni, Luca; Marzioni, Marco; Ahmed, Syed T; Milad, Mena; Ray, Debolina; Alpini, Gianfranco; Glaser, Shannon S

    2014-12-01

    The liver has the amazing capacity to repair itself after injury; however, the same processes that are involved in liver regeneration after acute injury can cause serious consequences during chronic liver injury. In an effort to repair damage, activated hepatic stellate cells trigger a cascade of events that lead to deposition and accumulation of extracellular matrix components causing the progressive replacement of the liver parenchyma by scar tissue, thus resulting in fibrosis. Although fibrosis occurs as a result of many chronic liver diseases, the molecular mechanisms involved depend on the underlying etiology. Since studying liver fibrosis in human subjects is complicated by many factors, mouse models of liver fibrosis that mimic the human conditions fill this void. This review summarizes the general mouse models of liver fibrosis and mouse models that mimic specific human disease conditions that result in liver fibrosis. Additionally, recent progress that has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the fibrogenic processes of each of the human disease conditions is highlighted. PMID:25396098

  12. Dual-energy CT for the evaluation of urinary calculi: Image interpretation, pitfalls and stone mimics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urolithiasis is a common disease with a reported prevalence between 4% and 20% in developed countries. Determination of urinary calculi composition is a key factor in preoperative evaluation, treatment, and stone recurrence prevention. Prior to the introduction of dual-energy computed tomography (DECT), available methods for determining urinary stone composition were only available after stone extraction, and thereby unable to aid in optimized stone management prior to intervention. DECT utilizes the attenuation difference produced by two different x-ray energy spectra to quantify urinary calculi composition as uric acid or non-uric acid (with likely further classification in the future) while still providing the information attained with a conventional CT. Knowledge of DECT imaging pitfalls and stone mimics is important, as the added benefit of dual-energy analysis is the determination of stone composition, which in turn affects all aspects of stone management. This review briefly describes DECT principles, scanner types and acquisition protocols for the evaluation of urinary calculi as they relate to imaging pitfalls (inconsistent characterization of small stones, small dual-energy field of view, and mischaracterization from surrounding material) and stone mimics (drainage devices) that may adversely impact clinical decisions. We utilize our clinical experience from scanning over 1200 patients with this new imaging technique to present clinically relevant examples of imaging pitfalls and possible mechanisms for resolution

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Energy Metabolic Pathways in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells by Selected Reaction Monitoring Assay*

    OpenAIRE

    Drabovich, Andrei P.; Pavlou, Maria P.; Dimitromanolakis, Apostolos; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the quantitative response of energy metabolic pathways in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells to hypoxia, glucose deprivation, and estradiol stimulation, we developed a targeted proteomics assay for accurate quantification of protein expression in glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, TCA cycle, and pentose phosphate pathways. Cell growth conditions were selected to roughly mimic the exposure of cells in the cancer tissue to the intermittent hypoxia, glucose deprivation, and hormonal stimula...

  14. Olfaction: anatomy, physiology and behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Benignus, Vernon A.; Prah, James D.

    1982-01-01

    The anatomy, physiology and function of the olfactory system are reviewed, as are the normal effects of olfactory stimulation. It is speculated that olfaction may have important but unobtrusive effects on human behavior.

  15. OLFACTION: ANATOMY, PHYSIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The anatomy, physiology and function of the olfactory system are reviewed, as are the normal effects of olfactory stimulation. It is speculated that olfaction may have important but unobtrusive effects on human behavior.

  16. Deriving stress from peripheral physiology

    OpenAIRE

    De Vries, J.J.G.; van Dooren, M.; Van Beek, W.H.M.; Dijk, E.O.; Ouwerkerk, M; Westerink, J.H.D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We set up an experiment to explore whether peripheral physiological parameters are capable of reflecting human (short term) stress. Methods For 30 participants, we measured peripheral physiology (SCR, ECG, RSP, TEMP, EMG) during several tasks (3 relaxing, 3 physically stressful, 3 mentally stressful). After each task, we measured their blood pressure, asked them to complete the Stress ArousalChecklist, and took a saliva swab to measure the cortisol concentration. For each participa...

  17. Structured modeling of fish physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Odd A. Olsen; Jens G. Balchen

    1993-01-01

    The use of models in simulation and state estimation has proved useful in diverse applications, especially in industrial process control. The project presented here looked into the modeling of fish physiology for applications in fish physiology research and aquaculture. The models deal with gastric evacuation, metabolism, kidneys, gills, the cardiovascular system, and feeding behaviour and are based on data from the literature. Model responses are mostly in accord with real responses in princ...

  18. Physiological factors in childhood epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeWinn, E B

    1980-08-01

    The identification and correction of adverse physiological changes that lead to seizures in children can improve the effectiveness of current therapeutic practices in epilepsy. It is proposed that various circadian rhythms (respiration, hormones, water balance, electrolytes, intracranial pressure, blood pressure), meteorological phenomena (barometric presure, ambient environmental temperature, relative humidity), and developmental processes can profoundly influence the precipitation or prevention of seizures through their physiological effects. PMID:7190490

  19. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantinos eKagias; Camilla eNehammer; Roger ePocock

    2012-01-01

    Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. Physiological stress can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive and reproduce...

  20. Mathematical challenges in integrative physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Brook, B.S.; Waters, S. L.

    2008-01-01

    Traditional approaches to biomedical research are based on the subdivision of biological systems—by length (or time) scales (body, organ, tissue, cell, and molecule), discipline (biology, physiology, bioengineering, etc.), or sub-systems (cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, etc.). These subdivisions, however, make it difficult to unravel the systemic nature of the mechanisms that govern many of the (patho-) physiological processes in the human body. The challenge now is to comp...

  1. From Antenna to Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Evan G.; Samuel, Amanda P. S.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-01-01

    Conspectus Ligand-sensitized, luminescent lanthanide(III) complexes are of considerable importance because their unique photophysical properties (microsecond to millisecond lifetimes, characteristic and narrow emission bands, and large Stokes shifts) make them well suited as labels in fluorescence-based bioassays. The long-lived emission of lanthanide(III) cations can be temporally resolved from scattered light and background fluorescence to vastly enhance measurement sensitivity. One challenge in this field is the design of sensitizing ligands that provide highly emissive complexes with sufficient stability and aqueous solubility for practical applications. In this Account, we give an overview of some of the general properties of the trivalent lanthanides and follow with a summary of advances made in our laboratory in the development of highly luminescent Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes for applications in biotechnology. A focus of our research has been the optimization of these compounds as potential commercial agents for use in Homogeneous Time-Resolved Fluorescence (HTRF) technology. Our approach involves developing high-stability octadentate Tb(III) and Eu(III) complexes that rely on all-oxygen donor atoms and using multi-chromophore chelates to increase molar absorptivity; earlier examples utilized a single pendant chromophore (that is, a single “antenna”). Ligands based on 2-hydroxyisophthalamide (IAM) provide exceptionally emissive Tb(III) complexes with quantum yield values up to ∼60% that are stable at the nanomolar concentrations required for commercial assays. Through synthetic modification of the IAM chromophore and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations, we have developed a method to predict absorption and emission properties of these chromophores as a tool to guide ligand design. Additionally, we have investigated chiral IAM ligands that yield Tb(III) complexes possessing both high quantum yield values and strong

  2. Regulatory physiology discipline science plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the Regulatory Physiology discipline of the Space Physiology and Countermeasures Program is twofold. First, to determine and study how microgravity and associated factors of space flight affect the regulatory mechanisms by which humans adapt and achieve homeostasis and thereby regulate their ability to respond to internal and external signals; and, second, to study selected physiological systems that have been demonstrated to be influenced by gravity. The Regulatory Physiology discipline, as defined here, is composed of seven subdisciplines: (1) Circadian Rhythms, (2) Endocrinology, (3) Fluid and Electrolyte Regulation, (4) Hematology, (5) Immunology, (6) Metabolism and Nutrition, and (7) Temperature Regulation. The purpose of this Discipline Science Plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences Division research and development activities in the area of regulatory physiology. It covers the research areas critical to NASA's programmatic requirements for the Extended-Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, and exploration mission science activities. These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; and animal and human research and development. This document summarizes the current status of the program, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies science priorities, and defines critical questions in regulatory physiology. It contains a general plan that will be used by both NASA Headquarters Program Offices and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational intramural and extramural research and development activities in this area.

  3. Protocol: optimising hydroponic growth systems for nutritional and physiological analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana and other plants

    OpenAIRE

    Conn, Simon J; Hocking, Bradleigh; Dayod, Maclin; Xu, Bo; Athman, Asmini; Henderson, Sam; Aukett, Lucy; Conn, Vanessa; Shearer, Monique K; Fuentes, Sigfredo; TYERMAN, STEPHEN D.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Background Hydroponic growth systems are a convenient platform for studying whole plant physiology. However, we found through trialling systems as they are described in the literature that our experiments were frequently confounded by factors that affected plant growth, including algal contamination and hypoxia. We also found the way in which the plants were grown made them poorly amenable to a number of common physiological assays. Results The drivers for the development of this hydroponic s...

  4. New Application of the Comet Assay: Chromosome–Comet Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva I.; DÁVILA-RODRÍGUEZ, MARTHA I.; Fernández, José Luís; López-Fernández, Carmen; Gosálbez, Altea; Gosálvez, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    The comet assay is a well-established, simple, versatile, visual, rapid, and sensitive tool used extensively to assess DNA damage and DNA repair quantitatively and qualitatively in single cells. The comet assay is most frequently used to analyze white blood cells or lymphocytes in human biomonitoring studies, although other cell types have been examined, including buccal, nasal, epithelial, and placental cells and even spermatozoa. This study was conducted to design a protocol that can be use...

  5. Ectopic γ-catenin expression partially mimics the effects of stabilized β-catenin on embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeivan Mahendram

    Full Text Available β-catenin, an adherens junction component and key Wnt pathway effector, regulates numerous developmental processes and supports embryonic stem cell (ESC pluripotency in specific contexts. The β-catenin homologue γ-catenin (also known as Plakoglobin is a constituent of desmosomes and adherens junctions and may participate in Wnt signaling in certain situations. Here, we use β-catenin((+/+ and β-catenin((-/- mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs to investigate the role of γ-catenin in Wnt signaling and mESC differentiation. Although γ-catenin protein is markedly stabilized upon inhibition or ablation of GSK-3 in wild-type (WT mESCs, efficient silencing of its expression in these cells does not affect β-catenin/TCF target gene activation after Wnt pathway stimulation. Nonetheless, knocking down γ-catenin expression in WT mESCs appears to promote their exit from pluripotency in short-term differentiation assays. In β-catenin((-/- mESCs, GSK-3 inhibition does not detectably alter cytosolic γ-catenin levels and does not activate TCF target genes. Intriguingly, β-catenin/TCF target genes are induced in β-catenin((-/- mESCs overexpressing stabilized γ-catenin and the ability of these genes to be activated upon GSK-3 inhibition is partially restored when wild-type γ-catenin is overexpressed in these cells. This suggests that a critical threshold level of total catenin expression must be attained before there is sufficient signaling-competent γ-catenin available to respond to GSK-3 inhibition and to regulate target genes as a consequence. WT mESCs stably overexpressing γ-catenin exhibit robust Wnt pathway activation and display a block in tri-lineage differentiation that largely mimics that observed upon overexpression of β-catenin. However, β-catenin overexpression appears to be more effective than γ-catenin overexpression in sustaining the retention of markers of naïve pluripotency in cells that have been subjected to differentiation

  6. A novel asymmetric 3D in-vitro assay for the study of tumor cell invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The induction of tumor cell invasion is an important step in tumor progression. Due to the cost and slowness of in-vivo invasion assays, there is need for quantitative in-vitro invasion assays that mimic as closely as possible the tumor environment and in which conditions can be rigorously controlled. We have established a novel asymmetric 3D in-vitro invasion assay by embedding a monolayer of tumor cells between two layers of collagen. The cells were then allowed to invade the upper and lower layers of collagen. To visualize invading cells the gels were sectioned perpendicular to the monolayer so that after seeding the monolayer appears as a thin line precisely defining the origin of invasion. The number of invading tumor cells, their proliferation rate, the distance they traverse and the direction of invasion could then be determined quantitatively. The assay was used to compare the invasive properties of several tumor cell types and the results compare well with those obtained by previously described assays. Lysyl-oxidase like protein-2 (Loxl2) is a potent inducer of invasiveness. Using our assay we show for the first time that inhibition of endogenous Loxl2 expression in several types of tumor cells strongly inhibits their invasiveness. We also took advantage of the asymmetric nature of the assay in order to show that fibronectin enhances the invasiveness of breast cancer cells more potently than laminin. The asymmetric properties of the assay were also used to demonstrate that soluble factors derived from fibroblasts can preferentially attract invading breast cancer cells. Our assay displays several advantages over previous invasion assays as it is allows the quantitative analysis of directional invasive behavior of tumor cells in a 3D environment mimicking the tumor microenvironment. It should be particularly useful for the study of the effects of components of the tumor microenvironment on tumor cell invasiveness

  7. Calorimetric assay of minor actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudy, C.; Bracken, D.; Cremers, T.; Foster, L.A.; Ensslin, N.

    1996-12-31

    This paper reviews the principles of calorimetric assay and evaluates its potential application to the minor actinides (U-232-4, Am-241, Am- 243, Cm-245, Np-237). We conclude that calorimetry and high- resolution gamma-ray isotopic analysis can be used for the assay of minor actinides by adapting existing methodologies for Pu/Am-241 mixtures. In some cases, mixtures of special nuclear materials and minor actinides may require the development of new methodologies that involve a combination of destructive and nondestructive assay techniques.

  8. Calorimetric assay of minor actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the principles of calorimetric assay and evaluates its potential application to the minor actinides (U-232-4, Am-241, Am- 243, Cm-245, Np-237). We conclude that calorimetry and high- resolution gamma-ray isotopic analysis can be used for the assay of minor actinides by adapting existing methodologies for Pu/Am-241 mixtures. In some cases, mixtures of special nuclear materials and minor actinides may require the development of new methodologies that involve a combination of destructive and nondestructive assay techniques

  9. Design and Construction of a Two-Temperature Preference Behavioral Assay for Undergraduate Neuroscience Laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Daniels, Richard L.; McKemy, David D

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral assays in the undergraduate neuroscience laboratory are useful for illustrating a variety of physiological concepts. An example is homeostatic temperature regulation (thermoregulation). Many model organisms, from flies to mice, regulate internal temperatures in part by moving to suitable climates (thermotaxis). A particularly reliable method of quantifying temperature-dependent thermotactic behaviors is the two-temperature preference behavioral assay. In this preparation, an organi...

  10. Conservation physiology of animal migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Robert J; Chapman, Jacqueline M; Souliere, Christopher M; Tudorache, Christian; Wikelski, Martin; Metcalfe, Julian D; Cooke, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a widespread phenomenon among many taxa. This complex behaviour enables animals to exploit many temporally productive and spatially discrete habitats to accrue various fitness benefits (e.g. growth, reproduction, predator avoidance). Human activities and global environmental change represent potential threats to migrating animals (from individuals to species), and research is underway to understand mechanisms that control migration and how migration responds to modern challenges. Focusing on behavioural and physiological aspects of migration can help to provide better understanding, management and conservation of migratory populations. Here, we highlight different physiological, behavioural and biomechanical aspects of animal migration that will help us to understand how migratory animals interact with current and future anthropogenic threats. We are in the early stages of a changing planet, and our understanding of how physiology is linked to the persistence of migratory animals is still developing; therefore, we regard the following questions as being central to the conservation physiology of animal migrations. Will climate change influence the energetic costs of migration? Will shifting temperatures change the annual clocks of migrating animals? Will anthropogenic influences have an effect on orientation during migration? Will increased anthropogenic alteration of migration stopover sites/migration corridors affect the stress physiology of migrating animals? Can physiological knowledge be used to identify strategies for facilitating the movement of animals? Our synthesis reveals that given the inherent challenges of migration, additional stressors derived from altered environments (e.g. climate change, physical habitat alteration, light pollution) or interaction with human infrastructure (e.g. wind or hydrokinetic turbines, dams) or activities (e.g. fisheries) could lead to long-term changes to migratory phenotypes. However, uncertainty remains

  11. A novel fluorescence-based cellular permeability assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ankur; Barillas, Samuel; Suliman, Ahmed; Angle, Niren

    2007-04-10

    Vascular permeability is a pathologic process in many disease states ranging from metastatic progression of malignancies to ischemia-reperfusion injury. In order to more precisely study tissue, and more specifically cell layer permeability, our goal was to create a fluorescence-based assay which could quantify permeability without radioactivity or electrical impedance measurements. Human aortic endothelial cells were grown in monolayer culture on Costar-Transwell clear polyester membrane 6-well cell culture inserts. After monolayer integrity was confirmed, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF(165)) at varying concentrations with a fixed concentration of yellow-green fluorescent 0.04 microm carboxylate-modified FluoSpheres microspheres were placed in the luminal chamber and incubated for 24 h. When stimulated with VEGF(165) at 20, 40, 80, and 100 ng/ml, this assay system was able to detect increases in trans-layer flux of 8.2+/-2.4%, 16.0+/-3.7%, 41.5+/-4.9%, and 58.6+/-10.1% for each concentration, respectively. This represents the first fluorescence-based permeability assay with the sensitivity to detect changes in the permeability of a cell layer to fluid flux independent of protein flux; as well as being simpler and safer than previous radioactive-and impedance-based permeability assays. With the application of this in vitro assay to a variety of pathologic conditions, both the dynamics and physiology relating to cellular permeability can be more fully investigated. PMID:16962665

  12. Oxidative Stress Facilitates IFN-γ-Induced Mimic Extracellular Trap Cell Death in A549 Lung Epithelial Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chien, Shun-Yi; Tseng, Po-Chun; Wang, Yu-Chih; Tsai, Tsung-Ting

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that IFN-γ induces an autophagy-regulated mimic extracellular trap cell death (ETosis) in A549 human lung cancer cells. Regarding reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in ETosis, this study investigated the role of oxidative stress. After IFN-γ stimulation, a necrosis-like cell death mimic ETosis occurred accompanied by the inhibition of cell growth, aberrant nuclear staining, and nucleosome release. ROS were generated in a time-dependent manner with an increase in NADPH oxidase component protein expression. STAT1-mediated IFN regulatory factor-1 activation was essential for upregulating ROS production. By genetically silencing p47phox, IFN-γ-induced ROS and mimic ETosis were significantly attenuated. This mechanistic study indicated that ROS may mediate DNA damage followed by histone H3 citrullination. Furthermore, ROS promoted IFN-γ-induced mimic ETosis in cooperation with autophagy. These findings further demonstrate that ROS regulates IFN-γ-induced mimic ETosis in lung epithelial malignancy. PMID:27575372

  13. Review of Breast Cancers That Can Mimic a Cystic Component: Ultrasonographic and Pathologic Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yun Woo; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin; Lee, Dong Wha [Dept. of Radiology, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Whan [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Seung Bo [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang Gumi Hospital, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    We illustrate the sonographic findings of malignant breast masses that can mimic a cystic component with pathologic correlations. The disease entities presented in this study include infiltrating ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), papillary carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, metaplastic carcinoma, and a malignant phyllodes tumor. Malignant masses with a cystic component are often characterized by well-circumscribed round, oval, or lobular masses, thereby appearing benign on ultrasonography. On pathology, the cystic component of a malignant mass is identified by cystic degeneration, hemorrhage, necrosis, or ductal dilatation. If the mass is well-circumscribed with a cystic component, a biopsy should be considered in the analysis of the solid component within a mass.

  14. Effects of disc asymmetries on astrometric measurements - Can they mimic planets?

    CERN Document Server

    Kral, Quentin; Kennedy, Grant; Souami, Damya

    2016-01-01

    Astrometry covers a parameter space that cannot be reached by RV or transit methods to detect terrestrial planets on wide orbits. In addition, high accuracy astrometric measurements are necessary to measure the inclination of the planet's orbits. Here we investigate the principles of an artefact of the astrometric approach. Namely, the displacement of the photo-centre due to inhomogeneities in a dust disc around the parent star. Indeed, theory and observations show that circumstellar discs can present strong asymmetries. We model the pseudo-astrometric signal caused by these inhomogeneities, asking whether a dust clump in a disc can mimic the astrometric signal of an Earth-like planet. We show that these inhomogeneities cannot be neglected when using astrometry to find terrestrial planets. We provide the parameter space for which these inhomogeneities can affect the astrometric signals but still not be detected by mid-IR observations. We find that a small cross section of dust corresponding to a cometary mass...

  15. Giant Polymersome Protocells Dock with Virus Particle Mimics via Multivalent Glycan-Lectin Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubilis, Artur; Abdulkarim, Ali; Eissa, Ahmed M; Cameron, Neil R

    2016-01-01

    Despite the low complexity of their components, several simple physical systems, including microspheres, coacervate droplets and phospholipid membrane structures (liposomes), have been suggested as protocell models. These, however, lack key cellular characteristics, such as the ability to replicate or to dock with extracellular species. Here, we report a simple method for the de novo creation of synthetic cell mimics in the form of giant polymeric vesicles (polymersomes), which are capable of behavior approaching that of living cells. These polymersomes form by self-assembly, under electroformation conditions, of amphiphilic, glycosylated block copolymers in aqueous solution. The glycosylated exterior of the resulting polymeric giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) allows their selective interaction with carbohydrate-binding receptor-functionalized particles, in a manner reminiscent of the cell-surface docking of virus particles. We believe that this is the first example of a simple protocell model displaying cell-like behavior through a native receptor-ligand interaction. PMID:27576579

  16. Do consistent F(R) models mimic general relativity plus Λ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modified gravity models are subject to a number of consistency requirements which restrict the form that the function F(R) can take. We study a particular class of F(R) functions which satisfy various constraints that have been found in the literature. These models have a late time accelerating epoch, and an acceptable matter era. We calculate the Friedmann equation for our models, and show that in order to satisfy the constraints we impose, they must mimic general relativity plus Λ throughout the cosmic history, with exponentially suppressed corrections. We also find that the free parameters in our model must be fine tuned to obtain an acceptable late time accelerating phase. We discuss the generality of this conclusion

  17. A processable rainbow mimic fluorescent polymer and its unprecedented coloration efficiency in electrochromic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cihaner, Atilla [Chemistry Group, Faculty of Engineering, Atilim University, 06836 Ankara (Turkey); Algi, Fatih [Department of Chemistry, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, 17100 Canakkale (Turkey)

    2008-01-01

    A processable rainbow mimic fluorescent polymer (PSNSF) based on 1-(9H-fluoren-2-yl)-2,5-di(thiophen-2-yl)-1H-pyrrole (SNSF) was synthesized via electrochemical polymerization in a mixture of ethanol and CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} solution containing 0.1 M LiClO{sub 4}. Characterization was carried out using cyclic voltammetry, UV-vis and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. Also, an electrochromic device based on PSNSF was studied, which exhibits high coloration efficiency (CE), high redox stability (retaining 98.6% of its optical activity after 4000th switch) and very low response time (less than 0.5 s). (author)

  18. Bilateral Tubo Ovarian Abscess Mimics Ovarian Cancer on MRI and 18F FDG PET/CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 20 year old woman, who presented with a several week history of abdominal pain, was referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and 18F fluorodeoxy glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) after an ultrasound showed complex cystic masses arising from both ovaries. The MRI and 18F FDG PET/CT imaging characteristics of the ovarian masses were strongly suspicious for malignancy, and the masses were surgically removed. Histopathological evaluation revealed a bilateral tuboovarian abscess, with no evidence of malignancy. This case highlights a potentially serious pitfall in the evaluation of suspicious pelvic masses by 18F FDG PET/CT, Whereby a complex bilateral tuboovarian abscess may mimic the PET/CT imaging characteristics of an ovarian or pelvic malignancy.

  19. Systemic lupus erythematosis with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: A mimic of Buerger′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasugi Zoya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report is about a past smoker who presented with history of recurrent ulcers and digital gangrene with claudication pain of the left foot for the past fifteen years. Clinical examination and angiogram showed disease involving the peripheral vessels of lowervlimb. This patient had been labeled as Buerger′s disease 15 years ago based on clinical and demographic profile of the illness. We felt that the progression of the disease despite the patient having stopped smoking 15 years ago along with the presence of elevated inflammatory markers in the blood with proteinuria was not in keeping with the nature of the disease. Furthur evaluation revealed that the patient had systemic lupus erythematosus with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. This case highlights the need for a careful search for diseases, which can mimic Buerger′s disease in young smokers who present with peripheral vascular disease and who have an atypical clinical presentation or progression.

  20. A Fluorescent Sensor for Dual-Channel Discrimination between Phosgene and a Nerve-Gas Mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Zeng, Yiying; Liyan, Chen; Wu, Xue; Yoon, Juyoung

    2016-04-01

    The ability to analyze highly toxic chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and related chemicals in a rapid and precise manner is essential in order to alleviate serious threats to humankind and public security caused by unexpected terrorist attacks and industrial accidents. In this investigation, we designed a o-phenylenediamine-pyronin linked dye that is capable of both fluorogenic and colorimetric discrimination between phosgene and the prototypical nerve-agent mimic, diethyl chlorophosphate (DCP) in the solution or gas phase. Moreover, this dye has been used to construct a portable kit that can be employed for real-time monitoring of DCP and phosgene in the field, both in a discriminatory manner, and in a simple and safe way. PMID:26938275

  1. Effects of disc asymmetries on astrometric measurements. Can they mimic planets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Q.; Schneider, J.; Kennedy, G.; Souami, D.

    2016-07-01

    Astrometry covers a parameter space that cannot be reached by RV or transit methods to detect terrestrial planets on wide orbits. In addition, high accuracy astrometric measurements are necessary to measure the inclination of the planet's orbits. Here we investigate the principles of an artefact of the astrometric approach, namely the displacement of the photo-centre owing to inhomogeneities in a dust disc around the parent star. Indeed, theory and observations show that circumstellar discs can present strong asymmetries. We model the pseudo-astrometric signal caused by these inhomogeneities, asking whether a dust clump in a disc can mimic the astrometric signal of an Earth-like planet. We show that these inhomogeneities cannot be neglected when using astrometry to find terrestrial planets. We provide the parameter space for which these inhomogeneities can affect the astrometric signals but still not be detected by mid-IR observations. We find that a small cross section of dust corresponding to a cometary mass object is enough to mimic the astrometric signal of an Earth-like planet. Astrometric observations of protoplanetary discs to search for planets can also be affected by the presence of inhomogeneities. Some further tests are given to confirm whether an observation is a real astrometric signal from a planet or an impostor. Eventually, we also study the case where the cross-section of dust is high enough to provide a detectable IR-excess and to have a measurable photometric displacement by actual instruments such as Gaia, IRAC, or GRAVITY. We suggest a new method, which consists of using astrometry to quantify asymmetries (clumpiness) in inner debris discs that cannot be otherwise resolved.

  2. Synthetic collagen heterotrimers: structural mimics of wild-type and mutant collagen type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauba, Varun; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D

    2008-06-11

    Collagen type I is an AAB heterotrimer assembled from two alpha1 chains and one alpha2 chain. Missense mutations in either of these chains that substitute a glycine residue in the ubiquitous X-Y-Gly repeat with a bulky amino acid leads to osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) of varying severity. These mutations have been studied in the past using collagen-like peptide homotrimers as a model system. However, homotrimers, which by definition will contain glycine mutations in all the three chains, do not accurately mimic the mutations in their native form and result in an exaggerated effect on stability and folding. In this article, we report the design of a novel model system based upon collagen-like heterotrimers that can mimic the glycine mutations present in either the alpha1 or alpha2 chains of type I collagen. This design utilizes an electrostatic recognition motif in three chains that can force the interaction of any three peptides, including AAA (all same), AAB (two same and one different), or ABC (all different) triple helices. Therefore, the component peptides can be designed in such a way that glycine mutations are present in zero, one, two, or all three chains of the triple helix. With this design, we for the first time report collagen mutants containing one or two glycine substitutions with structures relevant to native forms of OI. Furthermore, we demonstrate the difference in thermal stability and refolding half-life times between triple helices that vary only in the frequency of glycine mutations at a particular position. PMID:18481852

  3. A Specific Saturation Assay Technique for Serum Triiodothyronine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triiodothyronine (T3) exists in plasma at a concentration of approximately 0.3 μg/100 ml (representing 3-5% of the total thyroid hormone present); nevertheless it accounts for more than 20% of the secretion of hormonal iodine. Moreover, because of the relative biological potencies of thyroxine (T4) and T3, the latter compound represents roughly half the biologically effective hormone secreted by the thyroid gland. Serum T3 may, in principle, be assayed by saturation assay techniques relying on serum thyroxine binding protein as the saturable binding reagent, and at least one such method has been published. However, in our own thyroxine assay procedure T4 is approximately eight times more reactive than T3; this implies that, to measure serum T3 to an accuracy of better than 10% it is essential that not more than 0.05% of serum T4 should remain as a contaminant of T3 extracts. Observations of this kind raise doubts regarding the accuracy of published 13 estimates relying on T. B. P. /saturation assay techniques, and underline the desirability of an assay method designed to discriminate more effectively against T4. We have succeeded in raising specific antibodies directed against T3 which are essentially non-reaptive with T4. Using these as the saturable reagent, we have devised an assay technique sensitive to approximately 50 pg T3/ml of incubation mixture. Such sensitivity enables normal serum T3 values to be readily measured using starting volumes of blood of about 1-2 ml, and the physiological role of this hormone in health and disease to be elucidated. The application of the method to the assay of the iodinated amino acids MIT and DIT and to other similar compounds of a normally non- antigenic nature is also discussed. (author)

  4. Physiological conjunction of allelochemicals and desert plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital Yosef Friedjung

    Full Text Available Plants exchange signals with other physical and biological entities in their habitat, a form of communication termed allelopathy. The underlying principles of allelopathy and secondary-metabolite production are still poorly understood, especially in desert plants. The coordination and role of secondary metabolites were examined as a cause of allelopathy in plants thriving under arid and semiarid soil conditions. Desert plant species, Origanum dayi, Artemisia sieberi and Artemisia judaica from two different sources (cultivar cuttings and wild seeds were studied in their natural habitats. Growth rate, relative water content, osmotic potential, photochemical efficiency, volatile composition and vital factors of allelopathy were analyzed at regular intervals along four seasons with winter showing optimum soil water content and summer showing water deficit conditions. A comprehensive analysis of the volatile composition of the leaves, ambient air and soil in the biological niche of the plants under study was carried out to determine the effects of soil water conditions and sample plants on the surrounding flora. Significant morpho-physiological changes were observed across the seasons and along different soil water content. Metabolic analysis showed that water deficit was the key for driving selective metabolomic shifts. A. judaica showed the least metabolic shifts, while A. sieberi showed the highest shifts. All the species exhibited high allelopathic effects; A. judaica displayed relatively higher growth-inhibition effects, while O. dayi showed comparatively higher germination-inhibition effects in germination assays. The current study may help in understanding plant behavior, mechanisms underlying secondary-metabolite production in water deficit conditions and metabolite-physiological interrelationship with allelopathy in desert plants, and can help cull economic benefits from the produced volatiles.

  5. Technical advance: soluble OX40 molecule mimics regulatory T cell modulatory activity on FcεRI-dependent mast cell degranulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibilano, Riccardo; Gri, Giorgia; Frossi, Barbara; Tripodo, Claudio; Suzuki, Ryo; Rivera, Juan; MacDonald, Andrew S; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2011-10-01

    Tregs play a central role in modulating FcεRI-dependent MC effector functions in the course of the allergic response. Cellular interaction depends on the constitutive expression of OX40 on Tregs and the OX40L counterpart on MCs. Study of OX40L signaling on MCs is hampered by the need of a highly purified molecule, which triggers OX40L specifically. We now report that sOX40 mimics the physiological activity of Treg interaction by binding to activated MCs. When treated with sOX40, activated MCs showed decreased degranulation and Ca(++) influx, whereas PLC-γ2 phosphorylation remained unaffected. Once injected into experimental animals, sOX40 not only located within the endothelium but also in parenchyma, where it could be found in close proximity and apparently bound to MCs. This soluble molecule triggers MC-OX40L without the requirement of Tregs, thus allowing study of OX40L signaling pathways in MCs and in other OX40L-expressing cell populations. Importantly, as sOX40 inhibits MC degranulation, it may provide an in vivo therapeutic tool in allergic disease. PMID:21653238

  6. Regulation of ferritin mRNA translation in primary erythroblasts: exogenous c-Kit plus EpoR signaling mimics v-ErbA oncoprotein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulits, W; Schranzhofer, M; Deiner, E M; Beug, H; Müllner, E W

    2000-08-28

    In general, translation efficiency of ferritin mRNAs is modulated by variations in iron supply. In primary avian erythroblasts undergoing short-term proliferation, however, ferritin heavy chain (ferH) mRNA is repressed at all iron levels. Yet, expression of v-ErbA oncoprotein is sufficient to reinduce ferH mRNA utilization at physiological iron concentrations. Since overexpression of the receptor tyrosine kinase c-Kit and erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) stimulates long-term proliferation of primary erythroblasts like v-ErbA, we analyzed the impact of cooperation between c-Kit and EpoR on the regulation of iron storage. Whereas endogenous c-Kit in combination with exogenous EpoR had no significant effect, ectopic overexpression of both receptors abolished translational repression of ferH mRNA upon iron administration. Thus, high-intensity signaling through c-Kit plus EpoR pathways mimics the v-ErbA-mediated regulatory phenotype. PMID:10964660

  7. Endocrine regulation of circadian physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Anthony H; Astiz, Mariana; Friedrichs, Maureen; Oster, Henrik

    2016-07-01

    Endogenous circadian clocks regulate 24-h rhythms of behavior and physiology to align with external time. The endocrine system serves as a major clock output to regulate various biological processes. Recent findings suggest that some of the rhythmic hormones can also provide feedback to the circadian system at various levels, thus contributing to maintaining the robustness of endogenous rhythmicity. This delicate balance of clock-hormone interaction is vulnerable to modern lifestyle factors such as shiftwork or high-calorie diets, altering physiological set points. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the communication between the circadian timing and endocrine systems, with a focus on adrenal glucocorticoids and metabolic peptide hormones. We explore the potential role of hormones as systemic feedback signals to adjust clock function and their relevance for the maintenance of physiological and metabolic circadian homeostasis. PMID:27106109

  8. Correlation between the genotoxicity endpoints measured by two different genotoxicity assays: comet assay and CBMN assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2015-06-01

    The results concerning of positive findings by micronuclei and non significant ones by comet assay, are corroborated by Deng et al. (2005 study performed in workers occupationally exposed to methotrexate, also a cytostatic drug. According to Cavallo et al. (2009, the comet assay seems to be more suitable for the prompt evaluation of the genotoxic effects, for instance, of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons mixtures containing volatile substances, whereas the micronucleus test seems more appropriate to evaluate the effects of exposure to antineoplastic agents. However, there are studies that observed an increase in both the comet assay and the micronucleus test in nurses handling antineoplastic drugs, although statistical significance was only seen in the comet assay, quite the opposite of our results (Maluf & Erdtmann, 2000; Laffon et al. 2005.

  9. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its Biosensing Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong J.; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Zhaohui; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-15

    Ferritins are nano-scale globular protein cages encapsulating a ferric core. They widely exist in animals, plants, and microbes, playing indispensable roles in iron homeostasis. Interestingly, our study clearly demonstrates that ferritin has an enzyme-mimic activity derived from its ferric nano-core, but not the protein cage. Further study revealed that the mimic-enzyme activity of ferritin is more thermally stable and pH-tolerant compared with horseradish peroxidase. Considering the abundance of ferritin in numerous organisms, this finding may indicate a new role of ferritin in antioxidant and detoxification metabolisms. In addition, as a natural protein-caged nanoparticle with an enzyme-mimic activity, ferritin is readily conjugated with biomolecules to construct nano-biosensors, thus holds promising potential for facile and biocompatible labeling for sensitive and robust bioassays in biomedical applications.

  10. Stimulating Student Interest in Physiology: The Intermedical School Physiology Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hwee-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The Intermedical School Physiology Quiz (IMSPQ) was initiated in 2003 during the author's last sabbatical from the University of Malaya. At this inaugural event, there were just seven competing teams from Malaysian medical schools. The challenge trophy for the IMSPQ is named in honor of Prof. A. Raman, who was the first Malaysian Professor of…

  11. Natural enamel wear--a physiological source of hydroxylapatite nanoparticles for biofilm management and tooth repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannig, C; Hannig, M

    2010-04-01

    Dental caries is a widespread chronic disease caused by glucolytic biofilms. Despite considerable success in prophylaxis, there is still a strong demand for biomimetic biofilm management. Reflections on the abraded, but mostly caries-free teeth observed in prehistoric sculls or omnivorous primates, respectively, offer perspectives for developing new approaches in preventive dentistry. It is hypothesized that nano-sized hydroxylapatite crystallites occur in the oral cavity during extensive physiological wear of the hierarchical structured enamel surface due to dental abrasion and attrition. These nano-scaled apatite enamel crystallites might promote re-mineralization and physiological biofilm management at the tooth surface. Indeed, modern bioinspired nanomaterials in preventive dentistry containing nano-sized hydroxylapatite particles have shown efficacy in reducing oral biofilm formation and yield re-mineralizing effects. Accordingly, they seem to mimic extensive abrasions which do not occur with modern diet. PMID:19962245

  12. Construction of short tandem target mimic (STTM) to block the functions of plant and animal microRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Guiliang; Yan, Jun; Gu, Yiyou; Qiao, Mengmeng; Fan, Ruiwen; Mao, Yiping; Tang, Xiaoqing

    2012-01-01

    Small RNAs are widespread in plants and animals. They largely include microRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), and they play key roles in gene and chromatin regulations. Here we describe in detail the method for an effective construction of the recently developed short tandem target mimic (STTM) technology to block small RNA functions in plants and animals. STTM is a powerful technology complementing the previous target mimic (TM) in plants and the miRNA sponge, as well as the ...

  13. Evaluation of an ATP Assay to Quantify Bacterial Attachment to Surfaces in Reduced Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmele, Michele N.; Roberson, Luke B.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To develop an assay to quantify the biomass of attached cells and biofilm formed on wetted surfaces in variable-gravity environments. Methods and Results: Liquid cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were exposed to 30-35 brief cycles of hypergravity (assays were completed within 8 hours of exposure to variable gravity. The intracellular ATP luminescent assay accurately reflected cell physiology compared to both cultivation-based and direct-count microscopy analyses. Cells exposed to variable gravity had more than twice as much intracellular ATP as control cells exposed only to normal Earth gravity.

  14. Design and synthesis of cis-restricted benzimidazole and benzothiazole mimics of combretastatin A-4 as antimitotic agents with apoptosis inducing ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Md; Shaik, Thokhir B; Malik, M Shaheer; Syed, Riyaz; Mallipeddi, Prema L; Vardhan, M V P S Vishnu; Kamal, Ahmed

    2016-09-15

    A series of colchicine site binding tubulin inhibitors were designed and synthesized by the modification of the combretastatin A-4 (CA4) pharmacophore. The ring B was replaced by the pharmacologically relevant benzimidazole or benzothiazole scaffolds, and the cis-configuration of the olefinic bond was restricted by the incorporation of a pyridine ring which is envisaged by the structural resemblance to a tubulin inhibitor like E7010. These compounds were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity on selected cancer cell lines and an insight in the structure activity relationship was developed. The most potent compounds (6c and 6l) demonstrated an antiproliferative effect comparable and superior to that of CA4 (GI50 up to 40nM). Mitotic cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase revealed the disruption of microtubule dynamics that was confirmed by tubulin polymerization assays and immunocytochemistry studies at the cellular level. The molecular docking studies suggested that the binding of these mimics at the colchicine site of the tubulin is similar to that of combretastatin A-4. PMID:27515320

  15. Physiological aspects of paired stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijler, F.L.; Durrer, D.

    1965-01-01

    In this paper some physiological and clinical aspects of paired stimulation are discussed. I) The augmenting effect of paired stimulation on rnyocardial contractility is due to potentiation (increase in speed of restitution) and fusion of two contractions. 2) While using paired stimulation the oxyg

  16. Physiological adaptation in desert birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, JB; Tieleman, BI; Williams, Joseph B.

    2005-01-01

    We call into question the idea that birds have not evolved unique physiological adaptations to desert environments. The rate at which desert larks metabolize energy is lower than in mesic species within the same family, and this lower rate of living translates into a lower overall energy requirement

  17. Physiology Of Prolonged Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes physiological effects of prolonged bed rest. Rest for periods of 24 hours or longer deconditions body to some extent; healing proceeds simultaneously with deconditioning. Report provides details on shifts in fluid electrolytes and loss of lean body mass, which comprises everything in body besides fat - that is, water, muscle, and bone. Based on published research.

  18. Exercise Effects on Sleep Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunao eUchida

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review focuses on the effects of exercise on sleep. In its early days, sleep research largely focused on central nervous system (CNS physiology using standardized tabulations of several sleep-specific landmark electroencephalogram (EEG waveforms. Though coarse, this method has enabled the observation and inspection of numerous uninterrupted sleep phenomena. Thus, research on the effects of exercise on sleep began, in the 1960’s, with a focus primarily on sleep EEG (CNS sleep changes. Those early studies found only small effects of exercise on sleep. More recent sleep research has explored not only CNS functioning, but somatic physiology as well. As physical exercise mostly affects somatic functions, endocrine and autonomic nervous system (ANS changes that occur during sleep should be affected by daytime exercise. Since endocrinological, metabolic and autonomic changes can be measured during sleep, it should be possible to assess exercise effects on somatic physiology in addition to CNS sleep quality, building from standard polysomnographic (PSG techniques. Incorporating measures of somatic physiology in the quantitative assessment of sleep could further our understanding of sleep's function as an auto-regulatory, global phenomenon.

  19. Exercise effects on sleep physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Sunao; Shioda, Kohei; Morita, Yuko; Kubota, Chie; Ganeko, Masashi; Takeda, Noriko

    2012-01-01

    This mini-review focuses on the effects of exercise on sleep. In its early days, sleep research largely focused on central nervous system (CNS) physiology using standardized tabulations of several sleep-specific landmark electroencephalogram (EEG) waveforms. Though coarse, this method has enabled the observation and inspection of numerous uninterrupted sleep phenomena. The research on the effects of exercise on sleep began, in the 1960s, with a focus primarily on sleep related EEG changes (CNS sleep). Those early studies found only small effects of exercise on sleep. However, more recent sleep research has explored not only CNS functioning, but somatic physiology as well. Sleep should be affected by daytime exercise, as physical activity alters endocrine, autonomic nervous system (ANS), and somatic functions. Since endocrinological, metabolic, and autonomic changes can be measured during sleep, it should be possible to assess exercise effects on somatic physiology in addition to CNS sleep quality, evaluated by standard polysomnographic (PSG) techniques. Additional measures of somatic physiology have provided enough evidences to conclude that the auto-regulatory, global regulation of sleep is not the exclusive domain of the CNS, but it is heavily influenced by inputs from the rest of the body. PMID:22485106

  20. Assay for optical determination of biogenic amines using microtiterplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedeljko, Polona; Turel, Matejka; Lobnik, Aleksandra

    2013-05-01

    Direct determination of catecholamine noradreanaline (NOR) is presented using o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) as an indicator reagent. The fluorescent assay in which OPA forms with NOR a fluorescent complex (OPA-NOR) can be monitored at neutral, physiological conditions (pH 7) and performed in microtiterplates. The determination of NOR is optimal in the concentration range from 4.0×10-7 to 1.0×10-5 M and limit of detection is 4.0×10-7 M. The OPA-NOR complex maximum intensity is reached within 5 minutes. Dopamine and adrenaline could not be determined using the same approach.

  1. Development of a homogeneous binding assay for histamine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Kathy; Shih, Daw-Tsun

    2004-12-01

    Histamine is critically involved in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes through its actions at different receptors. Thus, histamine receptors have been actively pursued as therapeutic targets in the pharmaceutical industry for the treatment of a variety of diseases. There are currently four histamine receptors that have been cloned, all of which are G protein-coupled receptors. Studies from both academia and pharmaceutical companies have identified compounds that modulate the function of specific histamine receptors. These efforts led to the successful introduction of histamine H(1) and H(2) receptor antagonists for the treatment of allergy and excess gastric acid secretion, respectively. Histamine H(3) receptor ligands are currently under investigation for the treatment of obesity and neurological disorders. The recently identified histamine H(4) receptor is preferentially expressed in the immune tissues, suggesting a potential role in normal immune functions and possibly in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Even with the long history of histamine research and the important applications of histamine receptor ligands, assays to measure the affinity of compounds binding to histamine receptors are still routinely analyzed using a filtration assay, a very low-throughput assay involving washing and filtration steps. This article describes a simple, robust, and homogeneous binding assay based on the scintillation proximity assay (SPA) technology that provides results equivalent to those obtained using the more complex filtration assay. The SPA format is easily adapted to high-throughput screening because it is amenable to automation. In summary, this technique allows high-throughput screening of compounds against multiple histamine receptors and, thus, facilitates drug discovery efforts. PMID:15519569

  2. The pattern recognition molecule deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) and synthetic mimics inhibit liposomal nucleic acid delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Hansen, Pernille; Blaich, Stephanie; End, Caroline; Schmidt, Steffen; Møller, Jesper Bonnet; Holmskov, Uffe; Mollenhauer, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Liposomal nucleic acid delivery is a preferred option for therapeutic settings. The cellular pattern recognition molecule DMBT1, secreted at high levels in various diseases, and synthetic mimics efficiently inhibit liposomal nucleic acid delivery to human cells. These findings may have relevance ...

  3. Insights into molecular recognition of LewisX mimics by DC-SIGN using NMR and molecular modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we have studied in detail the binding of two α-fucosyl-amide-based mimics of LewisX to DC-SIGN ECD (ECD = extracellular domain) using STD NMR and docking. We have concluded that the binding mode occurs mainly through the fucose moiety, in the same way as LewisX. Similarly to other mimics containing mannose or fucose previously studied, we have shown that both compounds bind to DC-SIGN ECD in a multimodal fashion. In this case, the main contact is the interaction of two hydroxyl groups one equatorial and the other one axial (O3 and O4) of the fucose with the Ca2+ as LewisX and similarly to mannose-containing mimics (in this case the interacting groups are both in the equatorial position). Finally, we have measured the KD of one mimic that was 0.4 mM. Competitive STD NMR experiments indicate that the aromatic moiety provides additional binding contacts that increase the affinity. (authors)

  4. The design of redox active thiol peroxidase mimics: Dihydrolipoic acid recognition correlates with cytotoxicity and prooxidant action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadehvakili, B; McNeill, S M; Fawcett, J P; Giles, G I

    2016-03-15

    Redox active molecules containing organoselenium or organotellurium groups catalyse the oxidation of cellular thiols by hydrogen peroxide and are currently being developed as therapeutic agents. Potentially these synthetic thiol peroxidase (TPx) mimics can protect cells from oxidative stress by catalysing the reduction of reactive oxygen species by the cellular thiol glutathione, an activity which mimics the function of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase. Alternatively they can act as prooxidants by catalysing the oxidation of essential thiol species within the cell. However the structure-activity relationships which determine the choice of thiol substrate, and hence the overall antioxidant or prooxidant outcome of drug administration, remain unknown. We report the first study that relates the pharmacological properties of TPx mimics with their solubility and catalytic activity using different thiol substrates. We used a series of structurally related compounds PhMCnH2n+1 (M=Se, Te; n=4-7) and investigated their ability to catalyse the oxidation of the cellular thiols glutathione and dihydrolipoic acid by hydrogen peroxide. The resulting rate constants (kobs) were then related to compound cytotoxicity and antioxidant versus prooxidant action in A549 cancer cells. The results show that the dihydrolipoic acid kobs values correlate with both cytotoxicity and prooxidant function. This enabled us to define a relationship, IC50=10+280e(-5(DHLA)(kobs)()), which allows the prediction of TPx mimic cytotoxicity. In contrast, hydrophobicity and glutathione kobs were unrelated to the compounds' redox pharmacology. PMID:26801688

  5. Fluorometric, water-based sensors for the detection of nerve gas G mimics DMMP, DCP and DCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Andreas; Winter, Andreas; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2012-01-25

    Water-based Zn(II) bisterpyridine systems were used as fluorometric sensors for the detection of the nerve gas G mimics DMMP, DCP and DCNP. Analyte concentrations in the range of 10(-7) to 10(-6) M are detectable in solution. The utilization of a test stripe additionally allows the detection of organophosphonates from the gas phase. PMID:22158657

  6. V. S. Naipaul’s The Mimic Men: Disillusionment with the Metropolis, Cosmopolitanism and Colonial Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify the disillusionment with metropolitan-centred cosmopolitanism in Naipaul’s The Mimic Men. The immigrants are chosen as the focal point to reveal the dissociation between them and the metropolis. Examining Naipaul’s description of the immigrant population’s metropolitan life, I contend that the cosmopolitan ideology is in stark contrast with the reality of coexistence, intermingling and hybridisation. Mere coexistence of people of heterogeneous cultural, national, religious or other identity formations cannot guarantee the uptake or expression of cosmopolitan openness. Making using of cosmopolitan theories in marketing and sociology and taking subaltern and third world experiences as forces of intervention and interruption into account, the fraudulence and infeasibility of cosmopolitanism as hedonistic consumption of global products and luxurious stylisation of metropolitan life in the novel is highlighted. This study reveals that it is colonial education that builds unreal colonial fantasy of the metropolis and cosmopolitanism on the one hand and leads to disillusionment on the other.Keywords: colonial fantasy, disillusionment, metropolis, immigrant, cosmopolitan openness, consumption, colonial education

  7. Reproducing Natural Spider Silks' Copolymer Behavior in Synthetic Silk Mimics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Bo; Jenkins, Janelle E; Sampath, Sujatha; Holland, Gregory P; Hinman, Mike; Yarger, Jeffery L; Lewis, Randolph [Wyoming; (Sandia); (Utah SU); (AZU)

    2012-10-30

    Dragline silk from orb-weaving spiders is a copolymer of two large proteins, major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1) and 2 (MaSp2). The ratio of these proteins is known to have a large variation across different species of orb-weaving spiders. NMR results from gland material of two different species of spiders, N. clavipes and A. aurantia, indicates that MaSp1 proteins are more easily formed into β-sheet nanostructures, while MaSp2 proteins form random coil and helical structures. To test if this behavior of natural silk proteins could be reproduced by recombinantly produced spider silk mimic protein, recombinant MaSp1/MaSp2 mixed fibers as well as chimeric silk fibers from MaSp1 and MaSp2 sequences in a single protein were produced based on the variable ratio and conserved motifs of MaSp1 and MaSp2 in native silk fiber. Mechanical properties, solid-state NMR, and XRD results of tested synthetic fibers indicate the differing roles of MaSp1 and MaSp2 in the fiber and verify the importance of postspin stretching treatment in helping the fiber to form the proper spatial structure.

  8. Ion Transport Characteristics of Individual Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes Mimic Those of Biological Ion Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Hasti; Shepard, Kenneth; Nuckolls, Colin

    2014-03-01

    Transmembrane ionic channels play a crucial role in vital cellular activities by regulating the transport of ions and fluid across the cell membrane. Their structural complexity and flexibility as well as their many unique operational features, however, make their investigation extremely difficult. The simple, atomically smooth and well-defined structure of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) provides an excellent template for studying molecular transport at nanoscale. Additionally, CNTs have been suggested as analogues to biological pores since they share several common features such as nanometer size diameter, hydrophobic core and ultrafast water flow. Functionalizing the nanotube entrance can also mimic the selectivity filter of ion channels. In this work, we experimentally study ionic transport through individual single-walled CNTs connecting two fluid reservoirs as a function of pore properties and electrolyte type and concentration. We provide strong evidence that the electrostatic potentials arising from the ionized carboxyl groups at the pore entrance significantly influence the ion permeation in a manner consistent with a simple electrostatic mechanism. Lastly, the similarities of ionic transport mechanisms between individual single-walled CNTs and protein ion channels are discussed.

  9. Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology of Parathyroid Carcinoma Mimic Hürthle Cell Thyroid Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chutintorn Sriphrapradang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA can cause misdiagnosis of cytomorphological findings between parathyroid and thyroid lesions. Case Presentation. A 31-year-old man presented with a palpable neck mass on the right thyroid lobe. FNA cytology was reported as intrathyroidal lymphoid hyperplasia. After 5 years, repeated FNA was done on the enlarged nodule with result of Hürthle cell lesion. Prior to right lobectomy, laboratories revealed elevated serum calcium and parathyroid hormone (PTH. Careful history taking revealed chronic knee pain and ossifying fibroma at the maxilla. Ultrasonography showed a 2.8 cm mass inferior to right thyroid lobe. Pathology from en bloc resection was parathyroid carcinoma and immunohistochemical study revealed positivity for PTH. Genetic analysis found somatic mutation of CDC73 gene in exon1 (c.70delG which caused premature stop codon in amino acid 26 (p.Glu24Lysfs2*. The final diagnosis was hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome. Conclusions. FNA cytology of parathyroid can mimic thyroid lesion. It is important to consider and correlate the entire information from clinical history, laboratory, imaging, and FNA.

  10. Medical Textiles as Vascular Implants and Their Success to Mimic Natural Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charanpreet Singh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vascular implants belong to a specialised class of medical textiles. The basic purpose of a vascular implant (graft and stent is to act as an artificial conduit or substitute for a diseased artery. However, the long-term healing function depends on its ability to mimic the mechanical and biological behaviour of the artery. This requires a thorough understanding of the structure and function of an artery, which can then be translated into a synthetic structure based on the capabilities of the manufacturing method utilised. Common textile manufacturing techniques, such as weaving, knitting, braiding, and electrospinning, are frequently used to design vascular implants for research and commercial purposes for the past decades. However, the ability to match attributes of a vascular substitute to those of a native artery still remains a challenge. The synthetic implants have been found to cause disturbance in biological, biomechanical, and hemodynamic parameters at the implant site, which has been widely attributed to their structural design. In this work, we reviewed the design aspect of textile vascular implants and compared them to the structure of a natural artery as a basis for assessing the level of success as an implant. The outcome of this work is expected to encourage future design strategies for developing improved long lasting vascular implants.

  11. On Measuring miRNAs after Transient Transfection of Mimics or Antisense Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Daniel W.; Bracken, Cameron P.; Szubert, Jan M.; Goodall, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to alter microRNA (miRNA) abundance is crucial for studying miRNA function. To achieve this there is widespread use of both exogenous double-stranded miRNA mimics for transient over-expression, and single stranded antisense RNAs (antimiRs) for miRNA inhibition. The success of these manipulations is often assessed using qPCR, but this does not accurately report the level of functional miRNA. Here, we draw attention to this discrepancy, which is overlooked in many published reports. We measured the functionality of exogenous miRNA by comparing the total level of transfected miRNA in whole cell extracts to the level of miRNA bound to Argonaute following transfection and show that the supraphysiological levels of transfected miRNA frequently seen using qPCR do not represent the functional levels, because the majority of transfected RNA that is detected is vesicular and not accessible for loading into Argonaute as functionally active miRNAs. In the case of microRNA inhibition by transient transfection with antisense inhibitors, there is also the potential for discrepancy, because following cell lysis the abundant inhibitor levels from cellular vesicles can directly interfere with the PCR reaction used to measure miRNA level. PMID:23358900

  12. Intratemporal facial nerve neuromas and their mimics: CT and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Kyung Hwan; Cha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Chong Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Joon [Chungang Gil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-05-15

    CT and MR findings of nine cases with intra temporal facial nerve neuromas were described and compared with CT findings of 3 cases with facial nerve palsy and facial nerve canal erosion which may mimic facial nerve neuroma. The tympanic segment of the facial nerve was involved in 8 cases, mastoid segment in 7 cases and labyrinthine segment in 5 cases. The lesions were easily diagnosed with high resolution CT with bone algorithms by showing the expansion of bony structures along the course of the facial nerves. In 4 cases with large vertical segment tumors, extensive destruction of mastoid air cells and external auditory canals posed difficulty in making a diagnosis. Two out of 5 cases with labyrinthine segment involvement were presented as middle cranial fossa masses. MRI with enhancement was performed in 4 cases and was useful in characterizing the lesion as a tumor with its superior sensitivity to enhancement. Three cases of facial neuroma-mimicking lesion including post-inflammatory peri neural thickening, peri neural extension from parotid adenoid cystic carcinoma, and congenita; cholesteatoma showed irregular erosion or mild expansion of the facial nerve canal which may be helpful for differential diagnosis from neuromas.

  13. Extranodal hematopoietic neoplasms and mimics in the head and neck: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakral, Beenu; Zhou, Jane; Medeiros, L Jeffrey

    2015-08-01

    The head and neck region is a common site for extranodal lymphomas, second only to the gastrointestinal tract; and 12% to 15% of all head and neck tumors are lymphomas. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas are most common, and Hodgkin lymphoma occurs rarely at extranodal sites in the head and neck. Most non-Hodgkin lymphomas of the head and neck region are of B-cell lineage, and the Waldeyer ring is the most common site. Head and neck lymphomas have distinctive epidemiological and clinicopathologic features, including an association with immunosuppression, infectious organisms, or autoimmune disorders; site-specific differences (eg, thyroid gland versus ocular adnexa) for common lymphomas, such as extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue; and genetic differences that provide insights into etiology. Furthermore, the diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphomas at extranodal sites implies differences in prognosis and therapeutic implications with lymphomas at nodal sites. In this review, we discuss various types of non-Hodgkin lymphomas and Hodgkin lymphoma, focusing on unique aspects related to the head and neck region. We also discuss a number of newer entities that are clinically indolent as well as mimics of lymphoma that can occur in the head and neck region, including infectious mononucleosis, Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease, Kimura disease, Castleman disease, and immunoglobulin G4-related disease. PMID:26118762

  14. A de novo designed 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxin mimic mediates electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anindya; Sommer, Dayn Joseph; Schmitz, Robert Arthur; Brown, Chelsea Lynn; Gust, Devens; Astashkin, Andrei; Ghirlanda, Giovanna

    2014-12-10

    [Fe-S] clusters, nature's modular electron transfer units, are often arranged in chains that support long-range electron transfer. Despite considerable interest, the design of biomimetic artificial systems emulating multicluster-binding proteins, with the final goal of integrating them in man-made oxidoreductases, remains elusive. Here, we report a novel bis-[4Fe-4S] cluster binding protein, DSD-Fdm, in which the two clusters are positioned within a distance of 12 Å, compatible with the electronic coupling necessary for efficient electron transfer. The design exploits the structural repeat of coiled coils as well as the symmetry of the starting scaffold, a homodimeric helical protein (DSD). In total, eight hydrophobic residues in the core of DSD were replaced by eight cysteine residues that serve as ligands to the [4Fe-4S] clusters. Incorporation of two [4Fe-4S] clusters proceeds with high yield. The two [4Fe-4S] clusters are located in the hydrophobic core of the helical bundle as characterized by various biophysical techniques. The secondary structure of the apo and holo proteins is conserved; further, the incorporation of clusters results in stabilization of the protein with respect to chemical denaturation. Most importantly, this de novo designed protein can mimic the function of natural ferredoxins: we show here that reduced DSD-Fdm transfers electrons to cytochrome c, thus generating the reduced cyt c stoichiometrically. PMID:25437708

  15. Hexaniobate as nanoscale catalyst support for copper oxidase mimics based on metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizeto, Marcos Augusto [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Diadema, SP (Brazil); Alves, Wendel Andrade [Universidade Federal do ABC, SP (Brazil); Barbosa, Cesar Augusto Sales [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Bunge Fertilizantes; Ferreira, Ana Maria da Costa; Constantino, Vera Regina Leopoldo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2006-07-01

    Inorganic materials such as nanoporous zeolitic systems and layered structures have been considered special containers for chemical reactions, in which catalytically active species can show an energetic and/or spatial configuration that favors reactions of low activation energy. In this work, hexaniobate nanoscrolls were evaluated as a support for a metal complex that mimics copper oxidase enzymes. The cationic metal complex, 2-[2-(2-pyridyl)ethylimino-1-ethyl]pyridine-imidazole copper(II), [Cu(apip)imH]{sup 2}, was immobilized into hexaniobate scrolls by an ion exchange reaction. Chemical analysis, electronic and vibrational spectroscopies, thermogravimetric analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques were used to characterize the hexaniobatecopper complex system. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of isolated hexaniobate particles containing the cationic complex showed the presence of scrolls with a wall thickness of about 4.5-7.0 nm and an external diameter of about 25-30 nm. X ray diffraction patterns confirmed the presence of the copper complex in the interlayer spaces of hexaniobate nanoscrolls. The reactivity of the copper complex supported on hexaniobate nanoscrolls was investigated for catechol oxidation in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The formation of hydroxyl radicals (-OH) during the reaction was suggested by EPR data, which were obtained by monitoring the kinetics of DMPO/-OH adduct formation (DMPO is 5,5' dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide, used as spin trap). (author)

  16. Amyloid β-sheet mimics that antagonize protein aggregation and reduce amyloid toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Eisenberg, David; Nowick, James S.

    2012-11-01

    The amyloid protein aggregation associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type II diabetes (among many others) features a bewildering variety of β-sheet-rich structures in transition from native proteins to ordered oligomers and fibres. The variation in the amino-acid sequences of the β-structures presents a challenge to developing a model system of β-sheets for the study of various amyloid aggregates. Here, we introduce a family of robust β-sheet macrocycles that can serve as a platform to display a variety of heptapeptide sequences from different amyloid proteins. We have tailored these amyloid β-sheet mimics (ABSMs) to antagonize the aggregation of various amyloid proteins, thereby reducing the toxicity of amyloid aggregates. We describe the structures and inhibitory properties of ABSMs containing amyloidogenic peptides from the amyloid-β peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, β2-microglobulin associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide associated with type II diabetes, human and yeast prion proteins, and Tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles.

  17. Dosimetric evaluation of a Monte Carlo IMRT treatment planning system incorporating the MIMiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassiah-Szegedi, P.; Fuss, M.; Sheikh-Bagheri, D.; Szegedi, M.; Stathakis, S.; Lancaster, J.; Papanikolaou, N.; Salter, B.

    2007-12-01

    The high dose per fraction delivered to lung lesions in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) demands high dose calculation and delivery accuracy. The inhomogeneous density in the thoracic region along with the small fields used typically in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments poses a challenge in the accuracy of dose calculation. In this study we dosimetrically evaluated a pre-release version of a Monte Carlo planning system (PEREGRINE 1.6b, NOMOS Corp., Cranberry Township, PA), which incorporates the modeling of serial tomotherapy IMRT treatments with the binary multileaf intensity modulating collimator (MIMiC). The aim of this study is to show the validation process of PEREGRINE 1.6b since it was used as a benchmark to investigate the accuracy of doses calculated by a finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm for lung lesions treated on the SBRT dose regime via serial tomotherapy in our previous study. Doses calculated by PEREGRINE were compared against measurements in homogeneous and inhomogeneous materials carried out on a Varian 600C with a 6 MV photon beam. Phantom studies simulating various sized lesions were also carried out to explain some of the large dose discrepancies seen in the dose calculations with small lesions. Doses calculated by PEREGRINE agreed to within 2% in water and up to 3% for measurements in an inhomogeneous phantom containing lung, bone and unit density tissue.

  18. BioMimic fabrication of electrospun nanofibers with high-throughput

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spider-spun fiber is of extraordinary strength and toughness comparable to those of electrospun fiber, the later needs a very high voltage (from several thousands voltage to several ten thousands voltages) applied to water-soluble protein 'soup' that was produced by a spider, furthermore, its mechanical strength dramatically decreases comparable to spider silk. A possible mechanism in spider-spinning process is given, the distinct character in spider-spinning is that its spinneret consists of millions of nano scale tubes, and a bubble can be produced at the apex of each nano-tube. The surface tension of each bubble is extremely small such that it can be spun into nanofibers with an awfully small force, either by the spider's body weight or tension created by the rear legs. We mimic the spider-spinning in electrospinning using an aerated solution, which leads to various small bubbles on surface with very small surface tension, as a result the bubble can be easily electrospun into nanofibers with low applied voltage. This fabrication process possesses features of high productivity, versatility, in addition, the minimum diameter of nanofibers produced by this process can reach as small as 50 nm

  19. A scale-down mimic for mapping the process performance of centrifugation, depth and sterile filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Adrian; Kenty, Brian; Mollet, Michael; Hwang, Kenneth; Rose, Steven; Goldrick, Stephen; Bender, Jean; Farid, Suzanne S; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel

    2016-09-01

    In the production of biopharmaceuticals disk-stack centrifugation is widely used as a harvest step for the removal of cells and cellular debris. Depth filters followed by sterile filters are often then employed to remove residual solids remaining in the centrate. Process development of centrifugation is usually conducted at pilot-scale so as to mimic the commercial scale equipment but this method requires large quantities of cell culture and significant levels of effort for successful characterization. A scale-down approach based upon the use of a shear device and a bench-top centrifuge has been extended in this work towards a preparative methodology that successfully predicts the performance of the continuous centrifuge and polishing filters. The use of this methodology allows the effects of cell culture conditions and large-scale centrifugal process parameters on subsequent filtration performance to be assessed at an early stage of process development where material availability is limited. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1934-1941. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26927621

  20. Dosimetric evaluation of a Monte Carlo IMRT treatment planning system incorporating the MIMiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high dose per fraction delivered to lung lesions in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) demands high dose calculation and delivery accuracy. The inhomogeneous density in the thoracic region along with the small fields used typically in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments poses a challenge in the accuracy of dose calculation. In this study we dosimetrically evaluated a pre-release version of a Monte Carlo planning system (PEREGRINE 1.6b, NOMOS Corp., Cranberry Township, PA), which incorporates the modeling of serial tomotherapy IMRT treatments with the binary multileaf intensity modulating collimator (MIMiC). The aim of this study is to show the validation process of PEREGRINE 1.6b since it was used as a benchmark to investigate the accuracy of doses calculated by a finite size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm for lung lesions treated on the SBRT dose regime via serial tomotherapy in our previous study. Doses calculated by PEREGRINE were compared against measurements in homogeneous and inhomogeneous materials carried out on a Varian 600C with a 6 MV photon beam. Phantom studies simulating various sized lesions were also carried out to explain some of the large dose discrepancies seen in the dose calculations with small lesions. Doses calculated by PEREGRINE agreed to within 2% in water and up to 3% for measurements in an inhomogeneous phantom containing lung, bone and unit density tissue

  1. A new buildup biofilm model that mimics accumulation of material in flexible endoscope channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Luciano, Cristiana; Olson, Nancy; DeGagne, Patricia; Franca, Rodrigo; Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; Alfa, Michelle

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a new build up biofilm (BBF) model that was based on repeated exposure to test soil containing Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and repeated rounds of fixation to mimic the accumulation of patient material in endoscope channels during reprocessing. The new BBF model is a novel adaptation of the minimum biofilm effective concentration (MBEC) 96-well model where biofilm is formed on plastic pegs. The new MBEC-BBF model was developed over eight days and included four rounds of partial fixation using glutaraldehyde. There was 6.14Log10cfu/cm(2) of E. faecalis and 7.71Log10cfu/cm(2) of P. aeruginosa in the final BBF. Four detergents (two enzymatic and two non-enzymatic) were tested alone or in combination with orthophthalaldehyde, glutaraldehyde or accelerated hydrogen peroxide to determine if BBF could be either removed or the bacteria within the BBF killed. None of the detergents alone could remove the biofilm or reduce the bacterial level in the BBF as determined by viable count and scanning electron microscopy. The combination of detergents and disinfectants tested provided a 3 to 5Log10 reduction in viable bacteria but no combination could provide the expected 6Log10 reduction. Our data indicated that once formed BBF was extremely difficult to eliminate. Future research using the BBF model may help develop new cleaning and disinfection methods that can prevent or eliminate BBF within endoscope channels. PMID:27345713

  2. On measuring miRNAs after transient transfection of mimics or antisense inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W Thomson

    Full Text Available The ability to alter microRNA (miRNA abundance is crucial for studying miRNA function. To achieve this there is widespread use of both exogenous double-stranded miRNA mimics for transient over-expression, and single stranded antisense RNAs (antimiRs for miRNA inhibition. The success of these manipulations is often assessed using qPCR, but this does not accurately report the level of functional miRNA. Here, we draw attention to this discrepancy, which is overlooked in many published reports. We measured the functionality of exogenous miRNA by comparing the total level of transfected miRNA in whole cell extracts to the level of miRNA bound to Argonaute following transfection and show that the supraphysiological levels of transfected miRNA frequently seen using qPCR do not represent the functional levels, because the majority of transfected RNA that is detected is vesicular and not accessible for loading into Argonaute as functionally active miRNAs. In the case of microRNA inhibition by transient transfection with antisense inhibitors, there is also the potential for discrepancy, because following cell lysis the abundant inhibitor levels from cellular vesicles can directly interfere with the PCR reaction used to measure miRNA level.

  3. Can f(T) gravity theories mimic ΛCDM cosmic history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setare, M.R.; Mohammadipour, N., E-mail: rezakord@ipm.ir, E-mail: N.Mohammadipour@uok.ac.ir [Department of Science, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-01

    Recently the teleparallel Lagrangian density described by the torsion scalar T has been extended to a function of T. The f(T) modified teleparallel gravity has been proposed as the natural gravitational alternative for dark energy to explain the late time acceleration of the universe. In order to reconstruct the function f(T) by demanding a background ΛCDM cosmology we assume that, (i) the background cosmic history provided by the flat ΛCDM (the radiation ere with ω{sub eff} = (1/3), matter and de Sitter eras with ω{sub eff} = 0 and ω{sub eff} = −1, respectively) (ii) the radiation dominate in the radiation era with Ω{sub 0r} = 1 and the matter dominate during the matter phases when Ω{sub 0m} = 1. We find the cosmological dynamical system which can obey the ΛCDM cosmic history. In each era, we find a critical lines that, the radiation dominated and the matter dominated are one points of them in the radiation and matter phases, respectively. Also, we drive the cosmologically viability condition for these models. We investigate the stability condition with respect to the homogeneous scalar perturbations in each era and we obtain the stability conditions for the fixed points in each eras. Finally, we reconstruct the function f(T) which mimics cosmic expansion history.

  4. Multifunctional and stable bone mimic proteinaceous matrix for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Jong-Eun; Yun, Ye-Rang; Jang, Jun-Hyeog; Yang, Sung-Hee; Kim, Joong-Hyun; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Wall, Ivan B; Knowles, Jonathan C; Kim, Hae-Won

    2015-07-01

    Biomaterial surface design with biomimetic proteins holds great promise for successful regeneration of tissues including bone. Here we report a novel proteinaceous hybrid matrix mimicking bone extracellular matrix that has multifunctional capacity to promote stem cell adhesion and osteogenesis with excellent stability. Osteocalcin-fibronectin fusion protein holding collagen binding domain was networked with fibrillar collagen, featuring bone extracellular matrix mimic, to provide multifunctional and structurally-stable biomatrices. The hybrid protein, integrated homogeneously with collagen fibrillar networks, preserved structural stability over a month. Biological efficacy of the hybrid matrix was proven onto tethered surface of biopolymer porous scaffolds. Mesenchymal stem cells quickly anchored to the hybrid matrix, forming focal adhesions, and substantially conformed to cytoskeletal extensions, benefited from the fibronectin adhesive domains. Cells achieved high proliferative capacity to reach confluence rapidly and switched to a mature and osteogenic phenotype more effectively, resulting in greater osteogenic matrix syntheses and mineralization, driven by the engineered osteocalcin. The hybrid biomimetic matrix significantly improved in vivo bone formation in calvarial defects over 6 weeks. Based on the series of stimulated biological responses in vitro and in vivo the novel hybrid proteinaceous composition will be potentially useful as stem cell interfacing matrices for osteogenesis and bone regeneration. PMID:25934278

  5. To die or not to die? Lessons from lesion mimic mutants

    KAUST Repository

    Bruggeman, Quentin

    2015-01-30

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a ubiquitous genetically regulated process consisting in an activation of finely controlled signaling pathways that lead to cellular suicide. Although some aspects of PCD control appear evolutionary conserved between plants, animals and fungi, the extent of conservation remains controversial. Over the last decades, identification and characterization of several lesion mimic mutants (LMM) has been a powerful tool in the quest to unravel PCD pathways in plants. Thanks to progress in molecular genetics, mutations causing the phenotype of a large number of LMM and their related suppressors were mapped, and the identification of the mutated genes shed light on major pathways in the onset of plant PCD such as (i) the involvements of chloroplasts and light energy, (ii) the roles of sphingolipids and fatty acids, (iii) a signal perception at the plasma membrane that requires efficient membrane trafficking, (iv) secondary messengers such as ion fluxes and ROS and (v) the control of gene expression as the last integrator of the signaling pathways.

  6. Functionalized hybrid nanofibers to mimic native ECM for tissue engineering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppuswamy, Priyadharsini; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Navaneethan, Balchandar; Laiva, Ashang Luwang; Sridhar, Sreepathy; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-12-01

    Nanotechnology being one of the most promising technologies today shows an extremely huge potential in the field of tissue engineering to mimic the porous topography of natural extracellular matrix (ECM). Natural polymers are incorporated into the synthetic polymers to fabricate functionalized hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds, which improve cell and tissue compatibility. The present study identified the biopolymers - aloe vera, silk fibroin and curcumin incorporated into polycaprolactone (PCL) as suitable substrates for tissue engineering. Different combinations of PCL with natural polymers - PCL/aloe vera, PCL/silk fibroin, PCL/aloe vera/silk fibroin, PCL/aloe vera/silk fibroin/curcumin were electrospun into nanofibrous scaffolds. The fabricated two dimensional nanofibrous scaffolds showed high surface area, appropriate mechanical properties, hydrophilicity and porosity, required for the regeneration of diseased tissues. The nanofibrous scaffolds were characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM), porometry, Instron tensile tester, VCA optima contact angle measurement and FTIR to analyze the fiber diameter and morphology, porosity and pore size distribution, mechanical strength, wettability, chemical bonds and functional groups, respectively. The average fiber diameter of obtained fibers ranged from 250 nm to 350 nm and the tensile strength of PCL scaffolds at 4.49 MPa increased upto 8.3 MPa for PCL/silk fibroin scaffolds. Hydrophobicity of PCL decreased with the incorporation of natural polymers, especially for PCL/aloe vera scaffolds. The properties of as-spun nanofiber scaffolds showed their potential as promising scaffold materials in tissue engineering applications.

  7. Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibition mimics intermittent reoxygenation and improves cardioprotection in the hypoxic myocardium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Milano

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Although chronic hypoxia is a claimed myocardial risk factor reducing tolerance to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R, intermittent reoxygenation has beneficial effects and enhances heart tolerance to I/R. AIM OF THE STUDY: To test the hypothesis that, by mimicking intermittent reoxygenation, selective inhibition of phosphodiesterase-5 activity improves ischemia tolerance during hypoxia. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to hypoxia for 15 days (10% O₂ and treated with placebo, sildenafil (1.4 mg/kg/day, i. p., intermittent reoxygenation (1 h/day exposure to room air or both. Controls were normoxic hearts. To assess tolerance to I/R all hearts were subjected to 30-min regional ischemia by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation followed by 3 h-reperfusion. Whereas hypoxia depressed tolerance to I/R, both sildenafil and intermittent reoxygenation reduced the infarct size without exhibiting cumulative effects. The changes in myocardial cGMP, apoptosis (DNA fragmentation, caspase-3 activity (alternative marker for cardiomyocyte apoptosis, eNOS phosphorylation and Akt activity paralleled the changes in cardioprotection. However, the level of plasma nitrates and nitrites was higher in the sildenafil+intermittent reoxygenation than sildenafil and intermittent reoxygenation groups, whereas total eNOS and Akt proteins were unchanged throughout. CONCLUSIONS: Sildenafil administration has the potential to mimic the cardioprotective effects led by intermittent reoxygenation, thereby opening the possibility to treat patients unable to be reoxygenated through a pharmacological modulation of NO-dependent mechanisms.

  8. Chromosome aberration assays in Allium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    The common onion (Allium cepa) is an excellent plant for the assay of chromosome aberrations after chemical treatment. Other species of Allium (A. cepa var. proliferum, A. carinatum, A. fistulosum and A. sativum) have also been used but to a much lesser extent. Protocols have been given for using root tips from either bulbs or seeds of Allium cepa to study the cytological end-points, such as chromosome breaks and exchanges, which follow the testing of chemicals in somatic cells. It is considered that both mitotic and meiotic end-points should be used to a greater extent in assaying the cytogenetic effects of a chemical. From a literature survey, 148 chemicals are tabulated that have been assayed in 164 Allium tests for their clastogenic effect. Of the 164 assays which have been carried out, 75 are reported as giving a positive reaction, 49 positive and with a dose response, 1 positive and temperature-related, 9 borderline positive, and 30 negative; 76% of the chemicals gave a definite positive response. It is proposed that the Allium test be included among those tests routinely used for assessing chromosomal damage induced by chemicals.

  9. Bacterial mutagenicity assays: test methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatehouse, David

    2012-01-01

    The most widely used assays for detecting chemically induced gene mutations are those employing bacteria. The plate incorporation assay using various Salmonella typhimurium LT2 and E. coli WP2 strains is a short-term bacterial reverse mutation assay specifically designed to detect a wide range of chemical substances capable of causing DNA damage leading to gene mutations. The test is used worldwide as an initial screen to determine the mutagenic potential of new chemicals and drugs.The test uses several strains of S. typhimurium which carry different mutations in various genes of the histidine operon, and E. coli which carry the same AT base pair at the critical mutation site within the trpE gene. These mutations act as hot spots for mutagens that cause DNA damage via different mechanisms. When these auxotrophic bacterial strains are grown on a minimal media agar plates containing a trace of the required amino-acid (histidine or tryptophan), only those bacteria that revert to amino-acid independence (His(+) or Tryp(+)) will grow to form visible colonies. The number of spontaneously induced revertant colonies per plate is relatively constant. However, when a mutagen is added to the plate, the number of revertant colonies per plate is increased, usually in a dose-related manner.This chapter provides detailed procedures for performing the test in the presence and absence of a metabolic activation system (S9-mix), including advice on specific assay variations and any technical problems. PMID:22147566

  10. Assays for B lymphocyte function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondada, Subbarao; Robertson, Darrell A

    2003-11-01

    This unit describes the antigenic stimulation of in vitro antibody production by B cells and the subsequent measurement of secreted antibodies. The first basic protocol is a generalized system for inducing in vitro antibody production and can accommodate various types of antigens under study. Secreted antibodies can then be measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or other soluble-antibody detection systems. Alternatively, the number of antibody-producing cells can be quantified by plaque-forming cell (PFC) assays presented in this unit: the Cunningham-Szenberg and the Jerne-Nordin techniques. Both methods employ specially prepared slide chambers, described here, in which the antibody-producing B cells are mixed with complement and indicator sheep red blood cells (SRBC), or with trinitrophenol-modified SRBC (TNP-SRBC), with subsequent lysis and counting of plaques. Because IgM antibodies fix complement efficiently, whereas IgG and IgA antibodies do not, unmodified PFC assays measure only IgM antibodies. The assay can be modified, however, to measure all classes of antibodies or to enumerate total immunoglobulin-secreting B cells, as described in alternate protocols. Yet another method of measuring the number of antibody-producing B cells (in a class-specific fashion) is to use the ELISPOT technique described in UNIT 7.14. The resting B cells used in these procedures are prepared as described in the final support protocols for Percoll gradient centrifugation. PMID:18432909

  11. Application of expert system technology to nondestructive waste assay - initial prototype model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, G.K.; Determan, J.C. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Expert system technology has been identified as a technique useful for filling certain types of technology/capability gaps in existing waste nondestructive assay (NDA) applications. In particular, expert system techniques are being investigated with the intent of providing on-line evaluation of acquired data and/or directed acquisition of data in a manner that mimics the logic and decision making process a waste NDA expert would employ. The space from which information and data sources utilized in this process is much expanded with respect to the algorithmic approach typically utilized in waste NDA. Expert system technology provides a mechanism to manage and reason with this expanded information/data set. The material presented in this paper concerns initial studies and a resultant prototype expert system that incorporates pertinent information, and evaluation logic and decision processes, for the purpose of validating acquired waste NDA measurement assays. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Application of expert system technology to nondestructive waste assay - initial prototype model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Expert system technology has been identified as a technique useful for filling certain types of technology/capability gaps in existing waste nondestructive assay (NDA) applications. In particular, expert system techniques are being investigated with the intent of providing on-line evaluation of acquired data and/or directed acquisition of data in a manner that mimics the logic and decision making process a waste NDA expert would employ. The space from which information and data sources utilized in this process is much expanded with respect to the algorithmic approach typically utilized in waste NDA. Expert system technology provides a mechanism to manage and reason with this expanded information/data set. The material presented in this paper concerns initial studies and a resultant prototype expert system that incorporates pertinent information, and evaluation logic and decision processes, for the purpose of validating acquired waste NDA measurement assays. 6 refs., 6 figs

  13. The Physiology of Adventitious Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Bianka; Rasmussen, Amanda

    2016-02-01

    Adventitious roots are plant roots that form from any nonroot tissue and are produced both during normal development (crown roots on cereals and nodal roots on strawberry [Fragaria spp.]) and in response to stress conditions, such as flooding, nutrient deprivation, and wounding. They are important economically (for cuttings and food production), ecologically (environmental stress response), and for human existence (food production). To improve sustainable food production under environmentally extreme conditions, it is important to understand the adventitious root development of crops both in normal and stressed conditions. Therefore, understanding the regulation and physiology of adventitious root formation is critical for breeding programs. Recent work shows that different adventitious root types are regulated differently, and here, we propose clear definitions of these classes. We use three case studies to summarize the physiology of adventitious root development in response to flooding (case study 1), nutrient deficiency (case study 2), and wounding (case study 3). PMID:26697895

  14. CH2 - Lighting and Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Altomonte

    2012-01-01

    This paper explains the designed performances of the new CH2 building in Melbourne, Australia. CH2 is an environmentally significant project that involves biomimicry of natural systems to produce indoor conditions that are conducive to user comfort, health and productivity. This paper focuses on lighting and physiology and examines the solutions chosen for artificial and natural lighting and the likely effects these will have on building occupants. The purpose of the paper is to critically co...

  15. Cardiovascular physiology in space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John B.; Bungo, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of space flight on the cardiovascular system have been studied since the first manned flights. In several instances, the results from these investigations have directly contradicted the predictions based on established models. Results suggest associations between space flight's effects on other organ systems and those on the cardiovascular system. Such findings provide new insights into normal human physiology. They must also be considered when planning for the safety and efficiency of space flight crewmembers.

  16. Physiologic effects of bowel preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Nielsen, Kristine Grubbe; Madsen, Jan Lysgård; Kehlet, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    healthy volunteers (median age, 63 years) underwent bowel preparation with bisacodyl and sodium phosphate. Fluid and food intake were standardized according to weight, providing adequate calorie and oral fluid intake. Before and after bowel preparation, weight, exercise capacity, orthostatic tolerance...... preparation has significant adverse physiologic effects, which may be attributed to dehydration. The majority of these findings is small and may not be of clinical relevance in otherwise healthy patients undergoing bowel preparation and following recommendations for oral fluid intake....

  17. Neuronal Responses to Physiological Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. It can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress, and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature, and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive, and reproduce. In addition t...

  18. Applied physiology of tennis performance

    OpenAIRE

    Kovacs, M S

    2006-01-01

    Competitive tennis play requires a combination of the major physiological variables; however, the specifics of these variables have yet to be determined appropriately. General strength and flexibility training have been suggested as being beneficial for performance and injury prevention, yet specific guidelines are lacking. This paper provides a review of specific studies that relate to competitive tennis, and highlights the need for tennis‐specific training as opposed to generalised physical...

  19. PHYSIOLOGY OF BLOOD COAGULATION (II)

    OpenAIRE

    B. Ţuţuianu

    2007-01-01

    Coagulation cascade was untill recently the only model used to explain the physiological and pathological reactions during clot formation. Dr. Maureane Hoffman and her team suggested a cell-based model for coagulation, which takes place (according to this model) in three phases: initiation, amplification and propagation. This theory does not deny the coagulation cascade. It only says that the leading role in the whole process is held by the cells and that the „intrinsic” and the „extinsic” pa...

  20. Exercise Effects on Sleep Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    SunaoUchida; NorikoTakeda

    2012-01-01

    This mini-review focuses on the effects of exercise on sleep. In its early days, sleep research largely focused on central nervous system (CNS) physiology using standardized tabulations of several sleep-specific landmark electroencephalogram (EEG) waveforms. Though coarse, this method has enabled the observation and inspection of numerous uninterrupted sleep phenomena. The research on the effects of exercise on sleep began, in the 1960s, with a focus primarily on sleep related EEG changes (CN...

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of cardiac glycoside mimics as potential anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie; Schmidt, Steffen; Fedosova, Natalya;

    2011-01-01

    the bioactivity decreases as the size increases. The most potent Na(+), K(+)-ATPase inhibitors are the compounds with the shortest ethylene glycol chain (K(app) 0.48 μM) and thiodigitoxigenin (K(app) 0.42 μM), which both are comparable with digitoxigenin (K(app) 0.52 μM). For the cancer cell viability assay...

  2. Physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ippei; Minamino, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The heart must continuously pump blood to supply the body with oxygen and nutrients. To maintain the high energy consumption required by this role, the heart is equipped with multiple complex biological systems that allow adaptation to changes of systemic demand. The processes of growth (hypertrophy), angiogenesis, and metabolic plasticity are critically involved in maintenance of cardiac homeostasis. Cardiac hypertrophy is classified as physiological when it is associated with normal cardiac function or as pathological when associated with cardiac dysfunction. Physiological hypertrophy of the heart occurs in response to normal growth of children or during pregnancy, as well as in athletes. In contrast, pathological hypertrophy is induced by factors such as prolonged and abnormal hemodynamic stress, due to hypertension, myocardial infarction etc. Pathological hypertrophy is associated with fibrosis, capillary rarefaction, increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and cellular dysfunction (impairment of signaling, suppression of autophagy, and abnormal cardiomyocyte/non-cardiomyocyte interactions), as well as undesirable epigenetic changes, with these complex responses leading to maladaptive cardiac remodeling and heart failure. This review describes the key molecules and cellular responses involved in physiological/pathological cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:27262674

  3. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos eKagias

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. Physiological stress can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner chemistry during normal development. For example, conditions such as intrinsic hypoxia and oxidative stress, which result from an increase in tissue mass, have to be confronted by developing embryos in order to complete their development. Finally, organisms face the challenge of stochastic accumulation of molecular damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level.

  4. Plant Physiological Aspects of Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, E.; Fan, T.W-M.; Higashi, R.M.; Silk, W.K.

    2002-07-10

    The element silicon, Si, represents an anomaly in plant physiology (Epstein, 1994, 1999b). Plants contain the element in amounts comparable to those of such macronutrient elements as phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, viz. at tissue concentrations (dry weight basis) of about 0.1-10%, although both lower and higher values may be encountered. In some plants, such as rice and sugarcane, Si may be the mineral element present in largest amount. In much of plant physiological research, however, Si is considered a nonentity. Thus, not a single formulation of the widely used nutrient solutions includes Si. Experimental plants grown in these solutions are therefore abnormally low in their content of the element, being able to obtain only what Si is present as an unavoidable contaminant of the nutrient salts used, and from the experimental environment and their own seeds. The reason for the astonishing discrepancy between the prominence of Si in plants and its neglect in much of the enterprise of plant physiological research is that Si does not qualify as an ''essential'' element. Ever since the introduction of the solution culture method in the middle of the last century (Epstein, 1999a, b) it has been found that higher plants can grow in nutrient solutions in the formulation of which Si is not included. The only exceptions are the Equisitaceae (horsetails or scouring rushes), for which Si is a quantitatively major essential element.

  5. Assaying nonspecific phospholipase C activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pejchar, Přemysl; Günther, F.E.S.; Martinec, Jan

    Vol. 1009. New York City: Humana Press, 2013 - (Munnik, T.; Heilmann, I.), s. 193-203. (Methods in Molecular Biology). ISBN 978-1-62703-400-5 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/12/1942; GA ČR(CZ) GPP501/12/P950 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Bodipy * Diacylglycerol * Nonspecific phospholipase C Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  6. Controlling variation in the comet assay

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Andrew R; El Yamani, Naouale; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Shaposhnikov, Sergey; Brunborg, Gunnar; Azqueta, Amaya

    2014-01-01

    Variability of the comet assay is a serious issue, whether it occurs from experiment to experiment in the same laboratory, or between different laboratories analysing identical samples. Do we have to live with high variability, just because the comet assay is a biological assay rather than analytical chemistry? Numerous attempts have been made to limit variability by standardizing the assay protocol, and the critical steps in the assay have been identified; agarose concentration, duration of ...

  7. Simple and robust determination of the activity signature of key carbohydrate metabolism enzymes for physiological phenotyping in model and crop plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jammer, A.; Gapserl, A.; Luschin-Ebengreuth, N.; Heyneke, E.; Chu, H.; Cantero-Navarro, E.; Grosskinsky, D. K.; Albacete, A.; Stabentheiner, E.; Franzaring, J.; Fangmeier, A.; van der Graaff, E.; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 18 (2015), s. 5531-5542. ISSN 0022-0957 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Carbohydrate metabolism * dialysis * enzyme activities * kinetic assay * physiological phenotyping * physiological state * protein extraction * signatures Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 5.526, year: 2014

  8. An athymic mouse model to mimic cobalt-60 cutaneous radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosca, Rodrigo Crespo; Ferreira, Danilo Cardenuto; Napolitano, Celia Marina; Santin, Stefany Plumeri; Dornelles, Leonardo Dalla Porta; Alvarenga, Eluara Ortigoso; Mathor, Monica Beatriz, E-mail: rcmosca@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Propose: Cutaneous wound from irradiation is the most common complication in radiotherapy treatment, and can be lead to mortality. We describe an athymic mouse model to mimic cutaneous radiation injury by Cobalt-60. Methods: A protocol was including dosimetry with silicon diodes,10x10x5 cm arrangement made by four lead bricks and PVC pipe designed to immobilize the athymic mouse in order to irradiate one clamped back skin point that was subdivided in four parts. To get the measurements of dose rates on the arrangement in Panoramic Irradiator, it was used a silicon diode encased in an opaque protection for ambient light and connected to an electric cable, forming a dosing probe. The currents generated in diode sensitive volume as a function of time of exposure to gamma radiation coming from the radiator, with dose rate of 0,015 Gy/min in positions 1, 0,021 Gy/min in position 2, 0,55 Gy/min in position 3 and 1,45 Gy/min in position four. After the dosimetry, each athymic mouse was anesthetized using Xylazine and Ketamine dilution and entered into a PVC pipe and a small portion of skin (1 cm{sup 3}) was clamped. This tube was then fixed to arrangement and the athymic mouse was irradiate for 60 min, than it was being returned to its cage. Results: The wound was visualized in all animals and photographed after 5 days of irradiation, with the emergence of ulceration after 9 days. No systemic or lethal sequelae occurred or visualized in any animals. Late clinical signs included a wound healing after 22 days. Conclusion: While still being a baseline study, we created a new functional preclinical animal model that can be used for new therapies and may improve radiotherapy management. (author)

  9. Functionalized hybrid nanofibers to mimic native ECM for tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Functionalized hybrid polymer mats fabricated for tissue engineering. • Hybrid polymer mats showed high surface area, high porosity and good wettability. • Incorporation of natural polymers modified the properties of nanofiber mats more biologically favorable for biomedical applications. - Abstract: Nanotechnology being one of the most promising technologies today shows an extremely huge potential in the field of tissue engineering to mimic the porous topography of natural extracellular matrix (ECM). Natural polymers are incorporated into the synthetic polymers to fabricate functionalized hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds, which improve cell and tissue compatibility. The present study identified the biopolymers – aloe vera, silk fibroin and curcumin incorporated into polycaprolactone (PCL) as suitable substrates for tissue engineering. Different combinations of PCL with natural polymers – PCL/aloe vera, PCL/silk fibroin, PCL/aloe vera/silk fibroin, PCL/aloe vera/silk fibroin/curcumin were electrospun into nanofibrous scaffolds. The fabricated two dimensional nanofibrous scaffolds showed high surface area, appropriate mechanical properties, hydrophilicity and porosity, required for the regeneration of diseased tissues. The nanofibrous scaffolds were characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM), porometry, Instron tensile tester, VCA optima contact angle measurement and FTIR to analyze the fiber diameter and morphology, porosity and pore size distribution, mechanical strength, wettability, chemical bonds and functional groups, respectively. The average fiber diameter of obtained fibers ranged from 250 nm to 350 nm and the tensile strength of PCL scaffolds at 4.49 MPa increased upto 8.3 MPa for PCL/silk fibroin scaffolds. Hydrophobicity of PCL decreased with the incorporation of natural polymers, especially for PCL/aloe vera scaffolds. The properties of as-spun nanofiber scaffolds showed their potential as promising scaffold materials in

  10. An athymic mouse model to mimic cobalt-60 cutaneous radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propose: Cutaneous wound from irradiation is the most common complication in radiotherapy treatment, and can be lead to mortality. We describe an athymic mouse model to mimic cutaneous radiation injury by Cobalt-60. Methods: A protocol was including dosimetry with silicon diodes,10x10x5 cm arrangement made by four lead bricks and PVC pipe designed to immobilize the athymic mouse in order to irradiate one clamped back skin point that was subdivided in four parts. To get the measurements of dose rates on the arrangement in Panoramic Irradiator, it was used a silicon diode encased in an opaque protection for ambient light and connected to an electric cable, forming a dosing probe. The currents generated in diode sensitive volume as a function of time of exposure to gamma radiation coming from the radiator, with dose rate of 0,015 Gy/min in positions 1, 0,021 Gy/min in position 2, 0,55 Gy/min in position 3 and 1,45 Gy/min in position four. After the dosimetry, each athymic mouse was anesthetized using Xylazine and Ketamine dilution and entered into a PVC pipe and a small portion of skin (1 cm3) was clamped. This tube was then fixed to arrangement and the athymic mouse was irradiate for 60 min, than it was being returned to its cage. Results: The wound was visualized in all animals and photographed after 5 days of irradiation, with the emergence of ulceration after 9 days. No systemic or lethal sequelae occurred or visualized in any animals. Late clinical signs included a wound healing after 22 days. Conclusion: While still being a baseline study, we created a new functional preclinical animal model that can be used for new therapies and may improve radiotherapy management. (author)

  11. Somatostatin receptor 1 and 5 double knockout mice mimic neurochemical changes of Huntington's disease transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmesh S Rajput

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selective degeneration of medium spiny neurons and preservation of medium sized aspiny interneurons in striatum has been implicated in excitotoxicity and pathophysiology of Huntington's disease (HD. However, the molecular mechanism for the selective sparing of medium sized aspiny neurons and vulnerability of projection neurons is still elusive. The pathological characteristic of HD is an extensive reduction of the striatal mass, affecting caudate putamen. Somatostatin (SST positive neurons are selectively spared in HD and Quinolinic acid/N-methyl-D-aspartic acid induced excitotoxicity, mimic the model of HD. SST plays neuroprotective role in excitotoxicity and the biological effects of SST are mediated by five somatostatin receptor subtypes (SSTR1-5. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To delineate subtype selective biological responses we have here investigated changes in SSTR1 and 5 double knockout mice brain and compared with HD transgenic mouse model (R6/2. Our study revealed significant loss of dopamine and cAMP regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32 and comparable changes in SST, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors subtypes, calbindin and brain nitric oxide synthase expression as well as in key signaling proteins including calpain, phospho-extracellular-signal-regulated kinases1/2, synapsin-IIa, protein kinase C-α and calcineurin in SSTR1/5(-/- and R6/2 mice. Conversely, the expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes, enkephalin and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases were strain specific. SSTR1/5 appears to be important in regulating NMDARs, DARPP-32 and signaling molecules in similar fashion as seen in HD transgenic mice. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first comprehensive description of disease related changes upon ablation of G- protein coupled receptor gene. Our results indicate that SST and SSTRs might play an important role in regulation of neurodegeneration and targeting this pathway can provide a novel insight in understanding the

  12. Earwigs ( Labidura riparia) mimic rotting-flesh odor to deceive vertebrate predators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, John A.

    2015-08-01

    Many insects repel predators with caustic chemicals, while insects mimicking odors of wastes/dead insects to fool predators have not been documented. We found that the shore earwig, Labidura riparia (Dermaptera: Labiduridae) when bitten by anole lizards, Anolis carolinenesus, spits a rotting-flesh odor that deceives these insectivores into rejecting prey. Once a lizard attacked and rejected an earwig, the lizard did not attack another earwig during several weeks despite consuming other prey, indicating associative learning after one trial. The fetid odor was found in the head-prothorax containing salivary glands of both male and female earwigs and was comprised of ˜100 ng dimethyl disulfide and ˜600 ng dimethyl trisulfide. Nymphs had <5 ng of either compound. Adults also spit odorous sulfides after prolonged attacks by harvester ants, Pogonomyrmex rugosus, who were only deterred by the earwig's forceps. Sulfides released by the earwig are similar to odors of carrion/feces, which may be innately repulsive to some vertebrate predators. The mean initial discharge percentage (IDP) of sulfides from a cohort of earwigs was 62 %; however, IDPs of individuals were highly variable (3-99 %; mean 57 %). The discharge refill time (DRT) to refill 50 % of the earwig's allomone reservoir was estimated at 13 h. A positive relationship in sulfide amounts with body weight was found only in females in 2009, suggesting metabolic cost tradeoffs were revealed when sulfide content was half that in 2010. This is the first report of insects releasing sulfur-containing compounds that may mimic carrion-fecal odors as a deceptive defense against vertebrate predators.

  13. Space science applications for conducting polymer particles: synthetic mimics for cosmic dust and micrometeorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Lee A; Hillier, Jon K; Burchell, Mark J; Armes, Steven P

    2015-12-11

    Over the last decade or so, a range of polypyrrole-based particles have been designed and evaluated for space science applications. This electrically conductive polymer enables such particles to efficiently acquire surface charge, which in turn allows their acceleration up to the hypervelocity regime (>1 km s(-1)) using a Van de Graaff accelerator. Either organic latex (e.g. polystyrene or poly(methyl methacrylate)) or various inorganic materials (such as silica, olivine or pyrrhotite) can be coated with polypyrrole; these core-shell particles are useful mimics for understanding the hypervelocity impact ionisation behaviour of micro-meteorites (a.k.a. cosmic dust). Impacts on metal targets at relatively low hypervelocities (10 km s(-1)) generate predominately atomic species, since many more chemical bonds are cleaved if the particles impinge with higher kinetic energy. Such fundamental studies are relevant to the calibration of the cosmic dust analyser (CDA) onboard the Cassini spacecraft, which was designed to determine the chemical composition of Saturn's dust rings. Inspired by volcanism observed for one of the Jupiter's moons (Io), polypyrrole-coated sulfur-rich latexes have also been designed to help space scientists understand ionisation spectra originating from sulfur-rich dust particles. Finally, relatively large (20 μm diameter) polypyrrole-coated polystyrene latexes have proven to be useful for understanding the extent of thermal ablation of organic projectiles when fired at ultralow density aerogel targets at up to 6.1 km s(-1) using a Light Gas Gun. In this case, the sacrificial polypyrrole overlayer simply provides a sensitive spectroscopic signature (rather than a conductive overlayer), and the scientific findings have important implications for the detection of organic dust grains during the Stardust space mission. PMID:26458233

  14. Erdheim-Chester Disease as a Mimic of IgG4-Related Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianfreda, Davide; Musetti, Claudio; Nicastro, Maria; Maritati, Federica; Cobelli, Rocco; Corradi, Domenico; Vaglio, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Immunoglobulin-G4 (IgG4)-related disease (IgG4RD) is a fibro-inflammatory disorder characterized by tissue-infiltrating IgG4+ plasma cells, and, often, high serum IgG4. Several autoimmune, infectious, or proliferative conditions mimic IgG4RD. Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare non-Langerhans cell histiocytosis, characterized by foamy histiocytic infiltration, fibrosis, and chronic inflammation. ECD and IgG4RD manifestations may overlap. A patient presented with huge fibrous retroperitoneal masses causing compression on neighboring structures; the case posed the challenge of the differential diagnosis between IgG4RD and ECD mainly because of a prominent serum and tissue IgG4 response. Retroperitoneal biopsy led to the diagnosis of ECD; the V600E BRAF mutation was found. Treatment with the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib was started. Treatment failed to induce mass regression and the patient died after 3 months of therapy. Prompted by this case, we examined serum and tissue IgG4 in a series of 15 ECD patients evaluated at our center, and found that approximately one-fourth of the cases have increased IgG4 in the serum and often in the tissue. The differential diagnosis between IgG4RD and ECD can be challenging, as some ECD patients have prominent IgG4 responses. This suggests the possibility of common pathogenic mechanisms between ECD and IgG4RD. PMID:27227923

  15. Lymphoepithelioma-like cholangiocarcinoma: a mimic of hepatocellular carcinoma on imaging features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Tsan-Chieh; Liu, Chien-An; Chiu, Nai-Chi; Yeh, Yi-Chen; Chiou, Yi-You

    2015-04-01

    Primary lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma in the liver is extremely rare. A few cases of lymphoepithelioma-like cholangiocarcinoma have been reported, but few radiologic features were described. We reviewed 23 cases of lymphoepithelioma-like cholangiocarcinoma reported between 1996 and 2014 and describe a rare case of a 35-year-old woman in our hospital who was diagnosed with lymphoepithelioma-like cholangiocarcinoma of the liver and was a hepatitis B carrier. The tumor (1.6 cm) in our patient appeared to be hypoechoic in sonographic images and hypodense in computed tomography (CT) images. In addition, it was homogeneous hypointense in T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images (MRI) and hyperintense in T2-weighted MRI. Dynamic gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed typical image pattern of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The patient underwent a laparoscopic left hepatic lobectomy, and the resected tumor consisted of well-differentiated glandular cells with extensive lymphocytic infiltration that were immunoreactive to CK (AE1/AE3), CD3, and CD20. In addition, the tumor was positive for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA in situ hybridization. Finally, lymphoepithelioma-like cholangiocarcinoma was diagnosed. In previous studies, the incidence is highest among middle-aged people. Most tumors appeared to be hypodense with either hypovascular or hypervascular patterns in CT images. This case report is the first study to address sonography, CT, and MRI observations and delineate pathologic correlations. We suggest that the imaging pattern of lymphoepithelioma-like cholangiocarcinoma, either the typical cholangiocarcinoma pattern or a mimic of HCC, should be considered in the differential lists for HCC. PMID:25852298

  16. Follicular pancreatitis: a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis-an additional mimic of pancreatic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajib K; Xie, Bill H; Patton, Kurt T; Lisovsky, Mikhail; Burks, Eric; Behrman, Stephen W; Klimstra, David; Deshpande, Vikram

    2016-02-01

    Follicular pancreatitis is a recently described variant of chronic pancreatitis characterized clinically by the formation of a discrete pancreatic mass and histologically by the presence of florid lymphoid aggregates with reactive germinal centers. Our aim was to study the clinical and histologic features of follicular pancreatitis, as well as to critically examine potential overlap with autoimmune pancreatitis. Immunohistochemistry for Bcl-2, CD21, κ and λ light chains as well as IgG4 and IgG were performed. We found a total of 6 patients (male-female ratio, 2:1; mean age, 57 years) who fulfilled the diagnosis of follicular pancreatitis in our institutions. Four had an incidental diagnosis, while two presented with abdominal pain, fatigue, and elevated liver enzymes. On imaging, 3 patients had a discrete solid mass, whereas 2 cases showed a dilated main pancreatic duct, mimicking an intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasm on imaging. One patient had a lesion in the intra-pancreatic portion of the common bile duct. On histopathology, all cases showed numerous lymphoid follicles with Bcl-2-negative germinal centers either in a periductal or in a more diffuse (periductal and intra-parenchymal) fashion, but without attendant storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis, or granulocytic epithelial lesions. IgG4-to-IgG ratio was <40% in 5 cases. A comparison cohort revealed germinal centers in 25% of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis and 2% of type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis cases, but none were periductal in location. In conclusion, follicular pancreatitis, an under-recognized mimic of pancreatic neoplasms is characterized by intrapancreatic lymphoid follicles with reactive germinal centers. PMID:26563969

  17. Heterologous cross-seeding mimics cross-species prion conversion in a yeast model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liebman Susan W

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prions are self-perpetuating, infectious, aggregated proteins that are associated with several neurodegenerative diseases in mammals and heritable traits in yeast. Sup35p, the protein determinant of the yeast prion [PSI+], has a conserved C terminal domain that performs the Sup35p function and a prion domain that is highly divergent. Prions formed by chimeras of the prion domain of various species fused to the C domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibit a 'species barrier', a phenomenon first observed in mammals, and often fail to transmit the prion state to chimeras with prion domains of other species. Results We focus on the chimera containing the prion domain of Pichia methanolica and examine how tight the 'species barrier' is between the chimera and S. cerevisiae. Although either of two Q/N-rich prions, [PSI+] or [PIN+], enhances the formation of the chimeric prion, [CHI+PM], neither a non-Q/N-rich prion nor a non-prion Q-rich aggregate promotes the formation of [CHI+PM]. [CHI+PM] has many features characteristic of yeast prions: aggregation, cytoplasmic transmission and a two-level protein structure. [CHI+PM] formed in the presence of [PSI+] can propagate independently of [PSI+] and forms at least two different variants of the prion, suggesting the generation and not transmission of new prion seeds. Conclusion Although the sequence similarity between the S. cerevisiae Q/N-rich prion determinants and the P. methanolica prion domain is low, we find that the chimera containing the prion domain of P. methanolica can occasionally be cross-seeded by [PSI+] to mimic crossing the species barrier, to form the [CHI+PM] prion. Our data suggests that crossing the barrier occurs by a de novo formation of the foreign chimeric prion. Thus, the species barrier appears to be crossed by a heterologous seeding mechanism, wherein the infected prion protein uses the pre-existing seed as an inefficient template.

  18. Conformational Melding Permits a Conserved Binding Geometry in TCR Recognition of Foreign and Self Molecular Mimics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Baker, Brian M. (Notre)

    2012-03-16

    Molecular mimicry between foreign and self Ags is a mechanism of TCR cross-reactivity and is thought to contribute to the development of autoimmunity. The {alpha}{beta} TCR A6 recognizes the foreign Ag Tax from the human T cell leukemia virus-1 when presented by the class I MHC HLA-A2. In a possible link with the autoimmune disease human T cell leukemia virus-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, A6 also recognizes a self peptide from the neuronal protein HuD in the context of HLA-A2. We found in our study that the complexes of the HuD and Tax epitopes with HLA-A2 are close but imperfect structural mimics and that in contrast with other recent structures of TCRs with self Ags, A6 engages the HuD Ag with the same traditional binding mode used to engage Tax. Although peptide and MHC conformational changes are needed for recognition of HuD but not Tax and the difference of a single hydroxyl triggers an altered TCR loop conformation, TCR affinity toward HuD is still within the range believed to result in negative selection. Probing further, we found that the HuD-HLA-A2 complex is only weakly stable. Overall, these findings help clarify how molecular mimicry can drive self/nonself cross-reactivity and illustrate how low peptide-MHC stability can permit the survival of T cells expressing self-reactive TCRs that nonetheless bind with a traditional binding mode.

  19. Functionalized hybrid nanofibers to mimic native ECM for tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karuppuswamy, Priyadharsini [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore); Department Physics and Nanotechnology, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Chennai (India); Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy, E-mail: nnijrv@nus.edu.sg [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore); Navaneethan, Balchandar [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore); Department Physics and Nanotechnology, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Chennai (India); Laiva, Ashang Luwang; Sridhar, Sreepathy; Ramakrishna, Seeram [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Functionalized hybrid polymer mats fabricated for tissue engineering. • Hybrid polymer mats showed high surface area, high porosity and good wettability. • Incorporation of natural polymers modified the properties of nanofiber mats more biologically favorable for biomedical applications. - Abstract: Nanotechnology being one of the most promising technologies today shows an extremely huge potential in the field of tissue engineering to mimic the porous topography of natural extracellular matrix (ECM). Natural polymers are incorporated into the synthetic polymers to fabricate functionalized hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds, which improve cell and tissue compatibility. The present study identified the biopolymers – aloe vera, silk fibroin and curcumin incorporated into polycaprolactone (PCL) as suitable substrates for tissue engineering. Different combinations of PCL with natural polymers – PCL/aloe vera, PCL/silk fibroin, PCL/aloe vera/silk fibroin, PCL/aloe vera/silk fibroin/curcumin were electrospun into nanofibrous scaffolds. The fabricated two dimensional nanofibrous scaffolds showed high surface area, appropriate mechanical properties, hydrophilicity and porosity, required for the regeneration of diseased tissues. The nanofibrous scaffolds were characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM), porometry, Instron tensile tester, VCA optima contact angle measurement and FTIR to analyze the fiber diameter and morphology, porosity and pore size distribution, mechanical strength, wettability, chemical bonds and functional groups, respectively. The average fiber diameter of obtained fibers ranged from 250 nm to 350 nm and the tensile strength of PCL scaffolds at 4.49 MPa increased upto 8.3 MPa for PCL/silk fibroin scaffolds. Hydrophobicity of PCL decreased with the incorporation of natural polymers, especially for PCL/aloe vera scaffolds. The properties of as-spun nanofiber scaffolds showed their potential as promising scaffold materials in

  20. Physiological Parameters Database for Older Adults

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Physiological Parameters Database for Older Adults is available for download and contains physiological parameters values for healthy older human adults (age 60...

  1. Highly efficient enzyme encapsulation in a protein nanocage: towards enzyme catalysis in a cellular nanocompartment mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonen, Lise; Nolte, Roeland J M; van Hest, Jan C M

    2016-08-14

    The study of enzyme behavior in small nanocompartments is crucial for the understanding of biocatalytic processes in the cellular environment. We have developed an enzymatic conjugation strategy to attach a model enzyme to the interior of a cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid. It is shown that with this methodology high encapsulation efficiencies can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate that the encapsulation does not affect the enzyme performance in terms of a decreased activity or a hampered substrate diffusion. Finally, it is shown that the encapsulated enzymes are protected against proteases. We believe that our strategy can be used to study enzyme kinetics in an environment that approaches physiological conditions. PMID:27407020

  2. Solution NMR of membrane proteins in bilayer mimics: Small is beautiful, but sometimes bigger is better

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poget, Sébastien F.; Girvin, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made recently on solution NMR studies of multi-transmembrane helix membrane protein systems of increasing size. Careful correlation of structure with function has validated the physiological relevance of these studies in detergent micelles. However, larger micelle and bicelle systems are sometimes required to stabilize the active forms of dynamic membrane proteins, such as the bacterial small multidrug resistance transporters. Even in these systems with aggregate molecular weights well over 100 kDa, solution NMR structural studies are feasible – but challenging. PMID:17961504

  3. Comet Assay in Cancer Chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Raffaela; Ferraiuolo, Maria; Morgano, Gian Paolo; Muti, Paola; Strano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The comet assay can be useful in monitoring DNA damage in single cells caused by exposure to genotoxic agents, such as those causing air, water, and soil pollution (e.g., pesticides, dioxins, electromagnetic fields) and chemo- and radiotherapy in cancer patients, or in the assessment of genoprotective effects of chemopreventive molecules. Therefore, it has particular importance in the fields of pharmacology and toxicology, and in both environmental and human biomonitoring. It allows the detection of single strand breaks as well as double-strand breaks and can be used in both normal and cancer cells. Here we describe the alkali method for comet assay, which allows to detect both single- and double-strand DNA breaks. PMID:26608293

  4. Nondestructive assay of sale materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper covers three primary areas: (1) reasons for performing nondestructive assay on SALE materials; (2) techniques used; and (3) discussion of investigators' revised results. The study shows that nondestructive calorimetric assay of plutonium offers a viable alternative to traditional wet chemical techniques. For these samples, the precision ranged from 0.4 to 0.6% with biases less than 0.2%. Thus, for those materials where sampling errors are the predominant source of uncertainty, this technique can provide improved accuracy and precision while saving time and money as well as reducing the amount of liquid wastes to be handled. In addition, high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements of solids can provide isotopic analysis data in a cost effective and timely manner. The timeliness of the method can be especially useful to the plant operator for production control and quality control measurements

  5. Caloric restriction mimetics: natural/physiological pharmacological autophagy inducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Guillermo; Pietrocola, Federico; Madeo, Frank; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient depletion, which is one of the physiological triggers of autophagy, results in the depletion of intracellular acetyl coenzyme A (AcCoA) coupled to the deacetylation of cellular proteins. We surmise that there are 3 possibilities to mimic these effects, namely (i) the depletion of cytosolic AcCoA by interfering with its biosynthesis, (ii) the inhibition of acetyltransferases, which are enzymes that transfer acetyl groups from AcCoA to other molecules, mostly leucine residues in cellular proteins, or (iii) the stimulation of deacetylases, which catalyze the removal of acetyl groups from leucine residues. There are several examples of rather nontoxic natural compounds that act as AcCoA depleting agents (e.g., hydroxycitrate), acetyltransferase inhibitors (e.g., anacardic acid, curcumin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate, garcinol, spermidine) or deacetylase activators (e.g., nicotinamide, resveratrol), and that are highly efficient inducers of autophagy in vitro and in vivo, in rodents. Another common characteristic of these agents is their capacity to reduce aging-associated diseases and to confer protective responses against ischemia-induced organ damage. Hence, we classify them as "caloric restriction mimetics" (CRM). Here, we speculate that CRM may mediate their broad health-improving effects by triggering the same molecular pathways that usually are elicited by long-term caloric restriction or short-term starvation and that imply the induction of autophagy as an obligatory event conferring organismal, organ- or cytoprotection. PMID:25484097

  6. Physiological and biochemical performances of menthol-induced aposymbiotic corals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jih-Terng Wang

    Full Text Available The unique mutualism between corals and their photosynthetic zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium spp. is the driving force behind functional assemblages of coral reefs. However, the respective roles of hosts and Symbiodinium in this endosymbiotic association, particularly in response to environmental challenges (e.g., high sea surface temperatures, remain unsettled. One of the key obstacles is to produce and maintain aposymbiotic coral hosts for experimental purposes. In this study, a simple and gentle protocol to generate aposymbiotic coral hosts (Isopora palifera and Stylophora pistillata was developed using repeated incubation in menthol/artificial seawater (ASW medium under light and in ASW in darkness, which depleted more than 99% of Symbiodinium from the host within 4∼8 days. As indicated by the respiration rate, energy metabolism (by malate dehydrogenase activity, and nitrogen metabolism (by glutamate dehydrogenase activity and profiles of free amino acids, the physiological and biochemical performances of the menthol-induced aposymbiotic corals were comparable to their symbiotic counterparts without nutrient supplementation (e.g., for Stylophora or with a nutrient supplement containing glycerol, vitamins, and a host mimic of free amino acid mixture (e.g., for Isopora. Differences in biochemical responses to menthol-induced bleaching between Stylophora and Isopora were attributed to the former digesting Symbiodinium rather than expelling the algae live as found in the latter species. Our studies showed that menthol could successfully bleach corals and provided aposymbiotic corals for further exploration of coral-alga symbioses.

  7. Gastrin role in normal physiology and disease states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the development of the gastrin RIA, rapid advances have been made in the understanding of gastrin's role both in normal physiology and in hypergastrinemic, hypersecretory states. Abnormalities of gastrin release are found in patients with ordinary duodenal ulcer disease and certainly contribute to the formation of these ulcers. However, fasting and postprandial gastrin levels are not useful in the diagnosis of duodenal ulcer disease because of the overlap with normal individuals. It is now apparent that Zollinger-Ellison syndrome need not be a clinically fulminant ulcer syndrome. In fact, it may mimic ordinary duodenal ulcer disease early in its course. The principal value of the gastrin RIA is in diagnosing this condition. Since hypochlorhydria of any cause may result in elevated circulating gastrin levels in the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome range, every patient with hypergastrinemia must have a formal gastric acid secretory study. In patients with hypergastrinemia and gastric acid-hypersecretion, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome can be differentiated from other conditions by the use of provocative tests. The secretin stimulation test is the most sensitive and specific provocative test for Zollinger-Ellison syndrome since gastrinomas respond paradoxically to secretin with gastrin release

  8. Toward the Development of a Virus-Cell-Based Assay for the Discovery of Novel Compounds against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Adelson, Martin E.; Pacchia, Annmarie L.; Kaul, Malvika; Rando, Robert F.; Ron, Yacov; Peltz, Stuart W.; Dougherty, Joseph P.

    2003-01-01

    The emergence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains resistant to highly active antiretroviral therapy necessitates continued drug discovery for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Most current drug discovery strategies focus upon a single aspect of HIV-1 replication. A virus-cell-based assay, which can be adapted to high-throughput screening, would allow the screening of multiple targets simultaneously. HIV-1-based vector systems mimic the HIV-1 life cycle without yielding repl...

  9. Assay of vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioassay is described for vitamin B12 which involves denaturing serum protein binding proteins with alkali. In the denaturation step a dithiopolyol and cyanide are used and in the intrinsic factor assay step a vitamin B12 analogue such as cobinamide is used to bind with any remaining serum proteins. The invention also includes a kit in which the dithiopolyol is provided in admixture with the alkali. The dithiopolyol may be dithiothreitol or dithioerythritol. (author)

  10. Physiology as a caste-defining feature

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, E. J. H.

    2009-01-01

    Division of labour is a key factor in the ecological success of social insects. Groups of individuals specializing on a particular behaviour are known as castes and are usually distinguished by morphology or age. Physiology plays a key role in both these types of caste, in either the developmental physiology which determines morphology, or the temporal changes in physiology over an insect's life. Physiological correlates of morphological or temporal caste include differences in gland structur...

  11. Extracellular Matrix Invasion in Metastases and Angiogenesis: Commentary on the Matrigel "Chemoinvasion Assay".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albini, Adriana

    2016-08-15

    Invasive and metastatic cells must cross the basement membrane's extracellular matrix to disseminate to distant sites. Although in the eighties the concept was well established, no easy in vitro functional assay was available. Working in Hynda Kleinman's and George Martin's laboratory at NIH (Bethesda, MD), where the reconstituted basement membrane Matrigel was discovered, I had the intuition that Matrigel coating of migration filters could represent a valid tool to mimic in vitro biological matrix barriers. The "chemoinvasion assay" using Matrigel in Boyden blind-well chambers was developed in 1985-1986 and published in Cancer Research in 1987. It was a rapid and easy tool for studying invasion, a crucial step in cancer metastasis. Since its conception, the assay has been employed for studies on the metastatic process, angiogenesis, and for the screening of drugs that are potentially able to decrease cell invasion. It was adapted to be easily employed as a routine assay and commercialized. In that historical article, we also described the use of thick layers of Matrigel for the study of morphogenesis of invasive cells, a simple and visual assay, adaptable to reproduce collective cell migration in vitro To date, in its diverse optimized variants, the chemoinvasion assay is still widely used, contributing to novel data production. In the era of precision medicine and next-generation sequencing, the cheap, fast, and reproducible chemoinvasion assay may have further developments, including possible applications in the investigations on cancer stem cells, immunity and immune modulators, applications with siRNA silencing, selection of aggressive cell populations, and phenotypes and genetic evaluations. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4595-7. ©2016 AACR.See related article by Albini A et al., Cancer Res 1987;47:3239-45Visit the Cancer Research 75(th) Anniversary timeline. PMID:27528578

  12. Lab-on-a-brane: A novel physiologically relevant planar arterial model to study transendothelial transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhwani, Karim Ismail

    The tremendous quality of life impact notwithstanding, cardiovascular diseases and Cancer add up to over US$ 700bn each year in financial costs alone. Aging and population growth are expected to further expand the problem space while drug research and development remain expensive. However, preclinical costs can be substantially mitigated by substituting animal models with in vitro devices that accurately model human cardiovascular transport. Here we present a novel physiologically relevant lab-on-a-brane that simulates in vivo pressure, flow, strain, and shear waveforms associated with normal and pathological conditions in large and small blood vessels for studying molecular transport across the endothelial monolayer. The device builds upon previously demonstrated integrated microfluidic loop design by: (a) introducing nanoscale pores in the substrate membrane to enable transmembrane molecular transport, (b) transforming the substrate membrane into a nanofibrous matrix for 3D smooth muscle cell (SMC) tissue culture, (c) integrating electrospinning fabrication methods, (d) engineering an invertible sandwich cell culture device architecture, and (e) devising a healthy co-culture mechanism for human arterial endothelial cell (HAEC) monolayer and multiple layers of human smooth muscle cells (HSMC) to accurately mimic arterial anatomy. Structural and mechanical characterization was conducted using confocal microscopy, SEM, stress/strain analysis, and infrared spectroscopy. Transport was characterized using FITC-Dextran hydraulic permeability protocol. Structure and transport characterization successfully demonstrate device viability as a physiologically relevant arterial mimic for testing transendothelial transport. Thus, our lab-on-a-brane provides a highly effective and efficient, yet considerably inexpensive, physiologically relevant alternative for pharmacokinetic evaluation; possibly reducing animals used in pre-clinical testing, clinical trials cost from false

  13. Highly efficient enzyme encapsulation in a protein nanocage: towards enzyme catalysis in a cellular nanocompartment mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonen, Lise; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; van Hest, Jan C. M.

    2016-07-01

    The study of enzyme behavior in small nanocompartments is crucial for the understanding of biocatalytic processes in the cellular environment. We have developed an enzymatic conjugation strategy to attach a model enzyme to the interior of a cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid. It is shown that with this methodology high encapsulation efficiencies can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate that the encapsulation does not affect the enzyme performance in terms of a decreased activity or a hampered substrate diffusion. Finally, it is shown that the encapsulated enzymes are protected against proteases. We believe that our strategy can be used to study enzyme kinetics in an environment that approaches physiological conditions.The study of enzyme behavior in small nanocompartments is crucial for the understanding of biocatalytic processes in the cellular environment. We have developed an enzymatic conjugation strategy to attach a model enzyme to the interior of a cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid. It is shown that with this methodology high encapsulation efficiencies can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate that the encapsulation does not affect the enzyme performance in terms of a decreased activity or a hampered substrate diffusion. Finally, it is shown that the encapsulated enzymes are protected against proteases. We believe that our strategy can be used to study enzyme kinetics in an environment that approaches physiological conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures for the cloning, expression, and purification of all proteins, as well as supplementary figures and calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04181g

  14. New lipase assay using Pomegranate oil coating in microtiter plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ülker, Serdar; Placidi, Camille; Point, Vanessa; Gadenne, Benoît; Serveau-Avesque, Carole; Canaan, Stéphane; Carrière, Frédéric; Cavalier, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Lipases play various roles in fat digestion, lipoprotein metabolism, and in the mobilization of fat stored in lipid bodies in animals, plants and microorganisms. In association with these physiological functions, there is an important field of research for discovering lipase inhibitors and developing new treatments of diseases such as obesity, atherosclerosis, diabetes and tuberculosis. In this context, the development of convenient, specific and sensitive analytical methods for the detection and assay of lipases and/or lipase inhibitors is of major importance. It is shown here that purified triacylglycerols (TAGs) from Punica granatum (Pomegranate) seed oil coated on microtiter plates can be used for the continuous assay of lipase activity by recording the variations with time of the UV absorption spectra at 275 nm. UV absorption is due the release of punicic acid (9Z,11E,13Z-octadeca-9,11,13-trienoic acid), a conjugated triene contained in Pomegranate oil. This new microtiter plate assay allows to accurately measure the activity of a wider range of lipases compared to the similar assay previously developed with Tung oil containing α-eleostearic acid (9Z,11E,13E-octadeca-9,11,13-trienoic acid), including the LipY lipase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although punicic acid is a diastereoisomer of α-eleostearic acid, the Δ(13)cis double bound found in punicic acid gives a different structure to the acyl chain that probably favours the interaction of Pomegranate TAGs with the lipase active site. The microplate lipase assay using Pomegranate TAGs shows high sensitivity, reproducibility and remarkable relevance for the high-speed screening of lipases and/or lipase inhibitors directly from raw culture media without any purification step. PMID:26343557

  15. Microfluidic multiculture assay to analyze biomolecular signaling in angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theberge, Ashleigh B; Yu, Jiaquan; Young, Edmond W K; Ricke, William A; Bushman, Wade; Beebe, David J

    2015-03-17

    Angiogenesis (the formation of blood vessels from existing blood vessels) plays a critical role in many diseases such as cancer, benign tumors, and macular degeneration. There is a need for cell culture methods capable of dissecting the intricate regulation of angiogenesis within the microenvironment of the vasculature. We have developed a microscale cell-based assay that responds to complex pro- and antiangiogenic soluble factors with an in vitro readout for vessel formation. The power of this system over traditional techniques is that we can incorporate the whole milieu of soluble factors produced by cells in situ into one biological readout (vessel formation), even if the identity of the factors is unknown. We have currently incorporated macrophages, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts into the assay, with the potential to include additional cell types in the future. Importantly, the microfluidic platform is simple to operate and multiplex to test drugs targeting angiogenesis in a more physiologically relevant context. As a proof of concept, we tested the effect of an enzyme inhibitor (targeting matrix metalloproteinase 12) on vessel formation; the triculture microfluidic assay enabled us to capture a dose-dependent effect entirely missed in a simplified coculture assay (p < 0.0001). This result underscores the importance of cell-based assays that capture chemical cross-talk occurring between cell types. The microscale dimensions significantly reduce cell consumption compared to conventional well plate platforms, enabling the use of limited primary cells from patients in future investigations and offering the potential to screen therapeutic approaches for individual patients in vitro. PMID:25719435

  16. Physiological ecology meets climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozinovic, Francisco; Pörtner, Hans-Otto

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we pointed out that understanding the physiology of differential climate change effects on organisms is one of the many urgent challenges faced in ecology and evolutionary biology. We explore how physiological ecology can contribute to a holistic view of climate change impacts on organisms and ecosystems and their evolutionary responses. We suggest that theoretical and experimental efforts not only need to improve our understanding of thermal limits to organisms, but also to consider multiple stressors both on land and in the oceans. As an example, we discuss recent efforts to understand the effects of various global change drivers on aquatic ectotherms in the field that led to the development of the concept of oxygen and capacity limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) as a framework integrating various drivers and linking organisational levels from ecosystem to organism, tissue, cell, and molecules. We suggest seven core objectives of a comprehensive research program comprising the interplay among physiological, ecological, and evolutionary approaches for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms. While studies of individual aspects are already underway in many laboratories worldwide, integration of these findings into conceptual frameworks is needed not only within one organism group such as animals but also across organism domains such as Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya. Indeed, development of unifying concepts is relevant for interpreting existing and future findings in a coherent way and for projecting the future ecological and evolutionary effects of climate change on functional biodiversity. We also suggest that OCLTT may in the end and from an evolutionary point of view, be able to explain the limited thermal tolerance of metazoans when compared to other organisms. PMID:25798220

  17. Upper gastrointestinal physiology and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldum, Helge L; Kleveland, Per M; Fossmark, Reidar

    2015-06-01

    Nordic research on physiology and pathophysiology of the upper gastrointestinal tract has flourished during the last 50 years. Swedish surgeons and physiologists were in the frontline of research on the regulation of gastric acid secretion. This research finally led to the development of omeprazole, the first proton pump inhibitor. When Swedish physiologists developed methods allowing the assessment of acid secretion in isolated oxyntic glands and isolated parietal cells, the understanding of mechanisms by which gastric acid secretion is regulated took a great step forward. Similarly, in Trondheim, Norway, the acid producing isolated rat stomach model combined with a sensitive and specific method for determination of histamine made it possible to evaluate this regulation qualitatively as well as quantitatively. In Lund, Sweden, the identification of the enterochromaffin-like cell as the cell taking part in the regulation of acid secretion by producing and releasing histamine was of fundamental importance both physiologically and clinically. Jorpes and Mutt established a center at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm for the purification of gastrointestinal hormones in the 1960s, and Danes followed up this work by excelling in the field of determination and assessment of biological role of gastrointestinal hormones. A Finnish group was for a long period in the forefront of research on gastritis, and the authors' own studies on the classification of gastric cancer and the role of gastrin in the development of gastric neoplasia are of importance. It can, accordingly, be concluded that Nordic researchers have been central in the research on area of the upper gastrointestinal physiology and diseases. PMID:25857514

  18. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger David John

    2012-01-01

    damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses...... include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review...... the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level....

  19. Hydroimidazolone modification of the conserved Arg12 in small heat shock proteins: studies on the structure and chaperone function using mutant mimics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram H Nagaraj

    Full Text Available Methylglyoxal (MGO is an α-dicarbonyl compound present ubiquitously in the human body. MGO reacts with arginine residues in proteins and forms adducts such as hydroimidazolone and argpyrimidine in vivo. Previously, we showed that MGO-mediated modification of αA-crystallin increased its chaperone function. We identified MGO-modified arginine residues in αA-crystallin and found that replacing such arginine residues with alanine residues mimicked the effects of MGO on the chaperone function. Arginine 12 (R12 is a conserved amino acid residue in Hsp27 as well as αA- and αB-crystallin. When treated with MGO at or near physiological concentrations (2-10 µM, R12 was modified to hydroimidazolone in all three small heat shock proteins. In this study, we determined the effect of arginine substitution with alanine at position 12 (R12A to mimic MGO modification on the structure and chaperone function of these proteins. Among the three proteins, the R12A mutation improved the chaperone function of only αA-crystallin. This enhancement in the chaperone function was accompanied by subtle changes in the tertiary structure, which increased the thermodynamic stability of αA-crystallin. This mutation induced the exposure of additional client protein binding sites on αA-crystallin. Altogether, our data suggest that MGO-modification of the conserved R12 in αA-crystallin to hydroimidazolone may play an important role in reducing protein aggregation in the lens during aging and cataract formation.

  20. Synthesis and Kinetics of a Novel Mimic with Glutathione Peroxidase Activity-Tellurium-containing Hyaluronic Acid (TeHA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Bo CHEN; Lan Ying LIU; Bo Xun ZHANG; Zhong Xiu HUANG; Qing Lin PENG; Jia CHEN; Yu WANG; Jian Guo ZHANG; Guang Zhi JIANG; Wen Shu LI

    2006-01-01

    A novel mimic was synthesized by modifying hyaluronic acid (HA) with tellurium,whose function is similar to that of glutathione peroxidase (GPX). The structure of TeHA was characterized by means of IR and NMR, the target-Te was located at -CH2OH of the N-acetyl-D-glucosamine of HA. The H2O2 reducing activity of TeHA, by glutathione (GSH), was 163.6U/μmol according to Wilson's method. In contrast to other mimics, TeHA displayed the highest activity. Moreover, TeHA accepted many hydroperoxides as its substrates, such as H2O2, cumenyl hydroperoxide (CuOOH) and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH), and CuOOH was the optimal substrate of TeHA. A ping-pong mechanism was observed in the steady-state kinetic studies of the reactions catalyzed by TeHA.

  1. Correlation between the genotoxicity endpoints measured by two different genotoxicity assays: comet assay and CBMN assay

    OpenAIRE

    Carina Ladeira; Susana Viegas; Gomes, Manuel C.

    2015-01-01

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome (CBMN) assay is a comprehensive system for measuring DNA damage; cytostasis and cytotoxicity-DNA damage events are scored specifically in once-divided binucleated cells. The endpoints possible to be measured are micronuclei (MN), a biomarker of chromosome breakage and/or whole chromosome loss, nucleoplasmic bridges (NPB), a biomarker of DNA misrepair and/or telomere end-fusions, and nuclear buds (NBUD), a biomarker of elimination of amplified DNA and/...

  2. An iron-iron hydrogenase mimic with appended electron reservoir for efficient proton reduction in aqueous media

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, René; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Li, Ping; Woutersen, Sander; Reek, Joost N. H.

    2016-01-01

    The transition from a fossil-based economy to a hydrogen-based economy requires cheap and abundant, yet stable and efficient, hydrogen production catalysts. Nature shows the potential of iron-based catalysts such as the iron-iron hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme, which catalyzes hydrogen evolution at rates similar to platinum with low overpotential. However, existing synthetic H2ase mimics generally suffer from low efficiency and oxygen sensitivity and generally operate in organic solvents. We repo...

  3. A frame-dependent gravitational effective action mimics a cosmological constant, but modifies the black hole horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    A frame dependent effective action motivated by the postulates of three-space general coordinate invariance and Weyl scaling invariance exactly mimics a cosmological constant in Robertson-Walker spacetimes. However, in a static spherically symmetric Schwarzschild-like geometry it modifies the black hole horizon structure within microscopic distances of the nominal horizon, in such a way that $g_{00}$ never vanishes. This could have important implications for the black hole "information paradox".

  4. Conspecific mimics and low host plant availability reduce egg laying by Heliconius erato phyllis (Fabricius) (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Elna Mugrabi-Oliveira; Moreira, Gilson R. P.

    1996-01-01

    Oviposition response of Heliconius erato phyllis (Fabricius, 1775) (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae) to variation in host plant availability, Passiflora suberosa Linnaeus (Passifloraceae), and to presence of conspecific eggs and larvae was determined through choice experiments performed under insectary conditions. Freeze dried, painted eggs and larvae were used as mimics for testing presence of conspecific effects. Females laid more eggs on intact P. suberosa shoots without conspecifics than on thos...

  5. A FRET-based ratiometric fluorescent and colorimetric probe for the facile detection of organophosphonate nerve agent mimic DCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Weimin; Cao, Yanting; Zhou, Jiahong; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-18

    A FRET ratiometric fluorescent probe enabling a fast and highly sensitive response to OP nerve agent mimic DCP within 1 min and with as low as 0.17 ppm concentration detection limit has been developed. Moreover, the probe exhibits noticeable color changes under UV light and even with the naked eye. It is also demonstrated that it can detect both liquid and gas nerve agents. PMID:24080856

  6. INHIBITION STUDIES OF TERPENE BASED NATURAL PRODUCTS WITH CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 4 (CDK4 MIMIC CDK2)

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Sunil H. Ganatra et al

    2012-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) are known as cell cycle regulators in eukaryotic cell cycle. Different CDKs (CDK2, CDK4 etc.) are having structure homology among them. Using computer based molecular modeling tools, interactions between naturally occurring terpene based compounds with crystal structure of CDK4 mimic CDK2 enzyme having PDB ID : 1GII. Using In-silico techniques, the binding energies between terpene based compounds and receptor enzymes are calculated in the form of ΔG in kcal/mol...

  7. Small Molecule Agonists of Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 Mimic L1 Functions In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Hardeep; Lutz, David; Chaudhary, Harshita; Schachner, Melitta; Loers, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery after injury, leading to severe disabilities in motor functions and pain. Peripheral nerve injury impairs motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, particularly in cases where nerve gaps are large and chronic nerve injury ensues. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration after acute injury. We screened libraries of known drugs for small molecule agonists of L1 and evaluated the effect of hit compounds in cell-based assays in vitro and in mice after femoral nerve and spinal cord injuries in vivo. We identified eight small molecule L1 agonists and showed in cell-based assays that they stimulate neuronal survival, neuronal migration, and neurite outgrowth and enhance Schwann cell proliferation and migration and myelination of neurons in an L1-dependent manner. In a femoral nerve injury mouse model, enhanced functional regeneration and remyelination after application of the L1 agonists were observed. In a spinal cord injury mouse model, L1 agonists improved recovery of motor functions, being paralleled by enhanced remyelination, neuronal survival, and monoaminergic innervation, reduced astrogliosis, and activation of microglia. Together, these findings suggest that application of small organic compounds that bind to L1 and stimulate the beneficial homophilic L1 functions may prove to be a valuable addition to treatments of nervous system injuries. PMID:26253722

  8. Functional neuroimaging: a physiological perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Ling Lin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic physiology and functional neuroimaging have played important and complementary roles over the past two decades. In particular, investigations of the mechanisms underlying functional neuroimaging signals have produced fundamental new insights into hemodynamic and metabolic regulation. However, controversies were also raised as regards the metabolic pathways (oxidative vs. non-oxidative for meeting the energy demand and driving the increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF during brain activation. In a recent study, with the concurrent fMRI-MRS measurements, we found that task-evoked energy demand was predominately met through oxidative metabolism (~ 98%, despite a small increase in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2; 12-17%. In addition, the task-induced increases in CBF were most likely mediated by anaerobic glycolysis rather than oxygen demand. These observations and others from functional neuroimaging support the activation-induced neuron-astrocyte interactions portrayed by the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle (ANLS model. The concurrent developments of neuroimaging methods and metabolic physiology will also pave the way for the future investigation of cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism in disease states.

  9. Neuronal responses to physiological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. It can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress, and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature, and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive, and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner chemistry during normal development. For example, conditions such as intrinsic hypoxia and oxidative stress, due to an increase in tissue mass, have to be confronted by developing embryos in order to complete their development. Finally, organisms face the challenge of stochastic accumulation of molecular damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level. PMID:23112806

  10. Physiology and physiopathology at CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although CT is essentially a morphological technique, it should theoretically enable investigation of certain physiological and physiopathological phenomena to be made, for example by the study of (i) CT numbers and (ii) the nature and evolution of enhancements. Intravenous injection of iodine contrast agent increases the attenuation coefficients of cerebral parenchyma, which is theoretically due only to the enhancement of the vascular compartment and in direct correlation with the cerebral blood volume (CBV). The authors have measured the attenuation coefficients of the blood and the parenchyma at varying times after contrast injection. Two contrast agents with differing osmolarities were studied. Two scanners were used - an ACTA scanner and an ND 8000. Twenty CTs were performed on five patients after a bolus injection of a solution of 38% iodine: sodium ioxithalamate 25.69 g; methylglucamine oxithalamate 51.3 osmolarity 1800 mosmol/12 ml/kg were injected. Leakage of the iodine contrast agent, however, considerably increases the density coefficient of cerebral parenchyma and rules out any accurate measurement of the CBV. CT study of cerebral physiopathology is also discussed. This is dependent on two techniques - measurement of attenuation coefficients and observation of enhancements - neither of which are shown to give results characteristic of any one physiopathology. The application of CT in physiological and physiopathological cerebral phenomena is currently extremely limited. (Auth.)

  11. Loss of H3K27 trimethylation distinguishes malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors from histologic mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Fletcher, Christopher Dm; Hornick, Jason L

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is challenging, particularly in the sporadic setting. Inactivation of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), resulting from inactivating mutations of its constituents SUZ12 or EED1, has recently been identified in 70-90% of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Homozygous PRC2 inactivation results in loss of histone H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3). PRC2 inactivation promotes tumor progression and may render patients sensitive to epigenetic-based targeted therapies. H3K27me3 loss has not yet been validated as a diagnostic marker. We evaluated immunohistochemistry for H3K27me3 in 100 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (70 sporadic, 10 neurofibromatosis type 1-associated, 10 radiation-associated, 10 epithelioid) and 200 other spindle cell neoplasms representing potential mimics (20 each monophasic synovial sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, dedifferentiated liposarcoma, malignant solitary fibrous tumor, low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma, cellular schwannoma, spindle cell melanoma, unclassified postradiation sarcoma; 10 each atypical neurofibroma, spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, fibrosarcomatous dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans). In total, 51 (51%) malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, including 34 (49%) sporadic, 7 (70%) neurofibromatosis type 1-associated, and 10 (100%) radiation-associated, but no epithelioid malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, were negative for H3K27me3. An additional 6 (6%) tumors showed heterogeneous H3K27me3 expression. Among the 90 sporadic, neurofibromatosis type 1-associated, and radiation-associated malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, complete H3K27me3 loss was observed in 29% of low-grade, 59% of intermediate-grade, and 83% of high-grade tumors (low vs intermediate/high grade, P=0.0003). Among other tumor types, 4 (20%) unclassified postradiation sarcomas were negative for H3K27me3, whereas all other neoplasms were positive. Loss of H3K27me

  12. HIV fusion peptide penetrates, disorders, and softens T-cell membrane mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Chan, Rob; Kooijman, Edgar; Uppamoochikkal, Pradeep; Qiang, Wei; Weliky, David P; Nagle, John F

    2010-09-10

    This work investigates the interaction of N-terminal gp41 fusion peptide (FP) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with model membranes in order to elucidate how FP leads to fusion of HIV and T-cell membranes. FP constructs were (i) wild-type FP23 (23 N-terminal amino acids of gp41), (ii) water-soluble monomeric FP that adds six lysines on the C-terminus of FP23 (FPwsm), and (iii) the C-terminus covalently linked trimeric version (FPtri) of FPwsm. Model membranes were (i) LM3 (a T-cell mimic), (ii) 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, (iii) 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/30 mol% cholesterol, (iv) 1,2-dierucoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and (v) 1,2-dierucoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/30 mol% cholesterol. Diffuse synchrotron low-angle x-ray scattering from fully hydrated samples, supplemented by volumetric data, showed that FP23 and FPtri penetrate into the hydrocarbon region and cause membranes to thin. Depth of penetration appears to depend upon a complex combination of factors including bilayer thickness, presence of cholesterol, and electrostatics. X-ray data showed an increase in curvature in hexagonal phase 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine, which further indicates that FP23 penetrates into the hydrocarbon region rather than residing in the interfacial headgroup region. Low-angle x-ray scattering data also yielded the bending modulus K(C), a measure of membrane stiffness, and wide-angle x-ray scattering yielded the S(xray) orientational order parameter. Both FP23 and FPtri decreased K(C) and S(xray) considerably, while the weak effect of FPwsm suggests that it did not partition strongly into LM3 model membranes. Our results are consistent with the HIV FP disordering and softening the T-cell membrane, thereby lowering the activation energy for viral membrane fusion. PMID:20655315

  13. Characteristics and genetic mapping of a lesion mimic mutant pl(t) in japonica rice variety zhejing 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lesion mimic mutant,obtained by radiation mutagenesis on the seeds of a japonica rice variety Zhejing 22, exhibited a lesion mimic phenotype during the whole growth stage under different environments. Genetic analysis indicated that the mutant trait was controlled by a single recessive gene named spl (t). Relying on simple sequence repeat (SSR) and recessive class analysis method to map the spl (t) gene with a F2 population was constructed by crossing the mutant spl (t) with Zhenshan 97B.spl (t) was mapped in the interval of 0.8cM between RM7195 and RM27929 near centromere region on the short arm of chromosome 12.Blue trypan dye analyses indicated that the lesion mimic trait of the mutant was caused by the programmer cell death. Further study showed that the programmer cell death was caused by H2O2 oxidative burst. By inoculation of bacterial leaf blight and blast strains, the resistances of the mutant were similar to the wild variety Zhejing 22. (authors)

  14. INHIBITION STUDIES OF TERPENE BASED NATURAL PRODUCTS WITH CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE 4 (CDK4 MIMIC CDK2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sunil H. Ganatra et al

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs are known as cell cycle regulators in eukaryotic cell cycle. Different CDKs (CDK2, CDK4 etc. are having structure homology among them. Using computer based molecular modeling tools, interactions between naturally occurring terpene based compounds with crystal structure of CDK4 mimic CDK2 enzyme having PDB ID : 1GII. Using In-silico techniques, the binding energies between terpene based compounds and receptor enzymes are calculated in the form of ΔG in kcal/mol. The reported binding energies for series of molecules are ranging from –5.35 to –13.20 kcal/mol. The negative docking energies and a few hydrogen bonds between selected ligands and receptor enzyme support the affinity of Terpene based compounds with CDK4 mimic CDK2 enzymes. It is also found out that those compounds having carbon atoms 30-31 interacts better with enzyme, whereas larger size compounds having carbon atoms higher than 40 show weak interactions. It is concluded that Tri-terpene class of compounds are the best CDK4 mimic CDK2 inhibitors.

  15. How to Diagnose and Treat IBD Mimics in the Refractory IBD Patient Who Does Not Have IBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chachu, Karen A; Osterman, Mark T

    2016-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract and includes both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Patients with IBD often present with abdominal pain, diarrhea, and rectal bleeding but may also have a wide variety of other symptoms such as weight loss, fever, nausea, vomiting, and possibly obstruction. Given that the presentation of IBD is not specific, the differential diagnosis is broad and encompasses a wide spectrum of diseases, many of which can mimic and/or even coexist with IBD. It is important for physicians to differentiate symptoms due to refractory IBD from symptoms due to IBD mimics when a patient is not responding to standard IBD treatment. Many of the various IBD mimics include infectious etiologies (viral, bacterial, mycobacterial, fungal, protozoal, and helminthic infections), vascular causes, other immune causes including autoimmune etiologies, drug-induced processes, radiation-induced, and other etiologies such as small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, diverticulitis, and bile acid malabsorption. Thoughtful consideration and evaluation of these potential etiologies through patient history and physical examination, as well as appropriate tests, endoscopic evaluation, and cross-sectional imaging is required to evaluate any patient presenting with symptoms consistent with IBD. PMID:26891261

  16. An iron-iron hydrogenase mimic with appended electron reservoir for efficient proton reduction in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, René; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Li, Ping; Woutersen, Sander; Reek, Joost N H

    2016-01-01

    The transition from a fossil-based economy to a hydrogen-based economy requires cheap and abundant, yet stable and efficient, hydrogen production catalysts. Nature shows the potential of iron-based catalysts such as the iron-iron hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme, which catalyzes hydrogen evolution at rates similar to platinum with low overpotential. However, existing synthetic H2ase mimics generally suffer from low efficiency and oxygen sensitivity and generally operate in organic solvents. We report on a synthetic H2ase mimic that contains a redox-active phosphole ligand as an electron reservoir, a feature that is also crucial for the working of the natural enzyme. Using a combination of (spectro)electrochemistry and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, we elucidate the unique redox behavior of the catalyst. We find that the electron reservoir actively partakes in the reduction of protons and that its electron-rich redox states are stabilized through ligand protonation. In dilute sulfuric acid, the catalyst has a turnover frequency of 7.0 × 10(4) s(-1) at an overpotential of 0.66 V. This catalyst is tolerant to the presence of oxygen, thereby paving the way for a new generation of synthetic H2ase mimics that combine the benefits of the enzyme with synthetic versatility and improved stability. PMID:26844297

  17. A novel flow cytometric assay for measurement of In Vivo pulmonary neutrophil phagocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gentry-Nielsen Martha J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phagocytosis assays are traditionally performed in vitro using polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs isolated from peripheral blood or the peritoneum and heat-killed, pre-opsonized organisms. These assays may not adequately mimic the environment within the infected lung. Our laboratory therefore has developed a flow cytometric in vivo phagocytosis assay that enables quantification of PMN phagocytosis of viable bacteria within the lungs of rats. In these studies, rats are injected transtracheally with lipopolysaccharide (LPS to recruit PMNs to their lungs. They are then infected with live 5(-and 6 carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFDA/SE labeled type 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae. Bronchoalveolar lavage is performed and resident alveolar macrophages and recruited PMNs are labeled with monoclonal antibodies specific for surface epitopes on each cell type. Three color flow cytometry is utilized to identify the cell types, quantify recruitment, and determine uptake of the labeled bacteria. Results The viability of the alveolar macrophages and PMNs isolated from the lavage fluid was >95%. The values of the percentage of PMNs in the lavage fluid as well as the percentage of PMNs associated with CFSE-labeled S. pneumoniae as measured through flow cytometry showed a high degree of correlation with the results from manual counting of cytospin slides. Conclusion This assay is suitable for measuring bacterial uptake within the infected lung. It can be adapted for use with other organisms and/or animal model systems.

  18. A microsystem-based assay for studying pollen tube guidance in plant reproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a novel microsystem-based assay to assess and quantify pollen tube behavior in response to pistil tissues. During plant reproduction, signals from female tissues (pistils) guide the sperm-carrying pollen tube to the egg cell to achieve fertilization and initiate seed development. Existing pollen tube guidance bioassays are performed in an isotropically diffusive environment (for example, a semi in vivo assay in petri dishes) instead of anisotropically diffusive conditions required to characterize guidance signal gradients. Lack of a sensitive pollen tube guidance bioassay has therefore compounded the difficulties of identifying and characterizing the guidance signals that are likely produced in minute quantities by the ovules. We therefore developed a novel microsystem-based assay that mimics the in vivo micro-environment of ovule fertilization by pollen tubes in the model research plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In this microdevice, the pollen tube growth rate, length and ovule targeting frequencies were similar to those obtained using a semi in vivo plate assay. As a direct measure of the microdevice's utility in monitoring pollen tube guidance, we demonstrated that in this device, pollen tubes preferentially enter chambers with unfertilized ovules, suggesting that the pollen tubes sense the concentration gradient and respond to the chemoattractants secreted by unfertilized ovules

  19. Development of a radioreceptor assay for human chorion gonadotropin: Application in normal and pathological pregnancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rats testes were homogenised, and the binding capacity of several dilutions of these were tested with iodine125-labelled human choriongonadotropin. Investigations about binding over a period of 36 hrs. with 3 different temperatures, inhibition tests and cross reaction analyses for determining the specificity were carried out. 2 assay systems could be developed. The highly sensitive assay was applied at early pregnancy, at suspected disturbed or ectopic gravidity and allowed to measure the hCG-serum concentration above the physiological basal secretion of hLH. The less sensitive assay was used for measuring hCG in later stages of pregnancy, chorionepitheliomas and other hCG producing tumours. With the highly sensitive and specific assay, hCG was determinable 8 to 10 days post conceptionem. (orig.)

  20. Radiosotopic assay and binder therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid and less costly radioisotopic assay for measuring the concentration of folate in blood serum is described. This procedure utilizes 3H-pteroylmonoglutamate, unlabeled 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid, and a partially purified folate binder, such as for example a folate binder extracted from hog kidney. The procedure involves radioisotopically relating the bound amounts of a labeled folate and a known folate at various concentrations of the known folate in a system containing a predetermined amount of the labeled folate, a predetermined amount of the binder factor for the folates, and a predetermined amount of defolated test serum. 16 claims, 8 drawing figures

  1. The radio ligand receptor assay for thyroid stimulating factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible uses of RRA in routine examinations to detect HTSI and physiological TSH concentrations were investigated in this study. The primary difficulties were that the RRA had a low sensitivity using the Mehdi method and the investigation results exhibited large deviations. The authors first investigated the non-specific influences of the incubation medium such as temperature, incubation time, protein used and salts on the 125I-TSH compared by means of the enriched membrane according to Mehdi. After the modification of the labelling process of 125I-TSH with Smith's post-purification method, it was possible to improve the sensitivity of the assay system from 100 μU to 10 μU TSH/test. It was now possible to detect HTSI in 67% of the Morbus Basedow sera in clinical tests (compared with 54% in the RRA prior to modification and 19% in the McKenzie assay). The discrepancy between these results and those of Mukhtar et al. - with a HTSI detection in 100% of the cases investigated for the same sensitivity of the assay - remains unexplained. The sensitivity of the RRA is not sufficient to detect TSH in serum, as the standard region for the basal TSH level in the serum is given as between 0.5 and 3.8 μU/ml in the radioimmunoassay. (orig./AJ)

  2. The chemistry behind antioxidant capacity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dejian; Ou, Boxin; Prior, Ronald L

    2005-03-23

    This review summarizes the multifaceted aspects of antioxidants and the basic kinetic models of inhibited autoxidation and analyzes the chemical principles of antioxidant capacity assays. Depending upon the reactions involved, these assays can roughly be classified into two types: assays based on hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions and assays based on electron transfer (ET). The majority of HAT-based assays apply a competitive reaction scheme, in which antioxidant and substrate compete for thermally generated peroxyl radicals through the decomposition of azo compounds. These assays include inhibition of induced low-density lipoprotein autoxidation, oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), total radical trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP), and crocin bleaching assays. ET-based assays measure the capacity of an antioxidant in the reduction of an oxidant, which changes color when reduced. The degree of color change is correlated with the sample's antioxidant concentrations. ET-based assays include the total phenols assay by Folin-Ciocalteu reagent (FCR), Trolox equivalence antioxidant capacity (TEAC), ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), "total antioxidant potential" assay using a Cu(II) complex as an oxidant, and DPPH. In addition, other assays intended to measure a sample's scavenging capacity of biologically relevant oxidants such as singlet oxygen, superoxide anion, peroxynitrite, and hydroxyl radical are also summarized. On the basis of this analysis, it is suggested that the total phenols assay by FCR be used to quantify an antioxidant's reducing capacity and the ORAC assay to quantify peroxyl radical scavenging capacity. To comprehensively study different aspects of antioxidants, validated and specific assays are needed in addition to these two commonly accepted assays. PMID:15769103

  3. Indirect conductimetric assay of antibacterial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawai, J; Doi, R; Maekawa, Y; Yoshikawa, T; Kojima, H

    2002-11-01

    The applicability of indirect conductimetric assays for evaluation of antibacterial activity was examined. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) obtained by the indirect method was consistent with that by the direct conductimetric assay and the turbidity method. The indirect assay allows use of growth media, which cannot be used in the direct conductimetric assay, making it possible to evaluate the antibacterial activity of insoluble or slightly soluble materials with high turbidity, such as antibacterial ceramic powders. PMID:12407467

  4. Serum indices: managing assay interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Christopher-John L; Carter, Andrew C

    2016-09-01

    Clinical laboratories frequently encounter samples showing significant haemolysis, icterus or lipaemia. Technical advances, utilizing spectrophotometric measurements on automated chemistry analysers, allow rapid and accurate identification of such samples. However, accurate quantification of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia interference is of limited value if laboratories do not set rational alert limits, based on sound interference testing experiments. Furthermore, in the context of increasing consolidation of laboratories and the formation of laboratory networks, there is an increasing requirement for harmonization of the handling of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia-affected samples across different analytical platforms. Harmonization may be best achieved by considering both the analytical aspects of index measurement and the possible variations in the effects of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia interferences on assays from different manufacturers. Initial verification studies, followed up with ongoing quality control testing, can help a laboratory ensure the accuracy of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia index results, as well as assist in managing any biases in index results from analysers from different manufacturers. Similarities, and variations, in the effect of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia interference in assays from different manufacturers can often be predicted from the mechanism of interference. Nevertheless, interference testing is required to confirm expected similarities or to quantify differences. It is important that laboratories are familiar with a number of interference testing protocols and the particular strengths and weaknesses of each. A rigorous approach to all aspects of haemolysis, icterus and lipaemia interference testing allows the analytical progress in index measurement to be translated into improved patient care. PMID:27147624

  5. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the R and D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O2, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed ''natural'' radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  6. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, R.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.

    2011-04-01

    We describe the R&D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O2, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed "natural" radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  7. 21 CFR 864.7525 - Heparin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heparin assay. 864.7525 Section 864.7525 Food and... HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7525 Heparin assay. (a) Identification. A heparin assay is a device used to determine the level of the anticoagulant heparin in the...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7490 - Sulfhemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sulfhemoglobin assay. 864.7490 Section 864.7490 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... assay. (a) Identification. A sulfhemoglobin assay is a device consisting of the reagents,...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7250 - Erythropoietin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Erythropoietin assay. 864.7250 Section 864.7250... assay. (a) Identification. A erythropoietin assay is a device that measures the concentration of erythropoietin (an enzyme that regulates the production of red blood cells) in serum or urine. This...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7425 - Carboxyhemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Carboxyhemoglobin assay. 864.7425 Section 864.7425 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... assay. (a) Identification. A carboxyhemoglobin assay is a device used to determine the...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food... DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay. (a) Identification. An endotoxin assay is a device that uses serological techniques in whole blood. The device...

  12. Multicentre comparison of a diagnostic assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waters, Patrick; Reindl, Markus; Saiz, Albert;

    2016-01-01

    ) assays in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD). METHODS: Coded samples from patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) or NMOSD (101) and controls (92) were tested at 15 European diagnostic centres using 21 assays including live (n=3) or fixed cell-based assays (n=10), flow cytometry (n=4...

  13. CH2 - Lighting and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Altomonte

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains the designed performances of the new CH2 building in Melbourne, Australia. CH2 is an environmentally significant project that involves biomimicry of natural systems to produce indoor conditions that are conducive to user comfort, health and productivity. This paper focuses on lighting and physiology and examines the solutions chosen for artificial and natural lighting and the likely effects these will have on building occupants. The purpose of the paper is to critically comment on the adopted strategy and, cognisance of contemporary thinking in lighting design, to judge the effectiveness of this aspect of the project with a view to later verification and post-occupancy review. The paper concludes that CH2 is an exemplar of lighting innovation that provides valuable lessons to designers of office buildings, particularly in the Melbourne CSD.

  14. Neuroanatomy and physiology of cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culpepper, Larry

    2015-07-01

    Research into the neuroanatomy and physiology of cognition is a growing field with applications for the treatment of major depressive disorder. The most common cognitive impairments in people with depression are related to executive function, memory, attention, and processing speed along with negative bias. Based on data from improved imaging technology, many cognitive functions once assumed to be localized in specific areas of the brain are now thought to result from deficits in 3 key networks (the central executive network, the salience network, and the default mode network) and their interactions with each other and other brain areas. New discoveries in the connections and functions of brain networks and regions may provide novel treatment targets for cognitive symptoms in major depressive disorder. PMID:26231020

  15. PHYSIOLOGY OF BLOOD COAGULATION (II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ţuţuianu

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Coagulation cascade was untill recently the only model used to explain the physiological and pathological reactions during clot formation. Dr. Maureane Hoffman and her team suggested a cell-based model for coagulation, which takes place (according to this model in three phases: initiation, amplification and propagation. This theory does not deny the coagulation cascade. It only says that the leading role in the whole process is held by the cells and that the „intrinsic” and the „extinsic” pathways operate in parallel on different cell surfaces. Using this model, a better understanding of the reactions in vivo during coagulation is achieved, together with answers related to clinical-based questions like „why haemophiliacs bleed?”.

  16. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Burton, Rachel A.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  17. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D; Burton, Rachel A; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  18. Establishment of Immunoradiometric Assay for Carcinoembryonic Antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Two anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies are used, one is coated on the microtiter plate, the other is labeled to make 125I-CEAMcAb. The one-step assay is established based on immunoradiometric assay(IRMA). The sensitivity of the assay is 0.5 μ g/L. The intra-assay CVs and the inter-assay CVs are lower than 10.0% and 15.0%, respectively. The analytical recoveries are ranged from 97.4% to 107.8%. The reference cut-out value of 35 normal serum is lower than

  19. Making transuranic assay measurements using modern controllers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes methodology and computer-controlled instrumentation developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory that accurately performs nondestructive assays of large containers bearing transuranic wastes and nonradioactive matrix materials. These assay systems can measure fissile isotopes with 1-mg sensitivity and spontaneous neutron-emitting isotopes at a 10-mg sensitivity. The assays are performed by neutron interrogation, detection, and counting in a custom assay chamber. An International Business Machines Personal Computer (IBM-PC) is used to control the CAMAC-based instrumentation system that acquires the assay data. 6 refs., 7 figs

  20. Physiological, Behavioral, and Dietary Characteristics Associated with Hypertension among Kenyan Defence Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundan, Victor; Muiva, Margaret; Kimani, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Background. Hypertensive disease is increasing in developing countries due to nutritional transition and westernization. Hypertensive disease among Kenya military may be lower because of health-focused recruitment, physical activities, routine checkups, and health awareness and management, but the disease has been increasing. Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine physiological, behavioral, and dietary characteristics associated with hypertension among Kenyan military. Methods. A cross-sectional study involving 340 participants was conducted at Armed Forces Memorial Hospital. Participants' history, risk factors assessment, and dietary patterns were obtained by structured questionnaire, while physiological and anthropometric parameters were measured. Results. Hypertensive participants were likely to have higher age, physiological, and anthropometric measurements, and they participated in peace missions. Daily alcohol and smoking, frequent red meat, and inadequate fruits and vegetables were associated with hypertension. Conclusions. The findings mimic the main risk factors and characteristics for hypertensive disease in developed countries whose lifestyle adoption is happening fast in low and middle-income countries. Whether or not prediction rules and/or risk scores may identify at-risk individuals for preventive strategy for targeted behavioral interventions among this population require investigation. PMID:24977096

  1. Intragroup emotions: physiological linkage and social presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simo eJärvelä

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated how technologically mediating two different components of emotion – communicative expression and physiological state – to group members affects physiological linkage and self-reported feelings in a small group during video viewing. In different conditions the availability of second screen text chat (communicative expression and visualization of group level physiological heart rates and their dyadic linkage (physiology was varied. Within this four person group two participants formed a physically co-located dyad and the other two were individually situated in two separate rooms. We found that text chat always increased heart rate synchrony but HR visualization only with non-co-located dyads. We also found that physiological linkage was strongly connected to self-reported social presence. The results encourage further exploration of the possibilities of sharing group member’s physiological components of emotion by technological means to enhance mediated communication and strengthen social presence.

  2. Non destructive assay (NDA) techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the IAEA Safeguards System the basic verification method used is nuclear material accountancy, with containment and surveillance as important complementary measures. If nuclear material accountancy is to be effective, IAEA inspectors have to make independent measurements to verify declared material quantities. Most of the equipment available to the inspectors is designed to measure gamma rays and/or neutrons emitted by various nuclear materials. Equipment is also available to measure the gross weight of an item containing nuclear material. These types of measurement techniques are generally grouped under the title of nondestructive assay (NDA). The paper describes the NDA techniques and instruments used to verify the total amount of nuclear material held at a nuclear facility. (author)

  3. Predictive Assay For Cancer Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suess, A; Nguyen, C; Sorensen, K; Montgomery, J; Souza, B; Kulp, K; Dugan, L; Christian, A

    2005-09-19

    Early detection of cancer is a key element in successful treatment of the disease. Understanding the particular type of cancer involved, its origins and probable course, is also important. PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6 phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine), a heterocyclic amine produced during the cooking of meat at elevated temperatures, has been shown to induce mammary cancer in female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Tumors induced by PhIP have been shown to contain discreet cytogenetic signature patterns of gains and losses using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). To determine if a protein signature exists for these tumors, we are analyzing expression levels of the protein products of the above-mentioned tumors in combination with a new bulk protein subtractive assay. This assay produces a panel of antibodies against proteins that are either on or off in the tumor. Hybridization of the antibody panel onto a 2-D gel of tumor or control protein will allow for identification of a distinct protein signature in the tumor. Analysis of several gene databases has identified a number of rat homologs of human cancer genes located in these regions of gain and loss. These genes include the oncogenes c-MYK, ERBB2/NEU, THRA and tumor suppressor genes EGR1 and HDAC3. The listed genes have been shown to be estrogen-responsive, suggesting a possible link between delivery of bio-activated PhIP to the cell nucleus via estrogen receptors and gene-specific PhIP-induced DNA damage, leading to cell transformation. All three tumors showed similar silver staining patterns compared to each other, while they all were different than the control tissue. Subsequent screening of these genes against those from tumors know to be caused by other agents may produce a protein signature unique to PhIP, which can be used as a diagnostic to augment optical and radiation-based detection schemes.

  4. Three-dimensional cultures of human endometrial cells on Matrigel mimic in vivo morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Hai-yan; WANG Jun-xia; TONG Xiao-mei; XU Wei-hai; JIANG Ling-ying; JING Xiao-ying; YANG Ling-yun; ZHOU Feng; ZHANG Song-ying

    2012-01-01

    Background The regulation of endometrial physiology and morphogenesis by the paracrine effectors has been well established using in vivo studies.A more complete understanding of the endometrial function has been delayed due,in part,to a lack of appropriate culture models.In this study,we aimed to simulate the in vivo three-dimensional (3-D) growth pattern of endometrial cells using a 3-D in vitro culture system.Methods Isolated endometrial epithelial cells,stromal cells and RL95-2 cells were seeded into culture chambers coated with the extracellular matrix Matrigel and observed using light microscopy.Fluorescence staining and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the morphology.Results Depending on the culture conditions,epithelial cells and RL95-2 cells formed multicellular structures on Matrigel; stromal cells remained individually distinguishable or grew together to form 3-D lattice-like structures.Conclusions Matrigel provided a good microenvironment for culturing endometrial cells.The cells cultured in the Matrigel-coated chambers closely resembled those seen in vivo.

  5. Effects of Starvation on Physiological Activity and Chlorine Disinfection Resistance in Escherichia coli O157:H7

    OpenAIRE

    Lisle, John T.; Broadaway, Susan C.; Prescott, Annette M.; Pyle, Barry H.; Fricker, Colin; McFeters, Gordon A.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 can persist for days to weeks in microcosms simulating natural conditions. In this study, we used a suite of fluorescent, in situ stains and probes to assess the influence of starvation on physiological activity based on membrane potential (rhodamine 123 assay), membrane integrity (LIVE/DEAD BacLight kit), respiratory activity (5-cyano-2,3-di-4-tolyl-tetrazolium chloride assay), intracellular esterase activity (ScanRDI assay), and 16S rRNA content. Growth-dependent as...

  6. Electrochemiluminescence immunosensing strategy based on the use of Au-Ag nanorods as a peroxidase mimic and NH4CoPO4 as a supercapacitive supporter: Application to the determination of carcinoembryonic antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The luminol-H2O2 system is widely applied in electrochemiluminescence (ECL) assays but has limited stability. We are presenting an alternative immunosensing strategy by making use of Au-Ag nanorods that mimic the enzyme peroxidase. It also makes use of the supercapacitive supporter NH4CoPO4 as a supporter substrate that facilitates ion movement due to its many nanogaps between the assembled nanoplates. It also plays a vital role for stabilizing the ECL signal of luminol. The immunosensor was constructed by first placing a chitosan film containing NH4CoPO4, Au-Ag and luminol on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE), and the immobilizing anti-CEA on its surface. ECL is generated via electrochemical reaction of luminol on the surface of the Au-Ag-luminol film in the presence of H2O2. The assay was evaluated with respect to effects of pH value, time and temperature of incubation, specificity, reproducibility, and stability in a lab setting. A linear relationship between ECL intensity and CEA concentration is found for the 0.1 pg · mL−1 to 380 ng · mL−1 range, and the lower detection limit is as low as 30 fg · mL−1. In our perception, this immunoassay has a large scope in that numerous other immunoassays will become feasible by using other antibodies and, possibly, aptamers. (author)

  7. Three-dimensional printing physiology laboratory technology

    OpenAIRE

    Sulkin, Matthew S.; Widder, Emily; Shao, Connie; Holzem, Katherine M.; Gloschat, Christopher; Gutbrod, Sarah R; Efimov, Igor R.

    2013-01-01

    Since its inception in 19th-century Germany, the physiology laboratory has been a complex and expensive research enterprise involving experts in various fields of science and engineering. Physiology research has been critically dependent on cutting-edge technological support of mechanical, electrical, optical, and more recently computer engineers. Evolution of modern experimental equipment is constrained by lack of direct communication between the physiological community and industry producin...

  8. Comet assay as a predictive assay for radiosensitivity of two human brain tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micronucleus assay and comet assay were compared as a predictive assay for radiosensitivity of tumors. Two human brain tumor cell lines, Becker (derived from astrocytoma) and ONS76 (derived from medulloblastoma) were used. Colony methods as the gold standard showed ONS76 as radiosensitive and Becker as radioresistant cell lines. Micronucleus assay revealed no different radiosensitivity between them. With comet assay, Becker cells received irradiation showed less damage to the DNA and faster repair of the damage than ONS76 cells did. The results correlate with those from colony methods. Comet assay is simple and rapid method for clinical use and it has an advantage not to establish the primary culture. Moreover, the results of comet assay showed not only DNA damage but also repair from the damage. It is concluded that comet assay is a superior method than micronucleus assay and has a potent candidate for clinical predictive assay. (author)

  9. Hydrodynamics, Fungal Physiology, and Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Carreón, L; Galindo, E; Rocha-Valadéz, J A; Holguín-Salas, A; Corkidi, G

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous cultures, such as fungi and actinomycetes, contribute substantially to the pharmaceutical industry and to enzyme production, with an annual market of about 6 billion dollars. In mechanically stirred reactors, most frequently used in fermentation industry, microbial growth and metabolite productivity depend on complex interactions between hydrodynamics, oxygen transfer, and mycelial morphology. The dissipation of energy through mechanically stirring devices, either flasks or tanks, impacts both microbial growth through shearing forces on the cells and the transfer of mass and energy, improving the contact between phases (i.e., air bubbles and microorganisms) but also causing damage to the cells at high energy dissipation rates. Mechanical-induced signaling in the cells triggers the molecular responses to shear stress; however, the complete mechanism is not known. Volumetric power input and, more importantly, the energy dissipation/circulation function are the main parameters determining mycelial size, a phenomenon that can be explained by the interaction of mycelial aggregates and Kolmogorov eddies. The use of microparticles in fungal cultures is also a strategy to increase process productivity and reproducibility by controlling fungal morphology. In order to rigorously study the effects of hydrodynamics on the physiology of fungal microorganisms, it is necessary to rule out the possible associated effects of dissolved oxygen, something which has been reported scarcely. At the other hand, the processes of phase dispersion (including the suspended solid that is the filamentous biomass) are crucial in order to get an integral knowledge about biological and physicochemical interactions within the bioreactor. Digital image analysis is a powerful tool for getting relevant information in order to establish the mechanisms of mass transfer as well as to evaluate the viability of the mycelia. This review focuses on (a) the main characteristics of the two most

  10. G-quadruplex based impedimetric 2-hydroxyfluorene biosensor using hemin as a peroxidase enzyme mimic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a sensitive and selective biosensor for the environmental metabolite 2-hydroxyfluorene (2-HOFlu). It is based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and was obtained by assembling a thiolated single-stranded DNA on a gold electrode via S-Au covalent bonding. It is then transformed to a K+-stabilized G-quadruplex-hemin complex which exhibits peroxidase-like activity to catalyze the oxidation of 2-HOFlu by H2O2. This results in the formation of insoluble products that are precipitated on the gold electrode. As a result, the charge transfer resistance (RCT) between the solution and the electrode surface is strongly increased within 10 min as demonstrated by using the ferro/ferricyanide system as a redox probe. The difference in the charge transfer resistances (ΔRCT) before and after incubation of the DNA film with 2-HOFlu and H2O2 serves as the signal for the quantitation of 2-HOFlu with a 1.2. nM detection limit in water of pH 7.4. The assay is highly selective over other selected fluorene derivatives. It was exploited to determine 2-HOFlu in spiked lake water samples where it displayed a detection limit of 3.6 nM. Conceivably, this method has a wide scope in that it may be applied to other analytes for which respective G-quadruplexes are available. (author)

  11. Obesity and Asthma: Physiological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bill Brashier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity induces some pertinent physiological changes which are conducive to either development of asthma or cause of poorly controlled asthma state. Obesity related mechanical stress forces induced by abdominal and thoracic fat generate stiffening of the lungs and diaphragmatic movements to result in reduction of resting lung volumes such as functional residual capacity (FRC. Reduced FRC is primarily an outcome of decreased expiratory reserve volume, which pushes the tidal breathing more towards smaller high resistance airways, and consequentially results in expiratory flow limitation during normal breathing in obesity. Reduced FRC also induces plastic alteration in the small collapsible airways, which may generate smooth muscle contraction resulting in increased small airway resistance, which, however, is not picked up by spirometric lung volumes. There is also a possibility that chronically reduced FRC may generate permanent adaptation in the very small airways; therefore, the airway calibres may not change despite weight reduction. Obesity may also induce bronchodilator reversibility and diurnal lung functional variability. Obesity is also associated with airway hyperresponsiveness; however, the mechanism of this is not clear. Thus, obesity has effects on lung function that can generate respiratory distress similar to asthma and may also exaggerate the effects of preexisting asthma.

  12. Clinical physiology of bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1993-01-01

    Maintenance of optimal health in humans requires the proper balance between exercise, rest, and sleep as well as time in the upright position. About one-third of a lifetime is spent sleeping; and it is no coincidence that sleeping is performed in the horizontal position, the position in which gravitational influence on the body is minimal. Although enforced bed rest is necessary for the treatment of some ailments, in some cases it has probably been used unwisely. In addition to the lower hydrostatic pressure with the normally dependent regions of the cardiovascular system, body fuid compartments during bed rest in the horizontal body position, and virtual elimination of compression on the long bones of the skeletal system during bed rest (hypogravia), there is often reduction in energy metabolism due to the relative confinement (hypodynamia) and alteration of ambulatory circadian variations in metabolism, body temperature, and many hormonal systems. If patients are also moved to unfamiliar surroundings, they probably experience some feelings of anxiety and some sociopsychological problems. Adaptive physiological responses during bed rest are normal for that environment. They are attempts by the body to reduce unnecessary energy expenditure, to optimize its function, and to enhance its survival potential. Many of the deconditioning responses begin within the first day or two of bed rest; these early responses have prompted physicians to insist upon early resumption of the upright posture and ambulation of bedridden patients.

  13. Seasonal changes in reindeer physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Reeta Pösö

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal changes in the photoperiod, temperature and availability of food need to be converted to hormonal signals in order to induce adaptations in the physiology of the reindeer. The most reliable of the seasonal changes in the environment is the photoperiod, which affects the reindeer physiology through pineal gland and its hormone, melatonin. Usually there are large diurnal changes in the concentration of melatonin, but in the reindeer the daily rhythm disappears during the arctic summer to return again in the autumn. Seasonal changes in melatonin secretion are involved in the regulation of reproduction, the growth of pelage, thermogenesis, body mass and immune function. Melatonin may exert its effects through gene activation, but the mechanisms are not completely understood. Other hormones that show seasonality are thyroid hormones, insulin and leptin. Thus the observed physiological changes are a result of actions of several hormones. Appetite, energy production and thermogenesis are all vital for survival. During winter, when energy balance is negative, the reindeer uses mainly body fat for energy production. The use of fat stores is economical as the rate of lipolysis is controlled and the use of fatty acids in tissues such as muscle decreases. Only in severe starvation the rate of lipolysis increases enough to give rise to accumulation of ketone bodies. The protein mass is maintained and only in starved individuals muscle protein is used for energy production. The winter feed of the reindeer, the lichens, is poor in nitrogen and the nitrogen balance during winter is strongly negative. Reindeer responds to limited availability of nitrogen by increasing the recycling of urea into rumen. In general the adaptation of reindeer physiology enables the reindeer to survive the winter and although several aspects are known many others require further studies.Abstract in Finnish / Tiivistelmä: Valaistus, lämpötila ja ravinnon saatavuus

  14. Expert system for transuranic waste assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transuranic wastes are generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) as a result of routine production of nuclear materials. These wastes contain Pu-238 and Pu-239 and are placed into lined 55-gallon waste drums. The drums are placed on monitored storage pads pending shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. A passive-active neutron (PAN) assay system is used to determine the mass of the radioactive material within the waste drums. Assay results are used to classify the wastes as either low-level or transuranic (TRU). During assays, the PAN assay system communicates with an IBM-AT computer. A Fortran computer program, called NEUT, controls and performs all data analyses. Unassisted, the NEUT program cannot adequately interpret assay results. To eliminate this limitation, an expert system shell was used to write a new algorithm, called the Transuranic Expert System (TRUX), to drive the NEUT program and add decision making capabilities for analysis of the assay results. The TRUX knowledge base was formulated by consulting with human experts in the field of neutron assay, by direct experimentation on the PAN assay system, and by observing operations on a daily basis. TRUX, with its improved ability to interpret assay results, has eliminated the need for close supervision by a human expert, allowing skilled technicians to operate the PAN assay system. 4 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  15. Comparative physiological and transcriptional analyses of two contrasting drought tolerant alfalfa varieties

    OpenAIRE

    Wenli eQuan; Xun eLiu; Haiqing eWang; Zhulong eChan

    2016-01-01

    Drought is one of major environmental determinants of plant growth and productivity. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is a legume perennial forage crop native to the arid and semi-arid environment, which is an ideal candidate to study the biochemical and molecular mechanisms conferring drought resistance in plants. In this study, drought stress responses of two alfalfa varieties, Longdong and Algonquin, were comparatively assayed at the physiological, morphological and transcriptional levels. Under ...

  16. Comparative Physiological and Transcriptional Analyses of Two Contrasting Drought Tolerant Alfalfa Varieties

    OpenAIRE

    Quan, Wenli; Liu, Xun; Wang, Haiqing; Chan, Zhulong

    2016-01-01

    Drought is one of major environmental determinants of plant growth and productivity. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa) is a legume perennial forage crop native to the arid and semi-arid environment, which is an ideal candidate to study the biochemical and molecular mechanisms conferring drought resistance in plants. In this study, drought stress responses of two alfalfa varieties, Longdong and Algonquin, were comparatively assayed at the physiological, morphological, and transcriptional levels. Under...

  17. Resveratrol production in bioreactor: Assessment of cell physiological states and plasmid segregational stability

    OpenAIRE

    Margarida S. Afonso; Susana Ferreira; Domingues, Fernanda C.; Filomena Silva

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is a plant secondary metabolite commonly found in peanuts and grapevines with significant health benefits. Recombinant organisms can produce large amounts of resveratrol and, in this work, Escherichia coli BW27784 was used to produce resveratrol in bioreactors while monitoring cell physiology and plasmid stability through flow cytometry and real-time qPCR, respectively. Initially, the influence of culture conditions and precursor addition was evaluated in screening assays and the ...

  18. Harmonization of radiobiological assays: why and how?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has made available a technical manual for cytogenetic biodosimetry assays (dicentric chromosome aberration (DCA) and cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assays) used for radiation dose assessment in radiation accidents. The International Standardization Organization, which develops standards and guidelines, also provides an avenue for laboratory accreditation, has developed guidelines and recommendations for performing cytogenetic biodosimetry assays. Harmonization of DCA and CBMN assays, has improved their accuracy. Double-blinded inter-laboratory comparison studies involving several networks have further validated DCA and CBMN assays and improved the confidence in their potential use for radiation dose assessment in mass casualties. This kind of international harmonization is lacking for pre-clinical radiobiology assays. The widely used pre-clinical assays that are relatively important to set stage for clinical trials include clonogenic assays, flow-cytometry assays, apoptotic assays, and tumor regression and growth delay assays. However, significant inter-laboratory variations occur with respect to data among laboratories. This raises concerns on the reliability and reproducibility of preclinical data that drives further development and translation. Lack of reproducibility may stem from a variety of factors such as poor scientist training, less than optimal experimental design, inadequate description of methodology, and impulse to publish only the positive data etc. Availability of technical manuals, standard operating procedures, accreditation avenues for laboratories performing such assays, inter-laboratory comparisons, and use of standardized protocols are necessary to enhance reliability and reproducibility. Thus, it is important that radiobiological assays are harmonized for laboratory protocols to ensure successful translation of pre-clinical research on radiation effect modulators to help design clinic trials with

  19. Physiologic Estrogen Replacement Increases Bone Density in Adolescent Girls with Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Madhusmita; Katzman, Debra; Miller, Karen K.; Mendes, Nara; Snelgrove, Deirdre; Russell, Melissa; Goldstein, Mark; Ebrahimi, Seda; Clauss, Laura; Weigel, Thomas; Mickley, Diane; Schoenfeld, David; Herzog, David B.; Klibanski, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Background Anorexia nervosa (AN) is prevalent in adolescents and is associated with decreased bone mineral accrual at a time critical for optimizing bone mass. Low bone mineral density (BMD) in AN is a consequence of nutritional and hormonal alterations, including hypogonadism and low estradiol levels. Effective therapeutic strategies to improve BMD in adolescents with AN have not been identified. Specifically, high estrogen doses given as an oral contraceptive do not improve BMD. The impact of physiological estrogen doses that mimic puberty on BMD has not been examined. Subjects and Methods We enrolled 110 girls with AN and 40 normal-weight controls (C) 12–18y of similar maturity. Subjects were studied for 18 months. Mature AN [bone age (BA) ≥15 y; n=96] were randomized to transdermal 100mcg 17β-estradiol (with cyclic progesterone) or placebo for 18m. Immature AN (BA <15y; n=14) were randomized to incremental low dose oral ethinyl-estradiol (3.75mcg daily from 0–6m, 7.5mcg from 6–12m, 11.25mcg from 12–18m) to mimic pubertal estrogen increases, or placebo for the 18m duration. Results All BMD measures assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were lower in AN than C. At baseline, AN randomized to estrogen (AN E+) did not differ from those randomized to placebo (AN E−) for age, maturity, height, BMI, amenorrhea duration and BMD parameters. Spine and hip BMD Z-scores increased over time in the AN E+ compared with AN E− group, even after controlling for baseline age and weight. Conclusion Physiological estradiol replacement increases spine and hip BMD in girls with AN. PMID:21698665

  20. Physiologic estrogen replacement increases bone density in adolescent girls with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Madhusmita; Katzman, Debra; Miller, Karen K; Mendes, Nara; Snelgrove, Deirdre; Russell, Melissa; Goldstein, Mark A; Ebrahimi, Seda; Clauss, Laura; Weigel, Thomas; Mickley, Diane; Schoenfeld, David A; Herzog, David B; Klibanski, Anne

    2011-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is prevalent in adolescents and is associated with decreased bone mineral accrual at a time critical for optimizing bone mass. Low BMD in AN is a consequence of nutritional and hormonal alterations, including hypogonadism and low estradiol levels. Effective therapeutic strategies to improve BMD in adolescents with AN have not been identified. Specifically, high estrogen doses given as an oral contraceptive do not improve BMD. The impact of physiologic estrogen doses that mimic puberty on BMD has not been examined. We enrolled 110 girls with AN and 40 normal-weight controls 12 to 18 years of age of similar maturity. Subjects were studied for 18 months. Mature girls with AN (bone age [BA] ≥15 years, n = 96) were randomized to 100 µg of 17β-estradiol (with cyclic progesterone) or placebo transdermally for 18 months. Immature girls with AN (BA < 15 years, n = 14) were randomized to incremental low-dose oral ethinyl-estradiol (3.75 µg daily from 0 to 6 months, 7.5 µg from 6 to 12 months, 11.25 µg from 12 to 18 months) to mimic pubertal estrogen increases or placebo for 18 months. All BMD measures assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were lower in girls with AN than in control girls. At baseline, girls with AN randomized to estrogen (AN E + ) did not differ from those randomized to placebo (AN E-) for age, maturity, height, BMI, amenorrhea duration, and BMD parameters. Spine and hip BMD Z-scores increased over time in the AN E+ compared with the AN E- group, even after controlling for baseline age and weight. It is concluded that physiologic estradiol replacement increases spine and hip BMD in girls with AN. PMID:21698665

  1. Measuring Norfloxacin Binding to Trypsin Using a Fluorescence Quenching Assay in an Upper-Division, Integrated Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence quenching assays are often used to measure dissociation constants that quantify the binding affinity between small molecules and proteins. In an upper-division undergraduate laboratory course, where students work on projects using a guided inquiry-based approach, a binding titration experiment at physiological pH is performed to…

  2. Identifying Intracellular Sites of Eicosanoid Lipid Mediator Synthesis with EicosaCell Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Bandeira-Melo, Christianne; Weller, Peter Fahey; Bozza, Patricia T.

    2011-01-01

    Eicosanoids, arachidonic acid-derived signaling lipid mediators, are newly formed and nonstorable molecules that have important roles in physiological and pathological processes. EicosaCell is a microscopic assay that enables the intracellular detection and localization of eicosanoid lipid mediator-synthesizing compartments by means of a strategy to covalently cross-link and immobilize eicosanoids at their sites of synthesis followed by immunofluorescent-based localization of the targeted eic...

  3. Illuminating cellular physiology: recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovko, Lubov Y; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2007-01-01

    Bioluminescent methods are gaining more and more attention among scientists due to their sensitivity, selectivity and simplicity; coupled with the fact that the bioluminescence can be monitored both in vitro and in vivo. Since the discovery of bioluminescence in the 19th century, enzymes involved in the bioluminescent process have been isolated and cloned. The bioluminescent reactions in several different organisms have also been fully characterized and used as reporters in a wide variety of biochemical assays. From the 1990s it became clear that bioluminescence can be detected and quantified directly from inside a living cell. This gave rise to numerous possibilities for the in vivo monitoring of intracellular processes non-invasively using bioluminescent molecules as reporters. This review describes recent developments in the area of bioluminescent imaging for cell biology. Newly developed imaging methods allow transcriptional/translational regulation, signal transduction, protein-protein interaction, oncogenic transformation, cell and protein trafficking, and target drug action to be monitored in vivo in real-time with high temporal and spatial resolution; thus providing researchers with priceless information on cellular functions. Advantages and limitations of these novel bioluminescent methods are discussed and possible future developments identified. PMID:17725230

  4. Optimization strategies on the structural modeling of gelatin/chitosan scaffolds to mimic human meniscus tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meniscus lesions are frequently occurring injuries with poor ability to heal. Typical treatment procedure includes removal of damaged regions, which can lead to sub-optimal knee biomechanics and early onset of osteoarthritis. Some of the drawbacks of current treatment approach present an opportunity for a tissue engineering solution. In this study, gelatin (G)/chitosan (Cs) scaffolds were synthesized via gel casting method and cross-linked with naturally derived cross-linker, genipin, through scaffold cross-linking method. Based on the characteristics of native meniscus tissue microstructure and function, three different layers were chosen to design the macroporous multilayered scaffolds. The multi-layered scaffolds were investigated for their ability to support human-derived meniscus cells by evaluating their morphology and proliferation using MTT assay at various time points. Based on structural, mechanical and cell compatibility considerations, laminated scaffolds composed of G60/Cs40, G80/Cs20 and G40/Cs60 samples, for the first, second and third layers, respectively, could be an appropriate combination for meniscus tissue engineering applications. - Graphical abstract: The wedge shaped multilayer/multiporous G/Cs meniscus scaffolds were mimicked by MR images of anatomical knee meniscus. The layers were chosen as G60/Cs40, G80/Cs20 and G40/Cs60, according to their characteristics similar to meniscus natural tissue, as the first, second and third layers, respectively. - Highlights: • Different gelatin/chitosan systems were chosen to engineer a multilayered scaffold. • The compressive modulus increased gradually by increasing the gelatin concentration. • Further addition of gelatin showed a meaningful decrease in the water uptake degree. • The layers supported cell growth and mimicked the meniscus fibrocartilage structure

  5. Optimization strategies on the structural modeling of gelatin/chitosan scaffolds to mimic human meniscus tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarem, Melika [Sports Engineering Group, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering (Center of Excellence), Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Freiburg, Hermann Staudinger Haus, Freiburg D-79104 (Germany); Helmholtz Virtual Institute: Multifunctional Biomaterials for Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Moztarzadeh, Fathollah [Sports Engineering Group, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering (Center of Excellence), Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biomaterials Group, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering (Center of Excellence), Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mozafari, Masoud, E-mail: mozafari.masoud@gmail.com [Sports Engineering Group, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering (Center of Excellence), Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biomaterials Group, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering (Center of Excellence), Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, School of Material Science and Engineering, Oklahoma State University, OK 74106 (United States); Shastri, V. Prasad [Institute for Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Freiburg, Hermann Staudinger Haus, Freiburg D-79104 (Germany); Helmholtz Virtual Institute: Multifunctional Biomaterials for Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Meniscus lesions are frequently occurring injuries with poor ability to heal. Typical treatment procedure includes removal of damaged regions, which can lead to sub-optimal knee biomechanics and early onset of osteoarthritis. Some of the drawbacks of current treatment approach present an opportunity for a tissue engineering solution. In this study, gelatin (G)/chitosan (Cs) scaffolds were synthesized via gel casting method and cross-linked with naturally derived cross-linker, genipin, through scaffold cross-linking method. Based on the characteristics of native meniscus tissue microstructure and function, three different layers were chosen to design the macroporous multilayered scaffolds. The multi-layered scaffolds were investigated for their ability to support human-derived meniscus cells by evaluating their morphology and proliferation using MTT assay at various time points. Based on structural, mechanical and cell compatibility considerations, laminated scaffolds composed of G60/Cs40, G80/Cs20 and G40/Cs60 samples, for the first, second and third layers, respectively, could be an appropriate combination for meniscus tissue engineering applications. - Graphical abstract: The wedge shaped multilayer/multiporous G/Cs meniscus scaffolds were mimicked by MR images of anatomical knee meniscus. The layers were chosen as G60/Cs40, G80/Cs20 and G40/Cs60, according to their characteristics similar to meniscus natural tissue, as the first, second and third layers, respectively. - Highlights: • Different gelatin/chitosan systems were chosen to engineer a multilayered scaffold. • The compressive modulus increased gradually by increasing the gelatin concentration. • Further addition of gelatin showed a meaningful decrease in the water uptake degree. • The layers supported cell growth and mimicked the meniscus fibrocartilage structure.

  6. Plasma insulin profiles after subcutaneous injection: how close can we get to physiology in people with diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home, P D

    2015-11-01

    Many people with diabetes rely on insulin therapy to achieve optimal blood glucose control. A fundamental aim of such therapy is to mimic the pattern of 'normal' physiological insulin secretion, thereby controlling basal and meal-time plasma glucose and fatty acid turnover. In people without diabetes, insulin release is modulated on a time base of 3-10 min, something that is impossible to replicate without intravascular glucose sensing and insulin delivery. Overnight physiological insulin delivery by islet β cells is unchanging, in contrast to requirements once any degree of hyperglycaemia occurs, when diurnal influences are evident. Subcutaneous pumped insulin or injected insulin analogues can approach the physiological profile, but there remains the challenge of responding to day-to-day changes in insulin sensitivity. Physiologically, meal-time insulin release begins rapidly in response to reflex activity and incretins, continuing with the rise in glucose and amino acid concentrations. This rapid response reflects the need to fill the insulin space with maximum concentration as early as 30 min after starting the meal. Current meal-time insulins, by contrast, are associated with a delay after injection before absorption begins, and a delay to peak because of tissue diffusion. While decay from peak for monomeric analogues is not dissimilar to average physiological needs, changes in meal type and, again, in day-to-day insulin sensitivity, are difficult to match. Recent and current developments in insulin depot technology are moving towards establishing flatter basal and closer-to-average physiological meal-time plasma insulin profiles. The present article discusses the ideal physiological insulin profile, how this can be met by available and future insulin therapies and devices, and the challenges faced by healthcare professionals and people with diabetes in trying to achieve an optimum plasma insulin profile. PMID:26041603

  7. Physiological characteristics of an aging Olympic athlete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Schmidt, Jakob Friis; Fritzdorf, Stephen;

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the physiological basis of continued world-class performance of a world-class rower who won medals (3 gold and 2 bronze) at five consecutive Olympic Games.......To investigate the physiological basis of continued world-class performance of a world-class rower who won medals (3 gold and 2 bronze) at five consecutive Olympic Games....

  8. HUMAN--A Comprehensive Physiological Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Thomas G.; Randall, James E.

    1983-01-01

    Describes computer program (HUMAN) used to simulate physiological experiments on patient pathology. Program (available from authors, including versions for microcomputers) consists of dynamic interactions of over 150 physiological variables and integrating approximations of cardiovascular, renal, lung, temperature regulation, and some hormone…

  9. Design Projects in Human Anatomy & Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzotto, Kristin; Ortiz, Mary T.

    2008-01-01

    Very often, some type of writing assignment is required in college entry-level Human Anatomy and Physiology courses. This assignment can be anything from an essay to a research paper on the literature, focusing on a faculty-approved topic of interest to the student. As educators who teach Human Anatomy and Physiology at an urban community college,…

  10. Epidemiology and Pulmonary Physiology of Severe Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Jacqueline; Mikulic, Lucas; Kaminsky, David A

    2016-08-01

    The epidemiology and physiology of severe asthma are inherently linked because of varying phenotypes and expressions of asthma throughout the population. To understand how to better treat severe asthma, we must use both population data and physiologic principles to individualize therapies among groups with similar expressions of this disease. PMID:27401616

  11. An ultrafiltration assay for lysyl oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shackleton, D.R.; Hulmes, D.J. (Univ. of Edinburgh Medical School (England))

    1990-03-01

    A modification of the original microdistillation assay for lysyl oxidase is described in which Amicon C-10 microconcentrators are used to separate, by ultrafiltration, the 3H-labeled products released from a (4,5-3H)-lysine-labeled elastin substrate. Enzyme activity is determined by scintillation counting of the ultrafiltrate, after subtraction of radioactivity released in the presence of beta-aminopropionitrile, a specific inhibitor of the enzyme. Conditions are described which optimize both the sensitivity and the efficient use of substrate. The assay shows linear inhibition of activity in up to 1 M urea; hence, as the enzyme is normally diluted in the assay, samples in 6 M urea can be assayed directly, without prior dialysis, and corrected for partial inhibition. Comparable results are obtained when enzyme activity is assayed by ultrafiltration or microdistillation. The assay is simple and convenient and, by using disposable containers throughout, it eliminates the need for time-consuming decontamination of radioactive glassware.

  12. Assay development status report for total cyanide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, B.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Jones, T.E.; Pool, K.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-02-01

    A validated cyanide assay that is applicable to a variety of tank waste matrices is necessary to resolve certain waste tank safety issues and for purposes of overall waste characterization. The target for this effort is an assay with an applicable range of greater than 1,000 ppM (0.10 wt%) total cyanide and a confidence level greater than 80%. Figure 1 illustrates the operating regime of the proposed cyanide assay method. The Assay Development Status Report for Total Cyanide will summarize the past experience with cyanide analyses on-tank waste matrices and will rate the status of the analytical methods used to assay total cyanide (CN{sup {minus}} ion) in the tank waste matrices as acceptable or unacceptable. This paper will also briefly describe the current efforts for improving analytical resolution of the assays and the attempts at speciation.

  13. An ultrafiltration assay for lysyl oxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A modification of the original microdistillation assay for lysyl oxidase is described in which Amicon C-10 microconcentrators are used to separate, by ultrafiltration, the 3H-labeled products released from a [4,5-3H]-lysine-labeled elastin substrate. Enzyme activity is determined by scintillation counting of the ultrafiltrate, after subtraction of radioactivity released in the presence of beta-aminopropionitrile, a specific inhibitor of the enzyme. Conditions are described which optimize both the sensitivity and the efficient use of substrate. The assay shows linear inhibition of activity in up to 1 M urea; hence, as the enzyme is normally diluted in the assay, samples in 6 M urea can be assayed directly, without prior dialysis, and corrected for partial inhibition. Comparable results are obtained when enzyme activity is assayed by ultrafiltration or microdistillation. The assay is simple and convenient and, by using disposable containers throughout, it eliminates the need for time-consuming decontamination of radioactive glassware

  14. Thyroglobulin measurement by highly sensitive assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giovanella, Luca; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Verburg, Frederik A;

    2015-01-01

    thyroglobulin (Tg), circulating Tg serves as a biochemical marker of persistent or recurrent disease in the follow-up of DTC. Due to the suboptimal clinical detection rate of older Tg assays endogenous or exogenous thyrotropin (TSH) stimulations are recommended for unmasking occult disease. However, the...... development of new Tg assays with improved analytical sensitivity and precision at low concentrations now allows detection of very low Tg concentrations, reflecting minimal amounts of thyroid tissue, even without the need for TSH stimulation. Even if the use of these assays still has not found its way in...... current clinical guidelines, such assays are now increasingly used in clinical practice. As serum Tg measurement is a technically challenging assay and criteria to define a 'highly sensitive' assay may be different, a good knowledge of the technical difficulties and interpretation criteria is of paramount...

  15. Automated amperometric plutonium assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amperometric titration for plutonium assay has been used in the nuclear industry for over twenty years and has been in routine use at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory since 1976 for the analysis of plutonium oxide and mixed oxide fuel material for the Fast Flux Test Facility. It has proven itself to be an accurate and reliable method. The method may be used as a direct end point titration or an excess of titrant may be added and a back titration performed to aid in determination of the end point. Due to the slowness of the PuVI-FeII reaction it is difficult to recognize when the end point is being approached and is very time consuming if the current is allowed to decay to the residual value after each titrant addition. For this reason the back titration in which the rapid FeII-CrVI reaction occurs is used by most laboratories. The back titration is performed by the addition of excess ferrous solution followed by two measured aliquots of standard dichromate with measurement of cell current after each addition

  16. Influenza virus assays based on virus‐inducible reporter cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunsheng; Larrimer, Audrey; Curtiss, Teresa; Kim, Jaekyung; Jones, Abby; Baird‐Tomlinson, Heather; Pekosz, Andrew; Olivo, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Background  Virus‐inducible reporter genes have been used as the basis of virus detection and quantitation assays for a number of viruses. A strategy for influenza A virus‐induction of a reporter gene was recently described. In this report, we describe the extension of this strategy to influenza B virus, the generation of stable cell lines with influenza A and B virus‐inducible reporter genes, and the use of these cells in various clinically relevant viral assays. Each of the cell lines described herein constitutively express an RNA transcript that contains a reporter gene coding region flanked by viral 5′‐ and 3′‐untranslated regions (UTR) and therefore mimics an influenza virus genomic segment. Upon infection of the cells with influenza virus the virus‐inducible reporter gene segment (VIRGS) is replicated and transcribed by the viral polymerase complex resulting in reporter gene expression. Findings  Reporter gene induction occurs after infection with a number of laboratory strains and clinical isolates of influenza virus including several H5N1 strains. The induction is dose‐dependent and highly specific for influenza A or influenza B viruses. Conclusions  These cell lines provide the basis of simple, rapid, and objective assays that involve virus quantitation such as determination of viral titer, assessment of antiviral susceptibility, and determination of antibody neutralization titer. These cell lines could be very useful for influenza virus researchers and vaccine manufacturers. PMID:21462401

  17. Matrix effects of TRU [transuranic] assays using the SWEPP PAN assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Drum Assay System (DAS) at the Stored Waste Experimental Pilot Plant (SWEPP) is a second-generation active-passive neutron assay system. It has been used to assay over 5000 208-liter drums of transuranic waste from the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Data from these assays have been examined and compared with the assays performed at Rocky Flats, mainly utilize counting of 239Pu gamma rays. For the most part the passive assays are in very good agreement with the Rocky Flats assays. The active assays are strongly correlated with the results of the other two methods, but require matrix-dependent correction factors beyond those provided by the system itself. A set of matrix-dependent correction factors has been developed from the study of the assay results. 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Determinants of Physiological and Perceived Physiological Stress Reactivity in Children and Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, B.E.; Greaves-Lord, K.; Euser, A.S.; Tulen, J.H.M.; Franken, I.H.A.; Huizink, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    textabstractAims:Abnormal physiological stress reactivity is increasingly investigated as a vulnerability marker for various physical and psychological health problems. However, studies are inconsistent in taking into account potential covariates that may influence the developing stress system. We systematically tested determinants (individual, developmental, environmental and substance use-related) of physiological and perceived physiological stress reactivity. We also examined the relation ...

  19. Physiological impacts on alkenone paleothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahl, F. G.; Sparrow, M. A.; Wolfe, G. V.

    2003-06-01

    We conducted isothermal (15°C) batch culture experiments with the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi (strain NEPCC 55a) to evaluate the extent to which nutrient and light stress contribute to variability in the alkenone unsaturation index U37K'. Alkenone content and composition were constant throughout exponential growth in both experiments when nutrients (nitrate and orthophosphate) were replete. Stationary phase (nutrient-starved) cells continued to produce alkenones, amassing concentrations (ΣAlk) ≥ 3 times higher than those dividing exponentially (1.5-2 pg cell-1), and the U37K' of "excess" alkenone dropped by 0.11 units. In contrast, 5 days of continuous darkness resulted in a 75% decrease in cellular ΣAlk and a significant U37K' increase (+0.11 units). Given an established 0.034 unit/°C response for exponentially growing cells of this strain, the observed range of U37K' variability at 15°C corresponds to an uncertainty of ±3.2°C in predicted growth temperature. This level of variability matches that of the global U37K' annual mean sea surface temperature calibration for surface marine sediments, begging the question: What is the physiological condition of alkenone-producing cells exported to marine sediments? Comparison of our laboratory results for a strain of E. huxleyi isolated from the subarctic Pacific Ocean with depth profiles for alkenones in surface waters from two contrasting sites in the northeast Pacific Ocean suggests that the answer to this question depends on the ocean regime considered, a possibility with significant bearing on how stratigraphic U37K' records in marine sediments are to be interpreted paleoceanographically.

  20. Immunofluorescence Assay for Serologic Diagnosis of SARS

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Paul K. S.; Ng, King-Cheung; Chan, Rickjason C. W.; Lam, Rebecca K. Y.; Chow, Viola C. Y.; Hui, Mamie; Wu, Alan; Lee, Nelson; Yap, Florence H.Y.; Cheng, Frankie W.T.; Joseph J. Y. Sung; Tam, John S

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated a virus-infected cell-based indirect immunofluorescence assay for detecting anti–severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibody. All confirmed SARS cases demonstrated seroconversion or fourfold rise in IgG antibody titer; no control was positive. Sensitivity and specificity of this assay were both 100%. Immunofluorescence assay can ascertain the status of SARS-CoV infection.

  1. Trypan blue exclusion assay by flow cytometry

    OpenAIRE

    Avelar-Freitas, B.A.; V.G. Almeida; Pinto, M.C.X.; F.A.G. Mourão; A.R. Massensini; O.A. Martins-Filho; E. Rocha-Vieira; G.E.A. Brito-Melo

    2014-01-01

    Dye exclusion tests are used to determine the number of live and dead cells. These assays are based on the principle that intact plasma membranes in live cells exclude specific dyes, whereas dead cells do not. Although widely used, the trypan blue (TB) exclusion assay has limitations. The dye can be incorporated by live cells after a short exposure time, and personal reliability, related to the expertise of the analyst, can affect the results. We propose an alternative assay for evaluating ce...

  2. Isolation of cell nuclei using inert macromolecules to mimic the crowded cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Ronald; Hadj-Sahraoui, Yasmina

    2009-01-01

    Cell nuclei are commonly isolated and studied in media which include millimolar concentrations of cations, which conserve the nuclear volume by screening the negative charges on chromatin and maintaining its compaction. However, two factors question if these ionic conditions correctly reproduce the environment of nuclei in vivo: the small-scale motion and conformation of chromatin in vivo are not reproduced in isolated nuclei, and experiments and theory suggest that small ions in the cytoplasm are not free in the soluble phase but are predominantly bound to macromolecules. We studied the possible role in maintaining the structure and functions of nuclei in vivo of a further but frequently overlooked property of the cytoplasm, the crowding or osmotic effects caused by diffusible macromolecules whose concentration, measured in several studies, is in the range of 130 mg/ml. Nuclei which conserved their volume in the cell and their ultrastructure seen by electron microscopy were released from K562 cells in media containing the inert polymer 70 kDa Ficoll (50% w/v) or 70 kDa dextran (35% w/v) to replace the diffusible cytoplasmic molecules which were dispersed on cell lysis with digitonin, with 100 microM K-Hepes buffer as the only source of ions. Immunofluorescence labelling and experiments using cells expressing GFP-fusion proteins showed that internal compartments (nucleoli, PML and coiled bodies, foci of RNA polymerase II) were conserved in these nuclei, and nascent RNA transcripts could be elongated. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that crowding by diffusible cytoplasmic macromolecules is a crucial but overlooked factor which supports the nucleus in vivo by equilibrating the opposing osmotic pressure cause by the high concentration of macromolecules in the nucleus, and suggest that crowded media provide more physiological conditions to study nuclear structure and functions. They may also help to resolve the long-standing paradox that the small

  3. Impedimetric aptasensor for nuclear factor kappa B with peroxidase-like mimic coupled DNA nanoladders as enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kanfu; Zhao, Hongwen; Xie, Pan; Hu, Shuang; Yuan, Yali; Yuan, Ruo; Wu, Xiongfei

    2016-07-15

    In this work, we developed a sensitive and universal aptasensor for nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) detection based on peroxidase-like mimic coupled DNA nanoladders for signal amplification. The dsDNA formed by capture DNA S1 and NF-κB binding aptamer (NBA) was firstly assembled on electrode surface. The presence of target NF-κB then led to the leave of NBA from electrode surface and thus provided the binding sites for immobilizing initiator to trigger in situ formation of DNA nanoladders on electrode surface. Since the peroxidase-like mimic manganese (III) meso-tetrakis (4-Nmethylpyridyl)-porphyrin (MnTMPyP) interacts with DNA nanoladders via groove binding, the insoluble benzo-4-chlorohexadienone (4-CD) precipitation derived from the oxidation of 4-chloro-1-naphthol (4-CN) could be formed on electrode surface in the presence of H2O2, resulting in a significantly amplified EIS signal output for quantitative target analysis. As a result, the developed aptasensor showed a low detection limit of 7pM and a wide linear range of 0.01-20nM. Featured with high sensitivity and label-free capability, the proposed sensing scheme can thus offer new opportunities for achieving sensitive, selective and stable detection of different types of target proteins. PMID:26913501

  4. Acute Interstitial Nephritis Proteinuria and Herpes Simplex Virus Hepatitis in Pregnancy Mimic HELLP Syndrome (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, Low Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy M. White

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Elevated transaminases, hemolysis, and thrombocytopenia in pregnancy are most often caused by a preeclampsia variant—HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets. In atypical cases, it is important to consider other causes, such as herpes simplex virus (HSV hepatitis. Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN-induced proteinuria can make distinguishing HELLP from its mimics more difficult. A 43-year-old G4P3 gestational carrier at 28 weeks had abnormal laboratory findings consistent with HELLP, including proteinuria. However, she was normotensive and febrile, prompting an investigation into other possible causes of her signs and symptoms. She ultimately was diagnosed with disseminated HSV infection, started on definitive therapy, and allowed to continue her pregnancy to term. The proteinuria was attributed to AIN. AIN can cause proteinuria in the critically ill pregnant patient. When mimics of HELLP syndrome, such as disseminated HSV infection, are the cause of critical illness, the presence of AIN-induced proteinuria may falsely implicate a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, resulting in iatrogenic premature delivery of the fetus and failure to initiate definitive potential lifesaving treatment.

  5. Effects of Echinococcus multilocularis miR-71 mimics on murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yadong; Guo, Xiaola; He, Wei; Shao, Zhongwei; Zhang, Xueyong; Yang, Jing; Shen, Yujuan; Luo, Xuenong; Cao, Jianping

    2016-05-01

    The microRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small regulatory non-coding RNA that contributes to the activation of host-pathogen cross-talk during infection. In helminthes, miR-71 is highly conserved and it has recently been detected in nematode exosomes, as well as in the sera and/or fluids of infected humans and mice. However, the role of miR-71 during infection remains poorly characterized. Herein, we show that Ago1 and Ago4, which encode key components of the small RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), were up-regulated in murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells transfected by Echinococcus multilocularis miR-71 (emu-miR-71) mimics. Using a miRNA PCR array, none of the 84 miRNAs involved in inflammation or autoimmunity were significantly up- or down-regulated in the transfected cells (p>0.05). Although it did not influence IL-10 production by the treated cells (p>0.05), the mimics significantly repressed the production of NO 12h after treatment with LPS and IFN-γ (p<0.01), identifying another potential mechanism whereby parasites can carefully regulate host levels of NO. These findings indicate that the release of parasite-derived miR-71 into hosts can affect the functions of macrophages, and possibly represents an exciting direction for studies of the interplay between parasites and hosts. PMID:26995025

  6. Colorimetric sensing of bithiols using photocatalytic UiO-66(NH2) as H2O2-free peroxidase mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhangmei; Jiang, Xue; Xu, Fujian; Jia, Jia; Long, Zhou; Hou, Xiandeng

    2016-09-01

    A facile colorimetric sensing method for biothiols was developed, based on photocatalytic property of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), UiO-66(NH2) nanoparticles (NPs), as peroxidase mimics under light irradiation. By the irradiation of a light emitting diode (LED) source, the colorless chromogenic substrate, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzydine (TMB), was oxidized into blue oxTMB with the aid of the catalytic UiO-66(NH2) NPs. With the existence of biothiols, the oxidization was prohibited, with the blue color paled and absorbance intensity decreased with the concentration of biothiols in a linear manner. Real samples of cysteine, glutathione, and homocysteine were analyzed under the optimized conditions, with high sensitivity (the limit of detection was calculated as 306nM, 310nM, and 330nm respectively) and selectivity. The recovery ranged from 93% to 107% with good precisions (RSD%≤5%). This photocatalytic property of UiO-66(NH2) as peroxidase mimics was studied based on steady-state kinetics, and the mechanism of oxidization process was also briefly discussed. This developed MOFs-based colorimetric sensing method demonstrated advantages over others for biothiols sensing, including high photo-catalytic activity compared to other nanomaterials, oxidation without H2O2, ease of regulation with the LED source, and low cost without expensive instrument and technically demanding. PMID:27343606

  7. Safeguards and Non-destructive Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCK-CEN's programme on safeguards and non-destructive assay includes: (1) various activities to assure nuclear materials accountancy; (2) contributes to the implementation of Integrated Safeguards measures in Belgium and to assist the IAEA through the Belgian Support Programme; (3) renders services to internal and external customers in the field of safeguards; (4) improves passive neutron coincidence counting techniques for waste assay and safeguards verification measurements by R and D on correlation algorithms implemented via software or dedicated hardware; (5) improves gamma assay techniques for waste assay by implementing advanced scanning techniques and different correlation algorithms; and (6) develops numerical calibration techniques. Major achievements in these areas in 2000 are reported

  8. Development, validation and quantitative assessment of an enzymatic assay suitable for small molecule screening and profiling: A case-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancenon, Vicente; Goh, Wei Hau; Sundaram, Aishwarya; Er, Kai Shih; Johal, Nidhi; Mukhina, Svetlana; Carr, Grant; Dhakshinamoorthy, Saravanakumar

    2015-06-01

    The successful discovery and subsequent development of small molecule inhibitors of drug targets relies on the establishment of robust, cost-effective, quantitative, and physiologically relevant in vitro assays that can support prolonged screening and optimization campaigns. The current study illustrates the process of developing and validating an enzymatic assay for the discovery of small molecule inhibitors using alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestine as model target. The assay development workflow includes an initial phase of optimization of assay materials, reagents, and conditions, continues with a process of miniaturization and automation, and concludes with validation by quantitative measurement of assay performance and signal variability. The assay is further evaluated for dose-response and mechanism-of-action studies required to support structure-activity-relationship studies. Emphasis is placed on the most critical aspects of assay optimization and other relevant considerations, including the technology, assay materials, buffer constituents, reaction conditions, liquid handling equipment, analytical instrumentation, and quantitative assessments. Examples of bottlenecks encountered during assay development and strategies to address them are provided. PMID:27077032

  9. Development, validation and quantitative assessment of an enzymatic assay suitable for small molecule screening and profiling: A case-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Sancenon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The successful discovery and subsequent development of small molecule inhibitors of drug targets relies on the establishment of robust, cost-effective, quantitative, and physiologically relevant in vitro assays that can support prolonged screening and optimization campaigns. The current study illustrates the process of developing and validating an enzymatic assay for the discovery of small molecule inhibitors using alkaline phosphatase from bovine intestine as model target. The assay development workflow includes an initial phase of optimization of assay materials, reagents, and conditions, continues with a process of miniaturization and automation, and concludes with validation by quantitative measurement of assay performance and signal variability. The assay is further evaluated for dose–response and mechanism-of-action studies required to support structure–activity-relationship studies. Emphasis is placed on the most critical aspects of assay optimization and other relevant considerations, including the technology, assay materials, buffer constituents, reaction conditions, liquid handling equipment, analytical instrumentation, and quantitative assessments. Examples of bottlenecks encountered during assay development and strategies to address them are provided.

  10. Tests for evaluating the physiological quality of pitaya seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Alberto Ortiz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Germination test is used to assess the physiological quality of seeds; however, since it is carried out under ideal conditions, this test has not been shown sufficient for this purpose. Instead, it is possible to use vigor tests, although the lack of standardized methodologies has reduced their applicability and reproducibility. Thus, this study aimed to develop methodologies for conducting tests of germination, accelerated aging, and electrical conductivity for the evaluation of the physiological quality of pitaya seeds. For this purpose, seeds from ripe Hylocereus undatus fruits were used. A completely randomized experimental design was used with four replications. The physiological quality of the seeds was assessed using germination, accelerated aging, and electrical conductivity tests, and the speed of germination index (SGI and mean germination time (MGT were determined for both the germination test and accelerated aging test. For the statistical analysis, we performed regression model adjustments and calculated the Pearson correlation coefficient (p < 0.05. The germination test for H. undatus seeds can be performed at 25 °C, with the aim of reaching the highest SGI and lowest MGT values. The accelerated aging test can be conducted at 43 °C for 48 h, because combining these factors favors the expression of seed vigor, allowing seeds to achieve the maximum SGI and minimum MGT, while reducing the time of the assay. The electrical conductivity test can be performed using 25 seeds at a temperature of 30 °C and a water volume of 10 mL, since under these conditions there is less interference from external factors on the leachate content of the solution.

  11. A radiochemical assay for biotin in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiochemical assay for biotin is described. The assay was sensitive to one nanogram and simple enough for routine biotin analyses. The assay yielded results which were comparable to those obtained from a microbiological assay using Lactobacillus plantarum. (author)

  12. LT-HSC Methylcellulose Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerenyi, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic differentiation is a highly complex process originating from an extraordinary population of cells called long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs). The unique feature of all stem cells, including HSCs, is their exceptional ability to divide asymmetrically giving rise to two different kinds of offspring. One daughter cell becomes an LT-HSC itself (self-renews) to maintain the LT-HSC pool, whereas the second daughter cell pursues a differentiation fate to ultimately give rise to terminally differentiated mature blood cells (Orkin and Zon, 2008). Quantification of phenotypic LT-HSCs can be performed by multi-color flow cytometry and the gold standard for assessment of LT-HSC self-renewal and function is competitive bone marrow transplantation (Miller et al., 2008). Although these methods are irreplaceable to determine LT-HSC abundance and functionality, they have their disadvantages and limitations. For example, competitive bone marrow transplantation is typically monitored as a function of peripheral blood donor contribution over 12–16 weeks. While reduced peripheral blood donor contribution by itself signifies impairment in the stem/progenitor cells compartment, it cannot unambiguously discriminate between reduced LT-HSC self-renewal, impaired LT-HSC differentiation or compromised progenitor cell differentiation. Here we describe an LT-HSCs methylcellulose colony-forming assay, as a fast complementary in vitro method to directly assess LT-HSC differentiation capacity. As described in Kerenyi et al. (2013), this technique acts as a powerful tool to differentiate between LT-HSC or progenitor cell differentiation defects.

  13. Tango assay for ligand-induced GPCR-β-arrestin2 interaction: Application in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Shalini; Sona, Chandan; Kumar, Ajeet; Yadav, Prem N

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are widely known to modulate almost all physiological functions and have been demonstrated over the time as therapeutic targets for wide gamut of diseases. The design and implementation of high-throughput GPCR-based assays that permit the efficient screening of large compound libraries to discover novel drug candidates are essential for a successful drug discovery endeavor. Usually, GPCR-based functional assays depend primarily on the measurement of G protein-mediated second messenger generation. However, with advent of advanced molecular biology tools and increased understanding of GPCR signal transduction, many G protein-independent pathways such as β-arrestin translocation are being utilized to detect the activity of GPCRs. These assays provide additional information on functional selectivity (also known as biased agonism) of compounds that could be harnessed to develop pathway-selective drug candidates to reduce the adverse effects associated with given GPCR target. In this chapter, we describe the basic principle, detailed methodologies and assay setup, result analysis and data interpretations of the β-arrestin2 Tango assay, and its comparison with cell-based G protein-dependent GPCR assays, which could be employed in a simple academic setup to facilitate GPCR-based drug discovery. PMID:26928547

  14. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyuan Ren

    Full Text Available A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1 mg(-1 for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes.

  15. Conceptual Learning: Enhancing Student Understanding of Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, Micah J.

    Students are leaving undergraduate science programs without the knowledge and skills they are expected to have. This is apparent in professional programs, such as medical and veterinary school, where students do not possess the critical thinking skills necessary to be successful. Physiology is a required discipline for these professional programs and often before, as a pre-requisite. Physiology classrooms are an excellent place to teach critical thinking skills because the content consists of integrated processes. Therefore, in one study, it was investigated whether focusing on physiological concepts improved student understanding of physiology in both a non-physiological science course, Invertebrate Zoology, and in an undergraduate physiology course. An educational intervention was used in Invertebrate Zoology, where students were exposed to human physiology concepts that were similar to comparative physiology concepts they had learned during the semester. A pre-/post-test was used to assess learning gains. In a second study, the use of multimedia file usage was correlated to student exam scores in a physiology course. This was done to see if providing additional study materials that focused on specific concepts improved student understanding, as assessed using exam scores. Overall these studies indicate that encouraging assimilation of new concepts that expand upon material from lecture may help students gain a more complete understanding of a concept. The integration of these concepts into pre-existing conceptual frameworks may serve to teach students valuable critical thinking skills such as evaluation of new ideas within their current understanding and synthesizing the new content with the existing information. Focusing on this type of conceptual learning may enable students to apply content knowledge and think through problems. Additionally, focusing on concepts may enable students to improve their understanding of material without being overwhelmed by

  16. Fluorescence response of hypocrellin B to the environmental changes in a mimic biological membrane--liposome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN; Xuanye; ZHAO; Yuewei; XIE; Jie; ZHAO; Jingquan

    2004-01-01

    [1]Diwu, Z. J., Novel therapeutic and diagnostic application of hypocrellins and hypericins Photochem, Photobiol., 1995, 61(6):529-539.[2]Zhang, Z. Y., Wang, N. H., EPR studies of singlet oxygen and free radicals generated during photosensitization of hypocrellin B,Free Radical Biol. Med., 1993 14: 1-9.[3]Chowdhury, P. K., Das, K., Datta, A. et al., A comparison of the excited-state processes of nearly symmetrical perylene quinones:hypocrellin A and hypomycin B, J. Photochem. Photobiol. A:Chem., 2002, 154: 107-116.[4]Hudson, J. B., Zhou, J., Chen, J. et al., Hypocrellin, from Hypocrella bambusae, is phototoxic to human immunodeficiency virus, Photochem. Photobiol., 1994, 60: 253-255.[5]Xu, S. J., Chen, S., Zhang, M. H. et al., First synthesis of methylated Hypocrellin and its fluorescent excited state: A cautionary tale, J. Org. Chem., 2003, 68: 2048-2050.[6]Zhang, K. H., Zhang, Z. Y., Molecular thermodynamics of the configuration of perylenequinonoid pigments, Sci. Sin. (B), 1997,27: 357-360.[7]Kawakami, M., Koya, K., Ukai, T. et al., Structure-activity of novel rhodacyanine dyes as antitumor agents, J. Med. Chem.,1998, 41(1): 130-142.[8]Vaupel, P., Kallinowski, F., Okunieff, P., Blood flow, oxygen and nutrient supply, and metabolic microenvironment of human tumors: A review, Cancer Res., 1989, 49: 6449-6465.[9]Patel, A. A., Gawlinski, E. T., Lemieux, S. K. et al., A cellular automaton model of early tumor growth and invasion, J. Theor.Biol., 2001, 213(3): 315-331.[10]Vorpai, E. S., Samtso, M. P., Chalov, V. N. et al., Fluorescence of the polymethine dyes, TIKS and diagnostics of cancer, J. Appl.Spectrosc., 2001, 68(3): 468-472.[11]Zadnia, A., Campbell, R., Sharma, M., The scope of dansyl vs.fluorescein label in fluorescence postlabeling assay for DNA damage, Anal. Biochem., 1994, 218: 444-448.[12]Yu, C. L., Chen, S., Zhang, M. H. et al., Spectroscopic studies and photodynamic actions of hypocrellin B in liposome

  17. Acellular comet assay: A tool for assessing variables influencing the alkaline comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, an acellular modification to the alkaline comet assay to further evaluate key variables within the assay that may influence the outcome of genotoxicity studies is described. This acellular comet assay can detect differences of 0.2 Gy of 60Co gamma-ray radiation between 0 and 1 Gy and differences of 1 Gy between 0 and 8 Gy; thus, this assay is applicable for a wide range of DNA damage levels. It is also shown that DNA damage from different radiation energies was not significantly different from 60Co gamma-ray. This assay displayed a statistical increase in DNA damage due to uncontrolled exposure to natural light; however, the slope of the dose-response curve for light-exposed samples was similar to that for samples protected from light. A comparison of the alkaline comet assay with the acellular comet assay allowed for the intrinsic repair capacity of the alkaline comet assay to be quantified. (authors)

  18. Development of an upconverting chelate assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xudong; Haushalter, Jeanne P.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Faris, Gregory W.

    2005-04-01

    We report progress on performing a cell-based assay for the detection of EGFR on cell surfaces by using upconverting chelates. An upconversion microscope has been developed for performing assays and testing optical response. A431 cells are labeled with europium DOTA and imaged using this upconverting microscope.

  19. A bioluminescent assay for measuring glucose uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valley, Michael P; Karassina, Natasha; Aoyama, Natsuyo; Carlson, Coby; Cali, James J; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2016-07-15

    Identifying activators and inhibitors of glucose uptake is critical for both diabetes management and anticancer therapy. To facilitate such studies, easy-to-use nonradioactive assays are desired. Here we describe a bioluminescent glucose uptake assay for measuring glucose transport in cells. The assay is based on the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and the enzymatic detection of the 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate that accumulates. Uptake can be measured from a variety of cell types, it can be inhibited by known glucose transporter inhibitors, and the bioluminescent assay yields similar results when compared with the radioactive method. With HCT 116 cells, glucose uptake can be detected in as little as 5000 cells and remains linear up to 50,000 cells with signal-to-background values ranging from 5 to 45. The assay can be used to screen for glucose transporter inhibitors, or by multiplexing with viability readouts, changes in glucose uptake can be differentiated from overall effects on cell health. The assay also can provide a relevant end point for measuring insulin sensitivity. With adipocytes and myotubes, insulin-dependent increases in glucose uptake have been measured with 10- and 2-fold assay windows, respectively. Significant assay signals of 2-fold or more have also been measured with human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes and skeletal myoblasts. PMID:27130501

  20. Radioreceptor assay: theory and applications to pharmacology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the first part of this work is to present the theory of the radioreceptor assay and to compare it to the other techniques of radioanalysis (radioimmunoassay, competitive protein binding assays). The technology of the radioreceptor assay is then presented and its components (preparation of the receptors, radioligand, incubation medium) are described. The analytical characteristics of the radioreceptor assay (specificity, sensitivity, reproductibility, accuracy) and the pharmacological significance of the results are discussed. The second part is devoted to the description of the radioreceptor assays of some pharmacological classes (neuroleptics, tricyclic antidepressants, benzodiazepines, β-blockers, anticholinergic drugs) and to their use in therapeutic drug monitoring. In conclusion, by their nature, radioreceptor assays are highly sensitive, reliable, precise, accurate and simple to perform. Their chief disadvantage relates to specificity, since any substance having an appreciable affinity to the receptor site will displace the specifically bound radioligand. Paradoxically in some cases, this lack of specificity may be advantageous in that it allows for the detection of not only the apparent compound but of active metabolites and endogenous receptor agonists as well and in that radioreceptors assays can be devised for a whole pharmacological class and not only for one drug as it is the case for classical physico-chemical techniques. For all these reasons future of radioreceptor assay in pharmacology appears promising