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Sample records for assay mimics physiological

  1. Dexamethasone mimics aspects of physiological acclimatization to 8 hours of hypoxia but suppresses plasma erythropoietin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun; Croft, Quentin P. P.; Kalidhar, Swati; Brooks, Jerome T.; Herigstad, Mari; Smith, Thomas G.; Dorrington, Keith L.

    2013-01-01

    Dexamethasone ameliorates the severity of acute mountain sickness (AMS) but it is unknown whether it obtunds normal physiological responses to hypoxia. We studied whether dexamethasone enhanced or inhibited the ventilatory, cardiovascular, and pulmonary vascular responses to sustained (8 h) hypoxia. Eight healthy volunteers were studied, each on four separate occasions, permitting four different protocols. These were: dexamethasone (20 mg orally) beginning 2 h before a control period of 8 h of air breathing; dexamethasone with 8 h of isocapnic hypoxia (end-tidal Po2 = 50 Torr); placebo with 8 h of air breathing; and placebo with 8 h of isocapnic hypoxia. Before and after each protocol, the following were determined under both euoxic and hypoxic conditions: ventilation; pulmonary artery pressure (estimated using echocardiography to assess maximum tricuspid pressure difference); heart rate; and cardiac output. Plasma concentrations of erythropoietin (EPO) were also determined. Dexamethasone had no early (2-h) effect on any variable. Both dexamethasone and 8 h of hypoxia increased euoxic values of ventilation, pulmonary artery pressure, and heart rate, together with the ventilatory sensitivity to acute hypoxia. These effects were independent and additive. Eight hours of hypoxia, but not dexamethasone, increased the sensitivity of pulmonary artery pressure to acute hypoxia. Dexamethasone, but not 8 h of hypoxia, increased both cardiac output and systemic arterial pressure. Dexamethasone abolished the rise in EPO induced by 8 h of hypoxia. In summary, dexamethasone enhances ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia. Thus, dexamethasone in AMS may improve oxygenation and thereby indirectly lower pulmonary artery pressure. PMID:23393065

  2. A novel circular invasion assay mimics in vivo invasive behavior of cancer cell lines and distinguishes single-cell motility in vitro

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    Estrada Lourdes

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical in vitro wound-healing assays and other techniques designed to study cell migration and invasion have been used for many years to elucidate the various mechanisms associated with metastasis. However, many of these methods are limited in their ability to achieve reproducible, quantitative results that translate well in vivo. Such techniques are also commonly unable to elucidate single-cell motility mechanisms, an important factor to be considered when studying dissemination. Therefore, we developed and applied a novel in vitro circular invasion assay (CIA in order to bridge the translational gap between in vitro and in vivo findings, and to distinguish between different modes of invasion. Method Our method is a modified version of a standard circular wound-healing assay with an added matrix barrier component (Matrigel™, which better mimics those physiological conditions present in vivo. We examined 3 cancer cell lines (MCF-7, SCOV-3, and MDA-MB-231, each with a different established degree of aggressiveness, to test our assay's ability to detect diverse levels of invasiveness. Percent wound closure (or invasion was measured using time-lapse microscopy and advanced image analysis techniques. We also applied the CIA technique to DLD-1 cells in the presence of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, a bioactive lipid that was recently shown to stimulate cancer cell colony dispersal into single migratory cells, in order to validate our method's ability to detect collective and individual motility. Results CIA method was found to be highly reproducible, with negligible levels of variance measured. It successfully detected the anticipated low, moderate, and high levels of invasion that correspond to in vivo findings for cell lines tested. It also captured that DLD-1 cells exhibit individual migration upon LPA stimulation, and collective behavior in its absence. Conclusion Given its ability to both determine pseudo-realistic invasive

  3. Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV mimics cocaine in its physiological and behavioral effects but induces distinct changes in NAc glucose

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    Ken Taro Wakabayashi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV is generally considered to be a more potent cocaine-like psychostimulant, as it shares a similar pharmacological profile with cocaine and induces similar physiological and locomotor responses. Recently, we showed that intravenous cocaine induces rapid rise in nucleus accumbens (NAc glucose and established its relation to neural activation triggered by the peripheral drug actions. This study was conducted to find out whether MDPV, at a behaviorally equivalent dose, will share a similar pattern of NAc glucose dynamics. Using enzyme-based glucose sensors coupled with amperometery in freely moving rats, we found that MDPV tonically decreases NAc glucose levels, a response that is opposite to what we previously observed with cocaine. By analyzing Skin-Muscle temperature differentials, a valid measure of skin vascular tone, we found that MDPV induces vasoconstriction; a similar effect at the level of cerebral vessels could be responsible for the MDPV-induced decrease in NAc glucose. While cocaine also induced comparable, if not slightly stronger peripheral vasoconstriction, this effect was overpowered by local neural activity-induced vasodilation, resulting in rapid surge in NAc glucose. These results imply that cocaine-users may be more susceptible to addiction than MDPV-users due to the presence of an interoceptive signal (i.e. sensory cue, which may result in earlier and more direct reward detection. Additionally, while health complications arising from acute cocaine use are typically cardiovascular related, MDPV may be more dangerous to the brain due to uncompensated cerebral vasoconstriction.

  4. Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) mimics cocaine in its physiological and behavioral effects but induces distinct changes in NAc glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Ken T; Ren, Suelynn E; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2015-01-01

    Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) is generally considered to be a more potent cocaine-like psychostimulant, as it shares a similar pharmacological profile with cocaine and induces similar physiological and locomotor responses. Recently, we showed that intravenous cocaine induces rapid rise in nucleus accumbens (NAc) glucose and established its relation to neural activation triggered by the peripheral drug actions. This study was conducted to find out whether MDPV, at a behaviorally equivalent dose, shares a similar pattern of NAc glucose dynamics. Using enzyme-based glucose sensors coupled with amperometery in freely moving rats, we found that MDPV tonically decreases NAc glucose levels, a response that is opposite to what we previously observed with cocaine. By analyzing Skin-Muscle temperature differentials, a valid measure of skin vascular tone, we found that MDPV induces vasoconstriction; a similar effect at the level of cerebral vessels could be responsible for the MDPV-induced decrease in NAc glucose. While cocaine also induced comparable, if not slightly stronger peripheral vasoconstriction, this effect was overpowered by local neural activity-induced vasodilation, resulting in rapid surge in NAc glucose. These results imply that cocaine-users may be more susceptible to addiction than MDPV-users due to the presence of an interoceptive signal (i.e., sensory cue), which may result in earlier and more direct reward detection. Additionally, while health complications arising from acute cocaine use are typically cardiovascular related, MDPV may be more dangerous to the brain due to uncompensated cerebral vasoconstriction.

  5. Risk and ethical concerns of hunting male elephant: behavioural and physiological assays of the remaining elephants.

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    Tarryne Burke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hunting of male African elephants may pose ethical and risk concerns, particularly given their status as a charismatic species of high touristic value, yet which are capable of both killing people and damaging infrastructure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We quantified the effect of hunts of male elephants on (1 risk of attack or damage (11 hunts, and (2 behavioural (movement dynamics and physiological (stress hormone metabolite concentrations responses (4 hunts in Pilanesberg National Park. For eleven hunts, there were no subsequent attacks on people or infrastructure, and elephants did not break out of the fenced reserve. For three focal hunts, there was an initial flight response by bulls present at the hunting site, but their movements stabilised the day after the hunt event. Animals not present at the hunt (both bulls and herds did not show movement responses. Physiologically, hunting elephant bulls increased faecal stress hormone levels (corticosterone metabolites in both those bulls that were present at the hunts (for up to four days post-hunt and in the broader bull and breeding herd population (for up to one month post-hunt. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As all responses were relatively minor, hunting male elephants is ethically acceptable when considering effects on the remaining elephant population; however bulls should be hunted when alone. Hunting is feasible in relatively small enclosed reserves without major risk of attack, damage, or breakout. Physiological stress assays were more effective than behavioural responses in detecting effects of human intervention. Similar studies should evaluate intervention consequences, inform and improve best practice, and should be widely applied by management agencies.

  6. Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Underlying recent developments in health care and new treatments for disease are advances in basic medical sciences. This edition of "Webwatch" focuses on sites dealing with basic medical sciences, with particular attention given to physiology. There is a vast amount of information on the web related to physiology. The sites that are included here…

  7. Methodology for benzodiazepine receptor binding assays at physiological temperature. Rapid change in equilibrium with falling temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, R.M.

    1986-12-01

    Benzodiazepine receptors of rat cerebellum were assayed with (/sup 3/H)-labeled flunitrazepam at 37/sup 0/C, and assays were terminated by filtration in a cold room according to one of three protocols: keeping each sample at 37 degrees C until ready for filtration, taking the batch of samples (30) into the cold room and filtering sequentially in the order 1-30, and taking the batch of 30 samples into the cold room and filtering sequentially in the order 30-1. the results for each protocol were substantially different from each other, indicating that rapid disruption of equilibrium occurred as the samples cooled in the cold room while waiting to be filtered. Positive or negative cooperativity of binding was apparent, and misleading effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid on the affinity of diazepam were observed, unless each sample was kept at 37/sup 0/C until just prior to filtration.

  8. Clinical Mimics: An Emergency Medicine-Focused Review of Cellulitis Mimics.

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    Blumberg, Garrett; Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex

    2017-10-01

    Cellulitis is a common clinical condition with low rates of morbidity and mortality if treated appropriately. Mimics of cellulitis presenting with erythema, edema, warmth, and pain can be associated with grave morbidity and mortality if misdiagnosed. This review investigates the signs and symptoms of cellulitis, mimics of cellulitis, and an approach to the management of both cellulitis and its mimics. The current emergency medicine definition of cellulitis includes erythema, induration, warmth, and swelling. Given the common pathophysiologic pathways, cellulitis mimics often present in an analogous manner. These conditions include septic bursitis, septic joint, deep vein thrombosis, phlegmasia cerulea dolens, necrotizing fasciitis, flexor tenosynovitis, fight bite (closed fist injury), orbital cellulitis, toxic shock syndrome, erysipelas, abscess, felon, paronychia, and gouty arthritis. Many of these diseases have high morbidity and mortality if missed by the emergency physician. Differentiating these mimics from cellulitis can be difficult in the fast-paced emergency setting. A combination of history, physical examination, and focused diagnostic assessment may assist in correctly identifying the underlying etiology. For many of the high mortality cellulitis mimics, surgical intervention is necessary. Cellulitis and its mimics present similarly due to the same physiologic responses to skin and soft tissue infections. A combination of history, physical examination, and diagnostic assessment will help the emergency physician differentiate cellulitis from mimics. Surgical intervention is frequently needed for high morbidity and mortality mimics. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Mimics of scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveri K Nalianda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis is a rare autoimmune connective tissue disorder characterised typically by tightening and tethering of skin. However, several other disorders are also characterised by hardening and thickening of skin. These mimics can be potentially confused with systemic sclerosis, leading to a misdiagnosis. This review describes the aetiopathogenesis, clinical features and treatment of Morphea (localised scleroderma, Scleredema, Scleromyxoedema, Eosinophilic fasciitis, Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis, Diabetic Cheiroarthropathy, chronic GVHD, POEMS syndrome and drug induced scleroderma like illness. A careful and thorough clinical assessment is essential in order to differentiate these mimics from each other and from systemic sclerosis, establish the diagnosis, and initiate appropriate treatment.

  10. Measuring physiological stress in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus): Validation of a salivary cortisol collection and assay technique.

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    Ash, Hayley; Smith, Tessa E; Knight, Simon; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M

    2017-12-15

    Cortisol levels are often used as a physiological measure of the stress response in captive primates, with non-invasive measures of this being an important step in welfare assessment. We report a method of collecting saliva samples voluntarily from unrestrained captive common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), and validate an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique previously unused in this species. Saliva samples were collected from marmosets housed in pairs in a UK laboratory. The assay showed parallelism, precision, accuracy and sensitivity, meeting the criteria typically used to investigate the effectiveness of new analytical techniques. Use of Salimetrics® Oral Swabs considerably increased the amount of cortisol recovered in comparison with previous studies using cotton buds. However, while use of banana on the swabs can encourage chewing, it may influence results. Although increases in cortisol levels have traditionally been interpreted as an indicator of stress in primates, there are many factors that affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, with some studies showing decreases in cortisol levels post-stressor. Following a likely stressful event (capture for weighing), we also found cortisol levels significantly decreased, possibly due to social buffering or 'blunting' of the HPA axis. Order of weighing also had an effect. The method therefore provided an effective non-invasive means of assessing acute changes in cortisol level that may be more useful than previous methods, improving our ability to study physiological aspects of welfare in primates. We discuss methodological considerations, as well as implications of using cortisol as a measure of stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. MIMIC en Robin Hood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. de Mooij (Ruud); A.L. Bovenberg (Lans); F. van der Ploeg (Ploeg)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractVerlaging van het belastingtarief in de eerste schijf, gefinancierd met verhoging van het tarief in de andere schijven, is in het MIMIC-model van het Centraal Planbureau goed voor de werkgelegenheid. Onlangs werd .in E5B betwijfeld of het CPB de gevolgen van zo'n 'Robin Hood'- beleid

  12. Competition assays and physiological experiments of soil and phyllosphere yeasts identify Candida subhashii as a novel antagonist of filamentous fungi.

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    Hilber-Bodmer, Maja; Schmid, Michael; Ahrens, Christian H; Freimoser, Florian M

    2017-01-05

    While recent advances in next generation sequencing technologies have enabled researchers to readily identify countless microbial species in soil, rhizosphere, and phyllosphere microbiomes, the biological functions of the majority of these species are unknown. Functional studies are therefore urgently needed in order to characterize the plethora of microorganisms that are being identified and to point out species that may be used for biotechnology or plant protection. Here, we used a dual culture assay and growth analyses to characterise yeasts (40 different isolates) and their antagonistic effect on 16 filamentous fungi; comprising plant pathogens, antagonists, and saprophytes. Overall, this competition screen of 640 pairwise combinations revealed a broad range of outcomes, ranging from small stimulatory effects of some yeasts up to a growth inhibition of more than 80% by individual species. On average, yeasts isolated from soil suppressed filamentous fungi more strongly than phyllosphere yeasts and the antagonistic activity was a species-/isolate-specific property and not dependent on the filamentous fungus a yeast was interacting with. The isolates with the strongest antagonistic activity were Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Hanseniaspora sp., Cyberlindnera sargentensis, Aureobasidium pullulans, Candida subhashii, and Pichia kluyveri. Among these, the soil yeasts (C. sargentensis, A. pullulans, C. subhashii) assimilated and/or oxidized more di-, tri- and tetrasaccharides and organic acids than yeasts from the phyllosphere. Only the two yeasts C. subhashii and M. pulcherrima were able to grow with N-acetyl-glucosamine as carbon source. The competition assays and physiological experiments described here identified known antagonists that have been implicated in the biological control of plant pathogenic fungi in the past, but also little characterised species such as C. subhashii. Overall, soil yeasts were more antagonistic and metabolically versatile than yeasts from

  13. A Batesian mimic and its model share color production mechanisms

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    David W. KIKUCHI, David W. PFENNIG

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Batesian mimics are harmless prey species that resemble dangerous ones (models, and thus receive protection from predators. How such adaptive resemblances evolve is a classical problem in evolutionary biology. Mimicry is typically thought to be difficult to evolve, especially if the model and mimic produce the convergent phenotype through different proximate mechanisms. However, mimicry may evolve more readily if mimic and model share similar pathways for producing the convergent phenotype. In such cases, these pathways can be co-opted in ancestral mimic populations to produce high-fidelity mimicry without the need for major evolutionary innovations. Here, we show that a Batesian mimic, the scarlet kingsnake Lampropeltis elapsoides, produces its coloration using the same physiological mechanisms as does its model, the eastern coral snake Micrurus fulvius. Therefore, precise color mimicry may have been able to evolve easily in this system. Generally, we know relatively little about the proximate mechanisms underlying mimicry [Current Zoology 58 (4: 658–667, 2012].

  14. Enzyme Mimics: Advances and Applications.

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    Kuah, Evelyn; Toh, Seraphina; Yee, Jessica; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-06-13

    Enzyme mimics or artificial enzymes are a class of catalysts that have been actively pursued for decades and have heralded much interest as potentially viable alternatives to natural enzymes. Aside from having catalytic activities similar to their natural counterparts, enzyme mimics have the desired advantages of tunable structures and catalytic efficiencies, excellent tolerance to experimental conditions, lower cost, and purely synthetic routes to their preparation. Although still in the midst of development, impressive advances have already been made. Enzyme mimics have shown immense potential in the catalysis of a wide range of chemical and biological reactions, the development of chemical and biological sensing and anti-biofouling systems, and the production of pharmaceuticals and clean fuels. This Review concerns the development of various types of enzyme mimics, namely polymeric and dendrimeric, supramolecular, nanoparticulate and proteinic enzyme mimics, with an emphasis on their synthesis, catalytic properties and technical applications. It provides an introduction to enzyme mimics and a comprehensive summary of the advances and current standings of their applications, and seeks to inspire researchers to perfect the design and synthesis of enzyme mimics and to tailor their functionality for a much wider range of applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Can physiological endpoints improve the sensitivity of assays with plants in the risk assessment of contaminated soils?

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    Ana Gavina

    Full Text Available Site-specific risk assessment of contaminated areas indicates prior areas for intervention, and provides helpful information for risk managers. This study was conducted in the Ervedosa mine area (Bragança, Portugal, where both underground and open pit exploration of tin and arsenic minerals were performed for about one century (1857-1969. We aimed at obtaining ecotoxicological information with terrestrial and aquatic plant species to integrate in the risk assessment of this mine area. Further we also intended to evaluate if the assessment of other parameters, in standard assays with terrestrial plants, can improve the identification of phytotoxic soils. For this purpose, soil samples were collected on 16 sampling sites distributed along four transects, defined within the mine area, and in one reference site. General soil physical and chemical parameters, total and extractable metal contents were analyzed. Assays were performed for soil elutriates and for the whole soil matrix following standard guidelines for growth inhibition assay with Lemna minor and emergence and seedling growth assay with Zea mays. At the end of the Z. mays assay, relative water content, membrane permeability, leaf area, content of photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids, malondialdehyde levels, proline content, and chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm and ΦPSII parameters were evaluated. In general, the soils near the exploration area revealed high levels of Al, Mn, Fe and Cu. Almost all the soils from transepts C, D and F presented total concentrations of arsenic well above soils screening benchmark values available. Elutriates of several soils from sampling sites near the exploration and ore treatment areas were toxic to L. minor, suggesting that the retention function of these soils was seriously compromised. In Z. mays assay, plant performance parameters (other than those recommended by standard protocols, allowed the identification of more phytotoxic soils

  16. Validation of a Fecal Glucocorticoid Assay to Assess Adrenocortical Activity in Meerkats Using Physiological and Biological Stimuli

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    Heistermann, Michael; Santema, Peter; Dantzer, Ben; Mausbach, Jelena; Ganswindt, Andre; Manser, Marta B.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, glucocorticoid (i.e. GC) levels have been associated with specific life-history stages and transitions, reproductive strategies, and a plethora of behaviors. Assessment of adrenocortical activity via measurement of glucocorticoid metabolites in feces (FGCM) has greatly facilitated data collection from wild animals, due to its non-invasive nature, and thus has become an established tool in behavioral ecology and conservation biology. The aim of our study was to validate a fecal glucocorticoid assay for assessing adrenocortical activity in meerkats (Suricata suricatta), by comparing the suitability of three GC enzyme immunoassays (corticosterone, 11β-hydroxyetiocholanolone and 11oxo-etiocholanolone) in detecting FGCM increases in adult males and females following a pharmacological challenge with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and biological stimuli. In addition, we investigated the time course characterizing FGCM excretion, the effect of age, sex and time of day on FGCM levels and assessed the potential effects of soil contamination (sand) on FGCM patterns. Our results show that the group specific 11β-hydroxyetiocholanolone assay was most sensitive to FGCM alterations, detecting significant and most distinctive elevations in FGCM levels around 25 h after ACTH administration. We found no age and sex differences in basal FGCM or on peak response levels to ACTH, but a marked diurnal pattern, with FGCM levels being substantially higher in the morning than later during the day. Soil contamination did not significantly affect FGCM patterns. Our results emphasize the importance of conducting assay validations to characterize species-specific endocrine excretion patterns, a crucial step to all animal endocrinology studies using a non-invasive approach. PMID:27077741

  17. Using ImageJ for the quantitative analysis of flow-based adhesion assays in real-time under physiologic flow conditions.

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    Meyer dos Santos, Sascha; Klinkhardt, Ute; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Harder, Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    This article intends to close the gap between the abundance of regular articles focusing on adhesive mechanisms of cells in a flow field and purely technical reports confined to the description of newly developed algorithms, not yet ready to be used by users without programming skills. A simple and robust method is presented for analysing raw videomicroscopic data of flow-based adhesion assays using the freely available public domain software ImageJ. We describe in detail the image processing routines used to rapidly and reliably evaluate the number of adherent and translocating platelets in videomicroscopic recordings. The depicted procedures were exemplified by analysing platelet interaction with immobilized von Willebrand factor and fibrinogen in flowing blood under physiological wall shear rates. Neutralizing GPIbalpha function reduced shear-dependent platelet translocation on von Willebrand factor and abolished firm platelet adhesion. Abciximab, Tirofiban and Eptifibatide completely inhibited GPIIb/IIIa-dependent stable platelet deposition on fibrinogen. The presented method to analyse videomicroscopic recordings from flow-based adhesion assays offers the advantage of providing a simple and reliable way to quantify flow-based adhesion assays, which is completely based on ImageJ and can easily be applied to study adhesion mechanisms of cells in non-fluorescent modes without the need to deviate from the presented protocol.

  18. A three-line lateral flow assay strip for the measurement of C-reactive protein covering a broad physiological concentration range in human sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young Kyoung; Joung, Hyou-Arm; Han, Hyung Soo; Suk, Ho-Jun; Kim, Min-Gon

    2014-11-15

    The lateral flow assay (LFA) strip sensor possesses many advantages as a diagnostic device, including the capabilities of rapid, one-step assay performance, and high throughput production. A major limitation of the sensor, however, is its difficulty in measuring a broad concentration range of target proteins, including C-reactive protein (CRP), due to the "hook effect." In this study, we report the use of a three-line LFA strip sensor, adding an antigen line to the conventional two-line LFA sensor, for detecting CRP within a broad concentration range in human sera. We introduced an antigen line between test and control lines in the LFA sensor. The antigen line was formed by dispensing a CRP antibody solution followed by a CRP solution in nitrocellulose membrane. All other conditions were identical to those applied to the conventional LFA strip sensor. The CRP level in test samples was generated by data processing from the intensities of three lines. The strip sensor measured a linear detection range of CRP concentration from 1 ng/mL to 500 μg/mL within 10 min, with a calculated detection range of 0.69 ng/mL-1.02 mg/mL. Using the developed three-line LFA sensor, 50 clinical samples were measured at a detection range of 0.4-84.7 μg/mL. This novel and easy-to-use CRP sensor can be a useful tool for rapid, sensitive, and cost-effective detection of a broad physiological concentration range of CRP capabilities that are vital for various diagnostic applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Two new beta-strand mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, J H; Waldman, A S; Nowick, J S

    1999-01-01

    In a previous report, Nowick and co-workers described beta-strand mimic A, which duplicates the structure and hydrogen-bonding pattern of one edge of a tetrapeptide in a beta-strand conformation (Nowick, J. S.; Pairish, M.; Lee, I. Q.; Holmes, D. L.; Ziller, J. W. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1997, 119, 5413). Beta-strand mimic A is composed of a 5-amino-2-methoxybenzoic acid unit linked to a 5-hydrazino-2-methoxybenzamide unit by means of an acylhydrazine group. This paper introduces two related beta-strand mimics (B and C) and reports their comparison to beta-strand mimic A. Beta-strand mimic B is composed of a 5-amino-2-methoxybenzoic acid unit linked by a diacylhydrazine group to a fumaramide unit; beta-strand mimic C is composed of a 5-amino-2-methoxybenzoic acid unit linked by a diacylhydrazine group to a peptide. Beta-strand mimics A-C were connected to tripeptide (Phe-Ile-Leu) groups by means of 1,2-diaminoethane diurea turn units to form artificial beta-sheets 1-3. 1H NMR studies, involving ROESY, chemical shift, coupling constant, and variable temperature experiments, reveal that 1-3 adopt hydrogen-bonded antiparallel beta-sheet conformations and establish that all three templates are viable beta-strand mimics.

  20. Morphologic Mimics of Invasive Lobular Carcinoma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ishikawa, Martin K; Pinsky, Renee W; Smith, Lauren B; Jorns, Julie M

    2015-01-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast is a relatively common diagnosis. However, other carcinomatous as well as noncarcinomatous neoplasms, either primary or metastatic to the breast, may mimic invasive lobular carcinoma...

  1. Morphologic Mimics of Invasive Lobular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Martin K; Pinsky, Renee W; Smith, Lauren B; Jorns, Julie M

    2015-10-01

    Invasive lobular carcinoma of the breast is a relatively common diagnosis. However, other carcinomatous as well as noncarcinomatous neoplasms, either primary or metastatic to the breast, may mimic invasive lobular carcinoma. As treatment may differ, establishing the correct diagnosis is paramount to providing the appropriate care for these patients. This review outlines important mimics of invasive lobular carcinoma and the key clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features as well as additional studies helpful in establishing their diagnoses.

  2. Survival assays using Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Eun H; Jung, Yoonji; Lee, Seung-Jae V

    2017-02-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is an important model organism with many useful features, including rapid development and aging, easy cultivation, and genetic tractability. Survival assays using C. elegans are powerful methods for studying physiological processes. In this review, we describe diverse types of C. elegans survival assays and discuss the aims, uses, and advantages of specific assays. C. elegans survival assays have played key roles in identifying novel genetic factors that regulate many aspects of animal physiology, such as aging and lifespan, stress response, and immunity against pathogens. Because many genetic factors discovered using C. elegans are evolutionarily conserved, survival assays can provide insights into mechanisms underlying physiological processes in mammals, including humans.

  3. Digital microfluidics for spheroid-based invasion assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Brian F; Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2016-04-21

    Cell invasion is a key process in tissue growth, wound healing, and tumor progression. Most invasion assays examine cells cultured in adherent monolayers, which fail to recapitulate the three-dimensional nuances of the tissue microenvironment. Multicellular cell spheroids have a three-dimensional (3D) morphology and mimic the intercellular interactions found in tissues in vivo, thus providing a more physiologically relevant model for studying the tissue microenvironment and processes such as cell invasion. Spheroid-based invasion assays often require tedious, manually intensive handling protocols or the use of robotic liquid handling systems, which can be expensive to acquire, operate, and maintain. Here we describe a digital microfluidic (DμF) platform that enables formation of spheroids by the hanging drop method, encapsulation of the spheroids in collagen, and the exposure of spheroids to migration-modulating agents. Collagen sol-gel solutions up to 4 mg mL(-1), which form gels with elastic moduli up to ∼50 kPa, can be manipulated on the device. In situ spheroid migration assays show that cells from human fibroblast spheroids exhibit invasion into collagen gels, which can be either enhanced or inhibited by the delivery of exogenous migration modulating agents. Exposing fibroblast spheroids to spheroid secretions from colon cancer spheroids resulted in a >100% increase in fibroblast invasion into the collagen gel, consistent with the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype. These data show that DμF can be used to automate the liquid handling protocols for spheroid-based invasion assays and create a cell invasion model that mimics the tissue microenvironment more closely than two-dimensional culturing techniques do. A DμF platform that facilitates the creation and assaying of 3D in vitro tissue models has the potential to make automated 3D cell-based assays more accessible to researchers in the life sciences.

  4. Clinical Mimics: An Emergency Medicine-Focused Review of Stroke Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex

    2017-02-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability and most commonly presents with focal neurologic deficit within a specific vascular distribution. Several other conditions may present in a similar manner. This review provides emergency providers with an understanding of stroke mimics, use of thrombolytics in these mimics, and keys to differentiate true stroke from mimic. Stroke has significant morbidity and mortality, and the American Heart Association emphasizes rapid recognition and aggressive treatment for patients with possible stroke-like symptoms, including thrombolytics. However, many conditions mimic the presentation of stroke, with up to a 31% rate of misdiagnosis, leading to potentially harmful treatment. Stroke mimics are conditions that present with stroke-like symptoms, including seizures, headaches, metabolic, infection, space-occupying lesion, neurodegenerative disorder, peripheral neuropathy, syncope, vascular disorder, and functional disorder. Factors of history and physical examination supporting stroke vs. mimic are discussed, though any sudden-onset, objective, focal neurologic deficit in a patient should be assumed acute stroke until proven otherwise. Head computed tomography noncontrast is the first-line imaging modality. Magnetic resonance imaging is the most sensitive and specific imaging modality. Neurology consultation is recommended in the majority of patients. If stroke is suspected after evaluation, shared decision-making for further management and consideration of thrombolytics is recommended. Stroke mimics present a conundrum for emergency providers. A new focal neurologic deficit warrants rapid evaluation for stroke with neuroimaging and neurology consultation. Several mimics found on assessment may resolve with treatment. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Carbocyclic Carbohydrate Mimics as Potential Glycosidase Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanefjord, Mette; Lundt, Inge

    developed in our group. A similar strategy has been used for synthesising mimics of D-carbohydrates. The α,β-unsaturated lactone 3 was cyclised to compound 4 which was further transformed into 5. The nitrogen functionality in compound 7 is introduced by an Overman rearrangement of 6 and the hydroxyl...... functionalities was introduced by either epoxidation or dihydroxylation of 7. Finally, reduction of the lactone ring led to the sugar mimics 8. The synthesis of several isomers of 8 will be presented. [1] a) Kleban, M. ; Hilgers, P. ; Greul, J.N. ; Kugler, R.D. ; Li, J. ; Picasso, S. ; Vogel, P. ; Jäger, V. Chem...

  6. Explosives mimic for testing, training, and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, John G.; Durban, Matthew M.; Gash, Alexander E.; Grapes, Michael D.; Kelley, Ryan S.; Sullivan, Kyle T.

    2018-02-13

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) is used to make mimics for explosives. The process uses mixtures of explosives and matrices commonly used in AM. The explosives are formulated into a mixture with the matrix and printed using AM techniques and equipment. The explosive concentrations are kept less than 10% by wt. of the mixture to conform to requirements of shipping and handling.

  7. Selenoglutaredoxin as a Glutathione Peroxidase Mimic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casi, Giulio; Roelfes, Gerard; Hilvert, Donald

    2008-01-01

    Glutaredoxin (Grx1) from Escherichia coli is a monomeric, 85-amino-acid-long, disulfide-containing redox protein. A Grx1 variant in which the redox-active disulfide was replaced with a selenocysteine (C11U/C14S) was prepared by native chemical ligation from three fragments as a potential mimic of

  8. Permanent female mimics in a lekking shorebird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jukema, Joop; Piersma, Theunis

    2006-01-01

    Female mimics are known from many species, but permanent, non-conditional, alternative mating strategies are only known from an isopod, a fish, a lizard and a bird. The single bird example refers to lek-breeding ruffs Philomachus pugnax, a shorebird for which two strategies (independent and

  9. Histologic Mimics of Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanoszek, Lauren M; Wang, Grace Y; Harms, Paul W

    2017-11-01

    - Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human malignant neoplasm and is a frequently encountered diagnosis in dermatopathology. Although BCC may be locally destructive, it rarely metastasizes. Many diagnostic entities display morphologic and immunophenotypic overlap with BCC, including nonneoplastic processes, such as follicular induction over dermatofibroma; benign follicular tumors, such as trichoblastoma, trichoepithelioma, or basaloid follicular hamartoma; and malignant tumors, such as sebaceous carcinoma or Merkel cell carcinoma. Thus, misdiagnosis has significant potential to result in overtreatment or undertreatment. - To review key features distinguishing BCC from histologic mimics, including current evidence regarding immunohistochemical markers useful for that distinction. - Review of pertinent literature on BCC immunohistochemistry and differential diagnosis. - In most cases, BCC can be reliably diagnosed by histopathologic features. Immunohistochemistry may provide useful ancillary data in certain cases. Awareness of potential mimics is critical to avoid misdiagnosis and resulting inappropriate management.

  10. Acute stroke differential diagnosis: Stroke mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Pedro

    2017-11-01

    Stroke mimics (SM) are non-vascular conditions that present with an acute neurological deficit simulating acute ischemic stroke and represent a significant percentage of all acute stroke hospital admissions. The most common clinical SM includes conversion/functional (psychiatric disorder); seizures and postictal paralysis; toxic-metabolic disturbances; brain tumours; infections, and migraine. Imaging is essential for SM recognition, being Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion imaging and angiographic studies very useful. There are several disorders that may have imaging features that simulate acute ischemic stroke, mainly presenting with cytotoxic oedema and/or perfusion deficits. The imaging features of the most frequent clinical and imaging stroke mimics are reviewed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinicopathologic study of Alzheimer's disease: Alzheimer mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Yong S; Roe, Catherine M; Buckles, Virginia D; Morris, John C

    2013-01-01

    A definite diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) can only be made at autopsy. Even at expert research centers, diagnostic accuracy is relatively low. We conducted this study to examine the accuracy of clinical diagnosis of AD and present a list of clinical and neuropsychological findings that could render the clinical diagnosis difficult. Using the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database, the records of 533 patients who had been diagnosed clinically with AD, and later underwent autopsy, were reviewed retrospectively. Since the pathologic results of 119 subjects did not meet the criteria for definite AD, we labeled them as Alzheimer "mimics". The neuropathological diagnoses of Alzheimer mimics consisted of dementia with Lewy bodies (n = 35, 29%), insufficient AD (n = 22, 18%), vascular disease (n = 15, 13%), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (n = 14, 12%), and hippocampal sclerosis (n = 10, 8%). History of pacemaker insertion (10.92% versus 4.11%, p = 0.005), congestive heart failure (13.45% versus 6.04%, p = 0.007), hypertension (56.30% versus 47.83%, p = 0.037), and resting tremor (14.29% versus 10.87%, p = 0.170) was more prevalent in Alzheimer mimics. Clinical Dementia Rating score and frequency of Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire items reflecting delusions, agitation, depression, and motor disturbance were more severe in confirmed AD. In addition to Mini-Mental State Examination (16.97 ± 8.29 versus 12.74 ± 15.26, p Test, and Digit Span scores showed more severe impairment in confirmed AD. Continuing systematic comparisons of the current criteria for the clinical and pathological dementia diagnoses are essential to clinical practice and research, and may also lead to further improvement of the diagnostic procedure.

  12. Oxidoreductase mimic activity of natural pyrrhotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez de Aldecoa, A. L.; Velasco, F.; Menor-Salván, C.

    2012-09-01

    The theory of the chemo-autotrophic origin of life, also called the "iron-sulfur world hypothesis", proposes that the system FeS/FeS2 present in the primitive Earth crust gave the reductive power necessary to conduct the first protometabolic redox reactions. Some experimental studies demonstrated the redox activity of the FeS/SH2 system, but none of them used natural FeS. Here, we show that the iron sulfide mineral pyrrhotite is able to mimic the redox activity of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, which reversibly reduces the pyruvate in lactate, under prebiotic conditions with pyrite formation.

  13. Stereocontrolled Synthesis of Methyl Silanediol Peptide Mimics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lone; Lindsay, Karl; Faber, Jesper

    2007-01-01

     The treatment of chiral sulfinimines with (methyldiphenylsilyl)lithium gives R-(methyldiphenylsilyl)-sulfinamides with excellent diastereoselectivity, and in good yield. The presence of α-protons on the imines is also well tolerated. The sulfinamide auxiliary is easily removed via treatment with...... corresponding bis-TMS siloxane via protection with TMSCl, and converted back to the desired silanediol via hydrolysis with aqueous KOH. Efforts to apply this approach to biologically relevant silanediol peptide mimics, with a view to protease inhibition, are described....

  14. Do benzodiazepines mimic reverse-turn structures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Masayuki; Marshall, Garland R.

    2006-05-01

    The role of benzodiazepine derivatives (BZD) as a privileged scaffold that mimics β-turn structures (Ripka et al. (1993) Tetrahedron 49:3593-3608) in peptide/protein recognition was reexamined in detail. Stable BZD ring conformers were determined with MM3, and experimental reverse-turn structures were extracted from the basis set of protein crystal structures previously defined by Ripka et al. Ideal β-turns were also modeled and similarly compared with BZD conformers. Huge numbers of conformers were generated by systematically scanning the torsional degrees of freedom for BZDs, as well as those of ideal β-turns for comparison. Using these structures, conformers of BZDs were fit to experimental structures as suggested by Ripka et al., or modeled classical β-turn conformers, and the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) values were calculated for each pairwise comparison. Pairs of conformers with the smallest RMSD values for overlap of the four α-β side-chain orientations were selected. All overlaps of BZD conformers with experimental β-turns yielded one or more comparisons where the least RMSD was significantly small, 0.48-0.86 Å, as previously suggested. Utilizing a different methodology, the overall conclusion that benzodiazepines could serve as reverse-turn mimetics of Ripka et al. is justified. The least RMSD values for the overlap of BZDs and modeled classical β-turns were also less than 1 Å. When comparing BZDs with experimental or classical β-turns, the set of experimental β-turns selected by Ripka et al. fit the BZD scaffolds better than modeled classical β-turns; however, all the experimental β-turns did not fit a particular BZD scaffold better. A single BZD ring conformation, and/or chiral orientation, can mimic some, but not all, of the experimental β-turn structures. BZD has two central ring conformations and one chiral center that explains why the four variations of the BZD scaffold can mimic all types of β-turn structure examined. It was

  15. A clinically isolated syndrome: butterfly glioma mimic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramshekhar Menon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The report explores a unique and treatable "butterfly"- glioma mimic and the neuroimaging characteristics that help to diagnose this entity. A 35-year-old patient presented with subacute-onset, progressive frontal lobe dysfunction followed by features of raised intracranial pressure. Neuroimaging features were consistent with a "butterfly" lesion that favored the possibility of a gliomatosis cerebri with significant edema and marked corpus callosum and fornix thickening. Contrast-enhanced and perfusion images revealed a confluent tumefactive lesion with a characteristic "broken-ring" pattern of enhancement, mass-effect and low perfusion; features favoring an alternative inflammatory pathology. This was peculiar as calloso-forniceal involvement of this nature has not been previously reported in inflammatory demyelinating mass lesions. This was confirmed as a tumefactive demyelination on histopathology. Following treatment, on clinical and imaging follow-up, significant resolution was evident suggesting a monophasic illness. This case highlights the stringent clinico-radiological-pathological approach required in the evaluation and management of butterfly lesions despite the striking imaging appearances. Tumefactive demyelination in this patient represents a clinically isolated syndromic presentation of an inflammatory pathology that can resemble gliomatosis cerebri. These "butterfly"-glioma mimics are scarcely reported in the literature, are eminently treatable with variable prognosis and prone for relapse.

  16. Proteolytically Stable Foldamer Mimics of Host-Defense Peptides with Protective Activities in a Murine Model of Bacterial Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teyssières, Emilie; Corre, Jean-Philippe; Antunes, Stephanie; Rougeot, Catherine; Dugave, Christophe; Jouvion, Grégory; Claudon, Paul; Mikaty, Guillain; Douat, Céline; Goossens, Pierre L; Guichard, Gilles

    2016-09-22

    The synthesis of bioinspired unnatural backbones leading to foldamers can provide effective peptide mimics with improved properties in a physiological environment. This approach has been applied to the design of structural mimics of membrane active antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) for which activities in vitro have been reported. Yet activities and pharmacokinetic properties in vivo in animal models have remained largely unexplored. Here, we report helical oligourea AMP mimics that are active in vitro against bacterial forms of Bacillus anthracis encountered in vivo, as well as in vivo in inhalational and cutaneous mouse models of B. anthracis infection. The pharmacokinetic profile and the tissue distribution were investigated by β-radio imager whole-body mapping in mice. Low excretion and recovery of the native oligourea in the kidney following intravenous injection is consistent with high stability in vivo. Overall these results provide useful information that support future biomedical development of urea-based foldamer peptide mimics.

  17. Preparation of highly efficient manganese catalase mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triller, Michael U; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Pecoraro, Vincent L; Rompel, Annette; Krebs, Bernt

    2002-10-21

    The series of compounds [Mn(bpia)(mu-OAc)](2)(ClO(4))(2) (1), [Mn(2)(bpia)(2)(muO)(mu-OAc)](ClO(4))(3).CH(3)CN (2), [Mn(bpia)(mu-O)](2)(ClO(4))(2)(PF(6)).2CH(3)CN (3), [Mn(bpia)(Cl)(2)](ClO)(4) (4), and [(Mn(bpia)(Cl))(2)(mu-O)](ClO(4))(2).2CH(3)CN (5) (bpia = bis(picolyl)(N-methylimidazol-2-yl)amine) represents a structural, spectroscopic, and functional model system for manganese catalases. Compounds 3 and 5 have been synthesized from 2 via bulk electrolysis and ligand exchange, respectively. All complexes have been structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography and by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopies. The different bridging ligands including the rare mono-mu-oxo and mono-mu-oxo-mono-mu-carboxylato motifs lead to a variation of the Mn-Mn separation across the four binuclear compounds of 1.50 A (Mn(2)(II,II) = 4.128 A, Mn(2)(III,III) = 3.5326 and 3.2533 A, Mn(2)(III,IV) = 2.624 A). Complexes 1, 2, and 3 are mimics for the Mn(2)(II,II), the Mn(2)(III,III), and the Mn(2)(III,IV) oxidation states of the native enzyme. UV-vis spectra of these compounds show similarities to those of the corresponding oxidation states of manganese catalase from Thermus thermophilus and Lactobacillus plantarum. Compound 2 exhibits a rare example of a Jahn-Teller compression. While complexes 1 and 3 are efficient catalysts for the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide and contain an N(4)O(2) donor set, 4 and 5 show no catalase activity. These complexes have an N(4)Cl(2) and N(4)OCl donor set, respectively, and serve as mimics for halide inhibited manganese catalases. Cyclovoltammetric data show that the substitution of oxygen donor atoms with chloride causes a shift of redox potentials to more positive values. To our knowledge, complex 1 is the most efficient binuclear functional manganese catalase mimic exhibiting saturation kinetics to date.

  18. Abdominal Sarcoidosis May Mimic Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorkem, Umit; Gungor, Tayfun; Bas, Yılmaz; Togrul, Cihan

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. It shows a great variety of clinical presentation, organ involvement, and disease progression. Lungs and lymphoid system are the most common sites involved with a frequency of 90% and 30%, respectively. Extrapulmonary involvement of sarcoidosis is reported in 30% of patients and abdomen is the most frequent site. Furthermore, peritoneal involvement is extremely rare in sarcoidosis. The case presented here described peritoneal manifestations of sarcoidosis without involvement of lungs. A 78-year-old woman possessing signs of malignancy on blood test and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging underwent laparatomy with a suspicion of ovarian malignancy. The macroscopic interpretation during surgery was peritoneal carcinomatosis. Total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, peritoneal biopsies, total omentectomy, and appendectomy were performed. Final histopathological result revealed the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. Clinicians must keep in mind that peritoneal sarcoidosis can mimic intra-abdominal malignancies. PMID:26558122

  19. The Analysis of Cu(II)/Zn(II) Cyclopeptide System as Potential Cu,ZnSOD Mimic Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotynia, Aleksandra; Janek, Tomasz; Czyżnikowska, Żaneta; Bielińska, Sylwia; Kamysz, Wojciech; Brasuń, Justyna

    2017-01-01

    In this paper are presented the features of copper (II) and zinc (II) heteronuclear complexes of the cyclic peptide-c(HKHGPG)2. The coordination properties of ligand were studied by potentiometric, UV-Vis and CD spectroscopic methods. These experiments were carried out in aqueous solutions at 298 K depending on pH. It turned out that in a physiological pH dominates Cu(II)/Zn(II) complex ([CuZnL]4+) which could mimic the active center of superoxide dismutase (Cu,ZnSOD). In next step we performed in vitro research on Cu,ZnSOD activity for [CuZnL]4+ complex existing in 7.4 pH by the method of reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT). Also mono- and di-nuclear copper (II) complexes of this ligand were examined. The ability of inhibition free radical reaction were compared for all complexes. The results of these studies show that Cu(II) mono-, di-nuclear and Cu(II)/Zn(II) complexes becoming to new promising synthetic superoxide dismutase mimetics, and should be considered for further biological assays.

  20. Non-invasive monitoring of physiological stress in the Western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla): validation of a fecal glucocorticoid assay and methods for practical application in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutt, Kathryn; Setchell, Joanna M; Heistermann, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Enzymeimmunoassays (EIAs) allow researchers to monitor stress hormone output via measurement of fecal glucocorticoid metabolites (FGCMs) in many vertebrates. They can be powerful tools which allow the acquisition of otherwise unobtainable physiological information from both captive animals and wild animals in remote forest habitats, such as great apes. However, methods for hormone measurement, extraction and preservation need to be adapted and validated for field settings. In preparation for a field study of Western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) in the Central African Republic we used samples from captive gorillas collected around opportunistic stressful situations to test whether four different glucocorticoid EIAs reflected adrenocortical activity reliably and to establish the lag-time from the stressor to peak excretion. We also validated a field extraction technique and established a simple, non-freezer-reliant method to preserve FGCMs in extracts long-term. We determined the rate of FGCM change over 28 days when samples cannot be extracted immediately and over 12h when feces cannot be preserved immediately in alcohol. Finally, we used repeat samples from identified individuals to test for diurnal variation in FGCM output. Two group-specific assays measuring major cortisol metabolites detected the predicted FGCM response to the stressor reliably, whereas more specific cortisol and corticosterone assays were distinctly less responsive and thus less useful. We detected a lag time of 2-3 days from stressor to peak FGCM excretion. Our field extraction method performed as well as an established laboratory extraction method and FGCMs in dried extracts stored at ambient temperatures were as stable as those at -20 °C over 1 yr. Hormones in non-extracted feces in alcohol were stable up to 28 days at ambient temperatures. FGCMs in un-fixed gorilla feces deteriorated to almost 50% of the original values within 6h under field conditions. We detected no diurnal

  1. Identification of Stroke Mimics in the Emergency Department Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Oliver Tobin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose Previous studies have shown a stroke mimic rate of 9%–31%. We aimed to establish the proportion of stroke mimics amongst suspected acute strokes, to clarify the aetiology of stroke mimic and to develop a prediction model to identify stroke mimics. Methods This was a retrospective cohort observational study. Consecutive “stroke alert” patients were identified over nine months in a primary stroke centre. 31 variables were collected. Final diagnosis was defined as “stroke” or “stroke mimic”. Multivariable regression analysis was used to define clinical predictors of stroke mimic. Results 206 patients were reviewed. 22% were classified as stroke mimics. Multivariable scoring did not help in identification of stroke mimics. 99.5% of patients had a neurological diagnosis at final diagnosis. Discussion 22% of patients with suspected acute stroke had a stroke mimic. The aetiology of stroke mimics was varied, with seizure, encephalopathy, syncope and migraine being commonest. Multivariable scoring for identification of stroke mimics is not feasible. 99.5% of patients had a neurological diagnosis. This strengthens the case for the involvement of stroke neurologists/stroke physicians in acute stroke care.

  2. One pot glucose detection by [Fe(III)(biuret-amide)] immobilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticles: an efficient HRP mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvi, Bharmana; Panda, Chakadola; Dhar, Basab B; Gupta, Sayam Sen

    2012-05-28

    An [Fe(III)(biuret-amide)] complex has been immobilized onto mesoporous silica nanoparticles via Cu(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne click chemistry. This hybrid material functions as an efficient peroxidase mimic and was successfully used for the quantitative determination of hydrogen peroxide and glucose via a one-pot colorimetric assay. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  3. Fe65-PTB2 Dimerization Mimics Fe65-APP Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas P. Feilen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Physiological function and pathology of the Alzheimer’s disease causing amyloid precursor protein (APP are correlated with its cytosolic adaptor Fe65 encompassing a WW and two phosphotyrosine-binding domains (PTBs. The C-terminal Fe65-PTB2 binds a large portion of the APP intracellular domain (AICD including the GYENPTY internalization sequence fingerprint. AICD binding to Fe65-PTB2 opens an intra-molecular interaction causing a structural change and altering Fe65 activity. Here we show that in the absence of the AICD, Fe65-PTB2 forms a homodimer in solution and determine its crystal structure at 2.6 Å resolution. Dimerization involves the unwinding of a C-terminal α-helix that mimics binding of the AICD internalization sequence, thus shielding the hydrophobic binding pocket. Specific dimer formation is validated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR techniques and cell-based analyses reveal that Fe65-PTB2 together with the WW domain are necessary and sufficient for dimerization. Together, our data demonstrate that Fe65 dimerizes via its APP interaction site, suggesting that besides intra- also intermolecular interactions between Fe65 molecules contribute to homeostatic regulation of APP mediated signaling.

  4. Clinical Mimics: An Emergency Medicine-Focused Review of Syncope Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Diana K; Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex

    2018-01-01

    Syncope is an event that causes a transient loss of consciousness (LOC) secondary to global cerebral hypoperfusion. The transient nature of the event can make diagnosis in the emergency department (ED) difficult, as symptoms have often resolved by time of initial presentation. The symptoms and presentation of syncope are similar to many other conditions, which can lead to difficulty in establishing a diagnosis in the ED. This review evaluates patients presenting with a history concerning for possible syncope, mimics of syncope, and approach to managing syncope mimics. Syncope is caused by transient LOC secondary to global cerebral hypoperfusion. Many conditions can present similarly to syncope, making diagnosis in the ED difficult. Some of the most emergent conditions include seizures, stroke, metabolic disorders, and head trauma. Other nonemergent conditions include cataplexy, pseudosyncope, or deconditioning. Many laboratory studies and imaging can be nondiagnostic during ED evaluation. For patients presenting with apparent syncope, immediate treatment should focus on identifying and treating life-threatening conditions. History and physical examination can help guide further diagnostic evaluation and management. Patients with apparent syncope should be evaluated for potential immediate life-threatening conditions. A thorough history and physical examination can aid in distinguishing syncope from common mimics and help identify and subsequently treat life-threatening conditions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Exploring Drug Dosing Regimens In Vitro Using Real-Time 3D Spheroid Tumor Growth Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal-Nag, Madhu; McGee, Lauren; Titus, Steven A; Brimacombe, Kyle; Michael, Sam; Sittampalam, Gurusingham; Ferrer, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Two-dimensional monolayer cell proliferation assays for cancer drug discovery have made the implementation of large-scale screens feasible but only seem to reflect a simplified view that oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes are the genetic drivers of cancer cell proliferation. However, there is now increased evidence that the cellular and physiological context in which these oncogenic events occur play a key role in how they drive tumor growth in vivo and, therefore, in how tumors respond to drug treatments. In vitro 3D spheroid tumor models are being developed to better mimic the physiology of tumors in vivo, in an attempt to improve the predictability and efficiency of drug discovery for the treatment of cancer. Here we describe the establishment of a real-time 3D spheroid growth, 384-well screening assay. The cells used in this study constitutively expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP), which enabled the real-time monitoring of spheroid formation and the effect of chemotherapeutic agents on spheroid size at different time points of sphere growth and drug treatment. This real-time 3D spheroid assay platform represents a first step toward the replication in vitro of drug dosing regimens being investigated in vivo. We hope that further development of this assay platform will allow the investigation of drug dosing regimens, efficacy, and resistance before preclinical and clinical studies.

  6. Mycosis Fungoides mimic chronic eczema? Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Andruszkiewicz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycosis fungoides (MF is the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma [1]. Because of its great variety of clinical features and nonspecific histological findings (especially in early stages has been named the "great imitator "and can induce many wrong diagnosis [2,3]. Mycosis fungoides (MF, is an epidermotropic lymphoma included as an indolent form in the recent WHO/EORTC classification. From a clinical point of view, the classic disease progression usually is slow and takes over years or even decades, and characterized by the evolution from patches to more infiltrated plaques and eventually to tumours or erythroderma. However, the analysis of the MF disease course has been greatly impaired by the rarity of the disease, thus data about the time course of disease progression and pattern of relapse during time are not well known [4,5]. Therefore very often Mycosis fungoides is misdiagnosed as chronic eczema [6]. MF can also mimic: vitiligo [6], alopecia-Areata [7], ecchymosis [8].

  7. Representing life in the Earth system with soil microbial functional traits in the MIMICS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieder, W. R.; Grandy, A. S.; Kallenbach, C. M.; Taylor, P. G.; Bonan, G. B.

    2015-06-01

    Projecting biogeochemical responses to global environmental change requires multi-scaled perspectives that consider organismal diversity, ecosystem processes, and global fluxes. However, microbes, the drivers of soil organic matter decomposition and stabilization, remain notably absent from models used to project carbon (C) cycle-climate feedbacks. We used a microbial trait-based soil C model with two physiologically distinct microbial communities, and evaluate how this model represents soil C storage and response to perturbations. Drawing from the application of functional traits used to model other ecosystems, we incorporate copiotrophic and oligotrophic microbial functional groups in the MIcrobial-MIneral Carbon Stabilization (MIMICS) model; these functional groups are akin to "gleaner" vs. "opportunist" plankton in the ocean, or r- vs. K-strategists in plant and animal communities. Here we compare MIMICS to a conventional soil C model, DAYCENT (the daily time-step version of the CENTURY model), in cross-site comparisons of nitrogen (N) enrichment effects on soil C dynamics. MIMICS more accurately simulates C responses to N enrichment; moreover, it raises important hypotheses involving the roles of substrate availability, community-level enzyme induction, and microbial physiological responses in explaining various soil biogeochemical responses to N enrichment. In global-scale analyses, we show that MIMICS projects much slower rates of soil C accumulation than a conventional soil biogeochemistry in response to increasing C inputs with elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) - a finding that would reduce the size of the land C sink estimated by the Earth system. Our findings illustrate that tradeoffs between theory and utility can be overcome to develop soil biogeochemistry models that evaluate and advance our theoretical understanding of microbial dynamics and soil biogeochemical responses to environmental change.

  8. Enzyme assays

    OpenAIRE

    Bisswanger, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The essential requirements for enzyme assays are described and frequently occurring errors and pitfalls as well as their avoidance are discussed. The main factors, which must be considered for assaying enzymes, are temperature, pH, ionic strength and the proper concentrations of the essential components like substrates and enzymes. Standardization of these parameters would be desirable, but the diversity of the features of different enzymes prevents unification of assay conditions. Neverthele...

  9. Nasal Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Nasal Physiology Jeremiah A. Alt, MD, PhD Noam Cohen, MD, ... control the inflammation. CONCLUSION An understanding of the physiology of the nose is critical to understand nasal ...

  10. Rice Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.A. Counce; Davidi R. Gealy; Shi-Jean Susana Sung

    2002-01-01

    Physiology occurs tn physical space through chemical reactions constrained by anatomy and morphology, yet guided by genetics. Physiology has been called the logic of life. Genes encode structural and fimcdonal proteins. These proteins are subsequently processed to produce enzymes that direct and govern the biomechanical processes involved in the physiology of the...

  11. Glutathione transferase mimics : Micellar catalysis of an enzymic reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lindkvist, Björn; Weinander, Rolf; Engman, Lars; Koetse, Marc; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.; Morgenstern, Ralf

    1997-01-01

    Substances that mimic the enzyme action of glutathione transferases (which serve in detoxification) are described. These micellar catalysts enhance the reaction rate between thiols and activated halogenated nitroarenes as well as alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyls. The nucleophilic aromatic

  12. Polymeric coatings that mimic the endothelium: combining nitric oxide release with surface-bound active thrombomodulin and heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Biyun; Gerlitz, Bruce; Grinnell, Brian W; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2007-10-01

    Multi-functional bilayer polymeric coatings are prepared with both controlled nitric oxide (NO) release and surface-bound active thrombomodulin (TM) alone or in combination with immobilized heparin. The outer-layer is made of CarboSil, a commercially available copolymer of silicone rubber (SR) and polyurethane (PU). The CarboSil is either carboxylated or aminated via an allophanate reaction with a diisocyanate compound followed by a urea-forming reaction between the generated isocyanate group of the polymer and the amine group of an amino acid (glycine), an oligopeptide (triglycine) or a diamine. The carboxylated CarboSil can then be used to immobilize TM through the formation of an amide bond between the surface carboxylic acid groups and the lysine residues of TM. Aminated CarboSil can also be employed to initially couple heparin to the surface, and then the carboxylic acid groups on heparin can be further used to anchor TM. Both surface-bound TM and heparin's activity are evaluated by chromogenic assays and found to be at clinically significant levels. The underlying NO release layer is made with another commercial SR-PU copolymer (PurSil) mixed with a lipophilic NO donor (N-diazeniumdiolated dibutylhexanediamine (DBHD/N(2)O(2))). The NO release rate can be tuned by changing the thickness of top coatings, and the duration of NO release at physiologically relevant levels can be as long as 2 weeks. The combination of controlled NO release as well as immobilized active TM and heparin from/on the same polymeric surface mimics the highly thromboresistant endothelium layer. Hence, such multifunctional polymer coatings should provide more blood-compatible surfaces for biomedical devices.

  13. Rowing Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinks, W. L.

    This review of the literature discusses and examines the methods used in physiological assessment of rowers, results of such assessments, and future directions emanating from research in the physiology of rowing. The first section discusses the energy demands of rowing, including the contribution of the energy system, anaerobic metabolism, and the…

  14. Musculoskeletal model-based control interface mimics physiologic hand dynamics during path tracing task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouch, Dustin L.; (Helen Huang, He

    2017-06-01

    Objective. We investigated the feasibility of a novel, customizable, simplified EMG-driven musculoskeletal model for estimating coordinated hand and wrist motions during a real-time path tracing task. Approach. A two-degree-of-freedom computational musculoskeletal model was implemented for real-time EMG-driven control of a stick figure hand displayed on a computer screen. After 5-10 minutes of undirected practice, subjects were given three attempts to trace 10 straight paths, one at a time, with the fingertip of the virtual hand. Able-bodied subjects completed the task on two separate test days. Main results. Across subjects and test days, there was a significant linear relationship between log-transformed measures of accuracy and speed (Pearson’s r  =  0.25, p  amputee subject could coordinate movement between the wrist and MCP joints, but favored metacarpophalangeal joint motion more highly than able-bodied subjects in 8 of 10 trials. For able-bodied subjects, tracing accuracy was lower at the extremes of the model’s range of motion, though there was no apparent relationship between tracing accuracy and fingertip location for the amputee. Our result suggests that, unlike able-bodied subjects, the amputee’s motor control patterns were not accustomed to the multi-joint dynamics of the wrist and hand, possibly as a result of post-amputation cortical plasticity, disuse, or sensory deficits. Significance. To our knowledge, our study is one of very few that have demonstrated the real-time simultaneous control of multi-joint movements, especially wrist and finger movements, using an EMG-driven musculoskeletal model, which differs from the many data-driven algorithms that dominate the literature on EMG-driven prosthesis control. Real-time control was achieved with very little training and simple, quick (~15 s) calibration. Thus, our model is potentially a practical and effective control platform for multifunctional myoelectric prostheses that could restore more life-like hand function for individuals with upper limb amputation.

  15. Molecular mimics of the tumour antigen MUC1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharappel C James

    Full Text Available A key requirement for the development of cancer immunotherapy is the identification of tumour-associated antigens that are differentially or exclusively expressed on the tumour and recognized by the host immune system. However, immune responses to such antigens are often muted or lacking due to the antigens being recognized as "self", and further complicated by the tumour environment and regulation of immune cells within. In an effort to circumvent the lack of immune responses to tumour antigens, we have devised a strategy to develop potential synthetic immunogens. The strategy, termed mirror image phage display, is based on the concept of molecular mimicry as demonstrated by the idiotype/anti-idiotype paradigm in the immune system. Here as 'proof of principle' we have selected molecular mimics of the well-characterised tumour associated antigen, the human mucin1 protein (MUC1 from two different peptide phage display libraries. The putative mimics were compared in structure and function to that of the native antigen. Our results demonstrate that several of the mimic peptides display T-cell stimulation activity in vitro when presented by matured dendritic cells. The mimic peptides and the native MUC1 antigenic epitopes can cross-stimulate T-cells. The data also indicate that sequence homology and/or chemical properties to the original epitope are not the sole determining factors for the observed immunostimulatory activity of the mimic peptides.

  16. Designed ankyrin repeat proteins: a new approach to mimic complex antigens for diagnostic purposes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Hausammann

    Full Text Available Inhibitory antibodies directed against coagulation factor VIII (FVIII can be found in patients with acquired and congenital hemophilia A. Such FVIII-inhibiting antibodies are routinely detected by the functional Bethesda Assay. However, this assay has a low sensitivity and shows a high inter-laboratory variability. Another method to detect antibodies recognizing FVIII is ELISA, but this test does not allow the distinction between inhibitory and non-inhibitory antibodies. Therefore, we aimed at replacing the intricate antigen FVIII by Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins (DARPins mimicking the epitopes of FVIII inhibitors. As a model we used the well-described inhibitory human monoclonal anti-FVIII antibody, Bo2C11, for the selection on DARPin libraries. Two DARPins were selected binding to the antigen-binding site of Bo2C11, which mimic thus a functional epitope on FVIII. These DARPins inhibited the binding of the antibody to its antigen and restored FVIII activity as determined in the Bethesda assay. Furthermore, the specific DARPins were able to recognize the target antibody in human plasma and could therefore be used to test for the presence of Bo2C11-like antibodies in a large set of hemophilia A patients. These data suggest, that our approach might be used to isolate epitopes from different sets of anti-FVIII antibodies in order to develop an ELISA-based screening assay allowing the distinction of inhibitory and non-inhibitory anti-FVIII antibodies according to their antibody signatures.

  17. Solid-phase-supported synthesis of morpholinoglycine oligonucleotide mimics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana V. Abramova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An efficient solid-phase-supported peptide synthesis (SPPS of morpholinoglycine oligonucleotide (MorGly mimics has been developed. The proposed strategy includes a novel specially designed labile linker group containing the oxalyl residue and the 2-aminomethylmorpholino nucleoside analogues as first subunits.

  18. An Emergency Medicine-Focused Review of Seizure Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, James; Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex

    2017-05-01

    Seizures result in a change in motor, sensory, and behavioral symptoms caused by abnormal neurologic electrical activity. The symptoms share similar presentations of several other conditions, leading to difficulties in diagnosis and frequent improper management. This review evaluates adult patients with suspected seizure, signs and symptoms of seizure, mimics of seizure, and an approach to management of seizure mimics. A seizure is caused by abnormal neurologic electrical activity resulting in altered motor, sensory, and behavioral symptoms. Other conditions may present similarly, causing a challenge in diagnosis. These conditions include syncope, psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, stroke or transient ischemic attack, sleep disorders, movement disorders, and migraines. Diagnosis of seizures in the emergency department (ED) is often clinical. Differentiation between seizures and other conditions can be difficult. Laboratories and imaging provide little benefit in definitive diagnosis in the emergency setting. For patients that have an apparent seizure, resuscitation and management is precedent while identifying any provoking factors and treatment of those factors. For adults recovering from suspected seizure, the combination of a focused history, physical examination, and additional studies can provide assistance in diagnosis. Patients with an apparent seizure should be resuscitated with identification of provoking factors. Many conditions can mimic seizures. A focused history, physical examination, and additional studies will assist in differentiating seizures from mimics. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Synthesis of aminocyclopentanols: a-D-galacto configured sugar mimics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøjstrup, Marie; Lundt, Inge

    2005-01-01

    Four aminocyclopentanols, as mimics of putative intermediates in hydrolysis of a-D-galactosides, have been synthesized through a number of stereoselective transformations, using the cis-fused cyclopentane-1,4-lactone (1R, 5S, 7R, 8R)-7,8-dihydroxy-2-oxabicyclo[3.3.0]oct-3-one 1 as a chiral buildi...

  20. Mathematical physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Sneyd, James

    2009-01-01

    There has been a long history of interaction between mathematics and physiology. This book looks in detail at a wide selection of mathematical models in physiology, showing how physiological problems can be formulated and studied mathematically, and how such models give rise to interesting and challenging mathematical questions. With its coverage of many recent models it gives an overview of the field, while many older models are also discussed, to put the modern work in context. In this second edition the coverage of basic principles has been expanded to include such topics as stochastic differential equations, Markov models and Gibbs free energy, and the selection of models has also been expanded to include some of the basic models of fluid transport, respiration/perfusion, blood diseases, molecular motors, smooth muscle, neuroendrocine cells, the baroreceptor loop, turboglomerular oscillations, blood clotting and the retina. Owing to this extensive coverage, the second edition is published in two volumes. ...

  1. Regulatory Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  2. Mimics of childhood stroke: characteristics of a prospective cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellhaas, Renée A; Smith, Sabrina E; O'Tool, Erin; Licht, Daniel J; Ichord, Rebecca N

    2006-08-01

    Little is known about the clinical features and spectrum of diagnoses in children with "stroke mimics," those with acute neurologic deficits but without cerebrovascular diseases. Our goal was to describe patients with stroke mimics and to determine if clinical features predict benign diagnoses. Our stroke consult team registered a prospective consecutive cohort of 143 patients with acute presentations suspicious for cerebrovascular disease from November 2003 to November 2004. Cases in which stroke was ruled out (stroke mimics) were reviewed for clinical features and diagnostic test results and were classified "benign" if there was no structural brain lesion and there was an expectation of complete recovery. Of the 143 cases evaluated for suspected stroke, 30 (21%) had stroke mimics. Presenting signs included seizure (n = 11), headache (n = 9), mental status change (n = 6), focal weakness (n = 14), and focal sensory change (n = 7). Eleven patients had "benign" diagnoses (3 migraine, 3 psychogenic diagnoses, 3 musculoskeletal abnormalities, 1 delirium, and 1 episodic vital sign changes). Nineteen patients had "not-benign" diagnoses (3 reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome, 3 neonatal seizures, 2 vascular anomalies, 2 inflammatory disease, 2 intracranial infection, 2 epilepsy, 2 metabolic stroke, 1 tumor, 1 drug toxicity, and 1 idiopathic intracranial hypertension). Except for the presence of seizures, there were no significant differences in presentation or risk factors between benign and not-benign cases. Many disorders mimic childhood stroke. History and clinical presentation often do not distinguish the one third of patients with benign disorders from the two thirds with more serious problems, necessitating timely comprehensive investigations, especially brain MRI.

  3. Protein-carbohydrate complex reveals circulating metastatic cells in a microfluidic assay

    KAUST Repository

    Simone, Giuseppina

    2013-02-11

    Advances in carbohydrate sequencing technologies reveal the tremendous complexity of the glycome and the role that glycomics might have to bring insight into the biological functions. Carbohydrate-protein interactions, in particular, are known to be crucial to most mammalian physiological processes as mediators of cell adhesion and metastasis, signal transducers, and organizers of protein interactions. An assay is developed here to mimic the multivalency of biological complexes that selectively and sensitively detect carbohydrate-protein interactions. The binding of β-galactosides and galectin-3 - a protein that is correlated to the progress of tumor and metastasis - is examined. The efficiency of the assay is related to the expression of the receptor while anchoring to the interaction\\'s strength. Comparative binding experiments reveal molecular binding preferences. This study establishes that the assay is robust to isolate metastatic cells from colon affected patients and paves the way to personalized medicine. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Russman, S.E.; Ellis, David H.; Gee, George F.; Mirande, Claire M.

    1996-01-01

    Conclusions: Although the general pattern of avian physiology applies to cranes, we have identified many physiological mechanisms (e.g., effects of disturbance) that need further study. Studies with cranes are expensive compared to those done with domestic fowl because of the crane's larger size, low reproductive rate, and delayed sexual maturity. To summarize, the crane reproductive system is composed of physiological and anatomical elements whose function is controlled by an integrated neural-endocrine system. Males generally produce semen at a younger age than when females lay eggs. Eggs are laid in clutches of two (1 to 3), and females will lay additional clutches if the preceding clutches are removed. Both sexes build nests and incubate the eggs. Molt begins during incubation and body molt may be completed annually in breeding pairs. However, remiges are replaced sequentially over 2 to 3 years, or abruptly every 2 to 3 years in other species. Most immature birds replace their juvenal remiges over a 2 to 3 year period. Stress interferes with reproduction in cranes by reducing egg production or terminating the reproductive effort. In other birds, stress elevates corticosterone levels and decreases LHRH release. We know little about the physiological response of cranes to stress.

  5. Exercise physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    The passing of Professor Bengt Saltin on September 12, 2014 truly marks the end of an era. As editor of the Journal of Applied Physiology and one of Bengt’s many collaborators and colleagues, I wanted the Journal to celebrate his many seminal contributions by means of an Editorial. Professor Bente...

  6. Structurally responsive oligonucleotide-based single-probe lateral-flow test for detection of miRNA-21 mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kor, Kamalodin; Turner, Anthony P F; Zarei, Kobra; Atabati, Morteza; Beni, Valerio; Mak, Wing Cheung

    2016-02-01

    A single-probe strip test for the rapid and sensitive detection of miRNA-21 mimics is reported herein. Highly specific structurally responsive bi-functional, thiol and biotin, DNA/LNA oligonucleotide probes (molecular beacons-MB) were designed and conjugated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) (i.e. biotin-MB-AuNPs). The proposed design had the ability to modulate the accessibility of the biotin group as a function of the presence of a miRNA target allowing the interaction of the boilable with the streptavidin test zone only in the presence of the miRNA-21 mimics. For quantitative evaluation, images of the strip tests were recorded using a flatbed scanner (Epson Perfection V370 Photo). The colour intensities of the test zones of the strip tests were analysed with the ImageJ software (Scion Corp., USA) and quantified as a function of pixel intensity. The response of the strip test was linear over the range 0.5 to 20 nM miRNA-21 (limit of detection of 115 pM) and showed good reproducibility (intra and inter CVs below 8%); furthermore, the assay was shown to be highly selective, discriminating other interference miRNAs mimics (e.g. miRNA-221 and miRNA-205). Finally, the proposed strip test was used for detection of miRNA-21 mimics in spiked serum samples, demonstrating its potential for point-of-care clinical applications. Main advantages of the single-probe strip test design are its versatility, simplicity and robustness, which can be easily extended to other miRNA targets by tuning the sequence of the single probe. Furthermore, the use of the structurally responsive single probe is particularly relevant in the case of short-length targets, such as miRNA, whereas a conventional sandwich approach might require a careful control of assay conditions such as hybridization temperature and salt concentration.

  7. A combinatorial method for solution-phase synthesis of labeled bivalent beta-turn mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, Yu; Chen, Dianjun; Brahimi, Fouad; Saragovi, H Uri; Burgess, Kevin

    2008-01-16

    Piperidine-functionalized, 1,4-disubstituted-1,2,3-triazoles of generic structure 1 were conceived as "minimalist" mimics of peptidic beta-turn structures. Key features of these molecules include (i) the possibility of incorporating amino acid side chains corresponding to many of the protein amino acids; (ii) a close correspondence of separations of these side chains to i + 1 to i + 2 residues in turns; (iii) facile adjustment of the side-chain vectors on docking while only influencing two critical degrees of freedom; and (iv) some electrostatic polarity. Fifteen monomers of this type were made via copper-mediated cycloaddition reactions. Solution-phase methodologies were devised to assemble these monomers into bivalent compounds in high purity states (typically >85%) so that they could be used in first-pass biological assays without further purification. The skeleton for forming these bivalent compounds is triazine-based. There is a third site which allowed for introduction of a fluorescent label (library of compounds 2) or an alkyne-functionalized triethylene glycol chain (library of compounds 3) included to promote water-solubility and to allow incorporation of probes via copper-mediated cycloaddition reactions. In the event, two 135-membered libraries were prepared, one consisting of compounds 2 and the other of 3. No protecting groups or coupling agents were required; these attributes of the method were important to allow most of the products to be obtained in over 85% purities. The fluorescein-tagged library of compounds 2 was screened in a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) assay using cells transfected to overexpress one of the following neurotrophin receptors: TrkA, TrkC, and p75. Preliminary findings indicate four compounds 2gm, 2gn, 2gi, and 2gj bound the TrkA receptor selectively; all of these contain a threonine-lysine turn mimic. Thus, a pharmacological probe for the TrkA receptor has been developed.

  8. Varroa destructor changes its cuticular hydrocarbons to mimic new hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Conte, Y.; Huang, Z. Y.; Roux, M.; Zeng, Z. J.; Christidès, J.-P.; Bagnères, A.-G.

    2015-01-01

    Varroa destructor (Vd) is a honeybee ectoparasite. Its original host is the Asian honeybee, Apis cerana, but it has also become a severe, global threat to the European honeybee, Apis mellifera. Previous studies have shown that Varroa can mimic a host's cuticular hydrocarbons (HC), enabling the parasite to escape the hygienic behaviour of the host honeybees. By transferring mites between the two honeybee species, we further demonstrate that Vd is able to mimic the cuticular HC of a novel host species when artificially transferred to this new host. Mites originally from A. cerana are more efficient than mites from A. mellifera in mimicking HC of both A. cerana and A. mellifera. This remarkable adaptability may explain their relatively recent host-shift from A. cerana to A. mellifera. PMID:26041867

  9. Varroa destructor changes its cuticular hydrocarbons to mimic new hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Conte, Y; Huang, Z Y; Roux, M; Zeng, Z J; Christidès, J-P; Bagnères, A-G

    2015-06-01

    Varroa destructor (Vd) is a honeybee ectoparasite. Its original host is the Asian honeybee, Apis cerana, but it has also become a severe, global threat to the European honeybee, Apis mellifera. Previous studies have shown that Varroa can mimic a host's cuticular hydrocarbons (HC), enabling the parasite to escape the hygienic behaviour of the host honeybees. By transferring mites between the two honeybee species, we further demonstrate that Vd is able to mimic the cuticular HC of a novel host species when artificially transferred to this new host. Mites originally from A. cerana are more efficient than mites from A. mellifera in mimicking HC of both A. cerana and A. mellifera. This remarkable adaptability may explain their relatively recent host-shift from A. cerana to A. mellifera. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Stroke and stroke mimics: a case of high grade glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Wolffenbüttel Argenti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical diagnosis of acute stroke is inaccurate approximately 10%-30% of the time, which can lead to unnecessary administration of thrombolytic therapy or delays in appropriate therapy. Rapid and accurate neuroimaging triage is essential to guide therapy and exclude mimics. Although many conditions that mimic stroke clinically have imaging appearances that can overlap acute stroke, these conditions can be differentiated in most cases by using a careful pattern-based approach. We describe a case of 67 yo male patient who had a clinic of wakeup stroke and at the first magnetic resonance image (MRI it was found that was an acute stroke of middle cerebral artery.The patient did not improve and a second MRI  revelead a two times growth of the lesion, and the MRI findings were compatible with tumor. At the surgery they found a infiltrative lesion and the anatomopathological exam showed that it was a high grade glioma.The diagnosis of ischemic stroke is often straight forward; however, the clinical diagnosis of acute stroke is inaccurate in many cases. Furthermore, many of these conditions, such as encephalitis, mass lesions, seizures, hypoglycemia, transient global amnesia (TGA,demyelinating disease, drug toxicity, and metabolic disturbances, have imaging appearances that can mimic acute or subacute infarction; however, an accurate diagnosis can often be made by using a pattern-based approach.

  11. CRADA Final Report: Mucin Mimic and Glycopeptide Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2002-10-22

    Mucus has several constituents but the most important are the mucins, heavily O-glycosylated proteins characterized by long stretches of tandem repeat sequences rich in glycosylated serine and threonine residues, with N- and C-terminal domains that have determined to a large extent by the viscous and viscoelastic properties of mucin glycoproteins. Indeed, these properties are evident in reconstituted purified mucin glycoproteins. Oligomeric mucin can be deconstructed into its monomeric components and then further into the domains that comprise each mucin molecule. There are two major domain types. "Glycodomains" are defined by stretches of the tandemly repeated Thr/Ser-rich segments that bear the characteristic O-linked glycans of the mucin molecule. The goal of this project is to synthesize polymeric materials that mimic mucin glycodomains. In order to mimic the central features of mucin, these materials should have dense clusters of glycans that bear a similar structure to those found in native mucins, and a fairly rigid polymer backbone. Four different polymers bearing ketone groups for the attachment of sugars were synthesized. GalNAc{alpha}-ONH{sub 2} and Sia{alpha}2,6GaINAc{alpha}·ONH{sub 2} both of which could be ligated to the polymer scaffolds were synthesized. Mucin glycodomain mimics were successfully synthesized by ligation of glycans to polymers.

  12. Quantitative Circulatory Physiology: an integrative mathematical model of human physiology for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abram, Sean R; Hodnett, Benjamin L; Summers, Richard L; Coleman, Thomas G; Hester, Robert L

    2007-06-01

    We have developed Quantitative Circulatory Physiology (QCP), a mathematical model of integrative human physiology containing over 4,000 variables of biological interactions. This model provides a teaching environment that mimics clinical problems encountered in the practice of medicine. The model structure is based on documented physiological responses within peer-reviewed literature and serves as a dynamic compendium of physiological knowledge. The model is solved using a desktop, Windows-based program, allowing students to calculate time-dependent solutions and interactively alter over 750 parameters that modify physiological function. The model can be used to understand proposed mechanisms of physiological function and the interactions among physiological variables that may not be otherwise intuitively evident. In addition to open-ended or unstructured simulations, we have developed 30 physiological simulations, including heart failure, anemia, diabetes, and hemorrhage. Additional stimulations include 29 patients in which students are challenged to diagnose the pathophysiology based on their understanding of integrative physiology. In summary, QCP allows students to examine, integrate, and understand a host of physiological factors without causing harm to patients. This model is available as a free download for Windows computers at http://physiology.umc.edu/themodelingworkshop.

  13. Occupational physiology

    CERN Document Server

    Toomingas, Allan; Tornqvist, Ewa Wigaeus

    2011-01-01

    In a clear and accessible presentation, Occupational Physiology focuses on important issues in the modern working world. Exploring major public health problems-such as musculoskeletal disorders and stress-this book explains connections between work, well-being, and health based on up-to-date research in the field. It provides useful methods for risk assessment and guidelines on arranging a good working life from the perspective of the working individual, the company, and society as a whole.The book focuses on common, stressful situations in different professions. Reviewing bodily demands and r

  14. Understanding the physiology of Lactobacillus plantarum at zero growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goffin, P.; van de Bunt, B.; Giovane, M.; Leveau, J.H.J.; Höppener-Ogawa, S.; Teusink, B.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2010-01-01

    Situations of extremely low substrate availability, resulting in slow growth, are common in natural environments. To mimic these conditions, Lactobacillus plantarum was grown in a carbon-limited retentostat with complete biomass retention. The physiology of extremely slow-growing L. plantarum—as

  15. Electrostatic Cycling of Hybridization Using Nonionic DNA Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Sade; Hung, Isabella A; Koniges, Ursula M; Levicky, Rastislav

    2017-07-28

    This study demonstrates efficient electrostatic control of surface hybridization through use of morpholinos, a charge-neutral DNA mimic, as the immobilized "probes". In addition to being compatible with low ionic strengths, use of uncharged probes renders the field interaction specific to the nucleic acid analyte. In contrast to DNA probes, morpholino probes enable facile cycling between hybridized and dehybridized states within minutes. Impact of ionic strength and temperature on the effectiveness of electrostatics to direct progress of hybridization is evaluated. Optimal electrostatic control is found when stability of probe-analyte duplexes is set so that electrostatics can efficiently switch between the forward (hybridization) and reverse (dehybridization) directions.

  16. Approaches to mimic the metallic sheen in beetles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Aggerbeck, Martin; Nielsen, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    aesthetic effects include metal sheen from non-metal surfaces combined with electric and thermal insulation. The reflection mechanism has been studied by a number of authors and is well understood. Basically there are 2 different reflection principles. One is the multilayer reflector where alternating...... layers have high and low refractive index. The other is the Bouligand structure where birefringent chiral nanofibres are organised in spiral structures. The paper describes work done to explore different approaches to mimic these structures using polymer based materials and production methods...

  17. Bicelles and Other Membrane Mimics: Comparison of Structure, Properties, and Dynamics from MD Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mikkel; Kraft, Johan Frederik; Vosegaard, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The increased interest in studying membrane proteins has led to the development of new membrane mimics such as bicelles and nanodiscs. However, only limited knowledge is available of how these membrane mimics are affected by embedded proteins and how well they mimic a lipid bilayer. Herein, we pr...

  18. The Mediated MIMIC Model for Understanding the Underlying Mechanism of DIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying; Shao, Can; Lathrop, Quinn N.

    2016-01-01

    Due to its flexibility, the multiple-indicator, multiple-causes (MIMIC) model has become an increasingly popular method for the detection of differential item functioning (DIF). In this article, we propose the mediated MIMIC model method to uncover the underlying mechanism of DIF. This method extends the usual MIMIC model by including one variable…

  19. Physiological Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Eric D.

    The analysis of physiological sound in the peripheral auditory system solves three important problems. First, sound energy impinging on the head must be captured and presented to the transduction apparatus in the ear as a suitable mechanical signal; second, this mechanical signal needs to be transduced into a neural representation that can be used by the brain; third, the resulting neural representation needs to be analyzed by central neurons to extract information useful to the animal. This chapter provides an overview of some aspects of the first two of these processes. The description is entirely focused on the mammalian auditory system, primarily on human hearing and on the hearing of a few commonly used laboratory animals (mainly rodents and carnivores). Useful summaries of non-mammalian hearing are available [1]. Because of the large size of the literature, review papers are referenced wherever possible.

  20. The transport of DDT from chylomicrons to adipocytes does not mimic triacylglycerol transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Alison B.; Vandersall, Abbey E.; Yang, Qing; Xu, Min; Jandacek, Ronald J.; Tso, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Despite being banned in the U.S., organochlorine toxins such as DDT are frequently detected in human adipose tissue. The main route of exposure is through the consumption of contaminated foods and subsequent intestinal packaging of DDT into chylomicrons. These chylomicrons, which also contain dietary triacylglycerol (TG), are delivered directly to peripheral tissues without first being metabolized by the liver. The physiological process by which these compounds are delivered from chylomicrons to adipose is not well understood, but is clinically relevant since it bypasses first-pass metabolism. Based on its highly lipophilic nature, it has been assumed that DDT is transferred to peripheral tissues similar to TG; however, this has not been measured. Here, we use the lymph fistula rat to isolate chylomicrons containing both DDT and TG. These chylomicrons are the in vivo DDT delivery vehicle. Using 3T3-L1 adipocytes, we investigated the rate at which DDT transfers from chylomicrons to adipocytes, and mediators of this process. This novel approach closely approximates the in vivo DDT exposure route. We show that: 1) DDT repartitions from chylomicrons to adipocytes, 2) this transport does not require hydrolysis of TG within the chylomicron, and is stimulated by the inhibition of LPL, 3) albumin does not inhibit DDT uptake, 4) DDT dissolved in DMSO does not appropriately mimic in vivo DDT transport; and most importantly, 5) DDT uptake from chylomicrons does not mimic the uptake of TG from the same particles. Understanding these factors is important for designing interventions for human populations exposed to DDT. PMID:22885168

  1. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Mimics a Conduction Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marrakchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is important to recognise Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome in electrocardiograms (ECG, as it may mimic ischaemic heart disease, ventricular hypertrophy, and bundle branch block. Recognising WPW syndrome allows for risk stratification, the identification of associated conditions, and the institution of appropriate management. Objective. The present case showed that electrophysiological study is indicated in patients with abnormal ECG and syncope. Case Report. A 40-year-old man with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome was presented to emergency with syncope. A baseline ECG was a complete right branch block and posterior left hemiblock. He was admitted to the cardiac care unit for pacemaker implantation. The atypical figure of complete right branch block and posterior left hemiblock was thought to be a “false positive” of conduction abnormality. But the long anterograde refractory period of the both accessory pathway and atrioventricular conduction may cause difficulty in diagnosing Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, Conclusion. A Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome may mimic a conduction disease. No reliable algorithm exists for making an ECG diagnosis of a preexcitation syndrome with conduction disorders. This can lead to diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas in the context of syncope.

  2. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Mimics of Biological Ion Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Hasti; Shepard, Kenneth L; Nuckolls, Colin; Hernández Sánchez, Raúl

    2017-02-08

    Here we report on the ion conductance through individual, small diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes. We find that they are mimics of ion channels found in natural systems. We explore the factors governing the ion selectivity and permeation through single-walled carbon nanotubes by considering an electrostatic mechanism built around a simplified version of the Gouy-Chapman theory. We find that the single-walled carbon nanotubes preferentially transported cations and that the cation permeability is size-dependent. The ionic conductance increases as the absolute hydration enthalpy decreases for monovalent cations with similar solid-state radii, hydrated radii, and bulk mobility. Charge screening experiments using either the addition of cationic or anionic polymers, divalent metal cations, or changes in pH reveal the enormous impact of the negatively charged carboxylates at the entrance of the single-walled carbon nanotubes. These observations were modeled in the low-to-medium concentration range (0.1-2.0 M) by an electrostatic mechanism that mimics the behavior observed in many biological ion channel-forming proteins. Moreover, multi-ion conduction in the high concentration range (>2.0 M) further reinforces the similarity between single-walled carbon nanotubes and protein ion channels.

  3. Space Physiology within an Exercise Physiology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jason R.; West, John B.

    2013-01-01

    Compare and contrast strategies remain common pedagogical practices within physiological education. With the support of an American Physiological Society Teaching Career Enhancement Award, we have developed a junior- or senior-level undergraduate curriculum for exercise physiology that compares and contrasts the physiological adaptations of…

  4. Swimming physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmér, I

    1992-05-01

    Swimming takes place in a medium, that presents different gravitational and resistive forces, respiratory conditions and thermal stress compared to air. The energy cost of propulsion in swimming is high, but a considerable reduction occurs at a given velocity as result of regular swim training. In medley swimmers the energy cost is lowest for front crawl, followed by backstroke, butterfly and breast-stroke. Cardiac output is probably not limiting for performance since swimmers easily achieve higher values during running. Maximal heart rate, however, is lowered by approx. 10 beats/min during swimming compared to running. Most likely active muscle mass is smaller and rate of power production lesser in swimming. Local factors, such as peripheral circulation, capillary density, perfusion pressure and metabolic capacity of active muscles, are important determinants of the power production capacity and emphasize the role of swim specific training movements. Improved swimming technique and efficiency are likely to explain much of the continuous progress in performance. Rational principles based on improved understanding of the biomechanics and physiology of swimming should be guidelines for swimmers and coaches in their efforts to explore the limits of human performance.

  5. Intraneural ganglion in superficial radial nerve mimics de quervain tenosynovitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Justin M; Potter, Michael Q; Sinclair, Micah; Hutchinson, Douglas T

    2014-11-01

    Background Intraneural ganglions in peripheral nerves of the upper extremity are extremely rare and poorly understood. Case Description We report a patient with symptoms consistent with de Quervain tenosynovitis who was found to have an intraneural ganglion in the superficial radial nerve. The ganglion did not communicate with the wrist joint. We removed the intraneural ganglion, and the patient's symptoms resolved. At her 6-month postoperative follow-up, she remained asymptomatic.  There is only one case report of intraneural ganglion in the superficial radial nerve. In that case, the patient had symptoms consistent with nerve irritation, including radiating pain and paresthesias. In contrast to that previous report, the patient in the current case had only localized pain, no paresthesias, and a physical exam consistent with de Quervain tenosynovitis. Clinical Relevance This case demonstrates that an intraneural ganglion cyst can mimic the symptoms of de Quervain tenosynovitis without the more usual presentation of painful paresthesias.

  6. Genomic responses in mouse models poorly mimic human inflammatory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Junhee; Warren, H. Shaw; Cuenca, Alex G.; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Baker, Henry V.; Xu, Weihong; Richards, Daniel R.; McDonald-Smith, Grace P.; Gao, Hong; Hennessy, Laura; Finnerty, Celeste C.; López, Cecilia M.; Honari, Shari; Moore, Ernest E.; Minei, Joseph P.; Cuschieri, Joseph; Bankey, Paul E.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Sperry, Jason; Nathens, Avery B.; Billiar, Timothy R.; West, Michael A.; Jeschke, Marc G.; Klein, Matthew B.; Gamelli, Richard L.; Gibran, Nicole S.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Calvano, Steve E.; Mason, Philip H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rahme, Laurence G.; Lowry, Stephen F.; Maier, Ronald V.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Herndon, David N.; Davis, Ronald W.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Abouhamze, Amer; Balis, Ulysses G. J.; Camp, David G.; De, Asit K.; Harbrecht, Brian G.; Hayden, Douglas L.; Kaushal, Amit; O’Keefe, Grant E.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Qian, Weijun; Schoenfeld, David A.; Shapiro, Michael B.; Silver, Geoffrey M.; Smith, Richard D.; Storey, John D.; Tibshirani, Robert; Toner, Mehmet; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wispelwey, Bram; Wong, Wing H

    2013-01-01

    A cornerstone of modern biomedical research is the use of mouse models to explore basic pathophysiological mechanisms, evaluate new therapeutic approaches, and make go or no-go decisions to carry new drug candidates forward into clinical trials. Systematic studies evaluating how well murine models mimic human inflammatory diseases are nonexistent. Here, we show that, although acute inflammatory stresses from different etiologies result in highly similar genomic responses in humans, the responses in corresponding mouse models correlate poorly with the human conditions and also, one another. Among genes changed significantly in humans, the murine orthologs are close to random in matching their human counterparts (e.g., R2 between 0.0 and 0.1). In addition to improvements in the current animal model systems, our study supports higher priority for translational medical research to focus on the more complex human conditions rather than relying on mouse models to study human inflammatory diseases. PMID:23401516

  7. Constraining cyclic peptides to mimic protein structure motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Timothy A.; Shepherd, Nicholas E.; Diness, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Many proteins exert their biological activities through small exposed surface regions called epitopes that are folded peptides of well-defined three-dimensional structures. Short synthetic peptide sequences corresponding to these bioactive protein surfaces do not form thermodynamically stable...... protein-like structures in water. However, short peptides can be induced to fold into protein-like bioactive conformations (strands, helices, turns) by cyclization, in conjunction with the use of other molecular constraints, that helps to fine-tune three-dimensional structure. Such constrained cyclic...... peptides can have protein-like biological activities and potencies, enabling their uses as biological probes and leads to therapeutics, diagnostics and vaccines. This Review highlights examples of cyclic peptides that mimic three-dimensional structures of strand, turn or helical segments of peptides...

  8. Piezoelectric materials mimic the function of the cochlear sensory epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaoka, Takatoshi; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kawano, Satoyuki; Ogita, Hideaki; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Hamanishi, Shinji; Wada, Hiroshi; Ito, Juichi

    2011-01-01

    Cochlear hair cells convert sound vibration into electrical potential, and loss of these cells diminishes auditory function. In response to mechanical stimuli, piezoelectric materials generate electricity, suggesting that they could be used in place of hair cells to create an artificial cochlear epithelium. Here, we report that a piezoelectric membrane generated electrical potentials in response to sound stimuli that were able to induce auditory brainstem responses in deafened guinea pigs, indicating its capacity to mimic basilar membrane function. In addition, sound stimuli were transmitted through the external auditory canal to a piezoelectric membrane implanted in the cochlea, inducing it to vibrate. The application of sound to the middle ear ossicle induced voltage output from the implanted piezoelectric membrane. These findings establish the fundamental principles for the development of hearing devices using piezoelectric materials, although there are many problems to be overcome before practical application. PMID:22025702

  9. Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula: Imaging features and its mimics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeog, Ying; Ting, David Yen; Hsu, Hui Ling; Huang, Yen Lin; Chen, Chi Jen; Tseng, Ting Chi [Dept. of Radiology, aipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-15

    Spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) is the most common spinal vascular malformation, however it is still rare and underdiagnosed. Magnetic resonance imaging findings such as spinal cord edema and dilated and tortuous perimedullary veins play a pivotal role in the confirmation of the diagnosis. However, spinal angiography remains the gold standard in the diagnosis of SDAVF. Classic angiographic findings of SDAVF are early filling of radicular veins, delayed venous return, and an extensive network of dilated perimedullary venous plexus. A series of angiograms of SDAVF at different locations along the spinal column, and mimics of serpentine perimedullary venous plexus on MR images, are demonstrated. Thorough knowledge of SDAVF aids correct diagnosis and prevents irreversible complications.

  10. Signs of Fungal Infection in Dead Mimic the Chronic Torture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Akhilesh K; Shukla, Vaishaki Y

    2017-07-01

    The cases of battered woman syndrome (BWS) are very common in India. The majority of the women suffer battering by their family members especially in-laws. The injuries occurring each time indicate their being battered, but on being questioned about these happenings, a mismatched history being given by them is the major indication of BWS. In many of the cases, the injuries present over the body either in healing stages or in association with skin diseases may mislead the forensic pathologists and investigating agencies. One such rare autopsy was conducted where the healing lesions of the chronic fungal infections were mistaken as the injuries of chronic torture. The case is presented here to remind to the forensic pathologist about the possibility of the signs of chronic fungal infections in dead, which can mimic the torture, and to discuss its medicolegal implications. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Ultrasound of Biliary Cast Syndrome and Its Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bing; Horrow, Mindy M

    2016-09-01

    Biliary cast syndrome (BCS) consists of mass-like hardened collections of inspissated bile and sloughed biliary mucosa filling the intrahepatic and/or extrahepatic bile ducts, which show an alternating pattern of dilatation and stricture. It is a rare but serious complication of liver transplantation frequently necessitating repeated percutaneous, endoscopic or surgical stent placements, and cast retrieval. Although not typically considered as the modality of choice for BCS compared with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, ultrasound can be quite useful for this diagnosis. This article reviews the sonographic appearance of BCS in postliver transplant patients and correlates with other imaging modalities including computed tomography, MRCP, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Also reviewed are other intrahepatic pathologies that mimic the appearance of BCS on ultrasound.

  12. Magnetic Tunnel Junction Mimics Stochastic Cortical Spiking Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Panda, Priyadarshini; Wijesinghe, Parami; Kim, Yusung; Roy, Kaushik

    2016-07-01

    Brain-inspired computing architectures attempt to mimic the computations performed in the neurons and the synapses in the human brain in order to achieve its efficiency in learning and cognitive tasks. In this work, we demonstrate the mapping of the probabilistic spiking nature of pyramidal neurons in the cortex to the stochastic switching behavior of a Magnetic Tunnel Junction in presence of thermal noise. We present results to illustrate the efficiency of neuromorphic systems based on such probabilistic neurons for pattern recognition tasks in presence of lateral inhibition and homeostasis. Such stochastic MTJ neurons can also potentially provide a direct mapping to the probabilistic computing elements in Belief Networks for performing regenerative tasks.

  13. Physiological and Immunological Regulations in Caenorhabditis elegans Infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivamaruthi, Bhagavathi Sundaram; Balamurugan, Krishnaswamy

    2014-03-01

    Studies pertaining to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection by utilizing model systems failed to mimic the essential aspects of immunity induced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, as the determinants of innate immunity are distinct. The present study investigated the physiological and innate immune responses of S. Typhi infected Caenorhabditis elegans and also explored the Ty21a mediated immune enhancement in C. elegans. Ty21a is a known live vaccine for typhoidal infection in human beings. Physiological responses of C. elegans infected with S. Typhi assessed by survival and behavioral assays revealed that S. Typhi caused host mortality by persistent infection. However, Ty21a exposure to C. elegans was not harmful. Ty21a pre-exposed C. elegans, exhibited significant resistance against S. Typhi infection. Elevated accumulation of S. Typhi inside the infected host was observed when compared to Ty21a exposures. Transcript analysis of candidate innate immune gene (clec-60, clec-87, lys-7, ilys-3, scl-2, cpr-2, F08G5.6, atf-7, age-1, bec-1 and daf-16) regulations in the host during S. Typhi infection have been assessed through qPCR analysis to understand the activation of immune signaling pathways during S. Typhi infections. Gene silencing approaches confirmed that clec-60 and clec-87 has a major role in the defense system of C. elegans during S. Typhi infection. In conclusion, the study revealed that preconditioning of host with Ty21a protects against subsequent S. Typhi infection.

  14. A Quantitative Fluorescence-Based Lipase Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Lomolino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An easy and fast gel diffusion assay for detecting and monitoring lipase activity by quantification of fluorescein is described. By measuring the intensity of fluorescein, it is possible to obtain a calibration curve with a regression coefficient better than by using the radius of fluorescent haloes. Through the quantification of fluorescence intensity of fluorescein released after the hydrolysis of a fluorescent ester, fluorescein dibutyrate, used as substrate in agar plates, commercial and skimmed milk lipase activity were studied. Moreover, with this method, lipase activity can be monitored in reaction medium that contains compounds which are affected by turbidity or cause measurement interference for UV-spectrophotometer and fluorimeter. In this experiment, boiled skimmed milk was dispersed in the agar gel with fluorescein dibutyrate, and it was used as a reaction medium to mimic natural conditions. The development of such an assay has a potential for applications in industries ranging from pharmaceuticals to food production and monitoring.

  15. SIRT1 Gain of Function Does Not Mimic or Enhance the Adaptations to Intermittent Fasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Boutant

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction (CR has been shown to prevent the onset of insulin resistance and to delay age-related physiological decline in mammalian organisms. SIRT1, a NAD+-dependent deacetylase enzyme, has been suggested to mediate the adaptive responses to CR, leading to the speculation that SIRT1 activation could be therapeutically used as a CR-mimetic strategy. Here, we used a mouse model of moderate SIRT1 overexpression to test whether SIRT1 gain of function could mimic or boost the metabolic benefits induced by every-other-day feeding (EODF. Our results indicate that SIRT1 transgenesis does not affect the ability of EODF to decrease adiposity and improve insulin sensitivity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that SIRT1 transgenesis and EODF promote very distinct adaptations in individual tissues, some of which can be even be metabolically opposite, as in brown adipose tissue. Therefore, whereas SIRT1 overexpression and CR both improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, the etiologies of these benefits are largely different.

  16. SIRT1 Gain of Function Does Not Mimic or Enhance the Adaptations to Intermittent Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutant, Marie; Kulkarni, Sameer S; Joffraud, Magali; Raymond, Frédéric; Métairon, Sylviane; Descombes, Patrick; Cantó, Carles

    2016-03-08

    Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to prevent the onset of insulin resistance and to delay age-related physiological decline in mammalian organisms. SIRT1, a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase enzyme, has been suggested to mediate the adaptive responses to CR, leading to the speculation that SIRT1 activation could be therapeutically used as a CR-mimetic strategy. Here, we used a mouse model of moderate SIRT1 overexpression to test whether SIRT1 gain of function could mimic or boost the metabolic benefits induced by every-other-day feeding (EODF). Our results indicate that SIRT1 transgenesis does not affect the ability of EODF to decrease adiposity and improve insulin sensitivity. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that SIRT1 transgenesis and EODF promote very distinct adaptations in individual tissues, some of which can be even be metabolically opposite, as in brown adipose tissue. Therefore, whereas SIRT1 overexpression and CR both improve glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, the etiologies of these benefits are largely different. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Human physiology: kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natochin, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    The content of human physiology as an independent part of current physiology is discussed. Substantiated is the point that subjects of human physiology are not only special sections of physiology where functions are inherent only in human (physiology of intellectual activity, speech, labor, sport), but also in peculiarities of functions, specificity of regulation of each of physiological systems. By the example of physiology of kidney and water-salt balance there are shown borders of norm, peculiarities of regulation in human, new chapters of renal physiology which have appeared in connection with achievements of molecular physiology.

  18. The interaction of a histidine-rich protein hpn with the membrane mimics: implications for pathologic roles of Hpn in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinglu; Qi, Shuang; Sun, Xuesong; Ge, Ruiguang

    2014-04-01

    Hpn is a small histidine-rich protein in Helicobacter pylori. This protein has been shown to play roles in nickel storage and detoxification and to exhibit cytotoxicity to gastric epithelial cells. Hpn can be secreted outside of the bacterium and forms amyloid-like structures. To study the interactions between Hpn and membrane mimics, which may further our understanding of the pathologic roles of this bacterium. Various biochemical and biophysical methods, such as secondary structure determination be CD, calcein release assay with fluorescence spectrometry, and Laurdan and Prodan generalized polarization determination have been used to characterize the interaction between Hpn and membrane mimics. Membrane mimics induced the formation of α-helix in Hpn. The interaction disrupts the integrity of the membrane mimics and leads to the release of inner calcein probe. The experiments involving the Laurdan and Prodan fluorescence indicated that increasing the total protein/lipid ratio leads to a less ordered and more hydrated lipid membrane structure close to the water/lipid interface of lipid bilayers modeling the mitochondrial inner membrane. The present data indicated that Hpn may take part in the pathological roles of Helicobacter pylori through membrane interactions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Peptoids that mimic the structure, function, and mechanism of helical antimicrobial peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chongsiriwatana, Nathaniel P.; Patch, James A.; Czyzewski, Ann M.; Dohm, Michelle T.; Ivankin, Andrey; Gidalevitz, David; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Barron, Annelise E. (IIT); (NWU); (LBNL)

    2008-04-02

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and their mimics are emerging as promising antibiotic agents. We present a library of 'ampetoids' (antimicrobial peptoid oligomers) with helical structures and biomimetic sequences, several members of which have low-micromolar antimicrobial activities, similar to cationic AMPs like pexiganan. Broad-spectrum activity against six clinically relevant BSL2 pathogens is also shown. This comprehensive structure-activity relationship study, including circular dichroism spectroscopy, minimum inhibitory concentration assays, hemolysis and mammalian cell toxicity studies, and specular x-ray reflectivity measurements shows that the in vitro activities of ampetoids are strikingly similar to those of AMPs themselves, suggesting a strong mechanistic analogy. The ampetoids' antibacterial activity, coupled with their low cytotoxicity against mammalian cells, make them a promising class of antimicrobials for biomedical applications. Peptoids are biostable, with a protease-resistant N-substituted glycine backbone, and their sequences are highly tunable, because an extensive diversity of side chains can be incorporated via facile solid-phase synthesis. Our findings add to the growing evidence that nonnatural foldamers will emerge as an important class of therapeutics.

  20. Phage-Displayed Peptides that Mimic Aflatoxins and its Application in Immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanru; Wang, Hong; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Kim, Hee Joo; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2013-01-01

    To search for an alternative to using protein conjugated aflatoxin as a coating antigen in aflatoxin detection by an ELISA method, a random-8-peptide library was constructed and used as a source of peptides that mimic aflatoxins (termed as mimotopes). Five mimotope peptides were obtained by panning-elution from the library and were successfully used in an indirect competitive ELISA for analyzing total aflatoxin concentration. The assay exhibited an IC50 value of 14 µg/kg in samples (with 1 in 7 dilution of sample extract) for aflatoxins. The linear range is 4–24 µg/kg. Further validation indicated relatively good recovery (60–120%) in peanut, rice and corn. Natural contaminated samples (peanut and feedstuff) were analyzed for aflatoxin concentration by both conventional ELISA and phage ELISA. The results showed good correlation. It can be concluded that the mimotope preparation is an effective substitute for the aflatoxin based coating antigen in ELISA and can be used in real sample analysis. PMID:23394544

  1. Increased sensitivity of SPR assays in plasma through efficient parallel assay optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Anna; Lager, Anna; Hämäläinen, Markku D; Jarhede, Tanja

    2013-05-05

    The sensitivity of biosensor assays in complex media such as plasma or serum is often limited by non-specific binding. The degree of binding often varies between individuals and therefore a large number of different plasma samples have to be used during assay development. Some surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors allow for parallel screening of several running buffer compositions, with a number of different immobilization levels for each buffer. These technical possibilities combined with statistical design of experiments (DoE) enable efficient parallel optimization of multiple assay conditions. In this paper we outline how to increase the sensitivity in SPR-based assays by minimizing background binding and variability from negative control plasma while retaining high signals from positive samples. To mimic immunogenicity studies of biotherapeutics we have used a model assay with anti-rituximab as an anti-drug antibody to be detected in plasma by binding to immobilized rituximab. Immobilization level and sodium chloride concentration were found to be the most important factors to optimize. There were also a number of significant interaction effects and strong non-linearites between the buffer composition/immobilization level and the assay performance, which necessitated DoE based optimization strategies. The applicability of the optimized conditions was verified with several assays (anti-erythropoietin, omalizumab, anti-IgE and anti-myoglobin) in spiked plasma samples resulting in detection levels in the range of 80-170 ng ml(-1). The buffer conditions presented in this paper can be used for other immunogenicity assays on biosensor platforms or as a good starting point for further assay development for new immunogenicity assays. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Physiology and behaviour of marine Thioploca

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgslund, Signe; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Kuenen, J Gijs

    2009-01-01

    reduce nitrate to ammonium and we found that dinitrogen was not produced, neither through denitrification nor through anammox activity. Unexpectedly, polyphosphate storage was not detectable by microautoradiography in physiological assays or by staining and microscopy. Carbon dioxide fixation increased...... as an adaptation to infrequent high sulphate reduction rates in the seabed. The physiology and behaviour of Thioploca are summarized and the adaptations to an environment, dominated by infrequent oxygen availability and periods of high sulphide abundance, are discussed....

  3. Decorin mimic inhibits vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Scott

    Full Text Available Over the past 10 years, the number of percutaneous coronary intervention procedures performed in the United States increased by 33%; however, restenosis, which inhibits complete functional recovery of the vessel wall, complicates this procedure. A wide range of anti-restenotic therapeutics have been developed, although many elicit non-specific effects that compromise vessel healing. Drawing inspiration from biologically-relevant molecules, our lab developed a mimic of the natural proteoglycan decorin, termed DS-SILY, which can mask exposed collagen and thereby effectively decrease platelet activation, thus contributing to suppression of vascular intimal hyperplasia. Here, we characterize the effects of DS-SILY on both proliferative and quiescent human SMCs to evaluate the potential impact of DS-SILY-SMC interaction on restenosis, and further characterize in vivo platelet interactions. DS-SILY decreased proliferative SMC proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in vitro in a concentration dependent manner as compared to untreated controls. The addition of DS-SILY to in vitro SMC cultures decreased SMC migration and protein synthesis by 95% and 37%, respectively. Furthermore, DS-SILY decreased platelet activation, as well as reduced neointimal hyperplasia by 60%, in vivo using Ossabaw swine. These results indicate that DS-SILY demonstrates multiple biological activities that may all synergistically contribute to an improved treatment paradigm for balloon angioplasty.

  4. Serous degeneration of bone marrow mimics spinal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Chih-Wei; Hsieh, Kevin Li-Chun; Lin, Yun-Ho; Lin, Chun-Yi; Lee, Chian-Her; Tsuang, Yang-Hwei; Kuo, Yi-Jie

    2017-05-01

    To present a rare case of serous degeneration of bone marrow which resembles primary spinal tumor or bony metastasis to spine. Serous degeneration of bone marrow or gelatinous marrow transformation is a rare disease characterized by focal marrow hypoplasia, fat atrophy, and accumulation of extracellular mucopolysaccharides abundant in hyaluronic acid. Few literature was reviewed and few clinical case was presented. Two cases of serous marrow transformation were reported. In the first case, a 29-year-old man suffered from severe left buttock pain. Bone metastasis was impressed in radiology examinations. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy was performed along with bone biopsy. In the second case, a 49-year-old man presented lower back pain with radiation to bilateral lower legs. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a water-like signal lesion in sacrum. Serous marrow transformation was confirmed pathologically in both cases. To the best of our knowledge, a case of serous degeneration of bone marrow resembling malignancy has not been reported in the literature. In this report, two cases demonstrate serous transformation of bone marrow mimics spinal tumor.

  5. A MIMIC approach to modeling the underground economy in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David Han-Min; Lin, Jer-Yan; Yu, Tiffany Hui-Kuang

    2006-11-01

    The size of underground economy (UE) expansion usually increases the tax gap, impose a burden on the economy, and results in tax distortions. This study uses the MIMIC approach to model the causal variables and indicating variables to estimate the UE in Taiwan. We also focus on testing the data for non-stationarity and perform diagnostic tests. By using annual time-series data for Taiwan from 1961 to 2003, it is found that the estimated size of the UE varies from 11.0% to 13.1% before 1988, and from 10.6% to 11.8% from 1989 onwards. That the size of the UE experienced a substantial downward shift in 1989 indicates that there was a structural break. The UE is significantly and positively affected by such casual variables as the logarithm of real government consumption and currency inflation, but is negatively affected by the tax burden at 5% significant level. Unemployment rate and crime rate are not significantly correlated with the UE in this study.

  6. Chimpanzees and humans mimic pupil-size of conspecifics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariska E Kret

    Full Text Available Group-living typically provides benefits to individual group members but also confers costs. To avoid incredulity and betrayal and allow trust and cooperation, individuals must understand the intentions and emotions of their group members. Humans attend to other's eyes and from gaze and pupil-size cues, infer information about the state of mind of the observed. In humans, pupil-size tends to mimic that of the observed. Here we tested whether pupil-mimicry exists in our closest relative, the chimpanzee (P. troglodytes. We conjectured that if pupil-mimicry has adaptive value, e.g. to promote swift communication of inner states and facilitate shared understanding and coordination, pupil-mimicry should emerge within but not across species. Pupillometry data was collected from human and chimpanzee subjects while they observed images of the eyes of both species with dilating/constricting pupils. Both species showed enhanced pupil-mimicry with members of their own species, with effects being strongest in humans and chimpanzee mothers. Pupil-mimicry may be deeply-rooted, but probably gained importance from the point in human evolution where the morphology of our eyes became more prominent. Humans' white sclera surrounding the iris, and the fine muscles around their eyes facilitate non-verbal communication via eye signals.

  7. A Case Report of Neurosarcoidosis Presenting as a Lymphoma Mimic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurcharanjeet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe a unique presentation of neurosarcoidosis. Background. Central nervous system involvement is rare in sarcoidosis. Sarcoidosis can be severe and can be mistaken for systemic lymphoma. Case Description. A 55-year-old right-handed white male with past medical history of obstructive sleep apnea, Raynaud’s disease, and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis was noted to have cognitive decline over a duration of few weeks and 20 lb weight loss. His neurologic exam (including cranial nerves was normal except for five-minute recall. Head CT revealed a lacrimal gland mass, confirmed on brain MRI, which was suspicious for lymphoma on brain PET/MRI. Subsequent whole-body FDG PET/CT scan showed multiple enlarged lymph nodes. Bone marrow biopsy was negative. Serum and CSF ACE levels were within normal limits. Supraclavicular lymph node biopsy before steroids therapy was initiated and revealed multiple noncaseating granulomas, diagnostic of “sarcoidosis.” He was treated with daily prednisone for two months, followed by weekly infliximab. Brain MRI two months after treatment with prednisone showed decrease in size of lacrimal lesion, and brain PET/MRI showed normal brain metabolism pattern after five months. Neurocognitive evaluation three months after diagnosis demonstrated improvements in memory abilities. Discussion. Both clinically and radiographically, neurosarcoidosis can mimic systemic lymphoma. Biopsy in these types of cases is necessary to establish the diagnosis.

  8. Penerapan Model MIMIC untuk Menguji Konsistensi Hasil Pengukuran melalui Skala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Widhiarso

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to demonstrate the use of multiple indicators and multiple (MIMIC model in testing the consistency of the measurement results when it's applied to individuals with different characteristics. Self-Esteem and Student Motivation Scale were employed to measure participant attributes. Impact of three student characteristics (gender, intelligence and school location on both measurement model were examined. Total of 2981 students from 30 cities of 15 provinces were participated in this study. Data analysis was utilized using confirmatory factor analysis under structural equation modeling (SEM approach. Results showed that measuring self-esteem was prone to be contaminated by individual heterogeneity. However, contrary results was found on motivation measure. Excluding three student characteristics as covariance in the model have increased model fit indices in the self-esteem measurement model, but not in the self-esteem. The presence of susceptibility scale to different characteristics indicated that this scale needs to be further modified. Therefore, when it is applied to heterogeneous population, the measurement results will produce consistently results.

  9. High rates and substrate selectivities in water by polyvinylimidazoles as transaminase enzyme mimics with hydrophobically bound pyridoxamine derivatives as coenzyme mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skouta, Rachid; Wei, Sujun; Breslow, Ronald

    2009-11-04

    Free-radical polymers of 4-vinylimidazole and copolymers with 1-dodecyl-4-vinylimidazole were used as enzyme mimics to transaminate pyruvic acid to alanine, phenylpyruvic acid to phenylalanine, and indole-3-pyruvic acid to tryptophan in water at pH 7.5 and 20 degrees C using pyridoxamines carrying hydrophobic side chains as coenzyme mimics. The best enzyme mimic accelerated the transamination of indole-3-pyruvic acid by a factor of 4 million relative to the rate without the polymer, a higher rate ratio than we had previously achieved with a polyaziridine-based enzyme mimic. The properties of various polyvinylimidazoles were compared, including those prepared with the RAFT modification of the polymerization process.

  10. Towards a standardization of thrombin generation assessment: The influence of tissue factor, platelets and phospholipids concentration on the normal values of Thrombogram-Thrombinoscope assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerotziafas, Grigoris T; Depasse, François; Busson, Joël; Leflem, Lena; Elalamy, Ismail; Samama, Meyer M

    2005-01-01

    Background Thrombin generation assay was developed several years ago to mimic physiological coagulation mechanisms but it had important limitations. Thrombogram-Thrombinoscope assay using a fluorogenic substrate, allows obtaining thrombin generation curves in non-defibrinated platelet rich plasma (PRP) in a fully automated manner. Methods We standardised the methodology of Thrombogram-Thrombinoscope and we evaluated the precision of thrombin generation parameters (lag-time, maximum concentration of thrombin [Cmax], time required to reach Cmax [Tmax] and endogenous thrombin potential ETP) using different concentrations of recombinant human tissue factor, platelets or phospholipids. Normal values of thrombin generation assay were established in optimal experimental conditions. Results In the presence of low TF concentrations (final dilution of thromboplastin in plasma: 1/1000–1/2000) the Thrombogram assay showed intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation lower than 9%. Thrombin generation parameters showed an important inter-individual variability and the coefficients of variation ranged from 18% to 50%. In PRP the lag-time, Cmax and Tmax but not the ETP, were influenced by TF concentration. Thrombin generation parameters were not influenced by variations of platelet concentration from 50 × 109/l to 400 × 109/l. The addition of synthetic procoagulant phospholipids in PPP strongly influenced all the parameters of thrombogram. For all the parameters of thrombogram a threshold effect was observed in the presence of phspholipid concentrations equal or higher to 4 μM. In frozen-thawed PRP the lag-time and the Tmax were significantly reduced and the Cmax was increased compared to the fresh PRP, but the ETP, the intra assay and the inter-assay coefficients of variation were similar in both test-systems. Conclusion Thrombogram-Thrombinoscope assay performed in fresh or in frozen-thawed PRP has an acceptable precision, with low inter-assay and intra-assay

  11. Towards a standardization of thrombin generation assessment: The influence of tissue factor, platelets and phospholipids concentration on the normal values of Thrombogram-Thrombinoscope assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leflem Lena

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thrombin generation assay was developed several years ago to mimic physiological coagulation mechanisms but it had important limitations. Thrombogram-Thrombinoscope assay using a fluorogenic substrate, allows obtaining thrombin generation curves in non-defibrinated platelet rich plasma (PRP in a fully automated manner. Methods We standardised the methodology of Thrombogram-Thrombinoscope and we evaluated the precision of thrombin generation parameters (lag-time, maximum concentration of thrombin [Cmax], time required to reach Cmax [Tmax] and endogenous thrombin potential ETP using different concentrations of recombinant human tissue factor, platelets or phospholipids. Normal values of thrombin generation assay were established in optimal experimental conditions. Results In the presence of low TF concentrations (final dilution of thromboplastin in plasma: 1/1000–1/2000 the Thrombogram assay showed intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation lower than 9%. Thrombin generation parameters showed an important inter-individual variability and the coefficients of variation ranged from 18% to 50%. In PRP the lag-time, Cmax and Tmax but not the ETP, were influenced by TF concentration. Thrombin generation parameters were not influenced by variations of platelet concentration from 50 × 109/l to 400 × 109/l. The addition of synthetic procoagulant phospholipids in PPP strongly influenced all the parameters of thrombogram. For all the parameters of thrombogram a threshold effect was observed in the presence of phspholipid concentrations equal or higher to 4 μM. In frozen-thawed PRP the lag-time and the Tmax were significantly reduced and the Cmax was increased compared to the fresh PRP, but the ETP, the intra assay and the inter-assay coefficients of variation were similar in both test-systems. Conclusion Thrombogram-Thrombinoscope assay performed in fresh or in frozen-thawed PRP has an acceptable precision, with low inter-assay

  12. 3D bioprinted extracellular matrix mimics facilitate directed differentiation of epithelial progenitors for sweat gland regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sha; Yao, Bin; Xie, Jiangfan; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-03-01

    Sweat glands perform a vital thermoregulatory function in mammals. Like other skin appendages, they originate from epidermal progenitors. However, they have low regenerative potential in response to injury, and whether adult epidermal progenitors could be specified to differentiate to a sweat gland cell lineage remains largely unexplored. We used bioprinting technology to create a functional in vitro cell-laden 3D extracellular matrix mimics (3D-ECM) with composite hydrogels based on gelatin and sodium alginate because of chemical and structural similarity to ECM components. To achieve specific cell differentiation, mouse plantar dermis and epidermal growth factor were synchronously incorporated into the 3D-ECM mimics to create an inductive niche for epidermal progenitor cells obtained from mice. The biological 3D construct could maintain cell viability, thereby facilitating cell spreading and matrix formation. In vitro data by immunofluorescence and gene expression assay of key cell-surface markers demonstrated that the bioprinted 3D-ECM could effectively create a restrictive niche for epidermal progenitors that ensures unilateral differentiation into sweat gland cells. Furthermore, direct delivery of bioprinted 3D-ECM into burned paws of mice resulted in functional restoration of sweat glands. This study represents the rational design to enhance the specific differentiation of epidermal lineages using 3D bioprinting and may have clinical and translational implications in regenerating sweat glands. Sweat gland regeneration after injury is of clinical importance but remains largely unsolved because of low regenerative potential and lack of a definite niche. Some studies have shown sweat gland regeneration with gene-based interventions or cell-based induction via embryonic components, but translation to clinic is challenging. The novelty and significance of the work lies in the fact that we design a 3D bioprinted extracellular matrix that provides the spatial

  13. A web-based data visualization tool for the MIMIC-II database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon; Ribey, Evan; Wallace, James R

    2016-02-04

    Although MIMIC-II, a public intensive care database, has been recognized as an invaluable resource for many medical researchers worldwide, becoming a proficient MIMIC-II researcher requires knowledge of SQL programming and an understanding of the MIMIC-II database schema. These are challenging requirements especially for health researchers and clinicians who may have limited computer proficiency. In order to overcome this challenge, our objective was to create an interactive, web-based MIMIC-II data visualization tool that first-time MIMIC-II users can easily use to explore the database. The tool offers two main features: Explore and Compare. The Explore feature enables the user to select a patient cohort within MIMIC-II and visualize the distributions of various administrative, demographic, and clinical variables within the selected cohort. The Compare feature enables the user to select two patient cohorts and visually compare them with respect to a variety of variables. The tool is also helpful to experienced MIMIC-II researchers who can use it to substantially accelerate the cumbersome and time-consuming steps of writing SQL queries and manually visualizing extracted data. Any interested researcher can use the MIMIC-II data visualization tool for free to quickly and conveniently conduct a preliminary investigation on MIMIC-II with a few mouse clicks. Researchers can also use the tool to learn the characteristics of the MIMIC-II patients. Since it is still impossible to conduct multivariable regression inside the tool, future work includes adding analytics capabilities. Also, the next version of the tool will aim to utilize MIMIC-III which contains more data.

  14. Two interdependent mechanisms of antimicrobial activity allow for efficient killing in nylon-3-based polymeric mimics of innate immunity peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle W; Chakraborty, Saswata; Schmidt, Nathan W; Murgai, Rajan; Gellman, Samuel H; Wong, Gerard C L

    2014-09-01

    Novel synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides have been developed to exhibit structural properties and antimicrobial activity similar to those of natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the innate immune system. These molecules have a number of potential advantages over conventional antibiotics, including reduced bacterial resistance, cost-effective preparation, and customizable designs. In this study, we investigate a family of nylon-3 polymer-based antimicrobials. By combining vesicle dye leakage, bacterial permeation, and bactericidal assays with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we find that these polymers are capable of two interdependent mechanisms of action: permeation of bacterial membranes and binding to intracellular targets such as DNA, with the latter necessarily dependent on the former. We systemically examine polymer-induced membrane deformation modes across a range of lipid compositions that mimic both bacteria and mammalian cell membranes. The results show that the polymers' ability to generate negative Gaussian curvature (NGC), a topological requirement for membrane permeation and cellular entry, in model Escherichia coli membranes correlates with their ability to permeate membranes without complete membrane disruption and kill E. coli cells. Our findings suggest that these polymers operate with a concentration-dependent mechanism of action: at low concentrations permeation and DNA binding occur without membrane disruption, while at high concentrations complete disruption of the membrane occurs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. miR156a Mimic Represses the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Human Nasopharyngeal Cancer Cells by Targeting Junctional Adhesion Molecule A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yunhong; Cai, Longmei; Tian, Yunming; Tu, Yinuo; Qiu, Huizhi; Xie, Guofeng; Huang, Donglan; Zheng, Ronghui; Zhang, Weijun

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been documented as having an important role in the development of cancer. Broccoli is very popular in large groups of the population and has anticancer properties. Junctional adhesion molecule A (JAMA) is preferentially concentrated at tight junctions and influences cell morphology and migration. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental program associated with cancer progression and metastasis. In this study we aimed to investigate the role of miRNAs from broccoli in human nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). We demonstrated that a total of 84 conserved miRNAs and 184 putative novel miRNAs were found in broccoli by sequencing technology. Among these, miR156a was expressed the most. In addition, synthetic miR156a mimic inhibited the EMT of NPC cells in vitro. Furthermore, it was confirmed that JAMA was the target of miR156a mimic as validated by 3' UTR luciferase reporter assays and western blotting. Knockdown of JAMA was consistent with the effects of miR156a mimic on the EMT of NPC, and the up-regulation of JAMA could partially restore EMT repressed by miR156a mimic. In conclusion, these results indicate that the miR156a mimic inhibits the EMT of NPC cells by targeting the 3' UTR of JAMA. These miRNA profiles of broccoli provide a fundamental basis for further research. Moreover, the discovery of miR156a may have clinical implications for the treatment of patients with NPC.

  16. miR156a Mimic Represses the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Human Nasopharyngeal Cancer Cells by Targeting Junctional Adhesion Molecule A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhong Tian

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been documented as having an important role in the development of cancer. Broccoli is very popular in large groups of the population and has anticancer properties. Junctional adhesion molecule A (JAMA is preferentially concentrated at tight junctions and influences cell morphology and migration. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is a developmental program associated with cancer progression and metastasis. In this study we aimed to investigate the role of miRNAs from broccoli in human nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC. We demonstrated that a total of 84 conserved miRNAs and 184 putative novel miRNAs were found in broccoli by sequencing technology. Among these, miR156a was expressed the most. In addition, synthetic miR156a mimic inhibited the EMT of NPC cells in vitro. Furthermore, it was confirmed that JAMA was the target of miR156a mimic as validated by 3' UTR luciferase reporter assays and western blotting. Knockdown of JAMA was consistent with the effects of miR156a mimic on the EMT of NPC, and the up-regulation of JAMA could partially restore EMT repressed by miR156a mimic. In conclusion, these results indicate that the miR156a mimic inhibits the EMT of NPC cells by targeting the 3' UTR of JAMA. These miRNA profiles of broccoli provide a fundamental basis for further research. Moreover, the discovery of miR156a may have clinical implications for the treatment of patients with NPC.

  17. Geographic variation in mimetic precision among different species of coral snake mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcali, C K; Pfennig, D W

    2017-07-01

    Batesian mimicry is widespread, but whether and why different species of mimics vary geographically in resemblance to their model is unclear. We characterized geographic variation in mimetic precision among four Batesian mimics of coral snakes. Each mimic occurs where its model is abundant (i.e. in 'deep sympatry'), rare (i.e. at the sympatry/allopatry boundary or 'edge sympatry') and absent (i.e. in allopatry). Geographic variation in mimetic precision was qualitatively different among these mimics. In one mimic, the most precise individuals occurred in edge sympatry; in another, they occurred in deep sympatry; in the third, they occurred in allopatry; and in the fourth, precise mimics were not concentrated anywhere throughout their range. Mimicry was less precise in allopatry than in sympatry in only two mimics. We present several nonmutually exclusive hypotheses for these patterns. Generally, examining geographic variation in mimetic precision - within and among different mimics - offers novel insights into the causes and consequences of mimicry. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  18. Testing Measurement Invariance Using MIMIC: Likelihood Ratio Test with a Critical Value Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Sook; Yoon, Myeongsun; Lee, Taehun

    2012-01-01

    Multiple-indicators multiple-causes (MIMIC) modeling is often used to test a latent group mean difference while assuming the equivalence of factor loadings and intercepts over groups. However, this study demonstrated that MIMIC was insensitive to the presence of factor loading noninvariance, which implies that factor loading invariance should be…

  19. A lesion mimic phenotype in tomato obtained by isolating and silencing an Lls1 homologue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spassieva, S; Hille, J

    Lesion mimic phenotypes serve as a tool to study the regulation of cell death in plants. In order to obtain a tomato lesion mimic phenotype, we used the conservation of the lethal leaf spot 1 (Lls1) genes between plant species. The tomato Lls1 homologue was cloned, sequenced and analyzed. It showed

  20. A novel microfluidic model to mimic the turbid nature and microvasculature of cutaneous tissue for optical imaging experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Ahmed, Midhat; Klämpfl, Florian; Stelzle, Florian; Schmidt, Michael

    2015-12-01

    To provide clinically relevant insights into the device performance of an optical imaging approach to reconstruct the superficial cutaneous micro-circulation (skin angiography), a phantom device with turbid matrix and perfusable micro-vessels is essential. In this work, we describe a novel microfluidic-based device to mimic the micro-vessels and the turbid nature of the epidermis and dermis. This phantom device contains a hollow assay with a diameter of the channels of 50 μm. The hollow assay includes the geometry of the inlet, the river-like assay, and the outlet, which can be perfused by e.g. meta-hemoglobin solution. This imitates the superficial micro-circulation in the skin. The absorption coefficient μa and the reduced scattering coefficient μs' are adjusted to match those of skin. As an application case, we attempt to reconstruct a 2-D velocity field of the hemoglobin flow in the scattering microfluidic device via the Doppler-mode of an OCT.

  1. Single prostacyclin receptor of gel-filtered platelets provides a correlation with antiaggregatory potency of PGI2 mimics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggerman, T.L.; Hartzell, C.J.; Selfe, S.; Andersen, N.H.

    1987-03-01

    Gel-filtered human platelets (GFP) display only a single binding site for (/sup 3/H)-PGI2: KD = 61nM, 234 fmol/10(8) platelets (1410 sites/platelet). Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) displays the same receptor density but the KD value increases to 123 nM due to protein binding of PGI2 which lowers its effective concentration. The (/sup 3/H)-PGI2/GFP binding assay has been used to evaluate the molecular basis of aggregation inhibition for prostacyclin analogs and mimics, three PGE type structures, and PGD2. Antiaggregatory IC50s and radioligand binding IC50s correlate for PGE2, E1, and six PGI2 analogs. PGD2, and to a lesser extent 6-oxo-PGE1, display greater antiaggregatory potency than expected based on PGI2-binding site affinity data.

  2. Evaluation of MIMIC-Model Methods for DIF Testing With Comparison to Two-Group Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Carol M

    2009-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) occurs when an item on a test or questionnaire has different measurement properties for 1 group of people versus another, irrespective of mean differences on the construct. This study focuses on the use of multiple-indicator multiple-cause (MIMIC) structural equation models for DIF testing, parameterized as item response models. The accuracy of these methods, and the sample size requirements, are not well established. This study examines the accuracy of MIMIC methods for DIF testing when the focal group is small and compares results with those obtained using 2-group item response theory (IRT). Results support the utility of the MIMIC approach. With small focal-group samples, tests of uniform DIF with binary or 5-category ordinal responses were more accurate with MIMIC models than 2-group IRT. Recommendations are offered for the application of MIMIC methods for DIF testing.

  3. Use of a continuous multistage bioreactor to mimic winemaking fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, T; Perez, M; Mouret, J R; Sablayrolles, J M; Camarasa, C

    2011-10-17

    Continuous fermentation set-ups are of great interest for studying the physiology of microorganisms. In winemaking conditions, yeasts go through a growth phase and a stationary phase during which more than half of the sugar is fermented. A comprehensive study of wine-yeast physiology must therefore include yeasts in a non-growing phase. This condition is impossible to achieve within a chemostat, which led us to design a multi-stage fermentation device. In this study, we evaluated the ability of such a device to reproduce, in a series of steady states, the conditions of batch fermentation. Two-stage and four-stage fermentations were carried out with two different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The main characteristics of the fermentation process (biomass growth, by-product content of the medium) were compared with those observed in batch mode at the same stage of fermentation, which was defined by glucose uptake. The four-stage configuration showed a better ability to reproduce batch fermentation characteristics than the two-stage set-up. It also allowed to uncouple the variations of environmental parameters and proved to be a promising tool to gain new insights into yeast metabolism during alcoholic fermentation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Membrane-Mimic Nanoparticles for Drug and Gene Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Alamoudi, Kholod

    2017-12-01

    Nanoscale organic particles have gained a prominent role in drug and gene delivery field. As the nature of the nanoparticle’s (NPs) surface plays a major role in their targeting efficiency, bioavailability, and cytotoxicity, membrane-mimic nanoparticles are considered highly attractive materials for in vivo and in vitro applications. Synthetic membrane vesicles (liposomes) and nanoconstructs built with native cancer cellular membrane are excellent scaffolds to improve cellular delivery. Liposomes have been extensively used due to their high loading capacity, biocompatibility and biodegradability. However, modifications with stimuli responsive materials are highly needed to improve their stability and turn them active participants in controlled delivery. Towards a nature inspired approach, reconstructed bilayers from cell membrane are a good candidate to enhance NP’s targeting ability and biocompatibility. The primary focus of this research is to develop smart responsive (lipid) membrane coated NPs with surface modifications for controlled and targeted drug and/or gene delivery for application in cancer therapy. Three approaches have been developed, namely i) liposomes as thermoresponsive nanocarriers for the delivery of genetic material; ii) magnetically photosensitive liposome hybrids and iii) biomimetic periodic mesoporous organo silica engineered for better a biocompatibility and targeting capabilities. In the first project synthetic liposomes were loaded with ammonium bicarbonate salt (ABC) and siRNA. The combination of lipids chosen and the relative ratios allowed the rapid release of the genetic material to the multi drug resistant cancer cells studied, upon external heat trigger. This design has improved the gene silencing efficiency via successful endosomal escape. In the second project, SPIO@Au nanoparticles were imbedded in the lipid bilayer to produce a photo/thermal responsive carrier that could be also used in cell imaging besides gene transfection

  5. Description of stroke mimics after complete neurovascular assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellaneda-Gómez, C; Rodríguez Campello, A; Giralt Steinhauer, E; Gómez González, A; Serra Martínez, M; de Ceballos Cerrajería, P; Zabalza de Torres, A; Cuadrado-Godia, E; Ois Santiago, A; Jiménez-Conde, J; Roquer, J

    2017-02-04

    A considerable percentage of events initially diagnosed as ischaemic stroke have non-cerebrovascular causes; these are called stroke mimics (SM). Currently available evidence about these events is heterogeneous and comes from studies with small samples. The purpose of our study is to identify conditions that may present as SM, define their epidemiological and clinical characteristics, and determine the percentage of cases of SM treated with intravenous fibrinolysis. Prospective study including all patients admitted to a tertiary university hospital between June 2005 and April 2015 with a diagnosis of acute stroke. We analysed demographic data, cardiovascular risk factors, time from code stroke activation to admission, stroke severity (NIHSS), final destination after discharge, degree of disability (mRS), and treatment. We compared SM and ischaemic strokes. We ruled out patients with intracranial haemorrhage, subarachnoid haemorrhage, or other causes of SM that may be detected on the baseline CT scan. Four hundred four of the 4,570 included patients (8.8%) were found to have SM. Patients with SM were younger (70.3 vs. 74, P<.0001), less likely to exhibit cardiovascular risk factors and atrial fibrillation (13 vs. 34%, P<.0001), scored lower on the NIHSS at baseline (2 vs. 4, P<.0001), and included fewer cases of aphasia (9.4 vs. 19.6%, P<.02) and dysphagia (1.2 vs. 17%, P<.0001) than patients with stroke. SM caused fewer code stroke activations (28 vs. 40%, P<.0001). Patients with SM required shorter hospital stays (4.9 vs. 7.8 days, P<.0001), were less frequently admitted to the stroke unit (47 vs. 60%, P<.0001) and more frequently discharged home (95 vs. 62%, P<.0001), and had better outcomes (mRS scores 0-2; 76 vs. 54%, P<.0001). Intravenous fibrinolysis was administered to 4.7% of these patients. Epileptic seizures were the most frequent cause of SM (26%). In our sample, 8.8% of all diagnoses of ischaemic stroke were SM. These events have different demographic

  6. Stroke mimics under the drip-and-ship paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sonal; Vora, Nirav; Edgell, Randall C; Allam, Hesham; Alawi, Aws; Koehne, Jennifer; Kumar, Abhay; Feen, Eliahu; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Alshekhlee, Amer

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports suggested better outcomes associated with the drip-and-ship paradigm for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) treated with thrombolysis. We hypothesized that a higher rate of stroke mimics (SM) among AIS treated in nonspecialized stroke centers that are transferred to comprehensive centers is responsible for such outcomes. Consecutive patients treated with thrombolysis according to the admission criteria were reviewed in a single comprehensive stroke center over 1 academic year (July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012). Information on the basic demographic, hospital complications, psychiatric diagnoses, and discharge disposition was collected. We identified those patients who were treated at a facility and then transferred to the tertiary center (ie, drip-and-ship paradigm). In addition to comparative and adjusted analysis to identify predictors for SM, a stratified analysis by the drip-and-ship status was performed. One hundred twenty patients were treated with thrombolysis for AIS included in this analysis; 20 (16.7%) were discharged with the final diagnosis of SM; 14 of those had conversion syndrome and 6 patients had other syndromes (seizures, migraine, and hypoglycemia). Patients with SM were younger (55.6 ± 15.0 versus 69.4 ± 14.9, P = .0003) and more likely to harbor psychiatric diagnoses (45% versus 9%; P ≤ .0001). Eighteen of 20 SM patients (90%) had the drip-and-ship treatment paradigm compared with 65% of those with AIS (P = .02). None of the SM had hemorrhagic complications, and all were discharged to home. Predictors of SM on adjusted analysis included the drip-and-ship paradigm (odds ratio [OR] 12.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.78, 92.1) and history of any psychiatric illness (OR 12.08; 95% CI 3.14, 46.4). Eighteen of 83 drip-and-ship patients (21.7%) were diagnosed with SM compared with 2 of 37 patients (5.4%) presented directly to the hub hospital (P = .02). The drip-and-ship paradigm and any psychiatric history predict the diagnosis of

  7. Ceropegia sandersonii Mimics Attacked Honeybees to Attract Kleptoparasitic Flies for Pollination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiduk, Annemarie; Brake, Irina; von Tschirnhaus, Michael; Göhl, Matthias; Jürgens, Andreas; Johnson, Steven D; Meve, Ulrich; Dötterl, Stefan

    2016-10-24

    Four to six percent of plants, distributed over different angiosperm families, entice pollinators by deception [1]. In these systems, chemical mimicry is often used as an efficient way to exploit the olfactory preferences of animals for the purpose of attracting them as pollinators [2,3]. Here, we report a very specific type of chemical mimicry of a food source. Ceropegia sandersonii (Apocynaceae), a deceptive South African plant with pitfall flowers, mimics attacked honeybees. We identified kleptoparasitic Desmometopa flies (Milichiidae) as the main pollinators of C. sandersonii. These flies are well known to feed on honeybees that are eaten by spiders, which we thus predicted as the model chemically mimicked by the plant. Indeed, we found that the floral scent of C. sandersonii is comparable to volatiles released from honeybees when under simulated attack. Moreover, many of these shared compounds elicited physiological responses in antennae of pollinating Desmometopa flies. A mixture of four compounds-geraniol, 2-heptanone, 2-nonanol, and (E)-2-octen-1-yl acetate-was highly attractive to the flies. We conclude that C. sandersonii is specialized on kleptoparasitic fly pollinators by deploying volatiles linked to the flies' food source, i.e., attacked and/or freshly killed honeybees. The blend of compounds emitted by C. sandersonii is unusual among flowering plants and lures kleptoparasitic flies into the trap flowers. This study describes a new example of how a plant can achieve pollination through chemical mimicry of the food sources of adult carnivorous animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-21

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Such tests are most often used to explore antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin system as well as a hybridization based assay. The agglutination systems are prone to selftermination of the linking analyte, prone to active site saturation and loss of agglomeration at high analyte concentrations. We investigated the molecular target/ligand interaction, explaining the common agglutination problems related to analyte self-termination, linkage of the analyte to the same bead instead of different microbeads. We classified the agglutination process into three kinds of assays: a two- component assay, a three-component assay and a stepped three- component assay. Although we compared these three kinds of assays for recognizing DNA and protein molecules, the assay can be used for virtually any molecule, including ions and metabolites. In total, the optimized assay permits detecting analytes with high sensitivity in a short time, 5 min, at room temperature. Such a system is appropriate for POC testing.

  9. Chemical screening and development of novel gibberellin mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kai; Shimotakahara, Hiroaki; Luo, Ming; Otani, Masato; Nakamura, Hidemitsu; Moselhy, Said Salama; Abualnaja, Khalid Omer; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman Labeed; Kumosani, Taha Abduallah; Kitahata, Nobutaka; Nakano, Takeshi; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Asami, Tadao

    2017-08-15

    Gibberellin (GA) plays versatile roles in the regulation of plant growth and development and therefore is widely used as a regulator in agriculture. We performed a chemical library screening and identified a chemical, named 67D, as a stimulator of seed germination that was suppressed by paclobutrazol (PAC), a GA biosynthesis inhibitor. In vitro binding assays indicated that 67D binds to the GID1 receptor. Further studies on the structure-activity relationship identified a chemical, named chemical 6, that strongly promoted seed germination suppressed by PAC. Chemical 6 was further confirmed to promote the degradation of RGA (for repressor of ga1-3), a DELLA protein, and suppress the expression levels of GA3ox1 in the same manner as GA does. 67D and its analogs are supposed to be agonists of GID1 and are expected to be utilized in agriculture and basic research as an alternative to GA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  11. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  12. Inhibition of Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis by Synthetic TF Antigen Mimic/Galectin-3 Inhibitor Lactulose-l-Leucine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Glinskii

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently incurable, prostate cancer metastasis has a remarkable ability to spread to the skeleton. Previous studies demonstrated that interactions mediated by the cancer-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich glycoantigen (TF-Ag and the carbohydrate-binding protein galectin-3 play an important role in several rate-limiting steps of cancer metastasis such as metastatic cell adhesion to bone marrow endothelium, homotypic tumor cell aggregation, and clonogenic survival and growth. This study investigated the ability of a synthetic small-molecular-weight nontoxic carbohydrate-based TF-Ag mimic lactulose-l-leucine (Lac-l-Leu to inhibit these processes in vitro and, ultimately, prostate cancer bone metastasis in vivo. Using an in vivo mouse model, based on intracardiac injection of human PC-3 prostate carcinoma cells stably expressing luciferase, we investigated the ability of Lac-l-Leu to impede the establishment and growth of bone metastasis. Parallel-flow chamber assay, homotypic aggregation assay, modified Boyden chamber assay, and clonogenic growth assay were used to assess the effects of Lac-l-Leu on tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium, homotypic tumor cell aggregation, transendothelial migration, and clonogenic survival and growth, respectively. We report that daily intraperitoneal administration of Lac-l-Leu resulted in a three-fold (P < .05 decrease in metastatic tumor burden compared with the untreated control. Mechanistically, the effect of Lac-l-Leu, which binds and inhibits galectins by mimicking essential structural features of the TF-Ag, was associated with a dose-dependent inhibition of prostate cancer cell adhesion to bone marrow endothelium, homotypic aggregation, transendothelial migration, and clonogenic growth. We conclude that small-molecular-weight carbohydrate-based compounds targeting β-galactoside-mediated interactions could provide valuable means for controlling and preventing metastatic prostate cancer spread to the skeleton.

  13. The Engineered SVA Trans-mobilization Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Anja; Schumann, Gerald G

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian genomes harbor autonomous retrotransposons coding for the proteins required for their own mobilization, and nonautonomous retrotransposons, such as the human SVA element, which are transcribed but do not have any coding capacity. Mobilization of nonautonomous retrotransposons depends on the recruitment of the protein machinery encoded by autonomous retrotransposons. Here, we summarize the experimental details of SVA trans-mobilization assays which address multiple questions regarding the biology of both nonautonomous SVA elements and autonomous LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons. The assay evaluates if and to what extent a noncoding SVA element is mobilized in trans by the L1-encoded protein machinery, the structural organization of the resulting marked de novo insertions, if they mimic endogenous SVA insertions and what the roles of individual domains of the nonautonomous retrotransposon for SVA mobilization are. Furthermore, the highly sensitive trans-mobilization assay can be used to verify the presence of otherwise barely detectable endogenously expressed functional L1 proteins via their marked SVA trans-mobilizing activity.

  14. Synthesis of Functionalised Nucleosides for Incorporation into Nucleic Acid-Based Serine Protease Mimics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemieke Madder

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of nucleosides modified with an extra imidazole, carboxyl and hydroxyl group is described. These nucleosides can be incorporated into an oligonucleotide duplex, thus generating a novel type of serine protease mimic.

  15. Transformation optics that mimics the system outside a Schwarzschild black hole

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Huanyang; Miao, Rong-Xin; Li, Miao

    2009-01-01

    We applied the transformation optics to mimic a black hole of Schwarzschild form. Similar properties of photon sphere were also found numerically for the metamaterial black hole. Several reduced versions of the black hole systems were proposed for easier implementations.

  16. [A tumour-mimic pig liver model for guiding focused ultrasound thermal ablation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melodelima, D; N'djin, Wa; Parmentier, H; Chesnais, S; Rivoire, M; Chapelon, J-Y

    2007-11-01

    There is no established liver tumour model in pigs to study the efficacy of ablative treatment options available for the treatment of liver tumours by physical agents. A tumour-mimic model visible with high contrast on sonograms and on gross pathology has been studied at mid-term on 20 pigs. The aim was to determine if these tumour-mimics are well tolerated and can be used to validate the use of thermal therapies at a preclinical stage. The dimensions of the tumour-mimics measured on sonograms were reproducible (diameter: 9.6 +/- 1.9 mm) and correlated with those performed in gross pathology (R(2)=0.73). The accuracy of focused ultrasound thermal therapy can be evaluated preclinically using these tumour-mimics.

  17. TRANSGENERATIONAL EFFECTS OF A JUVENILE HORMONE MIMIC ON THE ESTUARINE MYSID, MYSIDOPSIS BAHIA (CRUSTACEA: MYSIDACEA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoxycarb is a juvenile hormone (JH) mimic used to control insect pests by interfering with reproductive and developmental processes mediated by JH. Crustaceans are ideal organisms to monitor environmental effects of these endocrine disruptors, since they are dominant aquatic ar...

  18. Preservation of the Structure of Enzymatically-Degraded Bovine Vitreous Using Synthetic Proteoglycan Mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qianru; Filas, Benjamen A.; Roth, Robyn; Heuser, John; Ma, Nan; Sharma, Shaili; Panitch, Alyssa; Beebe, David C.; Shui, Ying-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Vitreous liquefaction and subsequent posterior vitreous detachment can lead to several sight-threatening diseases, including retinal detachment, macular hole and macular traction syndrome, nuclear cataracts, and possibly, open-angle glaucoma. In this study, we tested the ability of three novel synthetic chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan mimics to preserve the structure and physical properties of enzymatically-degraded bovine vitreous. Methods. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan mimics, designed to bind to type II collagen, hyaluronic acid, or both, were applied to trypsin- or collagenase-treated bovine vitreous in situ and in vitro. Rheology and liquefaction tests were performed to determine the physical properties of the vitreous, while Western blots were used to detect the presence and degradation of soluble collagen II (α1). Deep-etch electron microscopy (DEEM) identified the ultrastructure of mimic-treated and untreated enzyme-degraded bovine vitreous. Results. Proteoglycan mimics preserved the physical properties of trypsin-degraded bovine vitreous and protected against vitreous liquefaction. Although the collagen-binding mimic maintained the physical properties of collagenase-treated vitreous, liquefaction still occurred. Western blots indicated that the mimic provided only marginal protective ability against soluble collagen degradation. Deep-etch electron microscopy, however, showed increased density and isotropy of microstructural components in mimic-treated vitreous, supporting the initial result that vitreous structure was preserved. Conclusions. Proteoglycan mimics preserved bovine vitreous physical properties after enzymatic degradation. These compounds may be useful in delaying or preventing the pathological effects of age-related, or enzymatically-induced, degradation of the vitreous body. PMID:25342623

  19. Segmental specificity in belly dance mimics primal trunk locomotor patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Marilee M; Milner, Theodore E

    2017-03-01

    sequential pattern similar to lamprey swimming emerges, suggesting that primal involuntary control mechanisms dominate in fast lateral rhythmic spine undulations even in humans. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Doppler radar physiological sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lubecke, Victor M; Droitcour, Amy D; Park, Byung-Kwon; Singh, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive description of the theory and practical implementation of Doppler radar-based physiological monitoring. This book includes an overview of current physiological monitoring techniques and explains the fundamental technology used in remote non-contact monitoring methods. Basic radio wave propagation and radar principles are introduced along with the fundamentals of physiological motion and measurement. Specific design and implementation considerations for physiological monitoring radar systems are then discussed in detail. The authors address current research and commercial development of Doppler radar based physiological monitoring for healthcare and other applications.

  1. Determination of the mimic epitope of the M-like protein adhesin in swine Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Fuyu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The M-like protein, also known as SzP, is expressed on the surface of Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus. Previous studies demonstrated that SzP is similar to M protein of group A Streptococcus in the structure and characteristics of antiphagocytosis. The M protein is an adhesin that can bind to the host cells, however it is not known whether the SzP of S. zooepidemicus also functions as an adhesin. We conducted an investigation to determine SzP as an adhesin, and one SzP epitope was identified to be responsible for mediating binding to HEp-2 cells. Methods The gene encoding SzP was expressed in E. coli, and the purified recombinant SzP (rSzP was recognized by rabbit anti-S. zooepidemicus antibodies using immunoblot. Furthermore, the adherence of S. zooepidemicus to HEp-2 cells was inhibited by anti-rSzP antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. We employed a random 12-peptide phage display library for screening of immunodominant mimics of the SzP, which were recognized by an anti-SzP specific monoclonal antibody (mAb 2C8. Initial positive phage clones were identified by ELISA, followed by assays to determine the adherence-inhibiting ability of the peptide. Results Ten out of fourteen selected positive clones showed high reactivity that effectively inhibited the binding of mAb 2C8 to rSzP. The motif XSLSRX was highly conserved among six of the ten clones. Conclusion Collectively, our findings suggest that the motif XSLSRX may represent an immunodominant mimic epitope of the SzP of S. zooepidemicus strain ATCC 35246, and that the same epitope may be used to mediate SzP binding to HEp-2 cells.

  2. Lateral flow assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczula, Katarzyna M; Gallotta, Andrea

    2016-06-30

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  3. Lateral flow assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczula, Katarzyna M.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. PMID:27365041

  4. Tube-Forming Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan M; Meah, Christopher J; Heath, Victoria L; Styles, Iain B; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the generation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and is dependent on many growth factors and signaling events. In vivo angiogenesis is dynamic and complex, meaning assays are commonly utilized to explore specific targets for research into this area. Tube-forming assays offer an excellent overview of the molecular processes in angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube forming assay is a simple-to-implement but powerful tool for identifying biomolecules involved in angiogenesis. A detailed experimental protocol on the implementation of the assay is described in conjunction with an in-depth review of methods that can be applied to the analysis of the tube formation. In addition, an ImageJ plug-in is presented which allows automatic quantification of tube images reducing analysis times while removing user bias and subjectivity.

  5. Modelling the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArt, Darragh G; McKerr, George; Howard, C Vyvyan; Saetzler, Kurt; Wasson, Gillian R

    2009-08-01

    The single-cell gel electrophoresis technique or comet assay is widely regarded as a quick and reliable method of analysing DNA damage in individual cells. It has a proven track record from the fields of biomonitoring to nutritional studies. The assay operates by subjecting cells that are fixed in agarose to high salt and detergent lysis, thus removing all the cellular content except the DNA. By relaxing the DNA in an alkaline buffer, strands containing breaks are released from supercoiling. Upon electrophoresis, these strands are pulled out into the agarose, forming a tail which, when stained with a fluorescent dye, can be analysed by fluorescence microscopy. The intensity of this tail reflects the amount of DNA damage sustained. Despite being such an established and widely used assay, there are still many aspects of the comet assay which are not fully understood. The present review looks at how the comet assay is being used, and highlights some of its limitations. The protocol itself varies among laboratories, so results from similar studies may vary. Given such discrepancies, it would be attractive to break the assay into components to generate a mathematical model to investigate specific parameters.

  6. MIMIC II: a massive temporal ICU patient database to support research in intelligent patient monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, M.; Lieu, C.; Raber, G.; Mark, R. G.

    2002-01-01

    Development and evaluation of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) decision-support systems would be greatly facilitated by the availability of a large-scale ICU patient database. Following our previous efforts with the MIMIC (Multi-parameter Intelligent Monitoring for Intensive Care) Database, we have leveraged advances in networking and storage technologies to develop a far more massive temporal database, MIMIC II. MIMIC II is an ongoing effort: data is continuously and prospectively archived from all ICU patients in our hospital. MIMIC II now consists of over 800 ICU patient records including over 120 gigabytes of data and is growing. A customized archiving system was used to store continuously up to four waveforms and 30 different parameters from ICU patient monitors. An integrated user-friendly relational database was developed for browsing of patients' clinical information (lab results, fluid balance, medications, nurses' progress notes). Based upon its unprecedented size and scope, MIMIC II will prove to be an important resource for intelligent patient monitoring research, and will support efforts in medical data mining and knowledge-discovery.

  7. Scaffold optimization in discontinuous epitope containing protein mimics of gp120 using smart libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Gwenn E; Quarles van Ufford, H Linda C; van Ameijde, Jeroen; Brouwer, Arwin J; Kruijtzer, John A W; Liskamp, Rob M J

    2013-04-28

    A diversity of protein surface discontinuous epitope mimics is now rapidly and efficiently accessible. Despite the important role of protein-protein interactions involving discontinuous epitopes in a wide range of diseases, mimicry of discontinuous epitopes using peptide-based molecules remains a major challenge. Using copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), we have developed a general and efficient method for the synthesis of collections of discontinuous epitope mimics. Up to three different cyclic peptides, representing discontinuous epitopes in HIV-gp120, were conjugated to a selection of scaffold molecules. Variation of the scaffold molecule, optimization of the ring size of the cyclic peptides and screening of the resulting libraries for successful protein mimics led to an HIV gp120 mimic with an IC50 value of 1.7 μM. The approach described here provides rapid and highly reproducible access to clean, smart libraries of very complex bio-molecular constructs representing protein mimics for use as synthetic vaccines and beyond.

  8. Phun Week: Understanding Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limson, Mel; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2009-01-01

    Topics such as sports, exercise, health, and nutrition can make the science of physiology relevant and engaging for students. In addition, many lessons on these topics, such as those on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive systems, align with national and state life science education standards. Physiology Understanding Week (PhUn…

  9. Advances in physiological computing

    CERN Document Server

    Fairclough, Stephen H

    2014-01-01

    This edited collection will provide an overview of the field of physiological computing, i.e. the use of physiological signals as input for computer control. It will cover a breadth of current research, from brain-computer interfaces to telemedicine.

  10. Antimicrobial Effects of Novel Triple Antibiotic Paste-Mimic Scaffolds on Actinomyces naeslundii Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Maria T P; Ryan, Stuart J; Münchow, Eliseu A; Kamocka, Maria M; Gregory, Richard L; Valera, Marcia C; Bottino, Marco C

    2015-08-01

    Actinomyces naeslundii has been recovered from traumatized permanent teeth diagnosed with necrotic pulps. In this work, a triple antibiotic paste (TAP)-mimic scaffold is proposed as a drug-delivery strategy to eliminate A. naeslundii dentin biofilm. Metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and minocycline were added to a polydioxanone (PDS) polymer solution and spun into fibrous scaffolds. Fiber morphology, mechanical properties, and drug release were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy, microtensile testing, and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Human dentin specimens (4 × 4 × 1 mm(3), n = 4/group) were inoculated with A. naeslundii (ATCC 43146) for 7 days for biofilm formation. The infected dentin specimens were exposed to TAP-mimic scaffolds, TAP solution (positive control), and pure PDS (drug-free scaffold). Dentin infected (7-day biofilm) specimens were used for comparison (negative control). Confocal laser scanning microscopy was done to determine bacterial viability. Scaffolds displayed a submicron mean fiber diameter (PDS = 689 ± 312 nm and TAP-mimic = 718 ± 125 nm). Overall, TAP-mimic scaffolds showed significantly (P ≤ .040) lower mechanical properties than PDS. Within the first 24 hours, a burst release for all drugs was seen. A sustained maintenance of metronidazole and ciprofloxacin was observed over 4 weeks, but not for minocycline. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated complete elimination of all viable bacteria exposed to the TAP solution. Meanwhile, TAP-mimic scaffolds led to a significant (P < .05) reduction in the percentage of viable bacteria compared with the negative control and PDS. Our findings suggest that TAP-mimic scaffolds hold significant potential in the eradication/elimination of bacterial biofilm, a critical step in regenerative endodontics. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Rover waste assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched {sup 235}U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for {sup 137}Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Physiology in conservation translocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarszisz, Esther; Dickman, Christopher R.; Munn, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation translocations aim to restore species to their indigenous ranges, protect populations from threats and/or reinstate ecosystem functions. They are particularly important for the conservation and management of rare and threatened species. Despite tremendous efforts and advancement in recent years, animal conservation translocations generally have variable success, and the reasons for this are often uncertain. We suggest that when little is known about the physiology and wellbeing of individuals either before or after release, it will be difficult to determine their likelihood of survival, and this could limit advancements in the science of translocations for conservation. In this regard, we argue that physiology offers novel approaches that could substantially improve translocations and associated practices. As a discipline, it is apparent that physiology may be undervalued, perhaps because of the invasive nature of some physiological measurement techniques (e.g. sampling body fluids, surgical implantation). We examined 232 publications that dealt with translocations of terrestrial vertebrates and aquatic mammals and, defining ‘success’ as high or low, determined how many of these studies explicitly incorporated physiological aspects into their protocols and monitoring. From this review, it is apparent that physiological evaluation before and after animal releases could progress and improve translocation/reintroduction successes. We propose a suite of physiological measures, in addition to animal health indices, for assisting conservation translocations over the short term and also for longer term post-release monitoring. Perhaps most importantly, we argue that the incorporation of physiological assessments of animals at all stages of translocation can have important welfare implications by helping to reduce the total number of animals used. Physiological indicators can also help to refine conservation translocation methods. These approaches fall

  13. Graphene–palladium nanowires based electrochemical sensor using ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}–graphene quantum dots as an effective peroxidase mimic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weiyan; Yang, Hongmei; Ma, Chao; Ding, Ya-nan [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Ge, Shenguang [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Yu, Jinghua [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Yan, Mei, E-mail: chm_yanm@126.com [Key Laboratory of Chemical Sensing and Analysis in Universities of Shandong, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2014-12-10

    Highlights: • The nanohybrid ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs was developed by assembling the GQDs on the ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} through a photo-Fenton reaction. • The ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs exhibited higher peroxidase-like activity and better stability than each individual and HRP. • An electrochemical sensor was fabricated using ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs nanohybrid as a mimic enzymatic to detect DNA. • Graphene and Pd nanowires were modified on the glassy carbon electrode, which improved the electronic transfer rate. - Abstract: We proposed an electrochemical DNA sensor by using peroxidase-like magnetic ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}–graphene quantum dots (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs) nanohybrid as a mimic enzymatic label. Aminated graphene and Pd nanowires were successively modified on glassy carbon electrode, which improved the electronic transfer rate as well as increased the amount of immobilized capture ssDNA (S1). The nanohybrid ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs was prepared by assembling the GQDs on the surface of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} through a photo-Fenton reaction, which was not only used as a mimic enzyme but also as a carrier to label complementary ssDNA (S3). By synergistically integrating highly catalytically activity of nano-sized GQDs and ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, the nanohybrid possessed highly-efficient peroxidase-like catalytic activity which could produce a large current toward the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} for signal amplification. Thionine was used as an excellent electron mediator. Compared with traditional enzyme labels, the mimic enzyme ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/GQDs exhibited many advantages such as environment friendly and better stability. Under the optimal conditions, the approach provided a wide linear range from 10{sup −16} to 5 × 10{sup −9} M and low detection limit of 6.2 × 10{sup −17} M. The remarkable high catalytic capability could allow the nanohybrid to replace conventional peroxidase-based assay systems. The new, robust and convenient assay systems

  14. Lateral flow strip assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Robin R [Danville, CA; Benett, William J [Livermore, CA; Coleman, Matthew A [Oakland, CA; Pearson, Francesca S [Livermore, CA; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L [Livermore, CA

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  15. Cardio-vascular safety beyond hERG: in silico modelling of a guinea pig right atrium assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenu, Luca A; Teisman, Ard; De Buck, Stefan S; Sinha, Vikash K; Gilissen, Ron A H J; Nijsen, Marjoleen J M A; Mackie, Claire E; Sanderson, Wendy E

    2009-12-01

    As chemists can easily produce large numbers of new potential drug candidates, there is growing demand for high capacity models that can help in driving the chemistry towards efficacious and safe candidates before progressing towards more complex models. Traditionally, the cardiovascular (CV) safety domain plays an important role in this process, as many preclinical CV biomarkers seem to have high prognostic value for the clinical outcome. Throughout the industry, traditional ion channel binding data are generated to drive the early selection process. Although this assay can generate data at high capacity, it has the disadvantage of producing high numbers of false negatives. Therefore, our company applies the isolated guinea pig right atrium (GPRA) assay early-on in discovery. This functional multi-channel/multi-receptor model seems much more predictive in identifying potential CV liabilities. Unfortunately however, its capacity is limited, and there is no room for full automation. We assessed the correlation between ion channel binding and the GPRA's Rate of Contraction (RC), Contractile Force (CF), and effective refractory frequency (ERF) measures assay using over six thousand different data points. Furthermore, the existing experimental knowledge base was used to develop a set of in silico classification models attempting to mimic the GPRA inhibitory activity. The Naïve Bayesian classifier was used to built several models, using the ion channel binding data or in silico computed properties and structural fingerprints as descriptors. The models were validated on an independent and diverse test set of 200 reference compounds. Performances were assessed on the bases of their overall accuracy, sensitivity and specificity in detecting both active and inactive molecules. Our data show that all in silico models are highly predictive of actual GPRA data, at a level equivalent or superior to the ion channel binding assays. Furthermore, the models were interpreted in

  16. Cardio-vascular safety beyond hERG: in silico modelling of a guinea pig right atrium assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenu, Luca A.; Teisman, Ard; De Buck, Stefan S.; Sinha, Vikash K.; Gilissen, Ron A. H. J.; Nijsen, Marjoleen J. M. A.; Mackie, Claire E.; Sanderson, Wendy E.

    2009-12-01

    As chemists can easily produce large numbers of new potential drug candidates, there is growing demand for high capacity models that can help in driving the chemistry towards efficacious and safe candidates before progressing towards more complex models. Traditionally, the cardiovascular (CV) safety domain plays an important role in this process, as many preclinical CV biomarkers seem to have high prognostic value for the clinical outcome. Throughout the industry, traditional ion channel binding data are generated to drive the early selection process. Although this assay can generate data at high capacity, it has the disadvantage of producing high numbers of false negatives. Therefore, our company applies the isolated guinea pig right atrium (GPRA) assay early-on in discovery. This functional multi-channel/multi-receptor model seems much more predictive in identifying potential CV liabilities. Unfortunately however, its capacity is limited, and there is no room for full automation. We assessed the correlation between ion channel binding and the GPRA's Rate of Contraction (RC), Contractile Force (CF), and effective refractory frequency (ERF) measures assay using over six thousand different data points. Furthermore, the existing experimental knowledge base was used to develop a set of in silico classification models attempting to mimic the GPRA inhibitory activity. The Naïve Bayesian classifier was used to built several models, using the ion channel binding data or in silico computed properties and structural fingerprints as descriptors. The models were validated on an independent and diverse test set of 200 reference compounds. Performances were assessed on the bases of their overall accuracy, sensitivity and specificity in detecting both active and inactive molecules. Our data show that all in silico models are highly predictive of actual GPRA data, at a level equivalent or superior to the ion channel binding assays. Furthermore, the models were interpreted in

  17. (MTT) dye reduction assay.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to inhibit proliferation of HeLa cells was determined using the 3443- dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) dye reduction assay. Extracts from roots of Agathisanthemum bojeri, Synaptolepis kirkii and Zanha africana and the leaf extract of Physalis peruviana at a concentration of 10 pg/ml inhibited cell ...

  18. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis S; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  19. Physiologic effects of intravenous fluid administration in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Jensen, Peter; Kehlet, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    Dose regimens in perioperative fluid management are rarely evidence based. Therefore, we investigated responses to an IV fluid infusion in healthy volunteers to assess basic physiologic effects of a fluid infusion per se. In a prospective, double-blinded, cross-randomized study, 12 healthy...... volunteers with a median age of 63 yr (range, 59-67 yr) received an infusion of lactated Ringer's solution 40 mL/kg (median, 2820 mL) or 5 mL/kg (median, 353 mL; background infusion) in random order on two separate occasions. The study was designed to mimic the perioperative course with preoperative fasting...

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of cardiac glycoside mimics as potential anticancer drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie; Schmidt, Steffen; Fedosova, Natalya

    2011-01-01

    recent years cardiac glycosides have furthermore been suggested to possess valuable anticancer activity. To mimic the labile trisaccharide of digitoxin with a stabile carbohydrate surrogate, we have used sulfur linked ethylene glycol moieties of varying length (mono-, di-, tri- or tetra-ethylene glycol...

  1. Families, schools, and student achievement inequality: a multilevel MIMIC model approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tsai, S. L.; Smith, Michael; Hauser, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 1 (2017), s. 64-88 ISSN 0038-0407 R&D Projects: GA ČR GCP404/12/J006; GA ČR GB14-36154G Institutional support: RVO:67985998 Keywords : MIMIC model * education al inequality * academic performance Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 2.697, year: 2016

  2. Molecularly-imprinted polymers as synythetic mimics of bioreceptors. 2. Applications in modern biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergeyeva T. A.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to the analysis of publications on the synthesis of artificial mimics of biological receptors as well as their application in biotechnology. The special attention is paid to such areas of biotechnology: sensor technology, solid-phase extraction, pseudoimmunoassay, and chromatography.

  3. The role of the hipermobile mimic muscules of midle face on the postrhinoplastic results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayk D. Yenokyan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In article questions of influence of mimic muscles on the remote results ринопластических operations are considered. Use Botox (botulotoxin type A for improvement of results rhinoplasties.

  4. Efficient Nuclear DNA Cleavage in Human Cancer Cells by Synthetic Bleomycin Mimics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Qian; van der Wijst, Monique G. P.; Kazemier, Hinke G.; Rots, Marianne G.; Roelfes, Gerard

    Iron complexes of N,N-bis(2-Pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)-methylamine (N4Py) have proven to be excellent synthetic mimics of the Bleomycins (BLMs), which are a family of natural antibiotics used clinically in the treatment of certain cancers. However, most investigations of DNA cleavage activity

  5. Design of Effective Primary MicroRNA Mimics With Different Basal Stem Conformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona T van den Berg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary microRNA (pri-miRNA mimics are important mediators of effective gene silencing and are well suited for sustained therapeutic applications. Pri-miRNA mimics are processed in the endogenous miRNA biogenesis pathway, where elements of the secondary RNA structure are crucial for efficient miRNA production. Cleavage of the pri-miRNA to a precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA by Drosha-DGCR8 typically occurs adjacent to a basal stem of ≃11 bp. However, a number of pri-miRNA structures are expected to contain slightly shorter or longer basal stems, which may be further disrupted in predicted folding of the expressed pri-miRNA sequence. We investigated the function and processing of natural and exogenous RNA guides from pri-miRNAs with various basal stems (9–13 bp, where a canonical hairpin was predicted to be well or poorly maintained in predicted structures of the expressed sequence. We have shown that RNA guides can be effectively derived from pri-miRNAs with various basal stem conformations, while predicted guide region stability can explain the function of pri-miRNA mimics, in agreement with previously proposed design principles. This study provides insight for the design of effective mimics based on naturally occurring pri-miRNAs and has identified several novel scaffolds suitable for use in gene silencing applications.

  6. A novel nitrogen-dependent gene associates with the lesion mimic trait in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesion mimic (LM) refers to hypersensitive reaction-like (HRL) symptoms that appears on leaf tissue in the absence of plant pathogens. In a wheat line P7001, LM showed up on the leaves under the 0 g nitrogen (N) treatment, but disappeared when sufficient N was supplied, suggesting that LM is N-respo...

  7. Synthesis of oxime-linked mucin mimics containing thetumor-related TN and sialyl TN antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcaurelle, Lisa A.; Shin, Youngsook; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi,Carolyn R.

    2001-08-21

    The synthesis of oxime-linked mucin mimics was accomplished via the incorporation of multiple ketone residues into a peptide followed by reaction with aminooxy sugars corresponding to the tumor-related T{sub N} and sialyl T{sub N} (ST{sub N}) antigens.

  8. Recent advances in compartmentalized synthetic architectures as drug carriers, cell mimics and artificial organelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    York-Durán, María José; Gallardo, Maria Godoy; Labay, Cédric Pierre

    2017-01-01

    significant research attention and these assemblies are proposed as candidate materials for a range of biomedical applications. In this Review article, the recent successes of multicompartment architectures as carriers for the delivery of therapeutic cargo or the creation of micro- and nanoreactors that mimic...

  9. A homogeneous biochemiluminescent assay for detection of influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Kwok Min; Li, Xiao Jing; Pan, Lu; Li, X. J.

    2015-05-01

    Current methods of rapid detection of influenza are based on detection of the nucleic acids or antigens of influenza viruses. Since influenza viruses constantly mutate leading to appearance of new strains or variants of viruses, these detection methods are susceptible to genetic changes in influenza viruses. Type A and B influenza viruses contain neuraminidase, an essential enzyme for virus replication which enables progeny influenza viruses leave the host cells to infect new cells. Here we describe an assay method, the homogeneous biochemiluminescent assay (HBA), for rapid detection of influenza by detecting viral neuraminidase activity. The assay mimics the light production process of a firefly: a viral neuraminidase specific substrate containing a luciferin moiety is cleaved in the presence of influenza virus to release luciferin, which becomes a substrate to firefly luciferase in a light production system. All reagents can be formulated in a single reaction mix so that the assay involves only one manual step, i.e., sample addition. Presence of Type A or B influenza virus in the sample leads to production of strong, stable and easily detectable light signal, which lasts for hours. Thus, this influenza virus assay is suitable for use in point-of-care settings.

  10. Reproduction, physiology and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter summarizes fundamental knowledge and recent discoveries about the reproduction, physiology and biochemistry of plant-parasitic nematodes. Various types of reproduction are reviewed, including sexual reproduction and mitotic and meiotic parthenogenesis. Although much is known about the p...

  11. Physiology of Ramadan fasting

    OpenAIRE

    Shokoufeh Bonakdaran

    2016-01-01

    Considering the emphasis of Islam on the importance of fasting, Muslims attempt to fast from dawn until sunset during the holy month of Ramadan. Fasting is associated with several benefits for normal and healthy individuals. However, it could pose high risks to the health of diabetic patients due to certain physiological changes. This study aimed to compare the physiological changes associated with fasting in healthy individuals and diabetic patients during Ramadan. Furthermore, we reviewed t...

  12. Respiratory physiology at altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, C; Naylor, J

    2011-03-01

    The changes in respiratory physiology that occur with increasing altitude are driven by the fall in the partial pressure of oxygen that occurs with decreasing barometric pressure. At altitude, respiratory system changes occur which impact on each step of the oxygen cascade that occurs within the body. These changes are pivotal to the process of acclimatisation to altitude. The study of human respiratory physiology at altitude has the potential to produce research that will be translational to disease states characterised by hypoxaemia.

  13. Prehospital systolic blood pressure is higher in acute stroke compared with stroke mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Laura C; Zewude, Rahel T; Kate, Mahesh P; Liss, Kim; Rowe, Brian H; Buck, Brian; Jeerakathil, Thomas; Butcher, Ken

    2016-06-07

    To assess the natural history of prehospital blood pressure (BP) during emergency medical services (EMS) transport of suspected stroke and determine whether prehospital BP differs among types of patients with suspected stroke (ischemic stroke, TIA, intracerebral hemorrhage [ICH], or stroke mimic). A retrospective, cross-sectional, observational analysis of a centralized EMS database containing electronic records of patients transported by EMS to the emergency department (ED) with suspected stroke during an 18-month period was conducted. Hospital charts and neuroimaging were utilized to determine the final diagnosis (ischemic stroke, TIA, ICH, or stroke mimic). A total of 960 patients were transported by EMS to ED with suspected stroke. Stroke was diagnosed in 544 patients (56.7%) (38.2% ischemic stroke, 12.2% TIA, 5.3% ICH) and 416 (43.2%) were considered mimics. Age-adjusted mean prehospital systolic BP (SBP) was higher in acute stroke patients (155.6 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 153.4-157.9 mm Hg) compared to mimics (146.1 mm Hg; 95% CI: 142.5-148.6 mm Hg; p prehospital SBP was higher in ICH (172.3 mm Hg; 95% CI: 165.1-179.7 mm Hg) than in either ischemic stroke or TIA (154.7 mm Hg; 95% CI: 152.3-157.0 mm Hg; p prehospital SBP to ED SBP was 4 mm Hg (-6 to 17 mm Hg). Mean prehospital SBP was strongly correlated with ED SBP (r = 0.82, p Prehospital SBP is higher in acute stroke relative to stroke mimics and highest in ICH. Given the stability of BP between initial EMS and ED measurements, it may be reasonable to test the feasibility and safety of prehospital antihypertensive therapy in patients with suspected acute stroke. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC-II): A public-access intensive care unit database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Mohammed; Villarroel, Mauricio; Reisner, Andrew T.; Clifford, Gari; Lehman, Li-Wei; Moody, George; Heldt, Thomas; Kyaw, Tin H.; Moody, Benjamin; Mark, Roger G.

    2011-01-01

    Diseases, 9th Revision codes, the following disease categories each comprised at least 5% of the case records: diseases of the circulatory system (39.1%); trauma (10.2%); diseases of the digestive system (9.7%); pulmonary diseases (9.0%); infectious diseases (7.0%); and neoplasms (6.8%). Conclusions MIMIC-II documents a diverse and very large population of intensive care unit patient stays and contains comprehensive and detailed clinical data, including physiological waveforms and minute-by-minute trends for a subset of records. It establishes a new public-access resource for critical care research, supporting a diverse range of analytic studies spanning epidemiology, clinical decision-rule development, and electronic tool development. PMID:21283005

  15. Global assays of fibrinolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilich, A; Bokarev, I; Key, N S

    2017-10-01

    Fibrinolysis is an important and integral part of the hemostatic system. Acting as a balance to blood coagulation, the fibrinolytic system protects the body from unwanted thrombus formation and occlusion of blood vessels. As long as blood coagulation and fibrinolysis remain in equilibrium, response to injury, such as vessel damage, is appropriately regulated. However, alterations in this balance may lead to thrombosis or bleeding. A variety of methods have been proposed to assess fibrinolytic activity in blood or its components, but due to the complexity of the system, the design of a "gold standard" assay that reflects overall fibrinolysis has remained an elusive goal. In this review, we describe the most commonly used methods that have been described, such as thromboelastography (TEG and ROTEM), global fibrinolytic capacity in plasma and whole blood, plasma turbidity methods, simultaneous thrombin and plasmin generation assays, euglobulin clot lysis time and fibrin plate methods. All of these assays have strengths and limitations. We suggest that some methods may be preferable for detecting hypofibrinolytic conditions, whereas others may be better for detecting hyperfibrinolytic states. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Lucigenin chemiluminescence assay as an adjunctive tool for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    *Pathology and Physiology Research Branch, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health,. Morgantown, WV 26505, USA. †Corresponding author (Fax, 304-293-5449; Email, kvandyke@hsc.wvu.edu). A simple, fast, precise and biologically relevant toxicity assay for screening cytotoxicity of minerals would have.

  17. Reconstituting redox active centers of heme-containing proteins with biomineralized gold toward peroxidase mimics with strong intrinsic catalysis and electrocatalysis for H2O2 detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyan; Li, Shuai; Dong, Minmin; Jiang, Yao; Li, Ru; Zhang, Shuo; Lv, Xiaoxia; Chen, Lijun; Wang, Hua

    2017-01-15

    A facile and efficient enzymatic reconstitution methodology has been proposed for high-catalysis peroxidase mimics by remolding the redox active centers of heme-containing proteins with the in-site biomineralized gold using hemoglobin (Hb) as a model. Catalytic hemin (Hem) was extracted from the active centers of Hb for the gold biomineralization and then reconstituted into apoHb to yield the Hem-Au@apoHb nanocomposites showing dramatically improved intrinsic catalysis and electrocatalysis over natural Hb and Hem. The biomineralized gold, on the one hand, would act as "nanowires" to promote the electron transferring of the nanocomposites. On the other hand, it would create a reactivity pathway to pre-organize and accumulate more substrates towards the active sites of the peroxidase mimics. Steady-state kinetics studies indicate that Hem-Au@apoHb could present much higher substrate affinity (lower Michaelis constants) and intrinsic catalysis even than some natural peroxidases. Moreover, the application feasibility of the prepared artificial enzymes was demonstrated by colorimetric assays and direct electrocatalysis for H2O2 sensing, showing a detection limitation low as 0.45μM. Importantly, such a catalysis active-center reconstitution protocol may circumvent the substantial improvement of the intrinsic catalysis and electrocatalysis of diverse heme-containing proteins or enyzmes toward the extensive applications in the chemical, enviromental, and biomedical catalysis fields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Deficiency of zebrafish fgf20a results in aberrant skull remodeling that mimics both human cranial disease and evolutionarily important fish skull morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, W James; Wirgau, Rachel M; Sweet, Elly M; Albertson, R Craig

    2013-01-01

    The processes that direct skull remodeling are of interest to both human-oriented studies of cranial dysplasia and evolutionary studies of skull divergence. There is increasing awareness that these two fields can be mutually informative when natural variation mimics pathology. Here we describe a zebrafish mutant line, devoid of blastema (dob), which does not have a functional fgf20a protein, and which also presents cranial defects similar to both adaptive and clinical variation. We used geometric morphometric methods to provide quantitative descriptions of the effects of the dob mutation on skull morphogenesis. In combination with "whole-mount in situ hybridization" labeling of normal fgf20a expression and assays for osteoblast and osteoclast activity, the results of these analyses indicate that cranial dysmorphologies in dob zebrafish are generated by aberrations in post-embryonic skull remodeling via decreased osteoblasotgenesis and increased osteoclastogenesis. Mutational effects include altered skull vault geometries and midfacial hypoplasia that are consistent with key diagnostic signs for multiple human craniofacial syndromes. These phenotypic shifts also mimic changes in the functional morphology of fish skulls that have arisen repeatedly in several highly successful radiations (e.g., damselfishes and East-African rift-lake cichlids). Our results offer the dob/fgf20a mutant as an experimentally tractable model with which to examine post-embryonic skull development as it relates to human disease and vertebrate evolution. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Two interdependent mechanisms of antimicrobial activity allow for efficient killing in nylon-3-based polymeric mimics of innate immunity peptides ☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle W.; Chakraborty, Saswata; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Murgai, Rajan; Gellman, Samuel H.; Wong, Gerard C.L.

    2015-01-01

    Novel synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides have been developed to exhibit structural properties and antimicrobial activity similar to those of natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) of the innate immune system. These molecules have a number of potential advantages over conventional antibiotics, including reduced bacterial resistance, cost-effective preparation, and customizable designs. In this study, we investigate a family of nylon-3 polymer-based antimicrobials. By combining vesicle dye leakage, bacterial permeation, and bactericidal assays with small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we find that these polymers are capable of two interdependent mechanisms of action: permeation of bacterial membranes and binding to intracellular targets such as DNA, with the latter necessarily dependent on the former. We systemically examine polymer-induced membrane deformation modes across a range of lipid compositions that mimic both bacteria and mammalian cell membranes. The results show that the polymers' ability to generate negative Gaussian curvature (NGC), a topological requirement for membrane permeation and cellular entry, in model Escherichia coli membranes correlates with their ability to permeate membranes without complete membrane disruption and kill E. coli cells. Our findings suggest that these polymers operate with a concentration dependent mechanism of action: at low concentrations permeation and DNA binding occur without membrane disruption, while at high concentrations complete disruption of the membrane occurs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. PMID:24743021

  20. Amphiphilic polymeric micelles as microreactors: improving the photocatalytic hydrogen production of the [FeFe]-hydrogenase mimic in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Wen, Min; Feng, Ke; Liang, Wen-Jing; Li, Xu-Bing; Chen, Bin; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2016-01-11

    An amphiphilic polymeric micelle is utilized as a microreactor to load a hydrophobic [FeFe]-hydrogenase mimic in water. The local concentration enhancement and strong interaction between the mimic and the photosensitizer as well as the water-mediated fast proton migration caused by the microreactor improve photocatalytic hydrogen production remarkably in water.

  1. Bioprinting towards Physiologically Relevant Tissue Models for Pharmaceutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Weijie; Unutmaz, Derya; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T

    2016-09-01

    Improving the ability to predict the efficacy and toxicity of drug candidates earlier in the drug discovery process will speed up the introduction of new drugs into clinics. 3D in vitro systems have significantly advanced the drug screening process as 3D tissue models can closely mimic native tissues and, in some cases, the physiological response to drugs. Among various in vitro systems, bioprinting is a highly promising technology possessing several advantages such as tailored microarchitecture, high-throughput capability, coculture ability, and low risk of cross-contamination. In this opinion article, we discuss the currently available tissue models in pharmaceutics along with their limitations and highlight the possibilities of bioprinting physiologically relevant tissue models, which hold great potential in drug testing, high-throughput screening, and disease modeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Human physiology in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernikos, J.

    1996-01-01

    The universality of gravity (1 g) in our daily lives makes it difficult to appreciate its importance in morphology and physiology. Bone and muscle support systems were created, cellular pumps developed, neurons organised and receptors and transducers of gravitational force to biologically relevant signals evolved under 1g gravity. Spaceflight provides the only microgravity environment where systematic experimentation can expand our basic understanding of gravitational physiology and perhaps provide new insights into normal physiology and disease processes. These include the surprising extent of our body's dependence on perceptual information, and understanding the effect and importance of forces generated within the body's weightbearing structures such as muscle and bones. Beyond this exciting prospect is the importance of this work towards opening the solar system for human exploration. Although both appear promising, we are only just beginning to taste what lies ahead.

  3. Synthetic surfactant containing SP-B and SP-C mimics is superior to single-peptide formulations in rabbits with chemical acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans J. Walther

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chemical spills are on the rise and inhalation of toxic chemicals may induce chemical acute lung injury (ALI/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Although the pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS is well understood, the absence of specific antidotes has limited the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions.Objectives. Surfactant inactivation and formation of free radicals are important pathways in (chemical ALI. We tested the potential of lipid mixtures with advanced surfactant protein B and C (SP-B and C mimics to improve oxygenation and lung compliance in rabbits with lavage- and chemical-induced ALI/ARDS.Methods. Ventilated young adult rabbits underwent repeated saline lung lavages or underwent intratracheal instillation of hydrochloric acid to induce ALI/ARDS. After establishment of respiratory failure rabbits were treated with a single intratracheal dose of 100 mg/kg of synthetic surfactant composed of 3% Super Mini-B (S-MB, a SP-B mimic, and/or SP-C33 UCLA, a SP-C mimic, in a lipid mixture (DPPC:POPC:POPG 5:3:2 by weight, the clinical surfactant Infasurf®, a bovine lung lavage extract with SP-B and C, or synthetic lipids alone. End-points consisted of arterial oxygenation, dynamic lung compliance, and protein and lipid content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Potential mechanism of surfactant action for S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA were investigated with captive bubble surfactometry (CBS assays.Results. All three surfactant peptide/lipid mixtures and Infasurf equally lowered the minimum surface tension on CBS, and also improved oxygenation and lung compliance. In both animal models, the two-peptide synthetic surfactant with S-MB and SP-C33 UCLA led to better arterial oxygenation and lung compliance than single peptide synthetic surfactants and Infasurf. Synthetic surfactants and Infasurf improved lung function further in lavage- than in chemical-induced respiratory failure, with the difference probably due to greater capillary

  4. Radon assay for SNO+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumleskie, Janet [Laurentian University, Greater Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  5. How well does cholesteryl hemisuccinate mimic cholesterol in saturated phospholipid bilayers?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulig, W.; Tynkkynen, J.; Javanainen, M.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesteryl hemisuccinate is a detergent that is often used to replace cholesterol in crystallization of membrane proteins. Here we employ atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to characterize how well the properties of cholesteryl hemisuccinate actually match those of cholesterol in saturated...... protein-free lipid membranes. We show that the protonated form of cholesteryl hemisuccinate mimics many of the membrane properties of cholesterol quite well, while the deprotonated form of cholesteryl hemisuccinate is less convincing in this respect. Based on the results, we suggest that cholesteryl...... hemisuccinate in its protonated form is a quite faithful mimic of cholesterol for membrane protein crystallization, if specific cholesterol-protein interactions (not investigated here) are not playing a crucial role....

  6. Adding a Lysine Mimic in the Design of Potent Inhibitors of Histone Lysine Methyltransferases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yanqi; Ganesh, Thota; Horton, John R.; Spannhoff, Astrid; Liu, Jin; Sun, Aiming; Zhang, Xing; Bedford, Mark T.; Shinkai, Yoichi; Snyder, James P.; Cheng, Xiaodong (Emory); (Kyoto); (Texas)

    2010-07-19

    Dynamic histone lysine methylation involves the activities of modifying enzymes (writers), enzymes removing modifications (erasers), and readers of the histone code. One common feature of these activities is the recognition of lysines in methylated and unmethylated states, whether they are substrates, reaction products, or binding partners. We applied the concept of adding a lysine mimic to an established inhibitor (BIX-01294) of histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferases G9a and G9a-like protein by including a 5-aminopentyloxy moiety, which is inserted into the target lysine-binding channel and becomes methylated by G9a-like protein, albeit slowly. The compound enhances its potency in vitro and reduces cell toxicity in vivo. We suggest that adding a lysine or methyl-lysine mimic should be considered in the design of small-molecule inhibitors for other methyl-lysine writers, erasers, and readers.

  7. Idiopathic Hypertrophic Pyloric Stenosis in an Adult, a Potential Mimic of Gastric Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Zarineh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary or idiopathic hypertrophy of the pyloric muscle (IHPM is a rare entity with uncertain pathogenesis which both clinically and pathologically mimics gastric cancer. We present a rare late-occurring case of IHPM in a 71-year-old Caucasian man with no apparent predisposing factor. Imaging studies demonstrated gastric distension with air fluid levels and no evidence of extrinsic compression. At upper endoscopy, massive gastric distension and no evidence of any ulcer or other mucosal defects were observed. Microscopically, marked hypertrophy of muscularis mucosa with smooth muscle cells arranged in whorls and fascicles was present which gradually transitioned to normal areas. The muscle fibers stained with smooth muscle actin and trichrome stain highlighted fibrosis between the muscle fibers. Although uncommon, IHPM can clinically and histologically mimic other proliferations in the gastric wall, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor or a spindle cell neoplasm. The recent advances in understanding the pathogenesis of IHPM are discussed.

  8. Glutathione Peroxidase Mimic Ebselen Improves Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion in Murine Islets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinhui; Yun, Jun-Won

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Glutathione peroxidase (GPX) mimic ebselen and superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimic copper diisopropylsalicylate (CuDIPs) were used to rescue impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in islets of GPX1 and(or) SOD1-knockout mice. Results: Ebselen improved GSIS in islets of all four tested genotypes. The rescue in the GPX1 knockout resulted from a coordinated transcriptional regulation of four key GSIS regulators and was mediated by the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α)-mediated signaling pathways. In contrast, CuDIPs improved GSIS only in the SOD1 knockout and suppressed gene expression of the PGC-1α pathway. Innovation: Islets from the GPX1 and(or) SOD1 knockout mice provided metabolically controlled intracellular hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide conditions for the present study to avoid confounding effects. Bioinformatics analyses of gene promoters and expression profiles guided the search for upstream signaling pathways to link the ebselen-initiated H2O2 scavenging to downstream key events of GSIS. The RNA interference was applied to prove PGC-1α as the main mediator for that link. Conclusion: Our study revealed a novel metabolic use and clinical potential of ebselen in rescuing GSIS in the GPX1-deficient islets and mice, along with distinct differences between the GPX and SOD mimics in this regard. These findings highlight the necessities and opportunities of discretional applications of various antioxidant enzyme mimics in treating insulin secretion disorders. Rebound Track: This work was rejected during standard peer review and rescued by Rebound Peer Review (Antioxid Redox Signal 16: 293–296, 2012) with the following serving as open reviewers: Regina Brigelius-Flohe, Vadim Gladyshev, Dexing Hou, and Holger Steinbrenner. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 191–203. PMID:23795780

  9. Biomolecular Programming of Discrete Nanomaterials for Sensors, Templates and Mimics of Natural Nanoscale Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-17

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0343 BIOMOLECULAR PROGRAMMING OF DISCRETE NANOMATERIALS FOR SENSORS, TEMPLATES AND MIMICS OF NATURAL NANOSCALE ASSEMBLIES...Performance 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 01 Jun 2011 to 31 May 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE BIOMOLECULAR PROGRAMMING OF DISCRETE NANOMATERIALS FOR SENSORS...term use are needed; hence our interest in stabilized but responsive biomolecular materials and conjugates between 2011 and 2016. In terms of melanin

  10. Molecularly imprinted polymers as synthetic mimics of bioreceptors. 1. General principles of molecular imprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergeyeva T. A.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to analysis of the publications in the area of synthesis of artificial mimics of biological receptors using the method of molecular imprinting. General principles of molecular imprinting as well as main types of polymers being used in molecular imprinting are described. The special attention is paid to the polymers-biomimics synthesized using the method of non-covalent molecular imprinting.

  11. A scale?down mimic for mapping the process performance of centrifugation, depth and sterile filtration

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the production of biopharmaceuticals disk?stack centrifugation is widely used as a harvest step for the removal of cells and cellular debris. Depth filters followed by sterile filters are often then employed to remove residual solids remaining in the centrate. Process development of centrifugation is usually conducted at pilot?scale so as to mimic the commercial scale equipment but this method requires large quantities of cell culture and significant levels of effort for successfu...

  12. Active Immunization Using a Peptide Mimic of a Carbohydrate Tumor Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    improve current therapeutic regimes for breast cancer. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Tumor Inmunology , Vaccines 7 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY...allow the immune system to target and destroy TF-Ag expressing cancer cells. Body My training and research accomplishments for the past year have focused... system would provide better results. Four rabbits were immunized with peptide mimics, and one of these rabbits showed a low level increase after 3

  13. Tegaserod Mimics the Neurostimulatory Glycan Polysialic Acid and Promotes Nervous System Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Scheper, T., Grothe, C., Gerardy-Schahn, R., Kirschning, A., Drager, G., 2008. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a polysialic acid -based hydrogel...Steinhauser, C., 2004. Neural cell adhesion molecule-associated polysialic acid potentiates alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4- propionic acid ...Tegaserod mimics the neurostimulatory glycan polysialic acid and promotes nervous system repairq J. Bushman a, B. Mishra b, M. Ezra a, S. Gul c, C

  14. Proteomic analysis of a disease-resistance-enhanced lesion mimic mutant spotted leaf 5 in rice

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xifeng; Fu, Shufang; Zhang, Pinghua; Gu, Zhimin; Liu, Jianzhong; Qian, Qian; Ma, Bojun

    2013-01-01

    Background A lesion-mimic mutant in rice (Oryza sativa L.), spotted leaf 5 (spl5), displays a disease-resistance-enhanced phenotype, indicating that SPL5 negatively regulates cell death and resistance responses. To understand the molecular mechanisms of SPL5 mutation-induced cell death and resistance responses, a proteomics-based approach was used to identify differentially accumulated proteins between the spl5 mutant and wild type (WT). Results Proteomic data from two-dimensional gel electro...

  15. Preparation of High-Density Fibrillar Collagen Matrices that Mimic Desmoplastic Tumor Stroma

    OpenAIRE

    Artym, Vira V.

    2016-01-01

    The stroma of invasive tumors becomes enriched in dense fibrillar collagen as a result of the desmoplastic reaction. This desmoplastic collagen exerts profound effects on tumor and normal cells. In view of these findings, it is important to develop novel in vitro cell systems that mimic this desmoplastic extracellular matrix in order to permit cell studies under in vivo-like conditions. This Unit provides a protocol and troubleshooting guide for the preparation of high density fibrillar colla...

  16. Chemical UV Filters Mimic the Effect of Progesterone on Ca(2+) Signaling in Human Sperm Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, A; Dissing, S; Skakkebæk, N E

    2016-01-01

    Progesterone released by cumulus cells surrounding the egg induces a Ca(2+) influx into human sperm cells via the cationic channel of sperm (CatSper) Ca(2+) channel and controls multiple Ca(2+)-dependent responses essential for fertilization. We hypothesized that chemical UV filters may mimic...... competitively inhibited progesterone-induced Ca(2+) signals. In vivo exposure studies are needed to investigate whether UV filter exposure affects human fertility....

  17. Characterization and fine mapping of a light-dependent leaf lesion mimic mutant 1 in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Ye, Bangquan; Yin, Junjie; Yuan, Can; Zhou, Xiaogang; Li, Weitao; He, Min; Wang, Jichun; Chen, Weilan; Qin, Peng; Ma, Bintian; Wang, Yuping; Li, Shigui; Chen, Xuewei

    2015-12-01

    Plants that spontaneously produce lesion mimics or spots, without any signs of obvious adversity, such as pesticide and mechanical damage, or pathogen infection, are so-called lesion mimic mutants (lmms). In rice, many lmms exhibit enhanced resistance to pathogens, which provides a unique opportunity to uncover the molecular mechanism underlying lmms. We isolated a rice light-dependent leaf lesion mimic mutant 1 (llm1). Lesion spots appeared in the leaves of the llm1 mutant at the tillering stage. Furthermore, the mutant llm1 had similar agronomic traits to wild type rice. Trypan blue and diamiobenzidine staining analyses revealed that the lesion spot formation on the llm1 mutant was due to programmed cell death and reactive oxygen species. The chloroplasts were severely damaged in the llm1 mutant, suggesting that chloroplast damage was associated with the formation of lesion spots in llm1. More importantly, llm1 exhibited enhanced resistance to bacterial blight pathogens within increased expression of pathogenesis related genes (PRs). Using a map-based cloning approach, we delimited the LLM1 locus to a 121-kb interval between two simple sequence repeat markers, RM17470 and RM17473, on chromosome 4. We sequenced the candidate genes on the interval and found that a base mutation had substituted adenine phosphate for thymine in the last exon of LOC_Os04g52130, which led to an amino acid change (Asp(388) to Val) in the llm1 mutant. Our investigation showed that the putative coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (CPOX) encoded by LOC_Os04g52130 was produced by LLM1 and that amino acid Asp(388) was essential for CPOX function. Our study provides the basis for further investigations into the mechanism underlying lesion mimic initiation associated with LLM1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Artificial cell mimics as simplified models for the study of cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi-Reyhani, Ali; Ces, Oscar; Elani, Yuval

    2017-07-01

    Living cells are hugely complex chemical systems composed of a milieu of distinct chemical species (including DNA, proteins, lipids, and metabolites) interconnected with one another through a vast web of interactions: this complexity renders the study of cell biology in a quantitative and systematic manner a difficult task. There has been an increasing drive towards the utilization of artificial cells as cell mimics to alleviate this, a development that has been aided by recent advances in artificial cell construction. Cell mimics are simplified cell-like structures, composed from the bottom-up with precisely defined and tunable compositions. They allow specific facets of cell biology to be studied in isolation, in a simplified environment where control of variables can be achieved without interference from a living and responsive cell. This mini-review outlines the core principles of this approach and surveys recent key investigations that use cell mimics to address a wide range of biological questions. It will also place the field in the context of emerging trends, discuss the associated limitations, and outline future directions of the field. Impact statement Recent years have seen an increasing drive to construct cell mimics and use them as simplified experimental models to replicate and understand biological phenomena in a well-defined and controlled system. By summarizing the advances in this burgeoning field, and using case studies as a basis for discussion on the limitations and future directions of this approach, it is hoped that this minireview will spur others in the experimental biology community to use artificial cells as simplified models with which to probe biological systems.

  19. Smells like aphids: orchid flowers mimic aphid alarm pheromones to attract hoverflies for pollination

    OpenAIRE

    Stökl, Johannes; Brodmann, Jennifer; Dafni, Amots; Ayasse, Manfred; Hansson, Bill S.

    2010-01-01

    Most insects are dependent on chemical communication for activities such as mate finding or host location. Several plants, and especially orchids, mimic insect semiochemicals to attract insects for unrewarded pollination. Here, we present a new case of pheromone mimicry found in the terrestrial orchid Epipactis veratrifolia. Flowers are visited and pollinated by several species of aphidophagous hoverflies, the females of which also often lay eggs in the flowers. The oviposition behaviour of t...

  20. Field physiology: physiological insights from animals in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Daniel P; Sinervo, Barry

    2004-01-01

    Whereas comparative physiology documents the range of physiological variation across a range of organisms, field physiology provides insight into the actual mechanisms an organism employs to maintain homeostasis in its everyday life. This requires an understanding of an organism's natural history and is prerequisite to developing hypotheses about physiological mechanisms. This review focuses on a few areas of field physiology that exemplify how the underlying physiology could not have been understood without appropriate field measurements. The examples we have chosen highlight the methods and inference afforded by an application of this physiological analysis to organismal function in nature, often in extreme environments. The specific areas examined are diving physiology, the thermal physiology of large endothermic fishes, reproductive physiology of air breathing vertebrates, and endocrine physiology of reproductive homeostasis. These areas form a bridge from physiological ecology to evolutionary ecology. All our examples revolve around the central issue of physiological limits as they apply to organismal homeostasis. We view this theme as the cornerstone of physiological analysis and supply a number of paradigms on homeostasis that have been tested in the context of field physiology.

  1. Sequence-specific base pair mimics are efficient topoisomerase IB inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekhoff, Pierre; Duca, Maria; Guianvarc'h, Dominique; Benhida, Rachid; Arimondo, Paola B

    2012-01-10

    Topoisomerase IB controls DNA topology by cleaving DNA transiently. This property is used by inhibitors, such as camptothecin, that stabilize, by inhibiting the religation step, the cleavage complex, in which the enzyme is covalently attached to the 3'-phosphate of the cleaved DNA strand. These drugs are used in clinics as antitumor agents. Because three-dimensional structural studies have shown that camptothecin derivatives act as base pair mimics and intercalate between two base pairs in the ternary DNA-topoisomerase-inhibitor complex, we hypothesized that base pairs mimics could act like campthotecin and inhibit the religation reaction after the formation of the topoisomerase I-DNA cleavage complex. We show here that three base pair mimics, nucleobases analogues of the aminophenyl-thiazole family, once targeted specifically to a DNA sequence were potent topoisomerase IB inhibitors. The targeting was achieved through covalent linkage to a sequence-specific DNA ligand, a triplex-forming oligonucleotide, and was necessary to position and keep the nucleobase analogue in the cleavage complex. In the absence of triplex formation, only a weak binding to the DNA and topoisomerase I-mediated DNA cleavage was observed. The three compounds were equally active once conjugated, implying that the intercalation of the nucleobase upon triplex formation is the essential feature for the inhibition activity.

  2. DNA Mimics for the Rapid Identification of Microorganisms by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J. Vieira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH is a well-established technique that is used for a variety of purposes, ranging from pathogen detection in clinical diagnostics to the determination of chromosomal stability in stem cell research. The key step of FISH involves the detection of a nucleic acid region and as such, DNA molecules have typically been used to probe for the sequences of interest. However, since the turn of the century, an increasing number of laboratories have started to move on to the more robust DNA mimics methods, most notably peptide and locked nucleic acids (PNA and LNA. In this review, we will cover the state-of-the-art of the different DNA mimics in regard to their application as efficient markers for the presence of individual microbial cells, and consider their potential advantages and pitfalls. Available PNA probes are then reassessed in terms of sensitivity and specificity using rRNA databases. In addition, we also attempt to predict the applicability of DNA mimics in well-known techniques attempting to detect in situ low number of copies of specific nucleic acid sequences such as catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD and recognition of individual genes (RING FISH.

  3. Virulent Burkholderia species mimic host actin polymerases to drive actin-based motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benanti, Erin L; Nguyen, Catherine M; Welch, Matthew D

    2015-04-09

    Burkholderia pseudomallei and B. mallei are bacterial pathogens that cause melioidosis and glanders, whereas their close relative B. thailandensis is non-pathogenic. All use the trimeric autotransporter BimA to facilitate actin-based motility, host cell fusion, and dissemination. Here, we show that BimA orthologs mimic different host actin-polymerizing proteins. B. thailandensis BimA activates the host Arp2/3 complex. In contrast, B. pseudomallei and B. mallei BimA mimic host Ena/VASP actin polymerases in their ability to nucleate, elongate, and bundle filaments by associating with barbed ends, as well as in their use of WH2 motifs and oligomerization for activity. Mechanistic differences among BimA orthologs resulted in distinct actin filament organization and motility parameters, which affected the efficiency of cell fusion during infection. Our results identify bacterial Ena/VASP mimics and reveal that pathogens imitate the full spectrum of host actin-polymerizing pathways, suggesting that mimicry of different polymerization mechanisms influences key parameters of infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Instructions to mimic improve facial emotion recognition in people with sub-clinical autism traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Michael B; Dunn, Emily

    2017-11-01

    People tend to mimic the facial expression of others. It has been suggested that this helps provide social glue between affiliated people but it could also aid recognition of emotions through embodied cognition. The degree of facial mimicry, however, varies between individuals and is limited in people with autism spectrum conditions (ASC). The present study sought to investigate the effect of promoting facial mimicry during a facial-emotion-recognition test. In two experiments, participants without an ASC diagnosis had their autism quotient (AQ) measured. Following a baseline test, they did an emotion-recognition test again but half of the participants were asked to mimic the target face they saw prior to making their responses. Mimicry improved emotion recognition, and further analysis revealed that the largest improvement was for participants who had higher scores on the autism traits. In fact, recognition performance was best overall for people who had high AQ scores but also received the instruction to mimic. Implications for people with ASC are explored.

  5. DNA mimics for the rapid identification of microorganisms by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Laura; Azevedo, Nuno F; Almeida, Carina; Jardim, Tatiana; Keevil, Charles William; Vieira, Maria J

    2008-10-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a well-established technique that is used for a variety of purposes, ranging from pathogen detection in clinical diagnostics to the determination of chromosomal stability in stem cell research. The key step of FISH involves the detection of a nucleic acid region and as such, DNA molecules have typically been used to probe for the sequences of interest. However, since the turn of the century, an increasing number of laboratories have started to move on to the more robust DNA mimics methods, most notably peptide and locked nucleic acids (PNA and LNA). In this review, we will cover the state-of-the-art of the different DNA mimics in regard to their application as efficient markers for the presence of individual microbial cells, and consider their potential advantages and pitfalls. Available PNA probes are then reassessed in terms of sensitivity and specificity using rRNA databases. In addition, we also attempt to predict the applicability of DNA mimics in well-known techniques attempting to detect in situ low number of copies of specific nucleic acid sequences such as catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD) and recognition of individual genes (RING) FISH.

  6. Settlement pattern of Posidonia oceanica epibionts along a gradient of ocean acidification: an approach with mimics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. DONNARUMMA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Effects of ocean acidification (OA on the colonization/settlement pattern of the epibiont community of the leaves and rhizomesof the Mediterranean seagrass,Posidoniaoceanica, have been studied at volcanic CO2vents off Ischia (Italy, using “mimics”as artificial substrates. The experiments were conducted in shallowPosidoniastands (2-3 m depth, in three stations on the northand three on the south sides of the study area, distributed along a pH gradient. At each station, 4 rhizome mimics and 6 artificialleaves were collected every three months (Sept 2009-Sept 2010. The epibionts on both leaf and rhizome mimics showed clearchanges along the pH gradient; coralline algae and calcareous invertebrates (bryozoans, serpulid polychaetes and barnacles weredominant at control stations but progressively disappeared at the most acidified stations. In these extremely low pH sites theassemblage was dominated by filamentous algae and non calcareous taxa such as hydroids and tunicates. Settlement pattern onthe artificial leaves and rhizome mimics over time showed a consistent distribution pattern along the pH gradient and highlightedthe peak of recruitment of the various organisms in different periods according to their life history.Posidoniamimics at theacidified station showed a poor and very simplified assemblage where calcifying epibionts seemed less competitive for space. Thisprofound difference in epiphyte communities in low pH conditions suggests cascading effects on the food web of the meadow and,consequently, on the functioning of the system

  7. Gibberellic and kaurenoic hybrid strigolactone mimics for seed germination of parasitic weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Rondinelle G; Cala, Antonio; Fernández-Aparicio, Mónica; Molinillo, José Mg; Boaventura, Maria Ad; Macías, Francisco A

    2017-12-01

    Parasitic weeds are widespread and cause significant losses in important crops. Their germination requires the detection of crop-derived molecules such as strigolactones. Strigolactone mimics are germination-inducing molecules with the potential to apply a suicidal germination strategy for seed bank control of parasitic weeds. The D-ring, which is instrumental in the germination process of seeds of parasitic weeds, was attached to gibberellin (GA3 ) and kaurenoic acid as the scaffold. It was shown that indeed strigolactone mimics prepared from GA3 and kaurenoic acid are active as stimulants when a D-ring is present; some of the mimics are as active as GR24. The starting molecules were plant hormones that had previous growth-regulating activity in other organisms and the products showed enhanced activity towards parasitic weeds. The information generated may contribute to a better understanding of the germination biochemistry of the weed species used. Further research is required in this area but it is clear that the results are promising. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Nigerian Journal of Physiological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Physiological Sciences (Niger. J. Physiol. Sci.) is a biannual publication of the Physiological Society of Nigeria. It covers diverse areas of research in physiological sciences, publishing reviews in current research areas and original laboratory and clinical research in physiological sciences. Other websites ...

  9. The Face of Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul White

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the relationship between the physiology of the emotions and the display of character in Victorian Britain. Charles Bell and others had begun to link certain physiological functions, such as respiration, with the expression of feelings such as fear, regarding the heart and other internal organs as instruments by which the emotions were made visible. But a purely functional account of the emotions, which emerged through the development of reflex physiology during the second half of the century, would dramatically alter the nature of feelings and the means of observing them. At the same time, instinctual or acquired sympathy, which had long underpinned the accurate reading of expressions, became a problem to be surmounted by new 'objectively'. Graphic recording instruments measuring a variety of physiological functions and used with increasing frequency in clinical diagnostics became of fundamental importance for tracing the movement of feelings during the period prior to the development of cinematography. They remained, in the form of devices such as the polygraph, a crucial and controversial means of measuring affective states, beneath the potentially deceptive surface of the body.

  10. Starting Physiology: Bioelectrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Vander

    2015-01-01

    From a Cartesian perspective of rational analysis, the electric potential difference across the cell membrane is one of the fundamental concepts for the study of physiology. Unfortunately, undergraduate students often struggle to understand the genesis of this energy gradient, which makes the teaching activity a hard task for the instructor. The…

  11. Physiology of alpine skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, J R; Kilding, A E; Keogh, J W L

    2009-04-01

    The extreme environment of cold, altitude and movement complexity makes alpine ski racing a difficult sport to study. This review comprises >30 years of research and includes 29 on-snow investigations of specific physiology relating to the various ski racing disciplines, nine off-snow investigations of the physiological capacities of ski racers of varying ability and four review articles. Alpine ski racing appears to involve a complex integration of many different physiological systems, none of which may be more important than the other to overall performance. While technical ability appears to be the greatest influencing factor on performance, the ability to continually exhibit technical competence through a long competitive season requires high capabilities within all physiological systems. Identifying the optimal approach and time to concurrently develop these systems is a challenge for sport scientists. Further research is required using modern portable investigative tools for determining aerobic and anaerobic demands and abilities, especially in the areas of muscle function and relative energy system contribution during both single and multiple runs on varying terrain.

  12. Physiology of Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carley, David W; Farabi, Sarah S

    2016-02-01

    IN BRIEF Far from a simple absence of wakefulness, sleep is an active, regulated, and metabolically distinct state, essential for health and well-being. In this article, the authors review the fundamental anatomy and physiology of sleep and its regulation, with an eye toward interactions between sleep and metabolism.

  13. Physiology Flies with Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Amita

    2017-11-30

    The 2017 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology has been awarded to Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael Young for elucidating molecular mechanisms of the circadian clock. From studies beginning in fruit flies, we now know that circadian regulation pervades most biological processes and has strong ties to human health and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Physiology of Breastfeeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    This powerpoint presentation summaries physiology of lactation and the impact of a variety of clinical practices on lactation from delivery through weaning. Factors that inhibit lactogenesis stage II are explained, including retained placenta, excess blood loss during delivery, and hypoplastic brea...

  15. The Physiology of Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellar, Eliot

    1994-01-01

    A theory of the physiology of motivation is presented. The basic assumption is that the amount of motivated behavior is a direct function of the amount of activity in certain excitatory centers of the hypothalamus. Activities of these centers are determined by factors in four general classes. (SLD)

  16. Research on gravitational physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, A. H.; Dahl, A. O.

    1974-01-01

    The topic of gravitational plant physiology was studied through aspects of plant development (in ARABIDOPSIS) and of behavior (in HELIANTHUS) as these were affected by altered g experience. The effect of increased g levels on stem polarity (in COLEUS) was also examined.

  17. Renal Physiology of Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Katharine L.; Lafayette, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy involves remarkable orchestration of physiologic changes. The kidneys are central players in the evolving hormonal milieu of pregnancy, responding and contributing to the changes in the environment for the pregnant woman and fetus. The functional impact of pregnancy on kidney physiology is widespread, involving practically all aspects of kidney function. The glomerular filtration rate increases 50% with subsequent decrease in serum creatinine, urea, and uric acid values. The threshold for thirst and antidiuretic hormone secretion are depressed, resulting in lower osmolality and serum sodium levels. Blood pressure drops approximately 10 mmHg by the second trimester despite a gain in intravascular volume of 30% to 50%. The drop in systemic vascular resistance is multifactorial, attributed in part to insensitivity to vasoactive hormones, and leads to activation of the renin-aldosterone-angiostensin system. A rise in serum aldosterone results in a net gain of approximately 1000 mg of sodium. A parallel rise in progesterone protects the pregnant woman from hypokalemia. The kidneys increase in length and volume, and physiologic hydronephrosis occurs in up to 80% of women. This review will provide an understanding of these important changes in kidney physiology during pregnancy, which is fundamental in caring for the pregnant patient. PMID:23928384

  18. Deficiency of Prdm13, a dorsomedial hypothalamus-enriched gene, mimics age-associated changes in sleep quality and adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Akiko; Brace, Cynthia S; Rensing, Nick; Imai, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-04-01

    The dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) controls a number of essential physiological responses. We have demonstrated that the DMH plays an important role in the regulation of mammalian aging and longevity. To further dissect the molecular basis of the DMH function, we conducted microarray-based gene expression profiling with total RNA from laser-microdissected hypothalamic nuclei and tried to find the genes highly and selectively expressed in the DMH. We found neuropeptide VF precursor (Npvf), PR domain containing 13 (Prdm13), and SK1 family transcriptional corepressor (Skor1) as DMH-enriched genes. Particularly, Prdm13, a member of the Prdm family of transcription regulators, was specifically expressed in the compact region of the DMH (DMC), where Nk2 homeobox 1 (Nkx2-1) is predominantly expressed. The expression of Prdm13 in the hypothalamus increased under diet restriction, whereas it decreased during aging. Prdm13 expression also showed diurnal oscillation and was significantly upregulated in the DMH of long-lived BRASTO mice. The transcriptional activity of the Prdm13 promoter was upregulated by Nkx2-1, and knockdown of Nkx2-1 suppressed Prdm13 expression in primary hypothalamic neurons. Interestingly, DMH-specific Prdm13-knockdown mice showed significantly reduced wake time during the dark period and decreased sleep quality, which was defined by the quantity of electroencephalogram delta activity during NREM sleep. DMH-specific Prdm13-knockdown mice also exhibited progressive increases in body weight and adiposity. Our findings indicate that Prdm13/Nkx2-1-mediated signaling in the DMC declines with advanced age, leading to decreased sleep quality and increased adiposity, which mimic age-associated pathophysiology, and provides a potential link to DMH-mediated aging and longevity control in mammals. © 2014 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Critical role of peripheral vasoconstriction in fatal brain hyperthermia induced by MDMA (Ecstasy) under conditions that mimic human drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Kim, Albert H; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2014-06-04

    MDMA (Ecstasy) is an illicit drug used by young adults at hot, crowed "rave" parties, yet the data on potential health hazards of its abuse remain controversial. Here, we examined the effect of MDMA on temperature homeostasis in male rats under standard laboratory conditions and under conditions that simulate drug use in humans. We chronically implanted thermocouple microsensors in the nucleus accumbens (a brain reward area), temporal muscle, and facial skin to measure temperature continuously from freely moving rats. While focusing on brain hyperthermia, temperature monitoring from the two peripheral locations allowed us to evaluate the physiological mechanisms (i.e., intracerebral heat production and heat loss via skin surfaces) that underlie MDMA-induced brain temperature responses. Our data confirm previous reports on high individual variability and relatively weak brain hyperthermic effects of MDMA under standard control conditions (quiet rest, 22-23°C), but demonstrate dramatic enhancements of drug-induced brain hyperthermia during social interaction (exposure to male conspecific) and in warm environments (29°C). Importantly, we identified peripheral vasoconstriction as a critical mechanism underlying the activity- and state-dependent potentiation of MDMA-induced brain hyperthermia. Through this mechanism, which prevents proper heat dissipation to the external environment, MDMA at a moderate nontoxic dose (9 mg/kg or ~1/5 of LD50 in rats) can cause fatal hyperthermia under environmental conditions commonly encountered by humans. Our results demonstrate that doses of MDMA that are nontoxic under cool, quiet conditions can become highly dangerous under conditions that mimic recreational use of MDMA at rave parties or other hot, crowded venues. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/347754-09$15.00/0.

  20. Avian reproductive physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, G.F.; Gibbons, Edward F.; Durrant, Barbara S.; Demarest, Jack

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the many physiological factors associated with egg production , fertility, incubation, and brooding in nondomestic birds is limited. Science knows even less about reproduction in most of the 238 endangered or threatened birds. This discussion uses studies of nondomestic and, when necessary, domestic birds to describe physiological control of reproduction. Studies of the few nondomestic avian species show large variation in physiological control of reproduction. Aviculturists, in order to successfully propagate an endangered bird, must understand the bird's reproductive peculiarities. First, investigators can do studies with carefully chosen surrogate species, but eventually they need to confirm the results in the target endangered bird. Studies of reproduction in nondomestic birds increased in the last decade. Still, scientists need to do more comparative studies to understand the mechanisms that control reproduction in birds. New technologies are making it possible to study reproductive physiology of nondomestic species in less limiting ways. These technologies include telemetry to collect information without inducing stress on captives (Howey et al., 1987; Klugman, 1987), new tests for most of the humoral factors associated with reproduction, and the skill to collect small samples and manipulate birds without disrupting the physiological mechanisms (Bercovitz et al., 1985). Managers are using knowledge from these studies to improve propagation in zoological parks, private and public propagation facilities, and research institutions. Researchers need to study the control of ovulation, egg formation, and oviposition in the species of nondomestic birds that lay very few eggs in a season, hold eggs in the oviduct for longer intervals, or differ in other ways from the more thoroughly studied domestic birds. Other techniques that would enhance propagation for nondomestlc birds include tissue culture of cloned embryonic cells, cryopreservation of embryos

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Various Total Antioxidant Capacity Assays Applied to Phenolic Compounds with the CUPRAC Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Özyurt

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available It would be desirable to establish and standardize methods that can measure the total antioxidant capacity level directly from vegetable extracts containing phenolics. Antioxidant capacity assays may be broadly classified as electron transfer (ET− and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT−based assays. The majority of HAT assays are kinetics-based, and involve a competitive reaction scheme in which antioxidant and substrate compete for peroxyl radicals thermally generated through the decomposition of azo compounds. ET−based assays measure the capacity of an antioxidant in the reduction of an oxidant, which changes colour when reduced. ET assays include the ABTS/TEAC, CUPRAC, DPPH, Folin-Ciocalteu and FRAP methods, each using different chromogenic redox reagents with different standard potentials. This review intends to offer a critical evaluation of existing antioxidant assays applied to phenolics, and reports the development by our research group of a simple and low-cost antioxidant capacity assay for dietary polyphenols, vitamins C and E, and human serum antioxidants, utilizing the copper(II-neocuproine reagent as the chromogenic oxidizing agent, which we haved named the CUPRAC (cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity method. This method offers distinct advantages over other ET−based assays, namely the selection of working pH at physiological pH (as opposed to the Folin and FRAP methods, which work at alkaline and acidic pHs, respectively, applicability to both hydrophilic and lipophilic antioxidants (unlike Folin and DPPH, completion of the redox reactions for most common flavonoids (unlike FRAP, selective oxidation of antioxidant compounds without affecting sugars and citric acid commonly contained in foodstuffs and the capability to assay –SH bearing antioxidants (unlike FRAP. Other similar ET–based antioxidant assays that we have developed or modified for phenolics are the Fe

  2. Genomic and physiological perspectives on bioremediation processes at the FRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, Erick; Leigh, Mary Beth; Hemme, Christopher; Gentry, Terry; Harzman, Christina; Wu, Weimin; Criddle, Craig S.; Zhou, Jizhong; Marsh, Terence; Tiedje, James M.

    2006-04-05

    A suite of molecular and physiological studies, including metal reduction assays, metagenomics, functional gene microarrays and community sequence analyses were applied to investigate organisms involved in bioremediation processes at the ERSP Field Research Center and to understand the effects of stress on the makeup and evolution of microbial communities to inform effective remediation strategies.

  3. CoCl2, a mimic of hypoxia, induces formation of polyploid giant cells with stem characteristics in colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Lopez-Sánchez

    Full Text Available The induction of polyploidy is considered the reproductive end of cells, but there is evidence that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCCs contribute to cell repopulation during tumor relapse. However, the role of these cells in the development, progression and response to therapy in colon cancer remains undefined. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to investigate the generation of PGCCs in colon cancer cells and identify mechanisms of formation. Treatment of HCT-116 and Caco-2 colon cancer cells with the hypoxia mimic CoCl2 induced the formation of cells with larger cell and nuclear size (PGCCs, while the cells with normal morphology were selectively eliminated. Cytometric analysis showed that CoCl2 treatment induced G2 cell cycle arrest and the generation of a polyploid cell subpopulation with increased cellular DNA content. Polyploidy of hypoxia-induced PGCCs was confirmed by FISH analysis. Furthermore, CoCl2 treatment effectively induced the stabilization of HIF-1α, the differential expression of a truncated form of p53 (p47 and decreased levels of cyclin D1, indicating molecular mechanisms associated with cell cycle arrest at G2. Generation of PGCCs also contributed to expansion of a cell subpopulation with cancer stem cells (CSCs characteristics, as indicated by colonosphere formation assays, and enhanced chemoresistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin. In conclusion, the pharmacological induction of hypoxia in colon cancer cells causes the formation of PGCCs, the expansion of a cell subpopulation with CSC characteristics and chemoresistance. The molecular mechanisms involved, including the stabilization of HIF-1 α, the involvement of p53/p47 isoform and cell cycle arrest at G2, suggest novel targets to prevent tumor relapse and treatment failure in colon cancer.

  4. FLUIDICS DEVICE FOR ASSAY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for use in performing assays on standard laboratory solid supports whereon chemical entities are attached. The invention furthermore relates to the use of such a device and a kit comprising such a device. The device according to the present invention...... is adapted to receive one or more replaceable solid support(s) (40) onto which chemical entities (41) are attached, said device comprising a base (1, 60, 80, 300, 400, 10, 70, 140, 20, 90, 120, 150, 30, 100), one or more inlet(s) (5), one or more outlet(s) (6). The base and the solid support (40) defines......, when operatively connected, one or more chambers (21) comprising the chemical entities (41), the inlet(s) (5) and outlet(s) (6) and chambers (21) being in fluid connection. The device further comprise means for providing differing chemical conditions in each chamber (21)....

  5. The Effect of Small Sample Size on Measurement Equivalence of Psychometric Questionnaires in MIMIC Model: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamshid Jamali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating measurement equivalence (also known as differential item functioning (DIF is an important part of the process of validating psychometric questionnaires. This study aimed at evaluating the multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC model for DIF detection when latent construct distribution is nonnormal and the focal group sample size is small. In this simulation-based study, Type I error rates and power of MIMIC model for detecting uniform-DIF were investigated under different combinations of reference to focal group sample size ratio, magnitude of the uniform-DIF effect, scale length, the number of response categories, and latent trait distribution. Moderate and high skewness in the latent trait distribution led to a decrease of 0.33% and 0.47% power of MIMIC model for detecting uniform-DIF, respectively. The findings indicated that, by increasing the scale length, the number of response categories and magnitude DIF improved the power of MIMIC model, by 3.47%, 4.83%, and 20.35%, respectively; it also decreased Type I error of MIMIC approach by 2.81%, 5.66%, and 0.04%, respectively. This study revealed that power of MIMIC model was at an acceptable level when latent trait distributions were skewed. However, empirical Type I error rate was slightly greater than nominal significance level. Consequently, the MIMIC was recommended for detection of uniform-DIF when latent construct distribution is nonnormal and the focal group sample size is small.

  6. In vivo preclinical evaluation of the accuracy of toroidal-shaped HIFU treatments using a tumor-mimic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N' Djin, W A; Melodelima, D; Parmentier, H; Chapelon, J Y [Inserm, U556, Lyon, F-69003 (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon, F-69003 (France); Rivoire, M [Institute of Experimental Surgery-Centre Leon Berard, Lyon, F-69008 (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon, F-69003 (France)], E-mail: apoutou.ndjin@inserm.fr

    2010-04-21

    The pig is an ideal animal model for preclinical evaluation of HIFU treatments, especially in the liver. However, there is no liver tumor model available for pigs. In this work, we propose to study an in vivo tumor-mimic model as a tool for evaluating if a sonographycally guided HIFU treatment, delivered by a toroidal-shaped device dedicated for the treatment of liver metastases, is correctly located in the liver. One centimeter tumor-mimics were created in liver tissues. These tumor-mimics were detectable on ultrasound imaging and on gross pathology. Two studies were carried out. First, an in vivo study of tolerance at mid-term (30 days, 10 pigs) revealed that tumor-mimics are suitable for studying HIFU treatments at a preclinical stage, since local and biological tolerances were excellent. The dimensions of the tumor-mimics were reproducible (diameter at day 0: 9.7 {+-} 2.0 mm) and were the same as a function of time (p = 0.64). A second in vivo study was carried out in ten pigs. Tumor mimics were used as targets in liver tissues in order to determine if the HIFU treatment is correctly located in the liver. A procedure of extensive HIFU ablation using multiple HIFU lesions juxtaposed manually was then tested on eight tumor-mimics. In 88% of the cases (seven out of eight), tumor-mimics were treated with negative margins ({>=}1 mm) in all directions. On average, negative margins measured 10.0 {+-} 6.7 mm. These tumor-mimics constitute an excellent reference for studying in vivo the accuracy of HIFU therapy in the liver.

  7. Cell Proliferation and Cytotoxicity Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adan, Aysun; Kiraz, Yağmur; Baran, Yusuf

    Cell viability is defined as the number of healthy cells in a sample and proliferation of cells is a vital indicator for understanding the mechanisms in action of certain genes, proteins and pathways involved cell survival or death after exposing to toxic agents. Generally, methods used to determine viability are also common for the detection of cell proliferation. Cell cytotoxicity and proliferation assays are generally used for drug screening to detect whether the test molecules have effects on cell proliferation or display direct cytotoxic effects. Regardless of the type of cell-based assay being used, it is important to know how many viable cells are remaining at the end of the experiment. There are a variety of assay methods based on various cell functions such as enzyme activity, cell membrane permeability, cell adherence, ATP production, co-enzyme production, and nucleotide uptake activity. These methods could be basically classified into different categories: (I) dye exclusion methods such as trypan blue dye exclusion assay, (II) methods based on metabolic activity, (III) ATP assay, (IV) sulforhodamine B assay, (V) protease viability marker assay, (VI) clonogenic cell survival assay, (VII) DNA synthesis cell proliferation assays and (V) raman micro-spectroscopy. In order to choose the optimal viability assay, the cell type, applied culture conditions, and the specific questions being asked should be considered in detail. This particular review aims to provide an overview of common cell proliferation and cytotoxicity assays together with their own advantages and disadvantages, their methodologies, comparisons and intended purposes.

  8. Hair and Physiological Baldness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercantini, Edward S.

    1965-01-01

    Human hair is one of the structures of the body about which little is generally known. Disease affecting the hair is often minimized or ignored by physicians because of lack of knowledge of this rudimentary organ. However, the patient's attitude toward hair loss is very different from the doctor's and he feels great concern about such loss. The development, growth and morphology of human hair are briefly presented. Experimental work which will increase our knowledge of hair growth and loss is reviewed. The various forms of physiological alopecia from birth onward are discussed, with special emphasis on the least-known type of physiological baldness, “male-pattern baldness” in the adult female. PMID:14312445

  9. PHYSIOLOGIC PATTERNS OF SLEEP ON EEG, MASKING OF EPILEPTIFORM ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yu. Glukhova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiologic patterns of sleep on EEG can sometimes be similar to epileptiform activity and even to the EEG pattern of epileptic seizures, but they have no connection to epilepsy and their incorrect interpretation may lead to overdiagnosis of epilepsy. These sleep patterns include vertex transients, K-complexes, hypnagogic hypersynchrony, 14 and 6 Hz positive bursts, wicket-potentials, etc. The main distinctive features of acute physiological phenomena of sleep unlike epileptiform activity are stereotyped, monomorphic morphology of waves, which frequently has rhythmic, arcuate pattern, often with change of lateralization, mainly dominated in the first stages of sleep (N1-N2, with their reduction in the deeper stages and transition to delta sleep (N3. The correct interpretation of physiological sharp-wave phenomena of sleep on EEG requires considerable training and experience of the physician. Our review includes a variety of physiological sleep patterns, which can mimic epileptiform activity on EEG, their criteria of diagnostic with demonstration of own illustrations of EEG.

  10. Renal phosphate handling: Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus is a common anion. It plays an important role in energy generation. Renal phosphate handling is regulated by three organs parathyroid, kidney and bone through feedback loops. These counter regulatory loops also regulate intestinal absorption and thus maintain serum phosphorus concentration in physiologic range. The parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, Fibrogenic growth factor 23 (FGF23 and klotho coreceptor are the key regulators of phosphorus balance in body.

  11. Integrative Physiology of Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Stephen M; Carey, Hannah V

    2016-03-15

    Extended bouts of fasting are ingrained in the ecology of many organisms, characterizing aspects of reproduction, development, hibernation, estivation, migration, and infrequent feeding habits. The challenge of long fasting episodes is the need to maintain physiological homeostasis while relying solely on endogenous resources. To meet that challenge, animals utilize an integrated repertoire of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical responses that reduce metabolic rates, maintain tissue structure and function, and thus enhance survival. We have synthesized in this review the integrative physiological, morphological, and biochemical responses, and their stages, that characterize natural fasting bouts. Underlying the capacity to survive extended fasts are behaviors and mechanisms that reduce metabolic expenditure and shift the dependency to lipid utilization. Hormonal regulation and immune capacity are altered by fasting; hormones that trigger digestion, elevate metabolism, and support immune performance become depressed, whereas hormones that enhance the utilization of endogenous substrates are elevated. The negative energy budget that accompanies fasting leads to the loss of body mass as fat stores are depleted and tissues undergo atrophy (i.e., loss of mass). Absolute rates of body mass loss scale allometrically among vertebrates. Tissues and organs vary in the degree of atrophy and downregulation of function, depending on the degree to which they are used during the fast. Fasting affects the population dynamics and activities of the gut microbiota, an interplay that impacts the host's fasting biology. Fasting-induced gene expression programs underlie the broad spectrum of integrated physiological mechanisms responsible for an animal's ability to survive long episodes of natural fasting. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Physiology of wrestlers` dehydration

    OpenAIRE

    Cengiz, Asim; DEMİRHAN, Bilal

    2014-01-01

    Rapid weight loss via dehydration has profound adverse effects on the wrestler's physiology and muscular endurance even with %1 of body weight loss. Additionally, there is a decline after 4% of weight loss in strength or anaerobic power performance. However, these adverse effects do not seem to impair muscle strength during high-power exertions lasting less than 30 seconds. In fact, for athletes participating in brief-duration, high- power sports, rapid weight loss may give them an advan...

  13. Pavlov and integrative physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G P

    2000-09-01

    Ivan Petrovich Pavlov was the first physiologist to win the Nobel Prize. The Prize was given in 1904 for his research on the neural control of salivary, gastric, and pancreatic secretion. A major reason for the success and novelty of his research was the use of unanesthetized dogs surgically prepared with chronic fistulas or gastric pouches that permitted repeated experiments in the same animal for months. Pavlov invented this chronic method because of the limitations he perceived in the use of acute anesthetized animals for investigating physiological systems. By introducing the chronic method and by showing its experimental advantages, Pavlov founded modern integrative physiology. This paper reviews Pavlov's journey from his birthplace in a provincial village in Russia to Stockholm to receive the Prize. It begins with childhood influences, describes his training and mentors, summarizes the major points of his research by reviewing his book Lectures on the Work of the Digestive Glands, and discusses his views on the relationship between physiology and medicine.

  14. Cells assemble invadopodia-like structures and invade into matrigel in a matrix metalloprotease dependent manner in the circular invasion assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinzi; Machesky, Laura M

    2012-01-01

    The ability of tumor cells to invade is one of the hallmarks of the metastatic phenotype. To elucidate the mechanisms by which tumor cells acquire an invasive phenotype, in vitro assays have been developed that mimic the process of cancer cell invasion through basement membrane or in the stroma. We have extended the characterization of the circular invasion assay and found that it provides a simple and amenable system to study cell invasion in matrix in an environment that closely mimics 3D invasion. Furthermore, it allows detailed microscopic analysis of both live and fixed cells during the invasion process. We find that cells invade in a protease dependent manner in this assay and that they assemble focal adhesions and invadopodia that resemble structures visualized in 3D embedded cells. We propose that this is a useful assay for routine and medium throughput analysis of invasion of cancer cells in vitro and the study of cells migrating in a 3D environment.

  15. Assay for calcium channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glossmann, H.; Ferry, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter focuses on biochemical assays for Ca/sup 2 +/-selective channels in electrically excitable membranes which are blocked in electrophysiological and pharmacological experiments by verapamil, 1,4-dihydropyridines, diltiazen (and various other drugs), as well as inorganic di- or trivalent cations. The strategy employed is to use radiolabeled 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives which block calcium channels with ED/sub 50/ values in the nanomolar range. Although tritiated d-cis-diltiazem and verapamil can be used to label calcium channels, the 1,4-dihydropyridines offer numerous advantages. The various sections cover tissue specificity of channel labeling, the complex interactions of divalent cations with the (/sup 3/H)nimodipine-labeled calcium channels, and the allosteric regulation of (/sup 3/H)nimodipine binding by the optically pure enantiomers of phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine calcium channel blockers. A comparison of the properties of different tritiated 1,4-dihydropyridine radioligands and the iodinated channel probe (/sup 125/I)iodipine is given.

  16. Peptide mimics by linear arylamides: a structural and functional diversity test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhan-Ting; Hou, Jun-Li; Li, Chuang

    2008-10-01

    Hydrogen-bonded oligoamide foldamers represent a large family of peptide mimics. Pioneered by Gellman and Seebach (Appella , J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1996, 118, 13071- 13072; Seebach , Helv. Chim. Acta 1996, 79, 913- 941), aliphatic amino acid-based mimic structures have been extensively studied. Results of these studies have found many useful applications in areas including chemical biology and drug design. This Account describes our efforts in creating arylamide-based foldamers whose compact conformations are stabilized by hydrogen bonding. The aim of our study was to test whether this class of mimic structures is sufficiently rigid to lead to new interesting functions. It was envisioned that, if our approach was workable, it might be developed into a new family of useful soft frameworks for studies toward molecular recognition, self-assembly, and materials science. Three classes of mimic structures, that is, folded or helical, zigzag, and straight oligomers, have been constructed by simply changing the positions of the substituents at the benzene rings in the backbones. Both amide and hydrazide units have been employed to construct the frameworks. In most cases, O...H-N hydrogen bonding was chosen to stabilize the compact conformations. Notably, for the first time the F...H-N hydrogen-bonding pattern has been used to tune the size of the cavity. To test their usefulness, these frameworks have been extensively modified and functionalized. (1)H NMR, UV-vis, fluorescence, circular dichroism, and X-ray diffraction techniques have all been employed to establish the compact structures and their interactions with guest molecules. The properties or functions of the mimic structures have been studied in seven aspects. (1) Acyclic molecular receptors: The amide foldamers can bind amine cations, while the hydrazide foldamers can complex saccharides. (2) Acceleration of anisole hydrolysis: Several folded oligomers are able to bind alkali metal cations and consequently promote the

  17. Copeptin Levels in Patients With Acute Ischemic Stroke and Stroke Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Matthias; Ebinger, Martin; Kunz, Alexander; Rozanski, Michal; Waldschmidt, Carolin; Weber, Joachim E; Winter, Benjamin; Koch, Peter M; Nolte, Christian H; Hertel, Sabine; Ziera, Tim; Audebert, Heinrich J

    2015-09-01

    Copeptin levels are increased in patients diagnosed with stroke and other vascular diseases. Copeptin elevation is associated with adverse outcome, predicts re-events in patients with transient ischemic attack and is used in ruling-out acute myocardial infarction. We evaluated whether copeptin can also be used as a diagnostic marker in the prehospital stroke setting. We prospectively examined patients with suspected stroke on the Stroke Emergency Mobile-an ambulance that is equipped with computed tomography and point-of-care laboratory. A blood sample was taken from patients immediately after arrival. We analyzed copeptin levels in patients with final hospital-based diagnosis of stroke or stroke mimics as well as in vascular or nonvascular patients. In addition, we examined the associations of symptom onset with copeptin levels and the prognostic value of copeptin in patients with stroke. Blood samples of 561 patients were analyzed. No significant differences were seen neither between cerebrovascular (n=383) and other neurological (stroke mimic; n=90) patients (P=0.15) nor between vascular (n=391) and nonvascular patients (n=170; P=0.57). We could not detect a relationship between copeptin levels and time from onset to blood draw. Three-month survival status was available in 159 patients with ischemic stroke. Copeptin levels in nonsurviving patients (n=8: median [interquartile range], 27.4 [20.2-54.7] pmol/L) were significantly higher than in surviving patients (n=151: median [interquartile range], 11.7 [5.2-30.9] pmol/L; P=0.024). In the prehospital setting, copeptin is neither appropriate to discriminate between stroke and stroke mimic patients nor between vascular and nonvascular patients. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01382862. The Pre-Hospital Acute Neurological Therapy and Optimization of Medical Care in Stroke Patients study (PHANTOM-S) was registered (NCT01382862). This sub-study was observational and not registered separately

  18. Language barriers between physicians and patients are not associated with thrombolysis of stroke mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostanski, Sara K; Williams, Olajide; Stillman, Joshua I; Marshall, Randolph S; Willey, Joshua Z

    2016-10-01

    Acute stroke is a time-sensitive condition in which rapid diagnosis must be made in order for thrombolytic treatment to be administered. A certain proportion of patients who receive thrombolysis will be found on further evaluation to have a diagnosis other than stroke, so-called "stroke mimics." Little is known about the role of language discordance in the emergency department diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke. This is a retrospective analysis of all acute ischemic stroke patients who received IV tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in our emergency department between July 2011 and December 2015. Baseline characteristics, patient language, and final diagnosis were compared between encounters in which the treating neurologist and patient spoke the same language (concordant cases) and encounters in which they did not (discordant cases). A total of 350 patients received IV tPA during the study period. English was the primary language for 52.6%, Spanish for 44.9%, and other languages for 2.6%; 60.3% of cases were classified as language concordant and 39.7% as discordant. We found no significant difference in the proportion of stroke mimics in the language concordant compared to discordant groups (16.6% vs 9.4%, p = 0.06). Similarly, the proportion of stroke mimics did not differ between English- and Spanish-speaking patients (15.8% vs 11.5%, p = 0.27). Language discordance was not associated with acute stroke misdiagnosis among patients treated with IV tPA. Prospective evaluation of communication during acute stroke encounters is needed to gain clarity on the role of language discordance in acute stroke misdiagnosis.

  19. Design and Synthesis of a Conformationally Rigid Mimic of the Dihydropyrimidine Calcium Channel Modulator SQ 32,926

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Jauk

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available A conformationally rigid polyheterocycle (3 which mimics the putative receptorbound conformation of dihydropyridine-type calcium channel modulators is prepared in a seven-step reaction sequence based on a Biginelli-type cyclocondensation reaction.

  20. Design and Synthesis of a Conformationally Rigid Mimic of the Dihydropyrimidine Calcium Channel Modulator SQ 32,926

    OpenAIRE

    Birgit Jauk; Tetiana Pernat; Oliver Kappe, C.

    2000-01-01

    A conformationally rigid polyheterocycle (3) which mimics the putative receptorbound conformation of dihydropyridine-type calcium channel modulators is prepared in a seven-step reaction sequence based on a Biginelli-type cyclocondensation reaction.

  1. Chondromyxoid fibroma of the rib mimics a chondrosarcoma on 18F-FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makis, William (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Brandon Regional Health Centre, Brandon (Canada)), email: makisw79@yahoo.com; Ciarallo, Anthony; Lisbona, Robert (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill Univ. Health Centre, Montreal (Canada))

    2011-06-15

    Chondromyxoid fibroma (CMF) is a rare benign bone tumor of chondroid origin that occurs mostly in the metaphyses of long bones. CMF can occasionally mimic a chondrosarcoma on CT, and the literature on the 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging characteristics of CMF tumors is limited. In the presented case, a large histologically proven CMF chest wall mass was initially misinterpreted as a chondrosarcoma. This case highlights a potential pitfall in the PET/CT evaluation of these rare benign bone tumors

  2. Cholesterol atheroembolism of the colon can mimic the endoscopic features of pseudomembranous colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Geok-Hoon; Roslani, April Camilla; Pang, Brendan; Bih-Shiou, Charles Tsang

    2008-12-01

    The endoscopic features of cholesterol atheroembolism affecting the colon have not been extensively described in the literature, owing to the rarity of this entity. We report a middle-aged man who presented with hematochezia after recent coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Colonoscopy revealed ulcerative skip lesions with overlying slough resembling pseudomembranes distal to the transverse colon, inconsistent with the initial clinical impression of ischemic colitis. As a consequence of continued bleeding with hemodynamic instability, the patient underwent an extended low anterior resection with end transverse colostomy. Histology revealed cholesterol atheroembolism resulting in patchy ischemic ulceration of the colon. Colonic cholesterol atheroembolism can mimic the endoscopic features of pseudomembranous colitis.

  3. Design and Synthesis of Substituted Cyclopropanes as Conformationally Restrained Dipeptide Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    selective agonist. 12 By methylating at the pro-S position (R2 ) or the pro-R position (RI), sidechain X1 angle preferences could be controlled by limiting... rhizopus pepsin inhibitor and Abbott’s aspartic protease bound renin inhibitor A-0904 was 0.012 A! A stereoview of this remarkable example of conserved...of these dipeptide mimics and the hydroxyl carbon (Ca) is at the N-terminus. This reaction, therefore, offers the ability to control the C-terminus

  4. Label-acquired magnetorotation for biosensing: An asynchronous rotation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht, Ariel, E-mail: hecht@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); Kinnunen, Paivo, E-mail: pkkinn@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States); McNaughton, Brandon, E-mail: bmcnaugh@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States); Kopelman, Raoul, E-mail: kopelman@umich.ed [University of Michigan, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2200 Bonisteel, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2099 (United States); University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, 930 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); University of Michigan, Applied Physics Program, 2477 Randall Laboratory, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents a novel application of magnetic particles for biosensing, called label-acquired magnetorotation (LAM). This method is based on a combination of the traditional sandwich assay format with the asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) method. In label-acquired magnetorotation, an analyte facilitates the binding of a magnetic label bead to a nonmagnetic solid phase sphere, forming a sandwich complex. The sandwich complex is then placed in a rotating magnetic field, where the rotational frequency of the sandwich complex is a function of the amount of analyte attached to the surface of the sphere. Here, we use streptavidin-coated beads and biotin-coated particles as analyte mimics, to be replaced by proteins and other biological targets in future work. We show this sensing method to have a dynamic range of two orders of magnitude.

  5. The emergence of Applied Physiology within the discipline of Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Charles M

    2016-08-01

    Despite the availability and utilization of the physiology textbooks authored by Albrecht von Haller during the 18th century that heralded the modern age of physiology, not all physicians or physiologists were satisfied with its presentation, contents, or application to medicine. Initial reasons were fundamental disagreements between the "mechanists," represented by Boerhaave, Robinson, and von Haller, and the "vitalists," represented by the faculty and graduates of the Montpellier School of Medicine in France, notably, Bordeu and Barthez. Subsequently, objections originated from Europe, United Kingdom, and the United States in publications that focused not only on the teaching of physiology to medical and secondary students, but on the specific applications of the content of physiology to medicine, health, hygiene, pathology, and chronic diseases. At the turn of the 20th century, texts began to appear with applied physiology in their titles and in 1926, physician Samson Wright published a textbook entitled Applied Physiology that was intended for both medical students and the medical profession. Eleven years later, physicians Best and Taylor published The Physiological Basis of Medical Practice: A University of Toronto Texbook in Applied Physiology Although both sets of authors defined the connection between applied physiology and physiology, they failed to define the areas of physiology that were included within applied physiology. This was accomplished by the American Physiological Society (APS) Publications Committee in 1948 with the publication of the Journal of Appplied Physiology, that stated the word "applied" would broadly denote human physiology whereas the terms stress and environment would broadly include work, exercise, plus industrial, climatic and social factors. NIH established a study section (SS) devoted to applied physiology in 1964 which remained active until 2001 when it became amalgamated into other SSs. Before the end of the 20th century when

  6. Gastrointestinal Physiology and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Johnson, Anthony C; Grundy, David

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) system is responsible for the digestion and absorption of ingested food and liquids. Due to the complexity of the GI tract and the substantial volume of material that could be covered under the scope of GI physiology, this chapter briefly reviews the overall function of the GI tract, and discusses the major factors affecting GI physiology and function, including the intestinal microbiota, chronic stress, inflammation, and aging with a focus on the neural regulation of the GI tract and an emphasis on basic brain-gut interactions that serve to modulate the GI tract. GI diseases refer to diseases of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, and rectum. The major symptoms of common GI disorders include recurrent abdominal pain and bloating, heartburn, indigestion/dyspepsia, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation. GI disorders rank among the most prevalent disorders, with the most common including esophageal and swallowing disorders, gastric and peptic ulcer disease, gastroparesis or delayed gastric emptying, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Many GI disorders are difficult to diagnose and their symptoms are not effectively managed. Thus, basic research is required to drive the development of novel therapeutics which are urgently needed. One approach is to enhance our understanding of gut physiology and pathophysiology especially as it relates to gut-brain communications since they have clinical relevance to a number of GI complaints and represent a therapeutic target for the treatment of conditions including inflammatory diseases of the GI tract such as IBD and functional gut disorders such as IBS.

  7. Pioneering in gravitational physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffen, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    Gravity affects biology at almost all levels above that of the cell organelle. Attention is presently given to progress made in the understanding of gravitational effects through studies employing centrifuges, clinostats, inverted preparations, linear devices, water immersion, free fall, and short- and long-term spaceflight. The cardiovascular changes which cause malaise and illness during the first few days of extended space missions are the direct result of fluid translocation from the lower extremities. Upon reentry, there is hypovolumnia and a cardiovascular deconditioning that can include tachycardia, changes in arterial blood pressure, narrow pulse pressure, and syncope. Attention is also given to NASA's gravitational physiology reseach program.

  8. Conservation physiology of marine fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian; Peck, Myron A.; Antognarelli, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    At the end of May, 17 scientists involved in an EU COST Action on Conservation Physiology of Marine Fishes met in Oristano, Sardinia, to discuss how physiology can be better used in modelling tools to aid in management of marine ecosystems. Current modelling approaches incorporate physiology...

  9. Alkaloid defenses of co-mimics in a putative Müllerian mimetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Polytypism in aposematic species is unlikely according to theory, but commonly seen in nature. Ranitomeya imitator is a poison frog species exhibiting polytypic mimicry of three congeneric model species (R. fantastica, R. summersi, and two morphs of R. variabilis) across four allopatric populations (a "mimetic radiation"). In order to investigate chemical defenses in this system, a key prediction of Müllerian mimicry, we analyzed the alkaloids of both models and mimics from four allopatric populations. Results In this study we demonstrate distinct differences in alkaloid profiles between co-mimetic species within allopatric populations. We further demonstrate that R. imitator has a greater number of distinct alkaloid types than the model species and more total alkaloids in all but one population. Conclusions Given that R. imitator is the more abundant species in these populations, R. imitator is likely driving the majority of predator-learned avoidance in these complexes. The success of Ranitomeya imitator as a putative advergent mimic may be a direct result of differences in alkaloid sequestration. Furthermore, we propose that automimicry within co-mimetic species is an important avenue of research. PMID:24707851

  10. Asteroid Hyalosis: A Mimic of Vitreous Hemorrhage on Point of Care Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringer, Charles E A; Ahn, Justin S; Kim, Daniel J

    2017-07-01

    Point of care ultrasound in the emergency department (ED) is increasingly being used to diagnose time-sensitive, vision-threatening conditions. We present a case of a 64-year-old female who presented to the ED with a three-day history of worsening left eye floaters. Point of care ocular ultrasound demonstrated a posterior chamber containing many echogenic opacities of varying size without acoustic shadowing. Movement of the eye resulted in significant after-movement of these opacities, giving the classic "washing machine" appearance seen with vitreous hemorrhage (VH). Based on these ultrasound findings, the patient was diagnosed with a VH and was referred to ophthalmology. The consulting ophthalmologist ultimately diagnosed the patient with asteroid hyalosis without VH. Asteroid hyalosis is a benign condition of the vitreous resulting in calcium phosphate and lipid deposits that can mimic more serious VH on point of care ultrasound. Knowledge of this mimic is helpful for communication with specialists and for awareness of the potential for misdiagnosis with ocular ultrasound.

  11. Photocatalytic hydrogen evolution by [FeFe] hydrogenase mimics in homogeneous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Guang; Wang, Feng; Wang, Hong-Yan; Si, Gang; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2010-08-02

    To mimic [FeFe] hydrogenases (H(2)ases) in nature, molecular photocatalysts 1 a, 1 b, and 1 c anchoring rhenium(I) complex S to one of the iron cores of [FeFe]-H(2)ases model complex C, have been constructed for H(2) generation by visible light in homogeneous solution. The time-dependence of H(2) evolution and a spectroscopic study demonstrate that the orientation of S and the specific bridge in 1 a, 1 b, and 1 c are important both for the electron-transfer step from the excited S* to the catalytic C, and the formation of unprecedented long-lived charge separation for 1 a (780 micros), 1 b, and 1 c (>2 ms) in [FeFe]-H(2)ases mimics. The fast forward electron-transfer step from the excited S* to the catalytic C but the slow back electron-transfer step of the charge-recombination in the designed photocatalysts 1 a, 1 b, and 1 c are reminiscent of the behavior of [FeFe]-H(2)ases in nature.

  12. Smells like aphids: orchid flowers mimic aphid alarm pheromones to attract hoverflies for pollination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stökl, Johannes; Brodmann, Jennifer; Dafni, Amots; Ayasse, Manfred; Hansson, Bill S

    2011-04-22

    Most insects are dependent on chemical communication for activities such as mate finding or host location. Several plants, and especially orchids, mimic insect semiochemicals to attract insects for unrewarded pollination. Here, we present a new case of pheromone mimicry found in the terrestrial orchid Epipactis veratrifolia. Flowers are visited and pollinated by several species of aphidophagous hoverflies, the females of which also often lay eggs in the flowers. The oviposition behaviour of these hoverflies is mainly guided by aphid-derived kairomones. We show that the flowers produce α- and β-pinene, β-myrcene and β-phellandrene, and that these compounds attract and induce oviposition behaviour in female hoverflies. This floral odour profile is remarkably similar to the alarm pheromone released by several aphid species, such as Megoura viciae. We therefore suggest that E. veratrifolia mimics aphid alarm pheromones to attract hoverflies for pollination; this is the first time, to our knowledge, that such a case of mimicry has been demonstrated.

  13. A classical limit-cycle system that mimics the quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarmi, Yair

    2017-11-01

    Classical harmonic oscillators affected by appropriately chosen nonlinear dissipative perturbations can exhibit infinite sequences of limit cycles, which mimic quantized systems. For properly chosen perturbations, the large-amplitude limit cycles approach circles. The higher the amplitude of the limit cycle is, the smaller are the dissipative deviations from energy conservation. The weaker the perturbation is, the earlier on does the asymptotic behavior show up already in low-lying limit cycles. Simple modifications of the Rayleigh and van der Pol oscillators yield infinite sequences of limit cycles such that the energy spectrum of the higher-amplitude limit cycles tends to that of the quantum-mechanical particle in a box. For another judiciously chosen dissipative perturbation, the energy spectrum of the higher-amplitude limit cycles tends to that of the quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillator. In all cases, one first finds the limit-cycle solutions for dissipation strength, ε ≠ 0. The "energy of each limit cycle" then oscillates around an average value. In the limit ε → 0 these oscillations vanish, and the limit cycles in the infinite sequence attain constant values for their energies, a characteristic that is required for such classical systems to mimic Hamiltonian quantum-mechanical systems.

  14. A Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes (MIMIC) model of internal barriers to drug treatment in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chang; Kelly, Brian C; Liao, Yanhui; He, Haoyu; Luo, Tao; Deng, Huiqiong; Liu, Tieqiao; Hao, Wei; Wang, Jichuan

    2015-03-01

    Although evidence exists for distinct barriers to drug abuse treatment (BDATs), investigations of their inter-relationships and the effect of individual characteristics on the barrier factors have been sparse, especially in China. A Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes (MIMIC) model is applied for this target. A sample of 262 drug users were recruited from three drug rehabilitation centers in Hunan Province, China. We applied a MIMIC approach to investigate the effect of gender, age, marital status, education, primary substance use, duration of primary drug use, and drug treatment experience on the internal barrier factors: absence of problem (AP), negative social support (NSS), fear of treatment (FT), and privacy concerns (PC). Drug users of various characteristics were found to report different internal barrier factors. Younger participants were more likely to report NSS (-0.19, p=0.038) and PC (-0.31, pdrug users, ice users were more likely to report AP (0.44, pDrug treatment experiences related to AP (0.20, p=0.012). In addition, differential item functioning (DIF) occurred in three items when participant from groups with different duration of drug use, ice use, or marital status. Individual characteristics had significant effects on internal barriers to drug treatment. On this basis, BDAT perceived by different individuals could be assessed before tactics were utilized to successfully remove perceived barriers to drug treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comprehending body language and mimics: an ERP and neuroimaging study on Italian actors and viewers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Mado Proverbio

    Full Text Available In this study, the neural mechanism subserving the ability to understand people's emotional and mental states by observing their body language (facial expression, body posture and mimics was investigated in healthy volunteers. ERPs were recorded in 30 Italian University students while they evaluated 280 pictures of highly ecological displays of emotional body language that were acted out by 8 male and female Italian actors. Pictures were briefly flashed and preceded by short verbal descriptions (e.g., "What a bore!" that were incongruent half of the time (e.g., a picture of a very attentive and concentrated person shown after the previous example verbal description. ERP data and source reconstruction indicated that the first recognition of incongruent body language occurred 300 ms post-stimulus. swLORETA performed on the N400 identified the strongest generators of this effect in the right rectal gyrus (BA11 of the ventromedial orbitofrontal cortex, the bilateral uncus (limbic system and the cingulate cortex, the cortical areas devoted to face and body processing (STS, FFA EBA and the premotor cortex (BA6, which is involved in action understanding. These results indicate that face and body mimics undergo a prioritized processing that is mostly represented in the affective brain and is rapidly compared with verbal information. This process is likely able to regulate social interactions by providing on-line information about the sincerity and trustfulness of others.

  16. Artificial Enzyme-based Logic Operations to Mimic an Intracellular Enzyme-participated Redox Balance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanyan; Pu, Fang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2017-07-06

    Owing to the biocatalytic properties of artificial enzymes and the redox characteristic of glutathione, a colorimetric and resettable biological operation was successfully designed to mimic enzyme-participated redox balance in living systems. As one promising candidate of a natural enzyme, artificial enzyme possesses many advantages and has been used in numerous fields. Similar to natural enzymes, communications are also present between different artificial enzymes. With the assistance of four artificial enzymes, three simple biological logic gates were fabricated to help us deepen the understanding of communications between artificial enzymes. In the presence of glutathione, the system could be easily reset without any complicated procedures. We prospect that this work may push forward the exploration of communications between different artificial enzymes and the design of novel artificial enzyme-based biological gates or nanodevices. We hope that our mimic system may help us further understand the functioning of complex biological pathways in biological systems. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Homogeneous pancreatic cancer spheroids mimic growth pattern of circulating tumor cell clusters and macrometastases: displaying heterogeneity and crater-like structure on inner layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hao; Ou, Bao-Chi; Zhao, Jing-Kun; Yin, Shuai; Lu, Ai-Guo; Oechsle, Eva; Thasler, Wolfgang E

    2017-05-11

    Pancreatic cancer 3D in vitro models including multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS), single cell-derived tumor spheroid (SCTS), tissue-derived tumor spheroid, and organotypic models provided powerful platforms to mimic in vivo tumor. Recent work supports that circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters are more efficient in metastasis seeding than single CTCs. The purpose of this study is to establish 3D culture models which can mimic single CTC, monoclonal CTC clusters, and the expansion of macrometastases. Seven pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cell lines were used to establish MCTS and SCTS using hanging drop and ultra-low attachment plates. Spheroid immunofluorescence staining, spheroid formation assay, immunoblotting, and literature review were performed to investigate molecular biomarkers and the morphological characteristics of pancreatic tumor spheroids. Single cells experienced different growth patterns to form SCTS, like signet ring-like cells, blastula-like structures, and solid core spheroids. However, golf ball-like hollow spheroids could also be detected, especially when DanG and Capan-1 cells were cultivated with fibroblast-conditioned medium (p cell lines could also establish tumor spheroid with hanging drop plates by adding methylated cellulose. Tumor spheroids derived from pancreatic cancer cell line DanG possessed asymmetrically distributed proliferation center, immune-checkpoint properties. ß-catenin, Ki-67, and F-actin were active surrounding the crater-like structure distributing on the inner layer of viable rim cover of the spheroids, which was relevant to well-differentiated tumor cells. It is possible to establish 3D CTC cluster models from homogenous PDA cell lines using hanging drop and ultra-low attachment plates. PDA cell line displays its own intrinsic properties or heterogeneity. The mechanism of formation of the crater-like structure as well as golf ball-like structure needs further exploration.

  18. Starting physiology: bioelectrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Vander

    2015-12-01

    From a Cartesian perspective of rational analysis, the electric potential difference across the cell membrane is one of the fundamental concepts for the study of physiology. Unfortunately, undergraduate students often struggle to understand the genesis of this energy gradient, which makes the teaching activity a hard task for the instructor. The topic of bioelectrogenesis encompasses multidisciplinary concepts, involves several mechanisms, and is a dynamic process, i.e., it never turns off during the lifetime of the cell. Therefore, to improve the transmission and acquisition of knowledge in this field, I present an alternative didactic model. The design of the model assumes that it is possible to build, in a series of sequential steps, an assembly of proteins within the membrane of an isolated cell in a simulated electrophysiology experiment. Initially, no proteins are inserted in the membrane and the cell is at a baseline energy state; the extracellular and intracellular fluids are at thermodynamic equilibrium. Students are guided through a sequence of four steps that add key membrane transport proteins to the model cell. The model is simple at the start and becomes progressively more complex, finally producing transmembrane chemical and electrical gradients. I believe that this didactic approach helps instructors with a more efficient tool for the teaching of the mechanisms of resting membrane potential while helping students avoid common difficulties that may be encountered when learning this topic. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  19. Sulforhodamine B assay and chemosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Wieland

    2005-01-01

    The sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay was developed by Skehan and colleagues to measure drug-induced cytotoxicity and cell proliferation for large-scale drug-screening applications. Its principle is based on the ability of the protein dye sulforhodamine B to bind electrostatically and pH dependent on protein basic amino acid residues of trichloroacetic acid-fixed cells. Under mild acidic conditions it binds to and under mild basic conditions it can be extracted from cells and solubilized for measurement. Results of the SRB assay were linear with cell number and cellular protein measured at cellular densities ranging from 1 to 200% of confluence. Its sensitivity is comparable with that of several fluorescence assays and superior to that of Lowry or Bradford. The signal-to-noise ratio is favorable and the resolution is 1000-2000 cells/well. It performed similarly compared to other cytotoxicity assays such as MTT or clonogenic assay. The SRB assay possesses a colorimetric end point and is nondestructive and indefinitely stable. These practical advances make the SRB assay an appropriate and sensitive assay to measure drug-induced cytotoxicity even at large-scale application.

  20. Digital Assays Part II: Digital Protein and Cell Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Amar S

    2017-08-01

    A digital assay is one in which the sample is partitioned into many containers such that each partition contains a discrete number of biological entities (0, 1, 2, 3, . . .). A powerful technique in the biologist's toolkit, digital assays bring a new level of precision in quantifying nucleic acids, measuring proteins and their enzymatic activity, and probing single-cell genotype and phenotype. Where part I of this review focused on the fundamentals of partitioning and digital PCR, part II turns its attention to digital protein and cell assays. Digital enzyme assays measure the kinetics of single proteins with enzymatic activity. Digital enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISAs) quantify antigenic proteins with 2 to 3 log lower detection limit than conventional ELISA, making them well suited for low-abundance biomarkers. Digital cell assays probe single-cell genotype and phenotype, including gene expression, intracellular and surface proteins, metabolic activity, cytotoxicity, and transcriptomes (scRNA-seq). These methods exploit partitioning to 1) isolate single cells or proteins, 2) detect their activity via enzymatic amplification, and 3) tag them individually by coencapsulating them with molecular barcodes. When scaled, digital assays reveal stochastic differences between proteins or cells within a population, a key to understanding biological heterogeneity. This review is intended to give a broad perspective to scientists interested in adopting digital assays into their workflows.

  1. Disagreement between Human Papillomavirus Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Preisler, Sarah; Ejegod, Ditte Møller

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the disagreement in primary cervical screening between four human papillomavirus assays: Hybrid Capture 2, cobas, CLART, and APTIMA. Material from 5,064 SurePath samples of women participating in routine cervical screening in Copenhagen, Denmark, was tested with the four...... of considerable disagreement between human papillomavirus assays. This suggested that the extent of disagreement in primary screening is neither population- nor storage media-specific, leaving assay design differences as the most probable cause. The substantially different selection of women testing positive...... on the various human papillomavirus assays represents an unexpected challenge for the choice of an assay in primary cervical screening, and for follow up of in particular HPV positive/cytology normal women....

  2. Heterogeneous response of antimitochondrial autoantibodies and bile duct apical staining monoclonal antibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E2: the molecule versus the mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, C; Van de Water, J; Ansari, A A; Kaplan, M M; Coppel, R L; Lam, K S; Thompson, R K; Stevenson, F; Gershwin, M E

    2001-04-01

    The 2-oxo-acid dehydrogenase complexes and, in particular, the E2 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) are the target of antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA). More than 95% of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) patients have detectable levels of autoantibodies to PDC-E2 and in general these react with a region of the molecule that contains the prosthetic group lipoic acid (LA). LA is vital to the function of the enzyme, although there is conflicting evidence as to whether its presence is required for PDC-E2 recognition by AMA. Some, but not all, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to PDC-E2 produce an intense staining pattern at the apical surface of bile duct epithelial cells (BEC) in patients with PBC, and it has been argued that the molecule at the apical surface of PBC bile duct cells is a modified form of PDC-E2 or a cross-reactive molecule, acting as a molecular mimic. Herein, we characterize the epitopes recognized by 4 anti-PDC-E2 mAbs that give apical staining patterns (3 mouse and 1 human). In particular, by using a combination of recombinant antigens, competitive inhibition assays, and a unique peptide-on-bead assay, we determined that these apically staining mAbs recognize 3 or 4 distinct epitopes on PDC-E2. More importantly, this suggests that a portion spanning the entire inner lipoyl domain of PDC-E2 can be found at the BEC apical surface. In addition, competition assays with patient sera and a PDC-E2-specific mAb showed significant epitope overlap with only 1 of the 3 mouse mAbs and showed a differential response to the peptide bound to beads. These findings further highlight the heterogeneous response of patient autoantibodies to the inner lipoyl domain of PDC-E2.

  3. MR features of physiologic and benign conditions of the ovary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamai, Ken; Saga, Tsuneo; Kido, Aki; Kataoka, Masako; Umeoka, Shigeaki; Togashi, Kaori [Kyoto University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Koyama, Takashi [Kyoto University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kyoto (Japan); Fujii, Shingo [Kyoto University, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)

    2006-12-15

    In reproductive women, various physiologic conditions can cause morphologic changes of the ovary, resembling pathologic conditions. Benign ovarian diseases can also simulate malignancies. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can play an important role in establishing accurate diagnosis. Functional cysts should not be confused with cystic neoplasms. Corpus luteum cysts typically have a thick wall and are occasionally hemorrhagic. Multicystic lesions that may mimic cystic neoplasms include hyperreactio luteinalis, ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, and polycystic ovary syndrome. Recognition of clinical settings can help establish diagnosis. In endometrial cysts, MRI usually provides specific diagnosis; however, decidual change during pregnancy should not be confused with secondary neoplasm. Peritoneal inclusion cysts can be distinguished from cystic neoplasms by recognition of their characteristic configurations. Ovarian torsion and massive ovarian edema may mimic solid malignant tumors. Recognition of normal follicles and anatomic structures is useful in diagnosing these conditions. In pelvic inflammatory diseases, transfascial spread of the lesion should not be confused with invasive malignant tumors. Radiologic identification of abscess formation can be a diagnostic clue. Many benign tumors, including teratoma, Brenner tumor, and sex-cord stromal tumor, frequently show characteristic MRI features. Knowledge of MRI features of these conditions is essential in establishing accurate diagnosis and determining appropriate treatment. (orig.)

  4. Single Cell Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, Pierre; Sinha, Deepak Kumar; Kettunen, Petronella; Vriz, Sophie; Jullien, Ludovic; Bensimon, David

    The possibility to control at specific times and specific places the activity of biomolecules (enzymes, transcription factors, RNA, hormones, etc.) is opening up new opportunities in the study of physiological processes at the single cell level in a live organism. Most existing gene expression systems allow for tissue specific induction upon feeding the organism with exogenous inducers (e.g., tetracycline). Local genetic control has earlier been achieved by micro-injection of the relevant inducer/repressor molecule, but this is an invasive and possibly traumatic technique. In this chapter, we present the requirements for a noninvasive optical control of the activity of biomolecules and review the recent advances in this new field of research.

  5. Physiology for engineers applying engineering methods to physiological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chappell, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to qualitative and quantitative aspects of human physiology. It looks at biological and physiological processes and phenomena, including a selection of mathematical models, showing how physiological problems can be mathematically formulated and studied. It also illustrates how a wide range of engineering and physics topics, including electronics, fluid dynamics, solid mechanics and control theory can be used to describe and understand physiological processes and systems. Throughout the text there are introductions to measuring and quantifying physiological processes using both signal and imaging technologies. Physiology for Engineers describes the basic structure and models of cellular systems, the structure and function of the cardiovascular system, the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart and provides an overview of the structure and function of the respiratory and nervous systems. It also includes an introduction to the basic concepts and applications of reacti...

  6. Long-term physiological alterations and recovery in a mouse model of separation associated with time-restricted feeding: a tool to study anorexia nervosa related consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Zgheib

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anorexia nervosa is a primary psychiatric disorder, with non-negligible rates of mortality and morbidity. Some of the related alterations could participate in a vicious cycle limiting the recovery. Animal models mimicking various physiological alterations related to anorexia nervosa are necessary to provide better strategies of treatment. AIM: To explore physiological alterations and recovery in a long-term mouse model mimicking numerous consequences of severe anorexia nervosa. METHODS: C57Bl/6 female mice were submitted to a separation-based anorexia protocol combining separation and time-restricted feeding for 10 weeks. Thereafter, mice were housed in standard conditions for 10 weeks. Body weight, food intake, body composition, plasma levels of leptin, adiponectin, IGF-1, blood levels of GH, reproductive function and glucose tolerance were followed. Gene expression of several markers of lipid and energy metabolism was assayed in adipose tissues. RESULTS: Mimicking what is observed in anorexia nervosa patients, and despite a food intake close to that of control mice, separation-based anorexia mice displayed marked alterations in body weight, fat mass, lean mass, bone mass acquisition, reproductive function, GH/IGF-1 axis, and leptinemia. mRNA levels of markers of lipogenesis, lipolysis, and the brown-like adipocyte lineage in subcutaneous adipose tissue were also changed. All these alterations were corrected during the recovery phase, except for the hypoleptinemia that persisted despite the full recovery of fat mass. CONCLUSION: This study strongly supports the separation-based anorexia protocol as a valuable model of long-term negative energy balance state that closely mimics various symptoms observed in anorexia nervosa, including metabolic adaptations. Interestingly, during a recovery phase, mice showed a high capacity to normalize these parameters with the exception of plasma leptin levels. It will be interesting therefore to

  7. Recent advances in compartmentalized synthetic architectures as drug carriers, cell mimics and artificial organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York-Duran, M J; Godoy-Gallardo, M; Labay, C; Urquhart, A J; Andresen, T L; Hosta-Rigau, L

    2017-04-01

    Compartmentalization is a key feature of biological cells which conduct their metabolic activity in individual steps isolated in distinct, separated compartments. The creation of architectures containing multiple compartments with a structure that resembles that of a biological cell has generated significant research attention and these assemblies are proposed as candidate materials for a range of biomedical applications. In this Review article, the recent successes of multicompartment architectures as carriers for the delivery of therapeutic cargo or the creation of micro- and nanoreactors that mimic metabolic activities, thus acting as artificial cells or organelles, are discussed. The developed technologies to assemble such complex architectures are outlined, the multicompartment carriers' properties which contribute to their performance in diverse applications are discussed, and their successful applications are highlighted. Finally, future directions and developments in the field are suggested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Salivary Duct Carcinoma: An Update on Morphologic Mimics and Diagnostic Use of Androgen Receptor Immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udager, Aaron M; Chiosea, Simion I

    2017-09-01

    More than 15 years ago, seminal studies by Dr. E. Leon Barnes and colleagues transformed our understanding of salivary duct carcinoma (SDC) and, in doing so, paved the way for contemporary diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to this aggressive salivary adenocarcinoma. In particular, attention to the apocrine phenotype of SDC and expression of androgen receptor (AR) by immunohistochemistry has improved the diagnostic accuracy and showed how SDC can be reliably distinguished from its morphologic mimics (i.e., other salivary gland carcinomas with high grade transformation, low grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma, and squamous cell carcinomas involving parotid). Furthermore, the observation that SDC shares AR expression with prostate cancer and apocrine breast cancer foresaw the discovery of common molecular alterations between SDC and these tumor types and draw attention to androgen deprivation therapy for SDC patients.

  9. Enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen production from an MCM-41-immobilized photosensitizer-[Fe-Fe] hydrogenase mimic dyad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Yu, Tianjun; Zeng, Yi; Chen, Jinping; Yang, Guoqiang; Li, Yi

    2014-11-01

    A covalently linked photosensitizer-catalytic center dyad Ps-Hy, consisting of two bis(2-phenylpyridine)(2,2'-bipyridine)iridium(iii) chromophores (Ps) and a diiron hydrogenase mimic (Hy) was constructed by using click reaction. Ps-Hy was incorporated into K(+)-exchanged molecular sieve MCM-41 to form a composite (Ps-Hy@MCM-41), which has been successfully applied to the photochemical production of hydrogen. The catalytic activity of Ps-Hy@MCM-41 is ∼3-fold higher as compared with that of Ps-Hy in the absence of MCM-41. The incorporation of Ps-Hy into MCM-41 stabilizes the catalyst, and consequently, advances the photocatalysis. The present study provides a potential strategy for improving catalytic efficiency of artificial photosynthesis systems using mesoporous molecular sieves.

  10. Giant Polymersome Protocells Dock with Virus Particle Mimics via Multivalent Glycan-Lectin Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubilis, Artur; Abdulkarim, Ali; Eissa, Ahmed M.; Cameron, Neil R.

    2016-08-01

    Despite the low complexity of their components, several simple physical systems, including microspheres, coacervate droplets and phospholipid membrane structures (liposomes), have been suggested as protocell models. These, however, lack key cellular characteristics, such as the ability to replicate or to dock with extracellular species. Here, we report a simple method for the de novo creation of synthetic cell mimics in the form of giant polymeric vesicles (polymersomes), which are capable of behavior approaching that of living cells. These polymersomes form by self-assembly, under electroformation conditions, of amphiphilic, glycosylated block copolymers in aqueous solution. The glycosylated exterior of the resulting polymeric giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) allows their selective interaction with carbohydrate-binding receptor-functionalized particles, in a manner reminiscent of the cell-surface docking of virus particles. We believe that this is the first example of a simple protocell model displaying cell-like behavior through a native receptor-ligand interaction.

  11. Insights from the structure of a smallpox virus topoisomerase-DNA transition state mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Kay; Hwang, Young; Bushman, Frederic D.; Van Duyne, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Poxviruses encode their own type IB topoisomerases (TopIBs) which release superhelical tension generated by replication and transcription of their genomes. To investigate the reaction catalyzed viral TopIBs, we have determined the structure of a variola virus topoisomerase-DNA complex trapped as a vanadate transition state mimic. The structure reveals how the viral TopIB enzymes are likely to position the DNA duplex for ligation following relaxation of supercoils and identifies the sources of friction observed in single molecule experiments that argue against free rotation. The structure also identifies a conformational change in the leaving group sugar that must occur prior to cleavage and reveals a mechanism for promoting ligation following relaxation of supercoils that involves a novel Asp-minor groove interaction. Overall, the new structural data support a common catalytic mechanism for the TopIB superfamily but indicate distinct methods for controlling duplex rotation in the small vs. large enzyme subfamilies. PMID:20152159

  12. Identification of chemicals that mimic transcriptional changes associated with autism, brain aging and neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Brandon L.; Simon, Jeremy M.; McCoy, Eric S.; Salazar, Gabriela; Fragola, Giulia; Zylka, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental factors, including pesticides, have been linked to autism and neurodegeneration risk using retrospective epidemiological studies. Here we sought to prospectively identify chemicals that share transcriptomic signatures with neurological disorders, by exposing mouse cortical neuron-enriched cultures to hundreds of chemicals commonly found in the environment and on food. We find that rotenone, a pesticide associated with Parkinson's disease risk, and certain fungicides, including pyraclostrobin, trifloxystrobin, famoxadone and fenamidone, produce transcriptional changes in vitro that are similar to those seen in brain samples from humans with autism, advanced age and neurodegeneration (Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease). These chemicals stimulate free radical production and disrupt microtubules in neurons, effects that can be reduced by pretreating with a microtubule stabilizer, an antioxidant, or with sulforaphane. Our study provides an approach to prospectively identify environmental chemicals that transcriptionally mimic autism and other brain disorders. PMID:27029645

  13. Preparation of High-Density Fibrillar Collagen Matrices That Mimic Desmoplastic Tumor Stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artym, Vira V

    2016-03-01

    The stroma of invasive tumors becomes enriched in dense fibrillar collagen as a result of the desmoplastic reaction. This desmoplastic collagen exerts profound effects on tumor and normal cells. In view of these findings, it is important to develop novel in vitro cell systems that mimic this desmoplastic extracellular matrix in order to permit cell studies under in vivo-like conditions. This unit provides a protocol and troubleshooting guide for preparation of high-density fibrillar collagen (HDFC) matrices that closely model the desmoplastic collagenous matrix of malignant tumors. It then describes the use of this matrix for in vitro cell studies of invadopodia formation and function in extracellular matrix invasion. In addition, it provides a detailed protocol for immunolabeling of invadopodial proteins and detection of HDFC matrix degradation associated with invadopodia to permit visualization of invadopodia using fluorescence microscopy. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Giant Polymersome Protocells Dock with Virus Particle Mimics via Multivalent Glycan-Lectin Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubilis, Artur; Abdulkarim, Ali; Eissa, Ahmed M; Cameron, Neil R

    2016-08-31

    Despite the low complexity of their components, several simple physical systems, including microspheres, coacervate droplets and phospholipid membrane structures (liposomes), have been suggested as protocell models. These, however, lack key cellular characteristics, such as the ability to replicate or to dock with extracellular species. Here, we report a simple method for the de novo creation of synthetic cell mimics in the form of giant polymeric vesicles (polymersomes), which are capable of behavior approaching that of living cells. These polymersomes form by self-assembly, under electroformation conditions, of amphiphilic, glycosylated block copolymers in aqueous solution. The glycosylated exterior of the resulting polymeric giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) allows their selective interaction with carbohydrate-binding receptor-functionalized particles, in a manner reminiscent of the cell-surface docking of virus particles. We believe that this is the first example of a simple protocell model displaying cell-like behavior through a native receptor-ligand interaction.

  15. Review of Breast Cancers That Can Mimic a Cystic Component: Ultrasonographic and Pathologic Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yun Woo; Kwon, Kui Hyang; Choi, Deuk Lin; Lee, Dong Wha [Dept. of Radiology, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Whan [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Seung Bo [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang Gumi Hospital, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    We illustrate the sonographic findings of malignant breast masses that can mimic a cystic component with pathologic correlations. The disease entities presented in this study include infiltrating ductal carcinoma, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), papillary carcinoma, mucinous carcinoma, medullary carcinoma, metaplastic carcinoma, and a malignant phyllodes tumor. Malignant masses with a cystic component are often characterized by well-circumscribed round, oval, or lobular masses, thereby appearing benign on ultrasonography. On pathology, the cystic component of a malignant mass is identified by cystic degeneration, hemorrhage, necrosis, or ductal dilatation. If the mass is well-circumscribed with a cystic component, a biopsy should be considered in the analysis of the solid component within a mass.

  16. Regular Alcohol Consumption Mimics Cardiac Preconditioning by Protecting against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamae, Masami; Diamond, Ivan; Weiner, Michael W.; Camacho, S. Albert; Figueredo, Vincent M.

    1997-04-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that long-term alcohol consumption decreases the incidence of coronary disease and may improve outcome after myocardial infarction. Attenuation of ischemia-reperfusion injury after myocardial infarction improves survival. This study investigates the possibility that alcohol consumption can improve survival after myocardial infarction by reducing ischemia-reperfusion injury. Hearts were isolated from guinea pigs after drinking ethanol for 3-12 weeks and subjected to global ischemia and reperfusion. Hearts from animals drinking ethanol showed improved functional recovery and decreased myocyte damage when compared with controls. Adenosine A1 receptor blockade abolished the protection provided by ethanol consumption. These findings indicate that long-term alcohol consumption reduces myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury and that adenosine A1 receptors are required for this protective effect of ethanol. This cardioprotective effect of long-term alcohol consumption mimics preconditioning and may, in part, account for the beneficial effect of moderate drinking on cardiac health.

  17. Imaging tissue-mimic with light sheet microscopy: A comparative guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andilla, Jordi; Jorand, Raphael; Olarte, Omar E.; Dufour, Alexandre C.; Cazales, Martine; Montagner, Yoann L. E.; Ceolato, Romain; Riviere, Nicolas; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Lorenzo, Corinne

    2017-03-01

    Tissue mimics (TMs) on the scale of several hundred microns provide a beneficial cell culture configuration for in vitro engineered tissue and are currently under the spotlight in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Due to the cell density and size, TMs are fairly inaccessible to optical observation and imaging within these samples remains challenging. Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM)- an emerging and attractive technique for 3D optical sectioning of large samples- appears to be a particularly well-suited approach to deal with them. In this work, we compared the effectiveness of different light sheet illumination modalities reported in the literature to improve resolution and/or light exposure for complex 3D samples. In order to provide an acute and fair comparative assessment, we also developed a systematic, computerized benchmarking method. The outcomes of our experiment provide meaningful information for valid comparisons and arises the main differences between the modalities when imaging different types of TMs.

  18. Illustration of MIMIC-Model DIF Testing with the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Carol M; Oltmanns, Thomas F; Turkheimer, Eric

    2009-01-01

    This research provides an example of testing for differential item functioning (DIF) using multiple indicator multiple cause (MIMIC) structural equation models. True/False items on five scales of the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP) were tested for uniform DIF in a sample of Air Force recruits with groups defined by gender and ethnicity. Uniform DIF exists when an item is more easily endorsed for one group than the other, controlling for group mean differences on the variable under study. Results revealed significant DIF for many SNAP items and some effects were quite large. Differentially-functioning items can produce measurement bias and should be either deleted or modeled as if separate items were administered to different groups. Future research should aim to determine whether the DIF observed here holds for other samples.

  19. Identification of chemicals that mimic transcriptional changes associated with autism, brain aging and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Brandon L; Simon, Jeremy M; McCoy, Eric S; Salazar, Gabriela; Fragola, Giulia; Zylka, Mark J

    2016-03-31

    Environmental factors, including pesticides, have been linked to autism and neurodegeneration risk using retrospective epidemiological studies. Here we sought to prospectively identify chemicals that share transcriptomic signatures with neurological disorders, by exposing mouse cortical neuron-enriched cultures to hundreds of chemicals commonly found in the environment and on food. We find that rotenone, a pesticide associated with Parkinson's disease risk, and certain fungicides, including pyraclostrobin, trifloxystrobin, famoxadone and fenamidone, produce transcriptional changes in vitro that are similar to those seen in brain samples from humans with autism, advanced age and neurodegeneration (Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease). These chemicals stimulate free radical production and disrupt microtubules in neurons, effects that can be reduced by pretreating with a microtubule stabilizer, an antioxidant, or with sulforaphane. Our study provides an approach to prospectively identify environmental chemicals that transcriptionally mimic autism and other brain disorders.

  20. Myometrial hyperplasia mimics the clinical presentation of uterine fibroids: a report of 3 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Patricia M; Cramer, Stewart F; Leppert, Phyllis C

    2013-11-01

    The clinical diagnosis of fibroid uterus is based on physical examination findings and/or ultrasound. However, it is not uncommon for routine pathology examination to report no significant fibroids in such cases. Myometrial hyperplasia (MMH) is a structural variation with irregular zones of hypercellularity and increased nucleus/cell ratio that appears in adolescence, can progress during the childbearing years, and can sometimes cause grossly detectable bulges on pathologic examination. MMH can be inframucosal, intramural (microscopic), or subserosal. Three premenopausal women with a preoperative diagnosis of fibroids on pelvic examination, and/or sonograms, underwent hysterectomies. In all the 3 cases, the Myoma Index (number of fibroids×size of largest fibroid) indicated insignificant fibroids. The pathology simulating fibroids was firm, bulging inframucosal MMH. Firm, bulging MMH can mimic uterine fibroids on ultrasound and physical examination. In hysterectomies for fibroid uterus with a Myoma Index explanation for the findings on physical examination and/or ultrasound.

  1. Preparation of Artificial Skin that Mimics Human Skin Surface and Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Rana; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2017-12-14

    We have developed an artificial skin that mimics the morphological and mechanical properties of human skin. The artificial skin comprises a polyurethane block possessing a microscopically rough surface. We evaluated the tactile sensations when skin-care cream was applied to the artificial skin. Many subjects perceived smooth, moist, and soft feels during the application process. Cluster analysis showed that these characteristic tactile feels are similar to those when skin-care cream is applied to real human skin. Contact angle analysis showed that an oil droplet spread smoothly on the artificial skin surface, which occurred because there were many grooves several hundred micrometers in width on the skin surface. In addition, when the skin-care cream was applied, the change in frictional force during the dynamic friction process increased. These wetting and frictional properties are important factors controlling the similarity of artificial skin to real human skin.

  2. Variables That Best Differentiate In-Patient Acute Stroke from Stroke-Mimics with Acute Neurological Deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Natteru

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Strokes and stroke-mimics have been extensively studied in the emergency department setting. Although in-hospital strokes are less studied in comparison to strokes in the emergency department, they are a source of significant direct and indirect costs. Differentiating in-hospital strokes from stroke-mimics is important. Thus, our study aimed to identify variables that can differentiate in-hospital strokes from stroke-mimics. Methods. We present here a retrospective analysis of 93 patients over a one-year period (2009 to 2010, who were evaluated for a concern of in-hospital strokes. Results. About two-thirds (57 of these patients were determined to have a stroke, and the remaining (36 were stroke-mimics. Patients with in-hospital strokes were more likely to be obese (p=0.03, have been admitted to the cardiology service (p=0.01, have atrial fibrillation (p=0.03, have a weak hand or hemiparesis (p=0.03, and have a prior history of stroke (p=0.05, whereas, when the consults were called for “altered mental status” but no other deficits (p<0.0001, it is likely a stroke-mimic. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that in-hospital strokes are a common occurrence, and knowing the variables can aid in their timely diagnosis and treatment.

  3. A Taylor-Made Design of Phenoxyfuranone-Type Strigolactone Mimic

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    Kosuke Fukui

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Strigolactones are a class of plant hormones that inhibit axillary bud outgrowth and are released from plant roots to act as a rhizosphere communication signal. The Orobanchaceae parasitic plant Striga hermonthica perceives strigolactone as its germination signal, indicating host presence. After germination, the Striga plant parasitises the host plant and suppresses host growth by draining photosynthetic products, water and other essential nutrients. Because of this way of life, this parasite threatens crop production in sub-Saharan Africa with infestation in crop fields and crop devastation. Crop protection in such areas is among the most concerning problems to be dealt with as immediately as possible. With respect to crop protection from Striga, many strigolactone agonists have been developed and used in research to reveal Striga biology, and have contributed to development of crop protection methods. However, an effective method has yet to be found. In a previous study, we reported debranones as a group of strigolactone mimics that inhibit axillary buds outgrowth with moderate stimulation activity for Striga germination. Debranones would be accessible because they are simply synthesized from commercially available phenols and bromo butenolide. Taking this advantage of debranones for Striga research, we tried to find the debranones stimulating Striga seed germination. To modulate functional selectivity and to enhance germination inducing activity of debranones, we studied structure–activity relationships. We investigated effects of substituent position and functional group on debranone activity and selectivity as a strigolactone mimic. As a result, we improved stimulation activity of debranones for Striga seed germination by chemical modification, and demonstrated the pharmacophore of debranones for selective modulation of distinct strigolactone responses.

  4. Intermittent insulin treatment mimics ischemic postconditioning via MitoKATP channels, ROS, and RISK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeland, Erik; Breivik, Lars; Sishi, Balindiwe J; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart; Jonassen, Anne K

    2015-01-01

    It has previously been demonstrated that 15-min continuous insulin infusion at immediate reperfusion affords cardioprotection. This study sought to reduce the treatment time of insulin and test if intermittent insulin infusions can mimic ischemic postconditioning. In a Langendorff perfused rat heart model of regional ischemia, hearts were at the onset of reperfusion subjected to either 5- or 1-min continuous insulin infusion or 3 × 30 s intermittent insulin infusions (InsPost); with or without inhibitors of Akt (SH-6), p70s6-kinase (rapamycin), mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels (5-hydroxydecanoic acid [5-HD]), or a scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS; 2-mercaptopropionyl glycine [MPG]). Infarct size is expressed as percent of area at risk and presented as mean ± standard error of the mean or s.e.m. Only InsPost was able to reduce infarct size compared with controls (InsPost 33 ± 6% vs. Ctr 52 ± 4%, p < 0.05.). This cardioprotection was abrogated by co-administering SH-6, rapamycin, 5-HD, or MPG. (InsPost + SH-6 56 ± 9%, InsPost + Rapa 55 ± 8%, InsPost + 5-HD 56 ± 7%, InsPost + MPG 60 ± 3% vs. InsPost 33 ± 6% p < 0.05). These results were corroborated by a significant increase in phosphorylated Akt and p70s6k in the InsPost group compared with controls. Short intermittent insulin infusions can mimic ischemic postconditioning and reduce myocardial infarct size via Akt/p70s6k and mKATP channels/ROS-dependent signaling.

  5. Pigmentation of axillary sentinel nodes from extensive skin tattoo mimics metastatic melanoma: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganoni, Ausilia Maria; Sereni, Elena; Pata, Giacomo; Ungari, Marco; Pavoni, Laura; Farisoglio, Camillo; Calzavara-Pinton, Pier Giacomo; Farfaglia, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    The relationship between the occurrence of skin diseases and skin tattoos remains unclear. Dermatologic disorders have been reported to occur in about 2% of cases. In addition, tattoo pigment can migrate to the regional lymph nodes through the lymphatic vessels and subsequently mimic metastatic disease from melanoma. A 23-year-old Caucasian man presented with a pigmented lesion on the left scapular region, which had slowly enlarged over time. The patient exhibited an extensive tattoo on the left upper arm, left shoulder, and part of the upper back. His medical history was unremarkable. The pigmented lesion was excised. Histology confirmed malignant melanoma. Ultrasound examination of the abdomen, neck, and inguinal and axillary lymph nodes and a total body computed tomography scan showed no sign of disease. A re-excision with 2-cm margins and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) were performed. Two grossly enlarged, black sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) highly suggestive of melanoma metastases were removed. No evidence of melanoma metastasis was found in any of the sampled tissues. Large amounts of pigment were present within the subcapsular space and sinusoid areas of the two clinically suspicious lymph nodes. Immunohistochemical analysis was negative. Sentinel lymph node biopsy is widely performed in cutaneous melanoma. Histologic confirmation of any enlarged, pigmented SLN is essential prior to radical surgery, especially when pigmented SLNs are found near a tattoo. Tattoo pigments may deposit in the regional lymph nodes and may clinically mimic metastatic disease. A history of tattooing should be considered in all melanoma patients eligible for SLNB. In a finding of darkly pigmented nodes during SLNB, radical lymphadenectomy should be withheld until immunohistologic confirmation of metastasis in the SLN is obtained. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  6. Seminal epithelium in prostate biopsy can mimic malignant and premalignant prostatic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arista-Nasr, J; Trolle-Silva, A; Aguilar-Ayala, E; Martínez-Benítez, B

    2016-01-01

    In most prostate biopsies, the seminal epithelium is easily recognised because it meets characteristic histological criteria. However, some biopsies can mimic malignant or premalignant prostatic lesions. The aims of this study were to analyse the histological appearance of the biopsies that mimic adenocarcinomas or preneoplastic prostatic lesions, discuss the differential diagnosis and determine the frequency of seminal epithelia in prostate biopsies. We consecutively reviewed 500 prostate puncture biopsies obtained using the sextant method and selected those cases in which we observed seminal vesicle or ejaculatory duct epithelium. In the biopsies in which the seminal epithelium resembled malignant or premalignant lesions, immunohistochemical studies were conducted that included prostate-specific antigen and MUC6. The most important clinical data were recorded. Thirty-six (7.2%) biopsies showed seminal epithelium, and 7 of them (1.4%) resembled various prostate lesions, including high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical acinar proliferations, adenocarcinomas with papillary patterns and poorly differentiated carcinoma. The seminal epithelium resembled prostate lesions when the lipofuscin deposit, the perinuclear vacuoles or the nuclear pseudoinclusions were inconspicuous or missing. Five of the 7 biopsies showed mild to moderate cellular atypia with small and hyperchromatic nuclei, and only 2 showed cellular pleomorphism. The patients were alive and asymptomatic after an average of 6 years of progression. The seminal epithelium resembles prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical acinar proliferations and various types of prostatic adenocarcinomas in approximately 1.4% of prostate biopsies. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Protective immunization against group B meningococci using anti-idiotypic mimics of the capsular polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beninati, Concetta; Arseni, Simona; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania; Midiri, Angelina; Biondo, Carmelo; Polonelli, Luciano; Teti, Giuseppe

    2004-02-15

    Use of the serogroup B meningococcal capsular polysaccharide (MenB CP) as a vaccine is hampered by the presence of epitopes that cross-react with human polysialic acid. As non-cross-reactive, protective capsular epitopes have also been described, we set out to develop protein mimics of one of such epitopes using as a template a highly protective mAb (mAb Seam 3) raised against a chemically modified form of the MenB CP (N-Pr MenB CP). Using phage display, anti-idiotypic single-chain Ab fragments (scFvs) were obtained from spleen cells of mice immunized with the Seam 3 mAb. Two Seam 3-specific scFvs competed with N-Pr MenB CP for binding to either mAb Seam 3 or rabbit Abs present in typing sera. Moreover, in mice and rabbits the scFvs elicited the production of Abs reacting with both N-Pr MenB CP and whole meningococci, but not with human polysialic acid. These scFv-induced Ab responses were boostable and of the Th1 type, as shown by a predominance of IgG2a. In addition, passive immunization with sera from scFv-immunized animals partially protected neonatal mice from experimental infection with group B meningococci. In conclusion, we have produced anti-idiotypic scFvs that mimic a protective MenB CP epitope and may be useful in the development of an alternative group B meningococcal vaccine.

  8. Dynamic Changes in Host Gene Expression following In Vitro Viral Mimic Stimulation in Crocodile Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subir Sarker

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The initial control of viral infection in a host is dominated by a very well orchestrated early innate immune system; however, very little is known about the ability of a host to control viral infection outside of mammals. The reptiles offer an evolutionary bridge between the fish and mammals, with the crocodile having evolved from the archosauria clade that included the dinosaurs, and being the largest living reptile species. Using an RNA-seq approach, we have defined the dynamic changes of a passaged primary crocodile cell line to stimulation with both RNA and DNA viral mimics. Cells displayed a marked upregulation of many genes known to be involved in the mammalian response to viral infection, including viperin, Mx1, IRF7, IRF1, and RIG-I with approximately 10% of the genes being uncharacterized transcripts. Both pathway and genome analysis suggested that the crocodile may utilize the main known mammalian TLR and cytosolic antiviral RNA signaling pathways, with the pathways being responsible for sensing DNA viruses less clear. Viral mimic stimulation upregulated the type I interferon, IFN-Omega, with many known antiviral interferon-stimulated genes also being upregulated. This work demonstrates for the first time that reptiles show functional regulation of many known and unknown antiviral pathways and effector genes. An enhanced knowledge of these ancient antiviral pathways will not only add to our understanding of the host antiviral innate response in non-mammalian species, but is critical to fully comprehend the complexity of the mammalian innate immune response to viral infection.

  9. Spinal Epidural Varices, a great Mimic of Intervertebral Disc Prolapse - A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    V, Raghavendra; Haridas, Papanaik; Kumar, Anand; K, Ajith

    2014-01-01

    Epidural venous plexus enlargement, presenting with low back pain and radiculopathy, is an uncommon cause of nerve roots impingement. This condition commonly mimics a herniated nucleus pulposus radiologically. The radiological diagnosis is often missed and the diagnosis is made during the surgery. We are hereby presenting 2 such cases of epidural varices mimicking intervertebral disc prolapse with lumbar radiculopathy. Case 1: 43 yr old female presented with acute exacerbation of low back ache and significant right L5-S1 radiculopathy without neurological deficit. MRI reported as L5-S1 disc prolapse. Intra-operatively engorged dilated epidural vein seen compressing S1 nerve root. Associated Disc bulge removed and Coagulative ablation of the dilated epidural vein was performed Case 2: 45 year old male manual labourer presented with backache with left sided sciatica since 8 months, increased in severity since past 1month associated with sensory blunting in L5 and S1 dermatomes. Neurologic examination revealed normal muscle power in his lower extremities. Sensations was blunted in L5 and S1 dermatomes. MRI was reported as L5-S1 disc prolapsed compressing left S1 nerve root. Decompression of the L5-S1 intervertebral space was performed through a left -sidelaminotomy. Large, engorged serpentine epidural veins was found in the axilla of S1 nerve root, compressing it. Coagulative ablation of the dilated epidural vein was performed. Retrospectively, features of epidural varices were noted in the preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scans. Both patients had significant improvement in radiculopathy immediate postoperatively, and sensory symptoms resolved over the next 6 weeks in second case. At recent follow up, both patients had significant relief of symptoms and no recurrent radicular symptoms. An abnormal dilated epidural venous plexus that mimics a herniated lumbar disc is a rare entity. This pathology should be always kept in mind during lumbar disc surgery

  10. Procedures of Exercise Physiology Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Phillip A.; Fortney, Suzanne; Greenisen, Michael; Siconolfi, Steven F.; Bamman, Marcas M.; Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Squires, William

    1998-01-01

    This manual describes the laboratory methods used to collect flight crew physiological performance data at the Johnson Space Center. The Exercise Countermeasures Project Laboratory is a standard physiology laboratory; only the application to the study of human physiological adaptations to spaceflight is unique. In the absence of any other recently published laboratory manual, this manual should be a useful document staffs and students of other laboratories.

  11. Biological assays in microfabricated structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Daniel M.; Fare, Thomas L.; Dong, Qianping; Fan, Z. Hugh; Davis, Timothy J.; Kumar, Rajan

    1999-04-01

    Microfluidic control in microfabricated glass channels enables miniaturized, fast, and multianalyte assays. We are applying this technology in several areas, including real- time environmental monitoring for airborne biological agents. Two complementary approaches are being used in parallel. the first is assaying for the presence of nucleotide sequences that are markers for specific hazardous, engineered bacteria. The second is an assay that monitors the functionality of an in vitro biochemical pathway, in which the pathway that is chosen is sensitive to the presence of the class of toxins to be detected. The first approach is discussed here. The detected signal from the nucleic-acid-based assay is from fluorescently labeled probes that hybridize to bead-bound amplified DNA sequences. Detection approaches and their benefits will be discussed.

  12. Microtiter dish biofilm formation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, George A

    2011-01-30

    Biofilms are communities of microbes attached to surfaces, which can be found in medical, industrial and natural settings. In fact, life in a biofilm probably represents the predominate mode of growth for microbes in most environments. Mature biofilms have a few distinct characteristics. Biofilm microbes are typically surrounded by an extracellular matrix that provides structure and protection to the community. Microbes growing in a biofilm also have a characteristic architecture generally comprised of macrocolonies (containing thousands of cells) surrounded by fluid-filled channels. Biofilm-grown microbes are also notorious for their resistance to a range of antimicrobial agents including clinically relevant antibiotics. The microtiter dish assay is an important tool for the study of the early stages in biofilm formation, and has been applied primarily for the study of bacterial biofilms, although this assay has also been used to study fungal biofilm formation. Because this assay uses static, batch-growth conditions, it does not allow for the formation of the mature biofilms typically associated with flow cell systems. However, the assay has been effective at identifying many factors required for initiation of biofilm formation (i.e, flagella, pili, adhesins, enzymes involved in cyclic-di-GMP binding and metabolism) and well as genes involved in extracellular polysaccharide production. Furthermore, published work indicates that biofilms grown in microtiter dishes do develop some properties of mature biofilms, such a antibiotic tolerance and resistance to immune system effectors. This simple microtiter dish assay allows for the formation of a biofilm on the wall and/or bottom of a microtiter dish. The high throughput nature of the assay makes it useful for genetic screens, as well as testing biofilm formation by multiple strains under various growth conditions. Variants of this assay have been used to assess early biofilm formation for a wide variety of microbes

  13. Large-scale physiological waveform retrieval via locality-sensitive hashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongwook Bryce; O'Reilly, Una-May

    2015-08-01

    We propose a fast, scalable locality-sensitive hashing method for the problem of retrieving similar physiological waveform time series. When compared to the naive k-nearest neighbor search, the method vastly speeds up the retrieval time of similar physiological waveforms without sacrificing significant accuracy. Our result shows that we can achieve 95% retrieval accuracy or better with up to an order of magnitude of speed-up. The extra time required in advance to create the optimal data structure is recovered when query quantity equals 15% of the repository, while the method incurs a trivial additional memory cost. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method on an arterial blood pressure time series dataset extracted from the ICU physiological waveform repository of the MIMIC-II database.

  14. Physiology Considerations in Geriatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvis, Bret D; Hughes, Christopher G

    2015-09-01

    Physiology changes at the structural, functional, and molecular levels as people age, and every major organ system experiences physiologic change with time. The changes to the nervous system result mostly in cognitive impairments, the cardiovascular system develops higher blood pressures with lower cardiac output, the respiratory system undergoes a reduction of arterial oxyhemoglobin levels, the gastrointestinal system experiences delayed gastric emptying and reduction of hepatic metabolism, and the renal system experiences a diminished glomerular filtration rate. Combined, these changes create a complex physiologic condition. This unique physiology must be taken into consideration for geriatric patients undergoing general anesthesia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hemorrhagic shock: The "physiology approach"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Giuseppe Bonanno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A shift of approach from ′clinics trying to fit physiology′ to the one of ′physiology to clinics′, with interpretation of the clinical phenomena from their physiological bases to the tip of the clinical iceberg, and a management exclusively based on modulation of physiology, is finally surging as the safest and most efficacious philosophy in hemorrhagic shock. ATLS® classification and recommendations on hemorrhagic shock are not helpful because antiphysiological and potentially misleading. Hemorrhagic shock needs to be reclassified in the direction of usefulness and timing of intervention: in particular its assessment and management need to be tailored to physiology.

  16. Brain Physiology: Research and Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esler, William K.

    1982-01-01

    Indicates how research about the physiology and chemistry of the brain verifies the educational applications of Piaget's theory. Discusses maturation, experience, social transmission, and equilibration. (Author/DC)

  17. Egg activation in physiological polyspermy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iwao, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    .... While most animals exhibit monospermy, which is ensured by polyspermy blocks to prevent the entry of extra sperm into the egg at fertilization, several animals exhibit physiological polyspermy...

  18. A novel asymmetric 3D in-vitro assay for the study of tumor cell invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neufeld Gera

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The induction of tumor cell invasion is an important step in tumor progression. Due to the cost and slowness of in-vivo invasion assays, there is need for quantitative in-vitro invasion assays that mimic as closely as possible the tumor environment and in which conditions can be rigorously controlled. Methods We have established a novel asymmetric 3D in-vitro invasion assay by embedding a monolayer of tumor cells between two layers of collagen. The cells were then allowed to invade the upper and lower layers of collagen. To visualize invading cells the gels were sectioned perpendicular to the monolayer so that after seeding the monolayer appears as a thin line precisely defining the origin of invasion. The number of invading tumor cells, their proliferation rate, the distance they traverse and the direction of invasion could then be determined quantitatively. Results The assay was used to compare the invasive properties of several tumor cell types and the results compare well with those obtained by previously described assays. Lysyl-oxidase like protein-2 (Loxl2 is a potent inducer of invasiveness. Using our assay we show for the first time that inhibition of endogenous Loxl2 expression in several types of tumor cells strongly inhibits their invasiveness. We also took advantage of the asymmetric nature of the assay in order to show that fibronectin enhances the invasiveness of breast cancer cells more potently than laminin. The asymmetric properties of the assay were also used to demonstrate that soluble factors derived from fibroblasts can preferentially attract invading breast cancer cells. Conclusion Our assay displays several advantages over previous invasion assays as it is allows the quantitative analysis of directional invasive behavior of tumor cells in a 3D environment mimicking the tumor microenvironment. It should be particularly useful for the study of the effects of components of the tumor microenvironment on

  19. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its Biosensing Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong J.; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Zhaohui; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-15

    Ferritins are nano-scale globular protein cages encapsulating a ferric core. They widely exist in animals, plants, and microbes, playing indispensable roles in iron homeostasis. Interestingly, our study clearly demonstrates that ferritin has an enzyme-mimic activity derived from its ferric nano-core, but not the protein cage. Further study revealed that the mimic-enzyme activity of ferritin is more thermally stable and pH-tolerant compared with horseradish peroxidase. Considering the abundance of ferritin in numerous organisms, this finding may indicate a new role of ferritin in antioxidant and detoxification metabolisms. In addition, as a natural protein-caged nanoparticle with an enzyme-mimic activity, ferritin is readily conjugated with biomolecules to construct nano-biosensors, thus holds promising potential for facile and biocompatible labeling for sensitive and robust bioassays in biomedical applications.

  20. Smolt physiology and endocrinology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Stephen D.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Farrell, Anthony Peter; Brauner, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    Hormones play a critical role in maintaining body fluid balance in euryhaline fishes during changes in environmental salinity. The neuroendocrine axis senses osmotic and ionic changes, then signals and coordinates tissue-specific responses to regulate water and ion fluxes. Rapid-acting hormones, e.g. angiotensins, cope with immediate challenges by controlling drinking rate and the activity of ion transporters in the gill, gut, and kidney. Slow-acting hormones, e.g. prolactin and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1, reorganize the body for long-term acclimation by altering the abundance of ion transporters and through cell proliferation and differentiation of ionocytes and other osmoregulatory cells. Euryhaline species exist in all groups of fish, including cyclostomes, and cartilaginous and teleost fishes. The diverse strategies for responding to changes in salinity have led to differential regulation and tissue-specific effects of hormones. Combining traditional physiological approaches with genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analyses will elucidate the patterns and diversity of the endocrine control of euryhalinity.

  1. Polyamines in plant physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galston, A. W.; Sawhney, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The diamine putrescine, the triamine spermidine, and the tetramine spermine are ubiquitous in plant cells, while other polyamines are of more limited occurrence. Their chemistry and pathways of biosynthesis and metabolism are well characterized. They occur in the free form as cations, but are often conjugated to small molecules like phenolic acids and also to various macromolecules. Their titer varies from approximately micromolar to more than millimolar, and depends greatly on environmental conditions, especially stress. In cereals, the activity of one of the major polyamine biosynthetic enzymes, arginine decarboxylase, is rapidly and dramatically increased by almost every studied external stress, leading to 50-fold or greater increases in putrescine titer within a few hours. The physiological significance of this increase is not yet clear, although most recent work suggests an adaptive, protective role. Polyamines produced through the action of ornithine decarboxylase, by contrast, seem essential for DNA replication and cell division. The application of exogenous polyamines produces effects on patterns of senescence and morphogenesis, suggesting but not proving a regulatory role for polyamines in these processes. The evidence for such a regulatory role is growing.

  2. Physiology in Modelica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Mateják

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Modelica is an object-oriented language, in which models can be created and graphically represented by connecting instances of classes from libraries. These connections are not only assignments of values; they can also represent acausal equality. Even more, they can model Kirchhoff’s laws of circuits. In Modelica it is possible to develop library classes which are an analogy of electrical circuit components. The result of our work in this field is Physiolibrary (www.physiolibrary.org – a free, open-source Modelica library for human physiology. By graphical joining instances of Physiolibrary classes, user can create models of cardiovascular circulation, thermoregulation, metabolic processes, nutrient distribution, gas transport, electrolyte regulation, water distribution, hormonal regulation and pharmacological regulation. After simple setting of the parameters, the models are ready to simulate. After simulation, the user can examine variables as their values change over time. Representing the model as a diagram has also great educational advantages, because students are able to better understand physical principles when they see them modeled graphically.

  3. Correlation between the genotoxicity endpoints measured by two different genotoxicity assays: comet assay and CBMN assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2015-06-01

    The results concerning of positive findings by micronuclei and non significant ones by comet assay, are corroborated by Deng et al. (2005 study performed in workers occupationally exposed to methotrexate, also a cytostatic drug. According to Cavallo et al. (2009, the comet assay seems to be more suitable for the prompt evaluation of the genotoxic effects, for instance, of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons mixtures containing volatile substances, whereas the micronucleus test seems more appropriate to evaluate the effects of exposure to antineoplastic agents. However, there are studies that observed an increase in both the comet assay and the micronucleus test in nurses handling antineoplastic drugs, although statistical significance was only seen in the comet assay, quite the opposite of our results (Maluf & Erdtmann, 2000; Laffon et al. 2005.

  4. Applied physiology of cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, I E

    1984-01-01

    Historically, the bicycle has evolved through the stages of a machine for efficient human transportation, a toy for children, a finely-tuned racing machine, and a tool for physical fitness development, maintenance and testing. Recently, major strides have been made in the aerodynamic design of the bicycle. These innovations have resulted in new land speed records for human powered machines. Performance in cycling is affected by a variety of factors, including aerobic and anaerobic capacity, muscular strength and endurance, and body composition. Bicycle races range from a 200m sprint to approximately 5000km. This vast range of competitive racing requires special attention to the principle of specificity of training. The physiological demands of cycling have been examined through the use of bicycle ergometers, rollers, cycling trainers, treadmill cycling, high speed photography, computer graphics, strain gauges, electromyography, wind tunnels, muscle biopsy, and body composition analysis. These techniques have been useful in providing definitive data for the development of a work/performance profile of the cyclist. Research evidence strongly suggests that when measuring the cyclist's aerobic or anaerobic capacity, a cycling protocol employing a high pedalling rpm should be used. The research bicycle should be modified to resemble a racing bicycle and the cyclist should wear cycling shoes. Prolonged cycling requires special nutritional considerations. Ingestion of carbohydrates, in solid form and carefully timed, influences performance. Caffeine appears to enhance lipid metabolism. Injuries, particularly knee problems which are prevalent among cyclists, may be avoided through the use of proper gearing and orthotics. Air pollution has been shown to impair physical performance. When pollution levels are high, training should be altered or curtailed. Effective training programmes simulate competitive conditions. Short and long interval training, blended with long

  5. Development and comparison of nonradioactive in vitro kinase assays for NIMA-related kinase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Guixian; Aulabaugh, Ann; Pocas, Jennifer; Liu, Hao; Kriz, Ron; Sampath, Deepak

    2006-11-01

    NIMA (never in mitosis arrest)-related kinase 2 (Nek2) is a serine/threonine kinase required for centrosome splitting and bipolar spindle formation during mitosis. Currently, two in vitro kinase assays are commercially available: (i) a radioactive assay from Upstate Biotechnology and (ii) a nonradioactive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay from Invitrogen. However, due to several limitations such as radioactive waste management and lower sensitivity, a need for more robust nonradioactive assays would be ideal. Accordingly, we have developed four quantitative and sensitive nonradioactive Nek2 in vitro kinase assays: (i) a dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay (DELFIA) using peptides identified from a physiologically relevant protein substrate, (ii) DELFIA using Nek2 itself, (iii) a homogeneous time-resolved FRET assay termed LANCE, and (iv) A method of detecting phosphorylated products by HPLC. The DELFIA and LANCE assays are robust in that they generated more than 10-fold and 20-fold increases in signal-to-noise ratios, respectively, and are amenable to robotic high-throughput screening platforms. Validation of all four assays was confirmed by identifying a panel of small molecule ATP competitive inhibitors from an internal corporate library. The most potent compounds consistently demonstrated less than 100 nM activity regardless of the assay format and therefore were complementary. In summary, the Nek2 in vitro time-resolved FRET kinase assays reported are sensitive, quantitative, reproducible and amenable to high-throughput screening with improved waste management over radioactive assays.

  6. Adenine and benzimidazole-based mimics of REP-3123 as antibacterial agents against Clostridium difficile and Bacillus anthracis: Design, synthesis and biological evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed G. Eissa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available As part of our ongoing research efforts to develop new antibacterial agents acting on novel molecular targets, a series of twenty-two adenine and benzimidazole-based mimics of the lead compound REP-3123 was designed to target methionyl-tRNA synthetase of Clostridium difficile and Bacillus anthracis based on a homology model. Structures of the target compounds were elucidated by means of 1H and 13C NMR spectral data and their purity was confirmed by HRMS or microanalyses. The target compounds were tested for their in vitro antibacterial activity against those two challenging organisms by the microdilution method in brain heart infusion broth. Unfortunately, six of the target compounds were not biologically tested due to inadequate solubility in DMSO under the assay conditions. Only the fluoro-substituted adenine-based sulfamide (18 showed activity against C. difficile with an MIC of 85.33 μg/mL. The adenine-based thiourea (32 and diamine (36 were the most promising antibacterial agents against B. anthracis with an MIC of 92.16 μg/mL. The rest of the tested compounds either showed inferior activity (MIC = 102.4 μg/mL or were totally inactive. Although the compounds were not very active, the biological data are employed as a basis for our currently underway investigation for structure optimization.

  7. Assessing the potential of surrogate EPS to mimic natural biofilm mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Moritz; Schimmels, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Biofilms growing on benthic sediments may increase the resistance towards erosion considerably by the sticky nature of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The EPS is a biopolymer which is secreted by the microorganisms inhabiting the biofilm matrix and may be regarded as natural glue. However, laboratory studies on the biostabilization effect mediated by biofilms are often hampered by the unavailability of "environmental" flumes in which light intensities, water temperature and nutrient content can be controlled. To allow investigations on biostabilization in "traditional" flume settings the use of surrogate materials is studied. Another advantage of using appropriate surrogates is the potential to reduce the experimental time, as compared to cultivating natural biofilms, the surrogates can readily be designed to mimic biofilms at different growth stages. Furthermore, the use of surrogates which are expected to have more homogeneous mechanical properties could facilitate fundamental studies to improve our knowledge on biostabilization. Even though a number of studies have already utilized EPS surrogates it is not clear how to mix them to correctly mimic natural EPS mechanical properties. In this study the adhesiveness (a measure of stickiness) on the surface of several EPS surrogates (e.g. Xanthan Gum, sodium alginate) is measured. These surrogates which are originally used in the food industry as rheology modifiers are mixed by adding water to a powder at a desired concentration (C). The measured surface adhesion of different surrogates at different concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 6.7 N/m2, which is well in line with values found for laboratory cultured biofilms. We found that the surrogate characteristics differed largely especially in regard to a) the response of the adhesiveness to increased concentrations (powder to water) and b) in their rheological characteristics. A seemingly promising surrogate for the use in biostabilization studies is Xanthan Gum

  8. Theoretical modelling of physiologically stretched vessel in magnetisable stent assisted magnetic drug targeting application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardinoglu, Adil [Telecommunications Software and Systems Group (TSSG), Waterford Institute of Technology, Waterford (Ireland); Cregg, P.J.; Murphy, Kieran [Materials Characterisation and Processing Group, SEAM Centre, Waterford Institute of Technology, Waterford (Ireland); Curtin, Maurice [Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Prina-Mello, Adriele, E-mail: prinamea@tcd.i [Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2011-02-15

    The magnetisable stent assisted magnetic targeted drug delivery system in a physiologically stretched vessel is considered theoretically. The changes in the mechanical behaviour of the vessel are analysed under the influence of mechanical forces generated by blood pressure. In this 2D mathematical model a ferromagnetic, coiled wire stent is implanted to aid collection of magnetic drug carrier particles in an elastic tube, which has similar mechanical properties to the blood vessel. A cyclic mechanical force is applied to the elastic tube to mimic the mechanical stress and strain of both the stent and vessel while in the body due to pulsatile blood circulation. The magnetic dipole-dipole and hydrodynamic interactions for multiple particles are included and agglomeration of particles is also modelled. The resulting collection efficiency of the mathematical model shows that the system performance can decrease by as much as 10% due to the effects of the pulsatile blood circulation. - Research highlights: Theoretical modelling of magnetic drug targeting on a physiologically stretched stent-vessel system. Cyclic mechanical force applied to mimic the mechanical stress and strain of both stent and vessel. The magnetic dipole-dipole and hydrodynamic interactions for multiple particles is modelled. Collection efficiency of the mathematical model is calculated for different physiological blood flow and magnetic field strength.

  9. Cassava biology and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawy, Mabrouk A

    2004-11-01

    Cassava or manioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz), a perennial shrub of the New World, currently is the sixth world food crop for more than 500 million people in tropical and sub-tropical Africa, Asia and Latin America. It is cultivated mainly by resource-limited small farmers for its starchy roots, which are used as human food either fresh when low in cyanogens or in many processed forms and products, mostly starch, flour, and for animal feed. Because of its inherent tolerance to stressful environments, where other food crops would fail, it is often considered a food-security source against famine, requiring minimal care. Under optimal environmental conditions, it compares favorably in production of energy with most other major staple food crops due to its high yield potential. Recent research at the Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT) in Colombia has demonstrated the ability of cassava to assimilate carbon at very high rates under high levels of humidity, temperature and solar radiation,which correlates with productivity across all environments whether dry or humid. When grown on very poor soils under prolonged drought for more than 6 months, the crop reduce both its leaf canopy and transpiration water loss, but its attached leaves remain photosynthetically active, though at greatly reduced rates. The main physiological mechanism underlying such a remarkable tolerance to drought was rapid stomatal closure under both atmospheric and edaphic water stress, protecting the leaf against dehydration while the plant depletes available soil water slowly during long dry periods. This drought tolerance mechanism leads to high crop water use efficiency values. Although the cassava fine root system is sparse, compared to other crops, it can penetrate below 2 m soil,thus enabling the crop to exploit deep water if available. Leaves of cassava and wild Manihot possess elevated activities of the C4 enzyme PEP carboxylase but lack the leaf Kranz anatomy typical of C4

  10. Physiology of Alpine skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, R E; Montgomery, D L

    1988-10-01

    Physiological profiles of elite Alpine skiers reveal the importance of muscular strength, anaerobic power, anaerobic endurance, aerobic endurance, coordination, agility, balance, and flexibility. On-hill snow training and dryland training programmes should focus on the elevation of these fitness components. Physical characteristics of elite skiers reveal an average height and body mass. Today, successful skiers are taller and heavier than their predecessors. Slalom skiers tend to be leaner than skiers in other events while the downhill racers are the heaviest. Elite skiers have strong legs when peak torque is measured during isometric and isokinetic conditions involving knee extension, which may be a specific adaptation since the skier is in a crouched position for a prolonged period when racing. Leg strength correlates significantly with performance in the downhill and giant slalom events. The glycolytic contribution in the slalom and giant slalom events is about 40% of the total energy cost. Following a race, blood lactate concentration averages 9 to 13 mmol/L. A muscle lactate concentration of 24 mmol/kg wet muscle tissue has been reported. Elite skiers have higher lactate values than advanced or novice skiers. The aerobic demands of competitive Alpine skiing may approach (90 to 95%) of the athlete's maximal aerobic power. Maximal heart rate is achieved during the latter part of the race. Elite skiers have a high VO2max. This may reflect their training programme and not the actual demands of the sport. When turning, muscular activity acts to impede blood flow and oxygen delivery. As a consequence, anaerobic metabolism is increased. Glycogen studies show significant utilisation from both slow and fast twitch muscle fibres. Skilled and unskilled skiers differ with respect to glycogen utilisation. Skilled skiers have greater glycogen depletion in the slow twitch fibres compared to unskilled skiers. Muscle glycogen decreases by about 32 mmol/kg wet muscle tissue

  11. Activity Assays for Rhomboid Proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunova, E; Strisovsky, K; Lemieux, M J

    2017-01-01

    Rhomboids are ubiquitous intramembrane serine proteases that are involved in various signaling pathways. This fascinating class of proteases harbors an active site buried within the lipid milieu. High-resolution structures of the Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG with various inhibitors revealed the catalytic mechanism for rhomboid-mediated proteolysis; however, a quantitative characterization was lacking. Assessing an enzyme's catalytic parameters is important for understanding the details of its proteolytic reaction and regulatory mechanisms. To assay rhomboid protease activity, many challenges exist such as the lipid environment and lack of known substrates. Here, we summarize various enzymatic assays developed over the last decade to study rhomboid protease activity. We present detailed protocols for gel-shift and FRET-based assays, and calculation of KM and Vmax to measure catalytic parameters, using detergent solubilized rhomboids with TatA, the only known substrate for bacterial rhomboids, and the model substrate fluorescently labeled casein. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Extraction from ox retractor penis of an inhibitory substance which mimics its atropine-resistant neurogenic relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambache, N; Killick, S W; Aboo Aar, M

    1975-01-01

    The inhibitory post-ganglionic transmission in the retractor penis of the ox resembles that of the dog and is not cholinergic or adrenergic. Acid extracts of this tissue have yielded an unidentified, labile, inhibitory substance which mimics the effect of its inhibitory nerves. PMID:169935

  13. Selective Depletion of Neuropathy-Related Antibodies from Human Serum by Monolithic Affinity Columns Containing Ganglioside Mimics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetala, K.K.R.; Heikema, A.P.; Pukin, A.; Weijers, C.A.G.M.; Tio-Gillen, A.P.; Gilbert, M.; Endtz, H.P.; Belkum, van A.; Zuilhof, H.; Visser, G.M.; Jacobs, B.C.; Beek, van T.A.

    2011-01-01

    Monolithic columns containing ganglioside GM2 and GM3 mimics were prepared for selective removal of serum anti-ganglioside antibodies from patients with acute and chronic immune-mediated neuropathies. ELISA results demonstrated that anti-GM2 IgM antibodies in human sera and a mouse monoclonal

  14. The pattern recognition molecule deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) and synthetic mimics inhibit liposomal nucleic acid delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Hansen, Pernille; Blaich, Stephanie; End, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Liposomal nucleic acid delivery is a preferred option for therapeutic settings. The cellular pattern recognition molecule DMBT1, secreted at high levels in various diseases, and synthetic mimics efficiently inhibit liposomal nucleic acid delivery to human cells. These findings may have relevance ...

  15. Effects of model-mimic frequency on insect visitation and plant reproduction in a self-mimicry pollination system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Avila, Rubem Samuel; Oleques, Suiane Santos; Marciniak, Brisa; Ribeiro, José Ricardo I

    2017-11-01

    The proportion of mimics and models is a key parameter in mimetic systems. In monoecious plants with self-mimicry pollination systems, the mimic-model ratio is determined by the floral sex ratio. While an equal sex ratio (1:1) could provide the perfect balance between pollen donors and stigma surfaces able to receive the pollen, an unequal ratio could increase pollination by production of a greater number of rewarding, model flowers. The aim of the present study is to test the differences in visitation frequency and reproductive rates of different mimic and model flower arrays in order to assess the efficacy of the mimetic system in a Begonia cucullata population. The frequencies of visitors to groups of flowers with three distinctive sex ratio arrays (male-biased, female-biased and equal ratio) were compared using a Bayesian approach. The reproductive outcomes were compared in order to detect advantages of particular sex ratios. Low visitation frequency was recorded in all arrays. Pollinators showed similar behaviour regardless of sex ratio; they tended to avoid female, rewardless flowers. Pollination quality was highest in the equal sex ratio array. The current study shows that sex ratio plays a critical role in the pollination of B. cucullata and that the efficacy of the self-mimicry system appears to be doubtful. Visitation frequency may be associated with visual or chemical cues that allow pollinators to recognize models and mimics, regardless of their frequency in the population.

  16. Synthesis of Pyridinic-Rich N, S Co-doped Carbon Quantum Dots as Effective Enzyme Mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Teng; Cui, Zhi-wei; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Ying; Zou, Zhi-gang

    2017-05-01

    N and S co-doped carbon quantum dots (N, S-CQDs) with high N- and S-doping level were synthesized by microwave solid-phase pyrolysis within 50 s. Owing to the dominant pyridinic N injection into the conjugated framework, both high enzyme mimics catalytic activity and photoluminescence quantum yield are achieved simultaneously.

  17. Model lipid bilayers mimic non-specific interactions of gold nanoparticles with macrophage plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montis, Costanza; Generini, Viola; Boccalini, Giulia; Bergese, Paolo; Bani, Daniele; Berti, Debora

    2018-04-15

    Understanding the interaction between nanomaterials and biological interfaces is a key unmet goal that still hampers clinical translation of nanomedicine. Here we investigate and compare non-specific interaction of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with synthetic lipid and wild type macrophage membranes. A comprehensive data set was generated by systematically varying the structural and physicochemical properties of the AuNPs (size, shape, charge, surface functionalization) and of the synthetic membranes (composition, fluidity, bending properties and surface charge), which allowed to unveil the matching conditions for the interaction of the AuNPs with macrophage plasma membranes in vitro. This effort directly proved for the first time that synthetic bilayers can be set to mimic and predict with high fidelity key aspects of nanoparticle interaction with macrophage eukaryotic plasma membranes. It then allowed to model the experimental observations according to classical interface thermodynamics and in turn determine the paramount role played by non-specific contributions, primarily electrostatic, Van der Waals and bending energy, in driving nanoparticle-plasma membrane interactions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis and bioactivities study of new antibacterial peptide mimics: The dialkyl cationic amphiphiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, En; Bai, Peng-Yan; Cui, De-Yun; Chu, Wen-Chao; Hua, Yong-Gang; Liu, Qin; Yin, Hai-Yang; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Qin, Shangshang; Liu, Hong-Min

    2018-01-01

    The emergence of infectious diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria is widespread. Therefore, it is urgently required to enhance the development of novel antimicrobial agents with high antibacterial activity and low cytotoxicity. A series of novel dialkyl cationic amphiphiles bearing two identical length lipophilic alkyl chains and one non-peptidic amide bond were synthesized and tested for antimicrobial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Particular compounds synthesized showed excellent antibacterial activity toward drug-sensitive bacteria such as S. aureus, E. faecalis, E. coli and S. enterica, and clinical isolates of drug-resistant species such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), KPC-producing and NDM-1-producing carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). For example, the MIC values of the best compound 4g ranged from 0.5 to 2 μg/mL against all these strains. Moreover, these small molecules acted rapidly as bactericidal agents, and functioned primarily by permeabilization and depolarization of bacterial membranes. Importantly, these compounds were difficult to induce bacterial resistance and can potentially combat drug-resistant bacteria. Thus, these compounds can be developed into a new class of antibacterial peptide mimics against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including drug-resistant bacterial strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. To die or not to die? Lessons from lesion mimic mutants

    KAUST Repository

    Bruggeman, Quentin

    2015-01-30

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a ubiquitous genetically regulated process consisting in an activation of finely controlled signaling pathways that lead to cellular suicide. Although some aspects of PCD control appear evolutionary conserved between plants, animals and fungi, the extent of conservation remains controversial. Over the last decades, identification and characterization of several lesion mimic mutants (LMM) has been a powerful tool in the quest to unravel PCD pathways in plants. Thanks to progress in molecular genetics, mutations causing the phenotype of a large number of LMM and their related suppressors were mapped, and the identification of the mutated genes shed light on major pathways in the onset of plant PCD such as (i) the involvements of chloroplasts and light energy, (ii) the roles of sphingolipids and fatty acids, (iii) a signal perception at the plasma membrane that requires efficient membrane trafficking, (iv) secondary messengers such as ion fluxes and ROS and (v) the control of gene expression as the last integrator of the signaling pathways.

  20. We prefer what we fear: A response preference bias mimics attentional capture in spider fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberkamp, Anke; Biafora, Melanie; Schmidt, Thomas; Weiß, Katharina

    2018-01-01

    The extent to which emotionally significant stimuli capture visual attention remains elusive because a preference for reporting or choosing emotionally significant stimuli could mimic attentional capture by these stimuli. We conducted two prior-entry experiments to disentangle whether phobic and fear-relevant stimuli capture attention or merely produce a response bias in spider-fearful participants. Prior entry denotes the effect that attended stimuli are perceived earlier than unattended stimuli as indicated by temporal order judgments. We presented phobic (spiders), fear-relevant (snakes) and neutral stimuli in pairs with varying temporal onset. The participants' task was to indicate which stimulus was presented first (Experiment 1) or second (Experiment 2). In the first experiment, spider-fearful but not control participants indicated that they had perceived spiders as occurring earlier in time, suggesting a prior-entry effect for spiders in this group. But surprisingly, in the second experiment, spider-fearful participants indicated more frequently that they had seen spiders as being presented second. This finding rules out a genuine prior-entry effect and instead suggests a strong preference for the response option associated with the feared animal. This response bias may result from a hypervigilance toward the feared stimulus and contribute to maintaining avoidance behavior in individuals with specific phobias. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A model system to mimic environmentally active surface film roughness and hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jacob S; Shaw, Scott K

    2017-10-01

    This work presents the development and initial assessment of a laboratory platform to allow quantitative studies on model urban films. The platform consists of stearic acid and eicosane mixtures that are solution deposited from hexanes onto smooth, solid substrates. We show that this model has distinctive capabilities to better mimic a naturally occurring film's morphology and hydrophobicity, two important parameters that have not previously been incorporated into model film systems. The physical and chemical properties of the model films are assessed using a variety of analytical instruments. The film thickness and roughness are probed via atomic force microscopy while the film composition, wettability, and water uptake are analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, contact angle goniometry, and quartz crystal microbalance, respectively. Simulated environmental maturation is achieved by exposing the film to regulated amounts of UV/ozone. Ultimately, oxidation of the film is monitored by the analytical techniques mentioned above and proceeds as expected to produce a utile model film system. Including variable roughness and tunable surface coverage results in several key advantages over prior model systems, and will more accurately represent native urban film behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis of Ofornine mimics from natural product l-vasicine as anti-hypertensive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aga, Mushtaq A; Rayees, Sheikh; Rouf, Abdul; Kumar, Brijesh; Sharma, Anjna; Nagaraju, P V V S; Singh, Gurdarshan; Taneja, Subhash C

    2017-02-15

    We report the chemical synthesis of Ofornine mimics from l-vasicine, structure-activity relationship studies and their in vivo screening for anti-hypertensive action in Wistar rats. It was observed that most of the analogs possessed anti-hypertensive effect; however, the duration of the effect was variable and mostly transient. The results demonstrated that the analogs 12, 13, 14, 15, and 16 showed a sharp and significant decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure for 30-60min after intravenous administration. Analog (S)-(3-hydroxypyrrolidin-1-yl)(2-(pyridin-4-ylamino)phenyl)methanone (8) showed a significant decrease in blood pressure in a dose dependent manner whose maximal response lowered to 79.29±4.26mmHg of SBP and 62.55±2.9 of DBP at 10mg/kg intravenous dose. Further, the significant anti-hypertensive effect of 8 lasted for about 2.5h at 10mg/kg dose. We also evaluated the acute toxicity of the analog 8 as per the OECD guidelines and the compound was found to be safe up to the dose of 2000mg/kg body weight. These preclinical findings suggest that the analog 8 could be considered as a promising lead and a durable anti-hypertensive drug candidate and deserves further investigation. The SAR studies clearly showed that the amide, hydroxyl and pyridine ring plays important role in showing the activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cultivation of Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells on Topographical Substrates to Mimic the Human Corneal Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Shi Chua

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Human corneal endothelial cells have a limited ability to replicate in vivo and in vitro. Allograft transplantation becomes necessary when an accident or trauma results in excessive cell loss. The reconstruction of the cornea endothelium using autologous cell sources is a promising alternative option for therapeutic or in vitro drug testing applications. The native corneal endothelium rests on the Descemet’s membrane, which has nanotopographies of fibers and pores. The use of synthetic topographies mimics the native environment, and it is hypothesized that this can direct the behavior and growth of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs to resemble the corneal endothelium. In this study, HMVECs are cultivated on substrates with micron and nano-scaled pillar and well topographies. Closely packed HMVEC monolayers with polygonal cells and well-developed tight junctions were formed on the topographical substrates. Sodium/potassium (Na+/K+ adenine triphosphatase (ATPase expression was enhanced on the microwells substrate, which also promotes microvilli formation, while more hexagonal-like cells are found on the micropillars samples. The data obtained suggests that the use of optimized surface patterning, in particular, the microtopographies, can induce HMVECs to adopt a more corneal endothelium-like morphology with similar barrier and pump functions. The mechanism involved in cell contact guidance by the specific topographical features will be of interest for future studies.

  4. V. S. Naipaul’s The Mimic Men: Disillusionment with the Metropolis, Cosmopolitanism and Colonial Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify the disillusionment with metropolitan-centred cosmopolitanism in Naipaul’s The Mimic Men. The immigrants are chosen as the focal point to reveal the dissociation between them and the metropolis. Examining Naipaul’s description of the immigrant population’s metropolitan life, I contend that the cosmopolitan ideology is in stark contrast with the reality of coexistence, intermingling and hybridisation. Mere coexistence of people of heterogeneous cultural, national, religious or other identity formations cannot guarantee the uptake or expression of cosmopolitan openness. Making using of cosmopolitan theories in marketing and sociology and taking subaltern and third world experiences as forces of intervention and interruption into account, the fraudulence and infeasibility of cosmopolitanism as hedonistic consumption of global products and luxurious stylisation of metropolitan life in the novel is highlighted. This study reveals that it is colonial education that builds unreal colonial fantasy of the metropolis and cosmopolitanism on the one hand and leads to disillusionment on the other.

  5. Tuberculosis cervical lymphadenopathy mimics lateral neck metastasis from papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seok-Mo; Jun, Hak Hoon; Chang, Ho-Jin; Chun, Ki Won; Kim, Bup-Woo; Lee, Yong Sang; Chang, Hang-Seok; Park, Cheong Soo

    2016-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) lymphadenitis is a frequent cause of lymphadenopathy in areas in which TB is endemic. Cervical lymphadenopathy in TB can mimic lateral neck metastasis (LNM) from papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). This study evaluated the clinicopathological features of patients with PTC and TB lateral neck lymphadenopathy. Of the 9098 thyroid cancer patients who underwent thyroid cancer surgery at the Thyroid Cancer Center of Gangnam Severance Hospital between January 2009 and April 2013, 28 had PTC and showed TB lymphadenopathy of the lateral neck node. The clinicopathological features of these 28 patients were evaluated. Preoperatively, all 28 patients were diagnosed with PTC and showed cervical lymphadenopathy. All had radiological characteristics suspicious of metastasis in lateral neck nodes. Based upon the results from intraoperative frozen sections, lymph node dissection (LND) was not performed on 19 patients. Seven of eight patients who underwent LND had metastasis combined with tuberculous lymphadenopathy, with the remaining patient negative for LNM. Intraoperative sampling and frozen sectioning of lymph nodes suspicious of metastasis can help avoid unnecessary LND for tuberculous lymphadenopathy. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  6. Cadmium mimics the in vivo effects of estrogen in the uterus and mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael D; Kenney, Nicholas; Stoica, Adriana; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; Singh, Baljit; Chepko, Gloria; Clarke, Robert; Sholler, Peter F; Lirio, Apolonio A; Foss, Colby; Reiter, Ronald; Trock, Bruce; Paik, Soonmyoung; Martin, Mary Beth

    2003-08-01

    It has been suggested that environmental contaminants that mimic the effects of estrogen contribute to disruption of the reproductive systems of animals in the wild, and to the high incidence of hormone-related cancers and diseases in Western populations. Previous studies have shown that functionally, cadmium acts like steroidal estrogens in breast cancer cells as a result of its ability to form a high-affinity complex with the hormone binding domain of the estrogen receptor. The results of the present study show that cadmium also has potent estrogen-like activity in vivo. Exposure to cadmium increased uterine wet weight, promoted growth and development of the mammary glands and induced hormone-regulated genes in ovariectomized animals. In the uterus, the increase in wet weight was accompanied by proliferation of the endometrium and induction of progesterone receptor (PgR) and complement component C3. In the mammary gland, cadmium promoted an increase in the formation of side branches and alveolar buds and the induction of casein, whey acidic protein, PgR and C3. In utero exposure to the metal also mimicked the effects of estrogens. Female offspring experienced an earlier onset of puberty and an increase in the epithelial area and the number of terminal end buds in the mammary gland.

  7. ROMP- and RAFT-Based Guanidinium-Containing Polymers as Scaffolds for Protein Mimic Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapas, Joel M; Backlund, Coralie M; deRonde, Brittany M; Minter, Lisa M; Tew, Gregory N

    2017-05-17

    Cell-penetrating peptides are an important class of molecules with promising applications in bioactive cargo delivery. A diverse series of guanidinium-containing polymeric cell-penetrating peptide mimics (CPPMs) with varying backbone chemistries was synthesized and assessed for delivery of both GFP and fluorescently tagged siRNA. Specifically, we examined CPPMs based on norbornene, methacrylate, and styrene backbones to determine how backbone structure impacted internalization of these two cargoes. Either charge content or degree of polymerization was held constant at 20, with diguanidinium norbornene molecules being polymerized to both 10 and 20 repeat units. Generally, homopolymer CPPMs delivered low amounts of siRNA into Jurkat T cells, with no apparent backbone dependence; however, by adding a short hydrophobic methyl methacrylate block to the guanidinium-rich methacrylate polymer, siRNA delivery to nearly the entire cell population was achieved. Protein internalization yielded similar results for most of the CPPMs, though the block polymer was unable to deliver proteins. In contrast, the styrene-based CPPM yielded the highest internalization for GFP (≈40 % of cells affected), showing that indeed backbone chemistry impacts protein delivery, specifically through the incorporation of an aromatic group. These results demonstrate that an understanding of how polymer structure affects cargo-dependent internalization is critical to designing new, more effective CPPMs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Medical Textiles as Vascular Implants and Their Success to Mimic Natural Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charanpreet Singh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vascular implants belong to a specialised class of medical textiles. The basic purpose of a vascular implant (graft and stent is to act as an artificial conduit or substitute for a diseased artery. However, the long-term healing function depends on its ability to mimic the mechanical and biological behaviour of the artery. This requires a thorough understanding of the structure and function of an artery, which can then be translated into a synthetic structure based on the capabilities of the manufacturing method utilised. Common textile manufacturing techniques, such as weaving, knitting, braiding, and electrospinning, are frequently used to design vascular implants for research and commercial purposes for the past decades. However, the ability to match attributes of a vascular substitute to those of a native artery still remains a challenge. The synthetic implants have been found to cause disturbance in biological, biomechanical, and hemodynamic parameters at the implant site, which has been widely attributed to their structural design. In this work, we reviewed the design aspect of textile vascular implants and compared them to the structure of a natural artery as a basis for assessing the level of success as an implant. The outcome of this work is expected to encourage future design strategies for developing improved long lasting vascular implants.

  9. Testing a new surfactant in a widely-used blood mimic for ultrasound flow imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Hoskins, Peter R

    2017-11-01

    A blood-mimicking fluid developed by Ramnarine et al. has been widely used in flow phantoms for ultrasound flow imaging research, and it has also been cited by IEC 61685 as a reference for making blood-mimicking fluid.However, the surfactant material Synperonic N in this blood-mimicking fluid recipe is phased out from the European market due to environmental issues. The aim of this study is to test whether Synperonic N can be substituted by biodegradable Synperonic A7 in making blood-mimicking fluid for ultrasound flow imaging research. A flow phantom was fabricated to test the blood-mimicking fluid with Synperonic N and Synperonic A7 as surfactants separately. Doppler images and velocity data were collected using a clinical ultrasound scanner under constant and pulsatile flows; and images and measured velocities were compared. It was found that both blood mimics can provide exactly the same images under spectral Doppler ultrasound and colour Doppler ultrasound in terms of their image qualities. The maximum velocities under constant flow were measured by the spectral Doppler ultrasound as 0.4714 ± 0.001 m.s-1 and 0.4644 ± 0.001 m.s-1 for blood-mimicking fluid with Synperonic N and blood-mimicking fluid with Synperonic A7, respectively. Measured velocities using the two different blood-mimicking fluids were statistically different (p flow imaging research.

  10. Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology of Parathyroid Carcinoma Mimic Hürthle Cell Thyroid Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chutintorn Sriphrapradang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA can cause misdiagnosis of cytomorphological findings between parathyroid and thyroid lesions. Case Presentation. A 31-year-old man presented with a palpable neck mass on the right thyroid lobe. FNA cytology was reported as intrathyroidal lymphoid hyperplasia. After 5 years, repeated FNA was done on the enlarged nodule with result of Hürthle cell lesion. Prior to right lobectomy, laboratories revealed elevated serum calcium and parathyroid hormone (PTH. Careful history taking revealed chronic knee pain and ossifying fibroma at the maxilla. Ultrasonography showed a 2.8 cm mass inferior to right thyroid lobe. Pathology from en bloc resection was parathyroid carcinoma and immunohistochemical study revealed positivity for PTH. Genetic analysis found somatic mutation of CDC73 gene in exon1 (c.70delG which caused premature stop codon in amino acid 26 (p.Glu24Lysfs2*. The final diagnosis was hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome. Conclusions. FNA cytology of parathyroid can mimic thyroid lesion. It is important to consider and correlate the entire information from clinical history, laboratory, imaging, and FNA.

  11. Pronator syndrome and other nerve compressions that mimic carpal tunnel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael J; LaStayo, Paul C

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide a comprehensive review of compressive neuropathies that may mimic carpal tunnel syndrome, provide the clinician with information to differentially diagnose these median nerve compression sites, and provide an evidence-based opinion regarding conservative intervention techniques for the various compression syndromes. While rare in comparison to carpal tunnel syndrome, pronator syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve syndrome are proximal median nerve compressions that may be suspected if a patient with carpal tunnel syndrome fails to respond to conservative or surgical intervention. Differential diagnosis is based largely on the symptoms, patterns of paresthesia, and specific patterns of muscle weakness. Due to the relative rarity of pronator syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve syndrome, few controlled studies exist to determine the most effective treatment techniques. Based on sound anatomical and biomechanical considerations, anecdotal experience, and available research, however, treatment strategies for pronator syndrome and anterior interosseous nerve syndrome compression neuropathies can be divided into 4 major categories: (1) rest/immobilization, (2) modalities, (3) nerve gliding, and (4) nonconservative treatment.

  12. Orchid mimics honey bee alarm pheromone in order to attract hornets for pollination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodmann, Jennifer; Twele, Robert; Francke, Wittko; Yi-bo, Luo; Xi-qiang, Song; Ayasse, Manfred

    2009-08-25

    Approximately one-third of the world's estimated 30,000 orchid species are deceptive and do not reward their pollinators with nectar or pollen. Most of these deceptive orchids imitate the scent of rewarding flowers or potential mates. In this study, we investigated the floral scent involved in pollinator attraction to the rewardless orchid Dendrobium sinense, a species endemic to the Chinese island Hainan that is pollinated by the hornet Vespa bicolor. Via chemical analyses and electrophysiological methods, we demonstrate that the flowers of D. sinense produce (Z)-11-eicosen-1-ol and that the pollinator can smell this compound. This is a major compound in the alarm pheromones of both Asian (Apis cerana) and European (Apis mellifera) honey bees and is also exploited by the European beewolf (Philanthus triangulum) to locate its prey. This is the first time that (Z)-11-eicosen-1-ol has been identified as a floral volatile. In behavioral experiments, we demonstrate that the floral scent of D. sinense and synthetic (Z)-11-eicosen-1-ol are both attractive to hornets. Because hornets frequently capture honey bees to feed to their larvae, we suggest that the flowers of D. sinense mimic the alarm pheromone of honey bees in order to attract prey-hunting hornets for pollination.

  13. Immunogenicity of heme complexes of peptides designed to mimic the heme environment of myoglobin and hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atassi, M Zouhair; Childress, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    In the preceding paper (Protein J. 25, pages 37-49, 2005), we reported the preparation and oxygen-binding properties of peptides that form stable complexes with heme mimic. The design of the peptides was based on the natural environment of the heme group in myoglobin (Mb) and in the alpha- and beta-subunits of human adult hemoglobin (Hb). In the present work, the heme-peptides were each administered into mice, either as emulsions in adjuvant (both for injections and boosters) or intravenously as solutions in phosphate-buffered saline. Antibody (Ab) responses, monitored up to 14 weeks after the first administration, showed that when the heme-peptides were injected with adjuvant they stimulated Ab responses against the immunizing peptide, which in most cases bound to the correlate protein (Mb or Hb). However these heme-peptides were non-immunogenic when administered in PBS intravenously. It is concluded that heme-peptides:(a) would not trigger an adverse immune response if used for transfusion purposes.

  14. Peptidoglycan glycosyltransferase substrate mimics as templates for the design of new antibacterial drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline eDerouaux

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Peptidoglycan (PG is an essential net-like macromolecule that surrounds bacteria, gives them their shape, and protects them against their own high osmotic pressure. PG synthesis inhibition leads to bacterial cell lysis, making it an important target for many antibiotics. The final two reactions in PG synthesis are performed by penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs. Their glycosyltransferase (GT activity uses the lipid II precursor to synthesize glycan chains and their transpeptidase (TP activity catalyzes the cross-linking of two glycan chains via the peptide side chains. Inhibition of either of these two reactions leads to bacterial cell death. β-Lactam antibiotics target the transpeptidation reaction while antibiotic therapy based on inhibition of the GTs remains to be developed. Ongoing research is trying to fill this gap by studying the interactions of GTs with inhibitors and substrate mimics and utilizing the latter as templates for the design of new antibiotics. In this mini review we present an updated overview on the GTs and describe the structure-activity relationship of recently developed synthetic ligands.

  15. Hexaniobate as nanoscale catalyst support for copper oxidase mimics based on metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizeto, Marcos Augusto [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Diadema, SP (Brazil); Alves, Wendel Andrade [Universidade Federal do ABC, SP (Brazil); Barbosa, Cesar Augusto Sales [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Bunge Fertilizantes; Ferreira, Ana Maria da Costa; Constantino, Vera Regina Leopoldo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2006-07-01

    Inorganic materials such as nanoporous zeolitic systems and layered structures have been considered special containers for chemical reactions, in which catalytically active species can show an energetic and/or spatial configuration that favors reactions of low activation energy. In this work, hexaniobate nanoscrolls were evaluated as a support for a metal complex that mimics copper oxidase enzymes. The cationic metal complex, 2-[2-(2-pyridyl)ethylimino-1-ethyl]pyridine-imidazole copper(II), [Cu(apip)imH]{sup 2}, was immobilized into hexaniobate scrolls by an ion exchange reaction. Chemical analysis, electronic and vibrational spectroscopies, thermogravimetric analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) techniques were used to characterize the hexaniobatecopper complex system. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy of isolated hexaniobate particles containing the cationic complex showed the presence of scrolls with a wall thickness of about 4.5-7.0 nm and an external diameter of about 25-30 nm. X ray diffraction patterns confirmed the presence of the copper complex in the interlayer spaces of hexaniobate nanoscrolls. The reactivity of the copper complex supported on hexaniobate nanoscrolls was investigated for catechol oxidation in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The formation of hydroxyl radicals (-OH) during the reaction was suggested by EPR data, which were obtained by monitoring the kinetics of DMPO/-OH adduct formation (DMPO is 5,5' dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide, used as spin trap). (author)

  16. [Video Instruction for Synchronous Video Recording of Mimic Movement of Patients with Facial Palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaede, Rebecca Anna; Volk, Gerd Fabian; Modersohn, Luise; Barth, Jodi Maron; Denzler, Joachim; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2017-12-01

    Background Photografy and video are necessary to record the severity of a facial palsy or to allow offline grading with a grading system. There is no international standard for the video recording urgently needed to allow a standardized comparison of different patient cohorts. Methods A video instruction was developed. The instruction was shown to the patient and presents several mimic movements. At the same time the patient is recorded while repeating the presented movement using commercial hardware. Facial movements were selected in such a way that it was afterwards possible to evaluate the recordings with standard grading systems (House-Brackmann, Sunnybrook, Stennert, Yanagihara) or even with (semi)automatic software. For quality control, the patients evaluated the instruction using a questionnaire. Results The video instruction takes 11 min and 05 and is divided in 3 parts: 1) Explanation of the procedure; 2) Foreplay and recreating of the facial movements; 3) Repeating of sentences to analyze the communication skills. So far 13 healthy subjects and 10 patients with acute or chronic facial palsy were recorded. All recordings could be assessed by the above mentioned grading systems. The instruction was rated as well explaining and easy to follow by healthy persons and patients. Discussion There is now a video instruction available for standardized recording of facial movement. This instruction is recommended for use in clinical routine and in clinical trials. This will allow a standardized comparison of patients within Germany and international patient cohorts. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Fabrication of a modular hybrid chip to mimic endothelial-lined microvessels in flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitingolo, Gabriele; Vecchione, Raffaele; Falanga, Andrea P.; Guarnieri, Daniela; Netti, Paolo A.

    2017-03-01

    In vitro microvessel models exploiting microfluidic channels have been developed to replicate cardiovascular flow conditions and to more closely mimic the blood vessels by traditionally using plasma or solvent evaporation bonding methods. The drawback of these methods is represented by an irreversible sealing which prevents internal accessibility as well as the reuse of the device. This paper presents a novel, simple, and low cost procedure to fabricate a modular and reusable chip with endotheliazed microvessels in a hybrid configuration based on poly(methyl methacrylate) and polydimethylsiloxane presenting a temporary magnetic bonding. In details, small magnets are embedded in the two poly(methyl methacrylate) substrates each of them carrying a thin polydimethylsiloxane layer which provides enhanced sealing during flow conditions as compared to conventional procedures and makes the microchannels circular as preferred in cell culture. Finally, an endothelial cell layer is formed by culturing brain endothelial bEnd.3 cells inside the proposed microchannels and characterized upon microchannel aperture, demonstrating the preservation of the cell layer.

  18. A Periodic Diet that Mimics Fasting Promotes Multi-System Regeneration, Enhanced Cognitive Performance, and Healthspan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, Sebastian; Choi, In Young; Wei, Min; Cheng, Chia Wei; Sedrakyan, Sargis; Navarrete, Gerardo; Dubeau, Louis; Yap, Li Peng; Park, Ryan; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Di Biase, Stefano; Mirzaei, Hamed; Mirisola, Mario G; Childress, Patra; Ji, Lingyun; Groshen, Susan; Penna, Fabio; Odetti, Patrizio; Perin, Laura; Conti, Peter S; Ikeno, Yuji; Kennedy, Brian K; Cohen, Pinchas; Morgan, Todd E; Dorff, Tanya B; Longo, Valter D

    2015-07-07

    Prolonged fasting (PF) promotes stress resistance, but its effects on longevity are poorly understood. We show that alternating PF and nutrient-rich medium extended yeast lifespan independently of established pro-longevity genes. In mice, 4 days of a diet that mimics fasting (FMD), developed to minimize the burden of PF, decreased the size of multiple organs/systems, an effect followed upon re-feeding by an elevated number of progenitor and stem cells and regeneration. Bi-monthly FMD cycles started at middle age extended longevity, lowered visceral fat, reduced cancer incidence and skin lesions, rejuvenated the immune system, and retarded bone mineral density loss. In old mice, FMD cycles promoted hippocampal neurogenesis, lowered IGF-1 levels and PKA activity, elevated NeuroD1, and improved cognitive performance. In a pilot clinical trial, three FMD cycles decreased risk factors/biomarkers for aging, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer without major adverse effects, providing support for the use of FMDs to promote healthspan. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Triggering a false alarm: wounding mimics prey capture in the carnivorous Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovič, Andrej; Jakšová, Jana; Novák, Ondřej

    2017-11-01

    In the carnivorous plant Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula), the sequence of events after prey capture resembles the well-known plant defence signalling pathway in response to pathogen or herbivore attack. Here, we used wounding to mimic prey capture to show the similarities and differences between botanical carnivory and plant defence mechanisms. We monitored movement, electrical signalling, jasmonate accumulation and digestive enzyme secretion in local and distal (systemic) traps in response to prey capture, the mechanical stimulation of trigger hairs and wounding. The Venus flytrap cannot discriminate between wounding and mechanical trigger hair stimulation. Both induced the same action potentials, rapid trap closure, hermetic trap sealing, the accumulation of jasmonic acid (JA) and its isoleucine conjugate (JA-Ile), and the secretion of proteases (aspartic and cysteine proteases), phosphatases and type I chitinase. The jasmonate accumulation and enzyme secretion were confined to the local traps, to which the stimulus was applied, which correlates with the propagation of electrical signals and the absence of a systemic response in the Venus flytrap. In contrast to plant defence mechanisms, the absence of a systemic response in carnivorous plant may represent a resource-saving strategy. During prey capture, it could be quite expensive to produce digestive enzymes in the traps on the plant without prey. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Ring-down gravity waves: How far wormhole observables can mimic those of a black hole?

    CERN Document Server

    Nandi, Kamal K; Yanbekov, Almir A; Shayakhmetov, Azat A

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued that the recently detected ring-down gravity waveforms could be indicative only of the presence of light rings in a horizonless object, such as a surgical Schwarzschild wormhole, with the frequencies differing drastically from those of the horizon quasinormal mode frequencies $\\omega _{\\text{QNM}}$. While the possibility of such a horizonless alternative is novel by itself, we show by an appropriate example that the difference in frequencies need not be drastic. We shall consider here an analytic (as opposed to surgical) stable traversable Ellis-Bronnikov wormhole and show that observables such as the $\\omega _{\\text{QNM}}$, strong field Bozza lensing parameters and the accretion disk signatures of the Ellis-Bronnikov wormhole could actually be very close to those of a black hole (say, SgrA$^{\\ast }$ hosted by our galaxy) of the same mass. This situation indicates that the wormhole observables could remarkably mimic those of a black hole unless highly precise measurements distinguishing the...

  1. Amyloid β-sheet mimics that antagonize protein aggregation and reduce amyloid toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Eisenberg, David; Nowick, James S.

    2012-11-01

    The amyloid protein aggregation associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type II diabetes (among many others) features a bewildering variety of β-sheet-rich structures in transition from native proteins to ordered oligomers and fibres. The variation in the amino-acid sequences of the β-structures presents a challenge to developing a model system of β-sheets for the study of various amyloid aggregates. Here, we introduce a family of robust β-sheet macrocycles that can serve as a platform to display a variety of heptapeptide sequences from different amyloid proteins. We have tailored these amyloid β-sheet mimics (ABSMs) to antagonize the aggregation of various amyloid proteins, thereby reducing the toxicity of amyloid aggregates. We describe the structures and inhibitory properties of ABSMs containing amyloidogenic peptides from the amyloid-β peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, β2-microglobulin associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide associated with type II diabetes, human and yeast prion proteins, and Tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles.

  2. Closed-loop artificial pancreas systems: physiological input to enhance next-generation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudva, Yogish C; Carter, Rickey E; Cobelli, Claudio; Basu, Rita; Basu, Ananda

    2014-01-01

    To provide an understanding of both the preclinical and clinical aspects of closed-loop artificial pancreas systems, we provide a discussion of this topic as part of this two-part Bench to Clinic narrative. Here, the Bench narrative provides an in-depth understanding of insulin-glucose-glucagon physiology in conditions that mimic the free-living situation to the extent possible in type 1 diabetes that will help refine and improve future closed-loop system algorithms. In the Clinic narrative, Doyle and colleagues compare and evaluate technology used in current closed-loop studies to gain further momentum toward outpatient trials and eventual approval for widespread use.

  3. Closed-Loop Artificial Pancreas Systems: Physiological Input to Enhance Next-Generation Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Kudva, Yogish C.; Carter, Rickey E.; Cobelli, Claudio; Basu, Rita; Basu, Ananda

    2014-01-01

    To provide an understanding of both the preclinical and clinical aspects of closed-loop artificial pancreas systems, we provide a discussion of this topic as part of this two-part Bench to Clinic narrative. Here, the Bench narrative provides an in-depth understanding of insulin-glucose-glucagon physiology in conditions that mimic the free-living situation to the extent possible in type 1 diabetes that will help refine and improve future closed-loop system algorithms. In the Clinic narrative, ...

  4. Energetics, physiology and vertebrate ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasov, W H

    1986-10-01

    The magnitude of energy flow through individual animals and their populations is potentially limited by several physiological factors. These include thermal constraints affecting the time available for foraging, physiological design constraints affecting foraging mode and the rate of prey capture, and digestive constraints on how much food can be processed per day. Over short periods (hours or less), maximal rates of metabolism may determine survival during exposure to cold or when fleeing predators. Energetics, physiology and ecology can be usefully integrated within the context of the concept of maximum rate of energy flow. Copyright © 1986. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Metal-based superoxide dismutase and catalase mimics reduce oxidative stress biomarkers and extend life span of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Thales de P; Fonseca, Fernanda L; de Carvalho, Mariana D C; Godinho, Rodrigo M da C; de Almeida, Fernando Pereira; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana D; Rey, Nicolás A; Fernandes, Christiane; Horn, Adolfo; Pereira, Marcos D

    2017-01-15

    Aging is a natural process characterized by several biological changes. In this context, oxidative stress appears as a key factor that leads cells and organisms to severe dysfunctions and diseases. To cope with reactive oxygen species and oxidative-related damage, there has been increased use of superoxide dismutase (SOD)/catalase (CAT) biomimetic compounds. Recently, we have shown that three metal-based compounds {[Fe(HPClNOL)Cl2]NO3, [Cu(HPClNOL)(CH3CN)](ClO4)2 and Mn(HPClNOL)(Cl)2}, harboring in vitro SOD and/or CAT activities, were critical for protection of yeast cells against oxidative stress. In this work, treating Saccharomyces cerevisiae with these SOD/CAT mimics (25.0 µM/1 h), we highlight the pivotal role of these compounds to extend the life span of yeast during chronological aging. Evaluating lipid and protein oxidation of aged cells, it becomes evident that these mimics extend the life expectancy of yeast mainly due to the reduction in oxidative stress biomarkers. In addition, the treatment of yeast cells with these mimics regulated the amounts of lipid droplet occurrence, consistent with the requirement and protection of lipids for cell integrity during aging. Concerning SOD/CAT mimics uptake, using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, we add new evidence that these complexes, besides being bioabsorbed by S. cerevisiae cells, can also affect metal homeostasis. Finally, our work presents a new application for these SOD/CAT mimics, which demonstrate a great potential to be employed as antiaging agents. Taken together, these promising results prompt future studies concerning the relevance of administration of these molecules against the emerging aging-related diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  6. Boron Heterocycle High-Fidelity Estrogen Mimics as Novel Antiestrogens for the Treatment of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    beneficial role in the pathology of dental ionic borinates at physiologic pH. Trisubstitution caries,2 7 it has attracted some attention in alternative...aminophenylboronic In the anticoagulant field, the clinically used heparins acid bound by E. coli AmpC 13-lactamase was ob- and the vitamin K antagonist...development of orally bioavailable AmpC P3-lactamase, was solved to assist in the struc- boronic acid inhibitors of coagulation factor Xa is ture-based

  7. Paramyxovirus Infection Mimics In Vivo Cellular Dynamics in Three-Demensional Human Bronchio-Epithelial Tissue-Like Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deatly, Anne M.; Lin, Yen-Huei; McCarthy, Maureen; Chen, Wei; Miller, Lynn Z.; Quiroz, Jorge; Nowak, Becky M.; Lerch, Robert A.; Udem, Stephen A.; Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus cause severe respiratory disease, especially in infants, children and the elderly. An in vitro model that accurately mimics infection of the human respiratory epithelium (HRE) would facilitate vaccine development greatly. Monolayer cultures traditionally used to study these viruses do not accurately and precisely differentiate the replication efficiencies of wild type and attenuated viruses. Therefore, we engineered novel three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like assemblies (TLAs) of human broncho-epithelial (HBE) cells to produce a more physiologically relevant in vitro model of the HRE. TLAs resemble HRE structurally and by expression of differentiated epithelial cell markers. Most significantly, wild type viruses exhibited a clear growth advantage over attenuated strains in TLAs unlike monolayer cultures. In addition, the TLAs responded to virus infection by secreting pro-inflammatory mediators similar to the respiratory epithelia of infected children. These characteristics make the TLA model a valuable platform technology to develop and evaluate live, attenuated respiratory virus vaccine candidates for human use. Respiratory virus diseases, the most frequent and least preventable of all infectious diseases, range in severity from the common cold to severe bronchiolitis and pneumonia . Two paramyxoviruses, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3), are responsible for a majority of the most severe respiratory diseases of infants and young children. RSV causes 70% of all bronchiolitis cases and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in infants. PIV3 causes 10-15% of bronchiolitis and pneumonia during infancy, second only to RSV, and 40% of croup in infants To date, licensed vaccines are not available to prevent these respiratory diseases. At present, traditional monkey kidney (Vero and LLC-MK2) and human (HEp-2) tissue culture cells and small animal models (mouse

  8. Chromosome aberration assays in Allium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    The common onion (Allium cepa) is an excellent plant for the assay of chromosome aberrations after chemical treatment. Other species of Allium (A. cepa var. proliferum, A. carinatum, A. fistulosum and A. sativum) have also been used but to a much lesser extent. Protocols have been given for using root tips from either bulbs or seeds of Allium cepa to study the cytological end-points, such as chromosome breaks and exchanges, which follow the testing of chemicals in somatic cells. It is considered that both mitotic and meiotic end-points should be used to a greater extent in assaying the cytogenetic effects of a chemical. From a literature survey, 148 chemicals are tabulated that have been assayed in 164 Allium tests for their clastogenic effect. Of the 164 assays which have been carried out, 75 are reported as giving a positive reaction, 49 positive and with a dose response, 1 positive and temperature-related, 9 borderline positive, and 30 negative; 76% of the chemicals gave a definite positive response. It is proposed that the Allium test be included among those tests routinely used for assessing chromosomal damage induced by chemicals.

  9. Physiological Studies of Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gunda

    was found to facilitate the differentiation and accurate quantification of L. lactis cells in different physiological states, which agreed with the reproductive viability of reference samples and of exponential cells. The high viability of one particular L. lactis strain demonstrated its robustness during......, cell size comparison and pHi determination reflected the increasing physiological impairment during this accelerated stability test, while a preincubation in buffer led to inconsistent flow cytometric results. The comparison of reproductive and growth-independent viability suggested the presence......Aiming at a superior performance, survival and stability of dairy starter cultures requires deeper insights into physiological dynamics and relationships. This PhD thesis contributes to a more comprehensive physiological understanding of Lactococcus lactis under conditions encountered during...

  10. Olfaction: anatomy, physiology and behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Benignus, Vernon A.; Prah, James D.

    1982-01-01

    The anatomy, physiology and function of the olfactory system are reviewed, as are the normal effects of olfactory stimulation. It is speculated that olfaction may have important but unobtrusive effects on human behavior.

  11. Physiological anthropology: past and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steegmann, A Theodore

    2006-01-01

    Environmental studies in adaptive human biology by North American anthropologists have a history of strong investigative research. From both laboratory and field work, we have gained major insights into human response to physical and social challenges. While these results were considered by most professionals to belong within evolutionary biology, in fact the intellectual structure sprang almost entirely from physiological equilibrium models. Consequently, physiological process itself was the focus. Further, most of the physiological patterns were not linked directly to important outcomes such as work output, reproductive success or survival. About 1975, American physiological anthropologists, led by Paul Baker, turned to studies of health, change and stress response. These studies were strong, but were still neither genetic nor evolutionary in intellectual structure. Evolutionary human biology was taken over by a new body of theory now called "behavior ecology", positing that selfish genes control human behavior to promote their own reproduction. This was paralleled by strong use of evolutionary theory in some areas of molecular biology. However, although physiological anthropologists have not focused on evolution, we have been developing powerful causal models that incorporate elements of physiology, morphology, physical environment and cultural behavior. In these "proximate" biocultural models, it is of little importance whether outcomes such as work or energy management are genetically based. Our future offers two major challenges. First, we must confirm causal links between specific physiological patterns and outcomes of practical importance to individuals and societies. Second, if we are to take our place in evolutionary biology, the one overarching theory of life on earth, we must understand the heritability of physiological traits, and determine whether they play a role in survival and reproduction.

  12. Regulatory physiology discipline science plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the Regulatory Physiology discipline of the Space Physiology and Countermeasures Program is twofold. First, to determine and study how microgravity and associated factors of space flight affect the regulatory mechanisms by which humans adapt and achieve homeostasis and thereby regulate their ability to respond to internal and external signals; and, second, to study selected physiological systems that have been demonstrated to be influenced by gravity. The Regulatory Physiology discipline, as defined here, is composed of seven subdisciplines: (1) Circadian Rhythms, (2) Endocrinology, (3) Fluid and Electrolyte Regulation, (4) Hematology, (5) Immunology, (6) Metabolism and Nutrition, and (7) Temperature Regulation. The purpose of this Discipline Science Plan is to provide a conceptual strategy for NASA's Life Sciences Division research and development activities in the area of regulatory physiology. It covers the research areas critical to NASA's programmatic requirements for the Extended-Duration Orbiter, Space Station Freedom, and exploration mission science activities. These science activities include ground-based and flight; basic, applied, and operational; and animal and human research and development. This document summarizes the current status of the program, outlines available knowledge, establishes goals and objectives, identifies science priorities, and defines critical questions in regulatory physiology. It contains a general plan that will be used by both NASA Headquarters Program Offices and the field centers to review and plan basic, applied, and operational intramural and extramural research and development activities in this area.

  13. The sequence spectrum of frameshift reversions obtained with a novel adaptive mutation assay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich Heidenreich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on the mechanisms of adaptive mutagenesis in resting, i.e. non-replicating cells relies on appropriate mutation assays. Here we provide a novel procedure for the detection of frameshift-reverting mutations in yeast. Proliferation of non-reverted cells in this assay is suppressed by the lack of a fermentable carbon source. The test allele was constructed in a way that the reversions mimic microsatellite instability, a condition often found in cancer cells. We show the cell numbers during these starvation conditions and provide a DNA sequence spectrum of a representative set of revertants. The data in this article support the publication "Glucose starvation as a selective tool for the study of adaptive mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae" (Heidenreich and Steinboeck, 2016 [1].

  14. Application of expert system technology to nondestructive waste assay - initial prototype model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, G.K.; Determan, J.C. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Expert system technology has been identified as a technique useful for filling certain types of technology/capability gaps in existing waste nondestructive assay (NDA) applications. In particular, expert system techniques are being investigated with the intent of providing on-line evaluation of acquired data and/or directed acquisition of data in a manner that mimics the logic and decision making process a waste NDA expert would employ. The space from which information and data sources utilized in this process is much expanded with respect to the algorithmic approach typically utilized in waste NDA. Expert system technology provides a mechanism to manage and reason with this expanded information/data set. The material presented in this paper concerns initial studies and a resultant prototype expert system that incorporates pertinent information, and evaluation logic and decision processes, for the purpose of validating acquired waste NDA measurement assays. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Symbiotic properties of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus assayed on serradella plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieczysława Deryło

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiological and symbiotic properties of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus nodule isolates were compared to the standard slow-growing Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus strain USDA 3045. Lupine nodules isolates showed typical characteristics for bradyrhizobial strains and nodulated small seed legume, serradella (Ornithopus sativus, in tube test. We observed a permanent physiological segregation of the effective (Fix' and ineffective (Fix- symbiotic phenotype for all tested bradyrhizobial strains during the growth of serradella in plant tube test. The ultrastructural differences between Fix* and Fix serradella nodules were observed. Rapid and visible nodulation as well as easy assay of the reduction of acetylene make serradella a convenient system for studies of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus strains in laboratory conditions.

  16. AVE 0991, a nonpeptide mimic of the effects of angiotensin-(1-7) on the endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemer, Gabriele; Dobrucki, Lawrence W; Louka, Febee R; Malinski, Tadeusz; Heitsch, Holger

    2002-12-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that the heptapeptide angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-[1-7]) exhibits a favorable kinetic of nitric oxide (NO) release accompanied by extremely low superoxide (O2-) production. In this report we describe AVE 0991, a novel nonpeptide compound that evoked effects similar to Ang-(1-7) on the endothelium. AVE 0991 and unlabeled Ang-(1-7) competed for high-affinity binding of [125I]-Ang-(1-7) to bovine aortic endothelial cell membranes with IC50 values of 21+/-35 and 220+/-280 nmol/L, respectively. Stimulated NO and O2- release from bovine aortic endothelial cells was directly and simultaneously measured on the cell surface by selective electrochemical nanosensors. Peak concentrations of NO and O2- release by AVE 0991 and Ang-(1-7) (both 10 micromol/L) were not significantly different (NO: 295+/-20 and 270+/-25 nmol/L; O2-: 18+/-2 and 20+/-4 nmol/L). However, the released amount of bioactive NO was approximately 5 times higher for AVE 0991 in comparison to Ang-(1-7). The selective Ang-(1-7) antagonist [D-Ala(7)]-Ang-(1-7) inhibited the AVE 0991-induced NO and O2- production by approximately 50%. A similar inhibition level was observed for the Ang II AT1 receptor antagonist EXP 3174. In contrast, the Ang II AT2 receptor antagonist PD 123,177 inhibited the AVE 0991-stimulated NO production by approximately 90% but without any inhibitory effect on O2- production. Both NO and O2- production were inhibited by NO synthase inhibition ( approximately 70%) and by bradykinin B2 receptor blockade (approximately 80%). AVE 0991 efficiently mimics the effects of Ang-(1-7) on the endothelium, most probably through stimulation of a specific, endothelial Ang-(1-7)-sensitive binding site causing kinin-mediated activation of endothelial NO synthase.

  17. L30A Mutation of Phospholemman Mimics Effects of Cardiac Glycosides in Isolated Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himes, Ryan D; Smolin, Nikolai; Kukol, Andreas; Bossuyt, Julie; Bers, Donald M; Robia, Seth L

    2016-11-08

    To determine if mutations introduced into phospholemman (PLM) could increase the level of PLM-Na,K-ATPase (NKA) binding, we performed scanning mutagenesis of the transmembrane domain of PLM and measured Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between each mutant and NKA. We observed an increased level of binding to NKA for several PLM mutants compared to that of the wild type (WT), including L27A, L30A, and I32A. In isolated cardiomyocytes, overexpression of WT PLM increased the amplitude of the Ca(2+) transient compared to the GFP control. The Ca(2+) transient amplitude was further increased by L30A PLM overexpression. The L30A mutation also delayed Ca(2+) extrusion and increased the duration of cardiomyocyte contraction. This mimics aspects of the effect of cardiac glycosides, which are known to increase contractility through inhibition of NKA. No significant differences between WT and L30A PLM-expressing myocytes were observed after treatment with isoproterenol, suggesting that the superinhibitory effects of L30A are reversible with β-adrenergic stimulation. We also observed a decrease in the extent of PLM tetramerization with L30A compared to WT using FRET, suggesting that L30 is an important residue for mediating PLM-PLM binding. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the potential energy of the L30A tetramer is greater than that of the WT, and that the transmembrane α helix is distorted by the mutation. The results identify PLM residue L30 as an important determinant of PLM tetramerization and of functional inhibition of NKA by PLM.

  18. Sonography of tumors and tumor-like lesions that mimic carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopiński, Tomasz; Gołąbek, Tomasz; Ostasz, Oksana; Bojko, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    One of the basic abdominal organs that is assessed during transabdominal ultrasound examination for urological reasons is the urinary bladder. The bladder must be filled with urine. This is a prerequisite for a reliable assessment and, at the same time, an acoustic window in examining adjacent structures and organs, for instance the prostate gland. In some cases, doubts occur with respect to the nature of lesions detected. The paper presents anatomic lesions, defects and pathologies which might be erroneously interpreted as tumors of the urinary bladder, i.e. transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. The following lesions are discussed: 1) anatomic defects (including urachus remnants, ligaments that stabilize the bladder or cyst in the opening of the ureter into the bladder – ureterocele); 2) tumor- like lesions in the lumen of the urinary bladder (such as blood clots, fungus balls, stones or foreign bodies); 3) bladder wall pathologies (i.e. cystitis or endometriosis), focal decidual transformation of stromal cells or inflammatory pseudotumor; 4) lesions impressing on the bladder from the outside (the mesentery of the sigmoid colon, the bowel, pathological lesions in organs adjacent to the urinary bladder, inflammatory infiltration, vasogenic compression of the bladder, pelvic lipomatosis, pathological lesions of the pubic symphysis); 5) postoperative lesions. All these lesions may mimic carcinoma of the urinary bladder in sonography. Bearing this fact in mind is significant in establishing a diagnosis. Due to the malignant character of carcinoma of the urinary bladder and the need for aggressive surgical treatment, a correct diagnosis of this disease is essential for patients, particularly because the lack of adequate treatment and delayed treatment considerably affect prognosis. PMID:26672732

  19. Hereditary and inflammatory neuropathies: a review of reported associations, mimics and misdiagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabally, Yusuf A; Adams, David; Latour, Philippe; Attarian, Shahram

    2016-10-01

    Distinguishing between hereditary and inflammatory neuropathy is usually straightforward on clinical grounds with the help of a family history. There are nevertheless cases where the distinction is less clear. The advent of molecular genetics has in the past several years aided confirmatory diagnosis for an increasing proportion of patients with genetic neuropathy. Various reports have described associations of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with a suspected or confirmed inflammatory neuropathy occasionally responding to immunotherapy. Possible predisposition to an inflammatory component was suggested in a subset of patients. Such reports have, however, been relatively few in number, suggesting the rarity of such associations and of such a predisposition if it exists. There have been a number of publications detailing clinical presentations suggestive of inflammatory neuropathy in patients with a known or later proven genetic aetiology, and subsequently felt to be part of the phenotype rather than representing an association. A number of genetically mediated multisystemic diseases with neuropathy have otherwise been reported as mimicking chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). The most common example is that of familial amyloid polyneuropathy, of particular concern for the clinician when misdiagnosed as CIDP, in view of the therapeutic implications. We review the literature on reported associations, mimics and misdiagnoses of hereditary and inflammatory neuropathy and attempt to determine a practical approach to the problem in clinical practice using clinical features, electrophysiology, histopathology and targeted early genetic testing. The issue of attempting immunomodulatory therapy is discussed in view of the published literature. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Efficient [FeFe] hydrogenase mimic dyads covalently linking to iridium photosensitizer for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hong-hua; Hu, Ming-qiang; Wen, Hui-min; Chai, Guo-liang; Ma, Cheng-bing; Chen, Hui; Chen, Chang-neng

    2012-12-07

    Two [FeFe] hydrogenase mimics, [Fe(2)(μ-pdt)(CO)(5)L1] (L1 = PPh(2)SPhNH(2)) (Ph = phenyl) (2) and [Fe(2)(μ-pdt)(CO)(5)L2] (L2 = PPh(2)PhNH(2)) (3), and two molecular photocatalysts, [(CO)(5)(μ-pdt)Fe(2)PPh(2)SPhNHCO(bpy)(ppy)(2)Ir]PF(6) (bpy = bipyridine, ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) (2a) and [(CO)(5)(μ-pdt)Fe(2)PPh(2)PhNHCO(bpy)(ppy)(2)Ir](PF(6)) (3a), have been designed and synthesized, anchoring Ir(ppy)(2)(mbpy)PF(6) (mbpy = 4-methyl-4'-carbonyl-2,2'-bipyridine) (PS) to one of the iron centers of complexes 2 and 3 by forming amide bonds. Molecular dyads 2a, 3a and the intermolecular systems 2, 3 with PS have also been successfully constructed for photoinduced H(2) production using triethylamine (TEA) as a sacrificial electron donor by visible light (>400 nm) in CH(3)CN-H(2)O solution. The time-dependence of H(2) generation and spectroscopic studies suggest that the activity of H(2) evolution can be tuned by addition of a S atom to the phosphane ligand. The highest turnover numbers (TON) of hydrogen evolution obtained are 127, using 2a as a photocatalyst in a supramolecular system, and 138, based on catalyst 2 in a multi-component system. Density functional theory (DFT) computational studies demonstrate that the S atom in the second coordination sphere makes complex 2 accept an electron more easily than 3 and improves the activity in light-induced hydrogen production.

  1. Competition and phylogeny determine community structure in Müllerian co-mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrou, Markos A; Oliveira, Claudio; Maillard, Marjorie; McGill, Rona A R; Newton, Jason; Creer, Simon; Taylor, Martin I

    2011-01-06

    Until recently, the study of negative and antagonistic interactions (for example, competition and predation) has dominated our understanding of community structure, maintenance and assembly. Nevertheless, a recent theoretical model suggests that positive interactions (for example, mutualisms) may counterbalance competition, facilitating long-term coexistence even among ecologically undifferentiated species. Müllerian mimics are mutualists that share the costs of predator education and are therefore ideally suited for the investigation of positive and negative interactions in community dynamics. The sole empirical test of this model in a Müllerian mimetic community supports the prediction that positive interactions outweigh the negative effects of spatial overlap (without quantifying resource acquisition). Understanding the role of trophic niche partitioning in facilitating the evolution and stability of Müllerian mimetic communities is now of critical importance, but has yet to be formally investigated. Here we show that resource partitioning and phylogeny determine community structure and outweigh the positive effects of Müllerian mimicry in a species-rich group of neotropical catfishes. From multiple, independent reproductively isolated allopatric communities displaying convergently evolved colour patterns, 92% consist of species that do not compete for resources. Significant differences in phylogenetically conserved traits (snout morphology and body size) were consistently linked to trait-specific resource acquisition. Thus, we report the first evidence, to our knowledge, that competition for trophic resources and phylogeny are pivotal factors in the stable evolution of Müllerian mimicry rings. More generally, our work demonstrates that competition for resources is likely to have a dominant role in the structuring of communities that are simultaneously subject to the effects of both positive and negative interactions.

  2. Phospholipid composition of purified Chlamydia trachomatis mimics that of the eucaryotic host cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, G M; McClarty, G

    1998-08-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular eubacterial parasite capable of infecting a wide range of eucaryotic host cells. Purified chlamydiae contain several lipids typically found in eucaryotes, and it has been established that eucaryotic lipids are transported from the host cell to the parasite. In this report, we examine the phospholipid composition of C. trachomatis purified from host cells grown under a variety of conditions in which the cellular phospholipid composition was altered. A mutant CHO cell line, with a thermolabile CDP-choline synthetase, was used to show that decreased host cell phosphatidylcholine levels had no significant effect on C. trachomatis growth. However, less phosphatidylcholine was transported to the parasite and purified elementary bodies contained decreased levels of phosphatidylcholine. Brefeldin A, fumonisin B1, and exogenous sphingomyelinase were used to alter levels of host cell sphingomyelin. None of the agents had a significant effect on C. trachomatis replication. Treatment with fumonisin B1 and exogenous sphingomyelinase resulted in decreased levels of host cell sphingomyelin. This had no effect on glycerophospholipid trafficking to chlamydiae; however, sphingomyelin trafficking was reduced and elementary bodies purified from treated cells had reduced sphingomyelin content. Exposure to brefeldin A, which had no adverse effect on chlamydia growth, resulted in an increase in cellular levels of sphingomyelin and a concomitant increase in the amount of sphingomyelin in purified chlamydiae. Under the experimental conditions used, brefeldin A treatment had only a small effect on sphingomyelin trafficking to the host cell surface or to C. trachomatis. Thus, the final phospholipid composition of purified C. trachomatis mimics that of the host cell in which it is grown.

  3. Sonography of tumors and tumor-like lesions that mimic carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Smereczyński

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the basic abdominal organs that is assessed during transabdominal ultrasound examination for urological reasons is the urinary bladder. The bladder must be filled with urine. This is a prerequisite for a reliable assessment and, at the same time, an acoustic window in examining adjacent structures and organs, for instance the prostate gland. In some cases, doubts occur with respect to the nature of lesions detected. The paper presents anatomic lesions, defects and pathologies which might be erroneously interpreted as tumors of the urinary bladder, i.e. transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. The following lesions are discussed: 1 anatomic defects (including urachus remnants, ligaments that stabilize the bladder or cyst in the opening of the ureter into the bladder – ureterocele; 2 tumorlike lesions in the lumen of the urinary bladder (such as blood clots, fungus balls, stones or foreign bodies; 3 bladder wall pathologies (i.e. cystitis or endometriosis, focal decidual transformation of stromal cells or inflammatory pseudotumor; 4 lesions impressing on the bladder from the outside (the mesentery of the sigmoid colon, the bowel, pathological lesions in organs adjacent to the urinary bladder, inflammatory infiltration, vasogenic compression of the bladder, pelvic lipomatosis, pathological lesions of the pubic symphysis; 5 postoperative lesions. All these lesions may mimic carcinoma of the urinary bladder in sonography. Bearing this fact in mind is significant in establishing a diagnosis. Due to the malignant character of carcinoma of the urinary bladder and the need for aggressive surgical treatment, a correct diagnosis of this disease is essential for patients, particularly because the lack of adequate treatment and delayed treatment considerably affect prognosis.

  4. Methylated Cytokinins from the Phytopathogen Rhodococcus fascians Mimic Plant Hormone Activity1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhika, Venkatesan; Ueda, Nanae; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Kojima, Mikiko; Kikuchi, Jun; Kudo, Takuji; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins (CKs), a class of phytohormones that regulate plant growth and development, are also synthesized by some phytopathogens to disrupt the hormonal balance and to facilitate niche establishment in their hosts. Rhodococcus fascians harbors the fasciation (fas) locus, an operon encoding several genes homologous to CK biosynthesis and metabolism. This pathogen causes unique leafy gall symptoms reminiscent of CK overproduction; however, bacterial CKs have not been clearly correlated with the severe symptoms, and no virulence-associated unique CKs or analogs have been identified. Here, we report the identification of monomethylated N6-(∆2-isopentenyl)adenine and dimethylated N6-(∆2-isopentenyl)adenine (collectively, methylated cytokinins [MeCKs]) from R. fascians. MeCKs were recognized by a CK receptor and up-regulated type-A ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA RESPONSE REGULATOR genes. Treatment with MeCKs inhibited root growth, a hallmark of CK action, whereas the receptor mutant was insensitive. MeCKs were retained longer in planta than canonical CKs and were poor substrates for a CK oxidase/dehydrogenase, suggesting enhanced biological stability. MeCKs were synthesized by S-adenosyl methionine-dependent methyltransferases (MT1 and MT2) that are present upstream of the fas genes. The best substrate for methylation was isopentenyl diphosphate. MT1 and MT2 catalyzed distinct methylation reactions; only the MT2 product was used by FAS4 to synthesize monomethylated N6-(∆2-isopentenyl)adenine. The MT1 product was dimethylated by MT2 and used as a substrate by FAS4 to produce dimethylated N6-(∆2-isopentenyl)adenine. Chemically synthesized MeCKs were comparable in activity. Our results strongly suggest that MeCKs function as CK mimics and play a role in this plant-pathogen interaction. PMID:26251309

  5. Methylated Cytokinins from the Phytopathogen Rhodococcus fascians Mimic Plant Hormone Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhika, Venkatesan; Ueda, Nanae; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Kojima, Mikiko; Kikuchi, Jun; Kudo, Takuji; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2015-10-01

    Cytokinins (CKs), a class of phytohormones that regulate plant growth and development, are also synthesized by some phytopathogens to disrupt the hormonal balance and to facilitate niche establishment in their hosts. Rhodococcus fascians harbors the fasciation (fas) locus, an operon encoding several genes homologous to CK biosynthesis and metabolism. This pathogen causes unique leafy gall symptoms reminiscent of CK overproduction; however, bacterial CKs have not been clearly correlated with the severe symptoms, and no virulence-associated unique CKs or analogs have been identified. Here, we report the identification of monomethylated N(6)-(∆(2)-isopentenyl)adenine and dimethylated N(6)-(∆(2)-isopentenyl)adenine (collectively, methylated cytokinins [MeCKs]) from R. fascians. MeCKs were recognized by a CK receptor and up-regulated type-A ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA RESPONSE REGULATOR genes. Treatment with MeCKs inhibited root growth, a hallmark of CK action, whereas the receptor mutant was insensitive. MeCKs were retained longer in planta than canonical CKs and were poor substrates for a CK oxidase/dehydrogenase, suggesting enhanced biological stability. MeCKs were synthesized by S-adenosyl methionine-dependent methyltransferases (MT1 and MT2) that are present upstream of the fas genes. The best substrate for methylation was isopentenyl diphosphate. MT1 and MT2 catalyzed distinct methylation reactions; only the MT2 product was used by FAS4 to synthesize monomethylated N(6)-(∆(2)-isopentenyl)adenine. The MT1 product was dimethylated by MT2 and used as a substrate by FAS4 to produce dimethylated N(6)-(∆(2)-isopentenyl)adenine. Chemically synthesized MeCKs were comparable in activity. Our results strongly suggest that MeCKs function as CK mimics and play a role in this plant-pathogen interaction. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Somatostatin receptor 1 and 5 double knockout mice mimic neurochemical changes of Huntington's disease transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmesh S Rajput

    Full Text Available Selective degeneration of medium spiny neurons and preservation of medium sized aspiny interneurons in striatum has been implicated in excitotoxicity and pathophysiology of Huntington's disease (HD. However, the molecular mechanism for the selective sparing of medium sized aspiny neurons and vulnerability of projection neurons is still elusive. The pathological characteristic of HD is an extensive reduction of the striatal mass, affecting caudate putamen. Somatostatin (SST positive neurons are selectively spared in HD and Quinolinic acid/N-methyl-D-aspartic acid induced excitotoxicity, mimic the model of HD. SST plays neuroprotective role in excitotoxicity and the biological effects of SST are mediated by five somatostatin receptor subtypes (SSTR1-5.To delineate subtype selective biological responses we have here investigated changes in SSTR1 and 5 double knockout mice brain and compared with HD transgenic mouse model (R6/2. Our study revealed significant loss of dopamine and cAMP regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa (DARPP-32 and comparable changes in SST, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors subtypes, calbindin and brain nitric oxide synthase expression as well as in key signaling proteins including calpain, phospho-extracellular-signal-regulated kinases1/2, synapsin-IIa, protein kinase C-α and calcineurin in SSTR1/5(-/- and R6/2 mice. Conversely, the expression of somatostatin receptor subtypes, enkephalin and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases were strain specific. SSTR1/5 appears to be important in regulating NMDARs, DARPP-32 and signaling molecules in similar fashion as seen in HD transgenic mice.This is the first comprehensive description of disease related changes upon ablation of G- protein coupled receptor gene. Our results indicate that SST and SSTRs might play an important role in regulation of neurodegeneration and targeting this pathway can provide a novel insight in understanding the pathophysiology of Huntington's disease.

  7. An athymic mouse model to mimic cobalt-60 cutaneous radiation injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosca, Rodrigo Crespo; Ferreira, Danilo Cardenuto; Napolitano, Celia Marina; Santin, Stefany Plumeri; Dornelles, Leonardo Dalla Porta; Alvarenga, Eluara Ortigoso; Mathor, Monica Beatriz, E-mail: rcmosca@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Propose: Cutaneous wound from irradiation is the most common complication in radiotherapy treatment, and can be lead to mortality. We describe an athymic mouse model to mimic cutaneous radiation injury by Cobalt-60. Methods: A protocol was including dosimetry with silicon diodes,10x10x5 cm arrangement made by four lead bricks and PVC pipe designed to immobilize the athymic mouse in order to irradiate one clamped back skin point that was subdivided in four parts. To get the measurements of dose rates on the arrangement in Panoramic Irradiator, it was used a silicon diode encased in an opaque protection for ambient light and connected to an electric cable, forming a dosing probe. The currents generated in diode sensitive volume as a function of time of exposure to gamma radiation coming from the radiator, with dose rate of 0,015 Gy/min in positions 1, 0,021 Gy/min in position 2, 0,55 Gy/min in position 3 and 1,45 Gy/min in position four. After the dosimetry, each athymic mouse was anesthetized using Xylazine and Ketamine dilution and entered into a PVC pipe and a small portion of skin (1 cm{sup 3}) was clamped. This tube was then fixed to arrangement and the athymic mouse was irradiate for 60 min, than it was being returned to its cage. Results: The wound was visualized in all animals and photographed after 5 days of irradiation, with the emergence of ulceration after 9 days. No systemic or lethal sequelae occurred or visualized in any animals. Late clinical signs included a wound healing after 22 days. Conclusion: While still being a baseline study, we created a new functional preclinical animal model that can be used for new therapies and may improve radiotherapy management. (author)

  8. A mimic of sexually-motivated homicide: insect stings and heat exhaustion in a forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nancy X; Pollanen, Michael S

    2017-06-01

    We report the case a woman who was found dead in a forest. The body was nude and the position of the body suggested a sexually motivated homicide. We concluded that death was not related to homicide, but was related to the conjunction of environmental factors, including insect stings, and acute psychosis. A medicolegal death investigation with postmortem examination was undertaken to determine cause of death. At the scene, the body was supine with legs spread apart and the knees flexed, exposing the external genitalia. There were multiple apparent bruises on the body and neck. At autopsy, based on macroscopic and microscopic examination, the apparent bruises were found to be hemorrhagic insect bites. No significant injuries were present and no semen was found. Death appeared to be related to heat exhaustion and innumerable insect stings. Investigation of the medical history revealed longstanding schizoaffective disorder with episodic psychotic decompensations. In the past, during an acute psychotic episode the decedent removed her clothing and ran wildly in a forest, until she was rescued in a state of exhaustion and marked agitation, and taken to hospital for treatment. We concluded that the same circumstances had been repeated but with a fatal outcome. This case is an example of a mimic of sexually-motivated homicide and is a reminder to forensic pathologists to avoid tunnel vision. We need to be skeptical of the allure of common sense based on first impressions of the scene and the body. Forensic pathologists must be unafraid to scientifically explore improbable, but true, alternate explanations.

  9. Functionalized hybrid nanofibers to mimic native ECM for tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karuppuswamy, Priyadharsini [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore); Department Physics and Nanotechnology, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Chennai (India); Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy, E-mail: nnijrv@nus.edu.sg [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore); Navaneethan, Balchandar [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore); Department Physics and Nanotechnology, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Chennai (India); Laiva, Ashang Luwang; Sridhar, Sreepathy; Ramakrishna, Seeram [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Functionalized hybrid polymer mats fabricated for tissue engineering. • Hybrid polymer mats showed high surface area, high porosity and good wettability. • Incorporation of natural polymers modified the properties of nanofiber mats more biologically favorable for biomedical applications. - Abstract: Nanotechnology being one of the most promising technologies today shows an extremely huge potential in the field of tissue engineering to mimic the porous topography of natural extracellular matrix (ECM). Natural polymers are incorporated into the synthetic polymers to fabricate functionalized hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds, which improve cell and tissue compatibility. The present study identified the biopolymers – aloe vera, silk fibroin and curcumin incorporated into polycaprolactone (PCL) as suitable substrates for tissue engineering. Different combinations of PCL with natural polymers – PCL/aloe vera, PCL/silk fibroin, PCL/aloe vera/silk fibroin, PCL/aloe vera/silk fibroin/curcumin were electrospun into nanofibrous scaffolds. The fabricated two dimensional nanofibrous scaffolds showed high surface area, appropriate mechanical properties, hydrophilicity and porosity, required for the regeneration of diseased tissues. The nanofibrous scaffolds were characterized by Scanning electron microscope (SEM), porometry, Instron tensile tester, VCA optima contact angle measurement and FTIR to analyze the fiber diameter and morphology, porosity and pore size distribution, mechanical strength, wettability, chemical bonds and functional groups, respectively. The average fiber diameter of obtained fibers ranged from 250 nm to 350 nm and the tensile strength of PCL scaffolds at 4.49 MPa increased upto 8.3 MPa for PCL/silk fibroin scaffolds. Hydrophobicity of PCL decreased with the incorporation of natural polymers, especially for PCL/aloe vera scaffolds. The properties of as-spun nanofiber scaffolds showed their potential as promising scaffold materials in

  10. Revision of the Western Australian pebble-mimic dragon species-group (Tympanocryptis cephalus: Reptilia: Agamidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Paul; Kealley, Luke; Shoo, Luke P; Melville, Jane

    2015-11-03

    Recent work on species complexes of the pebble-mimic dragons of the Australian genus Tympanocryptis has greatly clarified evolutionary relationships among taxa and also indicated that species diversity has been severely underestimated. Here we provide a morphological and molecular appraisal of variation in the T. cephalus species-group and find evidence for recognizing five species-level lineages from Western Australia. Four species-level lineages are strongly supported with a combined mitochondrial and nuclear DNA Bayesian analysis (a fifth population from the Gascoyne region lacked tissue samples). Morphologically, we found subtle, yet consistent, differences among the populations in scalation, color and pattern. True T. cephalus Günther is restricted to the coastal Pilbara region and characterized by five dark blotches on the dorsum, keeled ventrals, and other characters. Two other lineages within the Pilbara, from the Hamersley range and Fortescue/northern Pilbara region, differed from T. cephalus senso stricto by possessing a more elongate body and a plain dorsum. Furthermore, the Hamersley lineage differed from the Fortescue lineage by possessing slightly more reddish coloration and feeble keeling on the snout. Although there are few specimens and no tissue samples available for the Gascoyne population, these individuals are larger, have rugose scales on the snout, and possess scattered enlarged tubercles with three large blotches on the dorsum. The name T. cephalus gigas Mitchell is available for this population. The most widespread lineage, and the one best represented in collections and in field guides, occurs throughout central Western Australia. These Goldfield populations are characterized by a protruding snout, narrow rostral, and uniform reddish-brown coloration, often with a dark wash. Based on the genetic and morphological differences, we redescribe T. cephalus, resurrect and elevate T. gigas to a full species and designate a neotype for this taxon

  11. Child Abuse Mimic: Avulsion Injury in a Child With Penoscrotal Webbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Stephanie Anne; Long, Christopher J; Srinivasan, Arun K; Wood, Joanne N

    2017-04-01

    Sexual abuse of children is prevalent in today's society. In 2012, approximately 686,000 children (9.2 per 1000) in the United States were determined to be victims of substantiated child abuse and neglect, according to national data compiled by child protective service agencies; victimization rates were highest for children younger than 1 year. Nearly 9.3% of maltreated children were victims of sexual abuse, this finding was reported by US Department of Health and Human Services (http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/research-data-technology/statistics-research/child-maltreatment). Previous research has shown that as many as 1 in 3 girls and 1 in 7 boys will be sexually abused during childhood (Child Abuse Negl. 2003;27:1205-1222). Although sexual abuse seems to be less common in boys than girls, this may be partly due to underdiagnosis and underreporting of sexual abuse in boys (Arch Dis Child. 2007;92:328-331). Clinicians should therefore consider the possibility of sexual abuse when boys present with genital injuries, because failing to recognize and diagnose sexual abuse can pose an ongoing safety risk to a child. However, an erroneous diagnosis of sexual abuse can have equally hazardous repercussions, including removal of a child from their caregivers or prosecution of an innocent individual. A number of medical conditions can mimic child sexual abuse injuries, including anal fissures, failure of midline fusion, perianal streptococcal dermatitis, and straddle injury (J Pediatr Health Care. 2009;23:283-288 and Acta Paediatr. 2011;100:590-593). The following case involves a 5-week-old male infant who presented to the pediatric emergency department with an avulsion injury to his penis concerning for sexual abuse. He was ultimately diagnosed with a relatively rare anatomic variant of the genitalia and determined to have sustained an accidental injury whose appearance mimicked abuse.

  12. Conformational Melding Permits a Conserved Binding Geometry in TCR Recognition of Foreign and Self Molecular Mimics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Baker, Brian M. (Notre)

    2012-03-16

    Molecular mimicry between foreign and self Ags is a mechanism of TCR cross-reactivity and is thought to contribute to the development of autoimmunity. The {alpha}{beta} TCR A6 recognizes the foreign Ag Tax from the human T cell leukemia virus-1 when presented by the class I MHC HLA-A2. In a possible link with the autoimmune disease human T cell leukemia virus-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis, A6 also recognizes a self peptide from the neuronal protein HuD in the context of HLA-A2. We found in our study that the complexes of the HuD and Tax epitopes with HLA-A2 are close but imperfect structural mimics and that in contrast with other recent structures of TCRs with self Ags, A6 engages the HuD Ag with the same traditional binding mode used to engage Tax. Although peptide and MHC conformational changes are needed for recognition of HuD but not Tax and the difference of a single hydroxyl triggers an altered TCR loop conformation, TCR affinity toward HuD is still within the range believed to result in negative selection. Probing further, we found that the HuD-HLA-A2 complex is only weakly stable. Overall, these findings help clarify how molecular mimicry can drive self/nonself cross-reactivity and illustrate how low peptide-MHC stability can permit the survival of T cells expressing self-reactive TCRs that nonetheless bind with a traditional binding mode.

  13. Flavonols Protect Against UV Radiation-Induced Thymine Dimer Formation in an Artificial Skin Mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maini, Sabia; Fahlman, Brian M; Krol, Ed S

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of skin to ultraviolet light has been shown to have a number of deleterious effects including photoaging, photoimmunosuppression and photoinduced DNA damage which can lead to the development of skin cancer. In this paper we present a study on the ability of three flavonols to protect EpiDerm™, an artificial skin mimic, against UV-induced damage. EpiDerm™ samples were treated with flavonol in acetone and exposed to UVA (100 kJ/m(2) at 365 nm) and UVB (9000 J/m(2) at 310 nm) radiation. Secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-a) were determined by ELISA, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers were quantified using LC-APCI-MS. EpiDerm™ treated topically with quercetin significantly decreased MMP-1 secretion induced by UVA (100 µM) or UVB (200 µM) and TNF-a secretion was significantly reduced at 100 µM quercetin for both UVA and UVB radiation. In addition, topically applied quercetin was found to be photostable over the duration of the experiment. EpiDerm™ samples were treated topically with quercetin, kaempferol or galangin (52 µM) immediately prior to UVA or UVB exposure, and the cyclobutane thymine dimers (T-T (CPD)) were quantified using an HPLC-APCI MS/MS method. All three flavonols significantly decreased T-T (CPD) formation in UVB irradiated EpiDerm™, however no effect could be observed for the UVA irradiation experiments as thymine dimer formation was below the limit of quantitation. Our results suggest that flavonols can provide protection against UV radiation-induced skin damage through both antioxidant activity and direct photo-absorption. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  14. A Simplified Approach to Encephalitis and Its Mimics: Key Clinical Decision Points in the Setting of Specific Imaging Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Colin D; Kelly, Aine M; Petrou, Myria; Nidecker, Anna E; Lorincz, Matthew T; Altaee, Duaa K; Gebarski, Stephen S; Foerster, Bradley

    2017-06-01

    Infectious encephalitis is a relatively common cause of morbidity and mortality. Treatment of infectious encephalitis with antiviral medication can be highly effective when administered promptly. Clinical mimics of encephalitis arise from a broad range of pathologic processes, including toxic, metabolic, neoplastic, autoimmune, and cardiovascular etiologies. These mimics need to be rapidly differentiated from infectious encephalitis to appropriately manage the correct etiology; however, the many overlapping signs of these various entities present a challenge to accurate diagnosis. A systematic approach that considers both the clinical manifestations and the imaging findings of infectious encephalitis and its mimics can contribute to more accurate and timely diagnosis. Following an institutional review board approval, a health insurance portability and accountability act (HIPAA)-compliant search of our institutional imaging database (teaching files) was conducted to generate a list of adult and pediatric patients who presented between January 1, 1995 and October 10, 2013 for imaging to evaluate possible cases of encephalitis. Pertinent medical records, including clinical notes as well as surgical and pathology reports, were reviewed and correlated with imaging findings. Clinical and imaging findings were combined to generate useful flowcharts designed to assist in distinguishing infectious encephalitis from its mimics. Key imaging features were reviewed and were placed in the context of the provided flowcharts. Four flowcharts were presented based on the primary anatomic site of imaging abnormality: group 1: temporal lobe; group 2: cerebral cortex; group 3: deep gray matter; and group 4: white matter. An approach that combines features on clinical presentation was then detailed. Imaging examples were used to demonstrate similarities and key differences. Early recognition of infectious encephalitis is critical, but can be quite complex due to diverse pathologies and

  15. Square pyramidal copper(II) complexes with forth generation fluoroquinolone and neutral bidentate ligand: structure, antibacterial, SOD mimic and DNA-interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mohan N; Parmar, Pradhuman A; Gandhi, Deepen S

    2010-02-01

    Coordination of neutral bidentate ligand to copper ion in combination with gatifloxacin have been focused in this article. The effect of complexation reflects antibacterial activity, DNA interaction and SOD mimic activity of individual greatly. The geometry at the central metal ion provides a site for binding of superoxide anion responsible for better SOD mimic behaviour. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Free thyroid assay, a logical evolution of thyroid function test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blockx, P. (Hopital Universitaire d' Anvers (Belgium))

    1984-01-01

    It is generally accepted nowadays that the serum levels of free thyroid hormones are the most discriminating physiological parameters regarding the thyroid status. During the last few years, various methodologies for determining these free thyroid hormones have been proposed as substitutes for the equilibrium dialysis reference method, which is rather of a cumbersome use in routine clinical conditions. Generally, these new methods yield good correlations with the reference method, as well as with the clinical evaluation of the patients' thyroid status. Nevertheless, some artifacts, inherent to these new methodologies, have been described, mainly regarding the direct assays using a labeled thyroxine or triiodothyronine analog. Other discrepancies, described as artifacts, in fact originate in a rupture between clinical status and true serum levels of the free thyroid hormones. In these cases, one cannot really speak of methodological artifacts. In fact, this discrepancy may be observed in various physiological (e.g. pregnancy) and pathological (e.g. ''euthyroid sick syndrome'') states. These conditions, frequently unrecognized with the total thyroid hormone assays, suggest the need to revise some physiopathological concepts. The present review tries to make an objective analysis of recent literature data on free thyroid hormones, and to determine the indications of their assay in daily clinical practice. Because of the simplicity of the procedure and the very low prevalence of the ''real'' artifacts, the direct assays of free thyroid hormones can be considered as a logical next step in the evolution of laboratory thyroid function tests.

  17. Comet Assay in Cancer Chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Raffaela; Ferraiuolo, Maria; Morgano, Gian Paolo; Muti, Paola; Strano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The comet assay can be useful in monitoring DNA damage in single cells caused by exposure to genotoxic agents, such as those causing air, water, and soil pollution (e.g., pesticides, dioxins, electromagnetic fields) and chemo- and radiotherapy in cancer patients, or in the assessment of genoprotective effects of chemopreventive molecules. Therefore, it has particular importance in the fields of pharmacology and toxicology, and in both environmental and human biomonitoring. It allows the detection of single strand breaks as well as double-strand breaks and can be used in both normal and cancer cells. Here we describe the alkali method for comet assay, which allows to detect both single- and double-strand DNA breaks.

  18. Use of the ninhydrin assay to measure the release of chitosan from oral solid dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leane, M M; Nankervis, R; Smith, A; Illum, L

    2004-03-01

    This study evaluated and optimised the ninhydrin assay as a tool for measuring the in vitro release and dissolution of chitosan from solid dosage forms. The precision and accuracy of the assay for the type of chitosan used in the study were examined by measuring the inter- and intra-sample variation and found to be within acceptable limits. The assay was applied practically to construct a pH/solubility profile for chitosan and subsequently to measure the release and dissolution of chitosan from dosage forms in the presence and absence of a model drug, sodium salicylate. Assay performance was found to be satisfactory over a wide range of physiologically relevant pH values. It is concluded that the ninhydrin assay is an essential aid in the design and testing of solid dosage forms with different chitosan-drug release profiles.

  19. Conservation physiology of animal migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Robert J.; Chapman, Jacqueline M.; Souliere, Christopher M.; Tudorache, Christian; Wikelski, Martin; Metcalfe, Julian D.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a widespread phenomenon among many taxa. This complex behaviour enables animals to exploit many temporally productive and spatially discrete habitats to accrue various fitness benefits (e.g. growth, reproduction, predator avoidance). Human activities and global environmental change represent potential threats to migrating animals (from individuals to species), and research is underway to understand mechanisms that control migration and how migration responds to modern challenges. Focusing on behavioural and physiological aspects of migration can help to provide better understanding, management and conservation of migratory populations. Here, we highlight different physiological, behavioural and biomechanical aspects of animal migration that will help us to understand how migratory animals interact with current and future anthropogenic threats. We are in the early stages of a changing planet, and our understanding of how physiology is linked to the persistence of migratory animals is still developing; therefore, we regard the following questions as being central to the conservation physiology of animal migrations. Will climate change influence the energetic costs of migration? Will shifting temperatures change the annual clocks of migrating animals? Will anthropogenic influences have an effect on orientation during migration? Will increased anthropogenic alteration of migration stopover sites/migration corridors affect the stress physiology of migrating animals? Can physiological knowledge be used to identify strategies for facilitating the movement of animals? Our synthesis reveals that given the inherent challenges of migration, additional stressors derived from altered environments (e.g. climate change, physical habitat alteration, light pollution) or interaction with human infrastructure (e.g. wind or hydrokinetic turbines, dams) or activities (e.g. fisheries) could lead to long-term changes to migratory phenotypes. However, uncertainty remains

  20. Protein binding assay for hyaluronate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, B.E.; Underhill, C.B.

    1986-11-01

    A relatively quick and simple assay for hyaluronate was developed using the specific binding protein, hyaluronectin. The hyaluronectin was obtained by homogenizing the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats, and then centrifuging the homogenate. The resulting supernatant was used as a source of crude hyaluronectin. In the binding assay, the hyaluronectin was mixed with (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate, followed by an equal volume of saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, which precipitated the hyaluronectin and any (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate associated with it, but left free (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in solution. The mixture was then centrifuged, and the amount of bound (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in the precipitate was determined. Using this assay, the authors found that hyaluronectin specifically bound hyaluronate, since other glycosaminoglycans failed to compete for the binding protein. In addition, the interaction between hyaluronectin and hyaluronate was of relatively high affinity, and the size of the hyaluronate did not appear to substantially alter the amount of binding. To determine the amount of hyaluronate in an unknown sample, they used a competition assay in which the binding of a set amount of (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate was blocked by the addition of unlabeled hyaluronate. By comparing the degree of competition of the unknown samples with that of known amounts of hyaluronate, it was possible to determine the amount of hyaluronate in the unknowns. They have found that this method is sensitive to 1 ..mu..g or less of hyaluronate, and is unaffected by the presence of proteins.

  1. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of fluorogenic phospholipids and evaluation in assays of phospholipases A, C and D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piel, Mathilde S.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Brask, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Phospholipases are ubiquitous in nature and the target of significant research aiming at both their physiological roles and technical applications in e.g. the food industry. In the search for sensitive and selective phospholipase assays, we have focused on synthetic FRET (Forster resonance energy...

  2. Increased NIH 3T3 fibroblast functions on cell culture dishes which mimic the nanometer fibers of natural tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Garima; Webster, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Traditional flat tissue cell culture dishes have consisted of polystyrene treated with plasma gases for growing, subculturing, and studying cell behavior in vitro. However, increasingly it has been observed that mimicking natural tissue properties (such as chemistry, three-dimensional structure, mechanical properties, etc) in vitro can lead to a better correlation of in vitro to in vivo cellular functions. The following studies compared traditional NIH 3T3 fibroblasts' functions on XanoMatrix scaffolds to standard tissue culture polystyrene. Results found significantly greater fibroblast adhesion and proliferation on XanoMatrix cell culture dishes which mimic the nanoscale geometry of natural tissue fibers with true, tortuous fiber beds creating a robust, consistent, and versatile growth platform. In this manner, this study supports that cell culture dishes which mimic features of natural tissues should be continually studied for a wide range of applications in which mimicking natural cellular functions are important.

  3. Utility of virtual reality environments to examine physiological reactivity and subjective distress in adults who stutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundage, Shelley B; Brinton, James M; Hancock, Adrienne B

    2016-12-01

    Virtual reality environments (VREs) allow for immersion in speaking environments that mimic real-life interactions while maintaining researcher control. VREs have been used successfully to engender arousal in other disorders. The purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of virtual reality environments to examine physiological reactivity and subjective ratings of distress in persons who stutter (PWS). Subjective and objective measures of arousal were collected from 10PWS during four-minute speeches to a virtual audience and to a virtual empty room. Stuttering frequency and physiological measures (skin conductance level and heart rate) did not differ across speaking conditions, but subjective ratings of distress were significantly higher in the virtual audience condition compared to the virtual empty room. VREs have utility in elevating subjective ratings of distress in PWS. VREs have the potential to be useful tools for practicing treatment targets in a safe, controlled, and systematic manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Acceleration of an Aromatic Claisen Rearrangement via a Designed Spiroligozyme Catalyst that Mimics the Ketosteroid Isomerase Catalytic Dyad

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Matthew F. L.; Osuna, S?lvia; Bollot, Guillaume; Vaddypally, Shivaiah; Zdilla, Michael J.; Houk, K. N.; Schafmeister, Christian E.

    2014-01-01

    A series of hydrogen-bonding catalysts have been designed for the aromatic Claisen rearrangement of a 1,1-dimethylallyl coumarin. These catalysts were designed as mimics of the two-point hydrogen-bonding interaction present in ketosteroid isomerase that has been proposed to stabilize a developing negative charge on the ether oxygen in the migration of the double bond.1 Two hydrogen bond donating groups, a phenol alcohol and a carboxylic acid, were grafted onto a conformationally restrained sp...

  5. N-Derivatives of peri-Substituted Dichalcogenide [FeFe]-Hydrogenase Mimics: Towards Photocatalytic Dyads for Hydrogen Production

    OpenAIRE

    Figliola, Carlotta; Male, Louise; Horswell, Sarah,; Grainger, Richard,

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Synthetic strategies towards molecular dyads based on peri-substituted dichalcogenide (S,Se) [FeFe]-hydrogenase synthetic mimics covalently linked to a ZnTPP photosensitizer are described. Dithiolate and diselenolate model systems 2–5 are prepared through condensation of 2-naphthaldehydes with p-methoxyaniline, reduction of the resulting Schiff base and oxidative insertion of Fe2(CO)6 into the dichalcogen bond of the imine or amine. Diselenolate-based [FeFe] complexes ...

  6. A frame-dependent gravitational effective action mimics a cosmological constant, but modifies the black hole horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    A frame dependent effective action motivated by the postulates of three-space general coordinate invariance and Weyl scaling invariance exactly mimics a cosmological constant in Robertson-Walker spacetimes. However, in a static spherically symmetric Schwarzschild-like geometry it modifies the black hole horizon structure within microscopic distances of the nominal horizon, in such a way that $g_{00}$ never vanishes. This could have important implications for the black hole "information paradox".

  7. A strategy for depositing different types of cells in three dimensions to mimic tubular structures in tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Jin, Yu; Sun, Yi; Wang, Dong; Sun, Jiashu; Wang, Zhuo; Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xingyu

    2012-02-14

    The fabrication of tubular structures, with multiple cell types forming different layers of the tube walls, is described using a stress-induced rolling membrane (SIRM). Cell orientation inside the tubes can also be controlled by topographical contact guidance. These layered tubes precisely mimic blood vessels and many other tubular structures, suggesting that they may be of great use in tissue engineering. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Simultaneous Vascular Targeting and Tumor Targeting of Cerebral Breast Cancer Metastases Using a T-Cell Receptor Mimic Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    in May 2013, the difference between nude mice (which lack T- cells , but still have a partially functional adaptive and innate immune system) and NSG...Mangada J, Greiner DL, Handgretinger R. Human lymphoid and myeloid cell development in NOD/LtSz-scid IL2R gamma null mice engrafted with mobilized human...Targeting of Cerebral Breast Cancer Metastases Using a T- Cell Receptor Mimic Antibody PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ulrich Bickel

  9. Identification and Mechanistic Studies of a Cell Cycle Regulator JP18 from a Library of Synthetic Indole Terpenoid Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Jinpeng; Zhou, Shupeng; Yang, Fan; Sun, Yu; Li, Ang; Zhang, Wei-Dong; He, Weiwei

    2016-10-06

    We constructed a small library of indole terpenoid mimics using a hybridizing strategy to link various indole and α,β-unsaturated enone building blocks together. Prepared compounds were evaluated for the cytotoxicity against a panel of cancer cell lines. An indolyl ketone called JP18 was identified as a cell cycle regulator, and the underlying mechanism was investigated. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Ghrelin mimics fasting to enhance human hedonic, orbitofrontal cortex, and hippocampal responses to food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstone, Anthony P; Prechtl, Christina G; Scholtz, Samantha; Miras, Alexander D; Chhina, Navpreet; Durighel, Giuliana; Deliran, Seyedeh S; Beckmann, Christian; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Ashby, Damien R; Waldman, Adam D; Gaylinn, Bruce D; Thorner, Michael O; Frost, Gary S; Bloom, Stephen R; Bell, Jimmy D

    2014-06-01

    Ghrelin, which is a stomach-derived hormone, increases with fasting and energy restriction and may influence eating behaviors through brain hedonic reward-cognitive systems. Therefore, changes in plasma ghrelin might mediate counter-regulatory responses to a negative energy balance through changes in food hedonics. We investigated whether ghrelin administration (exogenous hyperghrelinemia) mimics effects of fasting (endogenous hyperghrelinemia) on the hedonic response and activation of brain-reward systems to food. In a crossover design, 22 healthy, nonobese adults (17 men) underwent a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) food-picture evaluation task after a 16-h overnight fast (Fasted-Saline) or after eating breakfast 95 min before scanning (730 kcal, 14% protein, 31% fat, and 55% carbohydrate) and receiving a saline (Fed-Saline) or acyl ghrelin (Fed-Ghrelin) subcutaneous injection before scanning. One male subject was excluded from the fMRI analysis because of excess head motion, which left 21 subjects with brain-activation data. Compared with the Fed-Saline visit, both ghrelin administration to fed subjects (Fed-Ghrelin) and fasting (Fasted-Saline) significantly increased the appeal of high-energy foods and associated orbitofrontal cortex activation. Both fasting and ghrelin administration also increased hippocampus activation to high-energy- and low-energy-food pictures. These similar effects of endogenous and exogenous hyperghrelinemia were not explicable by consistent changes in glucose, insulin, peptide YY, and glucagon-like peptide-1. Neither ghrelin administration nor fasting had any significant effect on nucleus accumbens, caudate, anterior insula, or amygdala activation during the food-evaluation task or on auditory, motor, or visual cortex activation during a control task. Ghrelin administration and fasting have similar acute stimulatory effects on hedonic responses and the activation of corticolimbic reward-cognitive systems during food

  11. Physiological conjunction of allelochemicals and desert plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosef Friedjung, Avital; Choudhary, Sikander Pal; Dudai, Nativ; Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    Plants exchange signals with other physical and biological entities in their habitat, a form of communication termed allelopathy. The underlying principles of allelopathy and secondary-metabolite production are still poorly understood, especially in desert plants. The coordination and role of secondary metabolites were examined as a cause of allelopathy in plants thriving under arid and semiarid soil conditions. Desert plant species, Origanum dayi, Artemisia sieberi and Artemisia judaica from two different sources (cultivar cuttings and wild seeds) were studied in their natural habitats. Growth rate, relative water content, osmotic potential, photochemical efficiency, volatile composition and vital factors of allelopathy were analyzed at regular intervals along four seasons with winter showing optimum soil water content and summer showing water deficit conditions. A comprehensive analysis of the volatile composition of the leaves, ambient air and soil in the biological niche of the plants under study was carried out to determine the effects of soil water conditions and sample plants on the surrounding flora. Significant morpho-physiological changes were observed across the seasons and along different soil water content. Metabolic analysis showed that water deficit was the key for driving selective metabolomic shifts. A. judaica showed the least metabolic shifts, while A. sieberi showed the highest shifts. All the species exhibited high allelopathic effects; A. judaica displayed relatively higher growth-inhibition effects, while O. dayi showed comparatively higher germination-inhibition effects in germination assays. The current study may help in understanding plant behavior, mechanisms underlying secondary-metabolite production in water deficit conditions and metabolite-physiological interrelationship with allelopathy in desert plants, and can help cull economic benefits from the produced volatiles.

  12. Physiological conjunction of allelochemicals and desert plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital Yosef Friedjung

    Full Text Available Plants exchange signals with other physical and biological entities in their habitat, a form of communication termed allelopathy. The underlying principles of allelopathy and secondary-metabolite production are still poorly understood, especially in desert plants. The coordination and role of secondary metabolites were examined as a cause of allelopathy in plants thriving under arid and semiarid soil conditions. Desert plant species, Origanum dayi, Artemisia sieberi and Artemisia judaica from two different sources (cultivar cuttings and wild seeds were studied in their natural habitats. Growth rate, relative water content, osmotic potential, photochemical efficiency, volatile composition and vital factors of allelopathy were analyzed at regular intervals along four seasons with winter showing optimum soil water content and summer showing water deficit conditions. A comprehensive analysis of the volatile composition of the leaves, ambient air and soil in the biological niche of the plants under study was carried out to determine the effects of soil water conditions and sample plants on the surrounding flora. Significant morpho-physiological changes were observed across the seasons and along different soil water content. Metabolic analysis showed that water deficit was the key for driving selective metabolomic shifts. A. judaica showed the least metabolic shifts, while A. sieberi showed the highest shifts. All the species exhibited high allelopathic effects; A. judaica displayed relatively higher growth-inhibition effects, while O. dayi showed comparatively higher germination-inhibition effects in germination assays. The current study may help in understanding plant behavior, mechanisms underlying secondary-metabolite production in water deficit conditions and metabolite-physiological interrelationship with allelopathy in desert plants, and can help cull economic benefits from the produced volatiles.

  13. Physiological Conjunction of Allelochemicals and Desert Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudai, Nativ; Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2013-01-01

    Plants exchange signals with other physical and biological entities in their habitat, a form of communication termed allelopathy. The underlying principles of allelopathy and secondary-metabolite production are still poorly understood, especially in desert plants. The coordination and role of secondary metabolites were examined as a cause of allelopathy in plants thriving under arid and semiarid soil conditions. Desert plant species, Origanum dayi, Artemisia sieberi and Artemisia judaica from two different sources (cultivar cuttings and wild seeds) were studied in their natural habitats. Growth rate, relative water content, osmotic potential, photochemical efficiency, volatile composition and vital factors of allelopathy were analyzed at regular intervals along four seasons with winter showing optimum soil water content and summer showing water deficit conditions. A comprehensive analysis of the volatile composition of the leaves, ambient air and soil in the biological niche of the plants under study was carried out to determine the effects of soil water conditions and sample plants on the surrounding flora. Significant morpho-physiological changes were observed across the seasons and along different soil water content. Metabolic analysis showed that water deficit was the key for driving selective metabolomic shifts. A. judaica showed the least metabolic shifts, while A. sieberi showed the highest shifts. All the species exhibited high allelopathic effects; A. judaica displayed relatively higher growth-inhibition effects, while O. dayi showed comparatively higher germination-inhibition effects in germination assays. The current study may help in understanding plant behavior, mechanisms underlying secondary-metabolite production in water deficit conditions and metabolite-physiological interrelationship with allelopathy in desert plants, and can help cull economic benefits from the produced volatiles. PMID:24339945

  14. A multiplex protein-free lateral flow assay for detection of microRNAs based on unmodified molecular beacons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javani, Atefeh; Javadi-Zarnaghi, Fatemeh; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad

    2017-11-15

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) have promising potentials for point-of-care applications. Recently, many LFAs have been reported that are based on hybridization of oligonucleotide strands. Mostly, biotinylated capture DNAs are immobilized on the surface of a nitrocellulose membrane via streptavidin interactions. During the assay, stable colorful complexes get formed that are visible by naked eyes. Here, we present an inexpensive and unique design of LFA that applies unmodified oligonucleotides at capture lines. The presented LFA do not utilize streptavidin or any other affinity protein. We employ structural switch of molecular beacons (MB) in combination with base stacking hybridization (BSH) phenomenon. The unique design of the reported LFA provided high selectivity for target oligonucleotides. We validated potential applications of the system for detection of DNA mimics of two microRNAs in multiplex assays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Small Molecule Agonists of Cell Adhesion Molecule L1 Mimic L1 Functions In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Hardeep; Lutz, David; Chaudhary, Harshita; Schachner, Melitta; Loers, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Lack of permissive mechanisms and abundance of inhibitory molecules in the lesioned central nervous system of adult mammals contribute to the failure of functional recovery after injury, leading to severe disabilities in motor functions and pain. Peripheral nerve injury impairs motor, sensory, and autonomic functions, particularly in cases where nerve gaps are large and chronic nerve injury ensues. Previous studies have indicated that the neural cell adhesion molecule L1 constitutes a viable target to promote regeneration after acute injury. We screened libraries of known drugs for small molecule agonists of L1 and evaluated the effect of hit compounds in cell-based assays in vitro and in mice after femoral nerve and spinal cord injuries in vivo. We identified eight small molecule L1 agonists and showed in cell-based assays that they stimulate neuronal survival, neuronal migration, and neurite outgrowth and enhance Schwann cell proliferation and migration and myelination of neurons in an L1-dependent manner. In a femoral nerve injury mouse model, enhanced functional regeneration and remyelination after application of the L1 agonists were observed. In a spinal cord injury mouse model, L1 agonists improved recovery of motor functions, being paralleled by enhanced remyelination, neuronal survival, and monoaminergic innervation, reduced astrogliosis, and activation of microglia. Together, these findings suggest that application of small organic compounds that bind to L1 and stimulate the beneficial homophilic L1 functions may prove to be a valuable addition to treatments of nervous system injuries.

  16. A latex agglutination test for the field determination of abnormal vitellogenin production in male fishes contaminated by estrogen mimics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Ilizabete [Laboratoire d' Immunologie-Microbiologie (LIM/ESE-CNRS, unite FRE2635), IUT de Thionville-Yutz, 1, Impasse A Kastler, F-57970 Yutz (France); Pihan, Jean-Claude [Laboratoire de Production des Ecosystemes et Ecotoxicologie (LBFE), UFR SciFa, campus Bridoux, rue du G Delestraint, F-57070 Metz (France); Falla, Jairo [Laboratoire d' Immunologie-Microbiologie (LIM/ESE-CNRS, unite FRE2635), IUT de Thionville-Yutz, 1, Impasse A Kastler, F-57970 Yutz (France)

    2004-06-09

    Estrogen mimics are pollutants present in the aquatic environment. These compounds induce abnormalities in the reproductive system of male fishes, which lead to a total or partial male feminization, or to their demasculinization. Ultimately, these alterations could lead to a disappearance of the total contaminated fish population. Moreover, these toxic substances possess the capacity to mimic endogenous estrogens and to induce the abnormal production of vitellogenin (VTG) in male and immature fishes. The purpose of this research was to develop an easy, specific, cheap and fast method for diagnosing the contamination of male fishes by estrogen mimics, using VTG as biomarker. The selected method is based on a reverse latex agglutination test (rLAT), developed with monoclonal antibodies specific of this biomarker. The development of this VTG-rLAT has involved, firstly, the purification of carp VTG to produce monoclonal antibodies, specifics of this protein. One of these antibodies was selected to recover latex particles (diameter: 1 {mu}m). Finally, the immunoreactivity of the VTG-rLAT was verified with different fish plasma samples from males treated with 17{beta}-estradiol and non-treated males or females in vitellogenesis.

  17. An iron-iron hydrogenase mimic with appended electron reservoir for efficient proton reduction in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, René; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Li, Ping; Woutersen, Sander; Reek, Joost N H

    2016-01-01

    The transition from a fossil-based economy to a hydrogen-based economy requires cheap and abundant, yet stable and efficient, hydrogen production catalysts. Nature shows the potential of iron-based catalysts such as the iron-iron hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme, which catalyzes hydrogen evolution at rates similar to platinum with low overpotential. However, existing synthetic H2ase mimics generally suffer from low efficiency and oxygen sensitivity and generally operate in organic solvents. We report on a synthetic H2ase mimic that contains a redox-active phosphole ligand as an electron reservoir, a feature that is also crucial for the working of the natural enzyme. Using a combination of (spectro)electrochemistry and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, we elucidate the unique redox behavior of the catalyst. We find that the electron reservoir actively partakes in the reduction of protons and that its electron-rich redox states are stabilized through ligand protonation. In dilute sulfuric acid, the catalyst has a turnover frequency of 7.0 × 10(4) s(-1) at an overpotential of 0.66 V. This catalyst is tolerant to the presence of oxygen, thereby paving the way for a new generation of synthetic H2ase mimics that combine the benefits of the enzyme with synthetic versatility and improved stability.

  18. Chitosan confinement enhances hydrogen photogeneration from a mimic of the diiron subsite of [FeFe]-hydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jing-Xin; Liu, Qiang; Li, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Feng; Li, Xu-Bing; Li, Cheng-Bo; Liu, Bin; Meng, Qing-Yuan; Chen, Bin; Feng, Ke; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Nature has created [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzyme as a hydrogen-forming catalyst with a high turnover rate. However, it does not meet the demands of economically usable catalytic agents because of its limited stability and the cost of its production and purification. Synthetic chemistry has allowed the preparation of remarkably close mimics of [FeFe]-hydrogenase but so far failed to reproduce its catalytic activity. Most models of the active site represent mimics of the inorganic cofactor only, and the enzyme-like reaction that proceeds within restricted environments is less well understood. Here we report that chitosan, a natural polysaccharide, improves the efficiency and durability of a typical mimic of the diiron subsite of [FeFe]-hydrogenase for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution. The turnover number of the self-assembling system increases ~4,000-fold compared with the same system in the absence of chitosan. Such significant improvements to the activity and stability of artificial [FeFe]-hydrogenase-like systems have, to our knowledge, not been reported to date.

  19. Physiologic effects of bowel preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Nielsen, Kristine Grubbe; Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite the universal use of bowel preparation before colonoscopy and colorectal surgery, the physiologic effects have not been described in a standardized setting. This study was designed to investigate the physiologic effects of bowel preparation. METHODS: In a prospective study, 12...... healthy volunteers (median age, 63 years) underwent bowel preparation with bisacodyl and sodium phosphate. Fluid and food intake were standardized according to weight, providing adequate calorie and oral fluid intake. Before and after bowel preparation, weight, exercise capacity, orthostatic tolerance...... preparation has significant adverse physiologic effects, which may be attributed to dehydration. The majority of these findings is small and may not be of clinical relevance in otherwise healthy patients undergoing bowel preparation and following recommendations for oral fluid intake....

  20. Centrifuges in gravitational physiology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Rodney W.; Davies, Phil; Fuller, Charles A.

    1993-01-01

    Data from space flight and ground based experiments have clearly demonstrated the importance of Earth gravity for normal physiological function in man and animals. Gravitational Physiology is concerned with the role and influence of gravity on physiological systems. Research in this field examines how we perceive and respond to gravity and the mechanisms underlying these responses. Inherent in our search for answers to these questions is the ability to alter gravity, which is not physically possible without leaving Earth. However, useful experimental paradigms have been to modify the perceived force of gravity by changing either the orientation of subjects to the gravity vector (i.e., postural changes) or by applying inertial forces to augment the magnitude of the gravity vector. The later technique has commonly been used by applying centripetal force via centrifugation.

  1. Stimulating Student Interest in Physiology: The Intermedical School Physiology Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hwee-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The Intermedical School Physiology Quiz (IMSPQ) was initiated in 2003 during the author's last sabbatical from the University of Malaya. At this inaugural event, there were just seven competing teams from Malaysian medical schools. The challenge trophy for the IMSPQ is named in honor of Prof. A. Raman, who was the first Malaysian Professor of…

  2. From Physiology to Prevention: Further remarks on a physiological imperative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Jouanjean

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Physiology, is the fundamental and functional expression of life. It is the study of all the representative functions of Man in all his capacities, and in particular, his capacity to work. It is very possible to establish a link between a physiological and physiopathological state, the capacity of work and the economy, which can be understood as the articulation between the physiological capacities of Man and the production of work. If these functions are innately acquired by Man they are likewise maintained by regulatory functions throughout life. The stability of these regulatory mechanisms represent the state of good health. The management of this state, constitutes Primary Prevention where both chronic and acute physiopathology defines an alteration in these regulatory mechanisms. We deduce from this reasoning that a tripartite management adapted to the physiological situation is viable and that by choosing parameters specific to individual and collective behavior, it is possible to inject, and combine, at each level and to each demand in order to budget a healthcare system in a more balanced and equitable way. 

  3. Protective effect of 4-hydroxy-TEMPO, a low molecular weight superoxide dismutase mimic, on free radical toxicity in experimental pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledziński, Z; Woźniak, M; Antosiewicz, J; Lezoche, E; Familiari, M; Bertoli, E; Greci, L; Brunelli, A; Mazera, N; Wajda, Z

    1995-10-01

    Rats develop acute pancreatitis when infused iv for 3 h with cerulein (10 micrograms/kg/h). Autopsies of the pancreas seen by light microscope show interstitial edema, acinar cells vacuolization, and leukocyte margination in pancreatic capillaries; under electron microscope, severe damage concerning mitochondrial and zymogen granules structures are apparent. Particularly, swelling of the mitochondria and disruption of mitochondrial cristae was observed as well as formation of large vacuoles arising from zymogen granules and liposome fusion. A significant increase of lipid hydroperoxide level in the pancreatic tissue was observed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of 4-hydroxy-TEMPO--a low-mol-wt superoxide dismutase mimic--in a rat cerulein model of acute pancreatitis, with the expectation that free radical mediated hydroperoxide formation and tissue damage may be reduced significantly. Twenty-one male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: Group 1 (n = 5) served as a control and was infused iv for 3 h with physiologic saline; Group 2 (n = 8) was infused i.v. for 3 h with cerulein 10 micrograms/kg/h; and Group 3 (n = 8) infused i.v. both with cerulein and 4-hydroxy-TEMPO 22.6 mg/kg/h. Pancreatic tissue damage was quantified by measuring lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) level, the weight of the organ, and by light and electron microscopic examination. 4-hydroxy-TEMPO penetration across cellular membrane barriers was quantified by ESR spectrometric measurements of 4-hydroxy-TEMPO concentration in pancreatic tissue samples and pancreatic juice as well. Administering 4-hydroxy-TEMPO to rats resulted in preventing both lipid hydroperoxide formation and severe morphological damage. 4-hydroxy-TEMPO crossed cellular membrane barriers and was excreted to pancreatic juice. Infusion of 4-hydroxy-TEMPO appears to prevent pancreatic injury caused by free radicals in experimental cerulein pancreatitis.

  4. Hydroimidazolone modification of the conserved Arg12 in small heat shock proteins: studies on the structure and chaperone function using mutant mimics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram H Nagaraj

    Full Text Available Methylglyoxal (MGO is an α-dicarbonyl compound present ubiquitously in the human body. MGO reacts with arginine residues in proteins and forms adducts such as hydroimidazolone and argpyrimidine in vivo. Previously, we showed that MGO-mediated modification of αA-crystallin increased its chaperone function. We identified MGO-modified arginine residues in αA-crystallin and found that replacing such arginine residues with alanine residues mimicked the effects of MGO on the chaperone function. Arginine 12 (R12 is a conserved amino acid residue in Hsp27 as well as αA- and αB-crystallin. When treated with MGO at or near physiological concentrations (2-10 µM, R12 was modified to hydroimidazolone in all three small heat shock proteins. In this study, we determined the effect of arginine substitution with alanine at position 12 (R12A to mimic MGO modification on the structure and chaperone function of these proteins. Among the three proteins, the R12A mutation improved the chaperone function of only αA-crystallin. This enhancement in the chaperone function was accompanied by subtle changes in the tertiary structure, which increased the thermodynamic stability of αA-crystallin. This mutation induced the exposure of additional client protein binding sites on αA-crystallin. Altogether, our data suggest that MGO-modification of the conserved R12 in αA-crystallin to hydroimidazolone may play an important role in reducing protein aggregation in the lens during aging and cataract formation.

  5. The Limits of Exercise Physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gabriel, Brendan M; Zierath, Juleen R

    2017-01-01

    Many of the established positive health benefits of exercise have been documented by historical discoveries in the field of exercise physiology. These investigations often assess limits: the limits of performance, or the limits of exercise-induced health benefits. Indeed, several key findings have...... been informed by studying highly trained athletes, in addition to healthy or unhealthy people. Recent progress has been made in regard to skeletal muscle metabolism and personalized exercise regimes. In this perspective, we review some of the historical milestones of exercise physiology, discuss how...... these inform contemporary knowledge, and speculate on future questions....

  6. Nigerian Journal of Physiological Sciences: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. Nigerian Journal of Physiological Sciences (Niger. J. Physiol. Sci.) is a biannual publication of the Physiological Society of Nigeria. It covers diverse areas of research in physiological sciences, publishing reviews in current research areas and original laboratory and clinical research in physiological ...

  7. Urantide mimics urotensin-II induced calcium release in cells expressing recombinant UT receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarda, Valeria; Song, Wei; Marzola, Erika; Spagnol, Martina; Guerrini, Remo; Salvadori, Severo; Regoli, Domenico; Thompson, Jonathan P; Rowbotham, David J; Behm, David J; Douglas, Stephen A; Calo', Girolamo; Lambert, David G

    2004-09-13

    Urotensin-II is the natural ligand of the UT receptor. This novel system is involved in the regulation of cardiovascular functions. Recently, a urotensin-II analog ([Pen5,DTrp7,Orn8]urotensin-II(4-11)) named urantide, has been proposed as a selective and potent UT receptor antagonist. In order to pharmacologically characterize this new compound, urantide was tested on the native UT receptors of the rat aorta and on the human recombinant receptors expressed in CHO cells (CHO(hUT)). Indeed, urantide behaves as a competitive, potent (pA2 8.24), and pure antagonist in the rat aorta bioassay, while as an agonist (pEC50 8.11) in a calcium mobilization assay performed in CHO(hUT) cells. Urantide should be considered a low efficacy partial agonist.

  8. New lipase assay using Pomegranate oil coating in microtiter plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ülker, Serdar; Placidi, Camille; Point, Vanessa; Gadenne, Benoît; Serveau-Avesque, Carole; Canaan, Stéphane; Carrière, Frédéric; Cavalier, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Lipases play various roles in fat digestion, lipoprotein metabolism, and in the mobilization of fat stored in lipid bodies in animals, plants and microorganisms. In association with these physiological functions, there is an important field of research for discovering lipase inhibitors and developing new treatments of diseases such as obesity, atherosclerosis, diabetes and tuberculosis. In this context, the development of convenient, specific and sensitive analytical methods for the detection and assay of lipases and/or lipase inhibitors is of major importance. It is shown here that purified triacylglycerols (TAGs) from Punica granatum (Pomegranate) seed oil coated on microtiter plates can be used for the continuous assay of lipase activity by recording the variations with time of the UV absorption spectra at 275 nm. UV absorption is due the release of punicic acid (9Z,11E,13Z-octadeca-9,11,13-trienoic acid), a conjugated triene contained in Pomegranate oil. This new microtiter plate assay allows to accurately measure the activity of a wider range of lipases compared to the similar assay previously developed with Tung oil containing α-eleostearic acid (9Z,11E,13E-octadeca-9,11,13-trienoic acid), including the LipY lipase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although punicic acid is a diastereoisomer of α-eleostearic acid, the Δ(13)cis double bound found in punicic acid gives a different structure to the acyl chain that probably favours the interaction of Pomegranate TAGs with the lipase active site. The microplate lipase assay using Pomegranate TAGs shows high sensitivity, reproducibility and remarkable relevance for the high-speed screening of lipases and/or lipase inhibitors directly from raw culture media without any purification step. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  9. Glibenclamide Mimics Metabolic Effects of Metformin in H9c2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Salani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sulfonylureas, such as glibenclamide, are antidiabetic drugs that stimulate beta-cell insulin secretion by binding to the sulfonylureas receptors (SURs of adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels (KATP. Glibenclamide may be also cardiotoxic, this effect being ascribed to interference with the protective function of cardiac KATP channels for which glibenclamide has high affinity. Prompted by recent evidence that glibenclamide impairs energy metabolism of renal cells, we investigated whether this drug also affects the metabolism of cardiac cells. Methods: The cardiomyoblast cell line H9c2 was treated for 24 h with glibenclamide or metformin, a known inhibitor of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Cell viability was evaluated by sulforodhamine B assay. ATP and AMP were measured according to the enzyme coupling method and oxygen consumption by using an amperometric electrode, while Fo-F1 ATP synthase activity assay was evaluated by chemiluminescent method. Protein expression was measured by western blot. Results: Glibenclamide deregulated energy balance of H9c2 cardiomyoblasts in a way similar to that of metformin. It inhibited mitochondrial complexes I, II and III with ensuing impairment of oxygen consumption and ATP synthase activity, ATP depletion and increased AMPK phosphorylation. Furthermore, glibenclamide disrupted mitochondrial subcellular organization. The perturbation of mitochondrial energy balance was associated with enhanced anaerobic glycolysis, with increased activity of phosphofructo kinase, pyruvate kinase and lactic dehydrogenase. Interestingly, some additive effects of glibenclamide and metformin were observed. Conclusions: Glibenclamide deeply alters cell metabolism in cardiac cells by impairing mitochondrial organization and function. This may further explain the risk of cardiovascular events associated with the use of this drug, alone or in combination with metformin.

  10. Electronic Textbook in Human Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broering, Naomi C.; Lilienfield, Lawrence S.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the development of an electronic textbook in human physiology at the Georgetown University Medical Center Library that was designed to enhance learning and visualization through a prototype knowledge base of core instructional materials stored in digital format on Macintosh computers. The use of computers in the medical curriculum is…

  11. Physiological adaptation in desert birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, JB; Tieleman, BI; Williams, Joseph B.

    We call into question the idea that birds have not evolved unique physiological adaptations to desert environments. The rate at which desert larks metabolize energy is lower than in mesic species within the same family, and this lower rate of living translates into a lower overall energy requirement

  12. Exercise Effects on Sleep Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunao eUchida

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This mini-review focuses on the effects of exercise on sleep. In its early days, sleep research largely focused on central nervous system (CNS physiology using standardized tabulations of several sleep-specific landmark electroencephalogram (EEG waveforms. Though coarse, this method has enabled the observation and inspection of numerous uninterrupted sleep phenomena. Thus, research on the effects of exercise on sleep began, in the 1960’s, with a focus primarily on sleep EEG (CNS sleep changes. Those early studies found only small effects of exercise on sleep. More recent sleep research has explored not only CNS functioning, but somatic physiology as well. As physical exercise mostly affects somatic functions, endocrine and autonomic nervous system (ANS changes that occur during sleep should be affected by daytime exercise. Since endocrinological, metabolic and autonomic changes can be measured during sleep, it should be possible to assess exercise effects on somatic physiology in addition to CNS sleep quality, building from standard polysomnographic (PSG techniques. Incorporating measures of somatic physiology in the quantitative assessment of sleep could further our understanding of sleep's function as an auto-regulatory, global phenomenon.

  13. [Physiologic skin changes in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerouali, Aida; Zaraa, Inès; Trojjet, Sondes; El Euch, Dalenda; Azeiez, Mohamed Iadh; Mokni, Mourad; Zouari, Faouzia; Ben Osman, Amel

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy is a period of hormonal, immunological, metabolic and vascular changes. Some of them are considered to be physiologic, but others are real diseases specific or not of pregnancy. The aim of our study is to present the epidemiological and clinical physiologic dermatological changes of pregnancy. We present a transversal monocentric study. One hundred pregnant women attending the department of dermatology of the La Rabta hospital were enrolled. Systematic detailed cutaneous examination was performed by a dermatologist to look for a physiologic skin changes. The mean age was 29 years [20-46 years]. Pigmentary changes were the most preponderant (93%), dominated by the areolar region pigmentation (77%). The glandular changes were noted in 75% of cases. The vascular modifications were observed in 77% of pregnant women. Of these, gingival hyperemia was the most common (46%). Others cutaneous changes were less frequent (stria distensae 45%, nevi changes 35%, molluscum gravidarum 10%). The physiologic cutaneous changes during pregnancy are numerous. Our study confirms the frequency and the variability of these modifications. The pigmentary changes were the most common finding. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Physiology Of Prolonged Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes physiological effects of prolonged bed rest. Rest for periods of 24 hours or longer deconditions body to some extent; healing proceeds simultaneously with deconditioning. Report provides details on shifts in fluid electrolytes and loss of lean body mass, which comprises everything in body besides fat - that is, water, muscle, and bone. Based on published research.

  15. Face, content and concurrent validity of the Mimic® dV-Trainer for robot-assisted endoscopic surgery: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egi, H; Hattori, M; Tokunaga, M; Suzuki, T; Kawaguchi, K; Sawada, H; Ohdan, H

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether any correlation exists between the performance of the Mimic® dV-Trainer (Mimic Technologies, Seattle, Wash., USA) and the da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, Calif., USA). Twelve participants were recruited, ranging from residents to consultants. We used four training tasks, consisting of 'Pick and Place', 'Peg Board', 'Thread the Rings' and 'Suture Sponge', from the software program of the Mimic dV-Trainer. The performance of the participants was recorded and measured. Additionally, we prepared the same tasks for the da Vinci Surgical System. All participants completed the tasks using the da Vinci Surgical System and were assessed according to time, the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill checklist and the global rating score for endoscopic suturing assessed by two independent blinded observers. After performing these tasks, the participants completed a questionnaire that evaluated the Mimic dV-Trainer's face and content validity. The final results for each participant for the Mimic dV-Trainer and the da Vinci Surgical System were compared. All participants ranked the Mimic dV-Trainer as a realistic training platform that is useful for residency training. There was a significant relationship between the Mimic dV-Trainer and the da Vinci Surgical System in all four tasks. We verified the reliability of the assessment of the checklist and the global rating scores for endoscopic suturing assessed by the two blinded observers using Cronbach's alpha test (r = 0.803, 0.891). We evaluated the concurrent validity of the Mimic dV-Trainer and the da Vinci Surgical System. Our results suggest the possibility that training using the Mimic dV-Trainer may therefore be able to improve the operator's performance during live robot-assisted surgery. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Antioxidants and the Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cemeli, Eduardo; Baumgartner, Adolf; Anderson, Diana

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that antioxidants, either endogenous or from the diet, play a key role in preserving health. They are able to quench radical species generated in situations of oxidative stress, either triggered by pathologies or xenobiotics, and they protect the integrity of DNA from genotoxicants. Nevertheless, there are still many compounds with unclear or unidentified prooxidant/antioxidant activities. This is of concern since there is an increase in the number of compounds synthesized or extracted from vegetables to which humans might be exposed. Despite the well-established protective effects of fruit and vegetables, the antioxidant(s) responsible have not all been clearly identified. There might also be alternative mechanisms contributing to the protective effects for which a comprehensive description is lacking. In the last two decades, the Comet assay has been extensively used for the investigation of the effects of antioxidants and many reports can be found in the literature. The Comet assay, a relatively fast, simple, and sensitive technique for the analysis of DNA damage in all cell types, has been applied for the screening of chemicals, biomonitoring and intervention studies. In the present review, several of the most well-known antioxidants are considered. These include: catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, selenium, iron chelators, melatonin, melanin, vitamins (A, B, C and E), carotenes, flavonoids, isoflavones, tea polyphenols, wine polyphenols and synthetic antioxidants. Investigations showing beneficial as well as non-beneficial properties of the antioxidants selected, either at the in vitro, ex vivo or in vivo level are discussed.

  17. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, R.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.

    2011-04-01

    We describe the R&D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O2, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed "natural" radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  18. Reporter Gene Assays in Ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, Tal; Belkin, Shimshon

    The need for simple and rapid means for evaluating the potential toxic effects of environmental samples has prompted the development of reporter gene assays, based on tester cells (bioreporters) genetically engineered to report on sample toxicity by producing a readily quantifiable signal. Bacteria are especially suitable to serve as bioreporters owing to their fast responses, low cost, convenient preservation, ease of handling, and amenability to genetic manipulations. Various bacterial bioreporters have been introduced for general toxicity and genotoxicity assessment, and the monitoring of endocrine disrupting and dioxin-like compounds has been mostly covered by similarly engineered eukaryotic cells. Some reporter gene assays have been validated, standardized, and accredited, and many others are under constant development. Efforts are aimed at broadening detection spectra, lowering detection thresholds, and combining toxicity identification capabilities with characterization of the toxic effects. Taking advantage of bacterial robustness, attempts are also being made to incorporate bacterial bioreporters into field instrumentation for online continuous monitoring or on-site spot checks. However, key hurdles concerning test validation, cell preservation, and regulatory issues related to the use of genetically modified organisms still remain to be overcome.

  19. Assay for Glycosaminoglycans by Tandem Mass Spectrometry and its Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Shimada, Tsutomu; Mason, Robert W; Kelly, Joan; LaMarr, William A; Yasuda, Eriko; Shibata, Yuniko; Futatsumori, Hideyuki; Montaño, Adriana M; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Orii, Tadao

    2014-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are distributed in the whole body and play a variety of important physiological roles associated with inflammation, growth, coagulation, fibrinolysis, lipolysis, and cell-matrix biology. Accumulation of undegraded GAGs in lysosomes gives rise to a distinct clinical syndrome, mucopolysaccharidoses. Measurement of each specific GAG in a variety of specimens is urgently required to understand GAG interaction with other molecules, physiological status of patients, and prognosis and pathogenesis of the disease. We established a highly sensitive and accurate tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method for measurements of disaccharides derived from four specific GAGs [dermatan sulfate (DS), heparan sulfate (HS), keratan sulfate (KS), and chondroitin sulfate (CS)]. Disaccharides were produced by specific enzyme digestion of each GAG, and quantified by negative ion mode of multiple reaction monitoring. Subclasses of HS and GAGs with identical molecular weights can be separated using a Hypercarbcolumn (2.0 mm×50 mm, 5 μm) with an aectonitrile gradient in ammonium acetate (pH 11.0). We also developed a GAG assay by RapidFire with tandem mass spectrometry (RF-MS/MS). The RF system consists of an integrated solid phase extraction robot that binds and de-salts samples from assay plates and directly injects them into a MS/MS detector, reducing sample processing time to ten seconds. RF-MS/MS consequently yields much faster throughput than conventional LC-MS/MS-based methods. However, the RF system does not have a chromatographic step, and therefore, cannot distinguish GAGs that have identical molecular weights. Both methods can be applied to analysis of dried blood spots, blood, and urine specimens. In this article, we compare the assay methods for GAGs and describe their potential applications. PMID:25068074

  20. In vivo transgenic mutation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thybaud, Véronique; Dean, Stephen; Nohmi, Takehiko; de Boer, Johan; Douglas, George R; Glickman, Barry W; Gorelick, Nancy J; Heddle, John A; Heflich, Robert H; Lambert, Iain; Martus, Hans-Jörg; Mirsalis, Jon C; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Yajima, Nobuhiro

    2003-10-07

    Transgenic rodent gene-mutation models provide relatively quick and statistically reliable assays for gene mutations in the DNA from any tissue. This report summarizes those issues that have been agreed upon at a previous IWGT meeting [Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 35 (2000) 253], and discusses in depth those issues for which no consensus was reached before. It was previously agreed that for regulatory applications, assays should be based upon neutral genes, be generally available in several laboratories, and be readily transferable. For phage-based assays, five to ten animals per group should be analyzed, assuming a spontaneous mutant frequency (MF) of approximately 3x10(-5) mutants/locus and 125,000-300,000 plaque or colony forming units (pfu or cfu) per tissue per animal. A full set of data should be generated for a vehicle control and two dose groups. Concurrent positive control animals are only necessary during validation, but positive control DNA must be included in each plating. Tissues should be processed and analyzed in a blocked design, where samples from negative control, positive control and each treatment group are processed together. The total number of pfus or cfus and the MF for each tissue and animal are reported. Statistical tests should consider the animal as the experimental unit. Nonparametric statistical tests are recommended. A positive result is a statistically significant dose-response and/or statistically significant increase in any dose group compared to concurrent negative controls using an appropriate statistical model. A negative result is a statistically non-significant change, with all mean MFs within two standard deviations of the control. During the current workshop, a general protocol was agreed in which animals are treated daily for 28 consecutive days and tissues sampled 3 days after the final treatment. This recommendation could be modified by reducing or increasing the number of treatments or the length of the treatment period, when

  1. Anti-Metastatic Properties of a Marine Bacterial Exopolysaccharide-Based Derivative Designed to Mimic Glycosaminoglycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Heymann

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma is the most frequent malignant primary bone tumor characterized by a high potency to form lung metastases. In this study, the effect of three oversulfated low molecular weight marine bacterial exopolysaccharides (OS-EPS with different molecular weights (4, 8 and 15 kDa were first evaluated in vitro on human and murine osteosarcoma cell lines. Different biological activities were studied: cell proliferation, cell adhesion and migration, matrix metalloproteinase expression. This in vitro study showed that only the OS-EPS 15 kDa derivative could inhibit the invasiveness of osteosarcoma cells with an inhibition rate close to 90%. Moreover, this derivative was potent to inhibit both migration and invasiveness of osteosarcoma cell lines; had no significant effect on their cell cycle; and increased slightly the expression of MMP-9, and more highly the expression of its physiological specific tissue inhibitor TIMP-1. Then, the in vivo experiments showed that the OS-EPS 15 kDa derivative had no effect on the primary osteosarcoma tumor induced by osteosarcoma cell lines but was very efficient to inhibit the establishment of lung metastases in vivo. These results can help to better understand the mechanisms of GAGs and GAG-like derivatives in the biology of the tumor cells and their interactions with the bone environment to develop new therapeutic strategies.

  2. Structure of the SecY Complex Unlocked by a Preprotein Mimic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilem Hizlan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Sec complex forms the core of a conserved machinery coordinating the passage of proteins across or into biological membranes. The bacterial complex SecYEG interacts with the ATPase SecA or translating ribosomes to translocate secretory and membrane proteins accordingly. A truncated preprotein competes with the physiological full-length substrate and primes the protein-channel complex for transport. We have employed electron cryomicroscopy of two-dimensional crystals to determine the structure of the complex unlocked by the preprotein. Its visualization in the native environment of the membrane preserves the active arrangement of SecYEG dimers, in which only one of the two channels is occupied by the polypeptide substrate. The signal sequence could be identified along with the corresponding conformational changes in SecY, including relocation of transmembrane segments 2b and 7 as well as the plug, which presumably then promote channel opening. Therefore, we propose that the structure describes the translocon unlocked by preprotein and poised for protein translocation.

  3. Predictive Assay For Cancer Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suess, A; Nguyen, C; Sorensen, K; Montgomery, J; Souza, B; Kulp, K; Dugan, L; Christian, A

    2005-09-19

    Early detection of cancer is a key element in successful treatment of the disease. Understanding the particular type of cancer involved, its origins and probable course, is also important. PhIP (2-amino-1-methyl-6 phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine), a heterocyclic amine produced during the cooking of meat at elevated temperatures, has been shown to induce mammary cancer in female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Tumors induced by PhIP have been shown to contain discreet cytogenetic signature patterns of gains and losses using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). To determine if a protein signature exists for these tumors, we are analyzing expression levels of the protein products of the above-mentioned tumors in combination with a new bulk protein subtractive assay. This assay produces a panel of antibodies against proteins that are either on or off in the tumor. Hybridization of the antibody panel onto a 2-D gel of tumor or control protein will allow for identification of a distinct protein signature in the tumor. Analysis of several gene databases has identified a number of rat homologs of human cancer genes located in these regions of gain and loss. These genes include the oncogenes c-MYK, ERBB2/NEU, THRA and tumor suppressor genes EGR1 and HDAC3. The listed genes have been shown to be estrogen-responsive, suggesting a possible link between delivery of bio-activated PhIP to the cell nucleus via estrogen receptors and gene-specific PhIP-induced DNA damage, leading to cell transformation. All three tumors showed similar silver staining patterns compared to each other, while they all were different than the control tissue. Subsequent screening of these genes against those from tumors know to be caused by other agents may produce a protein signature unique to PhIP, which can be used as a diagnostic to augment optical and radiation-based detection schemes.

  4. Predictive assay for cancer targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Amanda; Nguyen, Christine; Sorensen, Karen; Montgomery, Jennifer; Souza, Brian; Kulp, Kris; Dugan, Larry; Christian, Allen

    2005-11-01

    Early detection of cancer is a key element in successful treatment of the disease. Understanding the particular type of cancer involved, its origins and probable course, is also important. PhIP (2-amino-1- methyl-6 phenylimidazo [4,5-b]pyridine), a heterocyclic amine produced during the cooking of meat at elevated temperatures, has been shown to induce mammary cancer in female, Sprague-Dawley rats. Tumors induced by PhIP have been shown to contain discreet cytogenetic signature patterns of gains and losses using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). To determine if a protein signature exists for these tumors, we are analyzing expression levels of the protein products of the above-mentioned tumors in combination with a new bulk protein subtractive assay. This assay produces a panel of antibodies against proteins that are either on or off in the tumor. Hybridization of the antibody panel onto a 2-D gel of tumor or control protein will allow for identification of a distinct protein signature in the tumor. Analysis of several gene databases has identified a number of rat homologs of human cancer genes located in these regions of gain and loss. These genes include the oncogenes c-MYK, ERBB2/NEU, THRA and tumor suppressor genes EGR1 and HDAC3. The listed genes have been shown to be estrogen-responsive, suggesting a possible link between delivery of bio-activated PhIP to the cell nucleus via estrogen receptors and gene-specific PhIP-induced DNA damage, leading to cell transformation. All three tumors showed similar silver staining patterns compared to each other, while they all were different than the control tissue. Subsequent screening of these genes against those from tumors know to be caused by other agents may produce a protein signature unique to PhIP, which can be used as a diagnostic to augment optical and radiation-based detection schemes.

  5. Amides are excellent mimics of phosphate internucleoside linkages and are well tolerated in short interfering RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutisya, Daniel; Selvam, Chelliah; Lunstad, Benjamin D; Pallan, Pradeep S; Haas, Amanda; Leake, Devin; Egli, Martin; Rozners, Eriks

    2014-06-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become an important tool in functional genomics and has an intriguing therapeutic potential. However, the current design of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is not optimal for in vivo applications. Non-ionic phosphate backbone modifications may have the potential to improve the properties of siRNAs, but are little explored in RNAi technologies. Using X-ray crystallography and RNAi activity assays, the present study demonstrates that 3'-CH2-CO-NH-5' amides are excellent replacements for phosphodiester internucleoside linkages in RNA. The crystal structure shows that amide-modified RNA forms a typical A-form duplex. The amide carbonyl group points into the major groove and assumes an orientation that is similar to the P-OP2 bond in the phosphate linkage. Amide linkages are well hydrated by tandem waters linking the carbonyl group and adjacent phosphate oxygens. Amides are tolerated at internal positions of both the guide and passenger strand of siRNAs and may increase the silencing activity when placed near the 5'-end of the passenger strand. As a result, an siRNA containing eight amide linkages is more active than the unmodified control. The results suggest that RNAi may tolerate even more extensive amide modification, which may be useful for optimization of siRNAs for in vivo applications. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Physiologic effects of bowel preparation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Nielsen, Kristine Grubbe; Madsen, Jan Lysgård

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite the universal use of bowel preparation before colonoscopy and colorectal surgery, the physiologic effects have not been described in a standardized setting. This study was designed to investigate the physiologic effects of bowel preparation. METHODS: In a prospective study, 12...... healthy volunteers (median age, 63 years) underwent bowel preparation with bisacodyl and sodium phosphate. Fluid and food intake were standardized according to weight, providing adequate calorie and oral fluid intake. Before and after bowel preparation, weight, exercise capacity, orthostatic tolerance......, plasma and extracellular volume, balance function, and biochemical parameters were measured. RESULTS: Bowel preparation led to a significant decrease in exercise capacity (median, 9 percent) and weight (median, 1.2 kg). Plasma osmolality was significantly increased from 287 to 290 mmol kg(-1), as well...

  7. PHYSIOLOGY OF ACID BASE BALANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acid-base, electrolyte, and metabolic disturbances are common in the intensive care unit. Almost all critically ill patients often suffer from compound acid-base and electrolyte disorders. Successful evaluation and management of such patients requires recognition of common patterns (e.g., metabolic acidosis and the ability to dissect one disorder from another. The intensivists needs to identify and correct these condition with the easiest available tools as they are the associated with multiorgan failure. Understanding the elements of normal physiology in these areas is very important so as to diagnose the pathological condition and take adequate measures as early as possible. Arterial blood gas analysis is one such tool for early detection of acid base disorder. Physiology of acid base is complex and here is the attempt to simplify it in our day to day application for the benefit of critically ill patients.

  8. Synthesis of indole terpenoid mimics through a functionality-tolerated Eu(fod)3 -catalyzed conjugate addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaochun; Zhang, Deliang; Li, Jian; Sun, Yu; Zhou, Shupeng; Yang, Ming; Shao, Huawu; Li, Ang

    2015-04-01

    The chemical synthesis of indole terpenoids of structural and biological interests has attracted remarkable attention. Here we report an Eu(fod)3 -catalyzed indole conjugate addition reaction, which tolerates various acid-sensitive functional groups. A collection of indole terpenoid mimics have been prepared from natural product-derived α,β-unsaturated enones on the basis of this reaction. The further conversion of the indole adducts into more complex natural product-like molecules has also been demonstrated. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Normal Bone Anatomy and Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Bart

    2008-01-01

    This review describes normal bone anatomy and physiology as an introduction to the subsequent articles in this section that discuss clinical applications of iliac crest bone biopsy. The normal anatomy and functions of the skeleton are reviewed first, followed by a general description of the processes of bone modeling and remodeling. The bone remodeling process regulates the gain and loss of bone mineral density in the adult skeleton and directly influences bone strength. Thorough understandin...

  10. Anatomy and physiology of cisternostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Iype; Grasso, Giovanni; Bernardo, Antonio; Munakomi, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Cisternostomy is defined as opening the basal cisterns to atmospheric pressure. This technique helps to reduce the intracranial pressure in severe head trauma as well as other conditions when the so-called sudden "brain swelling" troubles the surgeon. We elaborated the surgical anatomy of this procedure as well as the proposed physiology of how cisternostomy works. This novel technique may change the current trends in neurosurgery.

  11. Exercise Effects on Sleep Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Uchida, Sunao; Shioda, Kohei; Morita, Yuko; Kubota, Chie; Ganeko, Masashi; Takeda, Noriko

    2012-01-01

    This mini-review focuses on the effects of exercise on sleep. In its early days, sleep research largely focused on central nervous system (CNS) physiology using standardized tabulations of several sleep-specific landmark electroencephalogram (EEG) waveforms. Though coarse, this method has enabled the observation and inspection of numerous uninterrupted sleep phenomena. The research on the effects of exercise on sleep began, in the 1960s, with a focus primarily on sleep related EEG changes (CN...

  12. Exercise Effects on Sleep Physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Sunao eUchida; Kohei eShioda; Yuko eMorita; Chie eKubota; Masashi eGaneko; Noriko eTakeda; Noriko eTakeda

    2012-01-01

    This mini-review focuses on the effects of exercise on sleep. In its early days, sleep research largely focused on central nervous system (CNS) physiology using standardized tabulations of several sleep-specific landmark electroencephalogram (EEG) waveforms. Though coarse, this method has enabled the observation and inspection of numerous uninterrupted sleep phenomena. Thus, research on the effects of exercise on sleep began, in the 1960’s, with a focus primarily on sleep EEG (CNS sleep) c...

  13. Neutral Red versus MTT assay of cell viability in the presence of copper compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez Perez, Mariela; Fourcade, Lyvia; Mateescu, Mircea Alexandru; Paquin, Joanne

    2017-10-15

    Copper is essential for numerous physiological functions, and copper compounds may display therapeutic as well as cytotoxic effects. The MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) assay is a standard test largely used in cytotoxicity studies. This report shows that low micromolar levels of copper compounds such as Cu(II)Urea2, Cu(II)Ser2 and CuCl2 can interfere with the MTT assay making improper the detection of formazan product of MTT reduction. Comparatively, the Neutral Red assay appears to be sensitive and showing no interference with these compounds. The lactate dehydrogenase alternative assay cannot be used because of inhibitory effect of these copper compounds on the enzyme activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR assay for accurate Pocillopora damicornis species identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Luke; Stat, Michael; Evans, Richard D.; Kennington, W. Jason

    2016-09-01

    Pocillopora damicornis is one of the most extensively studied coral species globally, but high levels of phenotypic plasticity within the genus make species identification based on morphology alone unreliable. As a result, there is a compelling need to develop cheap and time-effective molecular techniques capable of accurately distinguishing P. damicornis from other congeneric species. Here, we develop a fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay to genotype a single nucleotide polymorphism that accurately distinguishes P. damicornis from other morphologically similar Pocillopora species. We trial the assay across colonies representing multiple Pocillopora species and then apply the assay to screen samples of Pocillopora spp. collected at regional scales along the coastline of Western Australia. This assay offers a cheap and time-effective alternative to Sanger sequencing and has broad applications including studies on gene flow, dispersal, recruitment and physiological thresholds of P. damicornis.

  15. Physiological and biochemical performances of menthol-induced aposymbiotic corals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jih-Terng Wang

    Full Text Available The unique mutualism between corals and their photosynthetic zooxanthellae (Symbiodinium spp. is the driving force behind functional assemblages of coral reefs. However, the respective roles of hosts and Symbiodinium in this endosymbiotic association, particularly in response to environmental challenges (e.g., high sea surface temperatures, remain unsettled. One of the key obstacles is to produce and maintain aposymbiotic coral hosts for experimental purposes. In this study, a simple and gentle protocol to generate aposymbiotic coral hosts (Isopora palifera and Stylophora pistillata was developed using repeated incubation in menthol/artificial seawater (ASW medium under light and in ASW in darkness, which depleted more than 99% of Symbiodinium from the host within 4∼8 days. As indicated by the respiration rate, energy metabolism (by malate dehydrogenase activity, and nitrogen metabolism (by glutamate dehydrogenase activity and profiles of free amino acids, the physiological and biochemical performances of the menthol-induced aposymbiotic corals were comparable to their symbiotic counterparts without nutrient supplementation (e.g., for Stylophora or with a nutrient supplement containing glycerol, vitamins, and a host mimic of free amino acid mixture (e.g., for Isopora. Differences in biochemical responses to menthol-induced bleaching between Stylophora and Isopora were attributed to the former digesting Symbiodinium rather than expelling the algae live as found in the latter species. Our studies showed that menthol could successfully bleach corals and provided aposymbiotic corals for further exploration of coral-alga symbioses.

  16. Tissue engineering: a new frontier in physiological genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Matthew C; Lazar, Jozef; Jacob, Howard J; Wakatsuki, Tetsuro

    2007-12-19

    Considerable progress has been made in the last decade in the engineering and construction of a number of artificial tissue types. These constructs are typically viewed from the perspective of possible sources for implant and transplant materials in the clinical arena. However, incorporation of engineered tissues, often referred to as three-dimensional (3D) cell culture, also offers the possibility for significant advancements in research for physiological genomics. These 3D systems more readily mimic the in vivo setting than traditional 2D cell culture, and offer distinct advantages over the in vivo setting for some organ systems. As an example, cardiac cells in 3D culture 1) are more accessible for siRNA studies, 2) can be engineered with specific cell types, and 3) offer the potential for high-throughput screening of gene function. Here the state-of-the-art is reviewed and the applications for engineered tissue in genomics research are proposed. The ability to use engineered tissue in combination with genomics creates a bridge between traditional cellular and in vivo studies that is critical to enabling the transition of genetic information into mechanistic understanding of disease processes.

  17. Physiology of in vitro culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jesús Cañal

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The culture procedures described up to the eighties, did not made any mention to the environmental control of in vitro plant development. However, growth rate, development and many of the physiologic-morphologic features of the in vitro grown plants are influenced by the culture vessel. The increasing knowledge about the environmental control of culture vessels under sterile conditions, is helping to change micorpropagation procedures. The in vitro environment with lower rate ventilation, brings about low flow rates of matter and energy, with minimum variations of temperature, high relative humidity and large daily changes of the concentration of CO2 inside the culture vessel. The type of culture vessel (size, shape, fabric and closing system can influence the evolution of the atmosphere along the time of culture. Although submitted to different stresses factors plant can be grown in vitro, but plants can be faulty in their anatomy, morphology and physiology. As a consequence, these plants shown a phenotype unable to survive to ex vitro conditions. Different strategies can be used to control the atmosphere along the different phases of micropropagation, in heterotrophic, mixotrophic or autotrophic cultures. The election of the best strategy will be based on different factors as species, number of transplantes required, or quality-price relationship. enviromental control, tissue culture, micropropagation Keywords: in vitro enviromental, characteristic physiology,

  18. ELECTROKINETICS AND CELL PHYSIOLOGY I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Roy A.; Haas, Felix L.

    1963-01-01

    Jensen, Roy A. (The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, Houston) and Felix L. Haas. Electrokinetics and cell physiology. I. Experimental basis for electrokinetic cell studies. J. Bacteriol. 86:73–78. 1963.—The stable and regular electrokinetic pattern displayed by Bacillus subtilis cell populations was presented as the basis for precisely controlled experimental procedures. The course of electrokinetic behavior characteristic of a cell population was one which paralleled the overall physiology of the culture. The prospects of capitalizing upon this biological feature of the cell were considered in cases where portions of a cell population were separable with respect to some distinct physiological criterion. Such cell fractions may be associated with a discrete and detectable difference in the net charge residing upon the bacterial cell surface. Within a limited pore-size range, membrane filters lost or retained cells, depending upon the electrostatic interaction between cell and filter disc. Fractionation on membrane filters proved to be adjustable and could be controlled by selecting the proper ionic strength in the culture medium. Procedures of this kind have potential for the development of preparative techniques or, alternatively, as experimental vehicles for kinetic analysis. PMID:14051825

  19. Physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ippei; Minamino, Tohru

    2016-08-01

    The heart must continuously pump blood to supply the body with oxygen and nutrients. To maintain the high energy consumption required by this role, the heart is equipped with multiple complex biological systems that allow adaptation to changes of systemic demand. The processes of growth (hypertrophy), angiogenesis, and metabolic plasticity are critically involved in maintenance of cardiac homeostasis. Cardiac hypertrophy is classified as physiological when it is associated with normal cardiac function or as pathological when associated with cardiac dysfunction. Physiological hypertrophy of the heart occurs in response to normal growth of children or during pregnancy, as well as in athletes. In contrast, pathological hypertrophy is induced by factors such as prolonged and abnormal hemodynamic stress, due to hypertension, myocardial infarction etc. Pathological hypertrophy is associated with fibrosis, capillary rarefaction, increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and cellular dysfunction (impairment of signaling, suppression of autophagy, and abnormal cardiomyocyte/non-cardiomyocyte interactions), as well as undesirable epigenetic changes, with these complex responses leading to maladaptive cardiac remodeling and heart failure. This review describes the key molecules and cellular responses involved in physiological/pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Plant Physiological Aspects of Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, E.; Fan, T.W-M.; Higashi, R.M.; Silk, W.K.

    2002-07-10

    The element silicon, Si, represents an anomaly in plant physiology (Epstein, 1994, 1999b). Plants contain the element in amounts comparable to those of such macronutrient elements as phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, viz. at tissue concentrations (dry weight basis) of about 0.1-10%, although both lower and higher values may be encountered. In some plants, such as rice and sugarcane, Si may be the mineral element present in largest amount. In much of plant physiological research, however, Si is considered a nonentity. Thus, not a single formulation of the widely used nutrient solutions includes Si. Experimental plants grown in these solutions are therefore abnormally low in their content of the element, being able to obtain only what Si is present as an unavoidable contaminant of the nutrient salts used, and from the experimental environment and their own seeds. The reason for the astonishing discrepancy between the prominence of Si in plants and its neglect in much of the enterprise of plant physiological research is that Si does not qualify as an ''essential'' element. Ever since the introduction of the solution culture method in the middle of the last century (Epstein, 1999a, b) it has been found that higher plants can grow in nutrient solutions in the formulation of which Si is not included. The only exceptions are the Equisitaceae (horsetails or scouring rushes), for which Si is a quantitatively major essential element.

  1. Live Cell Imaging Reveals Differential Modifications to Cytoplasmic Dynein Properties by Phospho- and Dephospho-mimic Mutations of the Intermediate Chain 2C S84

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasier, Kiev R.; Humsi, Michael K.; Ha, Junghoon; Ross, Mitchell W.; Smiley, W. Russell; Inamdar, Nirja A.; Mitchell, David J.; Lo, Kevin W.-H.; Pfister, K. Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a multi-subunit motor protein responsible for intracellular cargo transport toward microtubule minus ends. There are multiple isoforms of the dynein intermediate chain (DYNC1I, IC) which is encoded by two genes. One way to regulate cytoplasmic dynein is by IC phosphorylation. The IC-2C isoform is expressed in all cells and the functional significance of phosphorylation on IC-2C serine 84 was investigated using live cell imaging of fluorescent protein-tagged wild type IC-2C (WT) and phospho- and dephospho-mimic mutant isoforms in axonal transport model systems. Both mutations modulated dynein functional properties. The dephospho-mimic mutant IC-2C S84A had greater co-localization with mitochondria than IC-2C wild-type (WT) or the phospho-mimic mutant IC-2C S84D. The dephospho-mimic mutant IC-2C S84A was also more likely to be motile than the phospho-mimic mutant IC-2C S84D or IC-2C WT. In contrast, the phospho-mimic mutant IC-2C S84D mutant was more likely to move in the retrograde direction than was the IC-2C S84A mutant. The phospho-mimic IC-2C S84D was also as likely as IC-2C WT to co-localize with mitochondria. Both the S84D phospho- and S84A, dephospho-mimic mutants were found to be capable of microtubule minus end directed (retrograde) movement in axons. They were also observed to be passively transported in the anterograde direction. These data suggest that the IC-2C S84 has a role in modulating dynein properties. PMID:24798412

  2. Physiological Monitoring in Diving Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    NIR) spectrophotometry , the absorbance of transmitted NIR radiation by Hb is measured. The absorption spectra for oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO2) and...mammal research, but can biochemical data derived from post mortem tissues be reliable? In this study, we mapped an enzymatic degradation time series...recommendations for storage protocols for the best preservation of tissue. Ultimately, we aim to determine the reliability of biochemical assays derived

  3. Lab-on-a-brane: A novel physiologically relevant planar arterial model to study transendothelial transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhwani, Karim Ismail

    The tremendous quality of life impact notwithstanding, cardiovascular diseases and Cancer add up to over US$ 700bn each year in financial costs alone. Aging and population growth are expected to further expand the problem space while drug research and development remain expensive. However, preclinical costs can be substantially mitigated by substituting animal models with in vitro devices that accurately model human cardiovascular transport. Here we present a novel physiologically relevant lab-on-a-brane that simulates in vivo pressure, flow, strain, and shear waveforms associated with normal and pathological conditions in large and small blood vessels for studying molecular transport across the endothelial monolayer. The device builds upon previously demonstrated integrated microfluidic loop design by: (a) introducing nanoscale pores in the substrate membrane to enable transmembrane molecular transport, (b) transforming the substrate membrane into a nanofibrous matrix for 3D smooth muscle cell (SMC) tissue culture, (c) integrating electrospinning fabrication methods, (d) engineering an invertible sandwich cell culture device architecture, and (e) devising a healthy co-culture mechanism for human arterial endothelial cell (HAEC) monolayer and multiple layers of human smooth muscle cells (HSMC) to accurately mimic arterial anatomy. Structural and mechanical characterization was conducted using confocal microscopy, SEM, stress/strain analysis, and infrared spectroscopy. Transport was characterized using FITC-Dextran hydraulic permeability protocol. Structure and transport characterization successfully demonstrate device viability as a physiologically relevant arterial mimic for testing transendothelial transport. Thus, our lab-on-a-brane provides a highly effective and efficient, yet considerably inexpensive, physiologically relevant alternative for pharmacokinetic evaluation; possibly reducing animals used in pre-clinical testing, clinical trials cost from false

  4. Optimization strategies on the structural modeling of gelatin/chitosan scaffolds to mimic human meniscus tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarem, Melika [Sports Engineering Group, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering (Center of Excellence), Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Freiburg, Hermann Staudinger Haus, Freiburg D-79104 (Germany); Helmholtz Virtual Institute: Multifunctional Biomaterials for Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Moztarzadeh, Fathollah [Sports Engineering Group, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering (Center of Excellence), Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biomaterials Group, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering (Center of Excellence), Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mozafari, Masoud, E-mail: mozafari.masoud@gmail.com [Sports Engineering Group, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering (Center of Excellence), Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biomaterials Group, Faculty of Biomedical Engineering (Center of Excellence), Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Helmerich Advanced Technology Research Center, School of Material Science and Engineering, Oklahoma State University, OK 74106 (United States); Shastri, V. Prasad [Institute for Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Freiburg, Hermann Staudinger Haus, Freiburg D-79104 (Germany); Helmholtz Virtual Institute: Multifunctional Biomaterials for Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Meniscus lesions are frequently occurring injuries with poor ability to heal. Typical treatment procedure includes removal of damaged regions, which can lead to sub-optimal knee biomechanics and early onset of osteoarthritis. Some of the drawbacks of current treatment approach present an opportunity for a tissue engineering solution. In this study, gelatin (G)/chitosan (Cs) scaffolds were synthesized via gel casting method and cross-linked with naturally derived cross-linker, genipin, through scaffold cross-linking method. Based on the characteristics of native meniscus tissue microstructure and function, three different layers were chosen to design the macroporous multilayered scaffolds. The multi-layered scaffolds were investigated for their ability to support human-derived meniscus cells by evaluating their morphology and proliferation using MTT assay at various time points. Based on structural, mechanical and cell compatibility considerations, laminated scaffolds composed of G60/Cs40, G80/Cs20 and G40/Cs60 samples, for the first, second and third layers, respectively, could be an appropriate combination for meniscus tissue engineering applications. - Graphical abstract: The wedge shaped multilayer/multiporous G/Cs meniscus scaffolds were mimicked by MR images of anatomical knee meniscus. The layers were chosen as G60/Cs40, G80/Cs20 and G40/Cs60, according to their characteristics similar to meniscus natural tissue, as the first, second and third layers, respectively. - Highlights: • Different gelatin/chitosan systems were chosen to engineer a multilayered scaffold. • The compressive modulus increased gradually by increasing the gelatin concentration. • Further addition of gelatin showed a meaningful decrease in the water uptake degree. • The layers supported cell growth and mimicked the meniscus fibrocartilage structure.

  5. Coffee consumption prevents fibrosis in a rat model that mimics secondary biliary cirrhosis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arauz, Jonathan; Zarco, Natanael; Hernández-Aquino, Erika; Galicia-Moreno, Marina; Favari, Liliana; Segovia, José; Muriel, Pablo

    2017-04-01

    Investigations demonstrated that oxidative stress plays an important role in injury promotion in cholestatic liver disease. We hypothesized that coffee attenuates cholestasis-induced hepatic necrosis and fibrosis via its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antifibrotic properties. The major aim of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective properties of coffee and caffeine in a model of chronic bile duct ligation (BDL) in male Wistar rats. Liver injury was induced by 28-day BDL, and conventional coffee, decaffeinated coffee, or caffeine was administered daily. After treatment, the hepatic oxidative status was estimated by measuring lipid peroxidation, the reduced to oxidized glutathione ratio, and glutathione peroxidase. Fibrosis was assessed by measuring the liver hydroxyproline content. The transforming growth factor-β, connective tissue growth factor, α-smooth muscle actin, collagen 1, and interleukin-10 proteins and mRNAs were measured by Western blot and polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Conventional coffee suppressed most of the changes produced by BDL; however, caffeine showed better antifibrotic effects. Coffee demonstrated antioxidant properties by restoring the redox equilibrium, and it also prevented the elevation of liver enzymes as well as hepatic glycogen depletion. Interestingly, coffee and caffeine administration prevented collagen increases. Western blot assays showed decreased expression levels of transforming growth factor-β, connective tissue growth factor, α-smooth muscle actin, and collagen 1 in the coffee- and caffeine-treated BDL groups. Similarly, coffee decreased the mRNA levels of these proteins. We conclude that coffee prevents liver cirrhosis induced by BDL by attenuating the oxidant processes, blocking hepatic stellate cell activation, and downregulating the main profibrotic molecules involved in extracellular matrix deposition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Simultaneous assay of pigments, carbohydrates, proteins and lipids in microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yimin; Vaidyanathan, Seetharaman

    2013-05-07

    Biochemical compositional analysis of microbial biomass is a useful tool that can provide insight into the behaviour of an organism and its adaptational response to changes in its environment. To some extent, it reflects the physiological and metabolic status of the organism. Conventional methods to estimate biochemical composition often employ different sample pretreatment strategies and analytical steps for analysing each major component, such as total proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, making it labour-, time- and sample-intensive. Such analyses when carried out individually can also result in uncertainties of estimates as different pre-treatment or extraction conditions are employed for each of the component estimations and these are not necessarily standardised for the organism, resulting in observations that are not easy to compare within the experimental set-up or between laboratories. We recently reported a method to estimate total lipids in microalgae (Chen, Vaidyanathan, Anal. Chim. Acta, 724, 67-72). Here, we propose a unified method for the simultaneous estimation of the principal biological components, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, chlorophyll and carotenoids, in a single microalgae culture sample that incorporates the earlier published lipid assay. The proposed methodology adopts an alternative strategy for pigment assay that has a high sensitivity. The unified assay is shown to conserve sample (by 79%), time (67%), chemicals (34%) and energy (58%) when compared to the corresponding assay for each component, carried out individually on different samples. The method can also be applied to other microorganisms, especially those with recalcitrant cell walls. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Gravitational Effects on Human Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atomi, Yoriko

    2015-01-01

    Physical working capacity decreases with age and also in microgravity. Regardless of age, increased physical activity can always improve the physical adaptability of the body, although the mechanisms of this adaptability are unknown. Physical exercise produces various mechanical stimuli in the body, and these stimuli may be essential for cell survival in organisms. The cytoskeleton plays an important role in maintaining cell shape and tension development, and in various molecular and/or cellular organelles involved in cellular trafficking. Both intra and extracellular stimuli send signals through the cytoskeleton to the nucleus and modulate gene expression via an intrinsic property, namely the "dynamic instability" of cytoskeletal proteins. αB-crystallin is an important chaperone for cytoskeletal proteins in muscle cells. Decreases in the levels of αB-crystallin are specifically associated with a marked decrease in muscle mass (atrophy) in a rat hindlimb suspension model that mimics muscle and bone atrophy that occurs in space and increases with passive stretch. Moreover, immunofluorescence data show complete co-localization of αB-crystallin and the tubulin/microtubule system in myoblast cells. This association was further confirmed in biochemical experiments carried out in vitro showing that αB-crystallin acts as a chaperone for heat-denatured tubulin and prevents microtubule disassembly induced by calcium. Physical activity induces the constitutive expression of αB-crystallin, which helps to maintain the homeostasis of cytoskeleton dynamics in response to gravitational forces. This relationship between chaperone expression levels and regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics observed in slow anti-gravitational muscles as well as in mammalian striated muscles, such as those in the heart, diaphragm and tongue, may have been especially essential for human evolution in particular. Elucidation of the intrinsic properties of the tubulin/microtubule and chaperone

  8. Simple and robust determination of the activity signature of key carbohydrate metabolism enzymes for physiological phenotyping in model and crop plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jammer, A.; Gapserl, A.; Luschin-Ebengreuth, N.; Heyneke, E.; Chu, H.; Cantero-Navarro, E.; Grosskinsky, D. K.; Albacete, A.; Stabentheiner, E.; Franzaring, J.; Fangmeier, A.; van der Graaff, E.; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 18 (2015), s. 5531-5542 ISSN 0022-0957 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Carbohydrate metabolism * dialysis * enzyme activities * kinetic assay * physiological phenotyping * physiological state * protein extraction * signatures Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 5.677, year: 2015

  9. Detailed review of transgenic rodent mutation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Iain B; Singer, Timothy M; Boucher, Sherri E; Douglas, George R

    2005-09-01

    Induced chromosomal and gene mutations play a role in carcinogenesis and may be involved in the production of birth defects and other disease conditions. While it is widely accepted that in vivo mutation assays are more relevant to the human condition than are in vitro assays, our ability to evaluate mutagenesis in vivo in a broad range of tissues has historically been quite limited. The development of transgenic rodent (TGR) mutation models has given us the ability to detect, quantify, and sequence mutations in a range of somatic and germ cells. This document provides a comprehensive review of the TGR mutation assay literature and assesses the potential use of these assays in a regulatory context. The information is arranged as follows. (1) TGR mutagenicity models and their use for the analysis of gene and chromosomal mutation are fully described. (2) The principles underlying current OECD tests for the assessment of genotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, and also nontransgenic assays available for assessment of gene mutation, are described. (3) All available information pertaining to the conduct of TGR assays and important parameters of assay performance have been tabulated and analyzed. (4) The performance of TGR assays, both in isolation and as part of a battery of in vitro and in vivo short-term genotoxicity tests, in predicting carcinogenicity is described. (5) Recommendations are made regarding the experimental parameters for TGR assays, and the use of TGR assays in a regulatory context.

  10. So different and still so similar: The plant compound rosmarinic acid mimics bacterial homoserine lactone quorum sensing signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Ortega, Alvaro; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-01

    Apart from inter-bacteria communication quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms also enable inter-domain interactions. To interfere with bacterial QS, plants were found to secrete compounds; most of which of unknown identity. We have identified the plant compound rosmarinic acid (RA) to modulate Pseudomonas aeruginosa QS by binding to the RhlR QS regulator. RA was found to be a homoserine-lactone (HSL) mimic that caused agonistic effects on transcription, resulting ultimately in a stimulation of several RhlR controlled phenotypes like virulence factor synthesis or biofilm formation. Our study was initiated by in silico screening of an RhlR model with compound libraries, demonstrating that this approach is suitable to tackle a major bottleneck in signal transduction research, which is the identification of sensor protein ligands. Previous work has shown that plant compounds interfere with the function of orphan QS regulators. Our study demonstrates that this has not necessarily to be the case since RhlR forms a functional pair with the RhlI synthase. A wide range of structurally dissimilar compounds have been found to mimic HSLs suggesting that this class of QS regulators is characterized by a significant plasticity in the recognition of effector molecules. Further research will show to what extent RA impacts on QS mechanisms of other bacteria.

  11. Progesterone promotes neuronal differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells in culture conditions that mimic the brain microenvironment★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianying; Wu, Honghai; Xue, Gai; Hou, Yanning

    2012-01-01

    In this study, human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells from full-term neonates born by vaginal delivery were cultured in medium containing 150 mg/mL of brain tissue extracts from Sprague-Dawley rats (to mimic the brain microenvironment). Immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated that the cells differentiated into neuron-like cells. To evaluate the effects of progesterone as a neurosteroid on the neuronal differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells, we cultured the cells in medium containing progesterone (0.1, 1, 10 μM) in addition to brain tissue extracts. Reverse transcription-PCR and flow cytometric analysis of neuron specific enolase-positive cells revealed that the percentages of these cells increased significantly following progesterone treatment, with the optimal progesterone concentration for neuron-like differentiation being 1 μM. These results suggest that progesterone can enhance the neuronal differentiation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells in culture medium containing brain tissue extracts to mimic the brain microenvironment. PMID:25624820

  12. Acute Interstitial Nephritis Proteinuria and Herpes Simplex Virus Hepatitis in Pregnancy Mimic HELLP Syndrome (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver Enzymes, Low Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy M. White

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Elevated transaminases, hemolysis, and thrombocytopenia in pregnancy are most often caused by a preeclampsia variant—HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets. In atypical cases, it is important to consider other causes, such as herpes simplex virus (HSV hepatitis. Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN-induced proteinuria can make distinguishing HELLP from its mimics more difficult. A 43-year-old G4P3 gestational carrier at 28 weeks had abnormal laboratory findings consistent with HELLP, including proteinuria. However, she was normotensive and febrile, prompting an investigation into other possible causes of her signs and symptoms. She ultimately was diagnosed with disseminated HSV infection, started on definitive therapy, and allowed to continue her pregnancy to term. The proteinuria was attributed to AIN. AIN can cause proteinuria in the critically ill pregnant patient. When mimics of HELLP syndrome, such as disseminated HSV infection, are the cause of critical illness, the presence of AIN-induced proteinuria may falsely implicate a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy, resulting in iatrogenic premature delivery of the fetus and failure to initiate definitive potential lifesaving treatment.

  13. Testing Group Mean Differences of Latent Variables in Multilevel Data Using Multiple-Group Multilevel CFA and Multilevel MIMIC Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Sook; Cao, Chunhua

    2015-01-01

    Considering that group comparisons are common in social science, we examined two latent group mean testing methods when groups of interest were either at the between or within level of multilevel data: multiple-group multilevel confirmatory factor analysis (MG ML CFA) and multilevel multiple-indicators multiple-causes modeling (ML MIMIC). The performance of these methods were investigated through three Monte Carlo studies. In Studies 1 and 2, either factor variances or residual variances were manipulated to be heterogeneous between groups. In Study 3, which focused on within-level multiple-group analysis, six different model specifications were considered depending on how to model the intra-class group correlation (i.e., correlation between random effect factors for groups within cluster). The results of simulations generally supported the adequacy of MG ML CFA and ML MIMIC for multiple-group analysis with multilevel data. The two methods did not show any notable difference in the latent group mean testing across three studies. Finally, a demonstration with real data and guidelines in selecting an appropriate approach to multilevel multiple-group analysis are provided.

  14. Isolation of cell nuclei using inert macromolecules to mimic the crowded cytoplasm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Hancock

    Full Text Available Cell nuclei are commonly isolated and studied in media which include millimolar concentrations of cations, which conserve the nuclear volume by screening the negative charges on chromatin and maintaining its compaction. However, two factors question if these ionic conditions correctly reproduce the environment of nuclei in vivo: the small-scale motion and conformation of chromatin in vivo are not reproduced in isolated nuclei, and experiments and theory suggest that small ions in the cytoplasm are not free in the soluble phase but are predominantly bound to macromolecules. We studied the possible role in maintaining the structure and functions of nuclei in vivo of a further but frequently overlooked property of the cytoplasm, the crowding or osmotic effects caused by diffusible macromolecules whose concentration, measured in several studies, is in the range of 130 mg/ml. Nuclei which conserved their volume in the cell and their ultrastructure seen by electron microscopy were released from K562 cells in media containing the inert polymer 70 kDa Ficoll (50% w/v or 70 kDa dextran (35% w/v to replace the diffusible cytoplasmic molecules which were dispersed on cell lysis with digitonin, with 100 microM K-Hepes buffer as the only source of ions. Immunofluorescence labelling and experiments using cells expressing GFP-fusion proteins showed that internal compartments (nucleoli, PML and coiled bodies, foci of RNA polymerase II were conserved in these nuclei, and nascent RNA transcripts could be elongated. Our observations are consistent with the hypothesis that crowding by diffusible cytoplasmic macromolecules is a crucial but overlooked factor which supports the nucleus in vivo by equilibrating the opposing osmotic pressure cause by the high concentration of macromolecules in the nucleus, and suggest that crowded media provide more physiological conditions to study nuclear structure and functions. They may also help to resolve the long-standing paradox

  15. Archives: Nigerian Journal of Physiological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 19 of 19 ... Archives: Nigerian Journal of Physiological Sciences. Journal Home > Archives: Nigerian Journal of Physiological Sciences. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  16. Anatomy and physiology of chronic scrotal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Abhishek P

    2017-05-01

    This article reviews the anatomy and physiology of the scrotum and its contents as it pertains to chronic scrotal pain. Physiology of chronic pain is reviewed, as well as the pathophysiology involved in the development of chronic pain.

  17. Physiological determinants of human acute hypoxia tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    AbstractIntroduction. We investigated possible physiological determinants of variability in hypoxia tolerance in subjects given a 5-minute normobaric exposure to 25,000 ft equivalent. Physiological tolerance to hypoxia was defined as the magnitude of...

  18. Biomechanics and physiology in handrim wheelchair propulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woude, L.H.V.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Dallmeijer, A.J.; Janssen, T.W.J.; Rozendaal, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    Manual wheelchair propulsion in daily life and sports is increasingly being studied. Initially, an engineering and physiological perspective was taken. More recently a concomitant biomechanics interest is seen. Themes of biomechanical and physiological studies today are performance enhancing aspects

  19. Physiological Parameters Database for Older Adults

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Physiological Parameters Database for Older Adults is available for download and contains physiological parameters values for healthy older human adults (age 60...

  20. Assessment of porcine-induced pluripotent stem cells by in vivo assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Jan Ole Bertelsen; Freude, Karla Kristine; Petkov, Stoyan Gueorguiev

    Concerted efforts have been expended in deriving porcine induced pluripotent stem cells (piPSC) which are envisaged to more faithfully mimic human physiology than existing rodent-derived iPSC lines. While initial piPSC lines, first generated in 2009, exhibit the majority of hallmarks displayed by i......, human and murine episomal reprogramming approaches lead to integration of such transgenes. Thirdly, current culturing conditions fail to support the maintenance of either porcine embryonic stem cells (pESC) or piPSC. Lastly, piPSC are unable to reproducibly contribute to chimeric embryos as demonstrated......PSCs derived from other mammalian species, this is not without some caveats. Firstly, all existing piPSC-like cells are afflicted by insufficient activation of endogenous pluripotency genes. Secondly and associated with this, lack of silencing of exogenous pluripotency genes is a general drawback: in contrast...

  1. Physiological ecology meets climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozinovic, Francisco; Pörtner, Hans-Otto

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we pointed out that understanding the physiology of differential climate change effects on organisms is one of the many urgent challenges faced in ecology and evolutionary biology. We explore how physiological ecology can contribute to a holistic view of climate change impacts on organisms and ecosystems and their evolutionary responses. We suggest that theoretical and experimental efforts not only need to improve our understanding of thermal limits to organisms, but also to consider multiple stressors both on land and in the oceans. As an example, we discuss recent efforts to understand the effects of various global change drivers on aquatic ectotherms in the field that led to the development of the concept of oxygen and capacity limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) as a framework integrating various drivers and linking organisational levels from ecosystem to organism, tissue, cell, and molecules. We suggest seven core objectives of a comprehensive research program comprising the interplay among physiological, ecological, and evolutionary approaches for both aquatic and terrestrial organisms. While studies of individual aspects are already underway in many laboratories worldwide, integration of these findings into conceptual frameworks is needed not only within one organism group such as animals but also across organism domains such as Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya. Indeed, development of unifying concepts is relevant for interpreting existing and future findings in a coherent way and for projecting the future ecological and evolutionary effects of climate change on functional biodiversity. We also suggest that OCLTT may in the end and from an evolutionary point of view, be able to explain the limited thermal tolerance of metazoans when compared to other organisms.

  2. An ultrafiltration assay for lysyl oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shackleton, D.R.; Hulmes, D.J. (Univ. of Edinburgh Medical School (England))

    1990-03-01

    A modification of the original microdistillation assay for lysyl oxidase is described in which Amicon C-10 microconcentrators are used to separate, by ultrafiltration, the 3H-labeled products released from a (4,5-3H)-lysine-labeled elastin substrate. Enzyme activity is determined by scintillation counting of the ultrafiltrate, after subtraction of radioactivity released in the presence of beta-aminopropionitrile, a specific inhibitor of the enzyme. Conditions are described which optimize both the sensitivity and the efficient use of substrate. The assay shows linear inhibition of activity in up to 1 M urea; hence, as the enzyme is normally diluted in the assay, samples in 6 M urea can be assayed directly, without prior dialysis, and corrected for partial inhibition. Comparable results are obtained when enzyme activity is assayed by ultrafiltration or microdistillation. The assay is simple and convenient and, by using disposable containers throughout, it eliminates the need for time-consuming decontamination of radioactive glassware.

  3. Development and application of assays for serotonin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gow, I.F.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis, two assays for serotonin were developed, validated, and used to investigate the relationship between platelet aggregation, serotonin levels and sodium status and serotonin levels and platelet function in patients with cardiovascular disease. A radioimmunoassay (RIA) using an (/sup 125/I)-labelled tracer was developed and validated for the measurement of serotonin in human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and rat serum. Antisera were raised against N-succinamylserotonin conjugated to bovine albumin and, to improve assay sensitivity, the analyte was made chemically similar to the immunogen by conversion to N-acetylserotonin prior to assay, using the specific amino reagent N-acetoxysuccinimide. An assay for serotonin using high-pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD) was developed, and used to validate the RIA. The RIA can be used to assay up to 100 samples/day compared with 10-20/day by the HPLC-ECD assay.

  4. Multicentre comparison of a diagnostic assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waters, Patrick; Reindl, Markus; Saiz, Albert

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antibodies to cell surface central nervous system proteins help to diagnose conditions which often respond to immunotherapies. The assessment of antibody assays needs to reflect their clinical utility. We report the results of a multicentre study of aquaporin (AQP) 4 antibody (AQP4-Ab......) assays in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD). METHODS: Coded samples from patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO) or NMOSD (101) and controls (92) were tested at 15 European diagnostic centres using 21 assays including live (n=3) or fixed cell-based assays (n=10), flow cytometry (n=4...... with seronegative NMO/spectrum disorder (SD). On the basis of a combination of clinical phenotype and the highly specific assays, 66 AQP4-Ab seropositive samples were used to establish the sensitivities (51.5-100%) of all 21 assays. The specificities (85.8-100%) were based on 92 control samples and 35 seronegative...

  5. Fish cardiovascular physiology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Johanna; Weber, E Scott; Marty, Gary D; Hernandez-Divers, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Fish patients with cardiovascular disorders present a challenge in terms of diagnostic evaluation and therapeutic options. Veterinarians can approach these cases in fish using methods similar to those employed for other companion animals. Clinicians who evaluate and treat fish in private, aquarium, zoologic, or aquaculture settings need to rely on sound clinical judgment after thorough historical and physical evaluation. Pharmacokinetic data and treatments specific to cardiovascular disease in fish are limited; thus, drug types and dosages used in fish are largely empiric. Fish cardiovascular anatomy, physiology, diagnostic evaluation, monitoring, common diseases, cardiac pathologic conditions, formulary options, and comprehensive references are presented with the goal of providing fish veterinarians with clinically relevant tools.

  6. Physiologic mastectomy via flank laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Andrew J; Barrington, George M; Parish, Steve M

    2008-11-01

    Physiologic mastectomy can be used as a salvage procedure in cases of chronic suppurative mastitis, gangrenous mastitis, or chronic, severe mastitis associated with organisms liberating endotoxin or exotoxin. The surgical technique involves ligation of the major arterial blood supply (external pudendal artery) to the corresponding half of the mammary gland, which results in decreased systemic absorption of toxins and gland atrophy. The technique is performed with the cow standing, and it is relatively atraumatic. This procedure is a simple, yet effective alternative to radical mastectomy for unresponsive mastitis cases in genetically or otherwise valuable cattle.

  7. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger David John

    2012-01-01

    damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses...... include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review...... the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level....

  8. Journal of African Association of Physiological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of African Association of Physiological Sciences (J. Afr. Assoc. Physiol. Sci.) is an international, bi-annual official publication of African Association of Physiological Sciences. Both print and online forms are available. The journal is aimed at dissemination of information on diverse areas of research in Physiological ...

  9. Bengt Saltin and exercise physiology: a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    This perspective highlights some of the key contributions of Professor Bengt Saltin (1935-2014) to exercise physiology. The emergence of exercise physiology from work physiology as his career began is discussed as are his contributions in a number of areas. Saltin's open and question-based style of leadership is a model for the future of our field.

  10. A lateral electrophoretic flow diagnostic assay

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, R; Skandarajah, A; Gerver, RE; Neira, HD; Fletcher, DA; Herr, AE

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Royal Society of Chemistry. Immunochromatographic assays are a cornerstone tool in disease screening. To complement existing lateral flow assays (based on wicking flow) we introduce a lateral flow format that employs directed electrophoretic transport. The format is termed a "lateral e-flow assay" and is designed to support multiplexed detection using immobilized reaction volumes of capture antigen. To fabricate the lateral e-flow device, we employ mask-based UV photopatterning to ...

  11. Fluorescent Parkin Cell-Based Assay Development for the Screening of Drugs against Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villacé, Patricia; Mella, Rosa M; Roura-Ferrer, Meritxell; Valcárcel, María; Salado, Clarisa; Castilla, Amaia; Kortazar, Danel

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a prevalent neurodegenerative disease characterized by selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, causing tremor and motor impairment. Parkin protein, whose mutants are the cause of Parkinson disease type 2 (PARK2), has been mechanistically linked to the regulation of apoptosis and the turnover of damaged mitochondria. Several studies have implicated aberrant mitochondria as a key contributor to the development of PD. In the attempt to discover new drugs, high-content cell-based assays are becoming more important to mimic the nature of biological processes and their diversifications in diseases and will be essential for lead identification and the optimization of therapeutic candidates. We have developed a novel fluorescence cell-based assay for high-content screening to find compounds that can promote the mitochondrial localization of Parkin without severe mitochondrial damage induction. In this work, this model was used to screen a library of 1280 compounds. After the screening campaign, the positive compounds were chosen for further testing, based on the strength of the initial response and lack of cytotoxicity. These results indicated that this Parkin cell-based assay is a robust (Z' > 0.5) and valid strategy to test potential candidates for preclinical studies.

  12. Poor adhesion of fentanyl transdermal patches may mimic end-of-dosage failure after 48 hours and prompt early patch replacement in hospitalized cancer pain patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnet I

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Isabelle Arnet,1 Sabrina Schacher,1 Eva Balmer,2 Dieter Koeberle,2 Kurt E Hersberger1 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Pharmaceutical Care Research Group, University of Basel, 2Palliative Care Unit, Division of Oncology/Haematology, St Claraspital, Basel, Switzerland Context: Renewal of fentanyl transdermal patch (transdermal therapeutic system [TTS] should occur every 3 days (72 hours according to manufacturer’s guidelines. Some studies mentioned patients reporting end-of-dose failure, and thus, some authors recommend shortening the interval of application to 2 days (48 hours. However, reasons for early replacement are mostly unknown. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to assess the prevalence of early replacement of fentanyl TTS in a cancer center in Basel, Switzerland, and to assess the reasons for early replacement in stationary patients. Methods: We retrieved all fentanyl TTS administered in a cancer center in Basel, Switzerland, between November 11, 2011, and January 31, 2015, from the electronic medical database. Results: A total of 739 patients (mean age 71.4±11.5 years, 55% women were administered 2,250 fentanyl TTS (dosage 6–500 µg/hour. Most replacements occurred after 72 hours (61.6% and a few after 48 hours (7.4%. Patients with early replacement after 48 hours were significantly younger (63.8 years versus 71.5 years, p<0.001 and obtained higher mean dosages of fentanyl TTS (89 µg/hour versus 44.1 µg/hour, p<0.001 and rescue medication (calculated as oral morphine equivalent in milligrams: 185.1 mg versus 39.6 mg during the first 24 hours after replacement, p<0.001. No pharmacological rationale for early replacement was observed. According to 57 physicians, nurses, and pharmacists, the most often reasons for early TTS replacement were end-of-dosage pain (41.4% and poor adhesion (31.4%. Conclusion: In the absence of any physiological, pharmacological, or environmental reasons recorded in the

  13. The glycemic index: physiological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Amin; Wong, Julia M W; Mirrahimi, Arash; Srichaikul, Korbua; Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C

    2009-08-01

    The glycemic index (GI) is a physiological assessment of a food's carbohydrate content through its effect on postprandial blood glucose concentrations. Evidence from trials and observational studies suggests that this physiological classification may have relevance to those chronic Western diseases associated with overconsumption and inactivity leading to central obesity and insulin resistance. The glycemic index classification of foods has been used as a tool to assess potential prevention and treatment strategies for diseases where glycemic control is of importance, such as diabetes. Low GI diets have also been reported to improve the serum lipid profile, reduce C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations, and aid in weight control. In cross-sectional studies, low GI or glycemic load diets (mean GI multiplied by total carbohydrate) have been associated with higher levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), with reduced CRP concentrations, and, in cohort studies, with decreased risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition, some case-control and cohort studies have found positive associations between dietary GI and risk of various cancers, including those of the colon, breast, and prostate. Although inconsistencies in the current findings still need to be resolved, sufficient positive evidence, especially with respect to renewed interest in postprandial events, suggests that the glycemic index may have a role to play in the treatment and prevention of chronic diseases.

  14. Physiological Effects of Touching Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harumi Ikei

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to clarify the physiological effects of touching wood with the palm, in comparison with touching other materials on brain activity and autonomic nervous activity. Eighteen female university students (mean age, 21.7  ±  1.6 years participated in the study. As an indicator of brain activity, oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb concentrations were measured in the left/right prefrontal cortex using near-infrared time-resolved spectroscopy. Heart rate variability (HRV was used as an indicator of autonomic nervous activity. The high-frequency (HF component of HRV, which reflected parasympathetic nervous activity, and the low-frequency (LF/HF ratio, which reflected sympathetic nervous activity, were measured. Plates of uncoated white oak, marble, tile, and stainless steel were used as tactile stimuli. After sitting at rest with their eyes closed, participants touched the materials for 90 s. As a result, tactile stimulation with white oak significantly (1 decreased the oxy-Hb concentration in the left/right prefrontal cortex relative to marble, tile, and stainless steel and (2 increased ln(HF-reflected parasympathetic nervous activity relative to marble and stainless steel. In conclusion, our study revealed that touching wood with the palm calms prefrontal cortex activity and induces parasympathetic nervous activity more than other materials, thereby inducing physiological relaxation.

  15. ELECTROKINETICS AND CELL PHYSIOLOGY II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Roy A.; Haas, Felix L.

    1963-01-01

    Jensen, Roy A. (The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, Houston) and Felix L. Haas. Electrokinetics and cell physiology. II. Relationship of surface charge to onset of bacterial competence for genetic transformation. J. Bacteriol. 86:79–86. 1963.—A reliable cell fractionation scheme, which is sensitive to the electrokinetic properties of Bacillus subtilis cells, has been described in detail. Recipient cell populations, characterized by a wide range of competency for transformation to independence of nutritional markers, were subjected to electrokinetic fractionation. Results indicated that (i) physiological competency is directly related to the electrical charge on the cell surface, (ii) newly competent cells carry a maximal negative charge, (iii) the newly competent cell appears with spontaneous abruptness, (iv) a kinetic flow of competent cells from the highly charged fractions to the lower charged fractions indicates the progressive loss of the surface charge maintained by a competent cell, and (v), by token of the latter statement, cells competent to undergo transformation do so within a range of surface-charge values. PMID:14051826

  16. Physiological compliance and team performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Amanda N; Muth, Eric R; Hoover, Adam W; Walker, Alexander D; Carpenter, Thomas L; Switzer, Fred S

    2009-11-01

    Physiological compliance (PC) refers to the correlation between physiological measures of team members over time. The goals of this study were to examine ways of measuring PC in heart rate variability (HRV) data and the relationship between PC and team performance. Teams were tasked with entering both real and simulated rooms and "shooting" individuals with a weapon and identifying individuals without a weapon. The linear correlation and directional agreement PC methods were shown to be the most sensitive to differences in performance, with greater PC being associated with better performance. The correlation method when applied to a measure of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) revealed a significant difference between high and low performers (t[8]=-2.31, p=0.03) and the directional agreement applied to inter-beat-intervals and RSA revealed trend-level differences (t[4.62]=-1.86, p=0.06 and t[8]=-1.68, p=0.07). These results suggest that PC may have merit for predicting team performance.

  17. ECM degradation assays for analyzing local cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artym, Vira V; Yamada, Kenneth M; Mueller, Susette C

    2009-01-01

    Proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical step during cell invasion and tissue transmigration that is required for many physiological and pathological processes. Cellular structures that mediate cell adhesion to, degradation of, and invasion into ECM are invadopodia of transformed and tumor cells and podosomes of normal monocytic, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells. Detecting the ability of the cell to form invadopodia and podosomes and to degrade ECM is required for studying the invasive capability of the cell. We have developed approximately 50 nm thick fluorescent gelatin matrices that provide a rapid, sensitive, and reliable in vitro system for detection of invadopodia and podosomes, and measurements of the extent of ECM degradation. In this chapter, we provide a detailed protocol for preparation of thin fluorescent gelatin matrices and for evaluation of the results from this degradation assay.

  18. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny P Bartsch

    Full Text Available We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS, we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  19. Network Physiology: How Organ Systems Dynamically Interact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Ronny P; Liu, Kang K L; Bashan, Amir; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study how diverse physiologic systems in the human organism dynamically interact and collectively behave to produce distinct physiologic states and functions. This is a fundamental question in the new interdisciplinary field of Network Physiology, and has not been previously explored. Introducing the novel concept of Time Delay Stability (TDS), we develop a computational approach to identify and quantify networks of physiologic interactions from long-term continuous, multi-channel physiological recordings. We also develop a physiologically-motivated visualization framework to map networks of dynamical organ interactions to graphical objects encoded with information about the coupling strength of network links quantified using the TDS measure. Applying a system-wide integrative approach, we identify distinct patterns in the network structure of organ interactions, as well as the frequency bands through which these interactions are mediated. We establish first maps representing physiologic organ network interactions and discover basic rules underlying the complex hierarchical reorganization in physiologic networks with transitions across physiologic states. Our findings demonstrate a direct association between network topology and physiologic function, and provide new insights into understanding how health and distinct physiologic states emerge from networked interactions among nonlinear multi-component complex systems. The presented here investigations are initial steps in building a first atlas of dynamic interactions among organ systems.

  20. Applying the erythrocyte Pig-a assay concept to rat epididymal sperm for germ cell mutagenicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhiying; LeBaron, Matthew J

    2017-08-01

    The Pig-a assay, a recently developed in vivo somatic gene mutation assay, is based on the identification of mutant erythrocytes that have an altered repertoire of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell surface markers. We hypothesized that the erythrocyte Pig-a assay concept could be applied to rat cauda epididymal spermatozoa (sperm) for germ cell mutagenicity evaluation. We used GPI-anchored CD59 as the Pig-a mutation marker and examined the frequency of CD59-negative sperm using flow cytometry. A reconstruction experiment that spiked un-labeled sperm (mutant-mimic) into labeled sperm at specific ratios yielded good agreement between the detected and expected frequencies of mutant-mimic sperm, demonstrating the analytical ability for CD59-negative sperm detection. Furthermore, this methodology was assessed in F344/DuCrl rats administered N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), a prototypical mutagen, or clofibrate, a lipid-lowering drug. Rats treated with 1, 10, or 20 mg/kg body weight/day (mkd) ENU via daily oral garage for five consecutive days showed a dose-dependent increase in the frequency of CD59-negative sperm on study day 63 (i.e., 58 days after the last ENU dose). This ENU dosing regimen also increased the frequency of CD59-negative erythrocytes. In rats treated with 300 mkd clofibrate via daily oral garage for consecutive 28 days, no treatment-related changes were detected in the frequency of CD59-negative sperm on study day 85 (i.e., 57 days after the last dose) or in the frequency of CD59-negative erythrocytes on study day 29. In conclusion, these data suggest that the epidiymal sperm Pig-a assay in rats is a promising method for evaluating germ cell mutagenicity. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:485-493, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Daily timed melatonin feedings mimic effects of short days on testis regression and cortisol in circulation in Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebert, Sara M; Green, Stephen A; Yellon, Steven M

    2006-05-01

    This study tested the efficacy of timed oral administration of melatonin as an alternative both to invasive methods (daily injections, timed infusions) and to untimed oral administration in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus), an important model for the study of photoperiodism. Hamsters readily consumed a small piece of melatonin-treated apple immediately when presented and circulating melatonin was rapidly elevated with a half-life of approximately 3.5 h. Melatonin-treated apple was fed to hamsters for 3 weeks at 2 h before lights off to extend the duration of the nighttime rise in endogenous melatonin. Melatonin treatment induced testicular regression and elevated serum cortisol, effects comparable to those in hamsters exposed to short days. These findings support the hypothesis that timed oral administration of melatonin can mimic the effects of short days and provide a method by which melatonin can be delivered without the potentially confounding effects of handling and injection stress.

  2. Music and 25% glucose for preterm babies during the pre-procedure for arterial puncture: facial mimics emphasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Vera Lúcia Moreira Leitão Cardoso

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to describe and quantify facial mimic movements of preterm babies during music and 25% glucose interventions at the pre-procedure for arterial puncture. A randomized controlled trial involving 48 videos of preterm attended in a public neonatal unit, in Fortaleza – Ceará. We collected data from footage analyses during the pre-procedure. Babies heard a lullaby song for 10 minutes in the experimental group; we administered 25% glucose in the control group at the end of the eighth minute, matching a total of 10 minutes of observation. We assessed the frequency of facial expressions: cry, sneeze, yawn, frown the forehead, focused sight, vague sight, sleeping and head movement. Statistically significant variable for the control group: vague sight (p=0.001 at the two last minutes of observation. We concluded that there was no association between most of facial movements and the studied interventions, except for a vague sight in the control group.

  3. Bilateral Tubo Ovarian Abscess Mimics Ovarian Cancer on MRI and {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakheja, Rajan; Hickeson, Marc [Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill Univ. Health Centre, Montreal (Canada); Makis, William [Brandon Regional Health Centre, Brandon (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    A 20 year old woman, who presented with a several week history of abdominal pain, was referred for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and {sup 18F} fluorodeoxy glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) after an ultrasound showed complex cystic masses arising from both ovaries. The MRI and {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT imaging characteristics of the ovarian masses were strongly suspicious for malignancy, and the masses were surgically removed. Histopathological evaluation revealed a bilateral tuboovarian abscess, with no evidence of malignancy. This case highlights a potentially serious pitfall in the evaluation of suspicious pelvic masses by {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT, Whereby a complex bilateral tuboovarian abscess may mimic the PET/CT imaging characteristics of an ovarian or pelvic malignancy.

  4. Acceleration of an aromatic Claisen rearrangement via a designed spiroligozyme catalyst that mimics the ketosteroid isomerase catalytic dyad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Matthew F L; Osuna, Sílvia; Bollot, Guillaume; Vaddypally, Shivaiah; Zdilla, Michael J; Houk, K N; Schafmeister, Christian E

    2014-03-12

    A series of hydrogen-bonding catalysts have been designed for the aromatic Claisen rearrangement of a 1,1-dimethylallyl coumarin. These catalysts were designed as mimics of the two-point hydrogen-bonding interaction present in ketosteroid isomerase that has been proposed to stabilize a developing negative charge on the ether oxygen in the migration of the double bond.1 Two hydrogen bond donating groups, a phenol alcohol and a carboxylic acid, were grafted onto a conformationally restrained spirocyclic scaffold, and together they enhance the rate of the Claisen rearrangement by a factor of 58 over the background reaction. Theoretical calculations correctly predict the most active catalyst and suggest that both preorganization and favorable interactions with the transition state of the reaction are responsible for the observed rate enhancement.

  5. Bourgeois Males of the Peacock Blenny, Salaria pavo, Discriminate Female Mimics from Females?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonçalves, David; Matos, Ricardo Jorge Santa Clara; Fagundes, Teresa

    2005-01-01

    In a Portuguese population of Salaria pavo, two types of reproductively active males occur: large bourgeois males that defend nests and have fully developed secondary sex characters (SSC) and small sneaker males that mimic the females' morphology and behaviour to approach nests and parasitize...... fertilizations. These two alternative reproductive tactics are sequential, as sneakers develop into bourgeois males. We investigated whether bourgeois males were able to discriminate between sneakers and females of different sizes. In a laboratory experiment bourgeois males were sequentially presented...... with a female and a sneaker matched for size. Complementary field observations were conducted on the interactions between females and sneakers with bourgeois males. If bourgeois males discriminated females from sneakers, we predicted that they should direct more aggressive behaviours towards sneakers and more...

  6. METHODOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF QUANTITATIVE RECEPTOR ASSAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMISTEROVA, J; ENSING, K; DEZEEUW, RA

    Receptor assays occupy a particular position in the methods used in bioanalysis, as they do not exploit the physico-chemical properties of the analyte. These assays make use of the property of the analyte to bind to the specific binding site (receptor) and to competitively replace a labelled ligand

  7. A lateral electrophoretic flow diagnostic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Robert; Skandarajah, Arunan; Gerver, Rachel E; Neira, Hector D; Fletcher, Daniel A; Herr, Amy E

    2015-03-21

    Immunochromatographic assays are a cornerstone tool in disease screening. To complement existing lateral flow assays (based on wicking flow) we introduce a lateral flow format that employs directed electrophoretic transport. The format is termed a "lateral e-flow assay" and is designed to support multiplexed detection using immobilized reaction volumes of capture antigen. To fabricate the lateral e-flow device, we employ mask-based UV photopatterning to selectively immobilize unmodified capture antigen along the microchannel in a barcode-like pattern. The channel-filling polyacrylamide hydrogel incorporates a photoactive moiety (benzophenone) to immobilize capture antigen to the hydrogel without a priori antigen modification. We report a heterogeneous sandwich assay using low-power electrophoresis to drive biospecimen through the capture antigen barcode. Fluorescence barcode readout is collected via a low-resource appropriate imaging system (CellScope). We characterize lateral e-flow assay performance and demonstrate a serum assay for antibodies to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). In a pilot study, the lateral e-flow assay positively identifies HCV+ human sera in 60 min. The lateral e-flow assay provides a flexible format for conducting multiplexed immunoassays relevant to confirmatory diagnosis in near-patient settings.

  8. Assessing sediment contamination using six toxicity assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen G. BURTON Jr.

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of sediment toxicity at Lake Orta, Italy was conducted to compare a toxicity test battery of 6 assays and to evaluate the extent of sediment contamination at various sediment depths. Lake Orta received excessive loadings of copper and ammonia during the 1900’s until a large remediation effort was conducted in 1989-90 using lime addition. Since that time, the lake has shown signs of a steady recovery of biological communities. The study results showed acute toxicity still exists in sediments at a depth of 5 cm and greater. Assays that detected the highest levels of toxicity were two whole sediment exposures (7 d using Hyalella azteca and Ceriodaphnia dubia. The MicrotoxR assay using pore water was the third most sensitive assay. The Thamnotox, Rototox, Microtox solid phase, and Seed Germination-Root Elongation (pore and solid phase assays showed occasional to no toxicity. Based on similarity of responses and assay sensitivity, the two most useful assays were the C. dubia (or H. azteca and Microtox pore water. These assays were effective at describing sediment toxicity in a weight-of-evidence approach.

  9. A Continuous, Fluorogenic Sirtuin 2 Deacylase Assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galleano, Iacopo; Schiedel, Matthias; Jung, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    and kinetic insight regarding sirtuin inhibitors, it is important to have access to efficient assays. In this work, we report readily synthesized fluorogenic substrates enabling enzyme-economical evaluation of SIRT2 inhibitors in a continuous assay format as well as evaluation of the properties of SIRT2...

  10. Evaluation of fluorescence in-situ hybridization in monomorphic endometrial stromal neoplasms and their histological mimics: a review of 49 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Colin J R; Leung, Yee C; Murch, Ashleigh; Peverall, Joanne

    2014-10-01

    To perform a population-based review of monomorphic endometrial stromal tumours and their histological mimics presenting over a 20-year period, including an evaluation of fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) for the JAZF1 and YWHAE breakaparts. Forty-nine tumours were examined, comprising 13 histological mimics and 36 endometrial stromal tumours [six stromal nodules (ESNs), 25 low-grade stromal sarcomas (ESSs), and five monomorphic undifferentiated sarcomas (mUESs)]. Nine ESSs showed variant histological patterns, including smooth muscle, sex cord-like/glandular, fibrous or rhabdoid differentiation. Three ESSs were initially misclassified as benign uterine lesions, and, conversely, three benign mimics were originally reported as ESSs. One mUES showed a prominent pseudopapillary pattern. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization demonstrated JAZF1 breakaparts in five of six ESNs and 16 of 25 ESSs; however, only three of nine ESS variants were positive. YWHAE breakaparts were present in four of five mUESs. Analysis of a subsequent metastasis in the YWHAE breakapart-negative mUES demonstrated a YWHAE deletion. None of the histological mimics was positive in FISH analysis. Diffuse cyclin D1 expression was restricted to mUESs in this series. Endometrial stromal neoplasms continue to present diagnostic difficulty. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization analysis is helpful in distinguishing stromal tumours from their histological mimics and in distinguishing ESS from mUES. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Intranasal Delivery of miR-146a Mimics Delayed Seizure Onset in the Lithium-Pilocarpine Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Tao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Unveiling the key mechanism of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE for the development of novel treatments is of increasing interest, and anti-inflammatory miR-146a is now considered a promising molecular target for TLE. In the current study, a C57BL/6 TLE mouse model was established using the lithium-pilocarpine protocol. The seizure degree was evaluated according to the Racine scale, and level 5 was considered the threshold for generalized convulsions. Animals were sacrificed to analyze the hippocampus at three time points (2 h and 4 and 8 weeks after pilocarpine administration to evaluate the acute, latent, and chronic phases, resp.. After intranasal delivery of miR-146a mimics (30 min before pilocarpine injection, the percent of animals with no induced seizures increased by 6.7%, the latency to generalized convulsions was extended, and seizure severity was reduced. Additionally, hippocampal damage was alleviated. While the relative miR-146a levels significantly increased, the expression of its target mRNAs (IRAK-1 and TRAF-6 and typical inflammatory modulators (NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 decreased, supporting an anti-inflammatory role of miR-146a via the TLR pathway. This study is the first to demonstrate that intranasal delivery of miR-146a mimics can improve seizure onset and hippocampal damage in the acute phase of lithium-pilocarpine-induced seizures, which provides inflammation-based clues for the development of novel TLE treatments.

  12. Mosquito cell-derived West Nile virus replicon particles mimic arbovirus inoculum and have reduced spread in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Brendan T; Moreira, Fernando R; Carlson, Tim W; Bernard, Kristen A

    2017-02-01

    Half of the human population is at risk of infection by an arthropod-borne virus. Many of these arboviruses, such as West Nile, dengue, and Zika viruses, infect humans by way of a bite from an infected mosquito. This infectious inoculum is insect cell-derived giving the virus particles distinct qualities not present in secondary infectious virus particles produced by infected vertebrate host cells. The insect cell-derived particles differ in the glycosylation of virus structural proteins and the lipid content of the envelope, as well as their induction of cytokines. Thus, in order to accurately mimic the inoculum delivered by arthropods, arboviruses should be derived from arthropod cells. Previous studies have packaged replicon genome in mammalian cells to produce replicon particles, which undergo only one round of infection, but no studies exist packaging replicon particles in mosquito cells. Here we optimized the packaging of West Nile virus replicon genome in mosquito cells and produced replicon particles at high concentration, allowing us to mimic mosquito cell-derived viral inoculum. These particles were mature with similar genome equivalents-to-infectious units as full-length West Nile virus. We then compared the mosquito cell-derived particles to mammalian cell-derived particles in mice. Both replicon particles infected skin at the inoculation site and the draining lymph node by 3 hours post-inoculation. The mammalian cell-derived replicon particles spread from the site of inoculation to the spleen and contralateral lymph nodes significantly more than the particles derived from mosquito cells. This in vivo difference in spread of West Nile replicons in the inoculum demonstrates the importance of using arthropod cell-derived particles to model early events in arboviral infection and highlights the value of these novel arthropod cell-derived replicon particles for studying the earliest virus-host interactions for arboviruses.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of a lubricin mimic (mLub) to reduce friction and adhesion on the articular cartilage surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Alexandra; Xu, Xin; Bible, Melissa D; Calve, Sarah; Neu, Corey P; Panitch, Alyssa

    2015-12-01

    The lubricating proteoglycan, lubricin, facilitates the remarkable low friction and wear properties of articular cartilage in the synovial joints of the body. Lubricin lines the joint surfaces and plays a protective role as a boundary lubricant in sliding contact; decreased expression of lubricin is associated with cartilage degradation and the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis. An unmet need for early osteoarthritis treatment is the development of therapeutic molecules that mimic lubricin function and yet are also resistant to enzymatic degradation common in the damaged joint. Here, we engineered a lubricin mimic (mLub) that is less susceptible to enzymatic degradation and binds to the articular surface to reduce friction. mLub was synthesized using a chondroitin sulfate backbone with type II collagen and hyaluronic acid (HA) binding peptides to promote interaction with the articular surface and synovial fluid constituents. In vitro and in vivo characterization confirmed the binding ability of mLub to isolated type II collagen and HA, and to the cartilage surface. Following trypsin treatment to the cartilage surface, application of mLub, in combination with purified or commercially available hyaluronan, reduced the coefficient of friction, and adhesion, to control levels as assessed over macro-to micro-scales by rheometry and atomic force microscopy. In vivo studies demonstrate an mLub residency time of less than 1 week. Enhanced lubrication by mLub reduces surface friction and adhesion, which may suppress the progression of degradation and cartilage loss in the joint. mLub therefore shows potential for treatment in early osteoarthritis following injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Carbon monoxide induced erythroid differentiation of K562 cells mimics the central macrophage milieu in erythroblastic islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlomi Toobiak

    Full Text Available Growing evidence supports the role of erythroblastic islands (EI as microenvironmental niches within bone marrow (BM, where cell-cell attachments are suggested as crucial for erythroid maturation. The inducible form of the enzyme heme oxygenase, HO-1, which conducts heme degradation, is absent in erythroblasts where hemoglobin (Hb is synthesized. Yet, the central macrophage, which retains high HO-1 activity, might be suitable to take over degradation of extra, harmful, Hb heme. Of these enzymatic products, only the hydrophobic gas molecule--CO can transfer from the macrophage to surrounding erythroblasts directly via their tightly attached membranes in the terminal differentiation stage.Based on the above, the study hypothesized CO to have a role in erythroid maturation. Thus, the effect of CO gas as a potential erythroid differentiation inducer on the common model for erythroid progenitors, K562 cells, was explored. Cells were kept under oxygen lacking environment to mimic BM conditions. Nitrogen anaerobic atmosphere (N₂A served as control for CO atmosphere (COA. Under both atmospheres cells proliferation ceased: in N₂A due to cell death, while in COA as a result of erythroid differentiation. Maturation was evaluated by increased glycophorin A expression and Hb concentration. Addition of 1%CO only to N₂A, was adequate for maintaining cell viability. Yet, the average Hb concentration was low as compared to COA. This was validated to be the outcome of diversified maturation stages of the progenitor's population.In fact, the above scenario mimics the in vivo EI conditions, where at any given moment only a minute portion of the progenitors proceeds into terminal differentiation. Hence, this model might provide a basis for further molecular investigations of the EI structure/function relationship.

  15. Quantitative trait locus and haplotype analyses of wild and crop-mimic traits in U.S. weedy rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mispan, Muhamad S; Zhang, Lihua; Feng, Jiuhuan; Gu, Xing-You

    2013-06-21

    Conspecific weeds retained characteristics from wild ancestors and also developed crop mimicries for adaptation and competitiveness. This research was conducted to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with the wild and crop-mimic traits and to determine haplotype variants for QTL-rich regions in U.S. weedy rice. An F2 population from the cross between a cultivated (EM93-1) and a U.S. weedy (US1) rice line was evaluated for six wild and eight crop-mimic traits in a greenhouse to identify the QTL. A core collection of 27 U.S. weedy red rice lines and 14 AA-genome wild rice lines were determined for the haplotype variants. A total of 49 QTL were identified, with 45 collocated as clusters on 14 genomic segments. The number of haplotypes across the 14 segments was lower in the weedy (6.1 ± 2.4) than in the wild (7.5 ± 1.8) rice sample. Both samples shared ~50% haplotypes (wild-like). The EM93-1-like haplotypes accounted for a greater proportion (30 ± 26%) of the haplotypes in the weedy than in the wild (7 ± 10%) rice. Based on haplotype patterns for the 14 QTL cluster regions, 26 of the 28 red rice lines were clustered into two groups corresponding to the black-hull awned and straw-hull awnless morphological types, respectively. The QTL analysis demonstrated that conspecific weed-crop differentiation involved many genomic segments with multiple loci regulating natural variation for adaptation and competitiveness. The haplotype analysis revealed that U.S. weedy rice retained large blocks of linkage disequilibrium for the multiple loci from the wild relatives and also incorporated haplotypes from cultivars.

  16. Towards a systematic assessment of assay interference: Identification of extensively tested compounds with high assay promiscuity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilberg Erik; Stumpfe Dagmar; Bajorath Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    A large-scale statistical analysis of hit rates of extensively assayed compounds is presented to provide a basis for a further assessment of assay interference potential and multi-target activities...

  17. Measuring Norfloxacin Binding to Trypsin Using a Fluorescence Quenching Assay in an Upper-Division, Integrated Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence quenching assays are often used to measure dissociation constants that quantify the binding affinity between small molecules and proteins. In an upper-division undergraduate laboratory course, where students work on projects using a guided inquiry-based approach, a binding titration experiment at physiological pH is performed to…

  18. Physiologic effects of dry needling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnie, Barbara; Dewitte, Vincent; Barbe, Tom; Timmermans, Frank; Delrue, Nicolas; Meeus, Mira

    2013-08-01

    During the past decades, worldwide clinical and scientific interest in dry needling (DN) therapy has grown exponentially. Various clinical effects have been credited to dry needling, but rigorous evidence about its potential physiological mechanisms of actions and effects is still lacking. Research identifying these exact mechanisms of dry needling action is sparse and studies performed in an acupuncture setting do not necessarily apply to DN. The studies of potential effects of DN are reviewed in reference to the different aspects involved in the pathophysiology of myofascial triggerpoints: the taut band, local ischemia and hypoxia, peripheral and central sensitization. This article aims to provide the physiotherapist with a greater understanding of the contemporary data available: what effects could be attributed to dry needling and what are their potential underlying mechanisms of action, and also indicate some directions at which future research could be aimed to fill current voids.

  19. CH2 - Lighting and Physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Altomonte

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains the designed performances of the new CH2 building in Melbourne, Australia. CH2 is an environmentally significant project that involves biomimicry of natural systems to produce indoor conditions that are conducive to user comfort, health and productivity. This paper focuses on lighting and physiology and examines the solutions chosen for artificial and natural lighting and the likely effects these will have on building occupants. The purpose of the paper is to critically comment on the adopted strategy and, cognisance of contemporary thinking in lighting design, to judge the effectiveness of this aspect of the project with a view to later verification and post-occupancy review. The paper concludes that CH2 is an exemplar of lighting innovation that provides valuable lessons to designers of office buildings, particularly in the Melbourne CSD.

  20. Comet assay on mice testicular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar

    2015-01-01

    for germ cell mutagens (Speit et al., 2009). The in vivo Comet assay is considered a useful tool for investigating germ cell genotoxicity. In the present study DNA strand breaks in testicular cells of mice were investigated. Different classes of chemicals were tested in order to evaluate the sensitivity...... of the comet assay in testicular cells. The chemicals included environmentally relevant substances such as Bisphenol A, PFOS and Tetrabrombisphenol A. Statistical power calculations will be presented to aid in the design of future Comet assay studies on testicular cells. Power curves were provided...... with different fold changes in % tail DNA, different number of cells scored and different number of gels (Hansen et al., 2014). An example is shown in Figure 1. A high throughput version of the Comet assay was used. Samples were scored with a fully automatic comet assay scoring system that provided faster...