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Sample records for assay chembio hiv

  1. Laboratory evaluation of the Chembio Dual Path Platform HIV-Syphilis Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille B. Kalou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Use of rapid diagnostic tests for HIV and syphilis has increased remarkably in the last decade. As new rapid diagnostic tests become available, there is a continuous need to assess their performance and operational characteristics prior to use in clinical settings.Objectives: In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Chembio Dual Path Platform (DPP® HIV–Syphilis Assay to accurately diagnose HIV, syphilis, and HIV/syphilis co-infection.Method: In 2013, 990 serum samples from the Georgia Public Health Laboratory in Atlanta, Georgia, United States were characterised for HIV and syphilis and used to evaluate the platform. HIV reference testing combined third-generation Enzyme Immunoassay and Western Blot, whereas reference testing for syphilis was conducted by the Treponema pallidum passive particle agglutination method and the TrepSure assay. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of the DPP assay on this panel by comparing results with the HIV and syphilis reference testing algorithms.Results: For HIV, sensitivity was 99.8% and specificity was 98.4%; for syphilis, sensitivity was 98.8% and specificity was 99.4%. Of the 348 co-infected sera, 344 (98.9% were detected accurately by the DPP assay, but 11 specimens had false-positive results (9 HIV and 2 syphilis due to weak reactivity.Conclusion: In this evaluation, the Chembio DPP HIV–Syphilis Assay had high sensitivity and specificity for detecting both HIV and treponemal antibodies. Our results indicate that this assay could have a significant impact on the simultaneous screening of HIV and syphilis using a single test device for high-risk populations or pregnant women needing timely care and treatment.

  2. Laboratory evaluation of the Chembio Dual Path Platform HIV-Syphilis Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Arnold; Watson, Amy; Jost, Heather; Clay, Stacy; Tun, Ye; Chen, Cheng; Karem, Kevin; Nkengasong, John N.; Ballard, Ronald; Parekh, Bharat

    2016-01-01

    Background Use of rapid diagnostic tests for HIV and syphilis has increased remarkably in the last decade. As new rapid diagnostic tests become available, there is a continuous need to assess their performance and operational characteristics prior to use in clinical settings. Objectives In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Chembio Dual Path Platform (DPP®) HIV–Syphilis Assay to accurately diagnose HIV, syphilis, and HIV/syphilis co-infection. Method In 2013, 990 serum samples from the Georgia Public Health Laboratory in Atlanta, Georgia, United States were characterised for HIV and syphilis and used to evaluate the platform. HIV reference testing combined third-generation Enzyme Immunoassay and Western Blot, whereas reference testing for syphilis was conducted by the Treponema pallidum passive particle agglutination method and the TrepSure assay. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of the DPP assay on this panel by comparing results with the HIV and syphilis reference testing algorithms. Results For HIV, sensitivity was 99.8% and specificity was 98.4%; for syphilis, sensitivity was 98.8% and specificity was 99.4%. Of the 348 co-infected sera, 344 (98.9%) were detected accurately by the DPP assay, but 11 specimens had false-positive results (9 HIV and 2 syphilis) due to weak reactivity. Conclusion In this evaluation, the Chembio DPP HIV–Syphilis Assay had high sensitivity and specificity for detecting both HIV and treponemal antibodies. Our results indicate that this assay could have a significant impact on the simultaneous screening of HIV and syphilis using a single test device for high-risk populations or pregnant women needing timely care and treatment. PMID:28879115

  3. Sero – prevalence of Human Immunodeficency Virus (HIV) infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 281 samples were tested serologically by the serial algorithm method using three standard kits namely Abbott Determine HIV1/2, the Chembio HIV1/2 STATPAK assay and the Trinity Biotech UniGold HIV tests. Results indicated that 24(12.1%) were infected with HIV. The percentage prevalence by educational ...

  4. Evaluation of simple rapid HIV assays and development of national rapid HIV test algorithms in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

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    Mbwana Judica

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suitable algorithms based on a combination of two or more simple rapid HIV assays have been shown to have a diagnostic accuracy comparable to double enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA or double ELISA with Western Blot strategies. The aims of this study were to evaluate the performance of five simple rapid HIV assays using whole blood samples from HIV-infected patients, pregnant women, voluntary counseling and testing attendees and blood donors, and to formulate an alternative confirmatory strategy based on rapid HIV testing algorithms suitable for use in Tanzania. Methods Five rapid HIV assays: Determine™ HIV-1/2 (Inverness Medical, SD Bioline HIV 1/2 3.0 (Standard Diagnostics Inc., First Response HIV Card 1–2.0 (PMC Medical India Pvt Ltd, HIV1/2 Stat-Pak Dipstick (Chembio Diagnostic System, Inc and Uni-Gold™ HIV-1/2 (Trinity Biotech were evaluated between June and September 2006 using 1433 whole blood samples from hospital patients, pregnant women, voluntary counseling and testing attendees and blood donors. All samples that were reactive on all or any of the five rapid assays and 10% of non-reactive samples were tested on a confirmatory Inno-Lia HIV I/II immunoblot assay (Immunogenetics. Results Three hundred and ninety samples were confirmed HIV-1 antibody positive, while 1043 were HIV negative. The sensitivity at initial testing of Determine, SD Bioline and Uni-Gold™ was 100% (95% CI; 99.1–100 while First Response and Stat-Pak had sensitivity of 99.5% (95% CI; 98.2–99.9 and 97.7% (95% CI; 95.7–98.9, respectively, which increased to 100% (95% CI; 99.1–100 on repeat testing. The initial specificity of the Uni-Gold™ assay was 100% (95% CI; 99.6–100 while specificities were 99.6% (95% CI; 99–99.9, 99.4% (95% CI; 98.8–99.7, 99.6% (95% CI; 99–99.9 and 99.8% (95% CI; 99.3–99.9 for Determine, SD Bioline, First Response and Stat-Pak assays, respectively. There was no any sample which was

  5. A European multicientre study on the comparison of HIV-1 viral loads between VERIS HIV-1 Assay and Roche COBAS® TAQMAN® HIV-1 test, Abbott RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and Siemens VERSANT HIV-1 Assay.

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    Braun, Patrick; Delgado, Rafael; Drago, Monica; Fanti, Diana; Fleury, Hervé; Hofmann, Jörg; Izopet, Jacques; Kühn, Sebastian; Lombardi, Alessandra; Mancon, Alessandro; Marcos, Mª Angeles; Mileto, Davide; Sauné, Karine; O'Shea, Siobhan; Pérez-Rivilla, Alfredo; Ramble, John; Trimoulet, Pascale; Vila, Jordi; Whittaker, Duncan; Artus, Alain; Rhodes, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Viral load monitoring is essential for patients under treatment for HIV. Beckman Coulter has developed the VERIS HIV-1 Assay for use on the novel, automated DxN VERIS Molecular Diagnostics System. ¥ OBJECTIVES: Evaluation of the clinical performance of the new quantitative VERIS HIV-1 Assay at multiple EU laboratories. Method comparison with the VERIS HIV-1 Assay was performed with 415 specimens at 5 sites tested with COBAS ® AmpliPrep/COBAS ® TaqMan ® HIV-1 Test, v2.0, 169 specimens at 3 sites tested with RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and 202 specimens from 2 sites tested with VERSANT HIV-1 Assay. Patient monitoring sample results from 4 sites were also compared. Bland-Altman analysis showed the average bias between VERIS HIV-1 Assay and COBAS HIV-1 Test, RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and VERSANT HIV-1 Assay to be 0.28, 0.39, and 0.61 log 10 cp/mL, respectively. Bias at low end levels below 1000cp/mL showed predicted bias to be HIV-1 Assay versus COBAS HIV-1 Test and RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and HIV-1 Assay. Analysis on 174 specimens tested with the 0.175mL volume VERIS HIV-1 Assay and COBAS HIV-1 Test showed average bias of 0.39 log 10 cp/mL. Patient monitoring results using VERIS HIV-1 Assay demonstrated similar viral load trends over time to all comparators. The VERIS HIV-1 Assay for use on the DxN VERIS System demonstrated comparable clinical performance to COBAS ® HIV-1 Test, RealTime HIV-1 Assay, and VERSANT HIV-1 Assay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Evaluation of Abbott Fourth Generation HIV Antigen and Antibody Assays.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hee Jung; Yoo, Kyeong Ha; Kim, Han Sung; Cho, Hyoun Chan

    2006-02-01

    In order to reduce the diagnostic window period between the time of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and serological diagnosis, new fourth generation screening assays which detect HIV p24 antigen and specific antibody simultaneously have been developed. In this study, we evaluated the performance of a new fourth generation assay. We compared a new fourth generation assay, Architect HIV Ag/Ab combo, with another fourth generation assay AxSYM HIV Ag/Ab combo and a third generation assay, AxSYM HIV 1/2 gO for their performance. The assays were evaluated using 3 HIV seroconversion panels, 305 sera of healthy subjects and 100 sera of patients with HBsAg or anti-HCV antibodies. Within-run and total coefficient variations of the three screening assays were analyzed for the evaluation of precision. Architect HIV Ag/Ab combo shortened the window period by 8.7+/-2.1 days relative to AxSYM HIV 1/2 gO and 2.0+/-2.0 days relative to AxSYM HIV Ag/Ab combo in seroconversion panels. Architect HIV Ag/Ab combo presented the best performance in precision among the three reagents; total CV for positive control was 3.6%, 9.6% and 4.6% for Architect HIV Ag/Ab combo, AxSYM HIV Ag/Ab combo and AxSYM HIV 1/2 gO, respectively. Specificities of three assays were not different in this study. HIV Ag/Ab combined assays reduced the diagnostic window as compared to the third generation screening assays, enabling an earlier diagnosis of HIV infection. A new fourth generation assay, Architect HIV Ag/Ab combo presents a better performance than AxSYM HIV Ag/Ab combo, showing improved seroconversion sensitivity and precision.

  7. Evaluation of the Determine™ fourth generation HIV rapid assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, Marieke; De Villiers, Johanna C; Mayaphi, Simnikiwe H

    2013-04-01

    Assays that detect p24 antigen reduce the diagnostic window period of HIV testing. Most point-of-care HIV assays have poor sensitivity to diagnose acute HIV infection as they only detect antibodies against HIV-1 and HIV-2 (HIV-1/2). This was a cross-sectional laboratory-based study that evaluated the performance of the Determine™ HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo fourth generation rapid strip - currently the only rapid assay that detects both HIV-1/2 antibodies and p24 antigen. A total of 79 serum specimens (29 positive for HIV antibodies only, 14 positive for HIV antibodies and p24 antigen, 20 HIV-negative, and 16 positive for p24 antigen only) were used for the evaluation. Results were compared with those from validated fourth generation HIV ELISAs. The Determine™ Combo rapid strips had a sensitivity of 90.7% and a specificity of 100% for the detection of HIV-1/2 antibodies. Its sensitivity for the detection of p24 antigen was only 10% (3 out of 30 p24 antigen positive specimens). This implies that most acute HIV infections will be missed with this assay. The need for a point-of-care assay which can detect acute HIV infection reliably still remains, particularly for use in a high prevalence setting such as South Africa. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Multicenter evaluation of a new 4th generation HIV screening assay Elecsys HIV combi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, B; Orazi, B; Raineri, A; Thorstensson, R; Bürgisser, P; Mühlbacher, A; Areal, C; Eiras, A; Villaescusa, R; Camacho, R; Diogo, I; Roth, H J; Zahn, I; Bartel, J; Bossi, V; Piro, F; Atamasirikul, K; Permpikul, P; Webber, L; Singh, S

    2006-01-01

    Fourth-generation screening assays which permit a simultaneous detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen and antibody reduce the diagnostic window on average by four days in comparison to third-generation antibody assays. Recently, the new automated Elecsys HIV combi was compared in a multicenter study to alternative fourth- and third-generation assays, p24 antigen test and HIV-1 RNA RT-PCR. A total of 104 serocon-version panels, samples of the acute phase of infection after seroconversion (n = 33), anti-HIV-1 positive specimens (n = 572) from patients in different stages of the disease, 535 subtyped samples from different geographical locations, including group M (subtypes A-J) and group O, anti-HIV-2 positive sera (n = 364), dilutions of cell culture supernatants (n = 60) infected with different HIV-1 subtypes, selected performance panels, 8406 unselected samples from blood donors originating from different blood transfusion centers, 3810 unselected sera from daily routine and from hospitalized patients, 9927 unselected samples from South Africa and 1943 potentially interfering samples were tested with the Elecsys HIV combi. Elecsys HIV combi showed a comparable sensitivity to HIV-1 Ag stand-alone assays for early detection of HIV infection in seroconversion panels. The mean time delay of Elecsys HIV combi (last negative sample + 1 day) in comparison to HIV-1 RT-PCR for 92 panels tested with both methods was 3.23 days. The diagnostic window was reduced with Elecsys HIV combi between 1.56 and 5.32 days in comparison to third-generation assays. The specificity of Elecsys HIV combi in blood donors was 99.80% after repeated testing. Our results show that a fourth-generation assay with improved specificity and sensitivity like the Elecsys HIV combi is suitable for blood donor screening due to its low number of false positives and since it detects HIV p24 antigen with a comparable sensitivity to single antigen assays.

  9. Rapid Assay for Simultaneous Detection and Differentiation of Immunoglobulin G Antibodies to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Group M, HIV-1 Group O, and HIV-2

    OpenAIRE

    Vallari, Ana S.; Hickman, Robert K.; Hackett, John R.; Brennan, Catherine A.; Varitek, Vincent A.; Devare, Sushil G.

    1998-01-01

    A rapid immunodiagnostic test that detects and discriminates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections on the basis of viral type, HIV type 1 (HIV-1) group M, HIV-1 group O, or HIV-2, was developed. The rapid assay for the detection of HIV (HIV rapid assay) was designed as an instrument-free chromatographic immunoassay that detects immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to HIV. To assess the performance of the HIV rapid assay, 470 HIV-positive plasma samples were tested by PCR and/or Western b...

  10. Finger-stick whole blood HIV-1/-2 home-use tests are more sensitive than oral fluid-based in-home HIV tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Jaspard

    Full Text Available Several countries have recently recommended the expansion of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV antibody testing, including self-testing with rapid tests using oral fluid (OF. Several tests have been proposed for at-home use, but their diagnostic accuracy has not been fully evaluated.To evaluate the performance of 5 rapid diagnostic tests for the detection of anti-HIV-1/2 antibodies, with 4 testing OF and 1 testing whole blood.Prospective multi-center study in France. HIV-infected adults and HIV-uninfected controls were systematically screened with 5 at-home HIV tests using either OF or finger-stick blood (FSB specimens. Four OF tests (OraQuick Advance Rapid HIV-1/2, Chembio DPP HIV 1/2 Assay, test A, and test B and one FSB test (Chembio Sure Check HIV1/2 Assay were performed by trained health workers and compared with laboratory tests.In total, 179 HIV-infected patients (M/F sex ratio: 1.3 and 60 controls were included. Among the HIV-infected patients, 67.6% had an undetectable HIV viral load in their plasma due to antiretroviral therapy. Overall, the sensitivities of the OF tests were 87.2%, 88.3%, 58.9%, and 28% (for OraQuick, DPP, test A, and test B, respectively compared with 100% for the FSB test Sure Check (p50 copies/mL, reaching 94.8%, 96.5%, 90%, and 53.1% (for OraQuick, DPP, test A, and test B, respectively. The specificities of the four OF tests were 98.3%, 100%, 100%, and 87.5%, respectively, compared with 100% for the FSB test.An evaluation of candidates for HIV self-testing revealed unexpected differences in performance of the rapid tests: the FSB test showed a far greater reliability than OF tests.

  11. Identifying Recent HIV Infections: From Serological Assays to Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Sikhulile; Wilkinson, Eduan; Novitsky, Vladimir; Vandormael, Alain; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Essex, Max; Engelbrecht, Susan; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2015-10-23

    In this paper, we review serological and molecular based methods to identify HIV infection recency. The accurate identification of recent HIV infection continues to be an important research area and has implications for HIV prevention and treatment interventions. Longitudinal cohorts that follow HIV negative individuals over time are the current gold standard approach, but they are logistically challenging, time consuming and an expensive enterprise. Methods that utilize cross-sectional testing and biomarker information have become an affordable alternative to the longitudinal approach. These methods use well-characterized biological makers to differentiate between recent and established HIV infections. However, recent results have identified a number of limitations in serological based assays that are sensitive to the variability in immune responses modulated by HIV subtypes, viral load and antiretroviral therapy. Molecular methods that explore the dynamics between the timing of infection and viral evolution are now emerging as a promising approach. The combination of serological and molecular methods may provide a good solution to identify recent HIV infection in cross-sectional data. As part of this review, we present the advantages and limitations of serological and molecular based methods and their potential complementary role for the identification of HIV infection recency.

  12. Clinical performance of the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid test to correctly differentiate HIV-2 from HIV-1 infection in screening algorithms using third and fourth generation assays and to identify cross reactivity with the HIV-1 Western Blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eric M; Harb, Socorro; Dragavon, Joan; Coombs, Robert W

    2013-12-01

    An accurate and rapid serologic method to differentiate HIV-2 from HIV-1 infection is required since the confirmatory HIV-1 Western Blot (WB) may demonstrate cross-reactivity with HIV-2 antibodies. To evaluate the performance of the Bio-Rad Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid assay as a supplemental test to correctly identify HIV-2 infection and identify HIV-1 WB cross-reactivity with HIV-2 in clinical samples tested at an academic medical center. Between August 2008 and July 2012, clinical samples were screened for HIV using either 3rd- or 4th-generation HIV-1/2 antibody or combination antibody and HIV-1 p24 antigen assays, respectively. All repeatedly reactive samples were reflexed for Multispot rapid testing. Multispot HIV-2 and HIV-1 and HIV-2-reactive samples were further tested using an HIV-2 immunoblot assay and HIV-1 or HIV-2 RNA assays when possible. The HIV-1 WB was performed routinely for additional confirmation and to assess for HIV-2 antibody cross-reactivity. Of 46,061 samples screened, 890 (89.6%) of 993 repeatedly reactive samples were also Multispot-reactive: 882 for HIV-1; three for only HIV-2; and five for both HIV-1 and HIV-2. All three HIV-2-only Multispot-positives along with a single dually reactive HIV-1/2 Multispot-positive were also HIV-2 immunoblot-positive; the latter was HIV-1 RNA negative and HIV-2 RNA positive. The Multispot rapid test performed well as a supplemental test for HIV-1/2 diagnostic testing. Four new HIV-2 infections (0.45%) were identified from among 890 Multispot-reactive tests. The use of HIV-1 WB alone to confirm HIV-1/2 screening assays may underestimate the true prevalence of HIV-2 infection in the United States. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection of Individuals with Acute HIV-1 Infection using the ARCHITECT® HIV Ag/Ab Combo Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshleman, Susan H.; Khaki, Leila; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Johnson-Lewis, LeTanya; Husnik, Marla; Koblin, Beryl; Coates, Thomas; Chesney, Margaret; Vallari, Ana; Devare, Sushil G.; John Hackett, John

    2009-01-01

    Background We evaluated use of the ARCHITECT® HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay (HIV Combo; Abbott Diagnostics; available for sale outside of the U.S. only) for detection of acute HIV infection. Methods Samples were obtained from a behavioral intervention study (EXPLORE). HIV-uninfected men who have sex with men were enrolled and tested for HIV infection every 6 months. Samples from seroconverters collected at their last seronegative visit (n=217) were tested individually using two HIV RNA assays. Samples with detectable HIV RNA were classified as acute and were tested with HIV Combo. Samples from the enrollment visit (n=83) and the time of HIV seroconversion (n=219) were tested with HIV Combo as controls. Results Twenty-one (9.7%) samples from the last seronegative visit had detectable HIV RNA and were classified as acute. HIV Combo was positive for 13 (61.9%) of the acute samples. Samples not detected by HIV Combo had viral loads of 724 to 15,130 copies/ml. Expected results were obtained for positive and negative controls tested with HIV Combo. Conclusions HIV Combo detected nearly two-thirds of acute HIV infections identified in this high-risk population by non-pooled, HIV RNA assays. HIV Combo may be useful for high-throughput screening to identify individuals with acute HIV infection. PMID:19506484

  14. Identification of Acute HIV-1 Infection by Hologic Aptima HIV-1 RNA Qualitative Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Leigh Anne; Malia, Jennifer; Jagodzinski, Linda L.; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Oundo, Joseph; Lueer, Cornelia; Cham, Fatim; de Souza, Mark; Michael, Nelson L.; Robb, Merlin L.; Peel, Sheila A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Hologic Aptima HIV-1 Qualitative RNA assay was used in a rigorous screening approach designed to identify individuals at the earliest stage of HIV-1 infection for enrollment into subsequent studies of cellular and viral events in early infection (RV 217/Early Capture HIV Cohort [ECHO] study). Volunteers at high risk for HIV-1 infection were recruited from study sites in Thailand, Tanzania, Uganda, and Kenya with high HIV-1 prevalence rates among the populations examined. Small-volume blood samples were collected by finger stick at twice-weekly intervals and tested with the Aptima assay. Participants with reactive Aptima test results were contacted immediately for entry into a more comprehensive follow-up schedule with frequent blood draws. Evaluation of the Aptima test prior to use in this study showed a detection sensitivity of 5.5 copies/ml (50%), with all major HIV-1 subtypes detected. A total of 54,306 specimens from 1,112 volunteers were examined during the initial study period (August 2009 to November 2010); 27 individuals were identified as converting from uninfected to infected status. A sporadic reactive Aptima signal was observed in HIV-1-infected individuals under antiretroviral therapy. Occasional false-reactive Aptima results in uninfected individuals, or nonreactive results in HIV-1-infected individuals not on therapy, were observed and used to calculate assay sensitivity and specificity. The sensitivity and specificity of the Aptima assay were 99.03% and 99.23%, respectively; positive and negative predictive values were 92.01% and 99.91%, respectively. Conversion from HIV-1-uninfected to -infected status was rapid, with no evidence of a prolonged period of intermittent low-level viremia. PMID:28424253

  15. Evaluation of Xpert HIV-1 Qual assay for resolution of HIV-1 infection in samples with negative or indeterminate Geenius HIV-1/2 results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaeli, Michal; Wax, Marina; Gozlan, Yael; Rakovsky, Aviya; Mendelson, Ella; Mor, Orna

    2016-03-01

    Diagnosis of HIV infection is a multistage algorithm. Following screening with 4(th) generation combination immunoassay, confirmation of HIV infection is performed with an antibody assay that differentiates HIV-1 from HIV-2 infection. In the newly updated algorithm, samples that are nonreactive or indeterminate in the differentiation assay are to be tested with an HIV-1 nucleic acid amplification (NAAT) test for resolution. Xpert HIV-1 Qual is a new NAAT assay approved for the identification of HIV infection in whole and dried blood. To assess the performance of Xpert HIV-1 Qual supplementary assay in resolving the clinical status of serum samples reactive by 4(th) generation immunoassays and indeterminate or negative by Geenius HIV-1/2 confirmatory assay. In a retrospective study, samples from 97 individuals for whom the true HIV-1 status was already known (by follow-up samples) and which were negative or indeterminate by HIV-1/2 Geenius assay were tested with Xpert Qual HIV-1 assay. Xpert Qual assay correctly classified all 97 samples from HIV-1 positive (n=49) and negative (n=48) individuals. The sensitivity and specificity of Xpert Qual when using the true HIV status as a reference were 100% (92.7-100% at 95% confidence interval [CI] and 92.6-100% at 95% CI, respectively). Applying Xpert Qual HIV-1 assay in the new HIV multi-stage diagnostic algorithm correctly classified 100% of HIV-1 infections including 49 from HIV-1 carriers who have not yet seroconverted. With this assay the total time required for acute HIV diagnosis could be significantly reduced. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Performance of a Fourth-Generation HIV Screening Assay and an Alternative HIV Diagnostic Testing Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Muazzam; Wesolowski, Laura G.; Meyer, William A.; Owen, S. Michele; Masciotra, Silvina; Vorwald, Craig; Becker, William J.; Branson, Bernard M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the performance of the GS fourth-generation antigen/antibody assay and compared CDC’s proposed alternative algorithm (repeatedly reactive [RR] fourth-generation immunoassay [IA] followed by an HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation IA and, if needed, nucleic acid testing [NAT]) with the current algorithm (RR third-generation IA followed by HIV-1 Western blot [WB]). Design A convenience sample of the following four specimen sets was acquired: 10,014 from insurance applicants, 493 known WB-positive, 20 known WB-indeterminate specimens, and 230 specimens from 26 HIV-1 seroconverters. Methods Specimens were tested with the GS third- and fourth-generation IAs, the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation IA, NAT, and WB. We applied the two algorithms using these results. Results Among insurance specimens, 13 (0.13%) specimens were IA RR: 2 were HIV-positive (RR by third- and fourth-generation IAs, and WB and Multispot positive); 2 third-generation RR and 9 fourth-generation RR specimens were false-positive. Third- and fourth-generation specificities were 99.98% (95%CI: 99.93%–100%) and 99.91% (95%CI: 99.84%–99.96%) respectively. All HIV-1 WB-positive specimens were RR by third- and fourth-generation IAs. By Multispot, 491 (99.6%) were HIV-1 positive and 2 (0.4%) were HIV-2 positive. Only eight (40%) WB-indeterminate specimens were fourth-generation RR: 6 were Multispot and NAT negative and 2 were Multispot HIV-1 positive but NAT negative. The alternative algorithm correctly classified as positive 102 seroconverter specimens with the third-generation IA and 130 with the fourth-generation IA compared with 56 using the WB with either IA. Conclusions The alternative testing algorithm improved early infection sensitivity and identified HIV-2 infections. Two potential false-positive algorithm results occurred with WB-indeterminate specimens. PMID:23135170

  17. Genetic Variability of HIV-1 for Drug Resistance Assay Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana S. Clutter

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A hybridization-based point-of-care (POC assay for HIV-1 drug resistance would be useful in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs where resistance testing is not routinely available. The major obstacle in developing such an assay is the extreme genetic variability of HIV-1. We analyzed 27,203 reverse transcriptase (RT sequences from the Stanford HIV Drug Resistance Database originating from six LMIC regions. We characterized the variability in a 27-nucleotide window surrounding six clinically important drug resistance mutations (DRMs at positions 65, 103, 106, 181, 184, and 190. The number of distinct codons at each DRM position ranged from four at position 184 to 11 at position 190. Depending on the mutation, between 11 and 15 of the 24 flanking nucleotide positions were variable. Nonetheless, most flanking sequences differed from a core set of 10 flanking sequences by just one or two nucleotides. Flanking sequence variability was also lower in each LMIC region compared with overall variability in all regions. We also describe an online program that we developed to perform similar analyses for mutations at any position in RT, protease, or integrase.

  18. Performance evaluation of the ADVIA Centaur(®) HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumarola, Tomàs; Freeman, James; Saxton, Emeline; Dillon, Paul; Bal, Tricia; van Helden, Josef

    2010-12-01

    Early diagnosis of HIV infection and appropriate care reduces morbidity and mortality. As a result, recent guidelines recommend that HIV screening be routinely included in patient care. Routine screening will likely result in more patients being tested prior to seroconversion; fourth-generation assays can facilitate diagnosis in these patients. This study evaluated the performance of the automated fourth-generation ADVIA Centaur(®) HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay. Samples from three sites were tested using the HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay and a CE-marked predicate assay. The HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay's relative sensitivity was 98.36% (599/609; 95% confidence interval: 97.00-99.21%), and the relative specificity was 99.74% (7743/7763; 95% confidence interval: 99.60-99.84%). The HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay detected seroconversion at the same bleed or at least one bleed earlier in 34/37 panels compared to the CE-marked predicate assay. Compared to the final result, the HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay's sensitivity was 100% (598/598; 95% confidence interval: 99.39-100.00%), and the specificity was 99.74% (7753/7773; 95% confidence interval: 99.60-99.84%). Sensitivity was 100% for the HIV genotypes tested. The HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay is a sensitive and specific assay that can assist clinicians in the early diagnosis of HIV infection. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid assay for simultaneous detection and differentiation of immunoglobulin G antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M, HIV-1 group O, and HIV-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallari, A S; Hickman, R K; Hackett, J R; Brennan, C A; Varitek, V A; Devare, S G

    1998-12-01

    A rapid immunodiagnostic test that detects and discriminates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections on the basis of viral type, HIV type 1 (HIV-1) group M, HIV-1 group O, or HIV-2, was developed. The rapid assay for the detection of HIV (HIV rapid assay) was designed as an instrument-free chromatographic immunoassay that detects immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to HIV. To assess the performance of the HIV rapid assay, 470 HIV-positive plasma samples were tested by PCR and/or Western blotting to confirm the genotype of the infecting virus. These samples were infected with strains that represented a wide variety of HIV strains including HIV-1 group M (subtypes A through G), HIV-1 group O, and HIV-2 (subtypes A and B). The results showed that the HIV genotype identity established by the rapid assay reliably (469 of 470 samples) correlates with the HIV genotype identity established by PCR or Western blotting. A total of 879 plasma samples were tested for IgG to HIV by a licensed enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (470 HIV-positive samples and 409 HIV-negative samples). When they were tested by the rapid assay, 469 samples were positive and 410 were negative (99.88% agreement). Twelve seroconversion panels were tested by both the rapid assay and a licensed EIA. For nine panels identical results were obtained by the two assays. For the remaining three panels, the rapid assay was positive one bleed later in comparison to the bleed at which the EIA was positive. One hundred three urine samples, including 93 urine samples from HIV-seropositive individuals and 10 urine samples from seronegative individuals, were tested by the rapid assay. Ninety-one of the ninety-three urine samples from HIV-seropositive individuals were found to be positive by the rapid assay. There were no false-positive results (98.05% agreement). Virus in all urine samples tested were typed as HIV-1 group M. These results suggest that a rapid assay based on the detection of IgG specific for selected

  20. The Multispot rapid HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation assay is comparable with the Western blot and an immunofluorescence assay at confirming HIV infection in a prospective study in three regions of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandori, Mark W; Westheimer, Emily; Gay, Cindy; Moss, Nicholas; Fu, Jie; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B; Craw, Jason; Hall, Laura; Giancotti, Francesca R; Mak, Mae Ling; Madayag, Carmela; Tsoi, Benjamin; Louie, Brian; Patel, Pragna; Owen, S Michele; Peters, Philip J

    2013-12-01

    A new HIV diagnostic algorithm has been proposed which replaces the use of the HIV-1 Western blot and HIV-1 immunofluorescence assays (IFA) as the supplemental test with an HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody differentiation assay. To compare an FDA-approved HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody differentiation test (Multispot) as a confirmatory test with the HIV-1 Western blot and IFA. Participants were screened with an HIV-1/HIV-2 combination Antigen/Antibody (Ag/Ab) screening assay. Specimens with repeatedly reactive results were tested with Multispot and either Western blot or IFA. Specimens with discordant screening and confirmatory results were resolved with HIV-1 RNA testing. Individuals (37,876) were screened for HIV infection and 654 (1.7%) had a repeatedly reactive Ag/Ab assay result. On Multispot, 554 (84.7%) were HIV-1 reactive, 0 (0%) were HIV-2 reactive, 1 (0.2%) was reactive for both HIV-1 and HIV-2 (undifferentiated), 9 (1.4%) were HIV-1 indeterminate, and 90 (13.8%) were non-reactive. HIV-1 RNA was detected in 47/90 Multispot non-reactive (52.2%) specimens. Among specimens confirmed to have HIV infection (true positives), Multispot and Western blot detected HIV-1 antibody in a similar proportion of cases (93.7% vs. 94.4% respectively) while Multispot and IFA also detected HIV-1 antibody in a similar proportion of cases (84.5% vs. 83.4% respectively). In this study, Multispot confirmed HIV infections at a similar proportion to Western blot and IFA. Multispot, Western blot, and IFA, however, did not confirm all of the reactive Ag/Ab assay results and underscores the importance of HIV NAT testing to resolve discordant screening and confirmatory results. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Performance evaluation of a new fourth-generation HIV combination antigen-antibody assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlbacher, A; Schennach, H; van Helden, J; Hebell, T; Pantaleo, G; Bürgisser, P; Cellerai, C; Permpikul, P; Rodriguez, M I; Eiras, A; Alborino, F; Cunningham, P; Axelsson, M; Andersson, S; Wetlitzky, O; Kaiser, C; Möller, P; de Sousa, G

    2013-02-01

    Education and diagnostic tests capable of early detection represent our most effective means of preventing transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The importance of early detection is underlined by studies demonstrating increased life expectancy following early initiation of antiviral treatment. The Elecsys(®) HIV combi PT assay is a fourth-generation antigen-antibody combination assay developed to allow earlier detection of seroconversion, and to have increased sensitivity and improved specificity. We aimed to determine how early the assay could detect infection compared with existing assays; whether all HIV variants could be detected; and the assay's specificity using samples from blood donors, routine specimens, and patients with potential cross-reacting factors. Samples were identified as positive by the Elecsys(®) assay 4.9 days after a positive polymerase chain reaction result (as determined by the panel supplier), which was earlier than the 5.3-7.1 days observed with comparators. The analytical sensitivity of the Elecsys(®) HIV combi PT assay for the HIV-1 p24 antigen was 1.05 IU/mL, which compares favorably with the comparator assays. In addition, the Elecsys(®) assay identified all screened HIV subtypes and displayed greater sensitivity to HIV-2 homologous antigen and antibodies to HIV-1 E and O and HIV-2 than the other assays. Overall, the specificity of the Elecsys(®) assay was 99.88 % using samples from blood donors and 99.81 % when analyzing unselected samples. Potential cross-reacting factors did not interfere with assay performance. The Elecsys(®) HIV combi PT assay is a sensitive and specific assay that has been granted the CE mark according to Directive 2009/886/EC.

  2. Evaluation of the Bio-Rad Geenius HIV-1/2 test as a confirmatory assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesinos, Isabel; Eykmans, Joelle; Delforge, Marie-Luce

    2014-08-01

    We have evaluated the recently Conformité Européenne (CE)-marked Bio-Rad Geenius human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)1/2 as a rapid and simple alternative to western blot for confirmation of HIV screening results. A total of 160 serum samples were tested: 44 HIV-1 reactive samples by a fourth-generation Murex HIV Ag/Ab and/or Vidas HIV Duo Ultra, five HIV-2 reactive samples, 15 HIV-1 non-B subtype samples and 11 confirmed HIV-1 early seroconversion samples, 72 nonreactive samples, eight indeterminate samples by MP HIV BLOT 2.2 confirmed negative after follow-up and five low-reactive samples by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) negative by MP HIV BLOT 2.2. The samples were tested according to the manufacturer's guidelines. The overall sensitivity for Bio-Rad Geenius HIV1/2 assay was 92%. Five out of 11 early seroconversion samples were tested positive, four negative and two indeterminate. All HIV-1 non-B subtype samples were tested positive. Two out of the five HIV-2 reactive samples were tested positive HIV-2, two positive HIV-2 with HIV-1 cross-reaction and one HIV positive untypable. After excluding early seroconversion samples, the sensitivity of Bio-Rad Geenius HIV1/2 assay reached 100%. Overall specificity was 96%. All HIV negative serums by fourth-generation EIA were tested negative. All five low-reactive samples by EIA, negative by HIV BLOT 2.2 were tested negative by Bio-Rad Geenius HIV1/2. Two out of the eight indeterminate samples by MP HIV BLOT 2.2 that were confirmed negative after follow-up were tested indeterminate and one invalid, the other five were negative. After excluding these last 13 samples, the specificity of Bio-Rad Geenius HIV1/2 assay reached 100%. In comparison with MP HIV BLOT 2.2, the Bio-Rad Geenius HIV1/2 assay was markedly time saving, allowed full traceability, automatic reading and interpretation. The Bio-Rad Geenius HIV1/2 confirmatory system represents a reliable alternative to other confirmatory assays in HIV testing algorithms and

  3. Performance of a fourth-generation HIV screening assay and an alternative HIV diagnostic testing algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrullah, Muazzam; Wesolowski, Laura G; Meyer, William A; Owen, S Michele; Masciotra, Silvina; Vorwald, Craig; Becker, William J; Branson, Bernard M

    2013-03-13

    We evaluated the performance of the GS fourth-generation antigen/antibody assay and compared Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) proposed alternative algorithm [repeatedly reactive fourth-generation immunoassay followed by an HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation immunoassay and, if needed, nucleic acid test (NAT)] with the current algorithm (repeatedly reactive third-generation immunoassay followed by HIV-1 western blot). A convenience sample of the following four specimen sets was acquired: 10 014 from insurance applicants, 493 known western blot-positive, 20 known western blot-indeterminate specimens, and 230 specimens from 26 HIV-1 seroconverters. Specimens were tested with the GS third-generation and fourth-generation immunoassays, the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation immunoassay, NAT, and western blot. We applied the two algorithms using these results. Among insurance specimens, 13 (0.13%) specimens were immunoassay repeatedly reactive: two were HIV-positive (repeatedly reactive by third-generation and fourth-generation immunoassays, and western blot and Multispot positive); two third-generation repeatedly reactive and nine fourth-generation repeatedly reactive specimens were false-positive. Third-generation and fourth-generation specificities were 99.98% [95% confidence interval (CI) 99.93-100%] and 99.91% (95% CI 99.84-99.96%), respectively.All HIV-1 western blot-positive specimens were repeatedly reactive by third-generation and fourth-generation immunoassays. By Multispot, 491 (99.6%) were HIV-1-positive and two (0.4%) were HIV-2-positive.Only eight (40%) western blot-indeterminate specimens were fourth-generation repeatedly reactive: six were Multispot and NAT-negative and two were Multispot HIV-1-positive but NAT-negative.The alternative algorithm correctly classified as positive 102 seroconverter specimens with the third-generation immunoassay and 130 with the fourth-generation immunoassay compared with 56 using the western blot with

  4. HIV incidence in the Estonian population in 2013 determined using the HIV-1 limiting antigen avidity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soodla, P; Simmons, R; Huik, K; Pauskar, M; Jõgeda, E-L; Rajasaar, H; Kallaste, E; Maimets, M; Avi, R; Murphy, G; Porter, K; Lutsar, I

    2017-08-01

    Estonia has one the highest number of new HIV diagnoses in the European Union, mainly among injecting drug users and heterosexuals. Little is known of HIV incidence, which is crucial for limiting the epidemic. Using a recent HIV infection testing algorithm (RITA) assay, we aimed to estimate HIV incidence in 2013. All individuals aged ≥18 years newly-diagnosed with HIV in Estonia January- December 2013, except blood donors and those undergoing antenatal screening, were included. Demographic and clinical data were obtained from the Estonian Health Board and the Estonian HIV-positive patient database. Serum samples were tested for recent infection using the LAg-avidity EIA assay. HIV incidence was estimated based on previously published methods. Of 69,115 tested subjects, 286 (0.41%) were newly-diagnosed with HIV with median age of 33 years (IQR: 28-42) and 65% male. Self-reported routes of HIV transmission were mostly heterosexual contact (n = 157, 53%) and injecting drug use (n = 62, 21%); 64 (22%) were with unknown risk group. Eighty two (36%) were assigned recent, resulting in estimated HIV incidence of 0.06%, corresponding to 642 new infections in 2013 among the non-screened population. Incidence was highest (1.48%) among people who inject drugs. These high HIV incidence estimates in Estonia call for urgent action of renewed targeted public health promotion and HIV testing campaigns. © 2017 British HIV Association.

  5. Development and evaluation of HIV-1 subtype RNA panels for the standardization of HIV-1 NAT assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sherwin; Wood, Owen; Taffs, Rolf E; Hu, Jinjie; Machuca, Ana; Vallejo, Alejandro; Hewlett, Indira

    2006-11-01

    Multiple nucleic acid-based techniques (NAT) have been implemented for testing blood and plasma donors for HIV-1 RNA which may be detected at an earlier stage of infection when HIV antigen or antibody is absent or below the limit of detection of current assays. The available NAT assays are based on different technologies. In order to evaluate the performance of nucleic acid-based techniques (NAT assays) and to allow accurate comparisons of results from different assays, it is essential to have well characterized specimens with known copy numbers as a standard. For this purpose, a comprehensive study was conducted to develop two HIV-1 RNA reference panels. The first (Panel 1) was prepared using a single specimen from the HIV-1 group M subtype B and consists of panel members with a wide range of HIV-1 RNA copy numbers. Panel 2 consists of 26 members representing HIV-1 group M subtypes A, C, D, E, F, G and groups O and N. For accurate determination of HIV-1 RNA copy numbers of each member of Panel 2, they were analyzed using various testing platforms/technologies available through the cooperation of five independent laboratories participating in the study. A consensus value for HIV RNA copy number was assigned to each member of Panel 2 based on statistical analysis of the data provided by the participants. Both panels could serve as reference panels to be used by manufacturers of HIV NAT tests to evaluate the sensitivity limits of their assays.

  6. Confirmation of HIV seropositivity: comparison of a novel radioimmunoprecipitation assay to immunoblotting and virus culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tersmette, M.; Lelie, P. N.; van der Poel, C. L.; Wester, M. R.; de Goede, R. E.; Lange, J. M.; Miedema, F.; Huisman, J. G.

    1988-01-01

    A recently developed radioimmunoprecipitation assay, using 125I-labeled human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral proteins enriched for glycoproteins gp120env, gp41env (GRIPA), was compared to the immunoblot assay with respect to sensitivity and specificity for the detection of antibodies to HIV.

  7. Chem/bio sensing with non-classical light and integrated photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, J; Schwartz, M; Rengstl, U; Jetter, M; Michler, P; Mizaikoff, B

    2018-01-29

    Modern quantum technology currently experiences extensive advances in applicability in communications, cryptography, computing, metrology and lithography. Harnessing this technology platform for chem/bio sensing scenarios is an appealing opportunity enabling ultra-sensitive detection schemes. This is further facilliated by the progress in fabrication, miniaturization and integration of visible and infrared quantum photonics. Especially, the combination of efficient single-photon sources together with waveguiding/sensing structures, serving as active optical transducer, as well as advanced detector materials is promising integrated quantum photonic chem/bio sensors. Besides the intrinsic molecular selectivity and non-destructive character of visible and infrared light based sensing schemes, chem/bio sensors taking advantage of non-classical light sources promise sensitivities beyond the standard quantum limit. In the present review, recent achievements towards on-chip chem/bio quantum photonic sensing platforms based on N00N states are discussed along with appropriate recognition chemistries, facilitating the detection of relevant (bio)analytes at ultra-trace concentration levels. After evaluating recent developments in this field, a perspective for a potentially promising sensor testbed is discussed for reaching integrated quantum sensing with two fiber-coupled GaAs chips together with semiconductor quantum dots serving as single-photon sources.

  8. Equivalence of ELISpot assays demonstrated between major HIV network laboratories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilbinder K Gill

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The Comprehensive T Cell Vaccine Immune Monitoring Consortium (CTC-VIMC was created to provide standardized immunogenicity monitoring services for HIV vaccine trials. The ex vivo interferon-gamma (IFN-γ ELISpot is used extensively as a primary immunogenicity assay to assess T cell-based vaccine candidates in trials for infectious diseases and cancer. Two independent, GCLP-accredited central laboratories of CTC-VIMC routinely use their own standard operating procedures (SOPs for ELISpot within two major networks of HIV vaccine trials. Studies are imperatively needed to assess the comparability of ELISpot measurements across laboratories to benefit optimal advancement of vaccine candidates.We describe an equivalence study of the two independently qualified IFN-g ELISpot SOPs. The study design, data collection and subsequent analysis were managed by independent statisticians to avoid subjectivity. The equivalence of both response rates and positivity calls to a given stimulus was assessed based on pre-specified acceptance criteria derived from a separate pilot study.Detection of positive responses was found to be equivalent between both laboratories. The 95% C.I. on the difference in response rates, for CMV (-1.5%, 1.5% and CEF (-0.4%, 7.8% responses, were both contained in the pre-specified equivalence margin of interval [-15%, 15%]. The lower bound of the 95% C.I. on the proportion of concordant positivity calls for CMV (97.2% and CEF (89.5% were both greater than the pre-specified margin of 70%. A third CTC-VIMC central laboratory already using one of the two SOPs also showed comparability when tested in a smaller sub-study.The described study procedure provides a prototypical example for the comparison of bioanalytical methods in HIV vaccine and other disease fields. This study also provides valuable and unprecedented information for future vaccine candidate evaluations on the comparison and pooling of ELISpot results generated by the CTC

  9. Minimal residual HIV viremia: verification of the Abbott Real-Time HIV-1 assay sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Amendola

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the HIV-1 infection, the increase in number of CD4 T lymphocytes and the viral load decline are the main indicators of the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy. On average, 85% of patients receiving effective treatment has a persistent suppression of plasma viral load below the detection limit (<50 copies/mL of clinically used viral load assays, regardless of treatment regimen in use. It is known, however, that, even when viremia is reduced below the sensitivity limit of current diagnostic assays, the virus persists in “reservoirs” and traces of free virions can be detected in plasma.There is a considerable interest to investigate the clinical significance of residual viremia. Advances in molecular diagnostics allows nowadays to couple a wide dynamic range to a high sensitivity.The Abbott Real-time HIV-1 test is linear from 40 to 107 copies/mL and provides, below 40 copies/mL, additional information such as “<40cp/mL, target detected” or “target not detected”. The HIV-1 detection is verified by the max-Ratio algorithm software.We assessed the test sensitivity when the qualitative response is considered as well. Methods: A ‘probit’ analysis was performed using dilutions of the HIV-1 RNA Working Reagent 1 for NAT assays (NIBSC code: 99/634, defined in IU/mL and different from that used by the manufacturer (VQA,Virology Quality Assurance Laboratory of the AIDS Clinical Trial Group for standardization and definition of performances.The sample input volume (0.6 mL was the same used in clinical routine. A total of 196 replicates at concentrations decreasing from 120 to 5 copies/mL, in three different sessions, have been tested.The ‘probit’ analysis (binomial dose-response model, 95% “hit-rate” has been carried out on the SAS 9.1.3 software package. Results: The sensitivity of the “<40cp/mL, target detected” response was equal to 28,76 copies/mL, with 95% confidence limits between 22,19 and 52,27 copies

  10. ARCHITECT HIV Combo Ag/Ab® and RealTime® HIV-1 assays detect diverse HIV strains in clinical specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Mary A; Vallari, Ana S; Yamaguchi, Julie; Holzmayer, Vera; Harris, Barbara; Toure-Kane, Coumba; M'Boup, Souleymane; Badreddine, Samar; McArthur, Carole; Ndembi, Nicaise; Mbanya, Dora Ngum; Kaptué, Lazare; Cloherty, Gavin

    2017-12-12

    Periodic evaluation of the impact of viral diversity on diagnostic tests is critical to ensure current technologies are keeping pace with viral evolution. To determine whether HIV diversity impacts the ARCHITECT HIV Combo Ag/Ab (HIV Combo) or RealTime HIV-1 (RT) assays, a set of N=199 HIV clinical specimens from Cameroon, Senegal, Saudi Arabia, and Thailand were sequenced and tested in both assays. The panel included historical Group N and P specimens and a newly identified Group N specimen. These and specimens classified as H, U/URF, CRF01, 02, 06, 09, 11, 13, 18, 22, 37, and 43 were detected by both the RT assay (1.75-6.84 log copies/ml) and the HIV Combo assay (3.26-1121.96 sample to cutoff ratios). Sequence alignment identified 3 or fewer mismatches to the RT assay oligos in 82.4% of samples. Altogether, these data demonstrate the HIV Combo and RT assays detect diverse strains of HIV in clinical specimens.

  11. Evaluation of four commercial virological assays for early infant HIV-1 diagnosis using dried blood specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Patricia; Prieto, Luis; Martín, Leticia; Obiang, Jacinta; Avedillo, Pedro; Vargas, Antonio; Rojo, Pablo; Fernández McPhee, Carolina; Sanz Canalejas, Leticia; Benito, Agustín; Ramos, José Tomás; Holguín, África

    2017-01-01

    Early infant diagnosis (EID) of HIV-1 is necessary to reduce HIV-related mortality. As maternal antibodies transferred across the placenta may persist up to 18 mo, commercial virological assays (CVAs) are needed. This study compares four CVAs for EID using dried blood specimens (DBS) from HIV-1-exposed infants. DBS from 68 infants born to HIV-1-infected women were collected from November 2012 to December 2013 in Equatorial Guinea. Four CVAs were performed: Siemens VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 1.0 kPCR assay, Roche CAP/CTM Quantitative Test v2.0, CAP/CTM Qualitative Tests v1.0 and v2.0. Definitive diagnosis was established following World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations. Two HIV-1-infected infants (2.9%) were detected by the four CVAs while 49 (72%) resulted negative. Discordant results were observed in 17 (25%) infants and HIV-1 infection was excluded in 14 patients when virological and serological testing was performed in additional DBS. Different false-positive rates HIV-1 were observed with Roche assays. CVAs using DBS were useful for EID, although discrepant results were common. Further research is required to reduce false-positive results that could result in wrong diagnosis and unneeded treatment. We propose caution with low viral load (VL) values when using VL assays. Clear guidelines are required for EID of HIV-exposed infants with discrepant virological results.

  12. Evaluation of the performance of the Abbott ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Pollyanna; Wesolowski, Laura; Patel, Pragna; Delaney, Kevin; Owen, S Michele

    2011-12-01

    Worldwide, many countries test for HIV infection using combination assays that simultaneously detect p24 antigen and HIV antibodies. One such assay, the ARCHITECT(®) HIV Ag/Ab Combo Assay (ARCHITECT), has recently been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the United States. To evaluate the performance of ARCHITECT on well-characterized specimens from four CDC-funded studies. We evaluated 3386 HIV-infected, 7551 HIV-uninfected, and 58 acute HIV infection (AHI) specimens. HIV-infected specimens were repeatedly reactive by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and Western blot (WB) or positive by nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT). HIV-uninfected specimens were EIA- and NAAT-negative. AHI specimens were seronegative or indeterminate (using antibody-based EIAs, rapid tests or WB) and NAAT-positive. All specimens were de-identified and sent to Abbott Diagnostics for testing with ARCHITECT. ARCHITECT test results were compared to original study characterizations and were used to assess overall sensitivity and specificity and also sensitivity for AHI. ARCHITECT false-positive specimens with sufficient quantity were retested. Based on results from the initial ARCHITECT test, sensitivity was 99.94% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 99.79, 99.99) and specificity was 98.78% (95% CI: 98.51-99.01). Repeat testing resulted in corrected specificity of 99.50% (95% CI: 99.31, 99.64). Also, 48 AHI specimens (83%) were detected by this screening assay. The sensitivity and specificity of the ARCHITECT combination assay are very high and most AHIs were detected by the assay. Use of Ag/Ab combination assays may improve the number of AHIs identified relative to existing FDA-approved HIV-antibody only based serologic assays, particularly in high incidence populations. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Performance evaluation of a new fourth-generation HIV Ag/Ab combination electrochemiluminescence immunoassay - evaluation of a new HIV assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Li, Dongdong; Yan, Kening; Yuan, Yu; Yang, Tingfu; Du, Xiaoqing; Yan, Xuedan; Tao, Chuanmin; Wang, Lanlan

    2014-03-01

    A new fourth-generation HIV Ag/Ab electrochemiluminescence immunoassay for screening of HIV infection, the Elecsys HIV Combi PT (Roche Diagnostics, Penzberg, Germany) assay, is going to be commercially available in clinical laboratories in China. This assay was evaluated and compared with two commonly used assays: Elecsys HIV Combi assay and the Livzon anti-HIV-1/2 ELISA. Commercially available panels and 30 established HIV infection samples were tested to evaluate the sensitivity. In addition, a total of 675 routine clinical samples were collected and tested in West China Hospital to compare the specificity. Any reactive result from a screening test was retested and all reactive retested samples were confirmed with Western blot assay, Elecsys HIV Ag test, Elecsys HIV Ag confirmatory test or HIV-1 RNA NAT testing. According to the results of the HIV seroconversion panels, the Elecsys HIV Combi PT could detect seroconversion at the same bleed or at least one bleed earlier compared to the other two assays. Among the 675 clinical samples, most results were consistent except for one specimen with a false-negative result using Elecsys HIV Combi assay. In conclusion, the Elecsys HIV Combi PT has shown satisfactory sensitivity and specificity to be a screening test for HIV infection.

  14. HIV Integration Site Analysis of Cellular Models of HIV Latency with a Probe-Enriched Next-Generation Sequencing Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunshine, Sara; Kirchner, Rory; Amr, Sami S; Mansur, Leandra; Shakhbatyan, Rimma; Kim, Michelle; Bosque, Alberto; Siliciano, Robert F; Planelles, Vicente; Hofmann, Oliver; Ho Sui, Shannan; Li, Jonathan Z

    2016-05-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is successful in the suppression of HIV but cannot target and eradicate the latent proviral reservoir. The location of retroviral integration into the human genome is thought to play a role in the clonal expansion of infected cells and HIV persistence. We developed a high-throughput targeted sequence capture assay that uses a pool of HIV-specific probes to enrich Illumina libraries prior to deep sequencing. Using an expanded clonal population of ACH-2 cells, we demonstrate that this sequence capture assay has an extremely low false-positive rate. This assay assessed four cellular models commonly used to study HIV latency and latency-reversing agents: ACH-2 cells, J-Lat cells, the Bcl-2-transduced primary CD4(+)model, and the cultured TCM(central memory) CD4(+)model. HIV integration site characteristics and genes were compared between these cellular models and to previously reported patient data sets. Across these cellular models, there were significant differences in integration site characteristics, including orientation relative to that of the host gene, the proportion of clonally expanded sites, and the proportion located within genic regions and exons. Despite a greater diversity of minority integration sites than expected in ACH-2 cells, their integration site characteristics consistently differed from those of the other models and from the patient samples. Gene ontology analysis of highly represented genes from the patient samples found little overlap with HIV-containing genes from the cell lines. These findings show that integration site differences exist among the commonly used cellular models of HIV latency and in comparison to integration sites found in patient samples. Despite the success of ART, currently there is no successful therapy to eradicate integrated proviruses. Cellular models of HIV latency are used to test the efficacy of latency-reversing agents, but it is unclear how well these models reflect HIV integration

  15. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. (a...

  16. Performances of fourth generation HIV antigen/antibody assays on filter paper for detection of early HIV infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kania, Dramane; Truong, Tam Nguyen; Montoya, Ana; Nagot, Nicolas; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    Point-of-care testing and diagnosis of HIV acute infections play important roles in preventing transmission, but HIV rapid diagnosis tests have poor capacity to detect early infections. Filter paper can be used for capillary blood collection and HIV testing using 4th generation immunoassays. Antigen/antibody combined immunoassays were evaluated for their capacity to identify early HIV infections using filter paper in comparison with rapid test. Thirty nine serum samples collected from HIV seroconverters were spotted onto filter paper and tested by the Roche Elecsys(®) HIV Combi PT test and the DiaSorin Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag assay. Fourth generation immunoassays identified 34 out of 39 HIV early infections using dried serum spot, whereas the Determine™ HIV-1/2 rapid test detected 24 out of 39 HIV positive serum (87.2% vs 61.5% respectively, p = 0.009). p24 antigen was detected by the Liaison XL in 19 dried serum samples (48.7%). In the group characterized by a negative western blot, 7 out of 8 (87.5%) and 6 out of 8 (75.0%) samples were found positive for HIV using the Elecsys and the Liaison XL, respectively. None of these eight samples classified in this group of early acute infections were found positive by the rapid test. Fourth generation Ag/Ab immunoassays performed on dried serum spot had good performance for HIV testing during the early phases of HIV infection. This method may be useful to detect HIV early infections in hard-to-reach populations and individuals living in remote areas before rapid tests become positive. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Reduction of the HIV seroconversion window period and false positive rate by using ADVIA Centaur HIV antigen/antibody combo assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyunghoon; Park, Hyung-Doo; Kang, Eun-Suk

    2013-11-01

    Early diagnosis of HIV infection reduces morbidity and mortality. Fourth-generation HIV detection assays are more sensitive because they can detect p24 antigen as well as anti-HIV antibodies. In this study, we evaluated the performance of a new fourth-generation ADVIA Centaur HIV antigen/antibody combo (CHIV) assay (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc., USA) for early detection of HIV infection and reduction of false positive rate. Four seroconversion panels were included. The third-generation ADVIA Centaur HIV 1/O/2 enhanced (EHIV) assay (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc., USA) and fourth-generation CHIV assay were used to test each panel for HIV infection. The presence of antigen was confirmed using HIV p24 antigen assay. To evaluate false-positivity and specificity, 54 HIV false-positive and HIV-negative serum samples from 100 hospitalized patients and 600 healthy subjects were included. COMPARED TO THE EHIV ASSAY, THE CHIV ASSAY HAD A SHORTER WINDOW FOR THREE OF THE SEROCONVERSION PANELS: a difference of 10 days and two bleeds in one panel, and 4 days and one bleed in the other two panels. Only 34 of the 54 (63%) samples known to yield false-positive results by EHIV assay had repeatedly yielded reactive results in the CHIV assay. One of the 600 healthy subjects had a false-positive result with the CHIV assay; thus, the specificity was 99.85% (699/700). CHIV accurately determined the reactive results for the HIV-confirmed serum samples from known HIV patients and Korea Food & Drug Administration (KFDA) panels. The new fourth-generation ADVIA Centaur HIV assay is a sensitive and specific assay that shortens the serological window period and allows early diagnosis of HIV infection.

  18. Use of the Abbott Architect HIV antigen/antibody assay in a low incidence population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubravac, Terry; Gahan, Thomas F; Pentella, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    With the availability of 4th generation HIV diagnostic tests which are capable of detecting acute infection, Iowa evaluated the 3rd and 4th generation HIV test and compared the performance of these products in a low incidence population. This study was conducted to evaluate the performance of an HIV antigen/antibody combination (4th generation) assay compared to an EIA 3rd generation assay. Over a 4 month period, 2037 specimens submitted for HIV screening were tested by Bio-Rad GS HIV-1/HIV-2 Plus O EIA and the Abbott Architect i1000SR HIV Ag/Ab Combo. The performance characteristics of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were determined. Of the 2037 specimens tested, there were 13 (0.64%) true positives detected. None of the positive specimens were from patients in the acute phase of infection. The Abbott antigen/antibody combo assay had a sensitivity, specificity, positive-predictive value and negative predictive value of 100%, 99.85%, 81.25%, and 100% respectively. The Bio-Rad EIA assay had a sensitivity, specificity, positive-predictive value and negative predictive value of 100%, 99.80%, 76.47% and 100%, respectively. The EIA had four false positive results which tested negative by the antigen/antibody assay and western blot. In a low-incidence state where early infections are less commonly encountered, the EIA assay and the antigen/antibody assay performed with near equivalency. The antigen/antibody assay had one less false positive result. While no patients were detected in the acute stage of infection, the use of the antigen/antibody assay presents the opportunity to detect an infected patient sooner and prevent transmission to others. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Validation of the Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay for screening and reliable early detection of HIV-1 infection in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chuan Min; Cho, Yunjung; Ng, Kee Peng; Han, Xiaoxu; Oh, Eun-Jee; Zainah, Saat; Rozainanee, Mohd Zain; Wang, Lan Lan

    2013-09-01

    The Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay was developed to allow earlier detection of HIV infection with increased sensitivity and specificity. To validate the assay for screening and reliable early detection of HIV-1 infection in Asia. Samples tested reflected those routinely screened in Asia and comprised: HIV-1 antigen lysate (25 samples) and antibody (20 samples) dilutions; seven HIV-1 seroconversion panels (46 samples); 39 patient samples from early infection; 183 known-positive sera; HIV-1 p24 antigen sensitivity panel (seven samples); >500 routine clinical samples per center. The Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay was compared with fourth- (ADVIA Centaur® HIV combo, ARCHITECT® HIV combo, Elecsys® HIV combi) and third-generation (VIRONOSTIKA® HIV Uni-Form II Plus O, Zhuhai Livzon Anti-HIV EIA, Serodia® Particle Agglutination) assays commonly used in the region. Overall, the Elecsys® HIV combi PT showed superior or similar sensitivity to the comparators for detecting all subtypes. The assay correctly identified all positive samples, including those taken soon after infection, and detected seroconversion at a similar or shorter time interval than the comparators. The analytical sensitivity of Elecsys® HIV combi PT for HIV-1 p24 antigen was 0.90 IU/mL, which was lower than reported previously. The assay showed good specificity (99.86%) that was superior or equivalent to the other fourth-generation assays tested. These robust data demonstrate the good subtype inclusivity of the Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay and its suitability for screening and reliable early detection of HIV infection in Asia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. ARCHITECT® HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay: correlation of HIV-1 p24 antigen sensitivity and RNA viral load using genetically diverse virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Catherine A; Yamaguchi, Julie; Vallari, Ana; Swanson, Priscilla; Hackett, John R

    2013-06-01

    HIV antigen/antibody (Ag/Ab) combination assays represent a significant advancement in assays used for diagnosing HIV infection based on their ability to detect acute and chronic infections. During acute HIV infection (AHI), detection depends on assay sensitivity for p24 Ag. To directly compare the Ag sensitivity of the ARCHITECT(®) HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay to RNA viral load using cell culture supernatants of virus isolates. HIV-1 isolates allow correlation in the total absence of an antibody response to infection and across genetically diverse HIV-1 group M strains. Thirty-five HIV-1 isolates comprising subtypes A-D, F and G, CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG, and unique recombinant forms were evaluated. Cell-free culture supernatant for each isolate was diluted to four levels and tested in the HIV Combo assay to determine a signal to cutoff ratio and the RealTime(®) HIV-1 assay to quantify RNA. The RNA copies/mL at the HIV Combo assay cutoff was determined. The median RNA copies/mL at the HIV Combo assay cutoff was 57,900 for individual virus isolates (range 26,440-102,400). A single plot of all the data gave a value of 58,500RNA copies/mL. An analysis of data published for acute HIV infection in human subjects gave a similar result; HIV Combo detected 97% of AHIs with RNA copies/mL > 30,700. Based on analysis of virus isolates, the ARCHITECT HIV Combo assay can detect p24 Ag when RNA is above approximately 58,000copies/mL. The correlation of viral load and Ag sensitivity was consistent across genetically diverse HIV-1 group M strains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Current and future assays for identifying recent HIV infections at the population level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoleń-Dzirba, Joanna; Wąsik, Tomasz J

    2011-05-01

    The precise diagnosis of recent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is crucial for estimating HIV incidence, defined as the number of new infections in a population, per person at risk, during a specified time period. Incidence assessment is considered to be a tool for surveillance, public health and research. Differentiating recent from long-term HIV infections is possible thanks to the evaluation of HIV-specific immune response development or viral markers measurement. Several methods that enable the recognition of recent HIV-1 infection with the use of a single blood specimen have been developed, and their value for use in population level studies has been demonstrated. However, they are still inadequate due to a variable window period and false recent rates among HIV clades and across populations. Application of these assays at an individual level is far more questionable because of person-to-person variability in the antibody response and the course of HIV infection, and because of the prospective regulatory approval requirements. In this article we review the principles and the limitations of the currently available major laboratory techniques that allow detection of recent HIV infection. The assays based on the alteration of serological parameters, as well as the newest method based on an increase of HIV genetic diversity with the progress of infection, are described.

  2. Fluorogenic Assay for Inhibitors of HIV-1 Protease with Sub-picomolar Affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Ian W.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2015-08-01

    A fluorogenic substrate for HIV-1 protease was designed and used as the basis for a hypersensitive assay. The substrate exhibits a kcat of 7.4 s-1, KM of 15 μM, and an increase in fluorescence intensity of 104-fold upon cleavage, thus providing sensitivity that is unmatched in a continuous assay of HIV-1 protease. These properties enabled the enzyme concentration in an activity assay to be reduced to 25 pM, which is close to the Kd value of the protease dimer. By fitting inhibition data to Morrison’s equation, Ki values of amprenavir, darunavir, and tipranavir were determined to be 135, 10, and 82 pM, respectively. This assay, which is capable of measuring Ki values as low as 0.25 pM, is well-suited for characterizing the next generation of HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

  3. Using Elecsys® HIV Combi PT assay to identify acute and early HIV infection in a teaching hospital of southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Siyuan; Li, Dongdong; An, Jingna; Chen, Qixia; Liu, Qianqian; Tao, Chuanmin

    2016-03-01

    This study is the first attempt to evaluate the use of the Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay in identifying acute and early HIV infection in southwest China. We also analyzed the extent of cutoff ratios overlap between false-positive and true-positive results to aid the identification of HIV infection, using samples from the West China Hospital in Chengdu, Sichuan Province from April 2012 to December 2013. Reactive results from a screening test were retested and all repeatedly reactive samples - if available - were confirmed with Western blot, HIV-1 p24 antigen, or HIV-1 RNA. Of 241,840 samples screened, the Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay identified 54 patients with acute and early HIV infection; 99.8% cases with cutoff index ratios ≥50 were proved to be true-positive HIV infection and 95.6% cases with cutoff index ratios HIV combi PT assay can identify acute and early HIV infection, including those who might have been missed by third-generation HIV screening assays and Western blot. However, cutoff index ratios HIV-1 nucleic acid test may be unaffordable, detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen can be an alternative strategy to diagnose HIV infection in individuals with a negative or indeterminate Western blot. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. HIV-1 viral load measurement in venous blood and fingerprick blood using Abbott RealTime HIV-1 DBS assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Pahalawatta, Vihanga; Frank, Andrea; Bagley, Zowie; Viana, Raquel; Lampinen, John; Leckie, Gregor; Huang, Shihai; Abravaya, Klara; Wallis, Carole L

    2017-07-01

    HIV RNA suppression is a key indicator for monitoring success of antiretroviral therapy. From a logistical perspective, viral load (VL) testing using Dried Blood Spots (DBS) is a promising alternative to plasma based VL testing in resource-limited settings. To evaluate the analytical and clinical performance of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay using a fully automated one-spot DBS sample protocol. Limit of detection (LOD), linearity, lower limit of quantitation (LLQ), upper limit of quantitation (ULQ), and precision were determined using serial dilutions of HIV-1 Virology Quality Assurance stock (VQA Rush University), or HIV-1-containing armored RNA, made in venous blood. To evaluate correlation, bias, and agreement, 497 HIV-1 positive adult clinical samples were collected from Ivory Coast, Uganda and South Africa. For each HIV-1 participant, DBS-fingerprick, DBS-venous and plasma sample results were compared. Correlation and bias values were obtained. The sensitivity and specificity were analyzed at a threshold of 1000 HIV-1 copies/mL generated using the standard plasma protocol. The Abbott HIV-1 DBS protocol had an LOD of 839 copies/mL, a linear range from 500 to 1×107 copies/mL, an LLQ of 839 copies/mL, a ULQ of 1×107 copies/mL, and an inter-assay SD of ≤0.30 log copies/mL for all tested levels within this range. With clinical samples, the correlation coefficient (r value) was 0.896 between DBS-fingerprick and plasma and 0.901 between DBS-venous and plasma, and the bias was -0.07 log copies/mL between DBS-fingerprick and plasma and -0.02 log copies/mL between DBS-venous and plasma. The sensitivity of DBS-fingerprick and DBS-venous was 93%, while the specificity of both DBS methods was 95%. The results demonstrated that the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay with DBS sample protocol is highly sensitive, specific and precise across a wide dynamic range and correlates well with plasma values. The Abbott RealTime HIV-1 assay with DBS sample protocol provides an

  5. Clinical application evaluation of two fourth-generation human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening assays in West China Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongming; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Tingting; Yan, Kening; Zhu, Siyuan; Yang, Tingfu; Luo, Lan; Tao, Chuanmin

    2015-03-01

    Fourth-generation human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening assays have been used in many laboratories. The Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay is a new kind of fourth-generation HIV screening assay developed to allow earlier detection of seroconversion. A total of 271,845 routine specimens were detected using the Elecsys® HIV combi assay and Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay from September 2010 to December 2012 in a large university hospital. Repeatedly, reactive screening samples were confirmed according to recommended confirmatory algorithms. The false-positive rate and positive predictive value (PPV) of two assays are 0.08 and 78.35%, respectively, for the Elecsys® HIV combi assay and 0.07 and 82.21% for the Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay. Ninety-four percent cases with cutoff index ratio false-positive. When we set the specificity as 95.0 and 99.0%, PPV could increase to 98.7, 99.6, 98.8, and 99.7%, and sensitivity reduced to 99.2, 98.4, 98.5, and 96.8% for the Elecsys® HIV combi assay and the Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay, respectively. The Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay shows a better performance in specificity than the Elecsys® HIV combi assay. Most weakly reactive results were false-positive, this means it still need to be improved and it will need laboratory personnel to communicate with the clinical doctor and patients more properly about the result of the assay. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Evaluation of supplemental testing with the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 Rapid Test and APTIMA HIV-1 RNA Qualitative Assay to resolve specimens with indeterminate or negative HIV-1 Western blots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linley, Laurie; Ethridge, Steven F; Oraka, Emeka; Owen, S Michele; Wesolowski, Laura G; Wroblewski, Kelly; Landgraf, Kenneth M; Parker, Monica M; Brinson, Myra; Branson, Bernard M

    2013-12-01

    The use of Western blot (WB) as a supplemental test after reactive sensitive initial assays can lead to inconclusive or misclassified HIV test results, delaying diagnosis. To determine the proportion of specimens reactive by immunoassay (IA) but indeterminate or negative by WB that could be resolved by alternative supplemental tests recommended under a new HIV diagnostic testing algorithm. Remnant HIV diagnostic specimens that were reactive on 3rd generation HIV-1/2 IA and either negative or indeterminate by HIV-1 WB from 11 health departments were tested with the Bio-Rad Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 Rapid Test (Multispot) and the Gen-Probe APTIMA HIV-1 RNA Qualitative Assay (APTIMA). According to the new testing algorithm, 512 (89.8%) specimens were HIV-negative, 55 (9.6%) were HIV-1 positive (including 19 [3.3%] that were acute HIV-1 and 9 [1.6%] that were positive for HIV-1 by Multispot but APTIMA-negative), 2 (0.4%) were HIV-2 positive, and 1 (0.2%) was HIV-positive, type undifferentiated. 47 (21.4%) of the 220 WB-indeterminate and 8 (2.3%) of the 350 WB-negative specimens were HIV-1 positive. Applying the new HIV diagnostic algorithm retrospectively to WB-negative and indeterminate specimens, the HIV infection status could be established for nearly all of the specimens. IA-reactive HIV-infected persons with WB-negative results had been previously misclassified as uninfected, and HIV diagnosis was delayed for those with WB-indeterminate specimens. These findings underscore the limitations of the WB to confirm HIV infection after reactive results from contemporary 3rd or 4th generation IAs that can detect HIV antibodies several weeks sooner than the WB. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Evaluation of a new fourth generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the LG HIV Ag-Ab Plus, with a combined HIV p24 antigen and anti-HIV-1/2/O screening test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Joon-Sup; Jun, Gyo; Chang, Young; Sohn, Mi-Jin; Yoo, Seungbum; Kim, Eunkyung; Ryu, Seung-Ho; Kang, Hee-Jung; Kim, Young-A; Ahn, Sun-Young; Cha, Je-Eun; Youn, Sung-Tae; Park, Jae-Won

    2006-11-01

    The LG HIV Ag-Ab Plus, a new fourth generation diagnostic assay for HIV infection, was evaluated in comparison to the Enzygnost HIV Integral, an established fourth generation HIV assay. The LG assay showed 100% sensitivity with 109 samples with anti-HIV-1, anti-HIV-2 or anti-HIV-1 group O reactivity. It also detected correctly all 51 positives on three BBI performance panels, slightly outperforming the Enzygnost HIV Integral, which detected 50. The specificity of the LG HIV Ag-Ab Plus was 99.9% with 999 sera from healthy blood donors, which was slightly inferior to the performance of the Enzygnost HIV Integral, which had 100% specificity. The LG assay showed 100% specificity with 81 specimens with underlying diseases including hepatitis B, demonstrating a low risk of cross-reactivity with other infections. The reduction of the diagnostic window by the LG HIV Ag-Ab Plus, compared to a third generation HIV assay, was 6.3 days. The LG assay also showed sufficiently high intra-person and inter-person reproducibility. The overall performance of this new fourth generation HIV assay was adequate for screening and diagnosis of HIV infection.

  8. A Lateral Flow Assay for Quantitative Detection of Amplified HIV-1 RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Rohrman, Brittany A.; Veronica Leautaud; Elizabeth Molyneux; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R

    2012-01-01

    Although the accessibility of HIV treatment in developing nations has increased dramatically over the past decade, viral load testing to monitor the response of patients receiving therapy is often unavailable. Existing viral load technologies are often too expensive or resource-intensive for poor settings, and there is no appropriate HIV viral load test currently available at the point-of-care in low resource settings. Here, we present a lateral flow assay that employs gold nanoparticle probe...

  9. A lateral flow assay for quantitative detection of amplified HIV-1 RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany A Rohrman

    Full Text Available Although the accessibility of HIV treatment in developing nations has increased dramatically over the past decade, viral load testing to monitor the response of patients receiving therapy is often unavailable. Existing viral load technologies are often too expensive or resource-intensive for poor settings, and there is no appropriate HIV viral load test currently available at the point-of-care in low resource settings. Here, we present a lateral flow assay that employs gold nanoparticle probes and gold enhancement solution to detect amplified HIV RNA quantitatively. Preliminary results show that, when coupled with nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA, this assay can detect concentrations of HIV RNA that match the clinically relevant range of viral loads found in HIV patients. The lateral flow test is inexpensive, simple and rapid to perform, and requires few resources. Our results suggest that the lateral flow assay may be integrated with amplification and sample preparation technologies to serve as an HIV viral load test for low-resource settings.

  10. A Lateral Flow Assay for Quantitative Detection of Amplified HIV-1 RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrman, Brittany A.; Leautaud, Veronica; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca R.

    2012-01-01

    Although the accessibility of HIV treatment in developing nations has increased dramatically over the past decade, viral load testing to monitor the response of patients receiving therapy is often unavailable. Existing viral load technologies are often too expensive or resource-intensive for poor settings, and there is no appropriate HIV viral load test currently available at the point-of-care in low resource settings. Here, we present a lateral flow assay that employs gold nanoparticle probes and gold enhancement solution to detect amplified HIV RNA quantitatively. Preliminary results show that, when coupled with nucleic acid sequence based amplification (NASBA), this assay can detect concentrations of HIV RNA that match the clinically relevant range of viral loads found in HIV patients. The lateral flow test is inexpensive, simple and rapid to perform, and requires few resources. Our results suggest that the lateral flow assay may be integrated with amplification and sample preparation technologies to serve as an HIV viral load test for low-resource settings. PMID:23029134

  11. An improved microtiter assay for evaluating anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies from sera or plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yunyun

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibody assay is widely used in AIDS vaccine research and other experimental and clinical studies. The vital dye staining method applied in the detection of anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibody has been used in many laboratories. However, the unknown factor(s in sera or plasma affected cell growth and caused protection when the tested sera or plasma was continuously maintained in cell culture. In addition, the poor solubility of neutral red in medium (such as RPMI-1640 also limited the use of this assay. Methods In this study, human T cell line C8166 was used as host cells, and 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT instead of neutral red was used as vital dye. In order to avoid the effect of the unknown factor(s, the tested sera or plasma was removed by a washout procedure after initial 3–6 h culture in the assay. Result This new assay eliminated the effect of the tested sera or plasma on cell growth, improved the reliability of detection of anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibody, and showed excellent agreement with the p24 antigen method. Conclusion The results suggest that the improved assay is relatively simple, highly duplicable, cost-effective, and well reliable for evaluating anti-HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies from sera or plasma.

  12. A CD3/CD28 microbead-based HIV-1 viral outgrowth assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmichev, Yury V; Veenhuis, Rebecca T; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W; Garliss, Caroline C; Walker-Sperling, Victoria Ek; Blankson, Joel N

    2017-04-01

    Latently infected resting CD4 T cells represent a major barrier to HIV-1 eradication efforts. The standard assays used for measuring this reservoir induce activation of resting CD4 T cells with either phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) with irradiated feeder cells, or with anti-CD3 antibodies. We designed a study to compare the sensitivity of a new assay (based on the stimulation of CD4 T cells with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 coated microbeads) with that of the traditional PHA- and feeder-based viral outgrowth assay. Resting CD4 T cells from 10 HIV-1-infected patients on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) regimens were cultured in the traditional PHA/feeders viral outgrowth assay and the new CD3/CD28 bead-based assay. Flow cytometry was used to assess the kinetics of activation of resting CD4 T cells in the two different assays. There was no significant difference in the sensitivity of the two assays. The median frequency of latently infected cells was 0.83 infectious units per million (IUPM) for the PHA/feeders assay and 0.54 IUPM with the CD3/CD28 bead-based assay. However, while virus was obtained from all 10 patients with the traditional PHA/feeders outgrowth assay, no virus was obtained from two of 10 patients with the novel anti-CD3/CD28 bead-based viral outgrowth assay (IUPM CD3/CD28 bead-based assay has comparable sensitivity to the PHA/feeders assay and does not require the addition of feeders, making it a simpler and less labour-intensive alternative to the standard PHA/feeders-based assay.

  13. Quality Control Assessment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 (HIV-2) Viral Load Quantification Assays: Results from an International Collaboration on HIV-2 Infection in 2006▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damond, Florence; Benard, Antoine; Ruelle, Jean; Alabi, Abraham; Kupfer, Bernd; Gomes, Perpetua; Rodes, Berta; Albert, Jan; Böni, Jürg; Garson, Jeremy; Ferns, Bridget; Matheron, Sophie; Chene, Geneviève; Brun-Vezinet, Françoise

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) RNA quantification assays used in nine laboratories of the ACHIEV2E (A Collaboration on HIV-2 Infection) study group were evaluated. In a blinded experimental design, laboratories quantified three series of aliquots of an HIV-2 subtype A strain, each at a different theoretical viral load. Quantification varied between laboratories, and international standardization of quantification assays is strongly needed. PMID:18434556

  14. Comparison of 4th-Generation HIV Antigen/Antibody Combination Assay With 3rd-Generation HIV Antibody Assays for the Occurrence of False-Positive and False-Negative Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumar, Alagarraju; Alatoom, Adnan; Burns, Susan; Ashmore, Jerry; Kim, Anne; Emerson, Brian; Bannister, Edward; Ansari, M Qasim

    2015-01-01

    To assess the false-positive and false-negative rates of a 4th-generation human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) assay, the Abbott ARCHITECT, vs 2 HIV 3rd-generation assays, the Siemens Centaur and the Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics Vitros. We examined 123 patient specimens. In the first phase of the study, we compared 99 specimens that had a positive screening result via the 3rd-generation Vitros assay (10 positive, 82 negative, and 7 indeterminate via confirmatory immunofluorescent assay [IFA]/Western blot [WB] testing). In the second phase, we assessed 24 HIV-1 RNA-positive (positive result via the nuclear acid amplification test [NAAT] and negative/indeterminate results via the WB test) specimens harboring acute HIV infection. The 4th-generation ARCHITECT assay yielded fewer false-positive results (n = 2) than the 3rd-generation Centaur (n = 9; P = .02) and Vitros (n = 82; P positive case had a false-negative result via the Centaur assay. When specimens from the 24 patients with acute HIV-1 infection were tested, the ARCHITECT assay yielded fewer false-negative results (n = 5) than the Centaur (n = 10) (P = .13) and the other 3rd-generation tests (n = 16) (P = .002). This study indicates that the 4th-generation ARCHITECT HIV assay yields fewer false-positive and false-negative results than the 3rd-generation HIV assays we tested. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP).

  15. A Novel Assay to Measure the Magnitude of the Inducible Viral Reservoir in HIV-infected Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Andrea Procopio

    2015-08-01

    Research in context: In this manuscript, we describe the development of a novel assay that measures the magnitude of the latent HIV reservoir, the main barrier to HIV eradication. This novel assay, termed TILDA for Tat/rev Induced Limiting Dilution Assay, requires only 10 ml of blood, does not necessitate extraction of viral nucleic acids, is highly reproducible, covers a wide dynamic range of reservoir sizes and can be completed in two days. As such, TILDA may represent an alternative to existing assays used to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing the size of the latent HIV reservoir.

  16. Service impact of a change in HIV-1 viral load quantification assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Tipple

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Due to discontinuation of the Siemens Versant HIV-1 RNA (bDNA assay in the UK, our laboratory switched to the Roche Cobas Ampliprep/Taqman HIV-1 viral load (VL assay (Roche in April 2013. This assay has a lower cut-off of 20 RNA copies/mL (compared with <50 for the Siemens assay. Our laboratory demonstrated previously that a significant proportion (18% of patients undetectable using bDNA HIV-1 RNA quantification exhibited low level viraemia (LLV using the new assay. Local guidelines recommend that patients stable on therapy receive twice-yearly VLs. We evaluated the impact of the introduction of the new assay on our clinical service. Methods: A retrospective cohort analysis of treated patients with stable undetectable VL by bDNA (<50 copies/mL followed by ≥ one low-level (<400 copies/mL VL with the Roche assay. Demographic data were collected in addition to frequency of VL testing and genotypic resistance assays. Referrals to virtual clinic (VC were recorded. Patients were identified using laboratory data and information collected from electronic patient records. Results were analyzed with SPSS v18. Results: One hundred and ninety patients were included. Demographics: 79.5% male; 60.6% homosexual; mean age of 46 years. Duration on stable treatment was 46.35 (std. dev. 38.15 months. Current treatment regimens were 43.3% PI-based; 43.3% NNRTI-based and 13.7% other. Patients were stratified into VL 20–49 copies/mL (n=109; VL 50–199 copies/mL (n=71 and VL 200–399 copies/mL (n=10. In total, there were 471 VLs measured of which 274 were additional as a result of the assay switch. This resulted in six HIV-1 genotype requests and 16 VC discussions (Table 1. Longer duration on HAART was associated with reduced frequency of VL testing. The relative risk of ongoing detectability according to drug class are: PI 1.62 (95% CI 1.18–2.21; NNRTI 0.507 (95% CI 0.30–0.85 and other 1.09 (95% CI 0.48–2.43. Conclusions: Changes in assay

  17. Validation and clinical use of a sensitive HIV-2 viral load assay that uses a whole virus internal control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styer, Linda M; Miller, Thomas T; Parker, Monica M

    2013-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) is distantly related to the more widespread HIV-1. Although HIV-2 infection is rare in the U.S., cases are concentrated in the Northeast. No FDA-approved HIV-2 viral load assays exist. A clinically validated laboratory-developed assay is currently available in the U.S., however it is not currently approved for use on New York State patients. To develop a sensitive viral load assay to quantify HIV-2 RNA in plasma and to validate it for clinical use. The real-time RT-PCR assay simultaneously amplifies HIV-2 and a whole virus internal control, added during the lysis step. Two extraction volumes can be used. Results are reported in HIV-2 RNA International Units (IU). The assay has a limit of detection of 7 IU/mL and a lower limit of quantification of 29 IU/mL. The assay detects multiple strains of HIV-2 group A and B and generates reproducible results. Samples exchanged with a comparator laboratory produced similar viral load results, with 74% of positives differing by loads (range: 1.63-5.14 log10 IU/mL), 10 (19%) were positive but not quantifiable, and 14 were negative. HIV-2 RNA was detected in at least one specimen from 19 of 25 (76%) individuals tested. We developed a sensitive and accurate HIV-2 viral load assay. Validation data indicate the assay is suitable for clinical use and its availability in New York State will improve clinical monitoring of HIV-2 infected patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Gold nanoparticles mediated colorimetric assay for HIV-Tat protein detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashwan, Saeed S. Ba; Ruslinda, A. Rahim; Fatin, M. F.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Thivina, V.; Tony, V. C. S.; Arshad, M. K. Md.; Hashim, U.

    2016-07-01

    Gold-nanoparticle (AuNP) based colorimetric assays have been formulated for different biomolecular interactions. With this assay the probe such as antibody immobilized on the Au surface and in the presence of appropriate binding partner (antigen), will interact with each other on the Au surface. By following this strategy, herein we formulated a detection system with two anti-HIV-Tat antibodies, Mono (McAb) - and polyclonal (PcAb) by immobilizing them independently with different AuNPs. Under this condition, these two antibodies are under dispersed condition, and in the presence of HIV-Tat antigen, these molecules will be connected and forms the aggregation of AuNPs. This strategy yield rapid results, can be monitored by the spectral changes in UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Experiments were performed with two different methods using two anti-HIV-Tats monoclonal and one Polyclonal antibody against the antigen HIV-Tat. Between these methods conjugation of HIV-Tat and McAb on the AuNP followed by addition of PcAb yielded better results.

  19. Assays for precise quantification of total (including short) and elongated HIV-1 transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Philipp; Joshi, Sunil K; Kim, Peggy; Li, Peilin; Liu, Hongbing; Rice, Andrew P; Wong, Joseph K; Yukl, Steven A

    2017-04-01

    Despite intensive study, it is unclear which mechanisms are responsible for latent HIV infection in vivo. One potential mechanism is inhibition of HIV transcriptional elongation, which results in short abortive transcripts containing the trans-activation response (TAR) region. Because the relative levels of total (including short) and processive transcripts provide measures of HIV transcriptional initiation and elongation, there is a compelling need for techniques that accurately measure both. Nonetheless, prior assays for total transcripts have been semi-quantitative and have seen limited application to patient samples. This manuscript reports the validation of quantitative reverse transcription (RT) droplet digital PCR assays for measurement of total (TAR) and processive (R-U5/gag) HIV transcripts. Traditional RT priming strategies can efficiently detect the TAR region on long HIV transcripts but detect 10-fold higher than elongated transcripts, implying a substantial block to transcriptional elongation in vivo. This approach may be applied to other difficult-to-prime RNA targets. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Evaluation of a rapid and simple fourth-generation HIV screening assay for qualitative detection of HIV p24 antigen and/or antibodies to HIV-1 and HIV-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beelaert, G; Fransen, K

    2010-09-01

    The performance was assessed of a new, rapid, visual and qualitative immunoassay for the detection of HIV p24 antigen (Ag) and antibodies (Ab) to HIV-1 and HIV-2. Characterised serum or plasma specimens from patients diagnosed with HIV infection were tested: 179 samples of known Ab-positive patients harbouring different subtypes of HIV-1 (n=154) and HIV-2 (n=25) and 200 samples from individuals not infected with HIV. The assay's Ag sensitivity was assessed by testing HIV seroconversion panels (n=10) and primary HIV infection specimens (n=57). In addition, the influence of the genetic variability of HIV-1 on Ag detection was evaluated using dilutions of culture supernatants infected with different subtypes (n=50). The performance of the rapid test was compared to a "gold standard" testing algorithm with the use of a single Ag ELISA and with the Vironostika((R)) HIV Uni-Form II Ag/Ab test, a fourth-generation ELISA. The new assay, the Determine HIV-1/2 Combo demonstrated 100% (98.2-100.0) Ab specificity (200/200) and 100% (98.0-100.0) Ab sensitivity (179/179). In these samples, the observed Ag sensitivity was 86.6% (58/67) with the Determine HIV-1/2 Combo test and 92.5% (62/67) with the Vironostika compared to the reference single Ag ELISA. The assay could not detect Ag in one group O, one subtype F and two subtype H cell supernatant isolates. None of the HIV-2 Ag could be detected. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Generation of HIV-1 and Internal Control Transcripts as Standards for an In-House Quantitative Competitive RT-PCR Assay to Determine HIV-1 Viral Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anny Armas Cayarga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 viral load is useful for monitoring disease progression in HIV-infected individuals. We generated RNA standards of HIV-1 and internal control (IC by in vitro transcription and evaluated its performance in a quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR assay. HIV-1 and IC standards were obtained at high RNA concentrations, without DNA contamination. When these transcripts were included as standards in a qRT-PCR assay, it was obtained a good accuracy (±0.5 log10 unit of the expected results in the quantification of the HIV-1 RNA international standard and controls. The lower limit detection achieved using these standards was 511.0 IU/mL. A high correlation (=0.925 was obtained between the in-house qRT-PCR assay and the NucliSens easyQ HIV-1 test (bioMerieux for HIV-1 RNA quantitation with clinical samples (=14. HIV-1 and IC RNA transcripts, generated in this study, proved to be useful as standards in an in-house qRT-PCR assay for determination of HIV-1 viral load.

  2. Performance evaluation of the Bio-Rad Laboratories GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA, a 4th generation HIV assay for the simultaneous detection of HIV p24 antigen and antibodies to HIV-1 (groups M and O) and HIV-2 in human serum or plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentsen, Christopher; McLaughlin, Lisa; Mitchell, Elizabeth; Ferrera, Carol; Liska, Sally; Myers, Robert; Peel, Sheila; Swenson, Paul; Gadelle, Stephane; Shriver, M Kathleen

    2011-12-01

    A multi-center study was conducted to evaluate the Bio-Rad GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA, a 4th generation HIV-1/HIV-2 assay for the simultaneous detection of HIV p24 antigen and antibodies to HIV-1 (groups M and O) and HIV-2 in human serum or plasma in adult and pediatric populations. The objectives of the study were to assess assay performance for the detection of acute HIV infections; sensitivity in known HIV positive samples; percent agreement with HIV status; specificity in low and high risk individuals of unknown HIV status; and to compare assay performance to a 3rd generation HIV assay. The evaluation included testing 9150 samples at four U.S. clinical trial sites, using three kit lots. Unlinked samples were from routine testing, repositories or purchased from vendors. GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA detection in samples from individuals in two separate populations with acute HIV infection was 95.2% (20/21) and 86.4% (38/44). Sensitivity was 100% (1603/1603) in known antibody positive [HIV-1 Groups M and O, and HIV-2] samples. HIV p24 antigen detection was 100% (53/53) in HIV-1 culture supernatants. HIV-1 seroconversion panel detection improved by a range of 0-20 days compared to a 3rd generation HIV test. Specificity was 99.9% (5989/5996) in low risk, 99.9% (959/960) in high risk and 100% (100/100) in pediatric populations. The GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA significantly reduced the diagnostic window when compared to the 3rd generation screening assay, enabling earlier diagnosis of HIV infection. The performance parameters of the Bio-Rad GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA are well suited for use in HIV diagnostic settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Repeat testing of low-level HIV-1 RNA: assay performance and implementation in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kirsten; Garner, Will; Wei, Lilian; Eron, Joseph J; Zhong, Lijie; Miller, Michael D; Martin, Hal; Plummer, Andrew; Tran-Muchowski, Cecilia; Lindstrom, Kim; Porter, James; Piontkowsky, David; Light, Angela; Reiske, Heinz; Quirk, Erin

    2018-02-08

    Assess the performance of HIV-1 RNA repeat testing of stored samples in cases of low-level viremia during clinical trials. Prospective and retrospective analysis of randomized clinical trial samples and reference standards. To evaluate assay variability of the Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HIV-1 Test, v2.0, three separate sources of samples were utilized: the World Health Organization (WHO) HIV reference standard (assayed using 50 independent measurements at six viral loads <200 copies/ml), retrospective analysis of four to six aliquots of plasma samples from four clinical trial participants, and prospective repeat testing of 120 samples from participants in randomized trials with low-level viremia. The TaqMan assay on the WHO HIV-1 RNA standards at viral loads <200 copies/ml performed within the expected variability according to assay specifications. However, standards with low viral loads of 36 and 18 copies/ml reported values of at least 50 copies/ml in 66 and 18% of tests, respectively. In participants treated with antiretrovirals who had unexpected viremia of 50-200 copies/ml after achieving <50 copies/ml, retesting of multiple aliquots of stored plasma found <50 copies/ml in nearly all cases upon retesting (14/15; 93%). Repeat testing was prospectively implemented in four clinical trials for all samples with virologic rebound of 50-200 copies/ml (n = 120 samples from 92 participants) from which 42% (50/120) had a retest result of less than 50 copies/ml and 58% (70/120) retested at least 50 copies/ml. The TaqMan HIV-1 RNA assay shows variability around 50 copies/ml that affects clinical trial results and may impact clinical practice. In participants with a history of viral load suppression, unexpected low-level viremia may be because of assay variability rather than low-drug adherence or true virologic failure. Retesting a stored aliquot of the same sample may differentiate between assay variability and virologic failure as the source

  4. International network for comparison of HIV neutralization assays: the NeutNet report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Fenyö

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neutralizing antibody assessments play a central role in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 vaccine development but it is unclear which assay, or combination of assays, will provide reliable measures of correlates of protection. To address this, an international collaboration (NeutNet involving 18 independent participants was organized to compare different assays. METHODS: Each laboratory evaluated four neutralizing reagents (TriMab, 447-52D, 4E10, sCD4 at a given range of concentrations against a panel of 11 viruses representing a wide range of genetic subtypes and phenotypes. A total of 16 different assays were compared. The assays utilized either uncloned virus produced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs (virus infectivity assays, VI assays, or their Env-pseudotyped (gp160 derivatives produced in 293T cells (PSV assays from molecular clones or uncloned virus. Target cells included PBMC and genetically-engineered cell lines in either a single- or multiple-cycle infection format. Infection was quantified by using a range of assay read-outs that included extracellular or intracellular p24 antigen detection, RNA quantification and luciferase and beta-galactosidase reporter gene expression. FINDINGS: PSV assays were generally more sensitive than VI assays, but there were important differences according to the virus and inhibitor used. For example, for TriMab, the mean IC50 was always lower in PSV than in VI assays. However, with 4E10 or sCD4 some viruses were neutralized with a lower IC50 in VI assays than in the PSV assays. Inter-laboratory concordance was slightly better for PSV than for VI assays with some viruses, but for other viruses agreement between laboratories was limited and depended on both the virus and the neutralizing reagent. CONCLUSIONS: The NeutNet project demonstrated clear differences in assay sensitivity that were dependent on both the neutralizing reagent and the virus. No single assay was

  5. A high throughput Cre–lox activated viral membrane fusion assay identifies pharmacological inhibitors of HIV entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, Anthony M. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Cheung, Pamela [Integrated Screening Core, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Swartz, Talia H.; Li, Hongru [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Tsibane, Tshidi [Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Durham, Natasha D. [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States); Basler, Christopher F. [Department of Microbiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Felsenfeld, Dan P. [Integrated Screening Core, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Chen, Benjamin K., E-mail: benjamin.chen@mssm.edu [Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Immunology Institute, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Enveloped virus entry occurs when viral and cellular membranes fuse releasing particle contents into the target cell. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry occurs by cell-free virus or virus transferred between infected and uninfected cells through structures called virological synapses. We developed a high-throughput cell-based assay to identify small molecule inhibitors of cell-free or virological synapse-mediated entry. An HIV clone carrying Cre recombinase as a Gag-internal gene fusion releases active Cre into cells upon viral entry activating a recombinatorial gene switch changing dsRed to GFP-expression. A screen of a 1998 known-biological profile small molecule library identified pharmacological HIV entry inhibitors that block both cell-free and cell-to-cell infection. Many top hits were noted as HIV inhibitors in prior studies, but not previously recognized as entry antagonists. Modest therapeutic indices for simvastatin and nigericin were observed in confirmatory HIV infection assays. This robust assay is adaptable to study HIV and heterologous viral pseudotypes. - Highlights: • Cre recombinase viral fusion assay screens cell-free or cell–cell entry inhibitors. • This Gag-iCre based assay is specific for the entry step of HIV replication. • Screened a library of known pharmacologic compounds for HIV fusion antagonists. • Many top hits were previously noted as HIV inhibitors, but here are classified as entry antagonists. Many top hits were previously noted as HIV inhibitors, but not as entry antagonists. • The assay is compatible with pseudotyping with HIV and heterologous viruses.

  6. HIV serological screening in a population of pregnant women in the Republic of Congo: suitability of different assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzone, Bianca; Bisio, Francesca; Ventura, Agostina; Nigro, Nicola; Miguel, Landry M; Mayinda Mboungou, Franck A; Nzagou, Abdon C; Mayembo, Patrice; Uberti, Filippo; De Maria, Andrea; Icardi, Giancarlo; Viscoli, Claudio

    2008-07-01

    Different strategies can be applied for the screening of HIV infection, depending on the local seroprevalence. Within a WHO type III strategy, we compared the results of two different second-line methods for HIV screening of a population of pregnant women in the Republic of Congo. Sera from 3614 consecutive pregnant women were tested for HIV with Genescreen Plus Ag/Ab EIA assay; positive specimens were retested with two different second-line methods. (Determine HIV-1/2 rapid test and Vironostika HIV Ag/Ab specific EIA assay). Discordant samples were tested with HIV-1/2 Western Blot and, if necessary, HIV RNA molecular assay. Of the 3614 sera, 221 were positive with Genscreen. Among them, 21 and 10 tested negative with Vironostika and Determine, respectively. A 100% correspondence with 3rd line confirmation test results was found in Genscreen positive/Vironostika negative samples, whereas a 5.5% overestimation of HIV seroprevalence was observed when Determine, instead of Vironostika, was used as second-line test. The choice of appropriate assays in adequate sequence, within the correct WHO strategy, is pivotal to minimize the risk of overtreatment of HIV infection.

  7. Comparative evaluation of the Bio-Rad Geenius HIV-1/2 Confirmatory Assay and the Bio-Rad Multispot HIV-1/2 Rapid Test as an alternative differentiation assay for CLSI M53 algorithm-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloch, L; Kadivar, K; Putz, J; Levett, P N; Tang, J; Hatchette, T F; Kadkhoda, K; Ng, D; Ho, J; Kim, J

    2013-12-01

    The CLSI-M53-A, Criteria for Laboratory Testing and Diagnosis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection; Approved Guideline includes an algorithm in which samples that are reactive on a 4th generation EIA screen proceed to a supplemental assay that is able to confirm and differentiate between antibodies to HIV-1 and HIV-2. The recently CE-marked Bio-Rad Geenius HIV-1/2 Confirmatory Assay was evaluated as an alternative to the FDA-approved Bio-Rad Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 Rapid Test which has been previously validated for use in this new algorithm. This study used reference samples submitted to the Canadian - NLHRS and samples from commercial sources. Data was tabulated in 2×2 tables for statistical analysis; sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, kappa and likelihood ratios. The overall performance of the Geenius and Multispot was very high; sensitivity (100%, 100%), specificity (96.3%, 99.1%), positive (45.3, 181) and negative (0, 0) likelihood ratios respectively, high kappa (0.96) and low bias index (0.0068). The ability to differentiate HIV-1 (99.2%, 100%) and HIV-2 (98.1%, 98.1%) Ab was also very high. The Bio-Rad Geenius HIV-1/2 Confirmatory Assay is a suitable alternative to the validated Multispot for use in the second stage of CLSI M53 algorithm-I. The Geenius has additional features including traceability and sample and cassette barcoding that improve the quality management/assurance of HIV testing. It is anticipated that the CLSI M53 guideline and assays such as the Geenius will reduce the number of indeterminate test results previously associated with the HIV-1 WB and improve the ability to differentiate HIV-2 infections. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of maraviroc, a CCR5 antagonist for treatment of HIV, using a novel tropism assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ryst, Elna; Heera, Jayvant; Demarest, James; Knirsch, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Assays to identify infectious organisms are critical for diagnosis and enabling the development of therapeutic agents. The demonstration that individuals with a 32-bp deletion within the CCR5 locus were resistant to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, while those heterozygous for the mutation progressed more slowly, led to the discovery of maraviroc (MVC), a CCR5 antagonist. As MVC is only active against CCR5-tropic strains of HIV, it was critical to develop a diagnostic assay to identify appropriate patients. Trofile™, a novel phenotypic tropism assay, was used to identify patients with CCR5-tropic virus for the MVC development program. Results of these clinical studies demonstrated that the assay correctly identified patients likely to respond to MVC. Over time, the performance characteristics of the phenotypic assay were enhanced, necessitating retesting of study samples. Genotypic tropism tests that have the potential to allow for local use and more rapid turnaround times are also being developed. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. Viral vectors for gene modification of plants as chem/bio sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manginell, Monica; Harper, Jason C.; Arango, Dulce C.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Dolan, Patricia L.

    2006-11-01

    Chemical or biological sensors that are specific, sensitive, and robust allowing intelligence gathering for verification of nuclear non-proliferation treaty compliance and detouring production of weapons of mass destruction are sorely needed. Although much progress has been made in the area of biosensors, improvements in sensor lifetime, robustness, and device packaging are required before these devices become widely used. Current chemical and biological detection and identification techniques require less-than-covert sample collection followed by transport to a laboratory for analysis. In addition to being expensive and time consuming, results can often be inconclusive due to compromised sample integrity during collection and transport. We report here a demonstration of a plant based sensor technology which utilizes mature and seedling plants as chemical sensors. One can envision genetically modifying native plants at a site of interest that can report the presence of specific toxins or chemicals. In this one year project we used a developed inducible expression system to show the feasibility of plant sensors. The vector was designed as a safe, non-infectious vector which could be used to invade, replicate, and introduce foreign genes into mature host plants that then allow the plant to sense chem/bio agents. The genes introduced through the vector included a reporter gene that encodes for green fluorescent protein (GFP) and a gene that encodes for a mammalian receptor that recognizes a chemical agent. Specifically, GFP was induced by the presence of 17-{beta}-Estradiol (estrogen). Detection of fluorescence indicated the presence of the target chemical agent. Since the sensor is a plant, costly device packaging development or manufacturing of the sensor were not required. Additionally, the biological recognition and reporting elements are maintained in a living, natural environment and therefore do not suffer from lifetime disadvantages typical of most biosensing

  10. A SERS-based lateral flow assay biosensor for highly sensitive detection of HIV-1 DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiuli; Cheng, Ziyi; Yu, Jimin; Choo, Priscilla; Chen, Lingxin; Choo, Jaebum

    2016-04-15

    User-friendly lateral flow (LF) strips have been extensively used for point-of-care (POC) self-diagnostics, but they have some limitations in their detection sensitivity and quantitative analysis because they only identify the high cut-off value of a biomarker by utilizing color changes that are detected with the naked eye. To resolve these problems associated with LF strips, we developed a novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based LF assay for the quantitative analysis of a specific biomarker in the low concentration range. Herein, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA was chosen as the specific biomarker. Raman reporter-labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were employed as SERS nano tags for targeting and detecting the HIV-1 DNA marker, as opposed to using bare AuNPs in LF strips. It was possible to quantitatively analyze HIV-1 DNA with high sensitivity by monitoring the characteristic Raman peak intensity of the DNA-conjugated AuNPs. Under optimized conditions, the detection limit of our SERS-based lateral flow assay was 0.24 pg/mL, which was at least 1000 times more sensitive compared to colorimetric or fluorescent detection methods. These results demonstrate the potential feasibility of the proposed SERS-based lateral flow assay to quantitatively detect a broad range of genetic diseases with high sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. International technology transfer of a GCLP-compliant HIV-1 neutralizing antibody assay for human clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A Ozaki

    Full Text Available The Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery/Comprehensive Antibody-Vaccine Immune Monitoring Consortium (CAVD/CA-VIMC assisted an international network of laboratories in transferring a validated assay used to judge HIV-1 vaccine immunogenicity in compliance with Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (GCLP with the goal of adding quality to the conduct of endpoint assays for Human Immunodeficiency Virus I (HIV-1 vaccine human clinical trials. Eight Regional Laboratories in the international setting (Regional Laboratories, many located in regions where the HIV-1 epidemic is most prominent, were selected to implement the standardized, GCLP-compliant Neutralizing Antibody Assay for HIV-1 in TZM-bl Cells (TZM-bl NAb Assay. Each laboratory was required to undergo initial training and implementation of the immunologic assay on-site and then perform partial assay re-validation, competency testing, and undergo formal external audits for GCLP compliance. Furthermore, using a newly established external proficiency testing program for the TZM-bl NAb Assay has allowed the Regional Laboratories to assess the comparability of assay results at their site with the results of neutralizing antibody assays performed around the world. As a result, several of the CAVD/CA-VIMC Regional Laboratories are now in the process of conducting or planning to conduct the GCLP-compliant TZM-bl NAb Assay as an indicator of vaccine immunogenicity for ongoing human clinical trials.

  12. Pregnancy does not affect HIV incidence test results obtained using the BED capture enzyme immunoassay or an antibody avidity assay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Laeyendecker, Oliver; Church, Jessica D; Oliver, Amy E; Mwatha, Anthony; Owen, S Michele; Donnell, Deborah; Brookmeyer, Ron; Musoke, Philippa; Jackson, J Brooks; Guay, Laura; Nakabiito, Clemesia; Quinn, Thomas C; Eshleman, Susan H

    2010-01-01

    .... We used the BED capture immunoassay (BED) and an antibody avidity assay to test longitudinal samples from 51 HIV-infected Ugandan women infected with subtype A, C, D and intersubtype recombinant HIV who were enrolled in the HIVNET 012 trial...

  13. Performance of the Xpert® HIV-1 Viral Load assay: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Madlen; Huddart, Sophie; Badar, Sayema; Baliga, Shrikala; Saravu, Kavitha; Pai, Madhukar

    2018-01-31

    Viral load (VL) is the preferred treatment monitoring approach for HIV-positive patients. However, more rapid, near-patient, and low-complexity assays are needed to scale-up VL testing. The Xpert HIV-1 VL assay (Cepheid, Sunnyvale) is a new, automated molecular test, and can leverage the GeneXpert systems that are being used widely for tuberculosis diagnosis. We systematically reviewed the evidence on the performance of this new tool in comparison to established reference standards. A total of twelve articles (thirteen studies) in which HIV patient VLs were compared between Xpert HIV VL assay and a reference standard VL assay were identified. Study quality was generally high but substantial variability was observed in the number and type of agreement measures reported. Correlation coefficients between Xpert and reference assays were high with a pooled Pearson correlation (n=8) of 0.94 [lsqb]0.89,0.97[rsqb] and Spearman correlation (n=3) of 0.96 [lsqb]0.86, 0.99[rsqb]. Bland-Altman metrics (n=11) were all within 0.35 log copies/mL of perfect agreement. Overall, Xpert HIV -1 VL performed well in comparison with current reference tests. The minimal training and infrastructure requirements for the Xpert HIV-1 VL assay make it attractive for use in resource constrained settings, where point-of-care VL testing is most needed. Copyright © 2018 Nash et al.

  14. A Mos1 transposase in vivo assay to screen new HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancian, Mariana; Loreto, Elgion L S

    2018-01-19

    The integrase and transposase enzymes of retrovirus and transposons, respectively, share the catalytic DDE domain. In vitro assays showed that inhibitors of HIV-1 integrase generally inhibit the mariner Mos1 transposase. Using a Drosophila strain in which the mobilisation of the mariner element can be quantified by mosaic eyes, we showed that flies maintained in medium containing 210 µM to 4 mM of raltegravir, or 1 or 2 mM of dolutegravir, which are HIV-1 integrase inhibitor used in AIDS treatment, have 23-33% less somatic mobilisation in mosaic eyes when treated with raltegravir and 28-32% when treated with dolutegravir. The gene expression of the mariner transposase gene, estimated by qPCR, is similar among treated and control flies. The results suggest that in vivo assays using Drosophila can be used as a primary screening of inhibitory drugs for transposase and retroviral integrase. The advantages of this assay are that it is easy, quick, cheap and is an in vivo test, meaning that the tested substance has to have been taken in by cells and has arrived at the target site, which is not the case when in vitro assays are applied.

  15. Ultra-Sensitive HIV-1 Latency Viral Outgrowth Assays Using Humanized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Schmitt

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the current quest for a complete cure for HIV/AIDS, highly sensitive HIV-1 latency detection methods are critical to verify full viral eradication. Until now, the in vitro quantitative viral outgrowth assays (qVOA have been the gold standard for assessing latent HIV-1 viral burden. However, these assays have been inadequate in detecting the presence of ultralow levels of latent virus in a number of patients who were initially thought to have been cured, but eventually showed viral rebound. In this context, new approaches utilizing in vivo mouse-based VOAs are promising. In the murine VOA (mVOA, large numbers of CD4+ T cells or PBMC from aviremic subjects are xenografted into immunodeficient NSG mice, whereas in the humanized mouse-based VOA (hmVOA patient CD4+ T cell samples are injected into BLT or hu-hematopoetic stem cells (hu-HSC humanized mice. While latent virus could be recovered in both of these systems, the hmVOA provides higher sensitivity than the mVOA using a fewer number of input cells. In contrast to the mVOA, the hmVOA provides a broader spectrum of highly susceptible HIV-1 target cells and enables newly engrafted cells to home into preformed human lymphoid organs where they can infect cells in situ after viral activation. Hu-mice also allow for both xenograft- and allograft-driven cell expansions with less severe GvH providing a longer time frame for potential viral outgrowth from cells with a delayed latent viral activation. Based on these advantages, the hmVOA has great potential in playing an important role in HIV-1 latency and cure research.

  16. Prevalence of Primary HIV Drug Resistance in Thailand Detected by Short Reverse Transcriptase Genotypic Resistance Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Pinsai, Subencha; Chantratita, Wasun; Pasomsub, Ekawat; Leechawengwongs, Manoon; Thipmontree, Wilawan; Siriyakorn, Nirada; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek

    2016-01-01

    HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) is the major cause of treatment failure after scaling up of antiretroviral therapy (ART). HIVDR testing prior to ART initiation is not routinely performed in resource-limited settings. We aimed to assess the prevalence of primary HIVDR by short reverse transcriptase (RT) genotypic resistance assay and evaluate of the impact of the mutations on the treatment outcomes. A prospective cohort study was conducted in treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients. Fourteen major mutations of codon 99-191 on the RT gene were selected (K103N, V106A/M, V108I, Q151M, Y181C/I, M184V/I, Y188C/L/H, and G190S/A) at a cost of testing of 35 USD. The association between the presence of primary HIVDR and undetectable HIV RNA (logistic regression, factors associated with undetectable HIV RNA after 6 months of ART were: having M184V/I (odds ratio [OR] 0.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.02-0.62, p = 0.013), condom use (OR 2.38; 95% CI 1.12-5.06, p = 0.024), and adherence per 5% increase (OR 1.16; 95% CI 1.00-1.35, p = 0.044). The prevalence of primary HIVDR is approximately 8%; it is associated with detectable HIV RNA at 6 months after ART initiation. Routine "short RT" genotypic resistance assay should be considered in resource-limited settings to maximize treatment outcome.

  17. International network for comparison of HIV neutralization assays: the NeutNet report II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo Heyndrickx

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neutralizing antibodies provide markers for vaccine-induced protective immunity in many viral infections. By analogy, HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies induced by immunization may well predict vaccine effectiveness. Assessment of neutralizing antibodies is therefore of primary importance, but is hampered by the fact that we do not know which assay(s can provide measures of protective immunity. An international collaboration (NeutNet involving 18 different laboratories previously compared different assays using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and soluble CD4 (Phase I study. METHODS: In the present study (Phase II, polyclonal reagents were evaluated by 13 laboratories. Each laboratory evaluated nine plasmas against an 8 virus panel representing different genetic subtypes and phenotypes. TriMab, a mixture of three mAbs, was used as a positive control allowing comparison of the results with Phase I in a total of nine different assays. The assays used either uncloned virus produced in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs (Virus Infectivity Assays, VIA, or Env (gp160-pseudotyped viruses (pseudoviruses, PSV produced in HEK293T cells from molecular clones or from uncloned virus. Target cells included PBMC and genetically engineered cell lines in either single- or multiple-cycle infection format. Infection was quantified by using a range of assay read-outs including extra- or intra-cellular p24 antigen detection, luciferase, beta-galactosidase or green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter gene expression. FINDINGS: Using TriMab, results of Phase I and Phase II were generally in agreement for six of the eight viruses tested and confirmed that the PSV assay is more sensitive than PBMC (p = 0.014. Comparisons with the polyclonal reagents showed that sensitivities were dependent on both virus and plasma. CONCLUSIONS: Here we further demonstrate clear differences in assay sensitivities that were dependent on both the neutralizing reagent and the virus

  18. A sensitive HIV-1 envelope induced fusion assay identifies fusion enhancement of thrombin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, De-Chun; Zhong, Guo-Cai; Su, Ju-Xiang [Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Liu, Yan-Hong [Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, 246 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Li, Yan; Wang, Jia-Ye [Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Hattori, Toshio [Department of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Division of Internal Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University, Sendai 9808574 (Japan); Ling, Hong, E-mail: lingh@ems.hrbmu.edu.cn [Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Department of Parasitology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Key Lab of Heilongjiang Province for Infection and Immunity, Key Lab of Heilongjiang Province Education Bureau for Etiology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Zhang, Feng-Min, E-mail: fengminzhang@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, 194 Xuefu Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Key Lab of Heilongjiang Province for Infection and Immunity, Key Lab of Heilongjiang Province Education Bureau for Etiology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China)

    2010-01-22

    To evaluate the interaction between HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) and target cell receptors, various cell-cell-fusion assays have been developed. In the present study, we established a novel fusion system. In this system, the expression of the sensitive reporter gene, firefly luciferase (FL) gene, in the target cells was used to evaluate cell fusion event. Simultaneously, constitutively expressed Renilla luciferase (RL) gene was used to monitor effector cell number and viability. FL gave a wider dynamic range than other known reporters and the introduction of RL made the assay accurate and reproducible. This system is especially beneficial for investigation of potential entry-influencing agents, for its power of ruling out the false inhibition or enhancement caused by the artificial cell-number variation. As a case study, we applied this fusion system to observe the effect of a serine protease, thrombin, on HIV Env-mediated cell-cell fusion and have found the fusion enhancement activity of thrombin over two R5-tropic HIV strains.

  19. Dual Testing Algorithm of BED-CEIA and AxSYM Avidity Index Assays Performs Best in Identifying Recent HIV Infection in a Sample of Rwandan Sex Workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braunstein, S.L.; Nash, D.; Kim, A.A.; Ford, K.; Mwambarangwe, L.; Ingabire, C.M.; Vyankandondera, J.; van de Wijgert, J.H.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    To assess the performance of BED-CEIA (BED) and AxSYM Avidity Index (Ax-AI) assays in estimating HIV incidence among female sex workers (FSW) in Kigali, Rwanda. Eight hundred FSW of unknown HIV status were HIV tested; HIV-positive women had BED and Ax-AI testing at baseline and ≥12 months later to

  20. Development and evaluation of an assay for HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase drug resistance genotyping of all major group-M subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aitken, S.C.; Kliphuis, A.; Wallis, C.L.; Chu, M.L.; Fillekes, Q.; Barth, R.; Stevens, W.B.; Rinke de Wit, T.F.; Schuurman, R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High cost and varying sensitivity for non-B HIV-1 subtypes limits application of current commercial kits for HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping of all major HIV-1 group-M subtypes. OBJECTIVES: Our research aimed to develop and validate an assay specific for all major HIV-1 group-M subtypes

  1. Ultrasensitive HIV-1 p24 Assay Detects Single Infected Cells and Differences in Reservoir Induction by Latency Reversal Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaes, Caroline Pereira Bittencourt; Bruel, Timothée; Decalf, Jérémie; David, Annie; Angin, Mathieu; Monceaux, Valerie; Muller-Trutwin, Michaela; Noel, Nicolas; Bourdic, Katia; Lambotte, Olivier; Albert, Matthew L; Duffy, Darragh; Schwartz, Olivier; Sáez-Cirión, Asier

    2017-03-15

    The existence of HIV reservoirs in infected individuals under combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) represents a major obstacle toward cure. Viral reservoirs are assessed by quantification of HIV nucleic acids, a method which does not discriminate between infectious and defective viruses, or by viral outgrowth assays, which require large numbers of cells and long-term cultures. Here, we used an ultrasensitive p24 digital assay, which we report to be 1,000-fold more sensitive than classical enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in the quantification of HIV-1 Gag p24 production in samples from HIV-infected individuals. Results from ultrasensitive p24 assays were compared to those from conventional viral RNA reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR)-based assays and from outgrowth assay readout by flow cytometry. Using serial dilutions and flow-based single-cell sorting, we show that viral proteins produced by a single infected cell can be detected by the ultrasensitive p24 assay. This unique sensitivity allowed the early (as soon as day 1 in 43% of cases) and more efficient detection and quantification of p24 in phytohemagglutinin-L (PHA)-stimulated CD4(+) T cells from individuals under effective cART. When seven different classes of latency reversal agents (LRA) in resting CD4(+) T cells from HIV-infected individuals were tested, the ultrasensitive p24 assay revealed differences in the extent of HIV reactivation. Of note, HIV RNA production was infrequently accompanied by p24 protein production (19%). Among the drugs tested, prostratin showed a superior capacity in inducing viral protein production. In summary, the ultrasensitive p24 assay allows the detection and quantification of p24 produced by single infected CD4(+) T cells and provides a unique tool to assess early reactivation of infectious virus from reservoirs in HIV-infected individuals.IMPORTANCE The persistence of HIV reservoirs in infected individuals under effective antiretroviral

  2. Pregnancy does not affect HIV incidence test results obtained using the BED capture enzyme immunoassay or an antibody avidity assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Laeyendecker

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Accurate incidence estimates are needed for surveillance of the HIV epidemic. HIV surveillance occurs at maternal-child health clinics, but it is not known if pregnancy affects HIV incidence testing.We used the BED capture immunoassay (BED and an antibody avidity assay to test longitudinal samples from 51 HIV-infected Ugandan women infected with subtype A, C, D and intersubtype recombinant HIV who were enrolled in the HIVNET 012 trial (37 baseline samples collected near the time of delivery and 135 follow-up samples collected 3, 4 or 5 years later. Nineteen of 51 women were also pregnant at the time of one or more of the follow-up visits. The BED assay was performed according to the manufacturer's instructions. The avidity assay was performed using a Genetic Systems HIV-1/HIV-2 + O EIA using 0.1M diethylamine as the chaotropic agent.During the HIVNET 012 follow-up study, there was no difference in normalized optical density values (OD-n obtained with the BED assay or in the avidity test results (% when women were pregnant (n = 20 results compared to those obtained when women were not pregnant (n = 115; for BED: p = 0.9, generalized estimating equations model; for avidity: p = 0.7, Wilcoxon rank sum. In addition, BED and avidity results were almost exactly the same in longitudinal samples from the 18 women who were pregnant at only one study visit during the follow-up study (p = 0.6, paired t-test.These results from 51 Ugandan women suggest that any changes in the antibody response to HIV infection that occur during pregnancy are not sufficient to alter results obtained with the BED and avidity assays. Confirmation with larger studies and with other HIV subtypes is needed.

  3. Pregnancy does not affect HIV incidence test results obtained using the BED capture enzyme immunoassay or an antibody avidity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laeyendecker, Oliver; Church, Jessica D; Oliver, Amy E; Mwatha, Anthony; Owen, S Michele; Donnell, Deborah; Brookmeyer, Ron; Musoke, Philippa; Jackson, J Brooks; Guay, Laura; Nakabiito, Clemesia; Quinn, Thomas C; Eshleman, Susan H

    2010-10-11

    Accurate incidence estimates are needed for surveillance of the HIV epidemic. HIV surveillance occurs at maternal-child health clinics, but it is not known if pregnancy affects HIV incidence testing. We used the BED capture immunoassay (BED) and an antibody avidity assay to test longitudinal samples from 51 HIV-infected Ugandan women infected with subtype A, C, D and intersubtype recombinant HIV who were enrolled in the HIVNET 012 trial (37 baseline samples collected near the time of delivery and 135 follow-up samples collected 3, 4 or 5 years later). Nineteen of 51 women were also pregnant at the time of one or more of the follow-up visits. The BED assay was performed according to the manufacturer's instructions. The avidity assay was performed using a Genetic Systems HIV-1/HIV-2 + O EIA using 0.1M diethylamine as the chaotropic agent. During the HIVNET 012 follow-up study, there was no difference in normalized optical density values (OD-n) obtained with the BED assay or in the avidity test results (%) when women were pregnant (n = 20 results) compared to those obtained when women were not pregnant (n = 115; for BED: p = 0.9, generalized estimating equations model; for avidity: p = 0.7, Wilcoxon rank sum). In addition, BED and avidity results were almost exactly the same in longitudinal samples from the 18 women who were pregnant at only one study visit during the follow-up study (p = 0.6, paired t-test). These results from 51 Ugandan women suggest that any changes in the antibody response to HIV infection that occur during pregnancy are not sufficient to alter results obtained with the BED and avidity assays. Confirmation with larger studies and with other HIV subtypes is needed.

  4. Early infant diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in Luanda, Angola, using a new DNA PCR assay and dried blood spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Francisco; Palladino, Claudia; Mateus, Rita; Bolzan, Anna; Gomes, Perpétua; Brito, José; Carvalho, Ana Patrícia; Cardoso, Yolanda; Domingos, Cristovão; Lôa Clemente, Vanda Sofia; Taveira, Nuno

    2017-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment reduces HIV-1-related mortality, morbidity and size of viral reservoirs in infants infected perinatally. Commercial molecular tests enable the early diagnosis of infection in infants but the high cost and low sensitivity with dried blood spots (DBS) limit their use in sub-Saharan Africa. To develop and validate a sensitive and cheap qualitative proviral DNA PCR-based assay for early infant diagnosis (EID) in HIV-1-exposed infants using DBS samples. Chelex-based method was used to extract DNA from DBS samples followed by a nested PCR assay using primers for the HIV-1 integrase gene. Limit of detection (LoD) was determined by Probit regression using limiting dilutions of newly produced recombinant plasmids with the integrase gene of all HIV-1 subtypes and ACH-2 cells. Clinical sensitivity and specificity were evaluated on 100 HIV-1 infected adults; 5 infected infants; 50 healthy volunteers; 139 HIV-1-exposed infants of the Angolan Pediatric HIV Cohort (APEHC) with serology at 18 months of life. All subtypes and CRF02_AG were amplified with a LoD of 14 copies. HIV-1 infection in infants was detected at month 1 of life. Sensitivity rate in adults varied with viral load, while diagnostic specificity was 100%. The percentage of HIV-1 MTCT cases between January 2012 and October 2014 was 2.2%. The cost per test was 8-10 USD which is 2- to 4-fold lower in comparison to commercial assays. The new PCR assay enables early and accurate EID. The simplicity and low-cost of the assay make it suitable for generalized implementation in Angola and other resource-constrained countries.

  5. Evaluation of dried blood spot protocols with the Bio-Rad GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA and Geenius™ HIV 1/2 Supplemental Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Davis, Geoff; Li, LiXia; Shriver, M Kathleen; Mei, Joanne; Styer, Linda M; Parker, Monica M; Smith, Amanda; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela; Ethridge, Steve; Wesolowski, Laura; Owen, S Michele; Masciotra, Silvina

    2017-06-01

    FDA-approved antigen/antibody combo and HIV-1/2 differentiation supplemental tests do not have claims for dried blood spot (DBS) use. We compared two DBS-modified protocols, the Bio-Rad GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab (BRC) EIA and Geenius™ HIV-1/2 (Geenius) Supplemental Assay, to plasma protocols and evaluated them in the CDC/APHL HIV diagnostic algorithm. BRC-DBS p24 analytical sensitivity was calculated from serial dilutions of p24. DBS specimens included 11 HIV-1 seroconverters, 151 HIV-1-positive individuals, including 20 on antiretroviral therapy, 31 HIV-2-positive and one HIV-1/HIV-2-positive individuals. BRC-reactive specimens were tested with Geenius using the same DBS eluate. Matched plasma specimens were tested with BRC, an IgG/IgM immunoassay and Geenius. DBS and plasma results were compared using the McNemar's test. A DBS-algorithm applied to 348 DBS from high-risk individuals who participated in surveillance was compared to HIV status based on local testing algorithms. BRC-DBS detects p24 at a concentration 18 times higher than in plasma. In seroconverters, BRC-DBS detected more infections than the IgG/IgM immunoassay in plasma (p=0.0133), but fewer infections than BRC-plasma (p=0.0133). In addition, the BRC/Geenius-plasma algorithm identified more HIV-1 infections than the BRC/Geenius-DBS algorithm (p=0.0455). The DBS protocols correctly identified HIV status for established HIV-1 infections, including those on therapy, HIV-2 infections, and surveillance specimens. The DBS protocols exhibited promising performance and allowed rapid supplemental testing. Although the DBS algorithm missed some early infections, it showed similar results when applied to specimens from a high-risk population. Implementation of a DBS algorithm would benefit testing programs without capacity for venipuncture. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Comparisons of VLP-Based ELISA, Neutralization Assays with Native HPV, and Neutralization Assays with PsV in Detecting HPV Antibody Responses in HIV-Infected Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ping; Brendle, Sarah; Milici, Janice; Camacho, Fabian; Zurlo, John; Christensen, Neil; Meyers, Craig

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers are important public health problems in HIV-infected people. Assays based on HPV virus-like particles (VLP) and pseudoviruses (PsV) are commonly used to examine HPV antibody responses in HIV-infected people, but neutralization assays with native HPV have not been utilized and a comparison of these three assays is lacking. We evaluated the agreement of assays using VLP, native HPV and PsV in detecting HPV16 and 18 antibodies in HIV-infected women. The VLP-based ELISA (VLP-ELISA) was used to detect antibody responses to HPV16 and 18 and cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) VLP antigens. Neutralization assays with native HPV (NA-HPV) and with PsV (NA-PsV) were conducted to examine HPV16 or 18 neutralizing antibodies. Intra class correlation coefficients (ICC) and kappa coefficients were used to assess the agreements of seropositivity between the assays. The seroprevalence detected by the VLP-ELISA, NA-HPV and NA-PsV in 94 HIV-infected women was 35%, 51% and 27% for HPV16 and 14%, 44% and 21% for HPV18. Cross-reactivity between HPV16 and HPV18 was 0.35, 0.04 and 0.33 (kappa coefficients) for the VLP-ELISA, NA-HPV and NA-PsV. The agreements of seropositivity between the three assays were low. Six women who were HPV16 DNA positive were seropositive by the NA-HPV but only two were HPV16 seropositive by the VLP-ELISA or NA-PsV. One HPV18 DNA positive woman was seropositive by all three assays. Repeated tests indicated excellent reproducibility of the NA-HPV. HPV serology results vary across different assays. The NA-HPV appears to be a sensitive and reliable approach in detecting natural HPV antibodies in HIV-infected women. The NA-HPV can be applied in both HPV natural history studies and vaccine studies in HIV-infected people.

  7. An assay to monitor HIV-1 protease activity for the identification of novel inhibitors in T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett J Hilton

    Full Text Available The emergence of resistant HIV strains, together with the severe side-effects of existing drugs and lack of development of effective anti-HIV vaccines highlight the need for novel antivirals, as well as innovative methods to facilitate their discovery. Here, we have developed an assay in T-cells to monitor the proteolytic activity of the HIV-1 protease (PR. The assay is based on the inducible expression of HIV-1 PR fused within the Gal4 DNA-binding and transactivation domains. The fusion protein binds to the Gal4 responsive element and activates the downstream reporter, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP gene only in the presence of an effective PR Inhibitor (PI. Thus, in this assay, eGFP acts as a biosensor of PR activity, making it ideal for flow cytometry based screening. Furthermore, the assay was developed using retroviral technology in T-cells, thus providing an ideal environment for the screening of potential novel PIs in a cell-type that represents the natural milieu of HIV infection. Clones with the highest sensitivity, and robust, reliable and reproducible reporter activity, were selected. The assay is easily adaptable to other PR variants, a multiplex platform, as well as to high-throughput plate reader based assays and will greatly facilitate the search for novel peptide and chemical compound based PIs in T-cells.

  8. Novel 3′-Processing Integrase Activity Assay by Real-Time PCR for Screening and Identification of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sakkhachornphop, Supachai; Thongkum, Weeraya; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai

    2015-01-01

    .... Recently, we have developed a novel real-time PCR based assay for the detection of 3[variant prime]P activity in vitro. The methodology usually involves biotinylated HIV-1 LTR, HIV-1 integrase...

  9. Screening for antiviral inhibitors of the HIV integrase-LEDGF/p75 interaction using the AlphaScreen luminescent proximity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yan; McGuinness, Debra E; Prongay, Andrew J; Feld, Boris; Ingravallo, Paul; Ogert, Robert A; Lunn, Charles A; Howe, John A

    2008-06-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of HIV integrase (HIV IN) have emerged as a promising new class of antivirals for the treatment of HIV/AIDS. The compounds currently approved or in clinical development specifically target HIV DNA integration and were identified using strand-transfer assays targeting the HIV IN/viral DNA complex. The authors have developed a second biochemical assay for identification of HIV integrase inhibitors, targeting the interaction between HIV IN and the cellular cofactor LEDGF/p75. They developed a luminescent proximity assay (AlphaScreen) designed to measure the association of the 80-amino-acid integrase binding domain of LEDGF/p75 with the 163-amino-acid catalytic core domain of HIV IN. This assay proved to be quite robust (with a Z' factor of 0.84 in screening libraries arrayed as orthogonal mixtures) and successfully identified several compounds specific for this protein-protein interaction.

  10. Performance of an alternative HIV diagnostic algorithm using the ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay and potential utility of sample-to-cutoff ratio to discriminate primary from established infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eric M; Harb, Socorro; Dragavon, Joan; Swenson, Paul; Stekler, Joanne D; Coombs, Robert W

    2013-12-01

    The ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay has a wide dynamic range for determining the sample-to-cutoff ratio (S/CO) values compared to other diagnostic HIV antibody assays. Determine the performance of an HIV testing algorithm that uses the ARCHITECT combo assay in the clinical setting and explore the utility of the signal-to-cutoff (S/CO) ratio to predict acute HIV-1 infection status. A retrospective analysis of clinical samples from a hospital and referral population screened for HIV-1 infection between May 2011 and March 2013. Repeatedly reactive samples were tested using the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid test and depending on that result, confirmatory orthogonal testing used the Western blot (WB) for HIV-1, Immunoblot for HIV-2 and nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) for HIV RNA. A total of 21,317 test results were evaluated of which 509 were ARCHITECT repeatedly reactive; of these, 422 were Multispot-reactive only for HIV-1 (413 WB-positive; 9 indeterminate), 4 were Multispot-reactive for both HIV-1 and HIV-2 (one HIV-2 immunoblot-positive with 17 HIV-2 RNA copies/mL) and 83 were Multispot-non-reactive of which 15 were HIV-1 RNA positive and represented acute HIV-1 infection. There was an association among the ARCHITECT S/CO (median; IQR) values for antibody-negative (0.14; 0.11-0.16), acute infection (33; 2.1-76) and established HIV-1 infection (794; 494-1,029) (Kruskal-Wallis, pARCHITECT combo assay with Multispot confirmation and reserved use of HIV-1 WB, HIV-2 Immunoblot and HIV NAAT for Multispot dual HIV-1/2 infection, and NAAT alone for Multispot-negative specimens, had a suitable test performance for detecting acute and established HIV infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Performance of an alternative HIV diagnostic algorithm using the ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay and potential utility of sample-to-cutoff ratio to discriminate primary from established infection☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eric M.; Harb, Socorro; Dragavon, Joan; Swenson, Paul; Stekler, Joanne D.; Coombs, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Background The ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay has a wide dynamic range for determining the sample-to-cutoff ratio (S/CO) values compared to other diagnostic HIV antibody assays. Objectives Determine the performance of an HIV testing algorithm that uses the ARCHITECT combo assay in the clinical setting and explore the utility of the signal-to-cutoff (S/CO) ratio to predict acute HIV-1 infection status. Study design A retrospective analysis of clinical samples from a hospital and referral population screened for HIV-1 infection between May 2011 and March 2013. Repeatedly reactive samples were tested using the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid test and depending on that result, confirmatory orthogonal testing used the Western blot (WB) for HIV-1, Immunoblot for HIV-2 and nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) for HIV RNA. Results A total of 21,317 test results were evaluated of which 509 were ARCHITECT repeatedly reactive; of these, 422 were Multispot-reactive only for HIV-1 (413 WB-positive; 9 indeterminate), 4 were Multispot-reactive for both HIV-1 and HIV-2 (one HIV-2 immunoblot-positive with 17 HIV-2 RNA copies/mL) and 83 were Multispot-non-reactive of which 15 were HIV-1 RNA positive and represented acute HIV-1 infection. There was an association among the ARCHITECT S/CO (median; IQR) values for antibody-negative (0.14; 0.11–0.16), acute infection (33; 2.1–76) and established HIV-1 infection (794; 494–1,029) (Kruskal–Wallis, p ARCHITECT combo assay with Multispot confirmation and reserved use of HIV-1 WB, HIV-2 Immunoblot and HIV NAAT for Multispot dual HIV-1/2 infection, and NAAT alone for Multispot-negative specimens, had a suitable test performance for detecting acute and established HIV infection. PMID:24029686

  12. Transcriptomic assay of CD8+ T cells in treatment-naïve HIV, HCV-mono-infected and HIV/HCV-co-infected Chinese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Co-infection with HIV and HCV is very common. It is estimated that over 5 million people are co-infected with HIV and HCV worldwide. Accumulated evidence shows that each virus alters the course of infection of the other one. CD8+ T cells play a crucial role in the eradication of viruses and infected target cells. To the best of our knowledge, no one has investigated the gene expression profiles in HIV/HCV-co-infected individuals. METHODOLOGY: Genome-wide transcriptomes of CD8+ T cells from HIV/HCV-co-infected or mono-infected treatment-naïve individuals were analyzed by microarray assays. Pairwise comparisons were performed and differentially expressed genes were identified followed by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR validation. Directed Acyclic Graphs (DAG from Web-based Gene SeT AnaLysis Toolkit (WebGestalt and DAVID bioinformatics resources 6.7 (the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery were used to discover the Gene Ontology (GO categories with significantly enriched gene numbers. The enriched Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways were also obtained by using WebGestalt software. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A total of 110, 24 and 72 transcript IDs were shown to be differentially expressed (> 2-fold and p<0.05 in comparisons between HCV- and HIV-mono-infected groups, HIV/HCV-co-infected and HIV-mono-infected groups, and HIV/HCV-co-infected and HCV-mono-infected groups, respectively. In qRT-PCR assay, most of the genes showed similar expressing profiles with the observation in microarray assays. Further analysis revealed that genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, transcriptional regulation and cytokine responses were significantly altered. These data offer new insights into HIV/HCV co-infections, and may help to identify new markers for the management and treatment of HIV/HCV co-infections.

  13. False-positive rate of a "fourth-generation" HIV antigen/antibody combination assay in an area of low HIV prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sinyoung; Lee, Jong-Han; Choi, Jun Yong; Kim, June Myung; Kim, Hyon-Suk

    2010-10-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the performance of the Architect HIV antigen/antibody (Ag/Ab) combination assay in a tertiary health care center with a situation of low HIV prevalence. The specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) were 99.78% and 31.21%, respectively. However, the specificity and PPV could increase to 99.99% and 89.70% using an arbitrary cutoff value.

  14. Sensitivity of IFN-gamma release assay to detect latent tuberculosis infection is retained in HIV-infected patients but dependent on HIV/AIDS progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farba Karam

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection and treatment of latent TB infection (LTBI in HIV infected individuals is strongly recommended to decrease morbidity and mortality in countries with high levels of HIV.To assess the validity of a newly developed in-house ELISPOT interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA for the detection of LTBI amongst HIV infected individuals, in comparison with the Tuberculin Skin Test (TST.ESAT6/CFP10 (EC ELISPOT assays were performed, together with a TST, in 285 HIV infected individuals recruited in HIV clinics in Dakar, Senegal, who had no signs of active TB at time of enrolment. Thirty eight of the subjects (13.3% failed to respond to PHA stimulation and were excluded from the analysis. In the 247 remaining patients, response to PHA did not vary according to CD4 cell count categories (p = 0.51. EC ELISPOT was positive in 125 (50.6% subjects, while 53 (21.5% had a positive TST. Concordance between EC ELISPOT and TST was observed in 151 patients (61.1% (kappa = 0.23. The proportion of subjects with a positive response to the EC ELISPOT assay decreased with declining CD4 counts (p trend = 0.001, but were consistently higher than the proportion of TST responders. In multivariate analysis, the risk of being EC-ELISPOT positive in HIV infected individuals was associated with age, CD4 count and HIV-1 strain.Our study indicates that IGRAs using M. tuberculosis specific antigens are likely to retain their validity for the diagnosis of LTBI among HIV positive individuals, but may be impaired by T-cell anergy in severely immuno-suppressed individuals.

  15. Evaluation of a new generation synthetic peptide combination assay for detection of antibodies to HIV-1, HIV-2, HTLV-I, and HTLV-II simultaneously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Constantine, N T; Bansal, J; Callahan, J D; Marsiglia, V C

    1992-09-01

    A new generation combination test (Detect-Plus, IAF BioChem, Montreal, Canada) based on synthetic peptides for HIV-1, HIV-2, HTLV-I, and HTLV-II was compared with three routine commercial screening assays and confirmatory assays to determine its sensitivity and specificity and to evaluate it as a substitute screening method. Samples from 356 sexually transmitted disease (STD) patients were tested by the four screening tests. All initially reactive samples were retested in duplicate by the corresponding EIA and repeatedly reactive samples were confirmed by Western blots for HIV-1, HIV-2, and HTLV-I/II. The confirmed positives detected by each screening assay were HIV-1 (23/356, 6.46%), HIV-2 (11/356, 3.09%), and HTLV-I/II (5/356, 1.4%). The new generation Detect-Plus test produced only two results (2/356, 0.56%) that were presumed to be false-positives in comparison to the screening tests, but the OD/CO values were just slightly high (1.5 and 1.9). There were no false-negative results, indicating that the sensitivity of the new combination test was excellent (100%). Compared with routine retroviral EIA assays, the test is easy to perform--the total time requirement is only 2 hr and there is no need for incubation equipment. The OD/CO values were very high when samples were positive, making even visual interpretation possible. We conclude that this new combination assay is an excellent screening method for detection of antibodies to the human retroviruses, and may be particularly useful for screening blood for transfusion and in epidemiological investigations.

  16. Performance of Celera RUO integrase resistance assay across multiple HIV-1 subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Carole L; Viana, Raquel V; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Silva de Jesus, Carlos; Zeh, Clement; Halvas, Elias K; Mellors, John W

    2017-03-01

    HIV-1 sequence variation is a major obstacle to developing molecular based assays for multiple subtypes. This study sought to independently assess performance characteristics of the ViroSeq™ HIV-1 Integrase RUO Genotyping Kit (Celera, US) for samples of multiple different HIV-1 subtypes. 264 samples were tested in the validation, 106 from integrase inhibitor naïve patients' sent for routine HIV-1 drug resistance testing after failing a 1st- or 2nd-line regimen, and 158 samples from an external virology quality assurance program (VQA). For the latter, 53 unique VQA samples were tested in two to five different laboratories to assess assay reproducibility. For all assays, viral RNA was extracted using the ViroSeq extraction module, reverse transcribed, and amplified in a one-step reaction. Four sequencing primers were used to span codons 1-288 of integrase. The Rega subtyping tool was used for subtype assignment. Integrase polymorphisms and mutations were determined as differences from the HXB2 sequence and by the Stanford database, respectively. Sequences obtained from the different laboratories were aligned and sequence homology determined. HIV-1 RNA in the 264 samples ranged from 3.15 to 6.74logcopies/ml. Successful amplification was obtained for 97% of samples (n=256). The 8 samples that failed to amplify were subtype D (n=3), subtype C (n=1), CRF01_AE (n=1), subtype A1 (n=2), and an unassigned subtype (n=1). Of the 256 that successfully amplified samples, 203 (79%) were successfully sequenced with bidirectional coverage. Of the 53 unsuccessful samples, 13 (5%) failed sequencing and 40 (16%) did not have full bidirectional sequence, as a result of failure of sequencing primers: Primer A (n=1); Primer B (n=18); Primer C (n=1); Primer D (n=7) or short sequences (n=16). For the 135 VQA samples (30 unique samples) that were assayed by different laboratories, homology of the sequences obtained ranged from 92.1% to 100%. However, Laboratory 2 detected more mixtures

  17. Use of rapid HIV assays as supplemental tests in specimens with repeatedly reactive screening immunoassay results not confirmed by HIV-1 Western blot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, Laura G; Delaney, Kevin P; Meyer, William A; Blatt, Amy J; Bennett, Berry; Chavez, Pollyanna; Granade, Timothy C; Owen, Michele

    2013-09-01

    An alternate HIV testing algorithm has been proposed which includes a fourth-generation immunoassay followed by an HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody differentiation supplemental test for reactive specimens and a nucleic acid test (NAT) for specimens with discordant results. To evaluate the performance of five rapid tests (Alere Clearview, Bio-Rad Multispot, OraSure OraQuick, MedMira Reveal, and Trinity Biotech Unigold) as the supplemental antibody assay in the algorithm. A total of 3273 serum and plasma specimens that were third-generation immunoassay repeatedly reactive and Western blot (WB) negative or indeterminate were tested with rapid tests and NAT. Specimens were classified by NAT: (1) HIV-1 infected (NAT-reactive; n=184, 5.6%), (2) HIV-status unknown (NAT nonreactive; n=3078, 94.2%) or by Multispot, (3) HIV-2 positive (n=5), and (4) HIV-1 and HIV-2 positive (n=6). Excluding HIV-2 positive specimens, we calculated the proportion of reactive rapid tests among specimens with reactive and nonreactive NAT. The proportion of infected specimens with reactive rapid test results and negative or indeterminate WB ranged from 30.4% (56) to 47.8% (88) depending on the rapid test. From 1% to 2% of NAT-negative specimens had reactive rapid test results. In these diagnostically challenging specimens, all rapid tests identified infections that were missed by the Western blot, but only Multispot could differentiate HIV-1 from HIV-2. Regardless of which rapid test is used as a supplemental test in the alternative algorithm, false-positive algorithm results (i.e., reactive screening and rapid test in uninfected person) may occur, which will need to be resolved during the baseline medical evaluation. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. HIV Incidence Estimates Using the Limiting Antigen Avidity EIA Assay at Testing Sites in Kiev City, Ukraine: 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Ruth; Malyuta, Ruslan; Chentsova, Nelli; Karnets, Iryna; Murphy, Gary; Medoeva, Antonia; Kruglov, Yuri; Yurchenko, Alexander; Copas, Andrew; Porter, Kholoud

    2016-01-01

    To estimate HIV incidence and highlight the characteristics of persons at greatest risk of HIV in the Ukraine capital, Kiev. Residual samples from newly-diagnosed persons attending the Kiev City AIDS Centre were tested for evidence of recent HIV infection using an avidity assay. Questions on possible risk factors for HIV acquisition and testing history were introduced. All persons (≥16yrs) presenting for an HIV test April'13-March'14 were included. Rates per 100,000 population were calculated using region-specific denominators. During the study period 6370 individuals tested for HIV. Of the 467 individuals newly-diagnosed with HIV, 21 had insufficient samples for LAg testing. Of the remaining 446, 39 (8.7%) were classified as recent with an avidity index HIV infections. The only independent predictor for a recent infection was probable route of exposure, with MSM more likely to present with a recent infection compared with heterosexual contact [Odds Ratio 8.86; 95%CI 2.65-29.60]. We estimated HIV incidence at 21.5 per 100,000 population, corresponding to 466 new infections. Using population estimates for MSM and PWID, incidence was estimated to be between 2289.6 and 6868.7/100,000 MSM, and 350.4 for PWID. A high proportion of persons newly-infected remain undiagnosed, with MSM disproportionally affected with one in four newly-HIV-diagnosed and one in three recently-HIV-infected. Our findings should be used for targeted public health interventions and health promotion.

  19. HIV Incidence Estimates Using the Limiting Antigen Avidity EIA Assay at Testing Sites in Kiev City, Ukraine: 2013-2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Simmons

    Full Text Available To estimate HIV incidence and highlight the characteristics of persons at greatest risk of HIV in the Ukraine capital, Kiev.Residual samples from newly-diagnosed persons attending the Kiev City AIDS Centre were tested for evidence of recent HIV infection using an avidity assay. Questions on possible risk factors for HIV acquisition and testing history were introduced. All persons (≥16yrs presenting for an HIV test April'13-March'14 were included. Rates per 100,000 population were calculated using region-specific denominators.During the study period 6370 individuals tested for HIV. Of the 467 individuals newly-diagnosed with HIV, 21 had insufficient samples for LAg testing. Of the remaining 446, 39 (8.7% were classified as recent with an avidity index <1.5ODn, 10 were reclassified as long-standing as their viral load was <1000 copies/mL, resulting in 29 (6.5% recent HIV infections. The only independent predictor for a recent infection was probable route of exposure, with MSM more likely to present with a recent infection compared with heterosexual contact [Odds Ratio 8.86; 95%CI 2.65-29.60]. We estimated HIV incidence at 21.5 per 100,000 population, corresponding to 466 new infections. Using population estimates for MSM and PWID, incidence was estimated to be between 2289.6 and 6868.7/100,000 MSM, and 350.4 for PWID.A high proportion of persons newly-infected remain undiagnosed, with MSM disproportionally affected with one in four newly-HIV-diagnosed and one in three recently-HIV-infected. Our findings should be used for targeted public health interventions and health promotion.

  20. Development of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for the Detection of Treponema pallidum, HCV, HIV-1, and HBV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Gong, Rui; Lu, Xuan; Zhang, Yi; Tang, Jingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum, hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1, and hepatitis B virus (HBV) are major causes of sexually transmitted diseases passed through blood contact. The development of a sensitive and efficient method for detection is critical for early diagnosis and for large-scale screening of blood specimens in China. This study aims to establish an assay to detect these pathogens in clinical serum specimens. We established a TaqMan-locked nucleic acid (LNA) real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for rapid, sensitive, specific, quantitative, and simultaneous detection and identification. The copy numbers of standards of these 4 pathogens were quantified. Standard curves were generated by determining the mean cycle threshold values versus 10-fold serial dilutions of standards over a range of 10(6) to 10(1) copies/μL, with the lowest detection limit of the assay being 10(1) copies/μL. The assay was applied to 328 clinical specimens and compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and commercial nucleic acid testing (NAT) methods. The assay identified 39 T. pallidum-, 96 HCV-, 13 HIV-1-, 123 HBV-, 5 HBV/HCV-, 1 T. pallidum/HBV-, 1 HIV-1/HCV-, and 1 HIV-1/T. pallidum-positive specimens. The high sensitivity of the assay confers strong potential for its use as a highly reliable, cost-effective, and useful molecular diagnostic tool for large-scale screening of clinical specimens. This assay will assist in the study of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of sexually transmitted blood diseases.

  1. Identification of false-positive QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assays by repeat testing in HIV-infected patients at low risk for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Jacob; Reves, Randall; Johnson, Steven; Belknap, Robert

    2012-02-01

    The QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assay (QFT) is increasingly being used for latent tuberculosis screening in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the United States. This is a retrospective analysis of repeating positive QFT assays as a strategy to identify false-positive results in HIV-infected patients at low risk for tuberculosis.

  2. Accuracy of serological assays for detection of recent infection with HIV and estimation of population incidence: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Rebecca; Gold, Judy; Calleja, Jesus M García; Kim, Andrea A; Parekh, Bharat; Busch, Michael; Rehle, Thomas; Hargrove, John; Remis, Robert S; Kaldor, John M

    2009-12-01

    We systematically reviewed the accuracy of serological tests for recent infections with HIV that have become widely used for measuring population patterns incidence of HIV. Across 13 different assays, sensitivity to detect recent infections ranged from 42-100% (median 89%). Specificity for detecting established infections was between 49.5% and 100% (median 86.8%) and was higher for infections of durations longer than 1 year (median 98%, range 31.5-100.0). For four different assays, comparisons were made between assay-derived population incidence estimates and a reference incidence estimate. The median percentage difference between the assay-derived incidence and reference incidence was 26.0%. Serological assays have reasonable sensitivity for the detection of recent infection with HIV, but are vulnerable to misclassifying established infections as recent-potentially leading to biases in incidence estimates. This conclusion is highly qualified by the apparent absence of a standardised approach to assay evaluation. There is an urgent need for an internationally agreed framework for evaluating and comparing these tests.

  3. Comparison of three quantification methods for the TZM-bl pseudovirus assay for screening of anti-HIV-1 agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Liying; Wang, Shunyi; Hu, Qin; Li, Jingtao; Zeng, Yi

    2016-07-01

    The TZM-bl pseudovirus assay is commonly used to evaluate the efficacy of neutralizing antibodies and small molecular inhibitors in HIV-1 research. Here, to determine the optimal measurement method for screening anti-HIV-1 inhibitors, we compared three measurement methods based on firefly luciferase and β-galactosidase activities. The 50% tissue culture infective doses (TCID50) of the pseudoviruses were determined using the luciferase, β-galactosidase colorimetric, and 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (X-gal) staining assays. Three commercial reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (azidothymidine, nevirapine, and lamivudine) were tested as reference drugs to compare the reproducibility, linear correlation, and half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values determined using these methods. In the TCID50 assay, the sensitivity of β-galactosidase colorimetric assay was almost 562 times lower than that of the other two methods. Reproducible dose-response curves were obtained for the inhibitors with all methods; the IC50 values of the inhibitors were not significantly different. Linear regression analysis showed linear correlation between methods. Compared to the β-galactosidase colorimetric assay, the other two methods have the advantage of high sensitivity and are less affected by interference. In conclusion, the luciferase and X-gal staining assays, which can be applied either alone or combined, are recommended for anti-HIV-1 inhibitor screening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A retrospective analysis of the application of the Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shaocong; Deng, Guihua; Zhou, Shaosong; Zeng, Jing; Tan, Weiqing; Yuan, Xiaopeng

    2017-06-26

    Fourth-generation HIV assays have been implemented worldwide as a screening test for many years. Understanding the performance of fourth-generation assay in low HIV prevalence region is pivotal to interpret the test result correctly. In this study, retrospective analysis was used to evaluate application of the Elecsys® HIV combi PT assay. A total of 85 043 specimens from a low prevalence setting were detected between June 2013 and October 2015. We evaluated the false-positive rate (FPR), specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV). The specificity between male and female were 99.85% and 99.82%, respectively. The PPV on male (50.75%) was higher than female (17.05%) significantly, while the FPR was 0.15% and 0.18%. The gap between false-positive (median: 1.83, [IQR]: 1.30, 3.38) and confirmed-positive (median: 407.5, [IQR]: 184.2, 871.7) is enormous. The highest s/co ratio for false-positive cases was 85.45, while the lowest s/co ratio for confirmed-positive cases was 59.68. Various reasons were attributed to false-positive cases. Optimal cutoff value is needed to be set to reduce the false-positive cases and predict the final status of HIV infection reliably. Retrospective analysis will help us to understand more about diagnosis of HIV. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. High-throughput Characterization of HIV-1 Reservoir Reactivation Using a Single-Cell-in-Droplet PCR Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Yucha

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactivation of latent viral reservoirs is on the forefront of HIV-1 eradication research. However, it is unknown if latency reversing agents (LRAs increase the level of viral transcription from cells producing HIV RNA or harboring transcriptionally-inactive (latent infection. We therefore developed a microfluidic single-cell-in-droplet (scdPCR assay to directly measure the number of CD4+ T cells that produce unspliced (usRNA and multiply spliced (msRNA following ex vivo latency reversal with either an histone deacetylase inhibitor (romidepsin or T cell receptor (TCR stimulation. Detection of HIV-1 transcriptional activity can also be performed on hundreds of thousands of CD4+ T-cells in a single experiment. The scdPCR method was then applied to CD4+ T cells obtained from HIV-1-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. Overall, our results suggest that effects of LRAs on HIV-1 reactivation may be heterogeneous—increasing transcription from active cells in some cases and increasing the number of transcriptionally active cells in others. Genomic DNA and human mRNA isolated from HIV-1 reactivated cells could also be detected and quantified from individual cells. As a result, our assay has the potential to provide needed insight into various reservoir eradication strategies.

  6. Enhanced Sensitivity for Detection of HIV-1 p24 Antigen by a Novel Nuclease-Linked Fluorescence Oligonucleotide Assay.

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    Peihu Fan

    Full Text Available The relatively high detection limit of the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA prevents its application for detection of low concentrations of antigens. To increase the sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, we developed a highly sensitive nuclease-linked fluorescence oligonucleotide assay (NLFOA. Two major improvements were incorporated in NLFOA to amplify antibody-antigen interaction signals and reduce the signal/noise ratio; a large number of nuclease molecules coupled to the gold nanoparticle/streptavidin complex and fluorescent signals generated from fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides by the nuclease. The detection limit of p24 by NLFOA was 1 pg/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than the conventional ELISA (10 pg/mL. The specificity was 100% and the coefficient of variation (CV was 7.8% at low p24 concentration (1.5 pg/mL with various concentrations of spiked p24 in HIV-1 negative sera. Thus, NLFOA is highly sensitive, specific, reproducible and user-friendly. The more sensitive detection of low p24 concentrations in HIV-1-infected individuals by NLFOA could allow detection of HIV-1 infections that are missed by the conventional ELISA at the window period during acute infection to further reduce the risk for HIV-1 infection due to the undetected HIV-1 in the blood products. Moreover, NLFOA can be easily applied to more sensitive detection of other antigens.

  7. HIV incidence in rural South Africa: comparison of estimates from longitudinal surveillance and cross-sectional cBED assay testing.

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    Till Bärnighausen

    Full Text Available The BED IgG-Capture Enzyme Immunoassay (cBED assay, a test of recent HIV infection, has been used to estimate HIV incidence in cross-sectional HIV surveys. However, there has been concern that the assay overestimates HIV incidence to an unknown extent because it falsely classifies some individuals with non-recent HIV infections as recently infected. We used data from a longitudinal HIV surveillance in rural South Africa to measure the fraction of people with non-recent HIV infection who are falsely classified as recently HIV-infected by the cBED assay (the long-term false-positive ratio (FPR and compared cBED assay-based HIV incidence estimates to longitudinally measured HIV incidence.We measured the long-term FPR in individuals with two positive HIV tests (in the HIV surveillance, 2003-2006 more than 306 days apart (sample size n = 1,065. We implemented four different formulae to calculate HIV incidence using cBED assay testing (n = 11,755 and obtained confidence intervals (CIs by directly calculating the central 95(th percentile of incidence values. We observed 4,869 individuals over 7,685 person-years for longitudinal HIV incidence estimation. The long-term FPR was 0.0169 (95% CI 0.0100-0.0266. Using this FPR, the cross-sectional cBED-based HIV incidence estimates (per 100 people per year varied between 3.03 (95% CI 2.44-3.63 and 3.19 (95% CI 2.57-3.82, depending on the incidence formula. Using a long-term FPR of 0.0560 based on previous studies, HIV incidence estimates varied between 0.65 (95% CI 0.00-1.32 and 0.71 (95% CI 0.00-1.43. The longitudinally measured HIV incidence was 3.09 per 100 people per year (95% CI 2.69-3.52, after adjustment to the sex-age distribution of the sample used in cBED assay-based estimation.In a rural community in South Africa with high HIV prevalence, the long-term FPR of the cBED assay is substantially lower than previous estimates. The cBED assay performs well in HIV incidence estimation if the locally

  8. Multiple barriers to recombination between divergent HIV-1 variants revealed by a dual-marker recombination assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Galli, Andrea; Moore, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    Recombination is a major force for generating human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) diversity and produces numerous recombinants circulating in the human population. We previously established a cell-based system using green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) as a reporter to study the mechanisms...... of HIV-1 recombination. We now report an improved system capable of detecting recombination using authentic viral sequences. Frameshift mutations were introduced into the gag gene so that parental viruses do not express full-length Gag; however, recombination can generate a progeny virus that expresses...... a functional Gag. We demonstrate that this Gag reconstitution assay can be used to detect recombination between two group M HIV-1 variants of the same or of different subtypes. Using both gfp and gag assays, we found that, similar to group M viruses, group O viruses also recombine frequently. When...

  9. Assessment of the Cavidi ExaVir Load Assay for Monitoring Plasma Viral Load in HIV-2-Infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrego, Pedro; Gonçalves, Maria Fátima; Gomes, Perpétua; Araújo, Lavínia; Moranguinho, Inês; Figueiredo, Inês Brito; Barahona, Isabel; Rocha, José; Mendonça, Claudino; Cruz, Maria Cesarina; Barreto, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV plasma viral load is an established marker of disease progression and of response to antiretroviral therapy, but currently there is no commercial assay validated for the quantification of viral load in HIV-2-infected individuals. We sought to make the first clinical evaluation of Cavidi ExaVir Load (version 3) in HIV-2-infected patients. Samples were collected from a total of 102 individuals living in Cape Verde, and the HIV-2 viral load was quantified by both ExaVir Load and a reference in-house real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) used in Portugal in 91 samples. The associations between viral load and clinical prognostic variables (CD4+ T cell counts and antiretroviral therapy status) were similar for measurements obtained using ExaVir Load and qPCR. There was no difference between the two methods in the capacity to discriminate between nonquantifiable and quantifiable HIV-2 in the plasma. In samples with an HIV-2 viral load quantifiable by both methods (n = 27), the measurements were highly correlated (Pearson r = 0.908), but the ExaVir Load values were systematically higher relative to those determined by qPCR (median difference, 0.942 log10 copies/ml). A regression model was derived that enables the conversion of ExaVir Load results to those that would have been obtained by the reference qPCR. In conclusion, ExaVir Load version 3 is a reliable commercial assay to measure viral load in HIV-2-infected patients and therefore a valuable alternative to the in-house assays in current use. PMID:28515216

  10. Immunofluorescence assay in India for confirmation of HIV-1 infection using a T-cell line infected with defective HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Manju; Arias, Juan F; Deb, Monorama; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2010-12-01

    In India, the enzyme immunoassay (EIA)/rapid test is used for screening and confirmatory antibody testing of HIV infection, and all HIV reactive samples are further confirmed by two other rapid tests working on different principles; however, Western blotting (WB) and immunofluorescence (IF) assays are not routinely performed in this country. A total of 2104 sera from Indian subjects were tested for the presence of HIV-1 antibody using EIA/rapid tests, according to the guidelines of the National AIDS Control Organization of India, and were also subjected to IF test using L-2 cells persistently infected with defective HIV-1. WB and a nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed on discrepant samples. IF results were 100% concordant with EIA/rapid tests for 212 HIV-1-positive samples and 1889 HIV-1-negative samples. Interestingly, three (0.14%) samples negative by EIA/rapid tests were weakly or moderately positive (1+/2+) by IF test. All three of these samples were confirmed to be negative by WB (reactive with Gag/Pol, but not with Env), but positive by RT-PCR with primers targeting the C2-V5 fragment of the env gene. These three samples were from individuals who voluntarily reported for HIV testing because of high-risk practices, and they may have been at an early stage of HIV infection. These results confirm that the IF test using L-2 cells is a sensitive and specific alternative method for confirmation of HIV-1 infection and could be included in the diagnostic algorithm in reference laboratories in developing countries. Copyright © 2010 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Two types of nanoparticle-based bio-barcode amplification assays to detect HIV-1 p24 antigen

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    Dong Huahuang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 p24 antigen is a major viral component of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 which can be used to identify persons in the early stage of infection and transmission of HIV-1 from infected mothers to infants. The detection of p24 is usually accomplished by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA with low detection sensitivity. Here we report the use of two bio-barcode amplification (BCA assays combined with polymerase chain reaction (PCR and gel electrophoresis to quantify HIV-1 p24 antigen. Method A pair of anti-p24 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs were used in BCA assays to capture HIV-1 p24 antigen in a sandwich format and allowed for the quantitative measurement of captured p24 using PCR and gel electrophoresis. The first 1 G12 mAb was coated on microplate wells or magnetic microparticles (MMPs to capture free p24 antigens. Captured p24 in turn captured 1D4 mAb coated gold nanoparticle probes (GNPs containing double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. One strand of the oligonucleotides was covalently immobilized whereas the unbound complimentary bio-barcode DNA strand could be released upon heating. The released bio-barcode DNA was amplified by PCR, electrophoresed in agarose gel and quantified. Results The in-house ELISA assay was found to quantify p24 antigen with a limit of detection (LOD of 1,000 pg/ml and a linear range between 3,000 and 100,000 pg/ml. In contrast, the BCA-based microplate method yielded an LOD of 1 pg/ml and a linear detection range from 1 to 10,000 pg/ml. The BCA-based MMP method yielded an LOD of 0.1 pg/ml and a linear detection range from 0.1 to 1,000 pg/ml. Conclusions When combined with PCR and simple gel electrophoresis, BCA-based microplate and MMPs assays can be used to quantify HIV-1 p24 antigen. These methods are 3–4 orders of magnitude more sensitive than our in-house ELISA-based assay and may provide a useful approach to detect p24 in patients newly infected

  12. Development of Monoclonal Antibodies against HIV-1 p24 Protein and Its Application in Colloidal Gold Immunochromatographic Assay for HIV-1 Detection

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    Yi Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 p24 protein is the most abundant viral protein of HIV-1. This protein is secreted in blood serum at high levels during the early stages of HIV-1 infection, making it a biomarker for early diagnosis. In this study, a colloidal gold immunochromatographic assay (GICA was established for detecting p24 protein using mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. The HIV-1 p24 protein was expressed in E. coli strain BL21 and the purified protein was used to immunize mice. Stable hybridoma cell lines secreting anti-p24 monoclonal antibodies were obtained after ELISA screening and subcloning by limiting dilution. 34 different capture and labeling mAb pairs were selected by a novel antibody-capture indirect sandwich ELISA and then applied in GICA to detect p24 protein. The GICA method has a limit of detection (LOD of 25 pg/mL and could detect p24 protein in all 10 positive samples obtained from the National Reference of HIV-1 p24 antigen. Out of 153 negative samples tested, 3 false positives results were obtained. The overall specificity of this test was 98.03%. The good sensitivity and specificity of this method make it a suitable alternative to provide a more convenient and efficient tool for early diagnosis of HIV infection.

  13. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costantini, Lindsey M. [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Irvin, Susan C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Kennedy, Steven C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Guo, Feng [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C. [Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Snapp, Erik L., E-mail: erik-lee.snapp@einstein.yu.edu [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. - Highlights: • Development of fluorescent protein labeled HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Imaging of gp120 dynamics and trafficking in live cells. • Quantitative visual assay of antibody-mediated inhibition of gp120 binding to CD4 on live cells.

  14. Contamination with HIV antibody may be responsible for false positive results in specimens tested on automated platforms running HIV 4th generation assays in a region of high HIV prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, Diana Ruth; Korsman, Stephen N; Hsiao, Nei-Yuan; Morobadi, Molefi Daniel; Vawda, Sabeehah; Goedhals, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    In South Africa where the prevalence of HIV infection is very high, 4th generation HIV antibody/p24 antigen combo immunoassays are the tests of choice for laboratory based screening. Testing is usually performed in clinical pathology laboratories on automated analysers. To investigate the cause of false positive results on 4th generation HIV testing platforms in public sector laboratories, the performance of two automated platforms was compared in a clinical pathology setting, firstly on routine diagnostic specimens and secondly on known sero-negative samples. Firstly, 1181 routine diagnostic specimens were sequentially tested on Siemens and Roche automated 4th generation platforms. HIV viral load, western blot and follow up testing were used to determine the true status of inconclusive specimens. Subsequently, known HIV seronegative samples from a single donor were repeatedly tested on both platforms and an analyser was tested for surface contamination with HIV positive serum to identify how suspected specimen contamination could be occurring. Serial testing of diagnostic specimens yielded 163 weakly positive or discordant results. Only 3 of 163 were conclusively shown to indicate true HIV infection. Specimen contamination with HIV antibody was suspected, based on the following evidence: the proportion of positive specimens increased on repeated passage through the analysers; viral loads were low or undetectable and western blots negative or indeterminate on problem specimens; screen negative, 2nd test positive specimens tested positive when reanalysed on the screening assay; follow up specimens (where available) were negative. Similarly, an increasing number of known negative specimens became (repeatedly) sero-positive on serial passage through one of the analysers. Internal and external analyser surfaces were contaminated with HIV serum, evidence that sample splashes occur during testing. Due to the extreme sensitivity of these assays, contamination with minute

  15. Meticulous plasma isolation is essential to avoid false low-level viraemia in Roche Cobas HIV-1 viral load assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, Virginie; Vancoillie, Leen; Dauwe, Kenny; Staelens, Delfien; Demecheleer, Els; Schauvliege, Marlies; Dinakis, Sylvie; Van Maerken, Tom; Dessilly, Géraldine; Ruelle, Jean; Verhofstede, Chris

    2017-10-24

    Pre-analytical sample processing is often overlooked as a potential cause of inaccurate assay results. Here we demonstrate how plasma, extracted from standard EDTA- containing blood collection tubes, may contain traces of blood cells consequently resulting in a false low-level HIV-1 viral load when using Roche Cobas HIV-1 assays. The presence of human DNA in Roche Cobas 4800 RNA extracts and in RNA extracts from the Abbott HIV-1 RealTime assay was assessed by quantifying the human albumin gene by means of qPCR. RNA was extracted from plasma samples before and after an additional centrifugation and tested for viral load and DNA contamination. The relation between total DNA content and viral load was defined. Elevated concentrations of genomic DNA were detected in 28 out of 100 Cobas 4800 extracts and were significantly more frequent in samples processed outside of the Aids Reference Laboratory. An association between genomic DNA presence and spurious low-level viremia results was demonstrated. Supplementary centrifugation of plasma before RNA extraction eliminated the contamination and the false viremia. Plasma isolated from standard EDTA-containing blood collection tubes may contain traces of HIV DNA leading to false viral load results above the clinical cut-off. Supplementary centrifugation of plasma before viral load analysis may eliminate the occurrence of this spurious low-level viremia.

  16. Evaluation of a new fourth-generation microwell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of HIV-1 subtype B and E antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanbancherd, P; Limpairojn, N; de Souza, M S; Jugsudee, A; Julananto, P; Tienamporn, P; Leucha, W; Tasaniyananda, C; Brown, A E

    2001-03-01

    The recent fourth-generation enzyme-immunoassays have been used to increase the sensitivity for detecting HIV-1 antibodies and reduce the window period of HIV infection. The HIV antigens utilized in those assays were prepared from HIV-1 clade B which is different from HIV-1 subtypes circulating in Thailand. We evaluated 323 HIV-1 seropositives either B or E subtype to determine whether they were detected with the new combined anti-HIV and the p24 Ag assay. Under evaluation we found that this enzyme immunoassay manufactured by Organon Teknika showed the high sensitivity and specificity with a greater delta (delta) value with B than E subtypes samples (+15.29 vs +5.73).

  17. Using an improved phagocytosis assay to evaluate the effect of HIV on specific antibodies to pregnancy-associated malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataíde, Ricardo; Hasang, Wina; Wilson, Danny W; Beeson, James G; Mwapasa, Victor; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Meshnick, Steven R; Rogerson, Stephen J

    2010-05-25

    Pregnant women residing in malaria endemic areas are highly susceptible to Plasmodium falciparum malaria, particularly during their first pregnancy, resulting in low birth weight babies and maternal anaemia. This susceptibility is associated with placental sequestration of parasitised red blood cells expressing pregnancy-specific variant surface antigens. Acquisition of antibodies against these variant surface antigens may protect women and their offspring. Functions of such antibodies may include prevention of placental sequestration or opsonisation of parasitised cells for phagocytic clearance. Here we report the development and optimisation of a new high-throughput flow cytometry-based phagocytosis assay using undifferentiated Thp-1 cells to quantitate the amount of opsonizing antibody in patient sera, and apply this assay to measure the impact of HIV on the levels of antibodies to a pregnancy malaria-associated parasite line in a cohort of Malawian primigravid women. The assay showed high reproducibility, with inter-experimental correlation of r(2) = 0.99. In primigravid women, concurrent malaria infection was associated with significantly increased antibodies, whereas HIV decreased the ability to acquire opsonising antibodies (Mann-Whitney ranksum: p = 0.013). This decrease was correlated with HIV-induced immunosuppression, with women with less than 350 x 10(6) CD4+ T- cells/L having less opsonising antibodies (coef: -11.95,P = 0.002). Levels of antibodies were not associated with protection from low birth weight or anaemia. This flow cytometry-based phagocytosis assay proved to be efficient and accurate for the measurement of Fc-receptor mediated phagocytosis-inducing antibodies in large cohorts. HIV was found to affect mainly the acquisition of antibodies to pregnancy-specific malaria in primigravidae. Further studies of the relationship between opsonising antibodies to malaria in pregnancy and HIV are indicated.

  18. Comparison of the Hologic Aptima HIV-1 Quant Dx Assay to the Roche COBAS Ampliprep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 Test v2.0 for the quantification of HIV-1 RNA in plasma samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Johansen, Kim; Landt, Bodil

    2017-01-01

    of the Aptima HIV-1 Quant Dx Assay (Aptima) and the COBAS Ampliprep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 Test v2.0 (CAPCTMv2) for the quantification of HIV-1 RNA in plasma samples. Study design The performance of the two tests was compared on 216 clinical plasma samples, on dilutions series in seven replicates of five clinical......), but differed for the Low control (CV: 17.9% vs. 7.1%; Aptima assay vs. CAPCTMv2 test, respectively). However, this did not impact clinical categorization of clinical samples at neither the 50 cp/mL nor 200 cp/mL level. Conclusion The Aptima assay and the CAPCTMv2 test are highly correlated and are useful...

  19. High-throughput real-time assay based on molecular beacons for HIV-1 integrase 3'-processing reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-qiu HE; Xiao-hui MA; Bin LIU; Xiao-yi ZHANG; Wei-zu CHEN; Cun-xin WANG; Shao-hui CHENG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To develop a high-throughput real-time assay based on molecular beacons to monitor the integrase 3'-processing reaction in vitro and apply it to inhibitor screening.Methods: The recombinant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 integrase (IN) is incubated with a 38 mer oligonucleotide substrate, a sequence identical to the U5 end of HIV-1 long terminal repeats (LTR). Based on the fluores-cence properties of molecular beacons, the substrate is designed to form a stem-loop structure labeled with a fluorophore at the 5' end and a quencher at the 3'end.IN cleaves the terminal 3'-dinucleotide containing the quencher, resulting in an increase in fluorescence which can be monitored on a spectrofluorometer. To optimize this assay, tests were performed to investigate the effects of substrates, enzyme and the metal ion concentrations on the IN activity and optimal param-eters were obtained. Moreover, 2 IN inhibitors were employed to test the perfor-mance of this assay in antiviral compound screening.Results: The fluorescent intensity of the reaction mixture varies linearly with time and is proportional to the velocity of the 3'-processing reaction. Tests were performed and the results showed that the optimal rate was obtained for a reaction mixture containing 50 mg/L recom-binant HIV-1 IN, 400 nmol/L substrate, and 10 mmol/L Mn2+. The IN 3'-processing reaction under the optimal conditions showed a more than 18-fold increase in the fluorescence intensity compared to the enzyme-free control. The IC50 values of the IN inhibitors obtained in our assay were similar to the values obtained from a radiolabeled substrate assay.Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that this is a fast, reliable, and sensitive method to monitor HIV IN 3'-processing reaction and that it can be used for inhibitor screening.

  20. [Evaluation of a new screening assay kit for the combined detection of HIV p24 antigen and antibody--comparison of the performance of the new kit and HIV antibody assay kits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, T; Watanabe, S; Kondo, M; Saito, T; Imai, M

    1999-07-01

    DUO is an automated HIV infection screening test kit based on the combined detection of p24 Ag and anti-HIV-1 and anti-HIV-2 IgG in human sera or plasma using the ELFA technique (Enzyme-Linked Fluorescent Assay). The performance of DUO was compared with that of HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd generation EIA plus and particle agglutination (PA) test. A total of 141 seropositive sera, 3 seroconversion panels, 300 seronegative sera and 387 potentially cross-reactive serum samples were tested. One hundred and forty one seropositive sera in Japan and Cameroon were all positive with DUO. Three seroconversion panels (panel Q, Z, AE) were tested to evaluate sensitivity. In Panel Q, infecution was detected seven days earlier with DUO than with the 3rd generation EIA plus and PA. In Panel AE, infection was detected four days earlier with DUO than with the single antibody assays. Three hundred seronegative sera from Kanagawa prefectural public health centers were all negative with DUO as well as PA test. Three hundred and eighty seven potentially cross-reacting samples were tested to challenge the specificity of the assay. These included samples from pregnant women and hepatitis patients. In four of the 204 samples from pregnant women, false-positive results were observed with DUO. In three of the 183 samples from hepatitis patients, false-positive results were also obtained with DUO. All samples of 7 DUO positive results were negative with western blot test. Five of them were negative with RT-PCR and 2 of them were not tested because there were not enough samples. Thirty cross-reacting (false-positive) samples by PA test from blood donors were tested by DUO, and all of these were negative by DUO.

  1. Development of a one-tube multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay for the simultaneous amplification of HIV type 1 group M gag and env heteroduplex mobility assay fragments

    OpenAIRE

    Cham, F.; Heyndrickx, L; Janssens, W; Vereecken, K.; Houwer, K.; Coppens, S.; Van Der Auwera, G.; Whittle, H; van der Groen, G

    2000-01-01

    The emergence of intersubtype recombinant HIV-1 isolates has made it imperative to analyze different regions of HIV-1 genomes. For this purpose a one-tube multiplex RT-PCR, coamplifying first-round amplicons that allow amplification of gag and env heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) fragments from different HIV-1 group M isolates, was developed, starting with plasma samples. The multiplex RT-PCR assay is sensitive: 115 of 136 (84.5%) samples were positive for both gag and env, positive amplific...

  2. Lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay for detecting active tuberculosis in HIV-positive adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Maunank; Hanrahan, Colleen; Wang, Zhuo Yu; Dendukuri, Nandini; Lawn, Stephen D; Denkinger, Claudia M; Steingart, Karen R

    2016-05-10

    Rapid detection of tuberculosis (TB) among people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a global health priority. HIV-associated TB may have different clinical presentations and is challenging to diagnose. Conventional sputum tests have reduced sensitivity in HIV-positive individuals, who have higher rates of extrapulmonary TB compared with HIV-negative individuals. The lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay (LF-LAM) is a new, commercially available point-of-care test that detects lipoarabinomannan (LAM), a lipopolysaccharide present in mycobacterial cell walls, in people with active TB disease. To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM for the diagnosis of active TB disease in HIV-positive adults who have signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB diagnosis).To assess the accuracy of LF-LAM as a screening test for active TB disease in HIV-positive adults irrespective of signs and symptoms suggestive of TB (TB screening). We searched the following databases without language restriction on 5 February 2015: the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register; MEDLINE (PubMed,1966); EMBASE (OVID, from 1980); Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED, from 1900), Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S, from 1900), and BIOSIS Previews (from 1926) (all three using the Web of Science platform; MEDION; LILACS (BIREME, from 1982); SCOPUS (from 1995); the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT); the search portal of the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP); and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&l (from 1861). Eligible study types included randomized controlled trials, cross-sectional studies, and cohort studies that determined LF-LAM accuracy for TB against a microbiological reference standard (culture or nucleic acid amplification test from any body site). A higher quality reference standard was one in which two or more specimen types were evaluated for TB, and a lower quality reference

  3. High-sensitive and rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by IFN-γ release assay among HIV-infected individuals in BCG-vaccinated area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Weimin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An accurate test for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is urgently needed in immunosuppressed populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic power of enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT-based IFN-γ release assay in detecting active and latent tuberculosis in HIV-infected population in bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG-vaccinated area. A total of 100 HIV-infected individuals including 32 active tuberculosis patients were recruited. An ELISPOT-based IFN-γ release assay, T-SPOT.TB, was used to evaluate the M. tuberculosis ESAT-6 and CFP-10 specific IFN-γ response. Tuberculin skin test (TST was performed for all recruited subjects. Results The subjects were divided into group HIV+ATB (HIV-infected individuals with active tuberculosis, n = 32, group HIV+LTB (HIV-infected individuals with positive results of T-SPOT.TB assay, n = 46 and group HIV only (HIV-infected individuals with negative results of T-SPOT.TB assay and without evidence of tuberculosis infection, n = 22. In group HIV+ATB and HIV+LTB, T-SPOT.TB positive rate in subjects with TST P 85% in patients with TB treatment for less than 1 month and CD4+ T cells ≥200/μl, while for patients treated for more than 3 months and CD4+ T cells Conclusion ELISPOT-based IFN-γ release assay is more sensitive and rapid for the diagnosis of TB infection in Chinese HIV-infected individuals with history of BCG vaccination, and could be an effective tool for guiding preventive treatment with isoniazid in latently infected people and for TB control in China.

  4. Short Communication: False Recent Ratio of the Limiting-Antigen Avidity Assay and Viral Load Testing Algorithm Among Cameroonians with Long-Term HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Briana A; Patel, Eshan U; Courtney, Colleen R; Nanfack, Aubin J; Bimela, Jude; Wang, Xiaohong; Eid, Issa; Quinn, Thomas C; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Nyambi, Phillipe N; Duerr, Ralf; Redd, Andrew D

    2017-11-01

    Current serological assays that are used for cross-sectional HIV incidence estimation have been shown to misclassify individuals with chronic infection. Limited information exists on the performance of cross-sectional incidence assays in Central Africa. HIV-positive individuals from Cameroon who were infected for at least 1 or 2 years were evaluated to determine the false recent ratio (FRR) of a two-assay algorithm, which includes the Limiting Antigen Avidity (LAg-Avidity) assay (normalized optical density units, ODn HIV viral load (>1000 copies/ml). The subject-level FRR was 5.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.1-10.5) for individuals infected for ≥1 year and 3.9% (95% CI, 0.8-11.0) for individuals infected for ≥2 years. These data suggest that the LAg-Avidity plus viral load incidence algorithm may overestimate HIV incidence rates in Central Africa.

  5. Performance of three automated fourth-generation combined HIV antigen/antibody assays in large-scale screening of blood donors and clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, K; von Sydow, M; Andersson, S

    2009-04-01

    Since the introduction in the mid-1980s, HIV testing has gradually improved both in terms of sensitivity and specificity. The so-called fourth generation of tests, combined HIV antigen/antibody assays, has now been introduced. This study compares three automated combined assays with older third-generation antibody assays in large-scale screening. Serum samples from routine screening of blood and plasma donors and clinical samples were investigated for specificity evaluation. Three fourth-generation combination assays from one manufacturer were compared with three older third-generation antibody assays from the same manufacturer. More than 40 000 samples per assay were included. For sensitivity, selected panels of confirmed HIV-1- and HIV-2-positive samples as well as seroconversion samples (HIV-1) from commercial panels and also from patients who appeared during the evaluation were used. The specificities of the fourth-generation tests were 99.91% (AxSYM), 99.95% (ARCHITECT) and 99.97% (PRISM) after repeated testing. Some specificity variation between reagent batches was observed. All HIV-1-positive samples were reactive by the three fourth-generation systems. HIV-1 seroconversion samples and panels were reactive earlier than by antibody-only tests. As for HIV-2 samples, AxSYM failed to detect one (n = 40), whereas PRISM and ARCHITECT detected all (n = 16 for PRISM and n = 52 for ARCHITECT). The new HIV antigen/antibody combination assay systems were found to have high sensitivity and specificity. The instruments provided a rational and easy way of testing at large scale.

  6. Quantitation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in Cell-Free Cervicovaginal Secretions: Comparison of Reverse Transcription-PCR Amplification (AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR 1.5) with Enhanced-Sensitivity Branched-DNA Assay (Quantiplex 3.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si-Mohamed, Ali; Andreoletti, Laurent; Colombet, Isabelle; Carreno, Marie-Paule; Lopez, Gladys; Chatelier, Gilles; Kazatchkine, Michel D.; Belec, Laurent

    2001-01-01

    Two commercially available hypersensitive assays for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA quantitation, AMPLICOR HIV-1 Monitor Test 1.5 and Quantiplex HIV RNA 3.0, were compared to detect and quantify HIV-1 RNA in the cell-free fraction of cervicovaginal secretions collected by vaginal washing. Three panel specimens were used: pooled cervicovaginal secretions spiked with HIV-1 subtype A or HIV-1 subtype B and cervicovaginal lavages from HIV-positive and HIV-negative women. Compared to the AMPLICOR HIV-1 Monitor Test 1.5 assay, the Quantiplex HIV-1 3.0 assay yielded higher estimates of HIV-1 RNA concentrations in several tested samples spiked with HIV-1 RNA subtype A, as well as subtype B, particularly samples containing low amounts of HIV-1 RNA. The sensitivity and specificity of the AMPLICOR HIV-1 Monitor Test 1.5 assay were 93 and 100%, respectively; the sensitivity and specificity of the Quantiplex HIV RNA 3.0 assay were 97 and 50%, respectively. In conclusion, in quantifying HIV-1 RNA in cervicovaginal secretions, the Quantiplex HIV RNA 3.0 may lack specificity, and the AMPLICOR HIV-1 Monitor Test 1.5 assay, although highly specific, may lack sensitivity. PMID:11376034

  7. Novel 3′-Processing Integrase Activity Assay by Real-Time PCR for Screening and Identification of HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supachai Sakkhachornphop

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The 3′-end processing (3′P of each viral long terminal repeat (LTR during human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 integration is a vital step in the HIV life cycle. Blocking the 3′P using 3′P inhibitor has recently become an attractive strategy for HIV-1 therapeutic intervention. Recently, we have developed a novel real-time PCR based assay for the detection of 3′P activity in vitro. The methodology usually involves biotinylated HIV-1 LTR, HIV-1 integrase (IN, and specific primers and probe. In this novel assay, we designed the HIV-1 LTR substrate based on a sequence with a homology to HIV-1 LTR labeled at its 3′ end with biotin on the sense strand. Two nucleotides at the 3′ end were subsequently removed by IN activity. Only two nucleotides labeled biotin were captured on an avidin-coated tube; therefore, inhibiting the binding of primers and probe results in late signals in the real-time PCR. This novel assay has successfully detected both the 3′P activity of HIV-1 IN and the anti-IN activity by Raltegravir and sodium azide agent. This real-time PCR assay has been shown to be effective and inexpensive for a high-throughput screening of novel IN inhibitors.

  8. Nucleic acid amplification of HIV-1 integrase sequence subtypes CRF01_AE and B for development of HIV anti-integrase drug resistance genotyping assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlar, F. R.; Bela, B.

    2017-08-01

    To anticipate the potential use of anti-integrase drugs in Indonesia for treatment of HIV-1 infection, the development of a drug resistance genotyping assay for anti-integrase is crucial in identifying the genetic drug resistance profile of Indonesian HIV-1 strains. This experiment aimed to amplify a target region in the integrase gene of Indonesian HIV-1 subtypes CRF01_AE and B that contain genetic mutations known to confer resistance to anti-integrase drug. Eleven archived plasma samples from individuals living with HIV-1 were obtained from the Virology and Cancer Pathobiology Research Center for Health Service (VCPRC FKUI-RSCM) laboratory. One of the plasma samples contained HIV-1 subtype B, and the remaining plasma samples contained subtype CRF01_AE. The target regions for all samples were amplified through RT-PCR, with an annealing temperature of 55 °C, using the primer pair AE_POL 4086F and AE_POL 5232R that were designed by VCPRC FKUI-RSCM. The results of this experiment show that 18.2% (2/11) of the samples were successfully amplified using the one-step RT-PCR. While the primer pair was effective in amplifying the target region in the integrase gene sequence for subtype B (100%; 1/1), it had a low efficacy (10%, 1/10) for subtype CRF01_AE. In conclusion, the primer pair can be used to amplify the target region in Indonesian HIV-1 strain subtypes CRF01_AE and B. However, optimization of the PCR condition and an increased number of samples would help to determine an accurate representation of the efficacy of the primer pair.

  9. Evaluation of four simple/rapid assays and two fourth-generation ELISAs for the identification of HIV infection on a serum panel representing the HIV-1 group M genetic diversity in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghokeng, Avelin Fobang; Ewane, Léonard; Awazi, Bih; Nanfack, Aubin; Delaporte, Eric; Peeters, Martine; Zekeng, Léopold

    2004-12-15

    The performance of 4 rapid and simple assays: Camstix-HIV 1+2 (Camdiagnostix, Yaounde, Cameroon); Determine HIV 1+2+0 (Abbott Laboratories, Tokyo, Japan); Genie II HIV-1/HIV-2 (Bio-Rad, Marnes la Coquette, France); ImmunoComb II HIV 1 & 2 BiSpot (Orgenics, Yavne, Israel); and 2 fourth-generation ELISAs: Enzygnost HIV Integral (Dade Behring, Marburg, Germany) and Genscreen plus HIV Ag-Ab (Bio-Rad, Marnes la Coquette, France) currently used in Cameroon to detect HIV infections were evaluated on a local serum panel. A total of 503 samples were collected, using the Camstix-HIV 1+2 assay. Overall, 280 samples were confirmed HIV positive, 181 were negative, and 42 were indeterminate. All positive samples belonged to group M: CRF02_AG (73.5%), A1 (7.1%), A2 (1.2%), G (4.7%), F2 (5.1%), D (1.6%), CRF11 (1.6%), CRF06 (1.2%), and CRF01_AE (1.6%). Sensitivity, specificity, test efficiency, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated both including and excluding indeterminate samples. Except for Genie II and ImmunoComb II (98.9 and 99.3%, respectively), sensitivities were 100% for the remaining 4 tests. Specificities, efficiencies, and positive predictive values of all assays were negatively affected by the addition of HIV-indeterminate samples in the calculations. These data show the importance of prior test evaluations on local serum panels and in field conditions before a national policy for HIV screening is decided on and stress also the need to use tests and algorithms that can reduce the high number of HIV-indeterminate results in Africa.

  10. DIAGNOSTIC CHARACTERISTICS OF HYPERSENSITIVE IMMUNOENZYME ASSAY KIT TO HIV-INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yu. Trohimchuk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of early diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus remains relevant and can be solved by introduction the highly sensitive 4th generation ELISA test kits in the laboratory practice. The advantage of this analysis is simultaneous determination of serum antigen p24 HIV-1 and HIV-specific total antibody (IgG, IgM, IgA, that can detect the infection in the early stages of development. In Private Joint Stock Company «Scientific and Production Company Diaproph-Med» a modified version of the test kit of the 4th generation DIA-HIV-Ag/Ab hypersensitivity was developed, which uses a mixture of synthetic analogs of viral antigens in the immune-enzyme conjugates at two stages of reaction. Significant amplification of specific signal is achieved by introducing a streptavidin which is conjugated to horseradish peroxidase polymeric form. The analytical sensitivity of the test kit to identify the 1st International Standard WHO HIV p24 (NIBSC was 0.78 IU/ml. The ability to test kit to detect early HIV infection has been examined for 9 seroconversion panels of sera (7 production ZeptoMetrix Corp. and 2 – SeraCare Life Sciences, USA and is comparable to its peers, the leading manufacturers of test kits. The diagnostic characteristics of the test kit tested on standard panels, including dilution of serum of HIV- infected people, and not diluted sera with antibodies to HIV-1 (1 869 samples and HIV-2 ( 41 sample. In these studies, the test kit detected HIV in a large ratio OD/cut off compared to similar commercial test kits for the 4th generation. The diagnostic specificity of the test kit DIA-HIV-Ag/Ab according to the results obtained in the study of blood donors from various transfusion services in Ukraine (93 788 researches was 99.95%.

  11. [Value of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of p24 antigen of human immunodeficiency virus in confirmation of HIV-infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzaeva, L A; Ol'khovskiĭ, I A; Neshumaev, D A; Shevchenko, N M; Vinogradova, M N

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate diagnostic value of p24 antigen detection for algorithm of confirmatory diagnostics of HIV-infection. Concurrently with Western blot assay (WB, "New Lav Blot1", Bio-Rad), tests for detection of p24 antigen of HIV (Genetic Systems HIV-1 Ag EIA", "VectoHIV-1 p24-antigen confirming test", and "DS-EIA-HIV-AG-SCREEN") were used for confirmation of first-positive result of immuno-enzyme assay. p24 HIV antigen was detected in serum samples in 8.4% of patients with equivocal result of WB and in 4.2% of patients with negative and positive results of WB. Presence of p24 was correlated with high viral load, and, in patients with confirmed diagnosis, with low CD4 cells count (testing. In groups of persons with negative and equivocal results of WB assay, detection of HIV p24 antigen points to the presence of infection and could be the reason for the final diagnosis. Detection of p24 in patients with positive result of WB assay allows to consider them as probable candidates for highly active antiretroviral therapy.

  12. The impact of HIV infection and CD4 cell count on the performance of an interferon gamma release assay in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabye, Martine G.; Ravn, Pernille; PrayGod, George

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The performance of the tuberculosis specific Interferon Gamma Release Assays (IGRAs) has not been sufficiently documented in tuberculosis- and HIV-endemic settings. This study evaluated the sensitivity of the QuantiFERON TB-Gold In-Tube (QFT-IT) in patients with culture confirmed...... pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in a TB- and HIV-endemic population and the effect of HIV-infection and CD4 cell count on test performance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 161 patients with sputum culture confirmed PTB were subjected to HIV- and QFT-IT testing and measurement of CD4 cell count. The QFT......-infection is prevalent....

  13. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Lindsey M; Irvin, Susan C; Kennedy, Steven C; Guo, Feng; Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C; Snapp, Erik L

    2015-02-01

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Amplification of the Gp41 gene for detection of mutations conferring resistance to HIV-1 fusion inhibitors on genotypic assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanumihardja, J.; Bela, B.

    2017-08-01

    Fusion inhibitors have potential for future use in HIV control programs in Indonesia, so the capacity to test resistance to such drugs needs to be developed. Resistance-detection with a genotypic assay began with amplification of the target gene, gp41. Based on the sequence of the two most common HIV subtypes in Indonesia, AE and B, a primer pair was designed. Plasma samples containing both subtypes were extracted to obtain HIV RNA. Using PCR, the primer pair was used to produce the amplification product, the identity of which was checked based on length under electrophoresis. Eleven plasma samples were included in this study. One-step PCR using the primer pair was able to amplify gp41 from 54.5% of the samples, and an unspecific amplification product was seen in 1.1% of the samples. Amplification failed in 36.4% of the samples, which may be due to an inappropriate primer sequence. It was also found that the optimal annealing temperature for producing the single expected band was 57.2 °C. With one-step PCR, the designed primer pair amplified the HIV-1 gp41 gene from subtypes AE and B. However, further research should be done to determine the conditions that will increase the sensitivity and specificity of the amplification process.

  15. Acute HIV infection (AHI): Trained Service Linkage Workers and fourth-generation Assay Significantly Shorten Time to Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel; Gao, Qianmiao; Miao, Hongyu; Gutierrez, Oswaldo; Martinez, Cecilio; Vigil, Karen; Utay, Netanya S; Arduino, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Identification and early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) during acute HIV infection (AHI) can preserve the immune system, reduce HIV reservoir size, and prevent transmission. We aimed to characterize patients with symptomatic AHI and their linkage/retention to care in a county clinic. Methods Retrospective chart review of 60 patients diagnosed with AHI from 7/2012 to 4/2017 at two county hospitals emergency departments in Houston, TX. We compared the interval between diagnosis and initiation of ART before and after implementation of an AHI protocol in 11/2014 comprised of trained service linkage workers and use of the fourth-generation Ag/Ab combination assay as newly recommended by the CDC in 6/2014. AHI was defined as 1) detectable HIV RNA or reactive fourth-generation Ag/Ab combination assay with non-reactive HIV-1 antibody, 2) reactive third-generation Ab assay and negative/indeterminate Western blot (WB), or 3) positive WB that is negative for p31 band. CDC and DHHS definitions were used for linkage to and retention to care respectively. Results 10 patients were diagnosed prior to AHI protocol (25-month period) and 50 after (31-month period). 92% established care with 78% retention. Median age 34 years (IQR 25–42), with 78% men, 58% Hispanic, 36% Black non-Hispanic, 50% men having sex with men. Presenting symptoms include fever 78%, chills 47%, malaise/fatigue 47%, nausea 38%, sore throat 37%, and headache 37%. Physical exam findings include rash 20%, pharyngeal edema/erythema 14%, cervical lymphadenopathy 8%, and thrush 7%. Baseline median CD4+ T cell count was 205 cells/µL (IQR 123–350), median HIV RNA 4.75 x 106 copies/mL (IQR 1.1–10.0 x 106). 56% had leukopenia, 47% thrombocytopenia, 37% syphilis, 12% aseptic meningitis and 8% K103N mutation. Median time to ART initiation decreased from 17 days (IQR 11.75–23.5) to 7 days (IQR 4.0–13.25) after protocol implementation (P = 0.011). Conclusion Employing trained service

  16. A novel assay for rapid HIV-1 protease detection using optical sensors and magnetic carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esseghaier, Chiheb; Ng, Andy; Zourob, Mohammed

    2012-10-01

    In this work, a very simple electrochemical HIV-1 protease biosensor useful for the development of an inexpensive lab-on-a- chip (LOC) device was constructed. The detection mechanism was designed to minimize the complexity either in the recognition receptor immobilization step or during the detection itself. The magnetic self-assembled monolayer of HIV-1 protease substrate peptide was able to detect as low as 10 pg/ml of the protease within 25 minutes with high specificity.

  17. A Novel Single-Cell FISH-Flow Assay Identifies Effector Memory CD4+ T cells as a Major Niche for HIV-1 Transcription in HIV-Infected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Grau-Expósito

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cells that actively transcribe HIV-1 have been defined as the “active viral reservoir” in HIV-infected individuals. However, important technical limitations have precluded the characterization of this specific viral reservoir during both treated and untreated HIV-1 infections. Here, we used a novel single-cell RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization-flow cytometry (FISH-flow assay that requires only 15 million unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs to characterize the specific cell subpopulations that transcribe HIV RNA in different subsets of CD4+ T cells. In samples from treated and untreated HIV-infected patients, effector memory CD4+ T cells were the main cell population supporting HIV RNA transcription. The number of cells expressing HIV correlated with the plasma viral load, intracellular HIV RNA, and proviral DNA quantified by conventional methods and inversely correlated with the CD4+ T cell count and the CD4/CD8 ratio. We also found that after ex vivo infection of unstimulated PBMCs, HIV-infected T cells upregulated the expression of CD32. In addition, this new methodology detected increased numbers of primary cells expressing viral transcripts and proteins after ex vivo viral reactivation with latency reversal agents. This RNA FISH-flow technique allows the identification of the specific cell subpopulations that support viral transcription in HIV-1-infected individuals and has the potential to provide important information on the mechanisms of viral pathogenesis, HIV persistence, and viral reactivation.

  18. A Novel Single-Cell FISH-Flow Assay Identifies Effector Memory CD4+ T cells as a Major Niche for HIV-1 Transcription in HIV-Infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau-Expósito, Judith; Serra-Peinado, Carla; Miguel, Lucia; Navarro, Jordi; Curran, Adrià; Burgos, Joaquin; Ocaña, Imma; Ribera, Esteban; Torrella, Ariadna; Planas, Bibiana; Badía, Rosa; Castellví, Josep; Falcó, Vicenç; Crespo, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cells that actively transcribe HIV-1 have been defined as the “active viral reservoir” in HIV-infected individuals. However, important technical limitations have precluded the characterization of this specific viral reservoir during both treated and untreated HIV-1 infections. Here, we used a novel single-cell RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization-flow cytometry (FISH-flow) assay that requires only 15 million unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to characterize the specific cell subpopulations that transcribe HIV RNA in different subsets of CD4+ T cells. In samples from treated and untreated HIV-infected patients, effector memory CD4+ T cells were the main cell population supporting HIV RNA transcription. The number of cells expressing HIV correlated with the plasma viral load, intracellular HIV RNA, and proviral DNA quantified by conventional methods and inversely correlated with the CD4+ T cell count and the CD4/CD8 ratio. We also found that after ex vivo infection of unstimulated PBMCs, HIV-infected T cells upregulated the expression of CD32. In addition, this new methodology detected increased numbers of primary cells expressing viral transcripts and proteins after ex vivo viral reactivation with latency reversal agents. This RNA FISH-flow technique allows the identification of the specific cell subpopulations that support viral transcription in HIV-1-infected individuals and has the potential to provide important information on the mechanisms of viral pathogenesis, HIV persistence, and viral reactivation. PMID:28698276

  19. GeneXpert HIV-1 quant assay, a new tool for scale up of viral load monitoring in the success of ART programme in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Smita; Jadhav, Sushama; Khopkar, Priyanka; Sane, Suvarna; Londhe, Rajkumar; Chimanpure, Vaishali; Dhilpe, Veronica; Ghate, Manisha; Yelagate, Rajendra; Panchal, Narayan; Rahane, Girish; Kadam, Dilip; Gaikwad, Nitin; Rewari, Bharat; Gangakhedkar, Raman

    2017-07-21

    Recent WHO guidelines identify virologic monitoring for diagnosing and confirming ART failure. In view of this, validation and scale up of point of care viral load technologies is essential in resource limited settings. A systematic validation of the GeneXpert® HIV-1 Quant assay (a point-of-care technology) in view of scaling up HIV-1 viral load in India to monitor the success of national ART programme was carried out. Two hundred nineteen plasma specimens falling in nine viral load ranges (5 L copies/ml) were tested by the Abbott m2000rt Real Time and GeneXpert HIV-1 Quant assays. Additionally, 20 seronegative; 16 stored specimens and 10 spiked controls were also tested. Statistical analysis was done using Stata/IC and sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and %misclassification rates were calculated as per DHSs/AISs, WHO, NACO cut-offs for virological failure. The GeneXpert assay compared well with the Abbott assay with a higher sensitivity (97%), specificity (97-100%) and concordance (91.32%). The correlation between two assays (r = 0.886) was statistically significant (p HIV-1 Quant assay compared well with Abbott HIV-1 m2000 Real Time PCR; suggesting its use as a Point of care assay for viral load estimation in resource limited settings. Its ease of performance and rapidity will aid in timely diagnosis of ART failures, integrated HIV-TB management and will facilitate the UNAIDS 90-90-90 target.

  20. Non-instrumented incubation of a recombinase polymerase amplification assay for the rapid and sensitive detection of proviral HIV-1 DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine Lillis

    Full Text Available Sensitive diagnostic tests for infectious diseases often employ nucleic acid amplification technologies (NAATs. However, most NAAT assays, including many isothermal amplification methods, require power-dependent instrumentation for incubation. For use in low resource settings (LRS, diagnostics that do not require consistent electricity supply would be ideal. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA is an isothermal amplification technology that has been shown to typically work at temperatures ranging from 25-43°C, and does not require a stringent incubation temperature for optimal performance. Here we evaluate the ability to incubate an HIV-1 RPA assay, intended for use as an infant HIV diagnostic in LRS, at ambient temperatures or with a simple non-instrumented heat source. To determine the range of expected ambient temperatures in settings where an HIV-1 infant diagnostic would be of most use, a dataset of the seasonal range of daily temperatures in sub Saharan Africa was analyzed and revealed ambient temperatures as low as 10°C and rarely above 43°C. All 24 of 24 (100% HIV-1 RPA reactions amplified when incubated for 20 minutes between 31°C and 43°C. The amplification from the HIV-1 RPA assay under investigation at temperatures was less consistent below 30°C. Thus, we developed a chemical heater to incubate HIV-1 RPA assays when ambient temperatures are between 10°C and 30°C. All 12/12 (100% reactions amplified with chemical heat incubation from ambient temperatures of 15°C, 20°C, 25°C and 30°C. We also observed that incubation at 30 minutes improved assay performance at lower temperatures where detection was sporadic using 20 minutes incubation. We have demonstrated that incubation of the RPA HIV-1 assay via ambient temperatures or using chemical heaters yields similar results to using electrically powered devices. We propose that this RPA HIV-1 assay may not need dedicated equipment to be a highly sensitive tool to diagnose

  1. Interferon gamma release assays for the diagnosis of latent TB infection in HIV-infected individuals in a low TB burden country.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cheallaigh, Clíona Ní

    2013-01-01

    Interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs) are used to diagnose latent tuberculosis infection. Two IGRAs are commercially available: the Quantiferon TB Gold In Tube (QFT-IT) and the T-SPOT.TB. There is debate as to which test to use in HIV+ individuals. Previous publications from high TB burden countries have raised concerns that the sensitivity of the QFT-IT assay, but not the T-SPOT.TB, may be impaired in HIV+ individuals with low CD4+ T-cell counts. We sought to compare the tests in a low TB burden setting.

  2. Diagnostic performance of interferon-gamma releasing assay in HIV-infected patients in China.

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    Yanhua Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Active tuberculosis infection represents a very common and significant threat to HIV-infected patients. But measures to accurately detect it are limited. OBJECTIVE: To compare and analyze the diagnostic efficacy of T-SPOT.TB alone and in combination with TST in HIV-infected patients in China. METHOD: TST (tuberculin skin test and T-SPOT.TB were performed on 131 HIV-infected patients admitted in Beijing You'an Hospital and Beijing Ditan Hospital between Oct, 2010 and Jul, 2012, who were initially diagnosed as suspected ATB (active TB. The patients were further categorized into ATB and Not ATB based on clinical and cultural evidences. The performance of TST and T-SPOT.TB were analyzed and compared. RESULTS: The sensitivity and specificity of T-SPOT.TB were 41.3% and 94.6%, respectively, both higher than TST (12.9% and 91.8%. By combining T-SPOT.TB and TST, the sensitivity did not increase, but specificity was elevated to 100%. TST, T-SPOT.TB and their combinations all performed better in patients with extra-pulmonary diseases than with pulmonary disorders. False-positive T-SPOT.TB results were found to be associated with history of prior TB. In addition, concomitant bacterial infections and low CD4 counts were associated with increased ATB risk. CONCLUSIONS: T-SPOT.TB is superior in screening ATB in HIV-infected patients in China over traditional TST. Additional TST would help to confirm a positive T-SPOT.TB result. Both tests work better for patients with extra-pulmonary conditions.

  3. Performance evaluation of the FDA-approved Determine™ HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo assay using plasma and whole blood specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masciotra, Silvina; Luo, Wei; Westheimer, Emily; Cohen, Stephanie E; Gay, Cynthia L; Hall, Laura; Pan, Yi; Peters, Philip J; Owen, S Michele

    2017-06-01

    The Determine™ HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo (DC) rapid test can identify HIV-1 infection earlier than rapid antibody-only tests in plasma specimens. We compared the performance of DC with a laboratory-based antigen/antibody (Ag/Ab) combo assay in plasma and evaluated antigen reactivity in whole blood specimens. We tested by DC 508 plasma specimens collected in a prospective study and 107 sequential plasma and simulated whole blood specimens from 20 seroconversion panels. Previous results using the ARCHITECT (ARC) Ag/Ab combo assay were compared to DC results. In seroconversion panels, the days from the first HIV1 RNA-positive test to first DC-reactive in plasma and whole blood was compared. McNemar's and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used for statistical analysis. Of 415 HIV-positive samples, ARC detected 396 (95.4%) and DC 337 (81.2%) (pARC-reactive/MS-negative, 78.6% of ARC-reactive/MS-indeterminate, and 99.6% of ARC-reactive/MS-HIV-1-positive or -undifferentiated specimens. DC antigen reactivity was higher among ARC-reactive/MS-negative than MS-indeterminate samples. In 20 HIV-1 seroconversion panels, there was a significant difference between DC reactivity in plasma (91.1%) and whole blood (56.4%) (pplasma (p=0.008). In plasma, DC was significantly less sensitive than an instrumented laboratory-based Ag/Ab combo assay. DC in plasma was significantly more sensitive compared to whole blood in early HIV-1 infections. With the U.S. laboratory-based diagnostic algorithm, DC as the first step would likely miss a high proportion of HIV-1 infections in early stages of seroconversion. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Improved testing of recent HIV-1 infections with the BioRad avidity assay compared to the limiting antigen avidity assay and BED Capture enzyme immunoassay: evaluation using reference sample panels from the German Seroconverter Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Andrea; Santos-Hoevener, Claudia; Meixenberger, Karolin; Zimmermann, Ruth; Somogyi, Sybille; Fiedler, Stefan; Hofmann, Alexandra; Bartmeyer, Barbara; Jansen, Klaus; Hamouda, Osamah; Bannert, Norbert; Kuecherer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    The variety and limitations of current laboratory methods for estimating HIV-incidence has driven attempts to improve and standardize the performance of serological 'Tests for Recent HIV-Infections' (TRI). Primary and follow-up HIV-1 positive plasma samples from individuals with well-defined dates of infection collected as part of the German Seroconverter Cohort provided specimens highly suitable for use in comparing the performance of three TRIs: the AWARE™ BED™ EIA HIV-1 Incidence test (BED-CEIA), Genetic systems HIV-1/HIV-2 Plus O EIA antibody avidity-based assay (BioRad Avidity) and Sedia™ HIV-1 LAg Avidity EIA (LAg Avidity). The evaluation panel included 180 specimens: 44 from antiretroviral (ARV)-naïve individuals with recently acquired HIV-infection (≤ 130 days; 25 B and 19 non-B subtypes) and 136 from long-term (>12 months) infected individuals [101 ARV-naïve subtype B, 16 non-B subtypes, 14 ARV-treated individuals, 5 slow progressors (SLP)]. For long-term infected, ARV-naïve individuals the false recent rates (FRR) of both the BioRad and LAg Avidity assays were 2% (2/101 for subtype B) and 6% (1/16 for subtype 'non-B'), while the FRR of the BED-CEIA was 7% (7/101 for subtype B) and 25% (4/16 for subtype 'non-B') (all p>0.05). Misclassification of ARV-treated individuals and SLP was rare by LAg (1/14, 0/5) and BioRad Avidity assays (2/14, 1/5) but more frequent by BED-CEIA (5/14, 3/5). Among recently-infected individuals (subtype B), 60% (15/25) were correctly classified by BED-CEIA, 88% (22/25) by BioRad Avidity and significantly fewer by LAg (48%, 12/25) compared to BioRad Avidity (p = 0.005) with a higher true-recency rate among non-B infections for all assays. This study using well-characterized specimens demonstrated lower FRRs for both avidity methods than with the BED-CEIA. For recently infected individuals the BioRad Avidity assay was shown to give the most accurate results.

  5. Improved testing of recent HIV-1 infections with the BioRad avidity assay compared to the limiting antigen avidity assay and BED Capture enzyme immunoassay: evaluation using reference sample panels from the German Seroconverter Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Hauser

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The variety and limitations of current laboratory methods for estimating HIV-incidence has driven attempts to improve and standardize the performance of serological 'Tests for Recent HIV-Infections' (TRI. Primary and follow-up HIV-1 positive plasma samples from individuals with well-defined dates of infection collected as part of the German Seroconverter Cohort provided specimens highly suitable for use in comparing the performance of three TRIs: the AWARE™ BED™ EIA HIV-1 Incidence test (BED-CEIA, Genetic systems HIV-1/HIV-2 Plus O EIA antibody avidity-based assay (BioRad Avidity and Sedia™ HIV-1 LAg Avidity EIA (LAg Avidity. METHODS: The evaluation panel included 180 specimens: 44 from antiretroviral (ARV-naïve individuals with recently acquired HIV-infection (≤ 130 days; 25 B and 19 non-B subtypes and 136 from long-term (>12 months infected individuals [101 ARV-naïve subtype B, 16 non-B subtypes, 14 ARV-treated individuals, 5 slow progressors (SLP]. RESULTS: For long-term infected, ARV-naïve individuals the false recent rates (FRR of both the BioRad and LAg Avidity assays were 2% (2/101 for subtype B and 6% (1/16 for subtype 'non-B', while the FRR of the BED-CEIA was 7% (7/101 for subtype B and 25% (4/16 for subtype 'non-B' (all p>0.05. Misclassification of ARV-treated individuals and SLP was rare by LAg (1/14, 0/5 and BioRad Avidity assays (2/14, 1/5 but more frequent by BED-CEIA (5/14, 3/5. Among recently-infected individuals (subtype B, 60% (15/25 were correctly classified by BED-CEIA, 88% (22/25 by BioRad Avidity and significantly fewer by LAg (48%, 12/25 compared to BioRad Avidity (p = 0.005 with a higher true-recency rate among non-B infections for all assays. CONCLUSIONS: This study using well-characterized specimens demonstrated lower FRRs for both avidity methods than with the BED-CEIA. For recently infected individuals the BioRad Avidity assay was shown to give the most accurate results.

  6. A signal-to-cutoff ratio in the Abbott architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay that predicts subsequent confirmation of HIV-1 infection in a low-prevalence setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Tomas Ostergaard; Robertson, Peter; Whybin, Ross; Chambers, Ian; Lahra, Monica; Rawlinson, William; Post, Jeffrey John

    2015-05-01

    A rapid diagnosis is considered important in HIV care. In 138,911 testing episodes with the Abbott Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay (3,705 reactive samples), a signal-to-cutoff ratio of >151.17 had a positive predictive value of 100% and a sensitivity of 67.4% for the detection of subsequently confirmed HIV infection. We suggest that results higher than this signal-to-cutoff ratio threshold may be reported to clinicians before the completion of confirmatory testing. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Field Evaluation of Performance of Alere and Cepheid Qualitative HIV Assays for Pediatric Point-of-Care Testing in an Academic Hospital in Soweto, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Tanya Y; Sherman, Gayle G; Nakwa, Firdose; MacLeod, William B; Sipambo, Nosisa; Velaphi, Sithembiso; Carmona, Sergio

    2017-11-01

    Point-of-care (POC) technologies for HIV diagnosis in infants have the potential to overcome logistical challenges that delay treatment initiation and prevent improvements in morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of two POC technologies against the current standard-of-care (SOC) laboratory-based assay in South Africa, when operated by nurses in a hospital environment. Children <18 months of age who were treatment naive (excluding prophylaxis) and in whom an HIV PCR test was indicated were eligible for the study. To increase the rate of enrollment of HIV PCR-positive children, HIV-exposed neonates at high risk of mother-to-child transmission and children requiring confirmatory HIV testing were preferentially enrolled. The two POC technologies demonstrated excellent concordance, with 315 (97.8%) results consistent with the SOC result. The POC technologies yielded 102 positive and 220 negative tests each. The SOC assay had 101 positive, 214 negative, 4 indeterminate, 1 invalid, and 2 specimen-rejected results. To include the indeterminate results in sensitivity/specificity calculations, a sensitivity analysis was performed, which yielded a simulated sensitivity of 0.9904 (interquartile range [IQR], 0.9808 to 0.9904) and a specificity of 0.9954 (IQR, 0.9954 to 1.0). This study confirmed that both POC technologies can be successfully used outside the laboratory environment to yield precise sensitivity/specificity values for pediatric, including neonatal, HIV testing. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Dual testing algorithm of BED-CEIA and AxSYM Avidity Index assays performs best in identifying recent HIV infection in a sample of Rwandan sex workers.

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    Sarah L Braunstein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To assess the performance of BED-CEIA (BED and AxSYM Avidity Index (Ax-AI assays in estimating HIV incidence among female sex workers (FSW in Kigali, Rwanda. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Eight hundred FSW of unknown HIV status were HIV tested; HIV-positive women had BED and Ax-AI testing at baseline and ≥12 months later to estimate assay false-recent rates (FRR. STARHS-based HIV incidence was estimated using the McWalter/Welte formula, and adjusted with locally derived FRR and CD4 results. HIV incidence and local assay window periods were estimated from a prospective cohort of FSW. At baseline, 190 HIV-positive women were BED and Ax-AI tested; 23 were classified as recent infection (RI. Assay FRR with 95% confidence intervals were: 3.6% (1.2-8.1 (BED; 10.6% (6.1-17.0 (Ax-AI; and 2.1% (0.4-6.1 (BED/Ax-AI combined. After FRR-adjustment, incidence estimates by BED, Ax-AI, and BED/Ax-AI were: 5.5/100 person-years (95% CI 2.2-8.7; 7.7 (3.2-12.3; and 4.4 (1.4-7.3. After CD4-adjustment, BED, Ax-AI, and BED/Ax-AI incidence estimates were: 5.6 (2.6-8.6; 9.7 (5.0-14.4; and 4.7 (2.0-7.5. HIV incidence rates in the first and second 6 months of the cohort were 4.6 (1.6-7.7 and 2.2 (0.1-4.4. CONCLUSIONS: Adjusted incidence estimates by BED/Ax-AI combined were similar to incidence in the first 6 months of the cohort. Furthermore, false-recent rate on the combined BED/Ax-AI algorithm was low and substantially lower than for either assay alone. Improved assay specificity with time since seroconversion suggests that specificity would be higher in population-based testing where more individuals have long-term infection.

  9. Clinical utility of a novel molecular assay in various combination strategies with existing methods for diagnosis of HIV-related tuberculosis in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ssengooba, Willy; Nakiyingi, Lydia; Armstrong, Derek T.; Cobelens, Frank G.; Alland, David; Manabe, Yukari C.; Dorman, Susan E.; Ellner, Jerrold J.; Joloba, Moses L.

    2014-01-01

    Low income, high-tuberculosis burden, countries are considering selective deployment of Xpert MTB/RIF assay (Xpert) due to high cost per test. We compared the diagnostic gain of the Xpert add-on strategy with Xpert replacement strategy for pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosis among HIV-infected adults

  10. Ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric assay for therapeutic drug monitoring of antiretroviral drugs in pediatric HIV-1 infection applying dried blood spots.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, R.J.; Kampen, J.J. van; Reedijk, M.L.; Scheuer, R.D.; Dekker, L.J.; Burger, D.M.; Hartwig, N.G.; Osterhaus, A.D.; Luider, T.M.; Gruters, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Kaletra (Abott Laboratories) is a co-formulated medication used in the treatment of HIV-1-infected children, and it contains the two antiretroviral protease inhibitor drugs lopinavir and ritonavir. We validated two new ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric assays to be used for

  11. Ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric assay for therapeutic drug monitoring of antiretroviral drugs in pediatric HIV-1 infection applying dried blood spots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.W. Meesters (Roland); J.J.A. van Kampen (Jeroen); M.L. Reedijk (Mariska); R.D. Scheuer (Rachel); L.J.M. Dekker (Lennard); D.M. Burger (David); N.G. Hartwig (Nico); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); T.M. Luider (Theo); R.A. Gruters (Rob)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractKaletra® (Abott Laboratories) is a co-formulated medication used in the treatment of HIV-1-infected children, and it contains the two antiretroviral protease inhibitor drugs lopinavir and ritonavir. We validated two new ultrafast and high-throughput mass spectrometric assays to be used

  12. Surveillance technology for HIV-1 subtype C in Ethiopia: an env-based NASBA molecular beacon assay to discriminate between subcluster C and C'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ayele, Workenesh; Baar, Michel P. de; Goudsmit, Jaap; Kliphuis, Aletta; Tilahun, Tesfaye; Dorigo-Zetsma, Wendelien; Wolday, Dawit; Abebe, Almaz; Mengistu, Yohannes; Pollakis, Georgios

    2005-01-01

    Forty-nine samples with known C2V3 sequences were used for the evaluation of an env-based molecular beacon assay to distinguish between the two genetic subclusters C and C' which characterize the HIV-1 epidemic in Ethiopia. Two subcluster C and two subcluster C' beacons targeting two different loci

  13. DETERMINATION OF VIRAL TROPISM BY GENOTYPING AND PHENOTYPING ASSAYS IN BRAZILIAN HIV-1-INFECTED PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liã Bárbara Arruda

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The clinical application of CCR5 antagonists involves first determining the coreceptor usage by the infecting viral strain. Bioinformatics programs that predict coreceptor usage could provide an alternative method to screen candidates for treatment with CCR5 antagonists, particularly in countries with limited financial resources. Thus, the present study aims to identify the best approach using bioinformatics tools for determining HIV-1 coreceptor usage in clinical practice. Proviral DNA sequences and Trofile results from 99 HIV-1-infected subjects under clinical monitoring were analyzed in this study. Based on the Trofile results, the viral variants present were 81.1% R5, 21.4% R5X4 and 1.8% X4. Determination of tropism using a Geno2pheno[coreceptor] analysis with a false positive rate of 10% gave the most suitable performance in this sampling: the R5 and X4 strains were found at frequencies of 78.5% and 28.4%, respectively, and there was 78.6% concordance between the phenotypic and genotypic results. Further studies are needed to clarify how genetic diversity amongst virus strains affects bioinformatics-driven approaches for determining tropism. Although this strategy could be useful for screening patients in developing countries, some limitations remain that restrict the wider application of coreceptor usage tests in clinical practice.

  14. Multi-centre evaluation of the Determine HIV Combo assay when used for point of care testing in a high risk clinic-based population.

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    Damian P Conway

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Determine HIV Combo (DHC is the first point of care assay designed to increase sensitivity in early infection by detecting both HIV antibody and antigen. We conducted a large multi-centre evaluation of DHC performance in Sydney sexual health clinics. METHODS: We compared DHC performance (overall, by test component and in early infection with conventional laboratory HIV serology (fourth generation screening immunoassay, supplementary HIV antibody, p24 antigen and Western blot tests when testing gay and bisexual men attending four clinic sites. Early infection was defined as either acute or recent HIV infection acquired within the last six months. RESULTS: Of 3,190 evaluation specimens, 39 were confirmed as HIV-positive (12 with early infection and 3,133 were HIV-negative by reference testing. DHC sensitivity was 87.2% overall and 94.4% and 0% for the antibody and antigen components, respectively. Sensitivity in early infection was 66.7% (all DHC antibody reactive and the DHC antigen component detected none of nine HIV p24 antigen positive specimens. Median HIV RNA was higher in false negative than true positive cases (238,025 vs. 37,591 copies/ml; p = 0.022. Specificity overall was 99.4% with the antigen component contributing to 33% of false positives. CONCLUSIONS: The DHC antibody component detected two thirds of those with early infection, while the DHC antigen component did not enhance performance during point of care HIV testing in a high risk clinic-based population.

  15. Multi-Centre Evaluation of the Determine HIV Combo Assay when Used for Point of Care Testing in a High Risk Clinic-Based Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Damian P.; Holt, Martin; McNulty, Anna; Couldwell, Deborah L.; Smith, Don E.; Davies, Stephen C.; Cunningham, Philip; Keen, Phillip; Guy, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Background Determine HIV Combo (DHC) is the first point of care assay designed to increase sensitivity in early infection by detecting both HIV antibody and antigen. We conducted a large multi-centre evaluation of DHC performance in Sydney sexual health clinics. Methods We compared DHC performance (overall, by test component and in early infection) with conventional laboratory HIV serology (fourth generation screening immunoassay, supplementary HIV antibody, p24 antigen and Western blot tests) when testing gay and bisexual men attending four clinic sites. Early infection was defined as either acute or recent HIV infection acquired within the last six months. Results Of 3,190 evaluation specimens, 39 were confirmed as HIV-positive (12 with early infection) and 3,133 were HIV-negative by reference testing. DHC sensitivity was 87.2% overall and 94.4% and 0% for the antibody and antigen components, respectively. Sensitivity in early infection was 66.7% (all DHC antibody reactive) and the DHC antigen component detected none of nine HIV p24 antigen positive specimens. Median HIV RNA was higher in false negative than true positive cases (238,025 vs. 37,591 copies/ml; p = 0.022). Specificity overall was 99.4% with the antigen component contributing to 33% of false positives. Conclusions The DHC antibody component detected two thirds of those with early infection, while the DHC antigen component did not enhance performance during point of care HIV testing in a high risk clinic-based population. PMID:24714441

  16. Low specificity of determine HIV1/2 RDT using whole blood in south west Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inge Kroidl

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of two rapid detection tests (RDTs for HIV 1/2 in plasma and in whole blood samples. METHODS: More than 15,000 study subjects above the age of two years participated in two rounds of a cohort study to determine the prevalence of HIV. HIV testing was performed using the Determine HIV 1/2 test (Abbott in the first (2006/2007 and the HIV 1/2 STAT-PAK Dipstick Assay (Chembio in the second round (2007/2008 of the survey. Positive results were classified into faint and strong bands depending on the visual appearance of the test strip and confirmed by ELISA and Western blot. RESULTS: The sensitivity and specificity of the Determine RDT were 100% (95% confidence interval= 86.8 to 100% and 96.8% (95.9 to 97.6% in whole blood and 100% (99.7 to 100% and 97.9% (97.6 to 98.1% in plasma respectively. Specificity was highly dependent on the tested sample type: when using whole blood, 67.1% of positive results were false positive, as opposed to 17.4% in plasma. Test strips with only faint positive bands were more often false positive than strips showing strong bands and were more common in whole blood than in plasma. Evaluation of the STAT-PAK RDT in plasma during the second year resulted in a sensitivity of 99.7% (99.1 to 99.9% and a specificity of 99.3% (99.1 to 99.4% with 6.9% of the positive results being false. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that the Determine HIV 1/2 strip test with its high sensitivity is an excellent tool to screen for HIV infection, but that--at least in our setting--it can not be recommended as a confirmatory test in VCT campaigns where whole blood is used.

  17. Electrochemical studies of nevirapine, an anti-HIV drug, and its assay in tablets and biological samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JALDAPPAGARI SEETHARAMAPPA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical oxidation of nevirapine, an anti-HIV drug, at a glassy carbon electrode has been studied by voltammetric techniques. Nevirapine showed one well defined irreversible oxidation peak with a potential of 0.749 V in phosphate buffer at pH 10. The effects of different electrolytes, pH and scan rate on the electrochemical behaviour of nevira¬pine were examined to determine the optimum reaction conditions. The oxidation peak current was found to vary linearly with the concentration of nevirapine in the range of 5.0 – 350 µM. The limit of detection and limit of quantification values were calculated and found to be 1.026 µM and 3.420 µM, respectively. The low relative standard deviation values of inter-day and intra-day assays highlighted the good reproducibility of the proposed m¬ethod for assay of nevirapine. Further, a sensitive and accurate differential pulse voltammetric method was developed for the determination of nevirapine concentrations in pharma¬ceutical formulations.

  18. Accuracy of a rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for diagnosis of group B Streptococcus colonization in a cohort of HIV-infected pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouvea, Maria Isabel S; Joao, Esau C; Teixeira, Maria de Lourdes B; Read, Jennifer S; Fracalanzza, Sergio E L; Souza, Claudia T V; Souza, Maria José de; Torres Filho, Helio M; Leite, Cassiana C F; do Brasil, Pedro E A A

    2017-05-01

    There are limited data regarding Xpert performance to detect Group B Streptococcus (GBS) in HIV-infected pregnant women. We evaluated the accuracy of a rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test in a cohort of HIV-infected women. At 35-37 weeks of pregnancy, a pair of combined rectovaginal swabs were collected for two GBS assays in a cohort of sequentially included HIV-infected women in Rio de Janeiro: (1) culture; and (2) real-time PCR assay [GeneXpert GBS (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA)]. Using culture as the reference, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative-likelihood ratios were estimated. From June 2012 to February 2015, 337 pregnant women met inclusion criteria. One woman was later excluded, due to failure to obtain a result in the index test; 336 were included in the analyses. The GBS colonization rate was 19.04%. Sensitivity and specificity of the GeneXpert GBS assay were 85.94% (95% CI: 75.38-92.42) and 94.85% (95% CI: 91.55-96.91), respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 79.71% (95% CI: 68.78-87.51) and 96.63% (95% CI: 93.72-98.22), respectively. GeneXpert GBS is an acceptable test for the identification of GBS colonization in HIV-infected pregnant women and represents a reasonable option to detect GBS colonization in settings where culture is not feasible.

  19. A rapid and low-cost microscopic observation drug susceptibility assay for detecting TB and MDR-TB among individuals infected by HIV in South India

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    S Solomon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The converging epidemics of HIV and tuberculosis (TB pose one of the greatest public health challenges of our time. Rapid diagnosis of TB is essential in view of its infectious nature, high burden of cases, and emergence of drug resistance. Objective: The purpose of this present study was to evaluate the feasibility of implementing the microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS assay, a novel assay for the diagnosis of TB and multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB directly from sputum specimens, in the Indian setting. Materials and Methods: This study involved a cross-sectional, blinded assessment of the MODS assay on 1036 suspected cases of pulmonary TB in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients against the radiometric method, BD-BACTEC TB 460 system. Results: Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of the MODS assay in detecting MTB among TB suspected patients were 89.1%, 99.1%, 94.2%, 95.8%, respectively. In addition, in the diagnosis of drug-resistant TB, the MODS assay was 84.2% sensitive for those specimens reporting MDR, 87% sensitivity for those specimens reporting INH mono-resistance, and 100% sensitive for specimens reporting RIF mono-resistance. The median time to detection of TB in the MODS assay versus BACTEC was 9 versus 21 days (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Costing 5 to 10 times lesser than the automated culture methods, the MODS assay has the potential clinical utility as a simple and rapid method. It could be effectively used as an alternative method for diagnosing TB and detection of MDR-TB in a timely and affordable way in resource-limited settings.

  20. A Biochemical/Biophysical Assay Dyad for HTS-Compatible Triaging of Inhibitors of the HIV-1 Nef/Hck SH3 Interaction

    KAUST Repository

    Breuer, Sebastian

    2013-07-26

    The current treatment regimens for HIV include over 20 anti-retrovirals. However, adverse drug effects and the emergence of drug resistance necessitates the continued improvement of the existing drug classes as well as the development of novel drugs that target as yet therapeutically unexploited viral and cellular pathways. Here we demonstrate a strategy for the discovery of protein-protein interaction inhibitors of the viral pathogenicity factor HIV-1 Nef and its interaction with the host factor SH3. A combination of a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy resonance energy transfer-based assay and a label-free resonant waveguide grating-based assay was optimized for high-throughput screening formats.

  1. Evaluation of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay at a tertiary care referral hospital in a setting where tuberculosis and HIV infection are highly endemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Justin; Bates, Matthew; Chilukutu, Lophina; Mzyece, Judith; Cheelo, Busiku; Chilufya, Moses; Mukonda, Lukundo; Mumba, Maxwell; Tembo, John; Chomba, Mumba; Kapata, Nathan; Maeurer, Markus; Rachow, Andrea; Clowes, Petra; Hoelscher, Michael; Mwaba, Peter; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2012-11-01

    BACKGROUND. There were 1.45 million deaths from tuberculosis in 2011. A substantial proportion of active pulmonary tuberculosis cases in countries where tuberculosis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and AIDS are highly endemic remain undiagnosed because of the reliance on sputum-smear microscopy. This study evaluated the performance of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay at a tertiary care referral center in Zambia, a country where the burden of tuberculosis and HIV infection is high. METHODS. A total of 881 adult inpatients admitted to University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka who were able to produce sputum were enrolled and analyzed in the study, irrespective of admission diagnosis. Sputum specimens were analyzed by fluorescence smear microscopy, the Xpert MTB/RIF assay, mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) culture,and MGIT drug-susceptibility testing. The sensitivity and specificity of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay were evaluated using culture as the gold standard. RESULTS. Culture-confirmed tuberculosis was found in 201 of 881 patients (22.8%). The specificity of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay was 95.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92.4%–96.8%),and the sensitivity was 86.1% (95% CI, 80.3%–90.4%). In sputum smear–negative, culture-positive cases, the assay was 74.7% sensitive (95% CI, 64.6%–82.8%), identifying 71 additional tuberculosis cases that were not detected by smear microscopy.A total of 18 of 111 patients with tuberculosis who were tested (16.2%) had multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis.The sensitivity and specificity of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay for detecting culture-confirmed, rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis was 81.3% (95% CI, 53.7%–95.0%) and 97.5% (95% CI,90.4%–99.6%), respectively. CONCLUSIONS. The Xpert MTB/RIF assay performs better than smear microscopy in an inpatient setting in a country where tuberculosis and HIV infection are highly endemic. Assessment of its usefulness and cost-effectiveness for increased detection of tuberculosis

  2. Performance of the Abbott RealTime MTB and MTB RIF/INH Assays in a Setting of High Tuberculosis and HIV Coinfection in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lesley; David, Anura; Noble, Lara; Nduna, Matilda; Da Silva, Pedro; Black, Andrew; Venter, Francois; Stevens, Wendy

    2017-08-01

    South Africa is a country with a high incidence of tuberculosis (TB), complicated by coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The Xpert MTB/RIF (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) is used in South Africa as the test for the initial diagnosis of TB, and other molecular platforms such as the m 2000 (Abbott Molecular, Des Plaines, IL, USA) are widely used for molecular monitoring of HIV load. The latter platform is now also equipped with the RealTi m e (RT) MTB and RealTi m e MTB RIF/INH assays for TB and first-line drug resistance screening but has not been evaluated in settings of HIV and TB coinfection. A prospective clinical validation study was conducted at a community health center in Johannesburg, South Africa, and consenting individuals with presumptive pulmonary TB were enrolled. The performance of the Abbott assays was compared with those of the Xpert MTB/RIF, liquid culture, drug susceptibility testing, and clinical case definitions. A statistical analysis was performed on 206 individuals (73% were HIV positive). The sensitivity and specificity of the RT MTB were 82.5% (confidence interval [CI], 67.2 to 92.7) and 93.1% (CI, 86.2 to 97.2) on raw sputum and 77.5% (CI, 61.5 to 89.2) and 95.1% (CI, 88.9 to 98.4) on concentrated sputum, respectively, compared with those from liquid culture. The RT MTB correctly identified 17/35 more smear-negative culture-positive specimens than the Xpert MTB/RIF. Both the RT MTB and the Xpert MTB/RIF displayed sensitivities >70% and specificities >90% in HIV-positive individuals. The available drug resistance results concurred with MTBDR plus and drug susceptibility profiles. The RT MTB assay has similar diagnostic performance to the Xpert MTB/RIF and is suited to testing presumptive TB patients coinfected with HIV. The existing laboratory information system connectivity, training, and technical support make this a viable polyvalent option to scale up TB alongside HIV laboratory testing services in South Africa. Copyright

  3. Use of an in vivo FTA assay to assess the magnitude, functional avidity and epitope variant cross-reactivity of T cell responses following HIV-1 recombinant poxvirus vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danushka K Wijesundara

    Full Text Available Qualitative characteristics of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells (CTLs are important in measuring the effectiveness of CTLs in controlling HIV-1 infections. Indeed, in recent studies patients who are naturally resistant to HIV-1 infections have been shown to possess CTLs that are of high functional avidity and have a high capacity to recognize HIV epitope variants, when compared to HIV-1 infection progressors. When developing efficacious vaccines, assays that can effectively measure CTL quality specifically in vivo are becoming increasingly important. Here we report the use of a recently developed high-throughput multi-parameter technique, known as the fluorescent target array (FTA assay, to simultaneously measure CTL killing magnitude, functional avidity and epitope variant cross-reactivity in real time in vivo. In the current study we have applied the FTA assay as a screening tool to assess a large cohort of over 20 different HIV-1 poxvirus vaccination strategies in mice. This screen revealed that heterologous poxvirus prime-boost vaccination regimes (i.e., recombinant fowlpox (FPV-HIV prime followed by a recombinant vaccinia virus (VV-HIV booster were the most effective in generating high quality CTL responses in vivo. In conclusion, we have demonstrated how the FTA assay can be utilized as a cost effective screening tool (by reducing the required number of animals by >100 fold, to evaluate a large range of HIV-1 vaccination strategies in terms of CTL avidity and variant cross-reactivity in an in vivo setting.

  4. Assessment of BED HIV-1 incidence assay in seroconverter cohorts: effect of individuals with long-term infection and importance of stable incidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet M McNicholl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Performance of the BED assay in estimating HIV-1 incidence has previously been evaluated by using longitudinal specimens from persons with incident HIV infections, but questions remain about its accuracy. We sought to assess its performance in three longitudinal cohorts from Thailand where HIV-1 CRF01_AE and subtype B' dominate the epidemic. DESIGN: BED testing was conducted in two longitudinal cohorts with only incident infections (a military conscript cohort and an injection drug user cohort and in one longitudinal cohort (an HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial cohort that also included long-term infections. METHODS: Incidence estimates were generated conventionally (based on the number of annual serocoversions and by using BED test results in the three cohorts. Adjusted incidence was calculated where appropriate. RESULTS: For each longitudinal cohort the BED incidence estimates and the conventional incidence estimates were similar when only newly infected persons were tested, whether infected with CRF01_AE or subtype B'. When the analysis included persons with long-term infections (to mimic a true cross-sectional cohort, BED incidence estimates were higher, although not significantly, than the conventional incidence estimates. After adjustment, the BED incidence estimates were closer to the conventional incidence estimates. When the conventional incidence varied over time, as in the early phase of the injection drug user cohort, the difference between the two estimates increased, but not significantly. CONCLUSIONS: Evaluation of the performance of incidence assays requires the inclusion of a substantial number of cohort-derived specimens from individuals with long-term HIV infection and, ideally, the use of cohorts in which incidence remained stable. Appropriate adjustments of the BED incidence estimates generate estimates similar to those generated conventionally.

  5. HIV-1整合酶链转移反应抑制剂的荧光筛选方法%A Fluorescent Screening Assay for HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors Targeting Strand Transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘斌; 刘昕; 李杉; 何红秋; 张小轶; 谭建军; 陈慰祖; 王存新

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase is an ideal target for anti-HIV-1 drug discovery. The aim of the present study was to develop a highly effective and more convenient screening assay for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors targeting strand transfer. First, the recombinant expression vector pNL-IN, which contains the HIV-1 integrase gene, was transformed into E. coli BL21 ( DE3 ) competent cells for prokaryotic expression. The recombinant integrase protein was purified by affinity chromatography. It was validated that the recombinant integrase protein was pure and active for screening assay development. Then, the biotin-labeled donor DNA and the FITC-labeled target DNA were synthesized and applied in the assay, and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads were used to capture the product DNA in the reaction system. Finally, the fluorescence signal was detected by a fluorescence microplate reader for the calculation of sample activity. Two reported integrase inhibitors, S-1360 and MK-0518 , were tested to validate the screening assay, and the results are in accordance with previous studies, which indicated that the screening assay could be used for the screening of integrase inhibitor targeting strand transfer. The screening assay for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors developed in the present study is more convenient, time-saving and cost-effective than previous screening assays.%整合酶被认为是抗HIV-1药物研究的理想靶点之一.为了建立便捷高效的整合酶链转移反应抑制剂筛选方法,首先将HIV-1整合酶原核表达载体pNL-IN转化入大肠杆菌感受态细胞BL21(DE3)进行原核表达,并用镍琼脂糖凝胶进行亲和纯化,获得了纯度和活性均较高的整合酶重组蛋白;然后设计了生物素标记的供体DNA和FITC标记的靶DNA,用链霉亲和素磁珠捕获反应体系中的DNA产物;最后用荧光分析仪检测DNA产物的荧光信号,并计算待测样品的抑制率.用已知整合酶抑制剂S-1360和MK-0518对筛选方法进行了验

  6. The effects of HIV on the sensitivity of a whole blood IFN-gamma release assay in Zambian adults with active tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Raby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interferon gamma release assays (IGRA are replacing the tuberculin skin test (TST as a diagnostic tool for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. However research into the test's performance in the high HIV-TB burden setting is scarce. This study aimed to define the sensitivity of an IGRA, QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QGIT, in adult Zambian patients with active smear-positive tuberculosis. Secondary outcomes focussed on the effect of HIV on the test's performance. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Patients attending government health clinics were recruited within 1 month of starting treatment for TB. Subjects were tested with QGIT and TST. T lymphocyte counts were estimated (CD3(+, CD4(+, CD8(+. QGIT was performed for 112 subjects. 83/112 were QGIT positive giving an overall sensitivity of 74% [95%CI: 66,82]. A marked decrease in sensitivity was observed in HIV positive patients with 37/59 (63% being QGIT positive compared to 31/37 (84% HIV negative patients [chi(2 p = 0.033]. Low CD4(+ count was associated with increases in both indeterminate and false-negative results. Low CD4(+ count in combination with high/normal CD8(+ count was associated with false-negative results. TST was recorded for 92 patients, 62/92 were positive, giving a sensitivity of 67% [95%CI: 58,77]. Although there was little difference in the overall sensitivities, agreement between TST and QGIT was poor. CONCLUSIONS: QGIT was technically feasible with results in HIV negative subjects comparable to those achieved elsewhere. However, where under-treated HIV is prevalent, an increased proportion of both indeterminate and false-negative QGIT results can be expected in patients with active TB. The implications of this for the diagnosis of LTBI by QGIT is unclear. The diagnostic and prognostic relevance of IGRAs in high burden settings needs to be better characterised.

  7. HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. The·human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be transmiHed from one person to onother through the use of non-sterile nee- dles, syringes, and other skin-piercing and invasive instruments. Proper .sterilization of all such instruments is therefore important to prevent its transmission. HIV is very sensitive to ...

  8. hiv

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-31

    Mar 31, 2016 ... Indexed By: African Journal Online (AJOL); Texila American University; Genamics; Scholarsteer; EIJASR; CAS-American Chemical. Society; and IRMS Informatics India (J-Gate). ABSTRACT. This study evaluated the effect of HIV infection on CD4 T-lymphocyte depletion in people living with HIV/AIDS.

  9. From Space to the Patient: A New Cytokine Release Assay to Monitor the Immune Status of HIV Infected Patients and Sepsis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, I.; Draenert, R.; Gruber, M.; Feuerecker, M.; Crucian, B. E.; Mehta, S. L.; Roider, J.; Pierson, D. L.; Briegel, J. M.; Schelling, G.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of humans either in the healthy men under extreme environmental stress like space flight, in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients or in sepsis is of critical importance with regard to the timing of adequate therapeutic (counter-)measures. The in vivo skin delayed-type hypersensitivity test (DTH) served for many years as a tool to evaluate cell mediated immunity. However, this standardised in vivo test was removed from the market in 2002 due to the risk of antigen stabilization. To the best of our knowledge an alternative test as monitoring tool to determine cell mediated immunity is not available so far. For this purpose we tested a new alternative assay using elements of the skin DTH which is based on an ex vivo cytokine release from whole blood and asked if it is suitable and applicable to monitor immune changes in HIV infected patients and in patients with septic shock.

  10. Asymptomatic cryptococcal antigen prevalence detected by lateral flow assay in hospitalised HIV-infected patients in São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, José E; Toniolo, Carolina; Paulino, Adriana; Colombo, Arnaldo; Dos Anjos Martins, Marilena; da Silva Meira, Cristina; Pereira-Chioccola, Vera Lucia; Figueiredo-Mello, Claudia; Barros, Tiago; Duarte, Jequelie; Fonseca, Fernanda; Alves Cunha, Mirella; Mendes, Clara; Ribero, Taiana; Dos Santos Lazera, Marcia; Rajasingham, Radha; Boulware, David R

    2016-12-01

    To determine the prevalence of asymptomatic cryptococcal antigen (CRAG) using lateral flow assay (LFA) in hospitalised HIV-infected patients with CD4 counts Infectologia Emilio Ribas, a tertiary referral hospital to HIV-infected patients serving the São Paulo State, Brazil. All patients were >18 years old without prior cryptococcal meningitis, without clinical suspicion of cryptococcal meningitis, regardless of antiretroviral (ART) status, and with CD4 counts <200 cells/μl. Serum CRAG was tested by LFA in all patients, and whole blood CRAG was tested by LFA in positive cases. We enrolled 163 participants of whom 61% were men. The duration of HIV diagnosis was a median of 8 (range, 1-29) years. 26% were antiretroviral (ART)-naïve, and 74% were ART-experienced. The median CD4 cell count was 25 (range, 1-192) cells/μl. Five patients (3.1%; 95%CI, 1.0-7.0%) were asymptomatic CRAG-positive. Positive results cases were cross-verified by performing LFA in whole blood. 3.1% of HIV-infected inpatients with CD4 <200 cells/μl without symptomatic meningitis had cryptococcal antigenemia in São Paulo, suggesting that routine CRAG screening may be beneficial in similar settings in South America. Our study reveals another targeted population for CRAG screening: hospitalised HIV-infected patients with CD4 <200 cells/μl, regardless of ART status. Whole blood CRAG LFA screening seems to be a simple strategy to prevention of symptomatic meningitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The diagnostic performance of a single GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay in an intensified tuberculosis case finding survey among HIV-infected prisoners in Malaysia.

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    Haider Abdulrazzaq Abed Al-Darraji

    Full Text Available Delays in tuberculosis (TB diagnosis, particularly in prisons, is associated with detrimental outcomes. The new GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay (Xpert offers accurate and rapid diagnosis of active TB, but its performance in improving case detection in high-transmission congregate settings has yet to be evaluated. We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of a single Xpert assay in an intensified case finding survey among HIV-infected prisoners in Malaysia.HIV-infected prisoners at a single site provided two early-morning sputum specimens to be examined using fluorescence smear microscopy, BACTEC MGIT 960 liquid culture and a single Xpert. The sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive predictive values of Xpert were calculated relative to gold-standard results using MGIT 960 liquid culture. Relevant clinical and demographic data were used to examine correlates of active TB disease.The majority of enrolled subjects with complete data (N=125 were men (90.4%, age <40 years (61.6% and had injected drugs (75.2%. Median CD4 lymphocyte count was 337 cells/µL (IQR 149-492; only 19 (15.2% were receiving antiretroviral therapy. Of 15 culture-positive TB cases, single Xpert assay accurately detected only eight previously undiagnosed TB cases, resulting in a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 53.3% (95% CI 30.12-75.2%, 100% (95% CI 96.6-100%, 100% (95% CI 67.56-100% and 94.0% (95% CI 88.2-97.1%, respectively. Only 1 of 15 (6.7% active TB cases was smear-positive. The prevalence (12% of undiagnosed active pulmonary TB (15 of 125 prisoners was high and associated with longer duration of drug use (AOR 1.14, 95% CI 1.03-1.26, for each year of drug use.Single Xpert assay improved TB case detection and outperformed AFB smear microscopy, but yielded low screening sensitivity. Further examination of the impact of HIV infection on the diagnostic performance of the new assay alongside other screening methods in correctional

  12. Prevalence of Anal Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Performance of Cepheid Xpert and Hybrid Capture 2 (hc2) HPV Assays in South African HIV-Infected Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbulawa, Zizipho Z A; Wilkin, Timothy; Goeieman, Bridgette J; Jong, Eefje; Michelow, Pamela; Swarts, Avril; Smith, Jennifer S; Kegorilwe, Patricia; Firnhaber, Cynthia S; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated anal high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) prevalence in HIV-infected women using the Cepheid Xpert HPV assay and compares its performance with that of Hybrid Capture-2 (hc2). A total of 199 HIV-infected women were recruited from Helen Joseph Hospital, Johannesburg. Stored ThinPrep anal swabs that had previously been tested using hc2 were tested for HPV using Xpert. The HR-HPV prevalence by Xpert was 40.8% and similar to hc2 (41.8%) with overall agreement of 86.7%; Cohen's kappa 0.73 (95% CI 0.63-0.82). High grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) was associated with increasing number of multiple HPV infection (P HPV16 (OR: 14.0, 95% CI: 3.9-48.0, P HPV39/68/56/66 (OR: 4.1, 95% CI: 1.4-12, P = .01) and HPV51/59 (OR: 2.8, 95% CI: 1.1-7.6, P = .04) were independently associated with anal HSIL. Xpert HPV typing is a promising anal screening test in HIV-infected women that performs similarly to hc2.

  13. An effective tool for identifying HIV-1 subtypes B, C, CRF01_AE, their recombinant forms, and dual infections in Southeast Asia by the multi-region subtype specific PCR (MSSP) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkhachornphop, Supachai; Kijak, Gustavo H; Beyrer, Chris; Razak, Myat Htoo; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Jittiwutikarn, Jaroon; Suriyanon, Vinai; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H; Celentano, David D; McCutchan, Francine E; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2015-06-01

    The RV144 Thai vaccine trial has been the only vaccine study to show efficacy in preventing HIV infection. Ongoing molecular surveillance of HIV-1 in Southeast Asia is vital for vaccine development and evaluation. In this study a novel tool, the multi-region subtype specific PCR (MSSP) assay, that was able to identify subtypes B, C, CRF01_AE for Thailand, other Southeast Asian countries, India and China is described. The MSSP assay is based on a nested PCR strategy and amplifies eight short regions distributed along the HIV-1 genome using subtype-specific primers. A panel of 41 clinical DNA samples obtained primarily from opiate users in northern Thailand was used to test the assay performance. The MSSP assay provided 73-100% sensitivity and 100% specificity for the three subtypes in each genome region. The assay was then field-tested on 337 sera from HIV infected northern Thai drug users collected between 1999 and 2002. Subtype distribution was CRF01_AE 77.4% (n=261), subtype B 3.3% (n=11), CRF01_AE/B recombinant 12.2% (n=41), CRF01_AE/C recombinant 0.6% (n=2), and non-typeable 6.5% (n=22). The MSSP assay is a simple, cost-effective, and accurate genotyping tool for laboratory settings with limited resources and is sensitive enough to capture the recombinant genomes and dual infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Early morning urine collection to improve urinary lateral flow LAM assay sensitivity in hospitalised patients with HIV-TB co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gina, Phindile; Randall, Philippa J; Muchinga, Tapuwa E; Pooran, Anil; Meldau, Richard; Peter, Jonny G; Dheda, Keertan

    2017-05-12

    Urine LAM testing has been approved by the WHO for use in hospitalised patients with advanced immunosuppression. However, sensitivity remains suboptimal. We therefore examined the incremental diagnostic sensitivity of early morning urine (EMU) versus random urine sampling using the Determine® lateral flow lipoarabinomannan assay (LF-LAM) in HIV-TB co-infected patients. Consenting HIV-infected inpatients, screened as part of a larger prospective randomized controlled trial, that were treated for TB, and could donate matched random and EMU samples were included. Thus paired sample were collected from the same patient, LF-LAM was graded using the pre-January 2014, with grade 1 and 2 manufacturer-designated cut-points (the latter designated grade 1 after January 2014). Single sputum Xpert-MTB/RIF and/or TB culture positivity served as the reference standard (definite TB). Those treated for TB but not meeting this standard were designated probable TB. 123 HIV-infected patients commenced anti-TB treatment and provided matched random and EMU samples. 33% (41/123) and 67% (82/123) had definite and probable TB, respectively. Amongst those with definite TB LF-LAM sensitivity (95%CI), using the grade 2 cut-point, increased from 12% (5-24; 5/43) to 39% (26-54; 16/41) with random versus EMU, respectively (p = 0.005). Similarly, amongst probable TB, LF-LAM sensitivity increased from 10% (5-17; 8/83) to 24% (16-34; 20/82) (p = 0.001). LF-LAM specificity was not determined. This proof of concept study indicates that EMU could improve the sensitivity of LF-LAM in hospitalised TB-HIV co-infected patients. These data have implications for clinical practice.

  15. A cost-effective melting temperature assay for the detection of single-nucleotide polymorphism in the MBL2 gene of HIV-1-infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arraes L.C.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a fast (less than 3 h and cost-effective melting temperature assay method for the detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene. The protocol, which is based on the Corbett Rotor Gene real time PCR platform and SYBR Green I chemistry, yielded, in the cohorts studied, sensitive (100% and specific (100% PCR amplification without the use of costly fluorophore-labeled probes or post-PCR manipulation. At the end of the PCR, the dissociation protocol included a slow heating from 60º to 95ºC in 0.2ºC steps, with an 8-s interval between steps. Melting curve profiles were obtained using the dissociation software of the Rotor Gene-3000 apparatus. Samples were analyzed in duplicate and in different PCR runs to test the reproducibility of this technique. No supplementary data handling is required to determine the MBL2 genotype. MBL2 genotyping performed on a cohort of 164 HIV-1-positive Brazilian children and 150 healthy controls, matched for age and sex and ethnic origin, yielded reproducible results confirmed by direct sequencing of the amplicon performed in blind. The three MBL2 variants (Arg52Cys, Gly54Asp, Gly57Glu were grouped together and called allele 0, while the combination of three wild-type alleles was called allele A. The frequency of the A/A homozygotes was significantly higher among healthy controls (0.68 than in HIV-infected children (0.55; P = 0.0234 and the frequency of MBL2 0/0 homozygotes was higher among HIV-1-infected children than healthy controls (P = 0.0296. The 0 allele was significantly more frequent among the 164 HIV-1-infected children (0.29 than among the 150 healthy controls (0.18; P = 0.0032. Our data confirm the association between the presence of the mutated MBL2 allele (allele 0 and HIV-1 infection in perinatally exposed children. Our results are in agreement with the literature data which indicate that the presence of the allele 0 confers a relative risk of 1.37 for HIV-1 infection through

  16. Performance evaluation of three commercial molecular assays for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from clinical specimens in a high TB-HIV-burden setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matabane, M M Z; Ismail, F; Strydom, K A; Onwuegbuna, O; Omar, S V; Ismail, N

    2015-11-09

    A major challenge faced by countries with a high burden of tuberculosis (TB) is early detection especially in individuals with paucibacillary disease which is common in HIV endemic settings. Remarkable efforts have been made globally to accelerate the development and expansion of new diagnostic technologies that allow better and earlier diagnosis of active tuberculosis particularly directly from clinical specimens with a few commercial options available. These include GenoType MTBDRplus Version 2.0 (Hain Lifescience), Xpert® MTB/RIF (Cepheid) and Anyplex™ plus MTB/NTM/DR-TB Real-time detection (Seegene). We evaluated the diagnostic performance of these three commercial molecular assays for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from clinical specimens in a high TB-HIV-burden setting. This was a retrospective laboratory-based study using stored remnant sediments from clinical specimens of presumptive pulmonary TB cases. A stratified sample of smear positive TB, smear negative TB and TB culture negatives was included. All the samples were tested on the three molecular assays following the manufacturers' instructions; except for Anyplex™plus, for which DNA extraction was performed using the NucliSENS® easyMAG® platform (bioMerieux). Samples were also processed for liquid TB culture and time-to-culture positivity was recorded. Of the 90 sediments processed, 81 were analyzable across all three systems. The overall sensitivity was highest for Xpert® MTB/RIF (89.1%) followed by GenoType MTBDRplus (70.9%) and Anyplex™ plus (65.5%). The specificity and sensitivity in smear positive cases was comparable across all systems. There was a significant difference in sensitivity between Xpert® MTB/RIF and the other two assays for smear-negative cases (P < 0.05). The performance in cases where the time-to-culture positivity was ≥ 20 days was also significantly poorer for both Anyplex™ plus and GenoType MTBDRplus compared to Xpert® MTB/RIF (P < 0

  17. Prospective evaluation of diagnostic accuracy of dried blood spots from finger prick samples for determination of HIV-1 load with the NucliSENS Easy-Q HIV-1 version 2.0 assay in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Emmanuel; Metcalf, Carol A; Chaillet, Pascale; Aleixo, Lucia; Pannus, Pieter; Panunzi, Isabella; Triviño, Laura; Ellman, Tom; Likaka, Andrew; Mwenda, Reuben

    2014-05-01

    HIV-1 viral load (VL) testing is not widely available in resource-limited settings. The use of finger prick dried blood spot (FP-DBS) samples could remove barriers related to sample collection and transport. Measurement of VL using DBS from EDTA venous blood (VB-DBS) in place of plasma has previously been validated using the NucliSENS Easy-Q HIV-1 v2.0 assay, but information on the accuracy of FP-DBS samples for measuring VL is limited. This prospective study, conducted at Thyolo District Hospital in southern Malawi, compared VL levels measured on FP-DBS samples and plasma using the NucliSENS Easy-Q HIV-1 v2.0 assay. Comparability was assessed by means of agreement and correlation (131 patients with VLs of ≥100 copies/ml), sensitivity, and specificity (612 patients on antiretroviral treatment [ART]). Samples of EDTA venous blood and FP-DBS from 1,009 HIV-infected individuals were collected and prepared in the laboratory. Bland-Altman analysis found good agreement between plasma and FP-DBS VL levels, with a mean difference of -0.35 log10, and 95% limits of agreement from -1.26 to 0.55 log10. FP-DBS had a sensitivity of 88.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 81.1 to 94.4%) and a specificity of 97.8% (95% CI, 96.1 to 98.9%) using a 1,000-copies/ml cut point and a sensitivity of 83.0% (95% CI, 73.4 to 90.1%) and a specificity of 100% (95% CI, 99.3 to 100%) using a 5,000-copies/ml cut point. This study shows that FP-DBS is an acceptable alternative to plasma for measuring VL using the NucliSENS Easy-Q HIV-1 v2.0. We are conducting a second study to assess the proficiency of health workers at preparing FP-DBS in primary health care clinics.

  18. Interferon gamma release assays for the diagnosis of latent TB infection in HIV-infected individuals in a low TB burden country.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clíona Ní Cheallaigh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs are used to diagnose latent tuberculosis infection. Two IGRAs are commercially available: the Quantiferon TB Gold In Tube (QFT-IT and the T-SPOT.TB. There is debate as to which test to use in HIV+ individuals. Previous publications from high TB burden countries have raised concerns that the sensitivity of the QFT-IT assay, but not the T-SPOT.TB, may be impaired in HIV+ individuals with low CD4+ T-cell counts. We sought to compare the tests in a low TB burden setting. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: T-SPOT.TB, QFT-IT, and tuberculin skin tests (TST were performed in HIV infected individuals. Results were related to patient characteristics. McNemar's test, multivariate regression and correlation analysis were carried out using SPSS (SPSS Inc. 256 HIV infected patients were enrolled in the study. The median CD4+ T-cell count was 338 cells/µL (range 1-1328. 37 (14% patients had a CD4+ T-cell count of <100 cells/µL. 46/256 (18% of QFT-IT results and 28/256 (11% of T-SPOT.TB results were positive. 6 (2% of QFT-IT and 18 (7% of T-SPOT.TB results were indeterminate. An additional 9 (4% of T-SPOT.TB results were unavailable as tests were not performed due to insufficient cells or clotting of the sample. We found a statistically significant association between lower CD4+ T-cell count and negative QFT-IT results (OR 1.055, p=0.03, and indeterminate/unavailable T-SPOT.TB results (OR 1.079, p=0.02. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In low TB prevalence settings, the QFT-IT yields more positive and fewer indeterminate results than T-SPOT.TB. Negative results on the QFT-IT and indeterminate/unavailable results on the T-SPOT.TB were more common in individuals with low CD4+ T-cell counts.

  19. Usefulness of a fourth generation ELISA assay for the reliable identification of HCV infection in HIV-positive adults from Gabon (Central Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouet, François; Deleplancque, Luc; Mboumba, Berthold Bivigou; Sica, Jeanne; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Liégeois, Florian; Goudeau, Alain; Dubois, Frédéric; Gaudy-Graffin, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Guidelines for optimized HCV screening are urgently required in Africa, especially for patients infected with HIV, who sometimes show false positive or false negative reactivity in anti-HCV antibody assays. Here, we assessed the usefulness of a fourth-generation HCV Ag-Ab ELISA for the identification of active HCV infection in HIV-positive patients. This cross-sectional study was conducted between 03/2010 and 01/2013 and included 762 Gabonese HIV-positive adult patients. The results of ELISA (Monolisa HCV Ag-Ab ULTRA, Bio-Rad) were compared with those obtained by RT-PCR (gold standard). The optimal ELISA signal-to-cutoff (S/CO) ratio to identify patients with active hepatitis C (positive HCV RNA) was determined. Specimens were further tested by the INNO-LIA HCV Score assay (Innogenetics) and the Architect HCV Ag kit (Abbott) to define the best diagnostic strategy. Sixty-seven patients tested positive for HCV (S/CO ratio ≥ 1) by ELISA. Of these, 47 (70.1%) tested positive for HCV RNA. The optimal S/CO associated with active HCV infection was 1.7. At this threshold, the sensitivity of ELISA was 97.9% (95% confidence interval (CI) 90.0-99.9%), its specificity was 91.3% (95% CI 85.0-95.5%), and HCV seroprevalence rate was 7.3% (56/762) (95% CI 5.6-9.4%). Among 57 HCV-seropositive patients with available INNO-LIA results, false reactivity was identified in 14 (24.6%), resolved HCV infection in two (3.5%), possible acute HCV infections in nine (15.8%) and likely chronic HCV infections in 32 (56.1%) patients. HCV core Ag was undetectable in 14/15 (93.3%) specimens that tested negative for HCV RNA whereas it was quantified in 34 (out of 39, 87.2%) samples that tested positive for HCV RNA. Our study provides comprehensive guidance for HCV testing in Gabon, and will help greatly clinicians to improve case definitions for both the notification and surveillance of HCV in patients co-infected with HIV.

  20. A humanized mouse-based HIV-1 viral outgrowth assay with higher sensitivity than in vitro qVOA in detecting latently infected cells from individuals on ART with undetectable viral loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlins, Paige; Schmitt, Kimberly; Remling-Mulder, Leila; Hogan, Louise E; Hanhauser, Emily; Hobbs, Kristen S; Hecht, Frederick; Deeks, Steven G; Henrich, Timothy J; Akkina, Ramesh

    2017-07-01

    Assays that can verify full viral eradication are essential in the context of achieving a cure for HIV/AIDS. In vitro quantitative viral out growth assays (qVOA) are currently the gold standard for measuring latent HIV-1 but these assays often fail to detect very low levels of replication-competent virus. Here we investigated an alternative in vivo approach for sensitive viral detection using humanized mice (hmVOA). Peripheral blood CD4+ T cell samples from HIV subjects on stable ART with undetectable viral loads by RT-PCR were first assayed by in vitro qVOA. Corresponding patient samples in which no virus was detected by qVOA were injected into humanized mice to allow viral outgrowth. Of the five qVOA virus negative samples, four gave positive viral outgrowth in the hmVOA assay suggesting that it is more sensitive in detecting latent HIV-1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Diagnostic Performance of a Multiplex PCR assay for meningitis in an HIV-infected population in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Rhein, Joshua; Bahr, Nathan C; Hemmert, Andrew C; Cloud, Joann L; Bellamkonda, Satya; Oswald, Cody; Lo, Eric; Nabeta, Henry; Kiggundu, Reuben; Akampurira, Andrew; Musubire, Abdu; Williams, Darlisha; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2015-01-01

    Meningitis remains a worldwide problem, and rapid diagnosis is essential to optimize survival. We evaluated the utility of a multiplex PCR test in differentiating possible etiologies of meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 69 HIV-infected Ugandan adults with meningitis was collected at diagnosis (n=51) and among persons with cryptococcal meningitis during therapeutic lumbar punctures (n=68). Cryopreserved CSF specimens were analyzed with BioFire FilmArray? Meningitis/Encephalitis panel,...

  2. Microscopic observation drug susceptibility assay for the diagnosis of TB and MDR-TB in HIV-infected patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikman-Jorgensen, Philip; Llenas-García, Jara; Hobbins, Michael; Ehmer, Jochen; Abellana, Rosa; Gonçalves, Alessandra Queiroga; Pérez-Porcuna, Tomàs Maria; Ascaso, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS) assay for tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in HIV-infected patients. MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, African Index Medicus, ResearchGate, SciELO, and the abstracts of the main conferences on infectious diseases and tropical medicine were searched, and other sources investigated. Only studies including HIV-infected patients evaluating MODS for the diagnosis of TB and using culture-based diagnostic tests as a gold standard were analysed. Summary sensitivity and specificity were calculated with a bivariate model. 3259 citations were found, 29 were selected for full-text review and 10 studies including 3075 samples were finally analysed. Overall diagnostic accuracy of MODS for the diagnosis of TB was a sensitivity of 88.3% (95% CI 86.18-90.2%) and specificity 98.2% (95% CI 97.75-98.55%). For multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB, sensitivity was 89% (95% CI 66.07-97%) and specificity was 100% (95 CI 94.81-100%). For smear-negative pulmonary TB, a sensitivity of 88.2% (95% CI 86.1-89.9%) and specificity of 98.2% (95% CI 96.8-98.9%) were found. Costs varied between USD 0.72 and 7.31 per sample. Mean time to positivity was 8.24 days. MODS was found to have a good accuracy for the diagnosis of TB and MDR-TB in HIV-infected patients with low cost and fast results. ©ERS 2014.

  3. Effect of Pregnancy on Interferon Gamma Release Assay and Tuberculin Skin Test Detection of Latent TB Infection Among HIV-Infected Women in a High Burden Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCourse, Sylvia M; Cranmer, Lisa M; Matemo, Daniel; Kinuthia, John; Richardson, Barbra A; Horne, David J; John-Stewart, Grace

    2017-05-01

    Peripartum immunologic changes may affect latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) diagnostic performance among HIV-infected women. HIV-infected women were serially tested with tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon gamma release assay [QuantiFERON TB Gold In-tube (QFT)] in pregnancy and 6 weeks postpartum in Kenya. Prevalence, sensitivity and agreement, and correlates of QFT/TST positivity were assessed. Quantitative QFT mitogen and Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen (Mtb-Ag) responses were compared by peripartum stage. Incidence of test conversion at 6 weeks postpartum was evaluated in baseline TST-/QFT- women. Among 100 HIV-infected women, median age was 26 years, median CD4 was 555 cells per cubic millimeter, and 88% were on antiretrovirals. More women were QFT+ than TST+ in both pregnancy (35.4% vs. 13.5%, P = 0.001) and postpartum (29.6% vs. 14.8%, P test agreement postpartum (56.9%, κ = 0.20 to 82.4%, κ = 0.60). Three initially QFT-/TST- women had test conversion (TST+ and/or QFT+), suggesting new infection (incidence 13.4/100 person-years). Mean QFT mitogen (4.46 vs. 7.64 IU/mL, P pregnancy vs. postpartum, and specifically among persistently QFT+ women (Mtb-Ag: 3.46 vs. 4.48 IU/mL, P = 0.007). QFT indeterminate rate was higher in pregnancy (16%) compared with postpartum (0%) because of lower mitogen response. QFT identified >2-fold more women with LTBI compared with TST in pregnancy and postpartum. Lower QFT Mtb-Ag and mitogen responses in pregnancy compared with postpartum suggest that pregnancy-associated immunologic changes may influence LTBI test performance.

  4. Incremental Yield of Including Determine-TB LAM Assay in Diagnostic Algorithms for Hospitalized and Ambulatory HIV-Positive Patients in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Huerga

    Full Text Available Determine-TB LAM assay is a urine point-of-care test useful for TB diagnosis in HIV-positive patients. We assessed the incremental diagnostic yield of adding LAM to algorithms based on clinical signs, sputum smear-microscopy, chest X-ray and Xpert MTB/RIF in HIV-positive patients with symptoms of pulmonary TB (PTB.Prospective observational cohort of ambulatory (either severely ill or CD4<200cells/μl or with Body Mass Index<17Kg/m2 and hospitalized symptomatic HIV-positive adults in Kenya. Incremental diagnostic yield of adding LAM was the difference in the proportion of confirmed TB patients (positive Xpert or MTB culture diagnosed by the algorithm with LAM compared to the algorithm without LAM. The multivariable mortality model was adjusted for age, sex, clinical severity, BMI, CD4, ART initiation, LAM result and TB confirmation.Among 474 patients included, 44.1% were severely ill, 69.6% had CD4<200cells/μl, 59.9% had initiated ART, 23.2% could not produce sputum. LAM, smear-microscopy, Xpert and culture in sputum were positive in 39.0% (185/474, 21.6% (76/352, 29.1% (102/350 and 39.7% (92/232 of the patients tested, respectively. Of 156 patients with confirmed TB, 65.4% were LAM positive. Of those classified as non-TB, 84.0% were LAM negative. Adding LAM increased the diagnostic yield of the algorithms by 36.6%, from 47.4% (95%CI:39.4-55.6 to 84.0% (95%CI:77.3-89.4%, when using clinical signs and X-ray; by 19.9%, from 62.2% (95%CI:54.1-69.8 to 82.1% (95%CI:75.1-87.7, when using clinical signs and microscopy; and by 13.4%, from 74.4% (95%CI:66.8-81.0 to 87.8% (95%CI:81.6-92.5, when using clinical signs and Xpert. LAM positive patients had an increased risk of 2-months mortality (aOR:2.7; 95%CI:1.5-4.9.LAM should be included in TB diagnostic algorithms in parallel to microscopy or Xpert request for HIV-positive patients either ambulatory (severely ill or CD4<200cells/μl or hospitalized. LAM allows same day treatment initiation in patients at

  5. HIV-1 serologic test results for one million newborn dried-blood specimens: assay performance and implications for screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwinn, M; Redus, M A; Granade, T C; Hannon, W H; George, J R

    1992-01-01

    In a population-based national survey conducted in 1988-90, more than one million neonatal dried-blood specimens were tested for maternal antibody to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Enzyme immunoassays (EIA) and Western blot tests were performed in 20 state laboratories following standardized procedures. The observed predictive value of a repeatedly reactive EIA results closely coincided with that expected on the basis of manufacturer's estimates of test sensitivity and specificity for dried-blood specimens. Of the 2,845 EIA-reactive specimens tested by Western blot, 1,323 (47%) were positive, 1,270 (45%) were negative, and 252 (9%) were indeterminate. False-positive EIA and indeterminate Western blot results occurred at rates independent of seroprevalence. These data help characterize the results to be expected from screening of similar low-seroprevalence populations and constitute a base line for the detection of systematic testing errors.

  6. Comparison between Elecsys HBsAg II and architect HBsAg QT assays for quantification of hepatitis B surface antigen among patients coinfected with HIV and hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maylin, Sarah; Boyd, Anders; Delaugerre, Constance; Zoulim, Fabien; Lavocat, Fabien; Simon, François; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Lacombe, Karine

    2012-02-01

    Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) quantification has been steadily gaining interest as a clinical marker of therapeutic efficacy, for which two commercial assays are currently available: Architect HBsAg QT (Architect) and Elecsys HBsAg II (Elecsys). HBsAg quantification was evaluated using both assays in 126 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV)-coinfected patients initiating treatment with tenofovir dipivoxil fumarate. Linear regression and correlation were used to establish the relationship between the two methods. Bland-Altman analysis was performed to determine mean between-assay difference and limits of agreement (LOA) (±2 standard deviations [SD]) both overall and stratified on HBV (hepatitis B envelope antigen [HBeAg] status, replication, genotype, HBV mutants) or HIV (CD4(+) cell count) cofactors. There was a significant correlation between Elecsys and Architect assays (correlation coefficient, r = 0.959; P Architect, which was consistent across levels of CD4(+) cell count, presence of precore and YMDD mutations, and HBeAg status. A slightly larger mean between-assay difference was observed with genotypes A and G (0.196 and 0.201, respectively) versus HBV genotypes D and E (0.036 and 0.030, respectively). Mutations on the S region at position s120/s145 were the only determinant in which the mean between-assay difference in HBsAg quantification was lower than the null value (-0.078). In conclusion, the Elecsys assay, with automatic on-board dilution, is capable of quantifying serum HBsAg levels in HIV-HBV-coinfected patients, with very high correlation with the Architect assay.

  7. Early immunologic correlates of HIV protection can be identified from computational analysis of complex multivariate T-cell flow cytometry assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Chattopadhyay, Pratip K; Ganesan, Anuradha; O'Neill, Kieran; Zare, Habil; Jalali, Adrin; Hoos, Holger H; Roederer, Mario; Brinkman, Ryan R

    2012-04-01

    Polychromatic flow cytometry (PFC), has enormous power as a tool to dissect complex immune responses (such as those observed in HIV disease) at a single cell level. However, analysis tools are severely lacking. Although high-throughput systems allow rapid data collection from large cohorts, manual data analysis can take months. Moreover, identification of cell populations can be subjective and analysts rarely examine the entirety of the multidimensional dataset (focusing instead on a limited number of subsets, the biology of which has usually already been well-described). Thus, the value of PFC as a discovery tool is largely wasted. To address this problem, we developed a computational approach that automatically reveals all possible cell subsets. From tens of thousands of subsets, those that correlate strongly with clinical outcome are selected and grouped. Within each group, markers that have minimal relevance to the biological outcome are removed, thereby distilling the complex dataset into the simplest, most clinically relevant subsets. This allows complex information from PFC studies to be translated into clinical or resource-poor settings, where multiparametric analysis is less feasible. We demonstrate the utility of this approach in a large (n=466), retrospective, 14-parameter PFC study of early HIV infection, where we identify three T-cell subsets that strongly predict progression to AIDS (only one of which was identified by an initial manual analysis). The 'flowType: Phenotyping Multivariate PFC Assays' package is available through Bioconductor. Additional documentation and examples are available at: www.terryfoxlab.ca/flowsite/flowType/ Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. rbrinkman@bccrc.ca.

  8. Diagnostic performance of a multiplex PCR assay for meningitis in an HIV-infected population in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, Joshua; Bahr, Nathan C; Hemmert, Andrew C; Cloud, Joann L; Bellamkonda, Satya; Oswald, Cody; Lo, Eric; Nabeta, Henry; Kiggundu, Reuben; Akampurira, Andrew; Musubire, Abdu; Williams, Darlisha A; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2016-03-01

    Meningitis remains a worldwide problem, and rapid diagnosis is essential to optimize survival. We evaluated the utility of a multiplex PCR test in differentiating possible etiologies of meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 69 HIV-infected Ugandan adults with meningitis was collected at diagnosis (n=51) and among persons with cryptococcal meningitis during therapeutic lumbar punctures (n=68). Cryopreserved CSF specimens were analyzed with BioFire FilmArray® Meningitis/Encephalitis panel, which targets 17 pathogens. The panel detected Cryptococcus in the CSF of patients diagnosed with a first episode of cryptococcal meningitis by fungal culture with 100% sensitivity and specificity and differentiated between fungal relapse and paradoxical immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in recurrent episodes. A negative FilmArray result was predictive of CSF sterility on follow-up lumbar punctures for cryptococcal meningitis. EBV was frequently detected in this immunosuppressed population (n=45). Other pathogens detected included: cytomegalovirus (n=2), varicella zoster virus (n=2), human herpes virus 6 (n=1), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=1). The FilmArray Meningitis/Encephalitis panel offers a promising platform for rapid meningitis diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Diagnostic Performance of a Multiplex PCR assay for meningitis in an HIV-infected population in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, Joshua; Bahr, Nathan C; Hemmert, Andrew C; Cloud, Joann L; Bellamkonda, Satya; Oswald, Cody; Lo, Eric; Nabeta, Henry; Kiggundu, Reuben; Akampurira, Andrew; Musubire, Abdu; Williams, Darlisha; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2015-01-01

    Meningitis remains a worldwide problem, and rapid diagnosis is essential to optimize survival. We evaluated the utility of a multiplex PCR test in differentiating possible etiologies of meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 69 HIV-infected Ugandan adults with meningitis was collected at diagnosis (n=51) and among persons with cryptococcal meningitis during therapeutic lumbar punctures (n=68). Cryopreserved CSF specimens were analyzed with BioFire FilmArray® Meningitis/Encephalitis panel, which targets 17 pathogens. The panel detected Cryptococcus in the CSF of patients diagnosed with a first-episode of cryptococcal meningitis by fungal culture with 100% sensitivity and specificity, and differentiated between fungal relapse and paradoxical immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in recurrent episodes. A negative FilmArray result was predictive of CSF sterility on follow-up lumbar punctures for cryptococcal meningitis. EBV was frequently detected in this immunosuppressed population (n=45). Other pathogens detected included: CMV (n=2), VZV (n=2), HHV-6 (n=1), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=1). The FilmArray Meningitis/Encephalitis panel offers a promising platform for rapid meningitis diagnosis. PMID:26711635

  10. Incremental Yield of Including Determine-TB LAM Assay in Diagnostic Algorithms for Hospitalized and Ambulatory HIV-Positive Patients in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerga, Helena; Ferlazzo, Gabriella; Bevilacqua, Paolo; Kirubi, Beatrice; Ardizzoni, Elisa; Wanjala, Stephen; Sitienei, Joseph; Bonnet, Maryline

    2017-01-01

    Determine-TB LAM assay is a urine point-of-care test useful for TB diagnosis in HIV-positive patients. We assessed the incremental diagnostic yield of adding LAM to algorithms based on clinical signs, sputum smear-microscopy, chest X-ray and Xpert MTB/RIF in HIV-positive patients with symptoms of pulmonary TB (PTB). Prospective observational cohort of ambulatory (either severely ill or CD4LAM was the difference in the proportion of confirmed TB patients (positive Xpert or MTB culture) diagnosed by the algorithm with LAM compared to the algorithm without LAM. The multivariable mortality model was adjusted for age, sex, clinical severity, BMI, CD4, ART initiation, LAM result and TB confirmation. Among 474 patients included, 44.1% were severely ill, 69.6% had CD4LAM, smear-microscopy, Xpert and culture in sputum were positive in 39.0% (185/474), 21.6% (76/352), 29.1% (102/350) and 39.7% (92/232) of the patients tested, respectively. Of 156 patients with confirmed TB, 65.4% were LAM positive. Of those classified as non-TB, 84.0% were LAM negative. Adding LAM increased the diagnostic yield of the algorithms by 36.6%, from 47.4% (95%CI:39.4-55.6) to 84.0% (95%CI:77.3-89.4%), when using clinical signs and X-ray; by 19.9%, from 62.2% (95%CI:54.1-69.8) to 82.1% (95%CI:75.1-87.7), when using clinical signs and microscopy; and by 13.4%, from 74.4% (95%CI:66.8-81.0) to 87.8% (95%CI:81.6-92.5), when using clinical signs and Xpert. LAM positive patients had an increased risk of 2-months mortality (aOR:2.7; 95%CI:1.5-4.9). LAM should be included in TB diagnostic algorithms in parallel to microscopy or Xpert request for HIV-positive patients either ambulatory (severely ill or CD4LAM allows same day treatment initiation in patients at higher risk of death and in those not able to produce sputum.

  11. Utility of urine and serum lateral flow assays to determine the prevalence and predictors of cryptococcal antigenemia in HIV-positive outpatients beginning antiretroviral therapy in Mwanza, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinanga A Magambo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Detection of subclinical cryptococcal disease using cryptococcal antigen screening among HIV-positive individuals presents a potential opportunity for prevention of both clinical disease and death if patients with detectable cryptococcal antigen are identified and treated pre-emptively. Recently developed point-of-care cryptococcal antigen tests may be useful for screening, particularly in resource-limiting settings, but few studies have assessed their utility. Methodology: The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence and factors associated with cryptococcal antigenemia in HIV-positive patients with CD4+ T-cell counts ≤200 cells/µL who were initiating ART, and also to evaluate the utility of the point-of-care urine lateral flow assay (LFA cryptococcal antigen test using two different diluents, compared to gold standard serum antigen testing, as a screening tool. Urine and serum of outpatients initiating antiretroviral therapy at two hospitals in Mwanza were tested for cryptococcal antigen, and demographic and clinical characteristics were obtained using structured questionnaires and patients’ files. Patients with asymptomatic cryptococcal antigenemia received oral fluconazole in accordance with World Health Organization recommendations. Results: Among 140 patients screened, 10 (7.1% had asymptomatic cryptococcal antigenemia with a positive serum cryptococcal antigen. Four of these ten patients had CD4 counts between 100 and 200 cells/µL. The prevalence of cryptococcal antigen detected in urine using a standard (older and a test (newer diluent were 44 (31.4% and 19 (13.6%, with Kappa coefficients compared to serum of 0.28 and 0.51 (p<0.001 for both. Compared to the new LFA diluent for urine cryptococcal antigen, the standard diluent had higher sensitivity (100% versus 80% but lower specificity (74% versus 92% using serum cryptococcal antigen as a gold standard. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that HIV

  12. NEW INDIRECT IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE ASSAY AS A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-05-05

    HIV-1) infection is based on the detection of antibodies to HIV-1 in plasma or serum. Antibodies against various viral structure proteins are measured by a number of simple and sensitive screening tests. These assays include ...

  13. LATERAL FLOW ASSAY FOR CRYPTOCOCCAL ANTIGEN: AN IMPORTANT ADVANCE TO IMPROVE THE CONTINUUM OF HIV CARE AND REDUCE CRYPTOCOCCAL MENINGITIS-RELATED MORTALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose E. VIDAL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARYAIDS-related cryptococcal meningitis continues to cause a substantial burden of death in low and middle income countries. The diagnostic use for detection of cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide antigen (CrAg in serum and cerebrospinal fluid by latex agglutination test (CrAg-latex or enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA has been available for over decades. Better diagnostics in asymptomatic and symptomatic phases of cryptococcosis are key components to reduce mortality. Recently, the cryptococcal antigen lateral flow assay (CrAg LFA was included in the armamentarium for diagnosis. Unlike the other tests, the CrAg LFA is a dipstick immunochromatographic assay, in a format similar to the home pregnancy test, and requires little or no lab infrastructure. This test meets all of the World Health Organization ASSURED criteria (Affordable, Sensitive, Specific, User friendly, Rapid/robust, Equipment-free, and Delivered. CrAg LFA in serum, plasma, whole blood, or cerebrospinal fluid is useful for the diagnosis of disease caused by Cryptococcusspecies. The CrAg LFA has better analytical sensitivity for C. gattii than CrAg-latex or EIA. Prevention of cryptococcal disease is new application of CrAg LFA via screening of blood for subclinical infection in asymptomatic HIV-infected persons with CD4 counts < 100 cells/mL who are not receiving effective antiretroviral therapy. CrAg screening of leftover plasma specimens after CD4 testing can identify persons with asymptomatic infection who urgently require pre-emptive fluconazole, who will otherwise progress to symptomatic infection and/or die.

  14. LATERAL FLOW ASSAY FOR CRYPTOCOCCAL ANTIGEN: AN IMPORTANT ADVANCE TO IMPROVE THE CONTINUUM OF HIV CARE AND REDUCE CRYPTOCOCCAL MENINGITIS-RELATED MORTALITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    VIDAL, Jose E.; BOULWARE, David R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY AIDS-related cryptococcal meningitis continues to cause a substantial burden of death in low and middle income countries. The diagnostic use for detection of cryptococcal capsular polysaccharide antigen (CrAg) in serum and cerebrospinal fluid by latex agglutination test (CrAg-latex) or enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA) has been available for over decades. Better diagnostics in asymptomatic and symptomatic phases of cryptococcosis are key components to reduce mortality. Recently, the cryptococcal antigen lateral flow assay (CrAg LFA) was included in the armamentarium for diagnosis. Unlike the other tests, the CrAg LFA is a dipstick immunochromatographic assay, in a format similar to the home pregnancy test, and requires little or no lab infrastructure. This test meets all of the World Health Organization ASSURED criteria (Affordable, Sensitive, Specific, User friendly, Rapid/robust, Equipment-free, and Delivered). CrAg LFA in serum, plasma, whole blood, or cerebrospinal fluid is useful for the diagnosis of disease caused by Cryptococcus species. The CrAg LFA has better analytical sensitivity for C. gattii than CrAg-latex or EIA. Prevention of cryptococcal disease is new application of CrAg LFA via screening of blood for subclinical infection in asymptomatic HIV-infected persons with CD4 counts < 100 cells/mL who are not receiving effective antiretroviral therapy. CrAg screening of leftover plasma specimens after CD4 testing can identify persons with asymptomatic infection who urgently require pre-emptive fluconazole, who will otherwise progress to symptomatic infection and/or die. PMID:26465368

  15. High-performance liquid chromatography assay for the quantification of HIV protease inhibitors and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezk, Naser L; Tidwell, Richard R; Kashuba, Angela D M

    2004-06-15

    An accurate, sensitive, and specific reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay for the simultaneous quantitative determination of HIV-protease inhibitors (PIs) (indinavir, IDV; amprenavir, APV; saquinavir, SQV; nelfinavir, NFV; ritonavir, RTV; and lopinavir, LPV) and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) (nevirapine, NVP; delavirdine, DLV; and efavirenz, EFV) in human blood plasma is described. The method provides excellent resolution and peak shape for nine analytes through a linear gradient (36-86%) of 25% phosphate buffer (pH 4.5), 60% acetonitrile, 15% methanol, and 0.75 ml TFA, with a gradient mobile phase flow rate (0.9-1.1 ml) over 30 min run time. The optimized solid phase extraction (SPE) extraction method using (1.0 ml, 100mg BOND ELUT-C18 Varian) column provides a clean base line and high extraction efficiency using a 550 microl plasma sample. The method was validated over the range of 10-10,000 ng/ml for NVP, IDV, and SQV; 10-5000 ng/ml for EFV; 25-10000 ng/ml for APV; and 25-5000 ng/ml for DLV, NFV, RTV, and LPV. This method is accurate (average accuracies of three different concentrations ranged from 91 to 112%), and precise (within- and between-day precision measures ranged from 0.2 to 5.7% and 0.1 to 5.4%, respectively). This method is suitable for use in clinical pharmacokinetic studies as well as in therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM).

  16. The prognostic value of the suPARnosticTM ELISA assay in HIV-1 infected individuals is not affected by uPAR promoter polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Uffe; Nielsen, Rikke; Pedersen, Court

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: High blood levels of soluble urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (suPAR) are associated with poor outcomes in human immunodeficiency-1 (HIV-1) infected individuals. Research on the clinical value of suPAR in HIV-1 infection led to the development of the suPARnosticTM as...

  17. Avaliação de ensaio molecular para determinação de carga viral em indivíduos sorologicamente negativos para o HIV-1 Evaluation of a molecular assay for determining viral load on HIV-1 antibody negative patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Moreira Pereira

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available O teste de carga viral foi concebido para acompanhar a evolução e o tratamento do paciente com diagnóstico confirmado de HIV-1. Contudo, sua especificidade diagnóstica não foi ainda avaliada em pessoas que apresentam um teste sorológico negativo. Mesmo assim, ele tem sido erroneamente utilizado para o diagnóstico da infecção primária pelo HIV-1. Este trabalho relata quatro pacientes em que a carga viral plasmática NucliSens (Organon Teknika foi repetidamente positiva na ausência de anticorpos para HIV e chama atenção para o fato de que a carga viral abaixo de 10 mil cópias/ml é de difícil interpretação, como tem sido assinalado em numerosos artigos, em que foram utilizadas outras metodologias.The plasma viral load test for HIV-1,a exquisitely high sensitive assay, were neither developed nor evaluated for the diagnosis of primary HIV infection; therefore, their diagnostic specificity is not well delineated when applied to persons who are negative for HIV antibody. This article reported four cases of false positive results obtained by using NucliSens viral load assay (Organon Teknika and emphasize the importance that low positive plasma viral load (< 10 000 copies/ml may be difficult to interpret how has been assinalated in numerous articles in the medical literature, using other methodologies.

  18. Evaluation of two line probe assays for rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis (TB) drug resistance, and non-TB Mycobacteria in HIV-infected individuals with suspected TB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Kendall, Michelle A; Wu, Xingye; Lourenço, Maria Cristina; Jentsch, Ute; Swindells, Susan; Qasba, Sarojini S; Sanchez, Jorge; Havlir, Diane V; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Sanne, Ian M; Firnhaber, Cynthia

    2014-04-01

    Limited performance data from line probe assays (LPAs), nucleic acid tests used for the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB), nontuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance are available for HIV-infected individuals, in whom paucibacillary TB is common. In this study, the strategy of testing sputum with GenoType MTBDRplus (MTBDR-Plus) and GenoType Direct LPA (Direct LPA) was compared to a gold standard of one mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) liquid culture. HIV-positive (HIV(+)) individuals with suspected TB from southern Africa and South America with tuberculosis culture positive, of which 276 (72.8%) were acid-fast bacillus (AFB) smear positive. MTBDR-Plus had a sensitivity of 81.0% and a specificity of 100%, with sensitivities of 44.1% in AFB smear-negative versus 94.6% in AFB smear-positive specimens. For specimens that were positive for M. tuberculosis by MTBDR-Plus, the sensitivity and specificity for rifampin resistance were 91.7% and 96.6%, respectively, and for isoniazid (INH) they were 70.6% and 99.1%. The Direct LPA had a sensitivity of 88.4% and a specificity of 94.6% for M. tuberculosis detection, with a sensitivity of 72.5% in smear-negative specimens. Ten of 639 MGIT cultures grew Mycobacterium avium complex or Mycobacterium kansasii, half of which were detected by Direct LPA. Both LPA assays performed well in specimens from HIV-infected individuals, including in AFB smear-negative specimens, with 72.5% sensitivity for M. tuberculosis identification with the Direct LPA and 44.1% sensitivity with MTBDR-Plus. LPAs have a continued role for use in settings where rapid identification of INH resistance and clinically relevant NTM are priorities.

  19. Multi-centre field evaluation of the performance of the Trinity Biotech Uni-Gold HIV 1/2 rapid test as a first-line screening assay for gay and bisexual men compared with 4th generation laboratory immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen, P; Conway, D P; Cunningham, P; McNulty, A; Couldwell, D L; Davies, S C; Smith, D E; Gray, J; Holt, M; O'Connor, C C; Read, P; Callander, D; Prestage, G; Guy, R

    2017-01-01

    The Trinity Biotech Uni-Gold HIV test (Uni-Gold) is often used as a supplementary rapid test in testing algorithms. To evaluate the operational performance of the Uni-Gold as a first-line screening test among gay and bisexual men (GBM) in a setting where 4th generation HIV laboratory assays are routinely used. We compared the performance of Uni-Gold with conventional HIV serology conducted in parallel among GBM attending 22 testing sites. Sensitivity was calculated separately for acute and established infection, defined using 4th generation screening Ag/Ab immunoassay (EIA) and Western blot results. Previous HIV testing history and results of supplementary 3rd generation HIV Ab EIA, and p24 antigen EIA were used to further characterise cases of acute infection. Of 10,793 specimens tested with Uni-Gold and conventional serology, 94 (0.90%, 95%CI:0.70-1.07) were confirmed as HIV-positive by conventional serology, and 37 (39.4%) were classified as acute infection. Uni-Gold sensitivity was 81.9% overall (77/94, 95%CI:72.6-89.1); 56.8% for acute infection (21/37, 95%CI:39.5-72.9) and 98.2% for established infection (56/57, 95%CI:90.6-100.0). Of 17 false non-reactive Uni-Gold results, 16 were acute infections, and of these seven were p24 antigen reactive but antibody negative. Uni-Gold specificity was 99.9% (10,692/10,699, 95%CI:99.9-100.0), PPV was 91.7% (95%CI:83.6-96.6) and NPV was 99.8% (95%CI:99.7-99.9), respectively. In this population, Uni-Gold had good specificity and sensitivity was high for established infections when compared to 4th generation laboratory assays, however sensitivity was lower in acute infections. Where rapid tests are used in populations with a high proportion of acute infections, additional testing strategies are needed to detect acute infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Decreased specificity of an assay for recent infection in HIV-1-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral treatment: implications for incidence estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillon, Antoine; Le Vu, Stéphane; Brunet, Sylvie; Gras, Guillaume; Bastides, Frédéric; Bernard, Louis; Meyer, Laurence; Barin, Francis

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the rate of misclassification in treated HIV patients who initiated treatment at the chronic stage of HIV infection using an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) that discriminates between recent infection (RI; within 6 months) and established infection. The performance of EIA-RI was evaluated in 96 HIV-1 chronically infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) with an undetectable viral load (VL) for at least 3 years. Demographic data, HIV-1 viral load, CD4(+) T-cell count, viral subtype, and treatment duration were collected. The subset of misclassified patients was further analyzed using samples collected annually. The impact on incidence estimates was evaluated by simulation. The specificity in treated patients was significantly lower (70.8 to 77.1%) than that observed in untreated patients (93.3 to 99.3%, P test due to treatment may have a dramatic impact on the accuracy of the incidence estimates, with a major impact when HIV prevalence is high. The cross-sectional studies intended to derive HIV incidence must collect information on treatment or, alternatively, should include detection of antiretroviral drugs in blood specimens to rule out treated patients from the calculations.

  1. Evaluation of the NucliSens EasyQ v2.0 assay in comparison with the Roche Amplicor v1.5 and the Roche CAP/CTM HIV-1 Test v2.0 in quantification of C-clade HIV-1 in plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Muenchhoff

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 genetic diversity poses a challenge to reliable viral load monitoring. Discrepancies between different testing platforms have been observed, especially for non-clade-B virus. Therefore we compare, in antiretroviral therapy (ART-naïve South African subjects predominantly infected with HIV-1 clade-C, three commercially available assays: the COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 Test version 2.0 by Roche (CAP/CTM v2.0, the BioMérieux NucliSens Version 2.0 Easy Q/Easy Mag (NucliSens v2.0 and the Roche COBAS Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor Test Version 1.5 (Amplicor v1.5. Strong linear correlation was observed and Bland-Altman analyses showed overall good agreement between the assays with mean viral load differences of 0.078 log cp/ml (NucliSens v2.0 - Amplicor v1.5, 0.260 log cp/ml (CAP/CTM v2.0 - Amplicor v1.5 and 0.164 log cp/ml (CAP/CTM v2.0 - NucliSens v2.0, indicating lower mean viral load results for the Amplicor v1.5 and higher mean readings for the CAP/CTM v2.0. Consistent with observations following previous comparisons of CAP/CTM v2.0 versus Amplicor v1.5, the CAP/CTM v2.0 assay detected low-level viremia (median 65 cp/ml in more than one-third of those in whom viremia had been undetectable (<20 cp/ml in assays using the NucliSens platform. These levels of viremia are of uncertain clinical significance but may be of importance in early detection of ART resistance in those on treatment. Overall the three assays showed good comparability of results but with consistent, albeit relatively small, discrepancies for HIV-1 clade-C samples, especially in the low-viremic range that should be taken into account when interpreting viral load data.

  2. Comparison of Three Commercial Molecular Assays for Detection of Rifampin and Isoniazid Resistance among Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in a High-HIV-Prevalence Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strydom, K; Ismail, F; Matabane, M M Z; Onwuegbuna, O; Omar, S V; Ismail, N

    2015-09-01

    In a head-to-head comparison of the MTBDRplus version 2.0 (Hain Lifescience), the Xpert MTB/RIF (Cepheid), and the Anyplex MTB/NTM (Seegene) assays, we demonstrated equal sensitivity (59/61; 96.7%) and specificity (53/54; 98.1%) for detecting rifampin resistance with further analysis of discordances. The Xpert assay does not detect isoniazid resistance while the Anyplex assay showed high false positivity. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Comparison of Three Commercial Molecular Assays for Detection of Rifampin and Isoniazid Resistance among Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates in a High-HIV-Prevalence Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Strydom, K.; Ismail, F.; Matabane, M.M.Z.; O. Onwuegbuna; S V Omar; N. Ismail

    2015-01-01

    In a head-to-head comparison of the MTBDRplus version 2.0 (Hain Lifescience), the Xpert MTB/RIF (Cepheid), and the Anyplex MTB/NTM (Seegene) assays, we demonstrated equal sensitivity (59/61; 96.7%) and specificity (53/54; 98.1%) for detecting rifampin resistance with further analysis of discordances. The Xpert assay does not detect isoniazid resistance while the Anyplex assay showed high false positivity.

  4. Identification of the paired basic convertases implicated in HIV gp160 processing based on in vitro assays and expression in CD4(+) cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decroly, E; Wouters, S; Di Bello, C; Lazure, C; Ruysschaert, J M; Seidah, N G

    1996-11-29

    The human immunodeficiency virus HIV envelope glycoprotein gp160 is synthesized as an inactive precursor, which is processed into its fusiogenic form gp120/gp41 by host cell proteinases during its intracellular trafficking. Kexin/subtilisin-related endoproteases have been proposed to be enzyme candidates for this maturation process. In the present study, 1) we examined the ability of partially purified precursor convertases and their isoforms to cleave gp160 in vitro. The data demonstrate that all the convertases tested specifically cleave the HIV envelope glycoprotein into gp120 and gp41. 2) We demonstrated that a 19-amino acid model peptide spanning the gp120/gp41 junction is cleaved by all convertases at the same gp160 site as that recognized in HIV-infected cells. 3) In an effort to evaluate specific convertase inhibitors, we showed that the alpha1-antitrypsin variant, alpha1-PDX, inhibits equally well the ability of the tested convertases to cleave gp160 in vitro. 4) Three lymphocyte cell lines were screened by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in an effort to identify which are the convertases expressed in the most common HIV target, the CD4(+) lymphocytes. The data demonstrate that furin, PC5/6, and the newly cloned PC7 are the main transcribed convertases, suggesting that these proteinases are the major gp160-converting enzymes in T4 lymphocytes.

  5. Evaluation of immune responses in HIV infected patients with pleural tuberculosis by the QuantiFERON® TB-Gold interferon-gamma assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lekabe Jacob M

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis of tuberculous (TB pleuritis is difficult and better diagnostic tools are needed. New blood based interferon-gamma (IFN-γ tests are promising, but sensitivity could be low in HIV positive patients. The IFN-γ tests have not yet been validated for use in pleural fluid, a compartment with higher level of immune activation than in blood. Methods The QuantiFERON TB®-Gold (QFT-TB test was analysed in blood and pleural fluid from 34 patients presenting with clinically suspected pleural TB. Clinical data, HIV status and CD4 cell counts were recorded. Adenosine deaminase activity (ADA analysis and TB culture were performed on pleural fluid. Results The patients were categorised as 'confirmed TB' (n = 12, 'probable TB' (n = 16 and 'non-TB' pleuritis (n = 6 based on TB culture results and clinical and biochemical criteria. The majority of the TB patients were HIV infected (82%. The QFT-TB in pleural fluid was positive in 27% and 56% of the 'confirmed TB' and 'probable TB' cases, respectively, whereas the corresponding sensitivities in blood were 58% and 83%. Indeterminate results in blood (25% were caused by low phytohemagglutinin (PHA = positive control IFN-γ responses, significantly lower in the TB patients as compared to the 'non-TB' cases (p = 0.02. Blood PHA responses correlated with CD4 cell count (r = 0.600, p = 0.028. In contrast, in pleural fluid indeterminate results (52% were caused by high Nil (negative control IFN-γ responses in both TB groups. Still, the Nil IFN-γ responses were lower than the TB antigen responses (p Conclusion The QFT-TB test in blood could contribute to the diagnosis of TB pleuritis in the HIV positive population. Still, the number of inconclusive results is too high to recommend the commercial QFT-TB test for routine use in pleural fluid in a TB/HIV endemic resource-limited setting.

  6. Evaluation of performance of human immunodeficiency virus antigen/antibody combination assays in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Kai; Kao, Cheng-Feng; Lin, Pi-Han; Huang, Hui-Lin; Ho, Shu-Yuan; Wong, Kuo-Chen; Lin, Bo-Chang; Yeh, Chang-Ching; Lee, Chia-Yeh; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Lee, Chun-Nan; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Yang, Jyh-Yuan

    2017-08-01

    The fourth-generation human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) combination assay, which can simultaneously detect the presence of anti-HIV antibody and HIV antigen, has been shown to shorten the window period in HIV diagnosis compared with the third-generation HIV antibody immunoassay. This study was aimed to determine the performance of HIV combination assays in Taiwan, where the HIV-1 seroprevalence is 0.007% and HIV-2 infection has never been reported. Performance of three fourth-generation HIV Ag/Ab combination assays (Dia.Pro, Wantai, and Bio-Rad) and one third-generation HIV Ab immunoassay (AxSYM HIV 1/2 gO) was assessed. A total of 152 specimens, including 86 confirmed HIV-seropositive and 66 HIV-seronegative samples, were used in the study. The sensitivity of four assays varied from 98.8% to 100%, and specificity varied from 98.5% to 100%. Performance of the 75 equivocal samples, the HIV status of which was confirmed later, in terms of negative prediction varied from 81.8% to 87.5%. The Bio-Rad and Dia.Pro assays exhibited higher sensitivity for the detection of p24 antigen among the three fourth-generation HIV combination assays. The three fourth-generation HIV Ag/Ab combination assays exhibited better sensitivity, specificity, and negative prediction than the third-generation HIV Ab immunoassay. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy and effectiveness of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay for the diagnosis of HIV-associated lymph node tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rie, A; Page-Shipp, L; Mellet, K; Scott, L; Mkhwnazi, M; Jong, E; Omar, T; Beylis, N; Stevens, W; Sanne, I; Menezes, C N

    2013-11-01

    Xpert MTB/RIF (Xpert) is recommended for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated pulmonary tuberculosis but not extrapulmonary tuberculosis. We assessed the performance of Xpert for HIV-associated lymph node tuberculosis (LNTB), the most common type of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Among HIV-infected adults suspected of LNTB presenting for fine needle aspirate (FNA) at a South African hospital, we assessed the diagnostic accuracy of Xpert using either FNA culture or a composite of microscopy, culture, and cytology as the reference standard, and evaluated the impact of different diagnostics on patient management. Among 344 adults with valid FNA culture and Xpert results, 84 (24 %) were positive on microscopy, 149 (43 %) on culture, 152 (53 %) on Xpert, and 181 (57 %) had a cytology result suggestive of tuberculosis. Using liquid culture as the reference standard, the specificity of a single Xpert was suboptimal (88.2 %) but the sensitivity was high [93.3 %, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 87.6-96.6] and increased with decreasing CD4 count (from 87.0 % for CD4 >250 to 98.6 % for CD4 <100 cells/mm(3)). Using a composite reference standard reduced the sensitivity to 79.2 % but increased the specificity to 98.6 %. All Xpert-positive patients initiated treatment within one day, compared to 70 % of culture-positive but Xpert-negative and 13 % of culture- and Xpert-negative but cytology-positive patients. Xpert is accurate and effective and could be endorsed as the initial diagnostic for HIV-associated LNTB.

  8. Early immunologic correlates of HIV protection can be identified from computational analysis of complex multivariate T-cell flow cytometry assays*

    OpenAIRE

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Chattopadhyay, Pratip K.; Ganesan, Anuradha; O'Neill, Kieran; Zare, Habil; Jalali, Adrin; Hoos, Holger H.; Roederer, Mario; Brinkman, Ryan R.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Polychromatic flow cytometry (PFC), has enormous power as a tool to dissect complex immune responses (such as those observed in HIV disease) at a single cell level. However, analysis tools are severely lacking. Although high-throughput systems allow rapid data collection from large cohorts, manual data analysis can take months. Moreover, identification of cell populations can be subjective and analysts rarely examine the entirety of the multidimensional dataset (focusing instead o...

  9. Comparison of Rapid Point-of-Care Tests for Detection of Antibodies to Hepatitis C Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dennis G; Hess, Kristen L; Erlyana, Erlyana; Reynolds, Grace L; Cummins, Catherine A; Alonzo, Todd A

    2015-09-01

    Background.  Hepatitis C is one of the most prevalent blood-borne diseases in the United States. Despite the benefits of early screening, among 3.2 million Americans who are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), 50%-70% are unaware of their infection status. Methods.  Data were collected between 2011 and 2014, from 1048 clients who were in the following groups: (1) injection drug users, (2) women at sexual risk, (3) gay and bisexual men, and (4) transgender individuals. The sensitivity and specificity of point-of-care tests included (1) the MedMira rapid human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HCV antibody test, (2) MedMira hepatitis B (HBV)/HIV/HCV antibody test, (3) Chembio HCV Screen Assay used with both whole blood and (4) oral specimens, (5) Chembio HIV-HCV Assay also used with both whole blood and (6) oral specimens, (7) Chembio HIV-HCV-Syphilis Assay, and (8) OraSure HCV Rapid Antibody Test used with whole blood. The gold standard for the HCV tests were HCV enzyme immunoassay (EIA) 2.0. Results.  OraSure had the highest sensitivity at 92.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 88.8%-96.5%) followed closely by Chembio's 3 blood tests at 92.1% (95% CI = 87.7%-96.4%), 91.5% (95% CI = 87.2%-95.7%), and 92.3% (95% CI = 88.4%-96.2%). The sensitivities of MedMira HIV/HCV and MedMira HIV/HCV/HBV tests were the lowest, at 79.1% (95% CI = 72.6%-85.5%), and 81.5% (95% CI = 75.2%-87.8%), respectively. Specificity for the OraSure was 99.8% (95% CI = 99.4%-100%); specificity for the Chembio blood tests was 99.2% (95% CI = 98.6%-99.9%), 99.4% (95% CI = 98.8%-99.9%), and 99.3% (95% CI = 98.8%-99.9%); and specificity for the MedMira was100% and 100%. False-negative results were associated with HIV and hepatitis B core antibody serostatus. Conclusions.  The OraSure and Chembio blood tests (including those multiplexed with HIV and syphilis) appear to good performance characteristics. This study has identified potential limitations of rapid testing in those testing positive for

  10. Contribution of Interferon gamma release assays testing to the diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in HIV-infected patients: A comparison of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In Tube, T-SPOT.TB and tuberculin skin test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos José M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI is the most effective strategy to control tuberculosis (TB among patients with HIV infection. The tuberculin skin test (TST was the only available method to identify LTBI. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the usefulness of the interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs: QuantiFERON-tuberculosis (TB Gold-In-Tube test (QFG and T-SPOT.TB for the diagnosis of LTBI in a diverse cohort of HIV-infected patients. Methods A prospective study was carried out in consecutive patients cared for in a single institution in Spain from January 2009 to October 2010. IGRAs and TST were performed simultaneously. TST induration ≥ 5 mm was considered positive. Results QFG, T-SPOT.TB and TST were performed in 373 subjects. Median CD4 cell count was 470/μl with a median nadir of 150/μl. TST, QFG and T-SPOT.TB were positive in 13.3%, 7.5% and 18.5% cases respectively. Among 277 patients with neither past or current TB nor previous treatment for LTBI and who had TST results, a positive TST result was obtained in 20 (7.2% cases. When adding QFG results to TST, there were a total of 26 (8.6% diagnoses of LTBI. When the results of both IGRAs were added, the number of diagnoses increased to 54 (17.9% (incremental difference: 10.7% [95% confidence interval [CI]:5.3-16.2%] [p Conclusions IGRAs were more sensitive than TST for diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection in HIV-infected patients. Dual sequential testing with TST and IGRAs may be the optimal approach for LTBI screening in this population.

  11. SERO-DIAGNOSIS OF TUBERCULOSIS WITH A60 ANTIGEN ENZYME-LINKED-IMMUNOSORBENT-ASSAY - FAILURE IN HIV-INFECTED INDIVIDUALS IN GHANA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERWERF, TS; DAS, PK; VANSOOLINGEN, D; YONG, S; VANDERMARK, TW

    In order to assess the diagnostic usefulness of the A60 (ANDA Biologicals, Strassbourg, France) sero-diagnostic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit for tuberculosis in Africa, sera of 53 pulmonary smear-positive tuberculosis (TB) patients, 30 apparently healthy control subjects and 6 AIDS

  12. Risk factors for false-negative results of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assay in non-HIV-infected patients with culture-confirmed tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Young; Park, Moo Suk; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Chang, Joon; Kang, Young Ae

    2011-07-01

    Limited information is available on the risk factors for false-negative results with the new generation of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) tests in non-HIV-infected patients with tuberculosis (TB). We sought to identify risk factors for false-negative QFT-GIT results in culture-confirmed TB patients. We reviewed the microbiological, laboratory, radiographic, and clinical data of 362 patients with positive M. tuberculosis cultures who received QFT-GIT tests at a Korean tertiary hospital between September 2006 and March 2010. Of these, 311 (85.9%) had true-positive and 51 (14.1%) had false-negative results. The false-negative group was more likely to have immunosuppressant diseases and lower platelet, protein, and albumin levels than the true-positive group. An immunosuppressive condition was an independent risk factor for false-negative QFT-GIT results in non-HIV-infected patients with active TB (odds ratio, 2.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.38-6.47; P = .006). Careful interpretation of negative QFT-GIT results is thus necessary in immunocompromised patients suspected of having active TB. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reduction of diagnostic window by new fourth-generation human immunodeficiency virus screening assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, B; Fall, E H; Berger, A; Doerr, H W

    1998-08-01

    In order to reduce the diagnostic window between the time of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and laboratory diagnosis, new screening enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) which permit the simultaneous detection of HIV antigen and antibody have been developed. Two fourth-generation assays, HIV DUO (Biomérieux) and HIV Combi (Boehringer Mannheim), for the combined detection of HIV antigen and antibody, were compared with a third-generation assay (HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd Generation Plus enzyme immunoassay [EIA]; Abbott) and a p24 antigen test (HIV-1 Ag monoclonal; Abbott). A total of 17 seroconversion panels, 15 cell culture supernatants infected with different HIV type 1 (HIV-1) subtypes, and 255 potentially cross-reactive serum samples were tested. Ten seroconversions were detected an average of 8.1 days earlier with HIV DUO and 7.5 days earlier with HIV Combi than with the third-generation ELISA. Overall, in the 17 seroconversion panels tested, HIV DUO detected HIV-1 infection an average of 4.8 days and HIV Combi detected infection an average of 4.4 days earlier than HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd Generation Plus EIA. HIV antigen was detected with HIV DUO and HIV Combi in all of the 15 cell culture supernatants infected with different HIV-1 subtypes, including subtype O. With fourth-generation assays, considerably fewer false-positive results (n = 4 to 6) were obtained, in comparison with the third-generation EIA (n = 18). Fourth-generation assays permit an earlier diagnosis of HIV infection than third-generation antibody screening assays through the detection of p24 antigen, which may be present in serum samples from individuals with recent HIV infection prior to seroconversion.

  14. Performances of four fourth-generation human immunodeficiency virus-1 screening assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Eun Young; Hur, Mina; Roh, Eun Youn; Park, Myoung Hee; Moon, Hee-Won; Yun, Yeo Min

    2012-12-01

    Fourth-generation human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) screening assays have improved sensitivity, but vary in performance characteristics. The purpose of this study was to evaluate four different fourth-generation HIV-1 assays. These assays included the AxSYM HIV Ag/Ab Combo (Abbott diagnostics, Delkenheim, Germany), ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo (Abbott), Elecsys 2010 HIV Combi (Roche Diagnostics GmbH, Mannheim, Germany), and Elecsys HIV Combi PT (Roche). A total of 1,306 samples that included 1,225 clinical samples and 81 samples consisting of seroconversion panels, an HIV-1 p24 antigen sensitivity panel, and dilution series of HIV-1 lysates and HIV-1 antibodies were tested. All of the assays had sensitivities of 100% on clinical samples. The specificities of the AxSYM, ARCHITECT, Elecsys 2010 HIV Combi, and Elecsys HIV Combi PT were 99.6, 99.6, 99.0, and 99.5%, respectively. Of the 81 samples with different levels of HIV antigen or antibody and/or subtypes, Elecsys HIV Combi PT and ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo showed better analytical sensitivities than the other two assays. In summary, the performance characteristics of AxSYM, ARCHITECT, and Elecsys HIV Combi PT were comparable and satisfactory for clinical samples. ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo and Elecsys HIV Combi PT have the higher analytical sensitivities, and would be preferable for reducing the window period. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The clinical utility of the urine-based lateral flow lipoarabinomannan assay in HIV-infected adults in Myanmar: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thit, Swe Swe; Aung, Ne Myo; Htet, Zaw Win; Boyd, Mark A; Saw, Htin Aung; Anstey, Nicholas M; Kyi, Tint Tint; Cooper, David A; Kyi, Mar Mar; Hanson, Josh

    2017-08-04

    The use of the point-of-care lateral flow lipoarabinomannan (LF-LAM) test may expedite tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in HIV-positive patients. However, the test's clinical utility is poorly defined outside sub-Saharan Africa. The study enrolled consecutive HIV-positive adults at a tertiary referral hospital in Yangon, Myanmar. On enrolment, patients had a LF-LAM test performed according to the manufacturer's instructions. Clinicians managing the patients were unaware of the LF-LAM result, which was correlated with the patient's clinical course over the ensuing 6 months. The study enrolled 54 inpatients and 463 outpatients between July 1 and December 31, 2015. On enrolment, the patients' median (interquartile range) CD4 T-cell count was 270 (128-443) cells/mm 3 . The baseline LF-LAM test was positive in 201/517 (39%). TB was confirmed microbiologically during follow-up in 54/517 (10%), with rifampicin resistance present in 8/54 (15%). In the study's resource-limited setting, extrapulmonary testing for TB was not possible, but after 6 months, 97/201 (48%) with a positive LF-LAM test on enrolment had neither died, required hospitalisation, received a TB diagnosis or received empirical anti-TB therapy, suggesting a high rate of false-positive results. Of the 97 false-positive tests, 89 (92%) were grade 1 positive, suggesting poor test specificity using this cut-off. Only 21/517 (4%) patients were inpatients with TB symptoms and a CD4 T-cell count of < 100 cells/mm 3 . Five (24%) of these 21 died, three of whom had a positive LF-LAM test on enrolment. However, all three received anti-TB therapy before death - two after diagnosis with Xpert MTB/RIF testing, while the other received empirical treatment. It is unlikely that knowledge of the baseline LF-LAM result would have averted any of the study's other 11 deaths; eight had a negative test, and of the three patients with a positive test, two received anti-TB therapy before death, while one died from laboratory

  16. Enzyme assays

    OpenAIRE

    Bisswanger, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The essential requirements for enzyme assays are described and frequently occurring errors and pitfalls as well as their avoidance are discussed. The main factors, which must be considered for assaying enzymes, are temperature, pH, ionic strength and the proper concentrations of the essential components like substrates and enzymes. Standardization of these parameters would be desirable, but the diversity of the features of different enzymes prevents unification of assay conditions. Neverthele...

  17. Multicenter evaluation of a new rapid automated human immunodeficiency virus antigen detection assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, B; Mühlbacher, A; Michl, U; Paggi, G; Bossi, V; Sargento, C; Camacho, R; Fall, E H; Berger, A; Schmitt, U; Melchior, W

    1999-03-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen assays are of limited value for monitoring antiretroviral therapy, they play an important role for confirmatory testing of fourth generation HIV screening enzyme immunoassay (EIA) reactive samples. In a multicenter study, a new automated rapid p24 antigen assay, Elecsys HIV Ag (Roche Diagnostics Boehringer Mannheim GmbH, Penzberg, Germany), was compared to FDA licensed tests (Abbott HIV-1 Ag monoclonal and Coulter HIV-1 p24 antigen assay). In the evaluation 27 seroconversion panels were included, sera from the acute phase of infection, single and follow-up samples from HIV antibody positive patients, dilution series of HIV antigen positive standards, sera and cell culture supernatants infected with different HIV-1 subtypes (A-H, and O) HIV-2 and recombinant HIV-1 (gag/env) isolates. To challenge the specificity of the new assay, 2565 unselected blood donors, sera from pregnant women, dialysis and hospitalized patients and 407 potentially cross-reactive samples were investigated. Acute HIV infection was detected in three to eight seroconversion panels earlier with Elecsys HIV Ag than with the alternative assays. Higher numbers of serum samples from HIV infected patients tested positive by Elecsys HIV Ag than with the comparative assays. All HIV-1 subtypes and HIV-2 isolates were recognized with Elecsys HIV Ag. Abbott HIV-1 Ag monoclonal and Coulter HIV-1 p24 antigen assay showed a variable sensitivity for the different HIV-1 subtypes. The specificity of Elecsys HIV Ag and Coulter HIV-1 p24 antigen assay were 99.8 and 99.93%, respectively. All the eight sera that were false reactive by Elecsys HIV Ag were tested negative with the Elecsys HIV Ag Neutralization Test. In conclusion, Elecsys HIV Ag was more sensitive than the alternative assays and showed a high specificity in combination with the neutralization assay. The very short incubation time of 18 min and the fully automated procedure of Elecsys HIV Ag which

  18. HIV avidity index performance using a modified fourth-generation immunoassay to detect recent HIV infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suligoi, Barbara; Regine, Vincenza; Raimondo, Mariangela; Rodella, Anna; Terlenghi, Luigina; Caruso, Arnaldo; Bagnarelli, Patrizia; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Zanchetta, Nadia; Ghisetti, Valeria; Galli, Claudio

    2017-10-26

    Detecting recent HIV infections is important to evaluate incidence and monitor epidemic trends. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic performance and accuracy of the avidity index (AI) for discriminating for recent HIV infections. We collected serum samples from HIV-1 positive individuals: A) with known date of infection (midpoint in time between last HIV-negative and first HIV-positive test); B) infected for >1 year. Samples were divided into two aliquots: one diluted with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and the other with 1 M guanidine. Both aliquots were assayed by the Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo 4th generation assay (Abbott). We compared AI found in recent (RI=HIV subtype had no impact on AI misclassifications. All individuals in group A reached the AI threshold of 0.80 within 24 months after seroconversion. The AI is an accurate serological marker for discriminating recent from established HIV infections and meets WHO requirements for HIV incidence assays.

  19. High-performance liquid chromatography assay for the determination of the HIV-protease inhibitor tipranavir in human plasma in combination with nine other antiretroviral medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sun Ok; Rezk, Naser L; Kashuba, Angela D M

    2007-03-12

    An accurate, sensitive and simple reverse-phase (RP) high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay has been developed and validated for the simultaneous quantitative determination of tipranavir with nine other antiretroviral drugs in plasma. A liquid-liquid extraction of the drugs in tert-butylmethylether (TBME) from 200 microL of plasma is followed by a reversed phase gradient HPLC assay with UV detection at 210 nm. The standard curve for the drug was linear in the range of 80-80,000 ng/mL for tipranavir; 10-10,000 ng/mL for nevirapine, indinavir, efavirenz, and saquinavir; and 25-10,000 ng/mL for amprenavir, atazanavir, ritonavir, lopinavir, and nelfinavir. The regression coefficient (r(2)) was greater than 0.998 for all analytes. This method has been fully validated and shown to be specific, accurate and precise. Due to an excellent extraction procedure giving good recovery and a clean baseline, this method is simple, rapid, accurate and provides excellent resolution and peak shape for all analytes. Thus this method is very suitable for therapeutic drug monitoring.

  20. Indeterminate human immunodeficiency virus Western blot profiles in ethiopians with discordant screening-assay results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meles, Hailu; Wolday, Dawit; Fontanet, Arnaud; Tsegaye, Aster; Tilahun, Tesfaye; Aklilu, Mathias; Sanders, Eduard; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2002-01-01

    The Western blot (WB) assay is the most widely accepted confirmatory assay for the detection of antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). However, indeterminate WB reactivity to HIV-1 proteins may occur in individuals who do not appear to be infected with HIV. The profiles of WB

  1. HIV Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS HIV Transmission Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on ...

  2. [Evaluation of new fourth-generation human immunodeficiency virus antigen and antibody detection assay with enzyme-linked fluorescent immunoassay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Takako; Sudo, Koji; Kondo, Makiko; Kurai, Hanako; Sagara, Hiroko; Imai, Mitsunobu

    2007-09-01

    We evaluated the fourth-generation HIV screening assay VIDAS HIV DUOII (DUOII) based on ELFA for simultaneous detection of anti-HIV-1 and anti-HIV-2 antibodies and HIV-1 p24 antigen through comparison with other HIV antigen-antibody detection assays. Materials were 1228 HIV-negative specimens, 95 HIV-antibody-positive specimens, and HIV commercial panels. The specificity of DUOII was 99.8% and sensitivity 100%, detecting all of HIV-1 group M subtype A, B, B', C, D, A/E, F, G, B/D, HIV-1 group O, and HIV-2. The sensitivity test to HIV-1 p24 antigen was 5pg/ mL, higher than other assays. DUOII was equivalent to or superior in detecting results earlier than other assays in an evaluation using 10 commercial HIV-1 seroconversion panels of primary infection. DUOII detects anti-HIV IgM antibody, so no negative sample was found in the second window between p24 antigen disappearance and raised anti-HIV IgG antibody. DUOII has sufficient specificity and sensitivity for HIV screening, and detects primary infection sooner than other assays. These results indicate that DUOII is useful and reliable in HIV screening.

  3. Minor Contribution of Chimeric Host-HIV Readthrough Transcripts to the Level of HIV Cell-Associated gag RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasternak, A.O.; DeMaster, L.K.; Kootstra, N.A.; Reiss, P.; O'Doherty, U.; Berkhout, B.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-associated HIV unspliced RNA is an important marker of the viral reservoir. HIV gag RNA-specific assays are frequently used to monitor reservoir activation. Because HIV preferentially integrates into actively transcribed genes, some of the transcripts detected by these assays may not represent

  4. Acute HIV Discovered During Routine HIV Screening With HIV Antigen-Antibody Combination Tests in 9 US Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Douglas A E; Giordano, Thomas P; Pasalar, Siavash; Jacobson, Kathleen R; Glick, Nancy R; Sha, Beverly E; Mammen, Priya E; Hunt, Bijou R; Todorovic, Tamara; Moreno-Walton, Lisa; Adomolga, Vincent; Feaster, Daniel J; Branson, Bernard M

    2018-01-05

    Newer combination HIV antigen-antibody tests allow detection of HIV sooner after infection than previous antibody-only immunoassays because, in addition to HIV-1 and -2 antibodies, they detect the HIV-1 p24 antigen, which appears before antibodies develop. We determine the yield of screening with HIV antigen-antibody tests and clinical presentations for new diagnoses of acute and established HIV infection across US emergency departments (EDs). This was a retrospective study of 9 EDs in 6 cities with HIV screening programs that integrated laboratory-based antigen-antibody tests between November 1, 2012, and December 31, 2015. Unique patients with newly diagnosed HIV infection were identified and classified as having either acute HIV infection or established HIV infection. Acute HIV infection was defined as a repeatedly reactive antigen-antibody test result, a negative HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody differentiation assay, or Western blot result, but detectable HIV ribonucleic acid (RNA); established HIV infection was defined as a repeatedly reactive antigen-antibody test result and a positive HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody differentiation assay or Western blot result. The primary outcomes were the number of new HIV diagnoses and proportion of patients with laboratory-defined acute HIV infection. Secondary outcomes compared reason for visit and the clinical presentation of acute HIV infection. In total, 214,524 patients were screened for HIV and 839 (0.4%) received a new diagnosis, of which 122 (14.5%) were acute HIV infection and 717 (85.5%) were established HIV infection. Compared with patients with established HIV infection, those with acute HIV infection were younger, had higher RNA and CD4 counts, and were more likely to have viral syndrome (41.8% versus 6.5%) or fever (14.3% versus 3.4%) as their reason for visit. Most patients with acute HIV infection displayed symptoms attributable to acute infection (median symptom count 5 [interquartile range 3 to 6]), with fever often

  5. Reduction of the diagnostic window with a new combined p24 antigen and human immunodeficiency virus antibody screening assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürtler, L; Mühlbacher, A; Michl, U; Hofmann, H; Paggi, G G; Bossi, V; Thorstensson, R; G-Villaescusa, R; Eiras, A; Hernandez, J M; Melchior, W; Donie, F; Weber, B

    1998-11-01

    In order to reduce the window phase between time of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and laboratory diagnosis, new fourth generation screening assays which permit a simultaneous detection of HIV antigen and antibody have been developed. In a multicenter study, a new automated fourth generation assay, Enzymun-Test HIV Combi (Boehringer Mannheim GmbH) was compared to third generation assay, p24 antigen tests and Western blot. A total of 37 seroconversion panels, samples of the early infection (n = 42), HIV-1 antibody positive sera, including subtypes A E, and O (n = 1118), HIV-2 positive samples (n = 252) and cell culture supernatants infected with different HIV-1 subtypes and HIV-2 (n = 50), blood donors (n = 6649), hospitalized patients (n = 475), HIV neg. sera with indeterminate Western blot (n = 32), potentially cross reactive serum samples (n = 435) and HIV negative specimens from Cameroon (n = 68) were tested. A total of 16 of 29 seroconversions were detected on average 8.5 days earlier with Enzymun-Test HIV Combi than HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd generation EIA (Abbott Laboratories). Overall, in the 29 panels investigated comparatively with the two assays, the mean time delay between Enzymun-Test HIV Combi and HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd generation EIA was 4.7 days. HIV antigen was detected in three out of 35 seroconversions one bleed earlier with HIV-1 Ag Monoclonal than with Enzymun-Test HIV Combi. Enzymun-Test HIV Combi showed a sensitivity of 100% for HIV antibody detection for HIV-1 group M and O and HIV-2 positive specimens. While p24 antigen of different HIV-1 subtypes was detected with Enzymun-Test HIV Combi in all the 49 cell culture supernatants, HIV Ag was not detected in an HIV-2 virus lysate. A total of 66 false positive results out of 7659 HIV negative samples were obtained with the Enzymun-Test HIV Combi. The specificity for unselected blood donors was 99.6%. The Enzymun-Test HIV Combi permits an earlier diagnosis of HIV infection than third generation

  6. Comparative performance of the Geenius™ HIV-1/HIV-2 supplemental test in Florida's public health testing population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordan, Sally; Bennett, Berry; Lee, Meghan; Crowe, Susanne

    2017-06-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published updated guidelines in 2014 for the laboratory diagnosis of HIV in the United States, which recommend use of a supplemental immunoassay (IA) that differentiates HIV-1 from HIV-2 after a repeatedly reactive HIV-1/2 antigen/antibody "Combo" screening test. In October 2014, Bio-Rad Laboratories introduced the FDA-cleared Geenius HIV-1/HIV-2 Supplemental assay and in July 2016, it replaced the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation rapid test as the second test in the HIV diagnostic algorithm. To compare performance of the new FDA-cleared Bio-Rad Geenius HIV-1/HIV-2 Supplemental assay and the Bio-Rad Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation assay for use as the primary supplemental test in the 2014 CDC/APHL HIV Diagnostic Algorithm. Two sets of specimens were used to assess the performance of Geenius; 340 select retrospective specimens, obtained through routine clinical submissions from individuals seeking HIV serostatus determinations and 10 known HIV-2 antibody reactive specimens provided by Bio-Rad Laboratories. Panels were created and characterized solely by in-house laboratory results. The panels consisted of: algorithm-defined "established HIV-1 infections" (n=250), "acute HIV-1 infections" (n=20), "early HIV-1 infections" (n=10) and "false positive Combo specimens" (n=60). CONCLUSIONS: The Geenius assay provides significant advantages over Multispot as an appropriate replacement for the primary supplemental test in the HIV Diagnostic Algorithm. In this retrospective study, Geenius was highly concordant with Multispot, reclassified some acute and early algorithm-defined HIV-1 positive specimens and demonstrated a potential decrease in the number HIV-1 RNA nucleic acid amplification tests needed to complete the diagnostic algorithm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Alphabet Soup of HIV Reservoir Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, Radwa R; Li, Jonathan Z

    2017-04-01

    Despite the success of antiretroviral therapy in suppressing HIV, life-long therapy is required to avoid HIV reactivation from long-lived viral reservoirs. Currently, there is intense interest in searching for therapeutic interventions that can purge the viral reservoir to achieve complete remission in HIV patients off antiretroviral therapy. The evaluation of such interventions relies on our ability to accurately and precisely measure the true size of the viral reservoir. In this review, we assess the most commonly used HIV reservoir assays, as a clear understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of each is vital for the accurate interpretation of results and for the development of improved assays. The quantification of intracellular or plasma HIV RNA or DNA levels remains the most commonly used tests for the characterization of the viral reservoir. While cost-effective and high-throughput, these assays are not able to differentiate between replication-competent or defective fractions or quantify the number of infected cells. Viral outgrowth assays provide a lower bound for the fraction of cells that can produce infectious virus, but these assays are laborious, expensive and substantially underestimate the potential reservoir of replication-competent provirus. Newer assays are now available that seek to overcome some of these problems, including full-length proviral sequencing, inducible HIV RNA assays, ultrasensitive p24 assays and murine adoptive transfer techniques. The development and evaluation of strategies for HIV remission rely upon our ability to accurately and precisely quantify the size of the remaining viral reservoir. At this time, all current HIV reservoir assays have drawbacks such that combinations of assays are generally needed to gain a more comprehensive view of the viral reservoir. The development of novel, rapid, high-throughput assays that can sensitively quantify the levels of the replication-competent HIV reservoir is still needed.

  8. HIV-Selectest enzyme immunoassay and rapid test: ability to detect seroconversion following HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Surender; Norris, Philip J; Busch, Michael P; Haynes, Barton F; Park, Susan; Sasono, Pretty; Mlisana, Koleka; Salim, Abdool Karim; Hecht, Frederick M; Mulenga, Joseph; Chomba, Elwyn; Hunter, Eric; Allen, Susan; Nemo, George; Rodriguez-Chavez, Isaac R; Margolick, Joseph B; Golding, Hana

    2010-01-01

    HIV-Selectest is a serodiagnostic enzyme immunoassay (EIA), containing p6 and gp41 peptides, designed to differentiate between vaccine-induced antibodies and true infections. A rapid test version of the HIV-Selectest was developed. Both assays detected HIV antibodies in men and women within 2 to 4 weeks of infection, with sensitivity similar to third-generation EIAs.

  9. HIV Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Collapse All Is abstinence the only 100% effective HIV prevention option? Yes. Abstinence means not having oral, ...

  10. HIV Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... All Collapse All Should I get tested for HIV? CDC recommends that everyone between the ages of ...

  11. Diagnostik af HIV-1 infektionen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, C B; Dickmeiss, E; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    1991-01-01

    Different methods have been developed for the diagnosis of HIV infection, i.e. detection of antibodies, antigen and proviral DNA. ELISA methods for detecting HIV-1 antibodies are widely used as screening assays. A sample which is repeatedly positive with ELISA is re-tested with a confirmatory test...... in a proportion of patients. Detection and quantitation of HIV antigen are used as indicators of disease progression and for monitoring the antiviral efficacy of therapeutic interventions. When no antibodies or antigens can be detected in persons suspected of having HIV infection, culture of HIV can be performed....... For research purposes, detection of small amounts of proviral DNA can be made with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The method is not yet applicable in routine diagnosis of HIV infection....

  12. Correlation of serum HIV antigen and antibody with clinical status in HIV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, D A; Falk, L A; Kessler, H A; Chase, R M; Blaauw, B; Chudwin, D S; Landay, A L

    1987-08-01

    An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) has been developed which detects antigen(s) (Ag) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the serum of patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), AIDS-related complex (ARC), and patients at high risk for HIV infection. The test has a sensitivity of approximately 50 pg/ml of HIV protein. The specificity of the assay was determined with various virus infected cell lines, normal human sera/plasma, and serum from patients not known to be at risk for HIV infection. No false-positive HIV-Ag results were seen. Sera from 69% of patients with AIDS were positive for HIV-Ag as were 46% of patients with ARC and 19% of asymptomatic, HIV-antibody-positive individuals. There were significant associations between the stage of HIV infection--ie, AIDS vs ARC vs asymptomatic--and the detection of HIV-Ag in serum (p less than 0.0001) and the lack of detection of antibody to HIV core Ag (p less than 0.0001). HIV-Ag was also found in the serum of two asymptomatic antibody-negative individuals who were at high risk for AIDS and who later developed HIV antibody. The presence of HIV-Ag in sera was confirmed by an inhibition procedure. Thus, HIV-Ag can be detected in the serum of infected individuals prior to antibody production and correlates with the clinical stage of HIV infection.

  13. Evaluation of the Bio-Rad Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 Rapid Test as an alternative to Western blot for confirmation of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, Ana María; Baughan, Eleonore; Hodinka, Richard L

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, a new HIV diagnostic algorithm has been proposed that uses an HIV-1/HIV-2 antibody differentiation immunoassay instead of Western blot or immunofluoresence for confirmatory testing. To evaluate the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 Rapid Test (Multispot) as an alternative to Western blot analysis for confirmation of HIV infection. A series of 205 serum and plasma specimens positive for HIV-1 or HIV-2 were used to compare the performance of Multispot to a standard HIV-1 Western blot. Positive samples included 63 specimens from patients>18 months of age, 33 proficiency survey specimens, and 109 specimens from nine commercial seroconversion and performance panels. In addition, 63 specimens from 51 HIV-exposed, uninfected children≤18 months of age in various stages of seroreversion and 192 HIV-negative samples were tested. Specimens were initially screened using a 4th generation HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay. Multispot readily discriminated between individuals with HIV-1 or HIV-2 infection and those who were uninfected. Of the 205 samples repeatedly reactive by the 4th generation screening assay, infection status was correctly confirmed by Multispot in 83.9% (172/205) compared to 68.8% (141/205) for Western blot. Multispot detected HIV-1 earlier in 27.6% of low-titer antibody specimens called indeterminate by Western blot, and effectively reduced the number of indeterminate results in seroreverting HIV-1 exposed, uninfected infants and for HIV-2 infections misinterpreted as indeterminate or positive by HIV-1 Western blot. Multispot offers speed and simplicity over Western blot and has an excellent performance for differentiation and confirmation of antibodies to HIV-1 and HIV-2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Detection of emerging HIV variants in blood donors from urban areas of Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S; Wood, O; Tang, S; Hu, J; Machuca, A; Kerby, S; Awazi, B; Vockley, C; Hewlett, I

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has licensed several assays for use in donor testing and management of persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, the performance of these assays for detection and quantitation of emerging HIV genetic variants has not been studied extensively. We tested 240 human plasma specimens collected from two urban blood centers in Cameroon where HIV genetic diversity and recombinant HIV strains are highly prevalent, using several FDA licensed assays. The testing record in Cameroon indicated that 149 specimens were HIV antibody positive and 91 specimens were negative using a rapid HIV-1/2 antibody assay in routine use in Cameroon blood centers. Both sets of samples were evaluated in the FDA laboratory using four ELISA tests for HIV-1 group M, HIV-1 group O, and HIV-2 antibodies, one IFA for HIV-1 antibody, one Western blot for HIV-1, one HIV-1 p-24 antigen assay, and three nucleic acid tests (NAT). Our results indicate that the assays had high sensitivity for detection of emerging genetic variants, although a small number of samples harboring circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) found in Cameroon were not always consistently detected by a few assays. These findings may be due to the evolving genetic diversity of HIV strains in Cameroon.

  15. Rapid diagnostic tests duo as alternative to conventional serological assays for conclusive Chagas disease diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egüez, Karina E; Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Terán, Carolina; Chipana, Zenobia; García, Wilson; Torrico, Faustino; Gascon, Joaquim; Lozano-Beltran, Daniel-Franz; Pinazo, María-Jesús

    2017-04-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It affects several million people, mainly in Latin America, and severe cardiac and/or digestive complications occur in ~30% of the chronically infected patients. Disease acute stage is mostly asymptomatic and infection goes undiagnosed. In the chronic phase direct parasite detection is hampered due to its concealed presence and diagnosis is achieved by serological methods, like ELISA or indirect hemagglutination assays. Agreement in at least two tests must be obtained due to parasite wide antigenic variability. These techniques require equipped labs and trained personnel and are not available in distant regions. As a result, many infected people often remain undiagnosed until it is too late, as the two available chemotherapies show diminished efficacy in the advanced chronic stage. Easy-to-use rapid diagnostic tests have been developed to be implemented in remote areas as an alternative to conventional tests. They do not need electricity, nor cold chain, they can return results within an hour and some even work with whole blood as sample, like Chagas Stat-Pak (ChemBio Inc.) and Chagas Detect Plus (InBIOS Inc.). Nonetheless, in order to qualify a rapidly diagnosed positive patient for treatment, conventional serological confirmation is obligatory, which might risk its start. In this study two rapid tests based on distinct antigen sets were used in parallel as a way to obtain a fast and conclusive Chagas disease diagnosis using whole blood samples. Chagas Stat-Pak and Chagas Detect Plus were validated by comparison with three conventional tests yielding 100% sensitivity and 99.3% specificity over 342 patients seeking Chagas disease diagnosis in a reference centre in Sucre (Bolivia). Combined used of RDTs in distant regions could substitute laborious conventional serology, allowing immediate treatment and favouring better adhesion to it.

  16. Performance of the Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag Test on Clinical Samples Representing Current Epidemic HIV Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Lemee, Véronique; Leoz, Marie; Etienne, Manuel; De Oliveira, Fabienne; Plantier, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Screening for HIV infection has improved since the first immunoassays. Today, diagnosis of HIV infection can be performed with fourth-generation tests that track both the patient's antibodies and HIV antigen. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical sensitivity and specificity of the new DiaSorin Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag assay compared to another fourth-generation assay, the Abbott Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo kit. This work was performed on a large panel of 900 samples, includ...

  17. HIV Life Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... healthier lives. ART also reduces the risk of HIV transmission (the spread of HIV to others). HIV attacks and destroys ... lives. HIV medicines also reduce the risk of HIV transmission (the spread of HIV to others). What are the seven ...

  18. Women and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women and HIV: Get the Facts on HIV Testing, Prevention, and Treatment Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... How can you lower your chance of HIV? HIV Quick Facts What is HIV? HIV is the ...

  19. Treatment for HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Public Home » Treatment » Treatment Decisions and HIV HIV/AIDS Menu Menu HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Home ... here Enter ZIP code here Treatment Decisions and HIV for Veterans and the Public Treatment for HIV: ...

  20. HIV-Associated Neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Kuljeet Singh; Wadhwa, Ankur; Garg, Jyoti; Mahajan, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Few cases of HIV and neurocysticercosis co-infection have been reported till date. The symptomatic manifestation of cysticercosis may be further reduced by interactions between the 2 disease processes. In patients with HIV, the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis is challenging and management must be individualized depending on the stage and the coexistent opportunistic conditions. We present 2 such cases. First was a 35-year-old driver seropositive for HIV-1 presented with complex partial seizures and a CD4 count of 530 cells/mm(3). The second case was a 40-year-old businessman with a CD4 count of 350 cells/mm(3). Both of them had multiple parenchymal lesions, with 1 being a large cystic lesion. Relatively high CD4 count and a positive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay increased the likelihood for diagnosis and treatment. Both of our patients received cysticidal therapy, and none of them deteriorated with treatment. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. False negative HIV antibody test in HIV infected children who receive early antiretroviral treatment in a resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Alvarez-Uria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the implementation of 2010 World Health Organization guidelines, the number of infants from developing countries who will initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART will increase considerably. In this study we describe the HIV antibody tests of 14 HIV infected children who initiated ART at age less than one year in a rural setting of India. The HIV rapid test was negative in seven and indeterminate in two cases, whereas the HIV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA antibody test was negative in three and indeterminate in one case. In one child who had both negative HIV rapid test and ELISA initially, HIV serology turned positive after having a virological failure to ART, suggesting the possibility of utilizing HIV serology for monitoring ART effectiveness in children who experience HIV seroreversion. In conclusion, HIV seroreversion of children with early initiation of ART is common and should be considered for avoiding misdiagnosis of HIV infection. 

  2. Evaluation of the siemens HIV antigen-antibody immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallefuoco, Luca; Aden Abdi, Fatima; Sorrentino, Rosanna; Spalletti-Cernia, Daniela; Mazzarella, Claudia; Barbato, Sara; Perna, Enzo; Buffolano, Wilma; Di Nicuolo, Giuseppe; Portella, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Fourth-generation assays for the simultaneous detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen and antibodies are available on the international market and are currently used for blood donor screening and for HIV diagnosis. In this study we evaluated the performance of the novel automated fourth-generation ADVIA Centaur® HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay. The assay detected seroconversion at the same bleed or at least one bleed earlier in panels with respect to other assays and showed a detection efficacy equal to those of other assays in a low-titer panel. Samples obtained from blood donors (n = 2,778) or from HIV-positive patients (HIV-1 B subtype, n = 82; non-B subtype, n = 71) were also tested, showing a good correlation with other fourth-generation assays. We assessed the performance of 3 fourth-generation assays for detecting in utero transmitted anti-HIV antibodies and found a more specific detection efficiency with the ADVIA Centaur HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay compared to the other fourth-generation assays.

  3. Development of a World Health Organisation International Reference Panel for Anti-HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigglesworth, Erin; Heath, Alan; Holmes, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    In response to a recommendation made by the "World Health Organisation (WHO) Working Group on Reference Preparations for Testing HBsAg, Anti-HCV and Anti-HIV Diagnostic Kits", a reference panel for anti-HIV consisting of plasma samples representing the major groups and subtypes of HIV has been prepared. The panel consists of solvent-detergent treated anti-HIV-positive human plasma samples that have been diluted 1 in 40 in anti-HIV-negative human serum and freeze-dried and the anti-HIV-positive plasma samples were derived from individuals infected with HIV-1 group M subtypes A, B, C and CRF01_AE, HIV-1 group O and HIV-2. Fifteen laboratories from around the world took part in a collaborative study to evaluate the reference panel for anti-HIV and were requested to test the panel in as wide a range of assays as possible. Where appropriate, serial dilutions were performed and samples tested around their end-points to facilitate the comparison of analytical sensitivity between assays. For qualitative assays such as Western blots and rapid assays, the panel was tested undiluted. Results show that the HIV-negative serum sample was negative in all assays (except for a small number of Western blot assays) and that all HIV-positive samples were detected in all assays, with the exception of an anti-HIV-2 EIA that did not detect most HIV-1 samples and a small number of assays that failed to detect the group O sample. Considerable variability was seen in the end-point titres obtained with the various assays. A report on the study was submitted to the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardisation (ECBS) and the panel established as the 1st International Reference Panel for Anti-HIV (code 02/210); a unitage was not assigned to the panel members.

  4. Rapid Detection and Differentiation of Antibodies to HIV-1 and HIV-2 Using Multivalent Antigens and Magnetic Immunochromatography Testing▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granade, Timothy C.; Workman, Shon; Wells, Susan K.; Holder, Angela N.; Owen, S. Michele; Pau, Chou-Pong

    2010-01-01

    A simplified lateral-flow assay for the detection of antibodies to HIV using magnetic-bead conjugates and multibranched peptides from both HIV-1 and HIV-2 was developed. Magnetic immunochromatography testing (MICT) uses a standard lateral-flow platform that incorporates magnetic-bead conjugates for quantitative measurement of the magnetic field distortion associated with the bound magnetic conjugate (reported as adjusted relative magnetic units [MAR]). The results of the optimized MICT assay were compared to standard enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and Western blotting (WB) results using a blinded 649-member panel of specimens from the United States, Cameroon, and West Africa. The panel was comprised of samples from individuals infected with various HIV-1 subtypes (n = 234) or HIV-2 (n = 65) and HIV-seronegative specimens (n = 350). Additionally, 13 HIV-1 seroconversion panels (total specimens = 85), a worldwide panel containing seven of the major circulating HIV-1 subtypes (n = 18), an HIV-2 panel, an HIV-1/HIV-2 mixed panel, and 100 prospective specimens were tested with completely concordant results. Assay reproducibility (observed MAR) for both intra- and interrun testing was excellent, with coefficients of variation of HIV antibody status requiring no subjective interpretations. PMID:20410326

  5. Human Cytosolic Extracts Stabilize the HIV-1 Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Thomas; Brandariz-Nuñez, Alberto; Wang, Xiaozhao; Smith, Amos B.

    2013-01-01

    The stability of the HIV-1 core in the cytoplasm is crucial for productive HIV-1 infection. Mutations that stabilize or destabilize the core showed defects on HIV-1 reverse transcription and infection. We developed a novel and simple assay to measure the stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. The assay allowed us to demonstrate that cytosolic extracts strongly stabilize the HIV-1 core. Interestingly, stabilization of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes is not due solely to macromolecular crowding, suggesting the presence of specific cellular factors that stabilize the HIV-1 core. By using our novel assay, we measured the abilities of different drugs, such as PF74, CAP-1, IXN-053, cyclosporine, Bi2 (also known as BI-2), and the peptide CAI, to modulate the stability of in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. Interestingly, we found that PF74 and Bi2 strongly stabilized HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. On the other hand, the peptide CAI destabilized HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. We also found that purified cyclophilin A destabilizes in vitro-assembled HIV-1 CA-NC complexes in the presence of cellular extracts in a cyclosporine-sensitive manner. In agreement with previous observations using the fate-of-the-capsid assay, we also demonstrated the ability of recombinant CPSF6 to stabilize HIV-1 CA-NC complexes. Overall, our findings suggested that cellular extracts specifically stabilize the HIV-1 core. We believe that our assay can be a powerful tool to assess HIV-1 core stability in vitro. PMID:23885082

  6. Liver function tests in HIV-1 infected asymptomatic patients and HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatic functions were assessed by serum assays of albumin (ALB), total protein (TP), total bilirubin (TB), conjugated bilirubin (CB), serum activities of alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma – glutamyl transferase (GGT) in 51 HIV-1AIDS patients, 38 HIV-1 ...

  7. HIV-2 diagnosis and quantification in high-risk patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojic Erna

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Current diagnostic assays for HIV-1 do not always test for the presence of HIV-2 in the United States. We present the case of a patient from Cape Verde, who was admitted to our hospital with rapidly deteriorating neurological function and multiple white matter lesions on MRI likely secondary to progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. Initially, the patient had a positive EIA for HIV, but a negative HIV-1 Western Blot and no viral load detected on a branched-DNA assay. A repeat viral load by reverse transcriptase methodology (RT-DNA detected 121,000 copies and an HIV-2 Western Blot was positive. The case highlights an extremely rare presentation of HIV-2 with severe neurological disease. We discuss the different tests available for the diagnosis and monitoring of HIV-2 in the United States.

  8. Evaluation of two 4th generation point-of-care assays for the detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafylis, Chrysovalantis; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2017-01-01

    Fourth generation assays detect simultaneously antibodies for HIV and the p24 antigen, identifying HIV infection earlier than previous generation tests. Previous studies have shown that the Alere Determine HIV-1/2 Combo has lower than anticipated performance in detecting antibodies for HIV and the p24 antigen. Furthermore, there are currently very few studies evaluating the performance of Standard Diagnostics BIOLINE HIV Ag/Ab Combo. To evaluate the performance of the Alere Determine HIV-1/2 Combo and the Standard Diagnostics BIOLINE HIV Ag/Ab Combo in a panel of frozen serum samples. The testing panel included 133 previously frozen serum specimens from the UCLA Clinical Microbiology & Immunoserology laboratory. Reference testing included testing for HIV antibodies by a 3rd generation enzyme immunoassay followed by HIV RNA detection. Antibody negative and RNA positive sera were also tested by a laboratory 4th generation HIV Ab/Ag enzyme immunoassay. Reference testing yielded 97 positives for HIV infection and 36 negative samples. Sensitivity of the Alere test was 95% (88-98%), while the SD Bioline sensitivity was 91% (83-96%). Both assays showed 100% (90-100%) specificity. No indeterminate or invalid results were recorded. Among 13 samples with acute infection (HIV RNA positive, HIV antibody negative), 12 were found positive by the first assay and 8 by the second. The antigen component of the Alere assay detected 10 acute samples, while the SD Bioline assay detected only one. Both rapid assays showed very good overall performance in detecting HIV infection in frozen serum samples, but further improvements are required to improve the performance in acute infection.

  9. Evaluation of two 4th generation point-of-care assays for the detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysovalantis Stafylis

    Full Text Available Fourth generation assays detect simultaneously antibodies for HIV and the p24 antigen, identifying HIV infection earlier than previous generation tests. Previous studies have shown that the Alere Determine HIV-1/2 Combo has lower than anticipated performance in detecting antibodies for HIV and the p24 antigen. Furthermore, there are currently very few studies evaluating the performance of Standard Diagnostics BIOLINE HIV Ag/Ab Combo.To evaluate the performance of the Alere Determine HIV-1/2 Combo and the Standard Diagnostics BIOLINE HIV Ag/Ab Combo in a panel of frozen serum samples.The testing panel included 133 previously frozen serum specimens from the UCLA Clinical Microbiology & Immunoserology laboratory. Reference testing included testing for HIV antibodies by a 3rd generation enzyme immunoassay followed by HIV RNA detection. Antibody negative and RNA positive sera were also tested by a laboratory 4th generation HIV Ab/Ag enzyme immunoassay.Reference testing yielded 97 positives for HIV infection and 36 negative samples. Sensitivity of the Alere test was 95% (88-98%, while the SD Bioline sensitivity was 91% (83-96%. Both assays showed 100% (90-100% specificity. No indeterminate or invalid results were recorded. Among 13 samples with acute infection (HIV RNA positive, HIV antibody negative, 12 were found positive by the first assay and 8 by the second. The antigen component of the Alere assay detected 10 acute samples, while the SD Bioline assay detected only one.Both rapid assays showed very good overall performance in detecting HIV infection in frozen serum samples, but further improvements are required to improve the performance in acute infection.

  10. Moving towards a reliable HIV incidence test - current status, resources available, future directions and challenges ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, G; Pilcher, C D; Keating, S M; Kassanjee, R; Facente, S N; Welte, A; Grebe, E; Marson, K; Busch, M P; Dailey, P; Parkin, N; Osborn, J; Ongarello, S; Marsh, K; Garcia-Calleja, J M

    2017-04-01

    In 2011 the Incidence Assay Critical Path Working Group reviewed the current state of HIV incidence assays and helped to determine a critical path to the introduction of an HIV incidence assay. At that time the Consortium for Evaluation and Performance of HIV Incidence Assays (CEPHIA) was formed to spur progress and raise standards among assay developers, scientists and laboratories involved in HIV incidence measurement and to structure and conduct a direct independent comparative evaluation of the performance of 10 existing HIV incidence assays, to be considered singly and in combinations as recent infection test algorithms. In this paper we report on a new framework for HIV incidence assay evaluation that has emerged from this effort over the past 5 years, which includes a preliminary target product profile for an incidence assay, a consensus around key performance metrics along with analytical tools and deployment of a standardized approach for incidence assay evaluation. The specimen panels for this evaluation have been collected in large volumes, characterized using a novel approach for infection dating rules and assembled into panels designed to assess the impact of important sources of measurement error with incidence assays such as viral subtype, elite host control of viraemia and antiretroviral treatment. We present the specific rationale for several of these innovations, and discuss important resources for assay developers and researchers that have recently become available. Finally, we summarize the key remaining steps on the path to development and implementation of reliable assays for monitoring HIV incidence at a population level.

  11. HIV misdiagnosis: A root cause analysis leading to improvements in HIV diagnosis and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Raynell; Charlton, Carmen; Beckthold, Brenda; Kadivar, Kiana; Lavoie, Stephanie; Caswell, Debbie; Levett, Paul N; Horsman, Greg B; Kim, John; Gill, M John

    2017-11-01

    Standard diagnostic testing for HIV infection has traditionally relied on a high sensitivity HIV antibody screening test using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) followed by a high specificity antibody confirmatory test such as a Western Blot. Recently several of the screening assays have been enhanced with an ability to identify p24 antigen thereby narrowing the diagnostic window. To explore the implications of enhanced HIV screening methods that may be leading to HIV misdiagnoses. A patient deemed to be an HIV infected 'elite controller' was found to be misdiagnosed when undergoing detailed investigations prior to initiating antiretroviral therapy. A root cause analysis was performed to identify the causative factors of this misdiagnosis. A retrospective review of all "elite controllers" in Alberta, Canada revealed challenges of current HIV testing algorithms. Technical and human factors were identified as being causative in this HIV misdiagnosis including (i) high rates of false reactive results on the Abbott ARCHITECT HIV-1&2 COMBO EIA, (ii) human error in reading the initial Western blot, (iii) HIV algorithmic directives in which confirmatory (Western blot) testing was not performed on a repeatedly reactive screen test. The outcome of this analysis identified opportunities for improvement, including implementation of a newly approved (automated) confirmatory assay and improved communication between the clinician and laboratory. HIV testing remains problematic despite significant advances in HIV test performance and algorithm development, presenting new and unexpected issues. Ensuring a high-quality management system including implementation of the latest HIV technologies and algorithms along with human resources and policies are required to minimize the impact of false positive diagnoses, especially in the era of universal screening and 'test and treat' recommendations. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of early HIV infections using the fourth generation Abbott ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CIA) in San Diego County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manlutac, Anna Liza M; Giesick, Jill S; McVay, Patricia A

    2013-12-01

    HIV screening assays have gone through several generations of development in an effort to narrow the "window period" of detection. Utilizing a fourth generation HIV screening assay has the potential to detect earlier HIV infection, thus reducing HIV-1 transmission. To identify acute infections to decrease HIV transmission in San Diego County. Serum specimens were collected from clients seen by multiple submitters in San Diego County. All acceptable specimens were screened using the 4th Gen Combo Assay. Initially reactive specimens were repeated in duplicate and if repeatedly reactive, were confirmed by HIV-1 Immunofluorescent Antibody Assay (IFA). IFA negative/inconclusive specimens were sent for HIV-1 NAT and HIV-2 antibody testing to referral laboratories. BioRad Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 Rapid Test was also performed on a subset of specimens. Of 14,559 specimens received in 20 months, 14,517 specimens were tested. Of the 14,517 specimens that were tested, a total of 279 (1.9%) specimens were CIA repeatedly reactive and 240 of the 279 confirmed by HIV-1 IFA. Thirty-nine gave IFA negative/inconclusive result and 30 were further tested for HIV-1 NAT and 36 for HIV-2 antibody. Thirteen specimens were considered false positives by CIA and 17 specimens were classified as acute infections. Eleven of 39 IFA negative/inconclusive specimens were further tested by Multispot. Five of the 11 were positive by Multispot. The fourth generation Abbott ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo Assay identified 17 patients who may have been missed by the prior HIV-1 screening assay used at San Diego County Public Health Laboratory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Whole-blood agglutination assay for on-site detection of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amita; Chaudhary, Vijay K

    2003-07-01

    Simple and rapid diagnostic tests are needed to curtail human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, especially in the developing and underdeveloped nations of the world. The visible-agglutination assay for the detection of HIV with the naked eye (NEVA HIV, which represents naked eye visible-agglutination assay for HIV) is a hemagglutination-based test for the detection of antibodies to HIV in whole blood. The NEVA HIV reagent is a cocktail of highly stable recombinant bifunctional antibody fusion proteins with HIV antigens which can be produced in large quantities with a high degree of purity. The test procedure involves mixing of one drop of the NEVA HIV reagent with one drop of blood sample on a glass slide. The presence of anti-HIV antibodies in the blood sample leads to clumping of erythrocytes (agglutination) that can be seen with the naked eye. Evaluation with commercially available panels of sera and clinical samples has shown that the performance of NEVA HIV is comparable to those of U.S. and European Food and Drug Administration-approved rapid as well as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The test detects antibodies to both HIV type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 in a single spot and gives results in less than 5 min. The test was developed by keeping in mind the practical constraints of testing in less developed countries and thus is completely instrument-free, requiring no infrastructure or even electricity. Because the test is extremely rapid, requires no sample preparation, and is simple enough to be performed by a semiskilled technician in any remote area, NEVA HIV is a test for the hard-to-reach populations of the world.

  14. Detection of acute HIV infections in an urban HIV counseling and testing population in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priddy, Frances H; Pilcher, Christopher D; Moore, Renee H; Tambe, Pradnya; Park, Mahin N; Fiscus, Susan A; Feinberg, Mark B; del Rio, Carlos

    2007-02-01

    The southeastern United States has an increasing burden of HIV, particularly among blacks, women, and men who have sex with men. To evaluate HIV nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) and antibody-based algorithms in determination of HIV incidence, detection of acute HIV infections, and surveillance of drug-resistant virus transmission in the urban southeastern United States, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of prospectively collected data from 2202 adults receiving HIV testing and counseling at 3 sites in Atlanta, GA from October 2002 through January 2004. After standard testing with an HIV enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and Western blot confirmation, HIV-positive specimens were tested with 2 standardized assays to detect recent infection. HIV antibody-negative specimens were pooled and screened for HIV using NAAT. Seventy (3.2%) of 2202 subjects were HIV infected. Only 66 were positive on the standard HIV antibody test; 4 were antibody-negative but acutely HIV infected. The overall annual HIV incidence was 1.1% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.4 to 1.8) based on the Vironostika-LS assay and 1.3% (95% CI: 0.6 to 2.1) based on the BED Incidence Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA). The prevalence of acute HIV infection was 1.8 per 1000 persons (95% CI: 0.7 to 4.6). The sensitivity of the current testing algorithm using an EIA and Western blot test for detectable infections was only 94.3% (95% CI: 86.2 to 97.8). All 3 of the acutely infected subjects genotyped had drug resistance mutations, and 1 had multiclass resistance. Adding NAAT-based screening to standard HIV antibody testing increased case identification by 6% and uncovered the first evidence of multidrug-resistant HIV transmission in Atlanta. Antibody tests alone are insufficient for public health practice in high-risk urban HIV testing settings.

  15. Analysis of HIV Diversity in HIV-Infected Black Men Who Have Sex with Men (HPTN 061.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Chen

    Full Text Available HIV populations often diversify in response to selective pressures, such as the immune response and antiretroviral drug use. We analyzed HIV diversity in Black men who have sex with men who were enrolled in the HIV Prevention Trials Network 061 study.A high resolution melting (HRM diversity assay was used to measure diversity in six regions of the HIV genome: two in gag, one in pol, and three in env. HIV diversity was analyzed for 146 men who were HIV infected at study enrollment, including three with acute infection and 13 with recent infection (identified using a multi-assay algorithm, and for 21 men who seroconverted during the study. HIV diversification was analyzed in a paired analysis for 62 HIV-infected men using plasma samples from the enrollment and 12-month (end of study visits.Men with acute or recent infection at enrollment and seroconverters had lower median HRM scores (lower HIV diversity than men with non-recent infection in all six regions analyzed. In univariate analyses, younger age, higher CD4 cell count, and HIV drug resistance were associated with lower median HRM scores in multiple regions; ARV drug detection was marginally associated with lower diversity in the pol region. In multivariate analysis, acute or recent infection (all six regions and HIV drug resistance (both gag regions were associated with lower median HRM scores. Diversification in the pol region over 12 months was greater for men with acute or recent infection, higher CD4 cell count, and lower HIV viral load at study enrollment.HIV diversity was significantly associated with duration of HIV infection, and lower gag diversity was observed in men who had HIV drug resistance. HIV pol diversification was more pronounced in men with acute or recent infection, higher CD4 cell count, and lower HIV viral load.

  16. HIV Prevention

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-01

    Dr. Kevin Fenton, Director of CDC’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, talks about steps people can take to protect their health from HIV.  Created: 2/1/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 2/1/2012.

  17. Sensitive non-radioactive detection of HIV-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teglbjærg, Lars Stubbe; Nielsen, C; Hansen, J E

    1992-01-01

    to standard PCR for the detection of HIV-1 DNA. The assay described features the use of a simple and inexpensive sample preparation technique and a non-radioactive hybridization procedure for confirmation of results. To test the suitability of the assay for clinical purposes, we tested cell samples from 76......This report describes the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the non-radioactive detection of HIV-1 proviral genomic sequences in HIV-1 infected cells. We have developed a sensitive assay, using three different sets of nested primers and our results show that this method is superior...

  18. Frequency of HIV type 2 infections among blood donor population from India: A 10-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannangai R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In India, HIV-2 epidemic is alongside with HIV-1. Blood banks are introducing nucleic acid testing (NAT for screening. The limitation of NAT systems is the inability to detect HIV-2. Materials and Method : An analysis of HIV screening of a blood bank at a tertiary care center from 1998 to 2007 was carried out. Results : A total of 175026 donors were screened by serological assays and 789 were reactive for HIV antibody. Only 478 (61% were confirmed positive by Western blot/immunoblot. There were 465 (97.2% donations positive for HIV-1, 6 (1.3% for HIV-2 (monotypic infection and 7 (1.5% for HIV-1 and HIV-2 (dual infection. Conclusion : We show the presence of HIV-2 infection among the blood donors and the need for incorporating HIV-2 detection also in the NAT systems.

  19. Prevalences, Genotypes, and Risk Factors for HIV Transmission in South America

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Montano, Silvia M; Sanchez, Jose L; Laguna-Torres, Alberto; Cuchi, Paloma; Avila, Maria M; Weissenbacher, Mercedes; Serra, Margarita; Russi, Jose Vinoles ;Jose C; Aguayo, Nicolas

    2005-01-01

    .... Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay screening and Western blot confirmatory testing were performed, and env heteroduplex mobility assay genotyping and DNA sequencing were performed on a subset of HIV-positive subjects...

  20. [Recent progress in HIV screening tests and nucleic acid tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Mitsunobu; Kato, Shingo

    2010-03-01

    HIV testing plays a crucial role in detecting and monitoring HIV infection. Diagnosis of HIV infection is basically made by sequential two tests: a screening test with an enzyme immunoassay(EIA) and a confirmatory test with Western blot. The most recent EIAs, used in commercial laboratories, identify HIV infection earlier because they detect both HIV-1 antibody and antigen. Rapid tests represent another advance for HIV screening. They are widely used in voluntary counselling and testing at public health centers and private clinics. An assay for detection of HIV-1 RNA was approved as a confirmatory test of reactive screening tests to diagnose early infection. These new testing technologies offer more accurate, reliable, and convenient diagnosis of HIV infection.

  1. Comparison of Elecsys Anti-HCV II Assay With Other HCV Screening Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongdong; Zhu, Siyuan; Wang, Tingting; An, Jingna; Wang, Lanlan; Tao, Chuanmin

    2016-09-01

    Early detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important step in preventing progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Serologic assays for anti-HCV antibody are valuable first-line tests in the screening and diagnosis of HCV infection. This study's aim was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of Elecsys Anti-HCV II assay for HCV screening. A total of 1,044 routine sera, 20 known HCV-positive samples, plus 54 preselected weakly positive samples were tested for anti-HCV with Elecsys Anti-HCV II assay, Elecsys Anti-HCV assays, InTec HCV enzymoimmunoassay (EIA), and Livzon Anti-HCV EIA. Interference test was assessed with additional 423 specimens without clinical evidence of HCV infection: preselected HCV weak reactive samples; dialysis samples; anti-HBc (antibody to HBV core antigen) (+), anti-Treponema pallidum (+), and anti-HIV (+) sera; and samples form autoimmune/alcoholic hepatitis or systemic Lupus erythematosus (SLE). Discrepant results were evaluated with recombinant immunoblot assay. The seroconversion panels were evaluated to assess how early each assay could detect HCV infection. The specificity (99.81%) of the Elecsys Anti-HCV II assay was less than that with the two EIA comparison methods. However, false-negative results were easily seen in the EIA assays. When serial bleeds of HCV panels were compared with the above-mentioned methods, the assay detected acute HCV infection only 3.5 days after a positive HCV-RNA nucleic acid test and earlier than the comparator assays. Sensitivities and specificities of the anti-HCV assays were sufficiently high for use in this study. The Elecsys Anti-HCV II assay is suitable for screening and reliable early detection of HCV infection. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Frequency of human immunodeficiency virus type-2 in hiv infected patients in Maputo City, Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatt Nilesh

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The HIV/AIDS pandemic is primarily caused by HIV-1. Another virus type, HIV-2, is found mainly in West African countries. We hypothesized that population migration and mobility in Africa may have facilitated the introduction and spreading of HIV-2 in Mozambique. The presence of HIV-2 has important implications for diagnosis and choice of treatment of HIV infection. Hence, the aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HIV-2 infection and its genotype in Maputo, Mozambique. HIV-infected individuals (N = 1,200 were consecutively enrolled and screened for IgG antibodies against HIV-1 gp41 and HIV-2 gp36 using peptide-based enzyme immunoassays (pepEIA. Specimens showing reactivity on the HIV-2 pepEIA were further tested using the INNO-LIA immunoblot assay and HIV-2 PCR targeting RT and PR genes. Subtype analysis of HIV-2 was based on the protease gene. After screening with HIV-2 pepEIA 1,168 were non-reactive and 32 were reactive to HIV-2 gp36 peptide. Of this total, 30 specimens were simultaneously reactive to gp41 and gp36 pepEIA while two samples reacted solely to gp36 peptide. Only three specimens containing antibodies against gp36 and gp105 on the INNO-LIA immunoblot assay were found to be positive by PCR to HIV-2 subtype A. The proportion of HIV-2 in Maputo City was 0.25% (90%CI 0.01-0.49. The HIV epidemic in Southern Mozambique is driven by HIV-1, with HIV-2 also circulating at a marginal rate. Surveillance program need to improve HIV-2 diagnosis and consider periodical survey aiming to monitor HIV-2 prevalence in the country.

  3. Performance of the Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag test on clinical samples representing current epidemic HIV variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemee, Véronique; Leoz, Marie; Etienne, Manuel; De Oliveira, Fabienne; Plantier, Jean-Christophe

    2014-09-01

    Screening for HIV infection has improved since the first immunoassays. Today, diagnosis of HIV infection can be performed with fourth-generation tests that track both the patient's antibodies and HIV antigen. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical sensitivity and specificity of the new DiaSorin Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag assay compared to another fourth-generation assay, the Abbott Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo kit. This work was performed on a large panel of 900 samples, including negative samples (n = 493) and HIV-positive (n = 407) representatives of HIV-1 group M subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs), HIV-1 group O, and HIV-2 variants. The results highlight the high specificity (98.9%) and sensitivity (100%) of this new fourth-generation assay, which are consistent with its use for the screening and diagnosis of HIV infections with the current circulating strains. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Performance of the fourth-generation Bio-Rad GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab enzyme immunoassay for diagnosis of HIV infection in Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Fogel, Jessica M; Richardson, Paul; Wolf, Shauna; Clarke, William; Marzinke, Mark A; Fiamma, Agnès; Donnell, Deborah; Kulich, Michal; Mbwambo, Jessie K K; Richter, Linda; Gray, Glenda; Sweat, Michael; Coates, Thomas J; Eshleman, Susan H

    2015-01-01

    Fourth-generation HIV assays detect both antigen and antibody, facilitating detection of acute/early HIV infection. The Bio-Rad GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab assay (Bio-Rad Combo) is an enzyme immunoassay that simultaneously detects HIV p24 antigen and antibodies to HIV-1 and HIV-2 in serum or plasma. To evaluate the performance of the Bio-Rad Combo assay for detection of HIV infection in adults from Southern Africa. Samples were obtained from adults in Soweto and Vulindlela, South Africa and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania (300 HIV-positive samples; 300 HIV-negative samples; 12 samples from individuals previously classified as having acute/early HIV infection). The samples were tested with the Bio-Rad Combo assay. Additional testing was performed to characterize the 12 acute/early samples. All 300 HIV-positive samples were reactive using the Bio-Rad Combo assay; false positive test results were obtained for 10 (3.3%) of the HIV-negative samples (sensitivity: 100%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 98.8-100%); specificity: 96.7%, 95% CI: 94.0-98.4%). The assay detected 10 of the 12 infections classified as acute/early. The two infections that were not detected had viral loadsHIV-negative samples were pre-screened using a different fourth-generation test. The assay also had high sensitivity for detection of acute/early infection. False-negative test results may be obtained in individuals who are virally suppressed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Spatial Distributions of HIV Infection in an Endemic Area of Western Kenya: Guiding Information for Localized HIV Control and Prevention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonori Hoshi

    Full Text Available HIV is still a major health problem in developing countries. Even though high HIV-risk-taking behaviors have been reported in African fishing villages, local distribution patterns of HIV infection in the communities surrounding these villages have not been thoroughly analyzed. The objective of this study was to investigate the geographical distribution patterns of HIV infection in communities surrounding African fishing villages. In 2011, we applied age- and sex-stratified random sampling to collect 1,957 blood samples from 42,617 individuals registered in the Health and Demographic Surveillance System in Mbita, which is located on the shore of Lake Victoria in western Kenya. We used these samples to evaluate existing antibody detection assays for several infectious diseases, including HIV antibody titers. Based on the results of the assays, we evaluated the prevalence of HIV infection according to sex, age, and altitude of participating households. We also used Kulldorff's spatial scan statistic to test for HIV clustering in the study area. The prevalence of HIV at our study site was 25.3%. Compared with the younger age group (15-19 years, adults aged 30-34 years were 6.71 times more likely to be HIV-positive, and the estimated HIV-positive population among women was 1.43 times larger than among men. Kulldorff's spatial scan statistic detected one marginally significant (P = 0.055 HIV-positive and one significant HIV-negative cluster (P = 0.047 in the study area. These results suggest a homogeneous HIV distribution in the communities surrounding fishing villages. In addition to individual behavior, more complex and diverse factors related to the social and cultural environment can contribute to a homogeneous distribution pattern of HIV infection outside of African fishing villages. To reduce rates of transmission in HIV-endemic areas, HIV prevention and control programs optimized for the local environment need to be developed.

  6. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and type 2 antibodies by a new automated microparticle immunoassay AxSYM HIV-1/HIV-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, B; Behrens, N; Doerr, H W

    1997-01-01

    A new automated microparticle enzyme immunoassay (MEIA) for the AxSYM instrument developed recently by Abbott Laboratories was compared with two established assays, i.e. HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd Gen. Plus EIA (Abbott, Delkenheim, FRG) and Wellcozyme HIV 1 + 2 (Murex Diagnostics, Dartford, England) devised for the detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 antibodies. A total of 7293 serum samples were tested by the AxSYM HIV-1/HIV-2. The test panel included seroconversions (n = 22), samples from HIV-1 and HIV-2 positive individuals, hospitalized patients, blood donors, high risk individuals. To challenge further the specificity of the assays, large numbers of EIA repeatedly reactive but Western blot negative samples, potentially cross-reactive sera, Western blot indeterminate specimens and samples from pregnant women were tested. In four seroconversion panels, HIV-1 infection was detected one bleed earlier with the AxSYM HIV-1/HIV-2 than with the Abbott HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd Gen. Plus EIA. Although the AxSYM HIV-1/HIV-2 was tested with a higher number of challenging sera than the alternative assays, the specificity was very high (99.4%). The highest number of false positive results was obtained with serum samples that were repeatedly reactive in EIAs different from those compared in the present study. The automated AxSYM system permits the testing of a large sample number in a rapid turn-around time and by random access urgent tests can be carried out even when an assay is in progress.

  7. Synthetic peptides define the fine specificity of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp160 humoral immune response in HIV type 1-infected chimpanzees.

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, R Q; Wolf, H; Shuler, K R; Eichberg, J W; Zajac, R A; Boswell, R N; Kanda, P; Kennedy, R C

    1990-01-01

    The fine specificities of antibodies produced against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp160 were examined in sera from 23 HIV-1-infected chimpanzees. These animals had been infected with one of six isolates of HIV-1. Sera were screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for reactivity against seven synthetic peptides corresponding to regions of gp160. Chimpanzees appear to remain healthy after infection with HIV-1, suggesting that these animals may prevent extensive spread of th...

  8. Towards virological monitoring of HIV-1 drug resistance in resource-limited settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aitken, S.C.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 treatment monitoring is important to ensure effective viral suppression and prevent the development of HIV-1 drug resistance. Commercial assays for HIV-1 treatment monitoring are generally costly and complex, and require plasma as a sample type for testing. The components of this thesis are

  9. Determination of HIV status in African adults with discordant HIV rapid tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Jessica M.; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Donohue, Kelsey; Cummings, Vanessa; Marzinke, Mark A.; Clarke, William; Breaud, Autumn; Fiamma, Agnès; Donnell, Deborah; Kulich, Michal; Mbwambo, Jessie K. K.; Richter, Linda; Gray, Glenda; Sweat, Michael; Coates, Thomas J.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    Background In resource-limited settings, HIV infection is often diagnosed using two rapid tests. If the results are discordant, a third tie-breaker test is often used to determine HIV status. This study characterized samples with discordant rapid tests and compared different testing strategies for determining HIV status in these cases. Methods Samples were previously collected from 173 African adults in a population-based survey who had discordant rapid test results. Samples were classified as HIV positive or HIV negative using a rigorous testing algorithm that included two fourth-generation tests, a discriminatory test, and two HIV RNA tests. Tie-breaker tests were evaluated, including: rapid tests (one performed in-country), a third-generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA), and two fourth-generation tests. Selected samples were further characterized using additional assays. Results Twenty-nine (16.8%) samples were classified as HIV positive; 24 (82.8%) of those samples had undetectable HIV RNA. Antiretroviral drugs were detected in one sample. Sensitivity was 8.3%–43% for the rapid tests; 24.1% for the third-generation EIA; 95.8% and 96.6% for the fourth-generation tests. Specificity was lower for the fourth-generation tests than the other tests. Accuracy ranged from 79.5–91.3%. Conclusions In this population-based survey, most HIV-infected adults with discordant rapid tests were virally suppressed without antiretroviral drugs. Use of individual assays as tie-breaker tests was not a reliable method for determining HIV status in these individuals. More extensive testing algorithms that use a fourth-generation screening test with a discriminatory test and HIV RNA test are preferable for determining HIV status in these cases. PMID:25835607

  10. Frequency of False Positive Rapid HIV Serologic Tests in African Men and Women Receiving PrEP for HIV Prevention: Implications for Programmatic Roll-Out of Biomedical Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Ndase; Connie Celum; Lara Kidoguchi; Allan Ronald; Kenneth H Fife; Elizabeth Bukusi; Deborah Donnell; Baeten, Jared M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rapid HIV assays are the mainstay of HIV testing globally. Delivery of effective biomedical HIV prevention strategies such as antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) requires periodic HIV testing. Because rapid tests have high (>95%) but imperfect specificity, they are expected to generate some false positive results. Methods We assessed the frequency of true and false positive rapid results in the Partners PrEP Study, a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of PrEP. HIV test...

  11. Improved assays for DNA-polymerizing enzymes by the use of enzymatically synthesized 5-( sup 125 I)iodo-2'-deoxyuridine triphosphate, illustrated by direct quantitation of anti-HIV reverse transcriptase antibody and by serum DNA polymerase analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumueller, M.K.; Karlstroem, A.R.K.; Kaellander, C.F.G.; Gronowitz, J.S. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden))

    1990-02-01

    A one-step procedure which uses enzymes in a crude extract of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1-infected cells to synthesize 5-(125I)iodo-2'-deoxyuridine triphosphate (( 125I)dUTP) from (125I)dU is described. The design of a one-step procedure for the purification of the product is also presented. The recovery of (125I)dUTP from (125I)dU varied between 50 and 75%, the radiochemical purity of the product was greater than 90%, and both synthesis and purification were completed within 8 h. The sensitivity and specificity of (125I)dUTP as a substrate for both DNA-dependent DNA polymerase (DNAp) and RNA-dependent DNA polymerase (reverse transcriptase, RT) were evaluated and compared to those of (3H)dTTP for the following specimens: purified cloned Klenow fragment, crude extracts of HeLa-, BHK-, and HSV-2-infected BHK cells, purified avian myeloblastosis virus RT, and purified cloned human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) RT. The (125I)dUTP was accepted as a substrate equally as well (3H)dTTP by all of the specimens at all of the concentrations tested. When the same amount of radiolabel was used, (125I)dUTP gave a sensitivity 10- to 25-fold higher than that of (3H)dTTP. The gain in sensitivity was due to the higher specific activity and a higher counting efficiency of the 125I-label compound. The use of (125I)dUTP also offered technical advantages over alternative substrates available, such as product separation without acid precipitation and exclusion of the need for scintillation cocktails. The half-life of the nucleic also gives a reasonable shelf-life for use in routine assays. Activity of less than 0.3 pg of HIV RT could be detected when the new substrate was used, and this made it possible to quantitate HIV RT antibodies (abs) in diluted serum samples without purifying the immunoglobulin.

  12. Detection of Acute HIV-1 Infection by RT-LAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Donna L; Sullivan, Vickie; Owen, S Michele; Curtis, Kelly A

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, cost-effective diagnostic test for the detection of acute HIV-1 infection is highly desired. Isothermal amplification techniques, such as reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP), exhibit characteristics that are ideal for the development of a rapid nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) because they are quick, easy to perform and do not require complex, dedicated equipment and laboratory space. In this study, we assessed the ability of the HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay to detect acute HIV infection as compared to a representative rapid antibody test and several FDA-approved laboratory-based assays. The HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay detected seroconverting individuals one to three weeks earlier than a rapid HIV antibody test and up to two weeks earlier than a lab-based antigen/antibody (Ag/Ab) combo enzyme immunoassay (EIA). RT-LAMP was not as sensitive as a lab-based qualitative RNA assay, which could be attributed to the significantly smaller nucleic acid input volume. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of detecting acute HIV infection using the RT-LAMP assay. The availability of a rapid NAAT, such as the HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay, at the point of care (POC) or in laboratories that do not have access to large platform NAAT could increase the percentage of individuals who receive an acute HIV infection status or confirmation of their HIV status, while immediately linking them to counseling and medical care. In addition, early knowledge of HIV status could lead to reduced high-risk behavior at a time when individuals are at a higher risk for transmitting the virus.

  13. Detection of Acute HIV-1 Infection by RT-LAMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna L Rudolph

    Full Text Available A rapid, cost-effective diagnostic test for the detection of acute HIV-1 infection is highly desired. Isothermal amplification techniques, such as reverse-transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP, exhibit characteristics that are ideal for the development of a rapid nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT because they are quick, easy to perform and do not require complex, dedicated equipment and laboratory space. In this study, we assessed the ability of the HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay to detect acute HIV infection as compared to a representative rapid antibody test and several FDA-approved laboratory-based assays. The HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay detected seroconverting individuals one to three weeks earlier than a rapid HIV antibody test and up to two weeks earlier than a lab-based antigen/antibody (Ag/Ab combo enzyme immunoassay (EIA. RT-LAMP was not as sensitive as a lab-based qualitative RNA assay, which could be attributed to the significantly smaller nucleic acid input volume. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of detecting acute HIV infection using the RT-LAMP assay. The availability of a rapid NAAT, such as the HIV-1 RT-LAMP assay, at the point of care (POC or in laboratories that do not have access to large platform NAAT could increase the percentage of individuals who receive an acute HIV infection status or confirmation of their HIV status, while immediately linking them to counseling and medical care. In addition, early knowledge of HIV status could lead to reduced high-risk behavior at a time when individuals are at a higher risk for transmitting the virus.

  14. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-21

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Such tests are most often used to explore antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin system as well as a hybridization based assay. The agglutination systems are prone to selftermination of the linking analyte, prone to active site saturation and loss of agglomeration at high analyte concentrations. We investigated the molecular target/ligand interaction, explaining the common agglutination problems related to analyte self-termination, linkage of the analyte to the same bead instead of different microbeads. We classified the agglutination process into three kinds of assays: a two- component assay, a three-component assay and a stepped three- component assay. Although we compared these three kinds of assays for recognizing DNA and protein molecules, the assay can be used for virtually any molecule, including ions and metabolites. In total, the optimized assay permits detecting analytes with high sensitivity in a short time, 5 min, at room temperature. Such a system is appropriate for POC testing.

  15. Stoichiometric parameters of HIV-1 entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarr, Melissa; Siliciano, Robert

    2015-01-01

    During HIV type 1 (HIV-1) entry, trimers of gp120 bind to CD4 and either the CCR5 or CXCR4 coreceptor on the target cell. The stoichiometric parameters associated with HIV-1 entry remain unclear. Important unanswered questions include: how many trimers must attach to CD4 molecules, how many must bind coreceptors, and how many functional gp120 subunits per trimer are required for entry? We performed single round infectivity assays with chimeric viruses and compared the experimental relative infectivity curves with curves generated by mathematical models. Our results indicate that HIV-1 entry requires only a small number of functional spikes (one or two), that Env trimers may function with fewer than three active subunits, and that there is no major difference in the stoichiometric requirements for CCR5 vs. CXCR4 mediated HIV-1 entry into host cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of the automated 'Enzymen-Test Anti HIV-1 + 2' and 'Enzymen-Test Anti HIV-1/2 selective' for the combined detection and differentiation of anti-HIV-1 and anti-HIV-2 antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, B; Hess, G; Koberstein, R; Doerr, H W

    1993-10-01

    A new, modular automated ELISA (test 1) for HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibody detection and differentiation (Enzymun-Test Anti HIV-1 + 2; anti HIV 1/2 selective, Boehringer Mannheim) was compared with 3 alternative enzyme immunoassays (Abbott recombinant HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd generation EIA, Abbott (test 2); Enzygnost HIV 1 + 2, Behringwerke (test 3); and Wellcozyme HIV recombinant, Murex (test 4)) and Western blot (New LAV I Blot and New LAV II Blot; Diagnostics Pasteur). 380 serum samples from HIV-1 and HIV-2 seropositive patients at different stages of disease, high risk individuals, patients with conditions unrelated to AIDS and from healthy blood donors were used in this evaluation along with 6 seroconversion panels, 6 serum dilution series and 'tricky' sera (repeatedly positive results in ELISA, but negative or undeterminate in Western blot; n = 67). Using the Western blot as reference assay, the overall sensitivity of the four ELISAs was 100%. Test 4 showed the highest sensitivity for antibody detection in seroconversion and dilution series. A high specificity was achieved with test 1 (100%) and test 2 (99.4%). A relatively high rate of false positive results were obtained with test 2 (n = 12) and test 3 (n = 10) by testing 'tricky' sera or samples obtained from healthy blood donors. In comparison to Western blot, a clear differentiation between HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibody serum samples was achieved with the Enzymun-Test. The results of the present study show that the Enzymun-Test provides reliable selective HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibody detection at a cost which is significantly lower than the costs of Western blot tests. Furthermore, the evaluation of test 1 suggests, that it is a highly specific assay for HIV antibody detection.

  17. Get Tested for HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Basics: What Is HIV? What is HIV? HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. This is the virus that causes AIDS. There is no cure yet for HIV/AIDS, but there are treatments that can help ...

  18. HIV Genotypic Resistance Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that may be present in rare strains of HIV. The test may not detect a drug-resistant strain of ... Less Common Questions Related Content On This Site Tests: HIV Viral Load ; CD4 Count ; HIV Antibody and HIV ...

  19. HIV Genotypic Resistance Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV ... antiretroviral drugs. With genotypic resistance testing, the genetic code of the HIV a person has been infected ...

  20. HIV Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV Medication Adherence Last Reviewed: January 17, 2018 Key ...

  1. HIV and Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV and Immunizations Last Reviewed: February 6, 2018 Key ...

  2. HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It harms your immune system by destroying the white blood cells ... It is the final stage of infection with HIV. Not everyone with HIV develops AIDS. HIV most ...

  3. HIV and AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español HIV and AIDS KidsHealth / For Kids / HIV and AIDS ... actually the virus that causes the disease AIDS. HIV Hurts the Immune System People who are HIV ...

  4. HIV and Rheumatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions HIV & Rheumatic Diseases HIV and Rheumatic Disease Fast Facts Rheumatic diseases related ... knows he or she has HIV. What are HIV-associated rheumatic diseases? Some diseases of the joints ...

  5. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV Treatment: The Basics Last Reviewed: January 18, 2018 ...

  6. HIV and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG HIV and Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs HIV ... HIV and Pregnancy FAQ113, July 2017 PDF Format HIV and Pregnancy Pregnancy What is human immunodeficiency virus ( ...

  7. HIV/AIDS Coinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Delta Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS Coinfection HIV/AIDS Coinfection Approximately 10% of the HIV-infected population ... Disease Control and Prevention website to learn about HIV/AIDS and Viral Hepatitis guidelines and resources. Home About ...

  8. Comparative evaluation of Amplicor HIV-1 DNA test, version 1.5, by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA extractions by manual procedure and MP were performed each on cell pellet, venous blood and DBS samples and tested by Amplicor HIV-1 DNA assay. Of 325 samples included, 60 (18.5%) were confirmed HIV-infected by manual extraction performed on cell pellets. Sensitivity of the assay following MP processing of ...

  9. [HIV lipodystrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snopková, S; Matýsková, M; Povolná, K; Polák, P; Husa, P

    2010-12-01

    Combined antiretroviral therapy results in extraordinary decrease of morbidity and mortality of HIV-infected patients and in an essential change of the HIV/AIDS disease prognosis. However, long-term intake of antiretroviral medicaments is related to occurrence of metabolic and morphological abnormalities, of which some have been combined into a new syndrome--the so called HIV lipodystrophy. The HIV lipodystrophy syndrome covers metabolic and morphological changes. Metabolic changes include dyslipidaemia with hypercholesterolaemia and/or hypertriglyceridaemia, insulin resistance with hyperinsulinaemia and hyperlaktataemia. Morphological changes have the nature of lipoatrophia (loss of subcutaneous fat--on the cheeks, on extremities, on buttocks and marked prominence of surface veins) or lipohypertrophia (growth of fat tissue--on the chest, in the dorsocervical area, lipomatosis of visceral tissues and organs, fat accumulation in the abdominal area). Several HIV lipodystrophy features are very similar to the metabolic syndrome of the general population. That is why this new syndrome represents a prospective risk of premature atherosclerosis and increase of the cardiovascular risk in young HIV positive individuals. The article mentions major presented studies dealing with the relation of antiretroviral treatment and the cardiovascular risk. The conclusions of the studies are not unequivocal--this is, among others, given by the reason that their length is short from the viewpoint of atherogenesis. The major risk of subclinical atherosclerosis acceleration seems to be related to the deep immunodeficiency and low number of CD4+ lymphocytes and florid, uncontrolled HIV infection with a high number of HIV-1 RNA copies actually circulating in the plasma. The question, whether metabolic and morphological changes related to HIV and cART carry a similar atherogenic potential as in the general population, remains open for future.

  10. evaluation of commercial hiv test kits used in nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    As technology evolved, screening, confirmatory and. HIV monitoring assays have greatly improved in terms of quality and speed. Coupled with this development is the unprecedented increase in the number of test kits that are available for determining. HIV status. Test kits that are simple, instrument-free simple/rapid tests ...

  11. Cytoplasmic Dynein Promotes HIV-1 Uncoating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Pawlica

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Retroviral capsid (CA cores undergo uncoating during their retrograde transport (toward the nucleus, and/or after reaching the nuclear membrane. However, whether HIV-1 CA core uncoating is dependent upon its transport is not understood. There is some evidence that HIV-1 cores retrograde transport involves cytoplasmic dynein complexes translocating on microtubules. Here we investigate the role of dynein-dependent transport in HIV-1 uncoating. To interfere with dynein function, we depleted dynein heavy chain (DHC using RNA interference, and we over-expressed p50/dynamitin. In immunofluorescence microscopy experiments, DHC depletion caused an accumulation of CA foci in HIV-1 infected cells. Using a biochemical assay to monitor HIV-1 CA core disassembly in infected cells, we observed an increase in amounts of intact (pelletable CA cores upon DHC depletion or p50 over-expression. Results from these two complementary assays suggest that inhibiting dynein-mediated transport interferes with HIV-1 uncoating in infected cells, indicating the existence of a functional link between HIV-1 transport and uncoating.

  12. Evaluation of an alternative supplemental testing strategy for HIV diagnosis by retrospective analysis of clinical HIV testing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styer, Linda M; Sullivan, Timothy J; Parker, Monica M

    2011-12-01

    Because newer screening assays are more sensitive than traditional confirmatory assays, a new HIV testing algorithm was proposed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Association of Public Health Laboratories (APHL) in 2010 to replace the current enzyme immunoassay (EIA)-Western blot (WB) algorithm that was established in 1989. The new algorithm includes a sensitive screening EIA and a HIV-1/HIV-2 differentiation immunoassay (Multispot) for confirmation. Concordant reactive specimens are reported as HIV-1 and/or HIV-2 positive; those with discordant results receive nucleic acid testing (NAT). Our laboratory uses all components of both the current and proposed algorithms and conducted a retrospective analysis of test results to compare algorithm performance. All available test results from 38,257 specimens were analyzed, of which 36,598 were EIA non-reactive. Of 1659 EIA-reactive specimens, 1578 were defined by our laboratory as HIV-1 positive, 5 as HIV-2 positive, 69 as negative and 7 as unknown. These results were used to evaluate both algorithms. Under the proposed algorithm, all 1578 HIV-1-positive specimens would be reported as 'HIV-1 positive', whereas the current algorithm only confirmed 98% (1546/1578). The proposed algorithm produced fewer inconclusive results (9 vs 48); consequently, fewer follow-up specimens would be needed. The current algorithm produced one false-positive result whereas the proposed algorithm produced four. Two of these four false-positive results could be eliminated by requiring NAT for specimens with discordant HIV-1 results on the Multispot. Although both algorithms identified all HIV-2-positive specimens, the current algorithm required an additional 112 tests. The CDC/APHL HIV testing algorithm, proposed in 2010, outperformed the current algorithm because it was more sensitive for detecting HIV-1 infection, provided a greater number of definitive HIV results, and detected HIV-2 more efficiently. Copyright

  13. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  14. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  15. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of HIV in the United States, please visit: https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/hiv-aids- ... HIV, STD, and TB Prevention. What Is HIV? ( http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pubs/faq/faq1.htm ). ...

  16. Assessment of recent HIV-1 infection by a line immunoassay for HIV-1/2 confirmation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Schüpbach

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Knowledge of the number of recent HIV infections is important for epidemiologic surveillance. Over the past decade approaches have been developed to estimate this number by testing HIV-seropositive specimens with assays that discriminate the lower concentration and avidity of HIV antibodies in early infection. We have investigated whether this "recency" information can also be gained from an HIV confirmatory assay. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The ability of a line immunoassay (INNO-LIA HIV I/II Score, Innogenetics to distinguish recent from older HIV-1 infection was evaluated in comparison with the Calypte HIV-1 BED Incidence enzyme immunoassay (BED-EIA. Both tests were conducted prospectively in all HIV infections newly diagnosed in Switzerland from July 2005 to June 2006. Clinical and laboratory information indicative of recent or older infection was obtained from physicians at the time of HIV diagnosis and used as the reference standard. BED-EIA and various recency algorithms utilizing the antibody reaction to INNO-LIA's five HIV-1 antigen bands were evaluated by logistic regression analysis. A total of 765 HIV-1 infections, 748 (97.8% with complete test results, were newly diagnosed during the study. A negative or indeterminate HIV antibody assay at diagnosis, symptoms of primary HIV infection, or a negative HIV test during the past 12 mo classified 195 infections (26.1% as recent (< or = 12 mo. Symptoms of CDC stages B or C classified 161 infections as older (21.5%, and 392 patients with no symptoms remained unclassified. BED-EIA ruled 65% of the 195 recent infections as recent and 80% of the 161 older infections as older. Two INNO-LIA algorithms showed 50% and 40% sensitivity combined with 95% and 99% specificity, respectively. Estimation of recent infection in the entire study population, based on actual results of the three tests and adjusted for a test's sensitivity and specificity, yielded 37% for BED-EIA compared to 35% and 33

  17. Assessment of recent HIV-1 infection by a line immunoassay for HIV-1/2 confirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüpbach, Jörg; Gebhardt, Martin D; Tomasik, Zuzana; Niederhauser, Christoph; Yerly, Sabine; Bürgisser, Philippe; Matter, Lukas; Gorgievski, Meri; Dubs, Rolf; Schultze, Detlev; Steffen, Ingrid; Andreutti, Corinne; Martinetti, Gladys; Güntert, Bruno; Staub, Roger; Daneel, Synove; Vernazza, Pietro

    2007-12-01

    Knowledge of the number of recent HIV infections is important for epidemiologic surveillance. Over the past decade approaches have been developed to estimate this number by testing HIV-seropositive specimens with assays that discriminate the lower concentration and avidity of HIV antibodies in early infection. We have investigated whether this "recency" information can also be gained from an HIV confirmatory assay. The ability of a line immunoassay (INNO-LIA HIV I/II Score, Innogenetics) to distinguish recent from older HIV-1 infection was evaluated in comparison with the Calypte HIV-1 BED Incidence enzyme immunoassay (BED-EIA). Both tests were conducted prospectively in all HIV infections newly diagnosed in Switzerland from July 2005 to June 2006. Clinical and laboratory information indicative of recent or older infection was obtained from physicians at the time of HIV diagnosis and used as the reference standard. BED-EIA and various recency algorithms utilizing the antibody reaction to INNO-LIA's five HIV-1 antigen bands were evaluated by logistic regression analysis. A total of 765 HIV-1 infections, 748 (97.8%) with complete test results, were newly diagnosed during the study. A negative or indeterminate HIV antibody assay at diagnosis, symptoms of primary HIV infection, or a negative HIV test during the past 12 mo classified 195 infections (26.1%) as recent (EIA ruled 65% of the 195 recent infections as recent and 80% of the 161 older infections as older. Two INNO-LIA algorithms showed 50% and 40% sensitivity combined with 95% and 99% specificity, respectively. Estimation of recent infection in the entire study population, based on actual results of the three tests and adjusted for a test's sensitivity and specificity, yielded 37% for BED-EIA compared to 35% and 33% for the two INNO-LIA algorithms. Window-based estimation with BED-EIA yielded 41% (95% confidence interval 36%-46%). Recency information can be extracted from INNO-LIA-based confirmatory testing at

  18. HIV Among Asians

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Asians in the United States Format: Select ...

  19. Living with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS Living With HIV Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ...

  20. HIV among Transgender People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Transgender People Format: Select One PDF [227K] ...

  1. Antibody Responses with Fc-Mediated Functions after Vaccination of HIV-Infected Subjects with Trivalent Influenza Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anne B; Lay, William N; Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    This study seeks to assess the ability of seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) to induce nonneutralizing antibodies (Abs) with Fc-mediated functions in HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected subjects. Functional influenza-specific Ab responses were studied in 30 HIV-negative and 27 HIV......-positive subjects immunized against seasonal influenza. All 57 subjects received the 2015 TIV. Fc-mediated antihemagglutinin (anti-HA) Ab activity was measured in plasma before and 4 weeks after vaccination using Fc-receptor-binding assays, NK cell activation assays, and phagocytosis assays. At baseline, the HIV......-positive group had detectable but reduced functional Ab responses to both vaccine and nonvaccine influenza antigens. TIV enhanced Fc-mediated Ab responses in both HIV-positive and HIV-negative groups. A larger rise was generally observed in the HIV-positive group, such that there was no difference in functional...

  2. Markers of human immunodeficiency virus infection in high-risk individuals seronegative by first generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C; Lindhardt, B O; Lauritzen, E

    1989-01-01

    A total of 228 stored serum samples from 140 high risk individuals was examined for serological markers of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by second generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, immunoblot, and HIV antigen assay. All the samples were negative in first generation enzyme...... are common in high risk individuals seronegative by first generation ELISA. However, HIV infection do occur in subjects negative by first generation ELISA, which emphasises the need for more sensitive screening assays and/or the use of antigen detection as part of screening in high risk individuals...

  3. An automated HIV-1 Env-pseudotyped virus production for global HIV vaccine trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Schultz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infections with HIV still represent a major human health problem worldwide and a vaccine is the only long-term option to fight efficiently against this virus. Standardized assessments of HIV-specific immune responses in vaccine trials are essential for prioritizing vaccine candidates in preclinical and clinical stages of development. With respect to neutralizing antibodies, assays with HIV-1 Env-pseudotyped viruses are a high priority. To cover the increasing demands of HIV pseudoviruses, a complete cell culture and transfection automation system has been developed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The automation system for HIV pseudovirus production comprises a modified Tecan-based Cellerity system. It covers an area of 5×3 meters and includes a robot platform, a cell counting machine, a CO(2 incubator for cell cultivation and a media refrigerator. The processes for cell handling, transfection and pseudovirus production have been implemented according to manual standard operating procedures and are controlled and scheduled autonomously by the system. The system is housed in a biosafety level II cabinet that guarantees protection of personnel, environment and the product. HIV pseudovirus stocks in a scale from 140 ml to 1000 ml have been produced on the automated system. Parallel manual production of HIV pseudoviruses and comparisons (bridging assays confirmed that the automated produced pseudoviruses were of equivalent quality as those produced manually. In addition, the automated method was fully validated according to Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (GCLP guidelines, including the validation parameters accuracy, precision, robustness and specificity. CONCLUSIONS: An automated HIV pseudovirus production system has been successfully established. It allows the high quality production of HIV pseudoviruses under GCLP conditions. In its present form, the installed module enables the production of 1000 ml of virus-containing cell

  4. HIV resistance to antiretroviral drugs: Mechanisms, genotypic and phenotypic resistance testing in clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Blaise, Pierre; Clevenbergh, P.; Vaira, Dolorès; Moutschen, Michel; Dellamonica, P

    2002-01-01

    HIV resistance to antiretroviral agents is a major contributory cause of treatment failure. The dynamics of HIV replication, together with patient-, physician-, and drug-related factors, lead to emergence of HIV resistant strains in most of the patients. Phenotypic assays look for an increase in the antiretroviral drug (ARV) concentration that inhibits 50% of the growth of the tested HIV strain (IC50), comparatively with a reference strain cultivated in parallel. Genotypic tests detect resist...

  5. Prevalence and Correlates of Persistent HIV-1 RNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid During Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, AM; Munoz-Moreno, JA; McClernon, DR; Ellis, RJ; Cookson, D; Clifford, DB; Collier, AC.; Gelman, BB; Marra, CM; McArthur, JC; McCutchan, JA; Morgello, S.; Sacktor, N.; Simpson, DM; Franklin, DR

    2017-01-01

     Neurocognitive disorders remain common among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive adults, perhaps owing to persistent HIV-1 RNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during antiretroviral therapy (ART). Using a single-copy assay, we measured HIV-1 RNA levels in CSF and plasma specimens from 220 HIV-positive adults who were taking suppressive ART. Fifty-five participants were tested twice. HIV-1 RNA was detected in 42.3% of CSF and 65.2% of plasma samples. Correlates of higher CSF HIV-1 RNA lev...

  6. Multicenter Evaluation of a New Automated Fourth-Generation Human Immunodeficiency Virus Screening Assay with a Sensitive Antigen Detection Module and High Specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Bernard; Gürtler, Lutz; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Michl, Ulrike; Mühlbacher, Annelies; Bürgisser, Philippe; Villaescusa, Roberto; Eiras, Adolfo; Gabriel, Christian; Stekel, Herbert; Tanprasert, Srivilai; Oota, Sinenaart; Silvestre, Maria-Jose; Marques, Cristina; Ladeira, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Fourth-generation assays for the simultaneous detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen and antibody that were available on the international market until now have antigen detection modules with relatively poor sensitivity and produce a higher rate of false-positive results than third-generation enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). The new Cobas Core HIV Combi EIA with an improved sensitivity for HIV p24 antigen was compared to alternative fourth- and third-generation assays, the p24 ant...

  7. Prevalence and Incidence Estimation of HSV-2 by Two IgG ELISA Methods among South African Women at High Risk of HIV: e0120207

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Irith De Baetselier; Joris Menten; Vicky Cuylaerts; Khatija Ahmed; Jennifer Deese; Lut Van Damme; Tania Crucitti

    2015-01-01

    .... Using longitudinal samples from an HIV prevention study, we compared both assays and determined the HSV-2 prevalence and incidence in a South African young female population at elevated risk of acquiring HIV...

  8. Prevalence and incidence estimation of HSV-2 by two IgG ELISA methods among South African women at high risk of HIV

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    De Baetselier, Irith; Menten, Joris; Cuylaerts, Vicky; Ahmed, Khatija; Deese, Jennifer; Van Damme, Lut; Crucitti, Tania

    2015-01-01

    .... Using longitudinal samples from an HIV prevention study, we compared both assays and determined the HSV-2 prevalence and incidence in a South African young female population at elevated risk of acquiring HIV...

  9. HIV shedding from male circumcision wounds in HIV-infected men: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobian, Aaron A R; Kigozi, Godfrey; Manucci, Jordyn; Grabowski, Mary K; Serwadda, David; Musoke, Richard; Redd, Andrew D; Nalugoda, Fred; Reynolds, Steven J; Kighoma, Nehemiah; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Lessler, Justin; Gray, Ronald H; Quinn, Thomas C; Wawer, Maria J

    2015-04-01

    A randomized trial of voluntary medical male circumcision (MC) of HIV-infected men reported increased HIV transmission to female partners among men who resumed sexual intercourse prior to wound healing. We conducted a prospective observational study to assess penile HIV shedding after MC. HIV shedding was evaluated among 223 HIV-infected men (183 self-reported not receiving antiretroviral therapy [ART], 11 self-reported receiving ART and had a detectable plasma viral load [VL], and 29 self-reported receiving ART and had an undetectable plasma VL [HIV shedding and VL using a real-time quantitative PCR assay. Unadjusted prevalence risk ratios (PRRs) and adjusted PRRs (adjPRRs) of HIV shedding were estimated using modified Poisson regression with robust variance. HIV shedding was detected in 9.3% (17/183) of men not on ART prior to surgery and 39.3% (72/183) of these men during the entire study. Relative to baseline, the proportion shedding was significantly increased after MC at 1 wk (PRR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.12-3.14, p = 0.012), 2 wk (PRR = 3.16, 95% CI = 1.94-5.13, p HIV shedding was decreased by 6 wk after MC (PRR = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.09-0.83, p = 0.023) and remained suppressed at 12 wk after MC (PRR = 0.19, 95% CI = 0.06-0.64, p = 0.008). Detectable HIV shedding from MC wounds occurred in more study visits among men with an HIV plasma VL > 50,000 copies/ml than among those with an HIV plasma VL HIV shedding was less common in visits from men with healed MC wounds compared to visits from men without healed wounds (adjPRR = 0.12, 95% CI = 0.07-0.23, p HIV shedding, the median log10 HIV copies/milliliter of lavage fluid was significantly lower in men with ART-induced undetectable plasma VL (1.93, interquartile range [IQR] = 1.83-2.14) than in men not on ART (2.63, IQR = 2.28-3.22, p HIV shedding is significantly reduced after healing of MC wounds. Lower plasma VL is associated with decreased frequency and quantity of HIV shedding from MC wounds. Starting ART prior to MC

  10. Synthetic-peptide-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for screening human serum or plasma for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and type 2.

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, L; Boyle, R W; M. Zhang; Castillo, J; Whittier, S; Della-Latta, P; Clarke, L M; George, J R; Fang, X; Wang, J G; Hosein, B; C. Y. Wang

    1997-01-01

    A synthetic-peptide-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) capable of screening for antibodies to both human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 has been developed for use in blood banks and diagnostic laboratories. Microtiter wells are coated with two synthetic peptides, one corresponding to the highly conserved envelope region of HIV-1 and another corresponding to the conserved envelope region of HIV-2. Overall, sensitivity was 100% in 303 individuals diagnosed with AIDS ...

  11. Development and Validation of a HPV-32 Specific PCR Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Janet

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Papillomavirus-32 (HPV-32 has traditionally been associated with focal-epithelial-hyperplasia (FEH. It is also present in 58% of oral warts of HIV-positive individuals whose prevalence is increasing. Current methods for the detection of HPV-32 are labor-intensive and insensitive so the goal of this work was to develop a highly sensitive and easy to use specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay. Materials and methods An HPV-32 L1 specific PCR assay was developed and optimized. The sensitivity and specificity was compared to previous assays utilized for detection (PGMY and MY09/11 PCR with dot blot hybridization using cloned HPV-32 L1, the closely related HPV-42 L1 as well as clinical samples (oral swabs and fluids from 89 HIV-positive subjects. Results The HPV-32 specific PCR assay showed improved sensitivity to 5 copies of HPV-32 as compared to the PGMY PCR, MY09/11 PCR and dot blot which had a limit of detection of approximately 3,000 copies. Using the HPV-32 dot blot hybridization assay as the gold standard, the HPV-32 specific PCR assay has a sensitivity of 95.8% and 88.9% by sample and subject, respectively, and specificity was 87.8% and 58.8% by sample and subject, respectively. The low sensitivity is due to the HPV-32 specific PCR assays ability to detect more HPV-32 positive samples and may be the new gold standard. Conclusion Due to the ease, sensitivity, and specificity the HPV-32 specific PCR assay is superior to previous assays and is ideal for detection of HPV-32 in large cohorts. This assay provides an excellent tool to study the natural history of HPV-32 infection and the development of oral warts.

  12. Inhibitory effects of Sudanese plant extracts on HIV-1 replication and HIV-1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, G; Miyashiro, H; Nakamura, N; Hattori, M; Kawahata, T; Otake, T; Kakiuchi, N; Shimotohno, K

    1999-02-01

    Forty-eight methanol and aqueous extracts from Sudanese plants were screened for their inhibitory activity on viral replication. Nineteen extracts showed inhibitory effects on HIV-induced cytopathic effects (CPE) on MT-4 cells. The extracts were further screened against HIV-1 protease (PR) using an HPLC assay method. Of the tested extracts, the methanol extracts of Acacia nilotica (bark and pods), Euphorbia granulata (leaves), Maytenus senegalensis (stem-bark) and aqueous extracts of A. nilotica (pods) and M. senegalensis (stem-bark) showed considerable inhibitory effects against HIV-1 PR. Inhibitory principles were isolated from M. senegalensis and their activities were also discussed.

  13. Lateral flow assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczula, Katarzyna M; Gallotta, Andrea

    2016-06-30

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  14. Lateral flow assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczula, Katarzyna M.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. PMID:27365041

  15. Tube-Forming Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan M; Meah, Christopher J; Heath, Victoria L; Styles, Iain B; Bicknell, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis involves the generation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature and is dependent on many growth factors and signaling events. In vivo angiogenesis is dynamic and complex, meaning assays are commonly utilized to explore specific targets for research into this area. Tube-forming assays offer an excellent overview of the molecular processes in angiogenesis. The Matrigel tube forming assay is a simple-to-implement but powerful tool for identifying biomolecules involved in angiogenesis. A detailed experimental protocol on the implementation of the assay is described in conjunction with an in-depth review of methods that can be applied to the analysis of the tube formation. In addition, an ImageJ plug-in is presented which allows automatic quantification of tube images reducing analysis times while removing user bias and subjectivity.

  16. Modelling the comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArt, Darragh G; McKerr, George; Howard, C Vyvyan; Saetzler, Kurt; Wasson, Gillian R

    2009-08-01

    The single-cell gel electrophoresis technique or comet assay is widely regarded as a quick and reliable method of analysing DNA damage in individual cells. It has a proven track record from the fields of biomonitoring to nutritional studies. The assay operates by subjecting cells that are fixed in agarose to high salt and detergent lysis, thus removing all the cellular content except the DNA. By relaxing the DNA in an alkaline buffer, strands containing breaks are released from supercoiling. Upon electrophoresis, these strands are pulled out into the agarose, forming a tail which, when stained with a fluorescent dye, can be analysed by fluorescence microscopy. The intensity of this tail reflects the amount of DNA damage sustained. Despite being such an established and widely used assay, there are still many aspects of the comet assay which are not fully understood. The present review looks at how the comet assay is being used, and highlights some of its limitations. The protocol itself varies among laboratories, so results from similar studies may vary. Given such discrepancies, it would be attractive to break the assay into components to generate a mathematical model to investigate specific parameters.

  17. Diagnosis, antiretroviral therapy, and emergence of resistance to antiretroviral agents in HIV-2 infection: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Hightower

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and type 2 (HIV-2 are the causative agents of AIDS. HIV-2 is prevalent at moderate to high rates in West African countries, such as Senegal, Guinea, Gambia, and Cape Verde. Diagnosis of HIV-2 is made with a positive HIV-1/HIV-2 ELISA or simple/rapid assay, followed by one or two confirmatory tests specific for HIV-2. Following CD4+ T cell counts, HIV-2 viral burden and clinical signs and symptoms of immunodeficiency are beneficial in monitoring HIV-2 disease progression. Although non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are ineffective in treating HIV-2, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors can be effective in dual and triple antiretroviral regimens. Their use can decrease HIV-2 viral load, increase CD4+ T cell counts and improve AIDS-related symptoms. HIV-2 resistance to various nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors, including zidovudine, lamivudine, ritonavir and indinavir, has been identified in some HIV-2 infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. The knowledge of HIV-2 peculiarities, when compared to HIV-1, is crucial to helping diagnose and guide the clinician in the choice of the initial antiretroviral regimen and for monitoring therapy success.

  18. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of HIV in the United States, please visit: https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/hiv-aids- ... HIV, STD, and TB Prevention. About HIV/AIDS. ( https://www.cdc.gov/actagainstaids/basics/whatishiv.html ). Atlanta, ...

  19. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Projects » Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 – ... HIV and to help us Send the Message . Get the Facts What are HIV and AIDS? HIV ( ...

  20. Natural Plant Alkaloid (Emetine Inhibits HIV-1 Replication by Interfering with Reverse Transcriptase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Chaves Valadão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ipecac alkaloids are secondary metabolites produced in the medicinal plant Psychotria ipecacuanha. Emetine is the main alkaloid of ipecac and one of the active compounds in syrup of Ipecac with emetic property. Here we evaluated emetine’s potential as an antiviral agent against Human Immunodeficiency Virus. We performed in vitro Reverse Transcriptase (RT Assay and Natural Endogenous Reverse Transcriptase Activity Assay (NERT to evaluate HIV RT inhibition. Emetine molecular docking on HIV-1 RT was also analyzed. Phenotypic assays were performed in non-lymphocytic and in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC with HIV-1 wild-type and HIV-harboring RT-resistant mutation to Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (M184V. Our results showed that HIV-1 RT was blocked in the presence of emetine in both models: in vitro reactions with isolated HIV-1 RT and intravirion, measured by NERT. Emetine revealed a strong potential of inhibiting HIV-1 replication in both cellular models, reaching 80% of reduction in HIV-1 infection, with low cytotoxic effect. Emetine also blocked HIV-1 infection of RT M184V mutant. These results suggest that emetine is able to penetrate in intact HIV particles, and bind and block reverse transcription reaction, suggesting that it can be used as anti-HIV microbicide. Taken together, our findings provide additional pharmacological information on the potential therapeutic effects of emetine.

  1. Noninvasive High-Throughput Single-Cell Analysis of HIV Protease Activity Using Ratiometric Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaber, Rok; Majerle, Andreja; Jerala, Roman; Benčina, Mojca

    2013-01-01

    To effectively fight against the human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) epidemic, ongoing development of novel HIV protease inhibitors is required. Inexpensive high-throughput screening assays are needed to quickly scan large sets of chemicals for potential inhibitors. We have developed a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based, HIV protease-sensitive sensor using a combination of a fluorescent protein pair, namely mCerulean and mCitrine. Through extensive in vitro characterization, we show that the FRET-HIV sensor can be used in HIV protease screening assays. Furthermore, we have used the FRET-HIV sensor for intracellular quantitative detection of HIV protease activity in living cells, which more closely resembles an actual viral infection than an in vitro assay. We have developed a high-throughput method that employs a ratiometric flow cytometry for analyzing large populations of cells that express the FRET-HIV sensor. The method enables FRET measurement of single cells with high sensitivity and speed and should be used when subpopulation-specific intracellular activity of HIV protease needs to be estimated. In addition, we have used a confocal microscopy sensitized emission FRET technique to evaluate the usefulness of the FRET-HIV sensor for spatiotemporal detection of intracellular HIV protease activity. PMID:24287545

  2. Performance and logistical challenges of alternative HIV-1 virological monitoring options in a clinical setting of Harare, Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ondoa, Pascale; Shamu, Tinei; Bronze, Michelle; Wellington, Maureen; Boender, Tamara Sonia; Manting, Corry; Steegen, Kim; Luethy, Rudi; Rinke de Wit, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated a low-cost virological failure assay (VFA) on plasma and dried blood spot (DBS) specimens from HIV-1 infected patients attending an HIV clinic in Harare. The results were compared to the performance of the ultrasensitive heat-denatured p24 assay (p24). The COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan

  3. Comparison of antibody responses to HIV infection in Ugandan women infected with HIV subtypes A and D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longosz, Andrew F; Morrison, Charles S; Chen, Pai-Lien; Brand, Hilmarie H; Arts, Eric; Nankya, Immaculate; Salata, Robert A; Quinn, Thomas C; Eshleman, Susan H; Laeyendecker, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    We compared the serologic response to HIV infection in Ugandan women with HIV subtype A (N=82) and D (N=32) infection using a limiting antigen avidity assay (LAg-Avidity assay); 2,614 samples were analyzed. Study participants were followed a median of 6.6 years after HIV seroconversion. Samples were classified as assay positive if they had a LAg-Avidity assay result infection were more likely to have delayed antibody maturation. During the first 2 years after seroconversion, the mean time that women had an assay-positive result (mean duration of recent infection, MDRI) was longer for women with subtype D infection than women with subtype A infection (267.9 days, 95% CI: 231.2-308.2 vs. 167.3 days, 95% CI: 151.8-185.9 days, pinfection after excluding low viral load samples and samples from women on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Women infected for >2 years were also more likely to be misclassified as recently infected in they had subtype D infection. Women with subtype D infection were also more likely to have antibody waning compared to women with subtype A infection. These findings may be related to the higher pathogenicity of subtype D HIV infection and are relevant to use of the LAg-Avidity assay for cross-sectional HIV incidence estimation in populations where subtype D infection is prevalent.

  4. Anti-HIV Antibody Responses and the HIV Reservoir Size during Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulggi A Lee

    Full Text Available A major challenge to HIV eradication strategies is the lack of an accurate measurement of the total burden of replication-competent HIV (the "reservoir". We assessed the association of anti-HIV antibody responses and the estimated size of the reservoir during antiretroviral therapy (ART.We evaluated anti-HIV antibody profiles using luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS assay in relation to several blood-based HIV reservoir measures: total and 2-LTR DNA (rtPCR or droplet digital PCR; integrated DNA (Alu PCR; unspliced RNA (rtPCR, multiply-spliced RNA (TILDA, residual plasma HIV RNA (single copy PCR, and replication-competent virus (outgrowth assay. We also assessed total HIV DNA and RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (rtPCR. Spearman correlations and linear regressions were performed using log-transformed blood- or tissue-based reservoir measurements as predictors and log-transformed antibody levels as outcome variables.Among 51 chronically HIV-infected ART-suppressed participants (median age = 57, nadir CD4+ count = 196 cells/mm3, ART duration = 9 years, the most statistically significant associations were between antibody responses to integrase and HIV RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (1.17 fold-increase per two-fold RNA increase, P = 0.004 and between antibody responses to matrix and integrated HIV DNA in resting CD4+ T cells (0.35 fold-decrease per two-fold DNA increase, P = 0.003. However, these associations were not statistically significant after a stringent Bonferroni-adjustment of P<0.00045. Multivariate models including age and duration of ART did not markedly alter results.Our findings suggest that anti-HIV antibody responses may reflect the size of the HIV reservoir during chronic treated HIV disease, possibly via antigen recognition in reservoir sites. Larger, prospective studies are needed to validate the utility of antibody levels as a measure of the total body burden of HIV during treatment.

  5. HIV-1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the two major issues of stopping the AIDS epidemic and reducing poverty are addressed. Nevertheless ... affected by the same HIV epidemic as the general adult population. The resulting high absentee rates due to .... Streptococcus pneumoniae and non~typhoidal Salmonella. In the case of a Herxheimer-type reaction, ...

  6. HIV-1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaders of the world's most powerful countries recently agreed at the G8 Summit (July 22-23, 2000) to ..... way to reduce these early deaths by reducing this toxic reaction.22 Prospective controlled trials in the .... strong leadership, they need to acknowledge the link between tuberculosis and HIV, and they need to show a ...

  7. Rover waste assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched {sup 235}U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for {sup 137}Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Get Tested for HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS from other websites National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day Blog topics HIV and AIDS Breaking Down ... t Miss a Beat National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day National Women's Health Week Supporting Nursing Moms ...

  9. Asymptomatic HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000682.htm Asymptomatic HIV infection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asymptomatic HIV infection is a phase of HIV/AIDS during which ...

  10. Identification of HIV-1 Tat-Associated Proteins Contributing to HIV-1 Transcription and Latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Maxime Junior; Power, Derek; Kong, Weili; Huang, Huachao; Santoso, Netty; Zhu, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat is a virus-encoded trans-activator that plays a central role in viral transcription. We used our recently developed parallel analysis of in vitro translated open reading frames (ORFs) (PLATO) approach to identify host proteins that associate with HIV-1 Tat. From this proteomic assay, we identify 89 Tat-associated proteins (TAPs). We combine our results with other datasets of Tat or long terminal repeat (LTR)-associated proteins. For some of these proteins (NAT10, TINP1, XRCC5, SIN3A), we confirm their strong association with Tat. These TAPs also suppress Tat-mediated HIV-1 transcription. Removing suppression of HIV-1 transcription benefits the reversal of post-integrated, latent HIV-1 proviruses. We demonstrate that these transcriptionally suppressing TAPs contribute to HIV-1 latency in Jurkat latency (J-LAT) cells. Therefore, our proteomic analysis highlights the previously unappreciated TAPs that play a role in maintaining HIV-1 latency and can be further studied as potential pharmacological targets for the “shock and kill” HIV-1 cure strategy. PMID:28368303

  11. Multicenter evaluation of a new automated fourth-generation human immunodeficiency virus screening assay with a sensitive antigen detection module and high specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bernard; Gürtler, Lutz; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Michl, Ulrike; Mühlbacher, Annelies; Bürgisser, Philippe; Villaescusa, Roberto; Eiras, Adolfo; Gabriel, Christian; Stekel, Herbert; Tanprasert, Srivilai; Oota, Sinenaart; Silvestre, Maria-Jose; Marques, Cristina; Ladeira, Maria; Rabenau, Holger; Berger, Annemarie; Schmitt, Urban; Melchior, Walter

    2002-06-01

    Fourth-generation assays for the simultaneous detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen and antibody that were available on the international market until now have antigen detection modules with relatively poor sensitivity and produce a higher rate of false-positive results than third-generation enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). The new Cobas Core HIV Combi EIA with an improved sensitivity for HIV p24 antigen was compared to alternative fourth- and third-generation assays, the p24 antigen test, and HIV type 1 (HIV-1) RNA reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). A total of 94 seroconversion panels (n = 709 sera), samples from the acute phase of infection after seroconversion (n = 32), anti-HIV-1-positive specimens (n = 730) from patients in different stages of the disease, 462 subtyped samples from different geographical locations, anti-HIV-2-positive sera (n = 302), dilutions of cell culture supernatants (n = 62) from cells infected with different HIV-1 subtypes, selected performance panels from Boston Biomedica Inc., 7,579 unselected samples from blood donors, 303 unselected daily routine samples, 997 specimens from hospitalized patients, and potentially interfering samples (n = 1,222) were tested with Cobas Core HIV Combi EIA. The new assay showed a sensitivity comparable to that of the Abbott HIV-1 AG Monoclonal A for early detection of HIV infection in seroconversion panels. The mean time delay of Cobas Core HIV Combi EIA (last negative sample plus 1 day) in comparison to that for HIV-1 RT-PCR for 87 panels tested with both methods was 2.75 days. The diagnostic window was reduced with Cobas Core HIV Combi EIA by between 3.6 and 5.7 days from that for third-generation assays. The specificities of Cobas Core HIV Combi EIA in blood donors were 99.84 and 99.85% (after repeated testing). Overall, 30 repeatedly reactive false-positive results out of 10,031 HIV-negative samples were obtained with Cobas Core HIV Combi EIA. Our results show that a fourth

  12. In vitro separation and expansion of CD4 lymphocytes from HIV-infected individuals without activation of HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Nielsen, Jens Ole; Hansen, J E

    1997-01-01

    In order to offer a gene therapy-based treatment against AIDS, it is likely to be necessary to harvest and culture CD4 cells from HIV-positive patients without activating the HIV infection. We have used a magnetic cell sorting (MACS) system to enrich CD4 cells. Using positive selection, CD4 cells...... expression and no loss of polyclonality. Only in two of six cultures were we able to detect HIV-antigen production, and using an LTR-PCR and an RT assay, we did not find activation of the HIV infection during the culture period. Thus, the method described separates and expands CD4 cells from HIV......-positive patients without activation of the HIV infection....

  13. Lateral flow strip assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Robin R [Danville, CA; Benett, William J [Livermore, CA; Coleman, Matthew A [Oakland, CA; Pearson, Francesca S [Livermore, CA; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L [Livermore, CA

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  14. Single-molecule techniques to quantify and genetically characterise persistent HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Qian; Palmer, Sarah

    2018-01-09

    Antiretroviral therapy effectively suppresses, but does not eradicate HIV-1 infection. Persistent low-level HIV-1 can still be detected in plasma and cellular reservoirs even after years of effective therapy, and cessation of current treatments invariably results in resumption of viral replication. Efforts to eradicate persistent HIV-1 require a comprehensive examination of the quantity and genetic composition of HIV-1 within the plasma and infected cells located in the peripheral blood and tissues throughout the body. Single-molecule techniques, such as the single-copy assay and single-genome/proviral sequencing assays, have been employed to further our understanding of the source and viral dynamics of persistent HIV-1 during long-term effective therapy. The application of the single-copy assay, which quantifies plasma HIV-1 RNA down to a single copy, has revealed that viremia persists in the plasma and CSF after years of effective therapy. This low-level HIV-1 RNA also persists in the plasma following treatment intensification, treatment with latency reversing agents, cancer-related therapy, and bone marrow transplantation. Single-genome/proviral sequencing assays genetically characterise HIV-1 populations after passing through different selective pressures related to cell type, tissue type, compartment, or therapy. The application of these assays has revealed that the intracellular HIV-1 reservoir is stable and mainly located in CD4+ memory T cells. Moreover, this intracellular HIV-1 reservoir is primarily maintained by cellular proliferation due to homeostasis and antigenic stimulation, although cryptic replication may take place in anatomic sites where treatment is sub-optimal. The employment of single-genome/proviral sequencing showed that latency reversing agents broadly activate quiescent proviruses but do not clear the intracellular reservoir. Recently, full-length individual proviral sequencing assays have been developed and the application of these

  15. Evaluation of three enzyme immunoassays for HIV-1 antigen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, P B; Lisker, A; Folds, J D

    1989-01-01

    Three enzyme immunoassay (EIA) methods for the detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) were evaluated. Serum or plasma samples from 22 individuals seropositive for HIV-1 antibodies were tested with the Abbott, Coulter, and DuPont kits for presence of HIV-1 p24 antigen. Another 12 samples were tested with two kits only. Discordant results were obtained with 9 of 34 (26%) HIV-1-antibody-positive patient samples tested. Most of these discrepancies were found in samples containing less than 30 pg/ml of HIV-1 p24 core antigen. A sampling of sera from normal blood donors and patients with infectious or autoimmune diseases revealed a low level of false positive reactions, especially with sera containing antinuclear antibodies or rheumatoid factor. Noteworthy is the frequency of false positive reactions seen with the DuPont EIA for HIV-1 p24 antigen. 18/111 sera (16.2%) containing auto-antibodies tested positively with the DuPont HIV-1 p24 antigen EIA. The nonspecific nature of the test reactivity for 9/10 of these samples was confirmed using an HIV-1 p24 antigen inhibition assay. These findings are discussed in light of the need for HIV-1 antigen detection in the clinical laboratory and of other methods for HIV-1 detection: the polymerase chain reaction and measurements of reverse transcriptase activity.

  16. [Specificity of a new test for detection of antibodies to HIV-1/-2 in blood donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadé, C; Wüst, T

    1996-06-01

    The aim of the continuous development of anti-HIV-ELISA tests is the improvement of their specificity and sensitivity. With this study the precision and the specificity of the Cobas Core Anti-HIV-1/HIV-2 DAGS, a 3rd-generation anti-HIV assay, were evaluated. 1,557 frozen and 1,654 fresh sera from blood donors were tested with the Cobas Core Anti-HIV-1/HIV-2 DAGS (Roche Diagnostic Systems, Basel, Switzerland) and the Abbott Recombinant HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd Generation EIA (Abbott GmbH Diagnostika, Wiesbaden, Germany), which was used as a reference assay. Positive sera were tested with a Westernblot. 34 sera, previously not negative in the Abbott test, were retested with the two anti-HIV assays and with a Westernblot. The intra- and inter-assay precision was evaluated with the positive and negative controls of the test kits and with control sera. The intra- and inter-assay precision of the Roche test was very good. The specificity of the Roche test is 99.91%. Out of 3,211 tested sera those of three blood donors were false positive in the Roche test and one sample false positive in the Abbott test. The precision and specificity of the new anti-HIV test fulfil the demands of transfusion medicine.

  17. (MTT) dye reduction assay.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to inhibit proliferation of HeLa cells was determined using the 3443- dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) dye reduction assay. Extracts from roots of Agathisanthemum bojeri, Synaptolepis kirkii and Zanha africana and the leaf extract of Physalis peruviana at a concentration of 10 pg/ml inhibited cell ...

  18. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis S; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  19. HIV-1 is not a major driver of increased plasma IL-6 levels in chronic HIV-1 disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shive, Carey L.; Biancotto, Angélique; Funderburg, Nicholas T.; Pilch-Cooper, Heather A.; Valdez, Hernan; Margolis, Leonid; Sieg, Scott F.; McComsey, Grace A.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Lederman, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Increased plasma IL-6 levels have been associated with HIV-1 disease progression risk, yet the drivers of IL-6 production in HIV-1 infection are not known. This study was designed to explore the relationship between HIV-1 replication and IL-6 induction. Design Correlations between plasma levels of IL-6 and HIV-1 RNA were examined in two clinical studies. To more directly assess the induction of IL-6 by HIV-1, several cell and tissue types that support HIV-1 replication in vivo were infected with HIV-1 and expression of IL-6 was measured. Methods Spearman’s rank correlations were used to examine the relationship between plasma levels of IL-6 and HIV-1 RNA. Macrophages, and colonic and lymph node histocultures were infected with HIV-1 or stimulated with bacterial products, LPS or flagellin, and IL-6 levels in supernatant were measured by ELISA or multiplex bead assay. Results In the clinical studies there was weak or no correlation between plasma levels of IL-6 and HIV-1 RNA but IL-6 levels were correlated with plasma levels of the LPS coreceptor CD14. Macrophages stimulated with LPS or flagellin showed robust production of IL-6, but there was no increase in IL-6 production after HIV-1 infection. IL-6 expression was not increased in lymph node histocultures obtained from HIV-1 infected subjects nor after productive HIV-1 infection of colonic or lymph node histocultures ex vivo. Conclusions We find no evidence that HIV-1 replication is an important driver of IL-6 expression in vivo or in in vitro systems. PMID:22659649

  20. Synergistic antiviral effect in vitro of azidothymidine and amphotericin B methyl ester in combination on HIV infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Svenningsen, A

    1992-01-01

    The nucleoside analogue azidothymidine (AZT) and the methyl ester of amphotericin B (AME) were assayed for antiviral effect on HIV infection singly and in combination. Both compounds were effective in inhibiting HIV infection of MT-4 cells. At concentrations where either compound alone had no sig...... synergistic antiviral properties. Amphotericin B itself significantly reduced HIV infectivity in vitro and should not be used as an antifungal agent in cultures intended to propagate HIV....

  1. A molecular assay for sensitive detection of pathogen-specific T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria O Kasprowicz

    Full Text Available Here we describe the development and validation of a highly sensitive assay of antigen-specific IFN-γ production using real time quantitative PCR (qPCR for two reporters--monokine-induced by IFN-γ (MIG and the IFN-γ inducible protein-10 (IP10. We developed and validated the assay and applied it to the detection of CMV, HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB specific responses, in a cohort of HIV co-infected patients. We compared the sensitivity of this assay to that of the ex vivo RD1 (ESAT-6 and CFP-10-specific IFN-γ Elispot assay. We observed a clear quantitative correlation between the two assays (P<0.001. Our assay proved to be a sensitive assay for the detection of MTB-specific T cells, could be performed on whole blood samples of fingerprick (50 uL volumes, and was not affected by HIV-mediated immunosuppression. This assay platform is potentially of utility in diagnosis of infection in this and other clinical settings.

  2. Performance comparison of the 4th generation Bio-Rad Laboratories GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA on the EVOLIS™ automated system versus Abbott ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo, Ortho Anti-HIV 1+2 EIA on Vitros ECi and Siemens HIV-1/O/2 enhanced on Advia Centaur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Elizabeth O; Stewart, Greg; Bajzik, Olivier; Ferret, Mathieu; Bentsen, Christopher; Shriver, M Kathleen

    2013-12-01

    A multisite study was conducted to evaluate the performance of the Bio-Rad 4th generation GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA versus Abbott 4th generation ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo. The performance of two 3rd generation EIAs, Ortho Diagnostics Anti-HIV 1+2 EIA and Siemens HIV 1/O/2 was also evaluated. Study objective was comparison of analytical HIV-1 p24 antigen detection, sensitivity in HIV-1 seroconversion panels, specificity in blood donors and two HIV false reactive panels. Analytical sensitivity was evaluated with International HIV-1 p24 antigen standards, the AFFSAPS (pg/mL) and WHO 90/636 (IU/mL) standards; sensitivity in acute infection was compared on 55 seroconversion samples, and specificity was evaluated on 1000 negative blood donors and two false reactive panels. GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab demonstrated better analytical HIV antigen sensitivity compared to ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo: 0.41 IU/mL versus 1.2 IU/mL (WHO) and 12.7 pg/mL versus 20.1 pg/mL (AFSSAPS); GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab EIA also demonstrated slightly better specificity compared to ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo (100% versus 99.7%). The 4th generation HIV Combo tests detected seroconversion 7-11 days earlier than the 3rd generation HIV antibody only EIAs. Both 4th generation immunoassays demonstrated excellent performance in sensitivity, with the reduction of the serological window period (7-11 days earlier detection than the 3rd generation HIV tests). However, GS HIV Combo Ag/Ab demonstrated improved HIV antigen analytical sensitivity and slightly better specificity when compared to ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo assay, with higher positive predictive values (PPV) for low prevalence populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hybrid Chem/Bio Ultradense NanoDevice Sensors (HOUNDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    the limits of detectability; a semiconductor nanowire FET which could scale to single molecule detection (and high density); and ultra sensitive nucleotide switches with unique selectivity and sensitivity.

  4. Blending Chem-Bio Dispersion Forecasts and Sensor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-31

    of the IEEE Aerospace Conference, Vol. 4, Big Sky, MT, March 2003, pp. 1979–1993. [32] Incropera , F. P. and Dewitt, D. P., Fundamentals of Heat and... Mass Transfer , Third Edition, John Wiley and Sons Ltd., US, 1990. [33] Kolditz, O., Computational Methods in Environmental Fluid Mechanics, chap. 6...in all states for PF schemes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 2.6 Estimates of the mass fraction

  5. FUNCTIONALIZED LATERAL SURFACE COATED LASERS FOR CHEM-BIO DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, L L; Bond, T C; Cole, G D; Behymer, E M

    2007-07-05

    We present a class of compact, monolithic, photonic sensors consisting of multiple section edge emitting lasers with functionalized lateral surface coatings for low level detection of chemical or biological agents. Specifically, we discuss 8 {micro}m x 250 {micro}m Pd-coated H{sub 2} sensors and configurations to reduce the minimum detection limit from 138ppm for passive sensors to 1ppm for active sensors. Compared with conventional optical H{sub 2} sensors that use fiber gratings, surface plasmon resonances, or surface reflectance, our sensors offer the advantages of smaller size, wider dynamic range, monolithic integration of laser source and detector, and 2-D scalability to arrays of sensors that are functionalized to detect different agents.

  6. A drug discovery platform: a simplified immunoassay for analyzing HIV protease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitidee, Kuntida; Nangola, Sawitree; Hadpech, Sudarat; Laopajon, Witida; Kasinrerk, Watchara; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai

    2012-12-01

    Although numerous methods for the determination of HIV protease (HIV-PR) activity have been described, new high-throughput assays are required for clinical and pharmaceutical applications due to the occurrence of resistant strains. In this study, a simple enzymatic immunoassay to identify HIV-PR activity was developed based on a Ni(2+)-immobilized His(6)-Matrix-Capsid substrate (H(6)MA-CA) is cleaved by HIV protease-His(6) (HIV-PRH(6)) which removes the CA domain and exposes the free C terminus of MA. Following this cleavage, two monoclonal antibodies specific for either the free C-terminal MA or CA epitope are used to quantify the proteolytic activity using a standard ELISA-based system. Specificity for detection of the HIV-PRH(6) activity was confirmed with addition of protease inhibitor (PI), lopinavir. In addition, the assay was able to detect an HIV-PR variant activity indicating that this assay is capable of assessing viral mutation affect HIV-PR activity. The efficacy of commercially available PIs and their 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) were determined. This assay provides a high-throughput method for both validating the efficiency of new drugs in vitro and facilitating the discovery of new PIs. In addition, it could serve as a method for examining the influence of various mutations in HIV-PRs isolated from drug-resistant strains. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Vitamin D levels and influenza vaccine immunogenicity among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F; Won, Seunghyun; Lee, Rachel; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Ganesan, Anuradha; Burgess, Timothy; Agan, Brian K

    2016-09-22

    Vaccination is the most important preventive strategy against influenza, however post-vaccination antibody responses are often inadequate especially among HIV-infected persons. Vitamin D deficiency has been suggested to adversely influence immune responses and is highly prevalent among HIV-infected adults. Therefore, we evaluated the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels and post-influenza vaccination responses. We conducted a prospective cohort study evaluating the immunogenicity of monovalent influenza A (H1N1) vaccination among both HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adults (18-50years of age) during the 2009-2010 influenza season. Antibody titers were evaluated at baseline, day 28, and 6months post-vaccination using hemagluttination inhibition assays. Serum 25(OH)D levels were measured at day 28. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses examined the association between 25(OH)D levels [categorized as <20ng/ml (deficiency) vs. ⩾20ng/ml] with the primary outcome of seroconversion. Secondary outcomes included seroprotection; a ⩾4-fold increase in titers; and geometric mean titers post-vaccination. Analyses were repeated using 25(OH)D levels as a continuous variable. A total of 128 adults [64 HIV-infected (median CD4 count 580cells/mm(3)) and 64 HIV-uninfected] were included. Seroconversion at day 28 post-vaccination was achieved in fewer HIV-infected participants compared with HIV-uninfected participants (56% vs. 74%, p=0.03). Vitamin D deficiency was more prevalent among HIV-infected persons vs. HIV-uninfected persons (25% vs. 17%), although not significantly different (p=0.39). There were no associations found between lower 25(OH)D levels and poorer antibody responses at day 28 or 6months for any of the study outcomes among either HIV-infected or HIV-uninfected adults. Vitamin D deficiency was common among both HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adults, but lower levels did not predict antibody responses after H1N1 (2009) influenza

  8. Detection of acute HIV-1 infections utilizing NAAT technology in Dallas, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Brian; Plough, Kelly

    2013-12-01

    The detection of an acute human immunodeficiency virus infection (AHI) is vital in the fight against the spread of HIV to uninfected partners. Detection early after transmission is critical because the virus is replicating at a high level and is undetectable by serological markers. Nucleic acid amplification testing can detect HIV-1 RNA 10-12 days after exposure. Provide Dallas County Public Health Department the ability to detect an AHI and maintain a three day turn-around-time for a reactive specimen. The population includes patients requesting HIV testing at various clinics throughout the state of Texas. Analyze various pool sizes for the pooling of specimens with the Aptima HIV-1 RNA qualitative assay to detect an acute HIV infection. Modify the HIV testing algorithm to include the detection of an acute HIV infection without delaying reporting results to original submitters. Perform a study to compare the detection of HIV in various HIV assays (3rd generation EIA assay, 4th generation EIA assay, HIV-1 RNA NAAT). Perform public health follow-up on patients who are confirmed to have an acute HIV infection with a goal of preventing the spread to uninfected partners. A pooling protocol was validated and performed concurrently with the EIA to maintain a reactive result released after three days of collection. Of the 148,888 (2009-2012) specimens screened for HIV, 161 AHIs were detected and the public health follow-up identified an additional 13 new HIV infections that had been a contact to one of the AHIs. Without the advancement in technology, patients could have received a negative or indeterminate test prior to implementing the NAAT, resulting in a delay in diagnosis and potential spread to uninfected partners. Improving the detection of an AHI is crucial in preventing the spread of the virus. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Development of an RNA Assay to Access HIV-1 Latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-19

    PAGE Form Approved __________________________________________I 0MB No. 0704-0188 PUNK reporting burden #or tms colle1Cto of nformalton ,s estimated to... culture model systems (Folks et al., 1986; Folks et al., 1987; Zagury et al., 1986). After infection of primary lympho- cytes or certain lymphoid or...have been characterized in tissue culture systems but their role in vivo remains obscure. The vif gene is crucial for virion infectivity (Fisher et al

  10. Activation of NK cells by HIV-specific ADCC antibodies: role for granulocytes in expressing HIV-1 peptide epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavi, Vijaya; Navis, Marjon; Chung, Amy W; Isitman, Gamze; Wren, Leia H; De Rose, Robert; Kent, Stephen J; Stratov, Ivan

    2013-05-01

    HIV-specific ADCC antibodies could play a role in providing protective immunity. We have developed a whole blood ADCC assay that measures NK cell activation in response to HIV peptide epitopes. These HIV peptide-specific ADCC responses are associated with escape from immune recognition and slower progression of HIV infection and represent interesting HIV vaccine antigens. However, the mechanism by which these epitopes are expressed and whether or not they induce NK-mediated killing of cells expressing such peptide-antigens is not understood. Herein, we show that fluorescent-tagged ADCC peptide epitopes associate with blood granulocytes. The peptide-associated granulocytes become a specific target for antibody-mediated killing, as shown by enhanced expression of apoptosis marker Annexin and reduction in cell numbers. When HIV Envelope gp140 protein is utilized in the ADCC assay, we detected binding to its ligand, CD4. During the incubation, cells co-expressing gp140 and CD4 reduce in number. We also detected increasing Annexin expression in these cells. These data indicate that blood cells expressing HIV-specific ADCC epitopes are targeted for killing by NK cells in the presence of ADCC antibodies in HIV+ plasma and provide a clearer framework to evaluate these antigens as vaccine candidates.

  11. HIV integrase inhibitory activity of Agastache rugosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H K; Lee, H K; Shin, C G; Huh, H

    1999-10-01

    We have been screening anti-HIV integrase compounds from Korean medicinal plants by using an in vitro assay system which is mainly composed of recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase and radiolabeled oligonucleotides. From the above screening, the aqueous methanolic extract of the roots of Agastache rugosa exhibited a significant activity. Bioactivity-guided chromatographic fractionation of the methanolic extract resulted in the isolation of rosmarinic acid. The structure of the compound was determined by spectroscopic data and by the comparison with the reported values. The IC50 of the rosmarinic acid was approximately 10 microg/ml against HIV integrase.

  12. Global assays of fibrinolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilich, A; Bokarev, I; Key, N S

    2017-10-01

    Fibrinolysis is an important and integral part of the hemostatic system. Acting as a balance to blood coagulation, the fibrinolytic system protects the body from unwanted thrombus formation and occlusion of blood vessels. As long as blood coagulation and fibrinolysis remain in equilibrium, response to injury, such as vessel damage, is appropriately regulated. However, alterations in this balance may lead to thrombosis or bleeding. A variety of methods have been proposed to assess fibrinolytic activity in blood or its components, but due to the complexity of the system, the design of a "gold standard" assay that reflects overall fibrinolysis has remained an elusive goal. In this review, we describe the most commonly used methods that have been described, such as thromboelastography (TEG and ROTEM), global fibrinolytic capacity in plasma and whole blood, plasma turbidity methods, simultaneous thrombin and plasmin generation assays, euglobulin clot lysis time and fibrin plate methods. All of these assays have strengths and limitations. We suggest that some methods may be preferable for detecting hypofibrinolytic conditions, whereas others may be better for detecting hyperfibrinolytic states. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Development of an HIV-1 Subtype Panel in China: Isolation and Characterization of 30 HIV-1 Primary Strains Circulating in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwan Han

    Full Text Available The complex epidemic and significant diversity of HIV-1 strains in China pose serious challenges for surveillance and diagnostic assays, vaccine development and clinical management. There is a lack of HIV-1 isolates in current canonical HIV-1 subtype panels that can represent HIV-1 diversity in China; an HIV-1 subtype panel for China is urgently needed.Blood samples were collected from HIV-1 infected patients participating in the drug-resistance surveillance program in China. The samples were isolated, cultured and stored as neat culture supernatant. The HIV-1 isolates were fully characterized. The panel was used to compare 2 viral load assays and 2 p24 assays as the examples of how this panel could be used.An HIV-1 subtype panel for China composed of 30 HIV-1 primary strains of four subtypes (B [including Thai-B], CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and G was established. The samples were isolated and cultured to a high-titer (10(6-10(9 copies/ml/high-volume (40 ml. The HIV-1 isolates were fully characterized by the final viral load, p24 concentration, gag-pol and envC2V3 sequencing, co-receptor prediction, determination of the four amino acids at the tip of the env V3-loop, glycosylation sites in the V3 loop and the drug-resistance mutations. The comparison of two p24 assays and two viral load assays on the isolates illustrated how this panel may be used for the evaluation of diagnostic assay performance. The Pearson value between p24 assays were 0.938. The viral load results showed excellent concordance and agreement for samples of Thai-B, but lower correlations for samples of CRF01_AE.The current panel of 30 HIV-1 isolates served as a basis for the development of a comprehensive panel of fully characterized viral isolates, which could reflect the current dynamic and complex HIV-1 epidemic in China. This panel will be available to support HIV-1 research, assay evaluation, vaccine and drug development.

  14. HIV Structural Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 102 HIV Structural Database (Web, free access)   The HIV Protease Structural Database is an archive of experimentally determined 3-D structures of Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1), Human Immunodeficiency Virus 2 (HIV-2) and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Proteases and their complexes with inhibitors or products of substrate cleavage.

  15. [THE MOLECULAR TECHNIQUES OF DIAGNOSTIC OF GINGIVITIS AND PERIODONTITIS IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsarev, V N; Nikolaeva, E N; Iagodina, E V; Trefilova, Yu A; Ippolitov, E V

    2016-01-01

    The examination was carried out in the Moscow clinical infectious hospital No 2 concerning 102 patients with verified diagnosis "AIDS-infection" and seropositive according results of detection of anti-HIV-antibodies in blood serum. The study was organized to analyze rate ofcolonization of gums with virulent anaerobic bacteria in HIV-infected (polymerase chain reaction) and antibodies to HIV in gingival fluid (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). It is established that in HIV-infected patients, in scrape from gingival sulcus dominate anaerobic bacteria P. gigngivalis and A. ctinomycetemcomitans and in case of periodontitis--P. gingivalis and T. forsythia. The received data permits recommending the test-system "Multident-5" for polymerase chain reaction diagnostic. The reagents kit "Calypte®HIV-1/2"--for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay gingival fluid. The results of polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay have no impact of concomitant stomatological (periodontitis, gingivitis) and somatic pathology.

  16. NF45 and NF90 Bind HIV-1 RNA and Modulate HIV Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A previous proteomic screen in our laboratory identified nuclear factor 45 (NF45 and nuclear factor 90 (NF90 as potential cellular factors involved in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 replication. Both are RNA binding proteins that regulate gene expression; and NF90 has been shown to regulate the expression of cyclin T1 which is required for Tat-dependent trans-activation of viral gene expression. In this study the roles of NF45 and NF90 in HIV replication were investigated through overexpression studies. Ectopic expression of either factor potentiated HIV infection, gene expression, and virus production. Deletion of the RNA binding domains of NF45 and NF90 diminished the enhancement of HIV infection and gene expression. Both proteins were found to interact with the HIV RNA. RNA decay assays demonstrated that NF90, but not NF45, increased the half-life of the HIV RNA. Overall, these studies indicate that both NF45 and NF90 potentiate HIV infection through their RNA binding domains.

  17. Association of HIV diversity and virologic outcomes in early antiretroviral treatment: HPTN 052.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Philip J; Wilson, Ethan A; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Kumwenda, Newton; Makhema, Joseph; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Hakim, James G; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Melo, Marineide G; Godbole, Sheela V; Pilotto, Jose H; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Panchia, Ravindre; Chen, Ying Q; Cohen, Myron S; Eshleman, Susan H; Fogel, Jessica M

    2017-01-01

    Higher HIV diversity has been associated with virologic outcomes in children on antiretroviral treatment (ART). We examined the association of HIV diversity with virologic outcomes in adults from the HPTN 052 trial who initiated ART at CD4 cell counts of 350-550 cells/mm3. A high resolution melting (HRM) assay was used to analyze baseline (pre-treatment) HIV diversity in six regions in the HIV genome (two in gag, one in pol, and three in env) from 95 participants who failed ART. We analyzed the association of HIV diversity in each genomic region with baseline (pre-treatment) factors and three clinical outcomes: time to virologic suppression after ART initiation, time to ART failure, and emergence of HIV drug resistance at ART failure. After correcting for multiple comparisons, we did not find any association of baseline HIV diversity with demographic, laboratory, or clinical characteristics. For the 18 analyses performed for clinical outcomes evaluated, there was only one significant association: higher baseline HIV diversity in one of the three HIV env regions was associated with longer time to ART failure (p = 0.008). The HRM diversity assay may be useful in future studies exploring the relationship between HIV diversity and clinical outcomes in individuals with HIV infection.

  18. Development of pyridine dicoumarols as potent anti HIV-1 leads, targeting HIV-1 associated topoisomeraseIIβ kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammari, Kurumurthy; Devaraya, Kiran; Bommakanti, Akhila; Kondapi, Anand K

    2017-09-01

    A structural study of a series of pyridine dicoumarol derivatives with potential activity against a novel Topoisomerase IIβ kinase which was identified in the HIV-1 viral lysate, compounds were designed and synthesized based on a 3D-QSAR study. Based on QSAR model we have designed and synthesized a series of pyridine dicoumarol derivatives and characterized by spectral studies, all the molecules are biologically evaluated by kinase assay, cytotoxicity assay, ELISA and PCR method. We demonstrated the achievement of water soluble disodium pyridine dicoumarate derivatives showing high anti-HIV-1 activity (IC50 HIV-1-associated topoisomerase IIβ kinase inhibitors for clinical application against AIDS. A new class of anti-HIV-1 lead compounds have been designed and tested. Further studies would result in development of  novel and potential drugs.

  19. Dermatomyositis and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamata Chand

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available HIV has been linked to several autoimmune disorders since its emergence in the 1980s. By affecting different cells and pathways in the immune system, HIV induces the development of certain autoimmune diseases while prohibiting the emergence of others. Dermatomyositis has been rarely described in patients with HIV. We present a case of dermatomyositis in a patient with HIV and explore the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders in HIV focusing on dermatomyositis.

  20. National HIV Testing Day

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-09

    Dr. Kevin A. Fenton, Director of CDC's National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, discusses National HIV Testing Day, an annual observance which raises awareness of the importance of knowing one's HIV status and encourages at-risk individuals to get an HIV test.  Created: 6/9/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 6/9/2011.

  1. Eliminating Perinatal HIV Transmission

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-26

    In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Steve Nesheim discusses perinatal HIV transmission, including the importance of preventing HIV among women, preconception care, and timely HIV testing of the mother. Dr. Nesheim also introduces the revised curriculum Eliminating Perinatal HIV Transmission intended for faculty of OB/GYN and pediatric residents and nurse midwifery students.  Created: 11/26/2012 by Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.   Date Released: 11/26/2012.

  2. Side Effects of HIV Medicines: HIV and Hepatotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find HIV Treatment Services HIV and Mental Health HIV and Nutrition and Food Safety Print This Fact Sheet Entire Series Related Content AIDSource | HIV Treatment: Side Effects Need Help? Call 1-800- ...

  3. The characteristics of screening and confirmatory test results for HIV in Xi'an, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linchuan; Zhou, Kai-Hua; Zhao, He-Ping; Wang, Ji-Han; Zheng, Hai-Chao; Yu, Yan; Chen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with recent or acute HIV infection are more infectious than those with established infection. Our objective was to analyze the characteristics of detection among HIV infections in Xi'an. A 4th-generation kit (Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo) and three 3rd-generationEIA kits (WanTai, XinChuang and Livzon) were used for HIV screening. Overall, 665 individuals were identified as positive and were tested by western blotting (WB). The characteristics of the screening and confirmatory tests were analyzed, including the band patterns, the early detection performance and the false-positive rates. In total, 561 of the 665 patients were confirmed as having HIV-1 infection, and no HIV-2 specific band was observed. Among these 561 WB-positive cases, reactivity to greater than or equal to 9 antigens was the most commonly observed pattern (83.18%), and the absence of reactivity to p17, p31 and gp41 was detected in 6.44%, 5.9% and 2.86% of the cases, respectively. Two cases were positive by the 4th-generation assay but negative by the 3rd-generation assay for HIV screening and had seroconversion. The false-positive rate of the Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo (22.01%) was significantly higher than those of WanTai (9.88%), XinChuang (10.87%) and Livzon (8.93%), pHIV infection in Xi'an is mainly caused by HIV-1, and individuals are rarely identified at the early phase. Although the false-positive rate of the 4th-generation assay was higher than that of the 3rd-generation assay, it is still recommended for use as the initial HIV screening test for high-risk individuals. In Xi'an, a 3rd-generation assay for screening could be considered.

  4. The characteristics of screening and confirmatory test results for HIV in Xi'an, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linchuan Wang

    Full Text Available Individuals with recent or acute HIV infection are more infectious than those with established infection. Our objective was to analyze the characteristics of detection among HIV infections in Xi'an.A 4th-generation kit (Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo and three 3rd-generationEIA kits (WanTai, XinChuang and Livzon were used for HIV screening. Overall, 665 individuals were identified as positive and were tested by western blotting (WB. The characteristics of the screening and confirmatory tests were analyzed, including the band patterns, the early detection performance and the false-positive rates.In total, 561 of the 665 patients were confirmed as having HIV-1 infection, and no HIV-2 specific band was observed. Among these 561 WB-positive cases, reactivity to greater than or equal to 9 antigens was the most commonly observed pattern (83.18%, and the absence of reactivity to p17, p31 and gp41 was detected in 6.44%, 5.9% and 2.86% of the cases, respectively. Two cases were positive by the 4th-generation assay but negative by the 3rd-generation assay for HIV screening and had seroconversion. The false-positive rate of the Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo (22.01% was significantly higher than those of WanTai (9.88%, XinChuang (10.87% and Livzon (8.93%, p<0.05.HIV infection in Xi'an is mainly caused by HIV-1, and individuals are rarely identified at the early phase. Although the false-positive rate of the 4th-generation assay was higher than that of the 3rd-generation assay, it is still recommended for use as the initial HIV screening test for high-risk individuals. In Xi'an, a 3rd-generation assay for screening could be considered.

  5. Radon assay for SNO+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumleskie, Janet [Laurentian University, Greater Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  6. Valutazione di un test per la determinazione simultanea degli anticorpi e antigene p24 dell’HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Zanchetta

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A fourth generation immunoassay for the detection of antibodies to HIV-1 and HIV-2 and of HIV antigen p24 (Abbott Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo has been evaluated in comparison with two Ab-only third generation assays on 894 routine specimens and on preselected repository specimens.The Combo assay showed a better specificity (99.88% vs. 99.43-99.83% and an analytical sensitivity for p24 of 22 pg/mL on a BBI commercial panel. The Architect assays gave a negative result on 22/24 repository false positive specimens from 18 subjects and, conversely, was positive on all the 39 repository specimens from 24 HIV-positive patients. On six patients with acute HIV infection the Architect assay gave an earlier positivity than the antibody-only assays (EIA and WB on three cases, all viremic and positive for HIV p24.The performance characteristics of the new HIV Combo assay guarantee an advanced clinical sensitivity and a high specificity.

  7. Performance Characteristics of the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and the Opengene DNA Sequencing System

    OpenAIRE

    Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Grant, Robert M.; Feorino, Paul; Griswold, Marshal; Hoover, Marie; Young, Russell; DAY, Stephen; Lloyd, Jr., Robert M.; Reid, Caroline; Morgan, Gillian F.; Winslow, Dean L.

    2003-01-01

    The TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit and OpenGene DNA Sequencing System are designed to sequence the protease (PR)- and reverse transcriptase (RT)-coding regions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pol. Studies were undertaken to determine the accuracy of this assay system in detecting resistance-associated mutations and to determine the effects of RNA extraction methods, anticoagulants, specimen handling, and potentially interfering substances. Samples were plasma obtained from HIV-in...

  8. Anti-HIV-1 Activity of Eight Monofloral Iranian Honey Types

    OpenAIRE

    Mandana Behbahani

    2014-01-01

    Monofloral Iranian honeys from eight floral sources were analyzed to determine their anti-HIV-1 activities as well as their effects on lymphocyte proliferation. The Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) used in this study were prepared from five healthy volunteers who were seronegative for HIV, HCV, HBV and TB. The anti-HIV-1 activity of eight different honeys was performed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and high pure viral nucleic acid kit. The results demonstrate...

  9. Progress Toward HIV Eradication: Case Reports, Current Efforts, and the Challenges Associated with Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Alyssa R; Siliciano, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    An estimated 35 million people worldwide are infected with HIV, yet a widely applicable cure strategy remains elusive. Recent case reports have suggested that curing HIV infection is possible, renewing excitement about research efforts. We describe those cases and discuss their relevance to the global HIV epidemic. We also review ongoing cure strategies that are transitioning from the lab to the clinic, and the assays and clinical assessments that can be used to evaluate cure interventions.

  10. Astrocytes Resist HIV-1 Fusion but Engulf Infected Macrophage Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A. Russell

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 disseminates to diverse tissues and establishes long-lived viral reservoirs. These reservoirs include the CNS, in which macrophage-lineage cells, and as suggested by many studies, astrocytes, may be infected. Here, we have investigated astrocyte infection by HIV-1. We confirm that astrocytes trap and internalize HIV-1 particles for subsequent release but find no evidence that these particles infect the cell. Astrocyte infection was not observed by cell-free or cell-to-cell routes using diverse approaches, including luciferase and GFP reporter viruses, fixed and live-cell fusion assays, multispectral flow cytometry, and super-resolution imaging. By contrast, we observed intimate interactions between HIV-1-infected macrophages and astrocytes leading to signals that might be mistaken for astrocyte infection using less stringent approaches. These results have implications for HIV-1 infection of the CNS, viral reservoir formation, and antiretroviral therapy.

  11. FAITH – Fast Assembly Inhibitor Test for HIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadravová, Romana [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry IOCB Research Centre & Gilead Sciences, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo nám. 2, 166 10 Prague (Czech Republic); Rumlová, Michaela, E-mail: michaela.rumlova@vscht.cz [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry IOCB Research Centre & Gilead Sciences, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo nám. 2, 166 10 Prague (Czech Republic); Department of Biotechnology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Ruml, Tomáš, E-mail: tomas.ruml@vscht.cz [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Technická 3, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    Due to the high number of drug-resistant HIV-1 mutants generated by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), there is continuing demand for new types of inhibitors. Both the assembly of the Gag polyprotein into immature and mature HIV-1 particles are attractive candidates for the blocking of the retroviral life cycle. Currently, no therapeutically-used assembly inhibitor is available. One possible explanation is the lack of a reliable and simple assembly inhibitor screening method. To identify compounds potentially inhibiting the formation of both types of HIV-1 particles, we developed a new fluorescent high-throughput screening assay. This assay is based on the quantification of the assembly efficiency in vitro in a 96-well plate format. The key components of the assay are HIV-1 Gag-derived proteins and a dual-labelled oligonucleotide, which emits fluorescence only when the assembly of retroviral particles is inhibited. The method was validated using three (CAI, BM2, PF74) reported assembly inhibitors. - Highlights: • Allows screening of assembly inhibitors of both mature and immature HIV-1 particles. • Based on Gag-derived proteins with CA in mature or immature conformation. • Simple and sensitive method suitable for high-throughput screening of inhibitors. • Unlike in other HIV assembly methods, works under physiological conditions. • No washing steps are necessary.

  12. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and the disease it causes (AIDS) are often linked and referred to as "HIV/AIDS." HIV can ... HIV Related? Drug misuse and addiction have been linked with HIV/AIDS since the beginning of the ...

  13. Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Policy The Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic The Global HIV/AIDS Epidemic Published: Nov 29, 2017 Facebook Twitter ... 2001-FY 2018 Request The Global Response to HIV/AIDS International efforts to combat HIV began in ...

  14. HIV / AIDS: An Unequal Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV / AIDS: An Unequal Burden Past Issues / Summer 2009 ... high-risk category, emphasizes Dr. Cargill. Photo: iStock HIV and Pregnancy Are there ways to help HIV- ...

  15. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors associated with ... Send the Message . Get the Facts What are HIV and AIDS? HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is the ...

  16. HIV/AIDS in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It harms your immune system by destroying the white blood cells ... It is the final stage of infection with HIV. Not everyone with HIV develops AIDS. HIV often ...

  17. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Projects » Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 – ... and to help us Send the Message . Get the Facts What are HIV and AIDS? HIV (human ...

  18. Serodiagnostic profiles of HIV and HIV pathogenesis in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, J.; Lange, J. M.; Smit, L.; Bakker, M.; Klaver, B.; Danner, S. A.; Coutinho, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    Different stages of HIV infection are marked by expression of HIV genes, production of HIV antibodies, formation of antigen/antibody complexes and clearance of such complexes. Transient HIV antigenemia appearing generally 6-8 weeks prior to HIV antibody (HIV-Ab) seroconversion and lasting 3-4 months

  19. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTICS OF TUBERCULOSIS AND MYCOBACTERIOSIS IN HIV PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Panteleev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the differences in clinical and laboratory manifestations of tuberculosis and mycobacteriosis in HIV patients. It was found out that mycobacteriosis developed mostly in the socially well patients at the advanced stages of HIV infection. In case of mycobacteriosis, lesions were mostly located in the abdomen with limited inflammation in the chest, while in case of tuberculosis pulmonary lesions dominated. A negative result of sputum PCR assays for tuberculosis mycobacteria with a positive result of the test for AFB is an important sign for differential diagnostics. The obtained results allow performing differential diagnostics of these diseases in those HIV infected.

  20. Acute HIV-1 Infection in Antigen/Antibody-negative Blood Donors in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute HIV-1 Infection in Antigen/Antibody-negative Blood Donors in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ... Fourth generation human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen (Ag)/antibody (Ab) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test used in the current screening of blood donors at the National Blood Transfusion Service ...

  1. Prevalence of recent and long-established HIV-1 infections among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV enzyme immunoassay [AxSYM HIV1/2gO Avidity Index (AI) assay] to discriminate between recent and long established. AI of ≤ 0.80 indicated recent infection. Results: The prevalence of recent infection was 11%. Age and sex were not ...

  2. Anti-HIV Effect of Liposomes Bearing CXCR4 Receptor Antagonist ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate lymphatic system targeting and inhibitory ability of N15P nano-liposomal preparation (naLipo-N15P) of CXCR4 receptor antagonist in HIV infection. Methods: Chemotactic and chemotaxic inhibition activity assays were used to analyze the biological activity of naLipo-N15P. The anti-HIV potential of ...

  3. Potent functional antibody responses elicited by HIV-I DNA priming and boosting with heterologous HIV-1 recombinant MVA in healthy Tanzanian adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agricola Joachim

    Full Text Available Vaccine-induced HIV antibodies were evaluated in serum samples collected from healthy Tanzanian volunteers participating in a phase I/II placebo-controlled double blind trial using multi-clade, multigene HIV-DNA priming and recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (HIV-MVA virus boosting (HIVIS03. The HIV-DNA vaccine contained plasmids expressing HIV-1 gp160 subtypes A, B, C, Rev B, Gag A, B and RTmut B, and the recombinant HIV-MVA boost expressed CRF01_AE HIV-1 Env subtype E and Gag-Pol subtype A. While no neutralizing antibodies were detected using pseudoviruses in the TZM-bl cell assay, this prime-boost vaccination induced neutralizing antibodies in 83% of HIVIS03 vaccinees when a peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC assay using luciferase reporter-infectious molecular clones (LucR-IMC was employed. The serum neutralizing activity was significantly (but not completely reduced upon depletion of natural killer (NK cells from PBMC (p=0.006, indicating a role for antibody-mediated Fcγ-receptor function. High levels of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC-mediating antibodies against CRF01_AE and/or subtype B were subsequently demonstrated in 97% of the sera of vaccinees. The magnitude of ADCC-mediating antibodies against CM235 CRF01_AE IMC-infected cells correlated with neutralizing antibodies against CM235 in the IMC/PBMC assay. In conclusion, HIV-DNA priming, followed by two HIV-MVA boosts elicited potent ADCC responses in a high proportion of Tanzanian vaccinees. Our findings highlight the potential of HIV-DNA prime HIV-MVA boost vaccines for induction of functional antibody responses and suggest this vaccine regimen and ADCC studies as potentially important new avenues in HIV vaccine development.Controlled-Trials ISRCTN90053831 The Pan African Clinical Trials Registry ATMR2009040001075080 (currently PACTR2009040001075080.

  4. Marcadores virológicos no convencionales en pacientes infectados con el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana: ADN HIV-T, ADN HIV- 2LTR y ARN de HIV Non conventional virological markers in HIV-infected patients: T-HIV DNA, 2LTR-HIV DNA and HIV RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Gariglio

    2004-10-01

    study, we analyzed the presence of total HIV DNA (T-HIV DNA, non-integrated DNA with 2LTR (2LTR-HIV DNA and HIV RNA in a group of 55 HIV-positive subjects from Rosario City, with different clinical stages, with and without HAART. All markers were evaluated by PCR assays optimized in our laboratory that included colorimetric detection in microplate. HIV RNA clinical sensitivity was compared with a reference test, bDNA, resulting in 74% and 64% respectively, with an 85% of agreement. Thus, our HIV RNA assay could be used to monitor patients under HAART and at risk of infection. The 2LTR-HIV DNA was 54% positive although it was absent in patients with high VL. This marker was considered a labile product therefore its presence was associated with recent infection. However, current evidences question its stability. Thus, its clinical significance should be reconsidered. The absence of 2LTR-HIV DNA in patients with detectable VL may relate to the heterogeneity of the sequence used for its detection. T-HIV DNA was present in 100% of the samples and could be a relevant remission marker when therapies that effectively eradicate the infection became available.

  5. Comparative Performance of Electrochemiluminescence Immunoassay and EIA for HIV Screening in a Multiethnic Region of China

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaohui Bi; Hongxia Ning; Tingting Wang; Dongdong Li; Yongming Liu; Tingfu Yang; Jiansheng Yu; Chuanmin Tao

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The recent approval of 4th generation HIV tests has forced many laboratories to decide whether to shift from 3rd to these tests. There are limited published studies on the comparative evaluation of these two different assays. We compare the performance of fourth-generation electrochemiluminescence immunoassay (ChIA) and third-generation enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) screening and gauge whether the shift from EIA to ChIA could be bet...

  6. Heterogeneity of HIV-1 replication in ectocervical and vaginal tissue ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezzutti, Charlene S; Park, Seo Young; Marks, Kenneth; Lawlor, Sidney; Russo, Julie; Macio, Ingrid; Chappell, Catherine; Bunge, Katherine

    2017-10-06

    In clinical trials evaluating HIV-1 prevention products, ex vivo exposure of mucosal tissue to HIV-1 is performed to inform drug levels needed to suppress viral infection. Understanding assay and participant variables that influence HIV-1 replication will help with assay implementation. Demographic and behavioral data were obtained from 61 healthy women aged 21-45. Paired cervical (CT) and vaginal (VT) tissue biopsies were collected and treated with HIV-1BaL or HIV-1JR-CSF, washed, and cultured. On days 3, 7, and/or 11, culture supernatant was collected and viral replication was monitored by p24 ELISA. Tissue was extracted at study end and HIV-1 relative RNA copies were determined by PCR. Cumulative p24 and RNA were log-transformed and analyzed using a linear mixed model, t-test, and an intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). HIV replication was similar between CT and VT for each virus, but HIV-1BaL had 1.5 log10 and 0.9 log10 higher levels of p24 than HIV-1JR-CSF in CT and VT, respectively (p<.001), which correlated with HIV-1 relative RNA copies. Cumulative p24 and RNA copies in both tissues demonstrated low intra-person correlation for both viruses (ICC≤0.513 HIV-1BaL; ICC≤0.419 HIV-1JR-CSF). Enrollment into previous clinical studies in which genital biopsies were collected modestly decreased the HIV-1BaL cumulative p24 for CT, but not for VT. To improve the ex vivo challenge assay, viruses should be evaluated for replication in mucosal tissue prior to study implementation, baseline mucosal tissue is not needed if a placebo/no treatment group is included within the clinical trial, and previous biopsy sites should be avoided.

  7. FDA-Approved HIV Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets FDA-Approved HIV Medicines Search Search ... This Fact Sheet Entire Series Related Content AIDSource | Treatment: Medication FDA Approval of ... | HIV/AIDS Medicines Drugs That Fight HIV-1 HIV and ...

  8. False-negative HIV-1 polymerase chain reaction in a 15-month-old boy with HIV-1 subtype C infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladokun, R; Korsman, S; Ndabambi, N; Hsiao, N; Hans, L; Williamson, C; Abrahams, M-R; Eley, B

    2015-10-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing is the gold standard for determining the HIV status in children HIV-exposed boy referred to our hospital after he had been admitted several times for infectious diseases. A rapid antibody test on the child was positive, while routine diagnostic HIV PCRs using the Roche COBAS Ampliprep/COBAS TaqMan HIV Qual Test were negative at 6 weeks, 6 months, 7 months and 15 months. In addition, the same PCR test performed on the HIV-infected mother was also negative. Alternative PCR and viral load assays using different primer sets detected HIV RNA or proviral DNA in both child and mother. Gag sequences from the child and his mother classified both infections as HIV-1 subtype C, with very rare mutations that may have resulted in PCR assay primer/probe mismatch. Consequently, the child was commenced on antiretroviral therapy and made a remarkable recovery. These findings indicate that more reliable PCR assays capable of detecting a wide range of HIV subtypes are desirable to circumvent the clinical problems created by false-negative PCR results.

  9. FLUIDICS DEVICE FOR ASSAY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for use in performing assays on standard laboratory solid supports whereon chemical entities are attached. The invention furthermore relates to the use of such a device and a kit comprising such a device. The device according to the present invention...... is adapted to receive one or more replaceable solid support(s) (40) onto which chemical entities (41) are attached, said device comprising a base (1, 60, 80, 300, 400, 10, 70, 140, 20, 90, 120, 150, 30, 100), one or more inlet(s) (5), one or more outlet(s) (6). The base and the solid support (40) defines......, when operatively connected, one or more chambers (21) comprising the chemical entities (41), the inlet(s) (5) and outlet(s) (6) and chambers (21) being in fluid connection. The device further comprise means for providing differing chemical conditions in each chamber (21)....

  10. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  11. Survival assays using Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Eun H; Jung, Yoonji; Lee, Seung-Jae V

    2017-02-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is an important model organism with many useful features, including rapid development and aging, easy cultivation, and genetic tractability. Survival assays using C. elegans are powerful methods for studying physiological processes. In this review, we describe diverse types of C. elegans survival assays and discuss the aims, uses, and advantages of specific assays. C. elegans survival assays have played key roles in identifying novel genetic factors that regulate many aspects of animal physiology, such as aging and lifespan, stress response, and immunity against pathogens. Because many genetic factors discovered using C. elegans are evolutionarily conserved, survival assays can provide insights into mechanisms underlying physiological processes in mammals, including humans.

  12. FAITH - Fast Assembly Inhibitor Test for HIV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hadravová, Romana; Rumlová, Michaela; Ruml, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 486, Dec (2015), s. 78-87 ISSN 0042-6822 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-15326S; GA MŠk LO1302; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : retrovirus * HIV * assembly * assay * inhibitor Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.200, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0042682215003864

  13. Cell Proliferation and Cytotoxicity Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adan, Aysun; Kiraz, Yağmur; Baran, Yusuf

    Cell viability is defined as the number of healthy cells in a sample and proliferation of cells is a vital indicator for understanding the mechanisms in action of certain genes, proteins and pathways involved cell survival or death after exposing to toxic agents. Generally, methods used to determine viability are also common for the detection of cell proliferation. Cell cytotoxicity and proliferation assays are generally used for drug screening to detect whether the test molecules have effects on cell proliferation or display direct cytotoxic effects. Regardless of the type of cell-based assay being used, it is important to know how many viable cells are remaining at the end of the experiment. There are a variety of assay methods based on various cell functions such as enzyme activity, cell membrane permeability, cell adherence, ATP production, co-enzyme production, and nucleotide uptake activity. These methods could be basically classified into different categories: (I) dye exclusion methods such as trypan blue dye exclusion assay, (II) methods based on metabolic activity, (III) ATP assay, (IV) sulforhodamine B assay, (V) protease viability marker assay, (VI) clonogenic cell survival assay, (VII) DNA synthesis cell proliferation assays and (V) raman micro-spectroscopy. In order to choose the optimal viability assay, the cell type, applied culture conditions, and the specific questions being asked should be considered in detail. This particular review aims to provide an overview of common cell proliferation and cytotoxicity assays together with their own advantages and disadvantages, their methodologies, comparisons and intended purposes.

  14. Specificity of two HIV screening tests detecting simultaneously HIV-1 p24 antigen and antibodies to HIV-1 and -2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaich, Annette; Buser, Andreas; Stöckle, Marcel; Gehringer, Christian; Hirsch, Hans H; Battegay, Manuel; Klimkait, Thomas; Frei, Reno

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed at assessing the specificity of the Elecsys® HIV combi PT in comparison to the ARCHITECT® HIV Ag/Ab Combo. With both of these assays, 3997 unselected sera from patients of a tertiary health care centre in Basel, Switzerland, were screened for HIV. Reactive sera were reanalysed on the VIDAS® HIV Duo Ultra to identify false-reactive specimens prior to confirmation by quantitative PCR and line immunoassay. The Elecsys® compared to the ARCHITECT® shows a similar specificity (99.7% versus 99.8%) but a slightly lower positive predictive value (71.8% versus 80%). Samples tested with a cut-off index (COI) between 0.91 and 4.85 (cut-off false-reactive. There was no false-reactive result with the VIDAS®. Of the false-reactive samples, 66.7% could be related to patient-specific underlying conditions. The HIV two-tiered diagnostic algorithm proposed in this work improved the positive predictive values of the Elecsys® or ARCHITECT® to 100% when the results of the VIDAS® were included. Values just above the cut-off are highly suspicious to be false-reactive and high COI or S/CO ratios are associated with true positivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. High level of HIV-2 false positivity in KwaZulu-Natal province: a region of South Africa with a very high HIV-1 subtype C prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lavanya; Parboosing, Raveen; Manasa, Justen; Moodley, Pravi; de Oliveira, Tulio

    2013-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 2 (HIV-2) is found predominantly in West Africa. It is not unlikely, however, that HIV-2 may also be found in South Africa, due to the influx of immigrants into this country. It is important to distinguish between HIV-1 and HIV-2 since the clinical courses and treatment responses of these viruses are different. Routine serological methods for diagnosing HIV do not differentiate between HIV-1 and -2 infections, while rapid tests, viral load quantification and PCR are HIV-type--specific. The objective of this study was to describe the seroprevalence and molecular epidemiology of HIV-2 in KwaZulu-Natal, one of the regions with the highest HIV prevalence in the world and home of the two largest harbors in South Africa. HIV-1 positive samples were screened for antibodies against HIV-2, using a rapid test. The confirmation of HIV-2 positive samples was done by PCR. Of the 2,123 samples screened, 319 (15%) were identified as positive by the rapid test. None of these samples were confirmed positive by PCR. To explore this discrepancy in the results, a subset (n = 52) of the rapid HIV-2 positive samples was subjected to Western blotting. Thirty-seven (71%) of these were positive, yielding an overall HIV-2 seroprevalence of 10.6%. Three out of 28 (10.7%) Western blot positive samples were positive by a Pepti-LAV assay. This discrepancy between serological and molecular confirmation may be attributed to non-specific or cross-reacting antibodies. The use of rapid tests and Western blots for HIV-2 diagnosis in South Africa should be interpreted with caution. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Mechanisms of HIV persistence in HIV reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mzingwane, Mayibongwe L; Tiemessen, Caroline T

    2017-03-01

    The establishment and maintenance of HIV reservoirs that lead to persistent viremia in patients on antiretroviral drugs remains the greatest challenge of the highly active antiretroviral therapy era. Cellular reservoirs include resting memory CD4+ T lymphocytes, implicated as the major HIV reservoir, having a half-life of approximately 44 months while this is less than 6 hours for HIV in plasma. In some individuals, persistent viremia consists of invariant HIV clones not detected in circulating resting CD4+ T lymphocytes suggesting other possible sources of residual viremia. Some anatomical reservoirs that may harbor such cells include the brain and the central nervous system, the gastrointestinal tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and other lymphoid organs, and the genital tract. The presence of immune cells and other HIV susceptible cells, occurring in differing compositions in anatomical reservoirs, coupled with variable and poor drug penetration that results in suboptimal drug concentrations in some sites, are all likely factors that fuel the continued low-level replication and persistent viremia during treatment. Latently, HIV-infected CD4+ T cells harboring replication-competent virus, HIV cell-to-cell spread, and HIV-infected T cell homeostatic proliferation due to chronic immune activation represent further drivers of this persistent HIV viremia during highly active antiretroviral therapy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. HIV-1 group O integrase displays lower susceptibility to raltegravir and has a different mutational pathway for resistance than HIV-1 group M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnès Depatureaux

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV-1 group O (HIV-O is a rare HIV-1 variant characterized by a high number of polymorphisms, especially in the integrase gene, e.g. positions L74I, S153A, G163Q and T206S. As HIV-O integrase enzymes have not previously been studied, our aim was to assess the impact of HIV-O integrase polymorphisms on susceptibility to integrase inhibitors and emergence of resistance associated mutations. Viruses and Methods: We cloned and purified integrase proteins from each of HIV-1 Group O clades A (HIV-O/A and B (HIV-O/B, a HIV-O divergent strain (HIV-O/Div, and HIV-1 group M (subtype B, HIV-M/B and characterized these enzymes for susceptibility to integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs in cell-free assays and in tissue culture, in the absence or presence of varying concentrations of several INSTIs. The inhibition constant (Ki and IC50 were calculated and compared for HIV-M and HIV-O integrases. Selections for resistance-related mutations were performed using cord blood mononuclear cells and increasing concentration of INSTIs. Results: HIV-O integrase and viruses were more susceptible to raltegravir (RAL in competitive inhibition assays and in tissue culture than were HIV-M enzymes and viruses, respectively. During selection, we observed different pathways of resistance depending on the drug and clade. Mutations selected in HIV-O can be classified as follows: (1 mutations described for HIV-M such as T97A, Q148R, V151A/I (RAL, T66I, E92Q, E157Q (EVG and M50I, R263K (DTG and (2 signature mutations for HIV-O (i.e. not described in HIV-M F121C (HIV-O/B for RAL, V75I (HIV-O/A for RAL and S153V (HIV-O/A for DTG. Only the HIV-O/Div selected the Q148R mutation for RAL and R263K+M50I for DTG, as previously described for HIV-M. None of the HIV-O viruses selected either N155H or Y143C. The selection of the specific S153V mutation could be explained at the nucleotide level: HIV-O at this position contains an alanine and substitution of alanine to

  18. Evaluation of the IMMULITE® 2000 CMV IgM assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Tricia A; Armstrong, Glenn; Han, Xiang Y

    2012-02-29

    Diagnosis of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is challenging because of the high rate of asymptomatic infection and the low specificity of associated symptoms and signs. As a result, laboratory testing is an essential aid in making an accurate diagnosis. The presence of CMV IgM is indicative of primary CMV infection. In pregnancy, diagnosis of primary infection is important because primary maternal infection increases fetal infection risk substantially. Fetal infection can result in serious sequelae ranging from neurological deficits to death. Diagnosis among the immunocompromised is also critical for the timely initiation of therapy that can reduce morbidity and mortality risk. The IMMULITE® 2000 CMV IgM assay qualitatively detects CMV IgM antibodies in human serum or plasma to aid in the diagnosis of current or recent CMV infection. To determine expected values in apparently healthy subjects, 136 samples were tested. Reproducibility, normal range, and method comparison studies were also performed to evaluate the assay's performance. The assay's reproducibility was evaluated across three sites. Seven hundred and eighteen (n = 718) individual patient serum samples, which included samples from CMV IgM-positive (n = 109, determined by the Abbott IMx CMV or the Diamedix CMV IgM assays), pregnant (n = 210), HIV-positive (n = 30), immunosuppressed (n = 102), and transplant patients (n = 17) and from patients with potentially cross-reacting conditions (n = 136) were evaluated in the method comparison study. The positive, negative, and overall agreement between the IMMULITE 2000 CMV IgM assay and the VIDAS CMV IgM assay (predicate assay) were determined. The assay demonstrated excellent reproducibility with a total CV of less than 10%. The positive, negative, and overall agreement between the IMMULITE 2000 assay and the VIDAS assay were > 95% for the method comparison samples. Among potentially cross-reactive samples, the overall agreement between the two assays was 96

  19. Neoflavonoids as Inhibitors of HIV-1 Replication by Targeting the Tat and NF-κB Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionisio A. Olmedo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-eight neoflavonoids have been prepared and evaluated in vitro against HIV-1. Antiviral activity was assessed on MT-2 cells infected with viral clones carrying the luciferase reporter gene. Inhibition of HIV transcription and Tat function were tested on cells stably transfected with the HIV-LTR and Tat protein. Seven 4-phenylchromen-2-one derivatives showed HIV transcriptional inhibitory activity but only the phenylchrome-2-one 10 inhibited NF-κB and displayed anti-Tat activity simultaneously. Compounds 10, 14, and 25, inhibited HIV replication in both targets at concentrations <25 μM. The assays of these synthetic 4-phenylchromen-2-ones may aid in the investigation of some aspects of the anti-HIV activity of such compounds and could serve as a scaffold for designing better anti-HIV compounds, which may lead to a potential anti-HIV therapeutic drug.

  20. Performance of a Rapid and Simple HIV Testing Algorithm in a Multicenter Phase III Microbicide Clinical Trial▿

    OpenAIRE

    Crucitti, Tania; Taylor, Doug; Beelaert, Greet; Fransen, Katrien; Van Damme, Lut

    2011-01-01

    A multitest sequential algorithm based on rapid and simple (R/S) assays was applied for the diagnosis of HIV infection among participants in a phase 3 microbicide effectiveness trial. HIV testing was performed on finger-prick blood samples obtained from patients after their enrollment in the trial. The specimens were tested in a serial procedure using three different rapid tests (Determine HIV-1/2 [Abbott], SD Bioline HIV-1/2 3.0 [Standard Diagnostics], and Uni-Gold HIV [Trinity Biotech]). In...

  1. Using Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP to Reduce Viral Load Assay Cost.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M Berry

    Full Text Available Viral load (VL measurements are critical to the proper management of HIV in developing countries. However, access to VL assays is limited by the high cost and complexity of existing assays. While there is a need for low cost VL assays, performance must not be compromised. Thus, new assays must be validated on metrics of limit of detection (LOD, accuracy, and dynamic range. Patient plasma samples from the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda were de-identified and measured using both an existing VL assay (Abbott RealTime HIV-1 and our assay, which combines low cost reagents with a simplified method of RNA isolation termed Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP.71 patient samples with VLs ranging from 3,000,000 copies/mL were used to compare the two methods. We demonstrated equivalent LOD (~50 copies/mL and high accuracy (average difference between methods of 0.08 log, R2 = 0.97. Using expenditures from this trial, we estimate that the cost of the reagents and consumables for this assay to be approximately $5 USD. As cost is a significant barrier to implementation of VL testing, we anticipate that our assay will enhance access to this critical monitoring test in developing countries.

  2. Using Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP) to Reduce Viral Load Assay Cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Scott M; Pezzi, Hannah M; Williams, Eram D; Loeb, Jennifer M; Guckenberger, David J; Lavanway, Alex J; Puchalski, Alice A; Kityo, Cissy M; Mugyenyi, Peter N; Graziano, Franklin M; Beebe, David J

    2015-01-01

    Viral load (VL) measurements are critical to the proper management of HIV in developing countries. However, access to VL assays is limited by the high cost and complexity of existing assays. While there is a need for low cost VL assays, performance must not be compromised. Thus, new assays must be validated on metrics of limit of detection (LOD), accuracy, and dynamic range. Patient plasma samples from the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Uganda were de-identified and measured using both an existing VL assay (Abbott RealTime HIV-1) and our assay, which combines low cost reagents with a simplified method of RNA isolation termed Exclusion-Based Sample Preparation (ESP).71 patient samples with VLs ranging from 3,000,000 copies/mL were used to compare the two methods. We demonstrated equivalent LOD (~50 copies/mL) and high accuracy (average difference between methods of 0.08 log, R2 = 0.97). Using expenditures from this trial, we estimate that the cost of the reagents and consumables for this assay to be approximately $5 USD. As cost is a significant barrier to implementation of VL testing, we anticipate that our assay will enhance access to this critical monitoring test in developing countries.

  3. Adenovirus-based HIV-1 vaccine candidates tested in efficacy trials elicit CD8+ T cells with limited breadth of HIV-1 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Peter J; Cox, Josephine H; Coleman, Adam R; Fernandez, Natalia; Bergin, Philip J; Kopycinski, Jakub T; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttihum, Punnee; de Souza, Mark; Duerr, Ann; Morgan, Cecilia; Gilmour, Jill W

    2016-07-17

    The ability of HIV-1 vaccine candidates MRKAd5, VRC DNA/Ad5 and ALVAC/AIDSVAX to elicit CD8 T cells with direct antiviral function was assessed and compared with HIV-1-infected volunteers. Adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-based regimens MRKAd5 and VRC DNA/Ad5, designed to elicit HIV-1-specific T cells, are immunogenic but failed to prevent infection or impact on viral loads in volunteers infected subsequently. Failure may be due in part to a lack of CD8 T cells with effective antiviral functions. An in-vitro viral inhibition assay tested the ability of bispecific antibody expanded CD8 T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells to inhibit replication of a multiclade panel of HIV-1 isolates in autologous CD4 T cells. HIV-1 proteins recognized by CD8 T cells were assessed by IFNγ enzyme-linked immunospot assay. Ad5-based regimens elicited CD8 T cells that inhibited replication of HIV-1 IIIB isolate with more limited inhibition of other isolates. IIIB isolate Gag and Pol genes have high sequence identities (>96%) to vector HIV-1 gene inserts, and these were the predominant HIV-1 proteins recognized by CD8 T cells. Virus inhibition breadth was greater in antiretroviral naïve HIV-1-infected volunteers naturally controlling viremia (plasma viral load elicited by the ALVAC/AIDSVAX regimen. The Ad5-based regimens, although immunogenic, elicited CD8 T cells with limited HIV-1-inhibition breadth. Effective T-cell-based vaccines should presumably elicit broader HIV-1-inhibition profiles. The viral inhibition assay can be used in vaccine design and to prioritize promising candidates with greater inhibition breadth for further clinical trials.

  4. Continuous-flow protease assay based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirata, J.; Ariese, F.; Gooijer, C.; Irth, H.

    2003-01-01

    A homogeneous continuous-flow assay using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for detection was developed to measure the hydrolysis of HIV Protease Substrate 1 (to which two choromophores, EDANS and DABCYL are covalently attached) by a protease (e.g. Subtilisin Carlsberg) and the influence

  5. Sensitive Cell-Based Assay for Determination of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coreceptor Tropism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Weber, Jan; Vazquez, A. C.; Winner, D.; Gibson, R. M.; Rhea, A. M.; Rose, J. D.; Wylie, D.; Henry, K.; Wright, A.; King, K.; Archer, J.; Poveda, E.; Soriano, V.; Robertson, D. L.; Olivo, P. D.; Arts, E. J.; Quinones-Mateu, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 5 (2013), s. 1517-1527 ISSN 0095-1137 Grant - others:NIH(US) P30 AI036219 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : HIV tropism * phenotypic assay * genotypic prediction * disease progression * CCR5 antagonists * naive patients Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.232, year: 2013

  6. HIV: Treatment and Comorbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Rokx (Casper)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractClinicians worldwide strive to improve HIV care for their patients. Antiretroviral therapy prevents HIV related mortality and is lifelong. A clinical evaluation of these treatment strategies is necessary to identify strategies that may jeopardize treatment effectiveness and patient

  7. HIV and Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV and Opportunistic Infections, Coinfections, and Conditions Home Understanding ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV and Hepatitis B Last Reviewed: July 24, 2017 ...

  8. HIV and Tuberculosis (TB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV and Opportunistic Infections, Coinfections, and Conditions Home Understanding ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV and Tuberculosis (TB) Last Reviewed: July 26, 2017 ...

  9. HIV/AIDS Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Partner Spotlight Awareness Days Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or ... AIDS Get Email Updates on AAA Anonymous Feedback HIV/AIDS Media Infographics Syndicated Content Podcasts Slide Sets ...

  10. Travelers' Health: HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Compartir Chapter 3 - Histoplasmosis Chapter 3 - Influenza HIV Infection Philip J. Peters, John T. Brooks INFECTIOUS AGENT ... skin (see Chapter 8, Health Care Workers ). EPIDEMIOLOGY HIV infection occurs worldwide. As of the end of 2014, ...

  11. HIV Resistance Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 126 HIV Resistance Testing WHAT IS RESISTANCE? HOW DOES RESISTANCE DEVELOP? ... one or more ARVs. This is called transmitted resistance. The more that HIV multiplies, the more mutations ...

  12. Mouth Problems and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS > Mouth Problems and HIV Mouth Problems and HIV Main Content This information is for people who ... fever blisters. Sometimes Yes Prescription pill can reduce healing time and frequency of outbreaks. Click to enlarge ...

  13. Comparative analysis of measures of viral reservoirs in HIV-1 eradication studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Eriksson

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 reservoirs preclude virus eradication in patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. The best characterized reservoir is a small, difficult-to-quantify pool of resting memory CD4(+ T cells carrying latent but replication-competent viral genomes. Because strategies targeting this latent reservoir are now being tested in clinical trials, well-validated high-throughput assays that quantify this reservoir are urgently needed. Here we compare eleven different approaches for quantitating persistent HIV-1 in 30 patients on HAART, using the original viral outgrowth assay for resting CD4(+ T cells carrying inducible, replication-competent viral genomes as a standard for comparison. PCR-based assays for cells containing HIV-1 DNA gave infected cell frequencies at least 2 logs higher than the viral outgrowth assay, even in subjects who started HAART during acute/early infection. This difference may reflect defective viral genomes. The ratio of infected cell frequencies determined by viral outgrowth and PCR-based assays varied dramatically between patients. Although strong correlations with the viral outgrowth assay could not be formally excluded for most assays, correlations achieved statistical significance only for integrated HIV-1 DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and HIV-1 RNA/DNA ratio in rectal CD4(+ T cells. Residual viremia was below the limit of detection in many subjects and did not correlate with the viral outgrowth assays. The dramatic differences in infected cell frequencies and the lack of a precise correlation between culture and PCR-based assays raise the possibility that the successful clearance of latently infected cells may be masked by a larger and variable pool of cells with defective proviruses. These defective proviruses are detected by PCR but may not be affected by reactivation strategies and may not require eradication to accomplish an effective cure. A molecular understanding of the discrepancy

  14. Rapid HIV-1 testing during labor: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulterys, Marc; Jamieson, Denise J; O'Sullivan, Mary Jo; Cohen, Mardge H; Maupin, Robert; Nesheim, Steven; Webber, Mayris P; Van Dyke, Russell; Wiener, Jeffrey; Branson, Bernard M

    2004-07-14

    Timely testing of women in labor with undocumented human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status could enable immediate provision of antiretroviral prophylaxis. To determine the feasibility and acceptance of rapid HIV testing among women in labor and to assess rapid HIV assay performance. The Mother-Infant Rapid Intervention At Delivery (MIRIAD) study implemented 24-hour counseling and voluntary rapid HIV testing for women in labor at 16 US hospitals from November 16, 2001, through November 15, 2003. A rapid HIV-1 antibody test for whole blood was used. Acceptance of HIV testing; sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of the rapid test; time from blood collection to patient notification of results. There were 91,707 visits to the labor and delivery units in the study, 7381 of which were by eligible women without documentation of HIV testing. Of these, 5744 (78%) women were approached for rapid HIV testing and 4849 (84%) consented. HIV-1 test results were positive for 34 women (prevalence = 7/1000). Sensitivity and specificity of the rapid test were 100% and 99.9%, respectively; positive predictive value was 90% compared with 76% for enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Factors independently associated with higher test acceptance included younger age, being black or Hispanic, gestational age less than 32 weeks, and having had no prenatal care. Lower acceptance was associated with being admitted between 4 pm and midnight, particularly on Friday nights, but this may be explained in part by fewer available personnel. Median time from blood collection to patient notification of result was 66 minutes (interquartile range, 45-120 minutes), compared with 28 hours for EIA (PHIV testing is feasible and delivers accurate and timely test results for women in labor. It provides HIV-positive women prompt access to intrapartum and neonatal antiretroviral prophylaxis, proven to reduce perinatal HIV transmission, and may be particularly applicable to higher-risk populations.

  15. Trichomonas vaginalis treatment reduces vaginal HIV-1 shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Patricia; Amedee, Angela; Clark, Rebecca A; Dumestre, Jeanne; Theall, Katherine P; Myers, Leann; Hagensee, Michael E; Farley, Thomas A; Martin, David H

    2009-01-01

    Vaginal HIV-1 shedding has been associated with Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) infection and could play a role in HIV transmission. The purpose of the study was to examine if effective TV treatment reduces the presence of vaginal HIV-1 RNA. TV+ women attending an HIV outpatient clinic in New Orleans, LA, who resolved infection (n = 58) and TV-negative controls (n = 92), matched on antiretroviral therapy (ART) were examined and interviewed at baseline, 1, and 3 months. TV status was tested by culture and the amount of cell free HIV-1 RNA in the vaginal fluids was determined by the Amplicor HIV-1 Monitor ultrasensitive assay. : Most women (81.3%) were black and the mean age was 37.5 (SD 8.7). At baseline, 46.0% had plasma HIV-1 RNA >/=10,000 copies/mL, 26.4% had CD4<200 cells/muL, 54.7% were taking ART, and only 26.0% had detectable HIV-1 RNA in their vaginal fluids. TV-positive women who were effectively treated for TV were less likely to shed HIV vaginally at 3-months post-treatment compared to baseline (R.R. 0.34, 95% CI: 0.12-0.92, P = 0.03), whereas there was no change for TV-negative women. This study provides additional support that reducing TV infection among HIV-positive women may have an impact on the prevention of HIV transmission. Reasons for the delayed treatment effect and the effect on cervical shedding need further investigation.

  16. Assay for calcium channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glossmann, H.; Ferry, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter focuses on biochemical assays for Ca/sup 2 +/-selective channels in electrically excitable membranes which are blocked in electrophysiological and pharmacological experiments by verapamil, 1,4-dihydropyridines, diltiazen (and various other drugs), as well as inorganic di- or trivalent cations. The strategy employed is to use radiolabeled 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives which block calcium channels with ED/sub 50/ values in the nanomolar range. Although tritiated d-cis-diltiazem and verapamil can be used to label calcium channels, the 1,4-dihydropyridines offer numerous advantages. The various sections cover tissue specificity of channel labeling, the complex interactions of divalent cations with the (/sup 3/H)nimodipine-labeled calcium channels, and the allosteric regulation of (/sup 3/H)nimodipine binding by the optically pure enantiomers of phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine calcium channel blockers. A comparison of the properties of different tritiated 1,4-dihydropyridine radioligands and the iodinated channel probe (/sup 125/I)iodipine is given.

  17. Curr Opin HIV AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Zewdie, D.; Cahn, P.; McClure, C; Bataringaya, J.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There is growing recognition that greater investment in research is needed to expand our knowledge and understanding of how to scale up HIV programmes effectively and equitably in the context of weak health systems. Current debates acknowledge that there remains a gap in evidence on how HIV resources can best be managed to contribute to building health system capacity; how to integrate HIV interventions into primary healthcare systems; and how HIV scale-up is affecting othe...

  18. Knowledge, attitudes and practices on HIV/AIDS and prevalence of HIV in the general population of Sucre, Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terán Calderón, Carolina; Gorena Urizar, Dorian; González Blázquez, Cristina; Alejos Ferreras, Belén; Ramírez Rubio, Oriana; Bolumar Montrull, Francisco; Ortiz Rivera, Marta; del Amo Valero, Julia

    2015-01-01

    To analyse knowledge, attitudes and sexual practices on HIV/AIDS, and estimate HIV prevalence among residents of Sucre (Bolivia). Population-based survey of residents aged 15-49 randomly selected during 2008/2009. Blood samples were collected on Whatman-filter paper and tested with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Knowledge on HIV/AIDS, sexual risk practices and discriminatory attitudes against people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) were modelled with multiple logistic regression. Of 1499 subjects, 59% were women. All subjects were HIV-negative. Inadequate knowledge of HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention was observed in 67% and risk factors varied by gender (interaction p-value<0.05). Discriminatory attitudes were displayed by 85% subjects; associated factors were: rural residence, low educational level and low income. Unsafe sex was reported by 10%; risk factors varied by residence area (interaction p-value<0.05). In urban areas, risk factors were male sex, younger age and being in common-law union. Prevalence of HIV infection is very low and unsafe sex is relatively uncommon. Inadequate knowledge on HIV/AIDS and discriminatory attitudes towards PLWHA are extremely high and are associated to gender, ethnic and economic inequalities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative biochemical analysis of recombinant reverse transcriptase enzymes of HIV-1 subtype B and subtype C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisi Daniella

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 subtype C infections account for over half of global HIV infections, yet the vast focus of HIV-1 research has been on subtype B viruses which represent less than 12% of the global pandemic. Since HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT is a major target of antiviral therapy, and since differential drug resistance pathways have been observed among different HIV subtypes, it is important to study and compare the enzymatic activities of HIV-1 RT derived from each of subtypes B and C as well as to determine the susceptibilities of these enzymes to various RT inhibitors in biochemical assays. Methods Recombinant subtype B and C HIV-1 RTs in heterodimeric form were purified from Escherichia coli and enzyme activities were compared in cell-free assays. The efficiency of (- ssDNA synthesis was measured using gel-based assays with HIV-1 PBS RNA template and tRNA3Lys as primer. Processivity was assayed under single-cycle conditions using both homopolymeric and heteropolymeric RNA templates. Intrinsic RNase H activity was compared using 5'-end labeled RNA template annealed to 3'-end recessed DNA primer in a time course study in the presence and absence of a heparin trap. A mis-incorporation assay was used to assess the fidelity of the two RT enzymes. Drug susceptibility assays were performed both in cell-free assays using recombinant enzymes and in cell culture phenotyping assays. Results The comparative biochemical analyses of recombinant subtype B and subtype C HIV-1 reverse transcriptase indicate that the two enzymes are very similar biochemically in efficiency of tRNA-primed (- ssDNA synthesis, processivity, fidelity and RNase H activity, and that both enzymes show similar susceptibilities to commonly used NRTIs and NNRTIs. Cell culture phenotyping assays confirmed these results. Conclusions Overall enzyme activity and drug susceptibility of HIV-1 subtype C RT are comparable to those of subtype B RT. The use of RT inhibitors (RTIs

  20. HIV protease inhibitor resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, Annemarie M.J.; Fun, Axel; Nijhuis, Monique

    2017-01-01

    HIV protease is pivotal in the viral replication cycle and directs the formation of mature infectious virus particles. The development of highly specific HIV protease inhibitors (PIs), based on thorough understanding of the structure of HIV protease and its substrate, serves as a prime example of

  1. Primaer HIV-infektion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C; Pedersen, B K

    1996-01-01

    , oesophageal candidiasis, meningoencephalitis, rhabdomyolysis and epiglottitis have been reported. The diagnosis of the acute HIV infection syndrome can be established by demonstrating antibodies to HIV or by demonstration of HIV antigen positivity. Detection of virus through culture or PCR may prove...

  2. Thrombocytopenia in HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-06-15

    Jun 15, 2007 ... necessary tests are done initially and the correct treatment started. ... thrombocytopenia is prone to a more rapid acceleration of disease. ... Platelet life span is decreased in HIV-induced idiopathic thrompocytopenic purpura (ITP) and in. HIV patients without ITP. It seems as if HIV stimulates CD5+ cells.

  3. Vaccine-induced HIV seropositivity/reactivity in noninfected HIV vaccine recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Cristine J; Metch, Barbara; Dragavon, Joan; Coombs, Robert W; Baden, Lindsey R

    2010-07-21

    blot result, 92 (10.2%) had a positive Western blot result (displaying an atypical pattern consistent with vaccine product), and 592 (65.7%) had an indeterminate result. Only 8 participants with VISP received a vaccine not containing an envelope insert. The induction of VISP in HIV vaccine recipients is common, especially with vaccines containing both the HIV-1 envelope and group-specific core antigen gene proteins. Development and detection of VISP appear to be associated with the immunogenicity of the vaccine and the EIA assay used.

  4. Inaccurate diagnosis of HIV-1 group M and O is a key challenge for ongoing universal access to antiretroviral treatment and HIV prevention in Cameroon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avelin F Aghokeng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increased access to HIV testing is essential in working towards universal access to HIV prevention and treatment in resource-limited countries. We here evaluated currently used HIV diagnostic tests and algorithms in Cameroon for their ability to correctly identify HIV infections. METHODS: We estimated sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 5 rapid/simple tests, of which 3 were used by the national program, and 2 fourth generation ELISAs. The reference panel included 500 locally collected samples; 187 HIV -1 M, 10 HIV-1 O, 259 HIV negative and 44 HIV indeterminate plasmas. RESULTS: None of the 5 rapid assays and only 1 ELISA reached the current WHO/UNAIDS recommendations on performance of HIV tests of at least 99% sensitivity and 98% specificity. Overall, sensitivities ranged between 94.1% and 100%, while specificities were 88.0% to 98.8%. The combination of all assays generated up to 9% of samples with indeterminate HIV status, because they reacted discordantly with at least one of the different tests. Including HIV indeterminate samples in test efficiency calculations significantly decreased specificities to a range from 77.9% to 98.0%. Finally, two rapid assays failed to detect all HIV-1 group O variants tested, with one rapid test detecting only 2 out of 10 group O specimens. CONCLUSION: In the era of ART scaling-up in Africa, significant proportions of false positive but also false negative results are still observed with HIV screening tests commonly used in Africa, resulting in inadequate treatment and prevention strategies. Depending on tests or algorithms used, up to 6% of HIV-1 M and 80% of HIV-1 O infected patients in Cameroon do not receive ART and adequate counseling to prevent further transmission due to low sensitivities. Also, the use of tests with low specificities could imply inclusion of up to 12% HIV negative people in ART programs and increase budgets in addition to inconveniences

  5. Diagnosi di infezione acuta primaria da HIV in donatore di sangue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Anna Leone

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The early detection of HIV infection is of paramount either to achieve a better blood supply safety and to pose a prompt diagnosis so that to decrease the involuntary spreading of the disease.The fourth generation screening assays, which measure both the levels of the anti-HIV antibodies and the p-24 viral antigen, and mainly the development and widespread usage of the molecular biology tests, which identify the HIV-RNA in the early stage, have further reduced the diagnostic window period.We report a case about an acute primary HIV infection, occurred in a periodic donor, promptly diagnosed by the combined screening assays and the detection of HIV-RNA using molecular tests.

  6. HIV antibodies for treatment of HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, David M.; Koup, Richard A.; Ferrari, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Summary The bar is high to improve on current combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), now highly effective, safe, and simple. However antibodies that bind the HIV envelope are able to uniquely target the virus as it seeks to enter new target cells, or as it is expressed from previously infected cells. Further, the use of antibodies against HIV as a therapeutic may offer advantages. Antibodies can have long half-lives, and are being considered as partners for long-acting antiretrovirals for use in therapy or prevention of HIV infection. Early studies in animal models and in clinical trials suggest that such antibodies can have antiviral activity but, as with small molecule antiretrovirals, the issues of viral escape and resistance will have to be addressed. Most promising, however, are the unique properties of anti-HIV antibodies: the potential ability to opsonize viral particles, to direct antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against actively infected cells, and ultimately the ability to direct the clearance of HIV-infected cells by effector cells of the immune system. These distinctive activities suggest that HIV antibodies and their derivatives may play an important role in the next frontier of HIV therapeutics, the effort to develop treatments that could lead to an HIV cure. PMID:28133794

  7. HIV-1 Fusion Is Blocked through Binding of GB Virus C E2D Peptides to the HIV-1 gp41 Disulfide Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissmann, Kristin; Mueller, Sebastian; Sticht, Heinrich; Jung, Susan; Zou, Peng; Jiang, Shibo; Gross, Andrea; Eichler, Jutta; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Reil, Heide

    2013-01-01

    A strategy for antiviral drug discovery is the elucidation and imitation of viral interference mechanisms. HIV-1 patients benefit from a coinfection with GB Virus C (GBV-C), since HIV-positive individuals with long-term GBV-C viraemia show better survival rates than HIV-1 patients without persisting GBV-C. A direct influence of GBV-C on HIV-1 replication has been shown in coinfection experiments. GBV-C is a human non-pathogenic member of the flaviviridae family that can replicate in T and B cells. Therefore, GBV-C shares partly the same ecological niche with HIV-1. In earlier work we have demonstrated that recombinant glycoprotein E2 of GBV-C and peptides derived from the E2 N-terminus interfere with HIV entry. In this study we investigated the underlying mechanism. Performing a virus-cell fusion assay and temperature-arrested HIV-infection kinetics, we provide evidence that the HIV-inhibitory E2 peptides interfere with late HIV-1 entry steps after the engagement of gp120 with CD4 receptor and coreceptor. Binding and competition experiments revealed that the N-terminal E2 peptides bind to the disulfide loop region of HIV-1 transmembrane protein gp41. In conjunction with computational analyses, we identified sequence similarities between the N-termini of GBV-C E2 and the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120. This similarity appears to enable the GBV-C E2 N-terminus to interact with the HIV-1 gp41 disulfide loop, a crucial domain involved in the gp120-gp41 interface. Furthermore, the results of the present study provide initial proof of concept that peptides targeted to the gp41 disulfide loop are able to inhibit HIV fusion and should inspire the development of this new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. PMID:23349893

  8. HIV-1 fusion is blocked through binding of GB Virus C E2-derived peptides to the HIV-1 gp41 disulfide loop [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Eissmann

    Full Text Available A strategy for antiviral drug discovery is the elucidation and imitation of viral interference mechanisms. HIV-1 patients benefit from a coinfection with GB Virus C (GBV-C, since HIV-positive individuals with long-term GBV-C viraemia show better survival rates than HIV-1 patients without persisting GBV-C. A direct influence of GBV-C on HIV-1 replication has been shown in coinfection experiments. GBV-C is a human non-pathogenic member of the flaviviridae family that can replicate in T and B cells. Therefore, GBV-C shares partly the same ecological niche with HIV-1. In earlier work we have demonstrated that recombinant glycoprotein E2 of GBV-C and peptides derived from the E2 N-terminus interfere with HIV entry. In this study we investigated the underlying mechanism. Performing a virus-cell fusion assay and temperature-arrested HIV-infection kinetics, we provide evidence that the HIV-inhibitory E2 peptides interfere with late HIV-1 entry steps after the engagement of gp120 with CD4 receptor and coreceptor. Binding and competition experiments revealed that the N-terminal E2 peptides bind to the disulfide loop region of HIV-1 transmembrane protein gp41. In conjunction with computational analyses, we identified sequence similarities between the N-termini of GBV-C E2 and the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp120. This similarity appears to enable the GBV-C E2 N-terminus to interact with the HIV-1 gp41 disulfide loop, a crucial domain involved in the gp120-gp41 interface. Furthermore, the results of the present study provide initial proof of concept that peptides targeted to the gp41 disulfide loop are able to inhibit HIV fusion and should inspire the development of this new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors.

  9. Impact of chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma on residual viremia and cellular HIV-1 DNA in patients on suppressive antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillo, Anthony R; Krishnan, Supriya; McMahon, Deborah K; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T; Para, Michael F; Mellors, John W

    2014-01-01

    The first cure of HIV-1 infection was achieved through complex, multimodal therapy including myeloablative chemotherapy, total body irradiation, anti-thymocyte globulin, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a CCR5 delta32 homozygous donor. The contributions of each component of this therapy to HIV-1 eradication are unclear. To assess the impact of cytotoxic chemotherapy alone on HIV-1 persistence, we longitudinally evaluated low-level plasma viremia and HIV-1 DNA in PBMC from patients in the ACTG A5001/ALLRT cohort on suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) who underwent chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma without interrupting ART. Plasma HIV-1 RNA, total HIV-1 DNA and 2-LTR circles (2-LTRs) in PBMC were measured using sensitive qPCR assays. In the 9 patients who received moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma with uninterrupted ART, low-level plasma HIV-1 RNA did not change significantly with chemotherapy: median HIV-1 RNA was 1 copy/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 20) pre-chemotherapy versus 4 copies/mL (interquartile range: 1.0 to 7.0) post-chemotherapy. HIV-1 DNA levels also did not change significantly, with median pre-chemotherapy HIV-1 DNA of 355 copies/106 CD4+ cells versus 228 copies/106 CD4+ cells post-chemotherapy. 2-LTRs were detectable in 2 of 9 patients pre-chemotherapy and in 3 of 9 patients post-chemotherapy. In summary, moderately intensive chemotherapy for HIV-1 related lymphoma in the context of continuous ART did not have a prolonged impact on HIV-1 persistence. Clinical trials registration unique identifier: NCT00001137.

  10. Dysregulation of macrophage-secreted cathepsin B contributes to HIV-1-linked neuronal apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eillen J Rodriguez-Franco

    Full Text Available Chronic HIV infection leads to the development of cognitive impairments, designated as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND. The secretion of soluble neurotoxic factors by HIV-infected macrophages plays a central role in the neuronal dysfunction and cell death associated with HAND. One potentially neurotoxic protein secreted by HIV-1 infected macrophages is cathepsin B. To explore the potential role of cathepsin B in neuronal cell death after HIV infection, we cultured HIV-1(ADA infected human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM and assayed them for expression and activity of cathepsin B and its inhibitors, cystatins B and C. The neurotoxic activity of the secreted cathepsin B was determined by incubating cells from the neuronal cell line SK-N-SH with MDM conditioned media (MCM from HIV-1 infected cultures. We found that HIV-1 infected MDM secreted significantly higher levels of cathepsin B than did uninfected cells. Moreover, the activity of secreted cathepsin B was significantly increased in HIV-infected MDM at the peak of viral production. Incubation of neuronal cells with supernatants from HIV-infected MDM resulted in a significant increase in the numbers of apoptotic neurons, and this increase was reversed by the addition of either the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074 or a monoclonal antibody to cathepsin B. In situ proximity ligation assays indicated that the increased neurotoxic activity of the cathepsin B secreted by HIV-infected MDM resulted from decreased interactions between the enzyme and its inhibitors, cystatins B and C. Furthermore, preliminary in vivo studies of human post-mortem brain tissue suggested an upregulation of cathepsin B immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and basal ganglia in individuals with HAND. Our results demonstrate that HIV-1 infection upregulates cathepsin B in macrophages, increases cathepsin B activity, and reduces cystatin-cathepsin interactions, contributing to neuronal apoptosis. These findings

  11. A Robust PCR Protocol for HIV Drug Resistance Testing on Low-Level Viremia Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of drug resistance (DR mutations in people with HIV-1 infection, particularly those with low-level viremia (LLV, supports the need to improve the sensitivity of amplification methods for HIV DR genotyping in order to optimize antiretroviral regimen and facilitate HIV-1 DR surveillance and relevant research. Here we report on a fully validated PCR-based protocol that achieves consistent amplification of the protease (PR and reverse transcriptase (RT regions of HIV-1 pol gene across many HIV-1 subtypes from LLV plasma samples. HIV-spiked plasma samples from the External Quality Assurance Program Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL, covering various HIV-1 subtypes, as well as clinical specimens were used to optimize and validate the protocol. Our results demonstrate that this protocol has a broad HIV-1 subtype coverage and viral load span with high sensitivity and reproducibility. Moreover, the protocol is robust even when plasma sample volumes are limited, the HIV viral load is unknown, and/or the HIV subtype is undetermined. Thus, the protocol is applicable for the initial amplification of the HIV-1 PR and RT genes required for subsequent genotypic DR assays.

  12. [Screening of HIV in blood banks. Evaluation of fourth generation kits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canna, Fernando; Treviño, Elena; Domínguez, Claudia; Gastaldello, Rene; Barbas, Gabriela; Cudola, Analia; Irizar, Marta; Bepre, Hector; Gallego, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    Use of detection tests for p24 HIV antigen (p24Ag) in blood banks in Argentina is recommended by the Argentinean Society of Hemotherapy and Immunohematology. In the blood bank of the National University of Cordoba (Argentina), the recent implementation of the p24Ag screening test has considerably increased the cost of the battery of screening tests and its use in all blood donations has not produced the benefits expected. A 4th generation EIA was evaluated for the screening of HIV in comparison with the currently used assays in the blood bank of National University of Cordoba (3rd generation EIA + p24Ag assay). For this comparison, 11 serum samples from subjects with early HIV infection (early seroconversion period) were tested, as well as 27 serum samples from asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects and other 39 from non-HIV infected subjects. The 3rd generation EIA and the 4th generation EIA showed the same sensitivity value (100%) but the specificity of the 3rd generation EIA was higher (97.5%) comparing with 4th generation (95.1%). Besides, the p24Ag test failed to detect 2 samples from subjects with early HIV infection. These results indicate a good performance of both 3rd and 4th generation assays for screening of HIV. However, due to the lowest cost of 4th generation EIA kit, it could replace the currently used assays for HIV screening in regional blood banks. This screening assay will lead to gain in effectiveness and reduced costs until the detection of HIV RNA can be implemented in blood banks.

  13. Reactivity of routine HIV antibody tests in children who initiated antiretroviral therapy in early infancy as part of the Children with HIV Early Antiretroviral Therapy (CHER) trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, H; Mkhize, NN; Otwombe, K; Lewis, J; Panchia, R; Callard, R; Morris, L; Babiker, A; Violari, A; Cotton, MF; Klein, N; Gibb, DM

    2015-01-01

    Background Early ART and virological suppression may impact on evolving antibody responses to HIV-infection. We evaluated frequency and predictors of seronegativity in infants starting early ART. Methods HIV-antibody results were compared between two of three arms of the Children with HIV Early Antiretroviral Therapy (CHER) trial: HIV-infected infants aged HIV-infection was diagnosed by DNA PCR and RNA >1000 copies/ml. ART started at median age 7 and 23 weeks respectively. Antibody was measured from all available stored samples, ART-96W (n=109) and ART-Def (n=75), at trial week 84 (median age 92 (IQR 90.6–93.4) weeks) using 3 assays: 4th generation EIA HIV-antigen/antibody combination; HIV-1/2 rapid-antibody test and quantitative anti-gp120 IgG ELISA. Findings More ART-96W were seronegative than ART-Def by EIA (46% versus 11%, ptest (53% versus 14%, p24 weeks were seropositive. Cumulative viral load to week 84 correlated with anti-gp120 IgG levels (coefficient=0.54, pHIV-seronegative by at aged ∼2 years. HIV-antibody tests cannot be used to re-confirm HIV-diagnosis in children starting early-ART. Long-term consequences of seronegativity need further study. Funding Wellcome Trust, Medical Research Council, National Institutes of Health. PMID:26043884

  14. Inter-laboratory assessment of a prototype multiplex kit for determination of recent HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A Curtis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate and reliable laboratory-based assays are needed for estimating HIV-1 incidence from cross-sectional samples. We recently described the development of a customized, HIV-1-specific Bio-Plex assay that allows for the measurement of HIV-specific antibody levels and avidity to multiple analytes for improved HIV-1 incidence estimates. METHODS: To assess intra- and inter-laboratory assay performance, prototype multiplex kits were developed and evaluated by three distinct laboratories. Longitudinal seroconversion specimens were tested in parallel by each laboratory and kit performance was compared to that of an in-house assay. Additionally, the ability of the kit to distinguish recent from long-term HIV-1 infection, as compared to the in-house assay, was determined by comparing the reactivity of known recent (infected 12 months drug naïve specimens. RESULTS: Although the range of reactivity for each analyte varied between the prototype kit and in-house assay, a measurable distinction in reactivity between recent and long-term specimens was observed with both assays in all three laboratories. Additionally, kit performance was consistent between all three laboratories. The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV, between sample replicates for all laboratories, ranged from 0.5% to 6.1%. The inter-laboratory CVs ranged from 8.5% to 21.3% for gp160-avidity index (a and gp120-normalized mean fluorescent intensity (MFI value (n, respectively. CONCLUSION: We demonstrate the feasibility of producing a multiplex kit for measuring HIV antibody levels and avidity, with the potential for improved incidence estimates based on multi-analyte algorithms. The availability of a commercial kit will facilitate the transfer of technology among diverse laboratories for widespread assay use.

  15. Identifying the early post-HIV antibody seroconversion period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Frederick M; Wellman, Robert; Busch, Michael P; Pilcher, Christopher D; Norris, Philip J; Margolick, Joseph B; Collier, Ann C; Little, Susan J; Markowitz, Martin; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Holte, Sarah

    2011-08-15

    Identifying persons with recent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody seroconversion is useful for treatment, research, and prevention, but the sensitivity and specificity of tests for this purpose are uncertain. We used longitudinal specimens panels from 155 persons identified prior to HIV seroconversion to assess antibody-based methods for classifying persons as within 30, 60, or 90 days of seroconversion, including 2 incidence assays, a less-sensitive (LS) enzyme immunoassay (EIA), and the BED assay. Sensitivity and specificity, respectively, for identifying persons within 30 days of seroconversion were: 34%-57% and 98%-100% for 2 standard EIAs (employing a signal-to-cutoff ≤4.0; ≥1.0 defines HIV positive), 84% and 73% for the LS-EIA (≤0.2 cutoff), 88% and 72% for the BED (≤0.2 cutoff), and 43%-58% and 98% (≤3 bands) for 2 Western blot (WB) assays. By area under the receiver operator curves, the best test for identifying persons within 30 days of seroconversion was the number of bands on the Bio-Rad WB (0.90); within 60 days, the LS-EIA and BED (both 0.85); and for persons within 90 days the BED (0.86). Standard EIAs, Western blots, and HIV incidence assays provide useful information for identifying persons 30 to 90 days after seroconversion.

  16. EDITORIAL DIAGNOSIS OF PAEDIATRIC HIV/AIDS The human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other groups are currently assessing some less expensive laboratory approaches such as a boosted p24 antigen assay. Accurately diagnosing early, asymptomatic HIV infection in children remains of utmost importance and is impossible to do clinically. Diagnosing ...

  17. Systematic Review of the Performance of HIV Viral Load Technologies on Plasma Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollis, Kimberly A.; Smit, Pieter W.; Fiscus, Susan; Ford, Nathan; Vitoria, Marco; Essajee, Shaffiq; Barnett, David; Cheng, Ben; Crowe, Suzanne M.; Denny, Thomas; Landay, Alan; Stevens, Wendy; Habiyambere, Vincent; Perrins, Jos; Peeling, Rosanna W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Viral load (VL) monitoring is the standard of care in developing country settings for detecting HIV treatment failure. Since 2010 the World Health Organization has recommended a phase-in approach to VL monitoring in resource-limited settings. We conducted a systematic review of the accuracy and precision of HIV VL technologies for treatment monitoring. Methods and Findings A search of Medline and Embase was conducted for studies evaluating the accuracy or reproducibility of commercially available HIV VL assays. 37 studies were included for review including evaluations of the Amplicor Monitor HIV-1 v1.5 (n = 25), Cobas TaqMan v2.0 (n = 11), Abbott RealTime HIV-1 (n = 23), Versant HIV-1 RNA bDNA 3.0 (n = 15), Versant HIV-1 RNA kPCR 1.0 (n = 2), ExaVir Load v3 (n = 2), and NucliSens EasyQ v2.0 (n = 1). All currently available HIV VL assays are of sufficient sensitivity to detect plasma virus levels at a lower detection limit of 1,000 copies/mL. Bias data comparing the Abbott RealTime HIV-1, TaqMan v2.0 to the Amplicor Monitor v1.5 showed a tendency of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 to under-estimate results while the TaqMan v2.0 overestimated VL counts. Compared to the Amplicor Monitor v1.5, 2–26% and 9–70% of results from the Versant bDNA 3.0 and Abbott RealTime HIV-1 differed by greater than 0.5log10. The average intra and inter-assay variation of the Abbott RealTime HIV-1 were 2.95% (range 2.0–5.1%) and 5.44% (range 1.17–30.00%) across the range of VL counts (2log10–7log10). Conclusions This review found that all currently available HIV VL assays are of sufficient sensitivity to detect plasma VL of 1,000 copies/mL as a threshold to initiate investigations of treatment adherence or possible treatment failure. Sources of variability between VL assays include differences in technology platform, plasma input volume, and ability to detect HIV-1 subtypes. Monitoring of individual patients should be performed on the same

  18. Diet and Nutrition and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with HIV/AIDS: Diet and Nutrition--Entire Lesson HIV/AIDS Menu Menu HIV/AIDS HIV/AIDS Home ... code here Enter ZIP code here Living with HIV/AIDS: Diet and Nutrition--Entire Lesson for Veterans ...

  19. Basic HIV/AIDS Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Center . Expand All Collapse All How many new HIV infections are there each year in the United ...

  20. Serological markers in HIV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, J. M.; Goudsmit, J.; de Wolf, F.; Coutinho, R. A.; van der Noordaa, J.

    1988-01-01

    HIV antigenaemia can be detected at or possibly before the onset of clinical symptoms of primary HIV infection. Approximately one week after the onset of HIV antigenaemia, a primary anti-HIV IgM response may occur. A week later, generally within 3 to 6 weeks after infection, anti-HIV IgG can be

  1. Sulforhodamine B assay and chemosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Wieland

    2005-01-01

    The sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay was developed by Skehan and colleagues to measure drug-induced cytotoxicity and cell proliferation for large-scale drug-screening applications. Its principle is based on the ability of the protein dye sulforhodamine B to bind electrostatically and pH dependent on protein basic amino acid residues of trichloroacetic acid-fixed cells. Under mild acidic conditions it binds to and under mild basic conditions it can be extracted from cells and solubilized for measurement. Results of the SRB assay were linear with cell number and cellular protein measured at cellular densities ranging from 1 to 200% of confluence. Its sensitivity is comparable with that of several fluorescence assays and superior to that of Lowry or Bradford. The signal-to-noise ratio is favorable and the resolution is 1000-2000 cells/well. It performed similarly compared to other cytotoxicity assays such as MTT or clonogenic assay. The SRB assay possesses a colorimetric end point and is nondestructive and indefinitely stable. These practical advances make the SRB assay an appropriate and sensitive assay to measure drug-induced cytotoxicity even at large-scale application.

  2. Evaluation of screening kits for the detection of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and 2 (HIV-1/2) antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, L T; Yang, B S; Chen, J W; Yang, C M; Chou, C C; Li, L; Hung, C M; Tsai, S J; Lin, K S

    1995-08-01

    HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd generation (Abbott), Wellcozyme HIV 1 + 2 (Murex), Enzygnost Anti-HIV 1/-HIV 2 (Behring), and Genelavia Mixt (Sanofi Diagnostics Pasteur) are currently registered by authorities as enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) for detecting HIV-1/2 infection. The present study dissects these reagents by means of the major antigenic components, assay principles and their actual performance. The performances have been evaluated by their test results in international panels of seroconversion, mixed titer performance and HIV-1/2 combination, respectively. Those EIA tests were further used to examine 26 potentially false-reacting samples, serial diluted sera prepared from two confirmed positive specimens and 720 specimens obtained from random blood donors in the Taipei Blood Center, Chinese Blood Services Foundation (CBSF). The results showed that, although standard sera of the mixed titer, performance and HIV-1/2 combination rows could not distinguish significantly among various EIAs, the seroconverting samples clearly showed their differences. The differences, as calculated by using 3 of 4 seroconverting sera, was a backward window period ranging from 19 to 23 days as compared to the detection of HIV-1 antigens. Together, these studies strongly suggest that assays which are capable of detecting HIV-specific IgM and IgG antibodies have a shorter seroconversion window. Furthermore, the HIV-2 antigen seems to be crucial for successful detection of anti-HIV-2. Finally, testing anti-HIV-1/2 in the routine screenings is expected not to increase the exclusion rate of blood units currently acquired from the examination of anti-HIV-1. Consequently, with both HIV-1/2 specificities and the ability of early detection, IgM/IgG-captured EIAs may represent a better screening method than assays based solely on the detection of HIV-specific IgG.

  3. Comparison of HPV DNA testing in cervical exfoliated cells and tissue biopsies among HIV-positive women in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    De Vuyst, Hugo; Chung, Michael H.; Baussano, Iacopo; Mugo, Nelly R.; Tenet, Vanessa; van Kemenade, Folkert J; Rana, Farzana S.; Sakr, Samah R.; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Snijders, Peter J.F.; Franceschi, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    HIV-positive women are infected with human papillomavirus (HPV) (especially with multiple types), and develop cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer more frequently than HIV-negative women. We compared HPV DNA prevalence obtained using a GP5+/6+ PCR assay in cervical exfoliated cells to that in biopsies of 468 HIV-positive women from Nairobi, Kenya. HPV prevalence was higher in cells than biopsies and the difference was greatest in 94 women with a combination normal cyto...

  4. Reliability of testing and potential impact on HIV prevention in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaibo, G N; Donbraye, E; Adewumi, M O; Bakarey, A S; Ibeh, M A; Olaleye, D O

    2006-12-01

    Several factors including variability of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), laboratory facilities, cost and competence of personnel handling the tests are some of the important factors that affect accuracy and reliability of HIV testing in most parts of Africa. Recently investigators in Africa have observed that antibody detection assays based on antigens derived from HIV-1 subtype B show moderate to significantly lower sensitivity for detection of infection by various non-B subtypes. In this study, we evaluated the reliability of two EIA and 12 rapid HIV-1/2 test kits that are commercially available in Nigeria using the Western immunoblotting technique as reference. A panel of 100 sera from Western blot confirmed symptomatic or asymptomatic HIV-1 infected persons and 90 seronegative patients from those referred for testing in our laboratory were used for this study. Each sample was tested with two HIV-1/2 EIA, and 12 HIV-1/2 rapid test kits commercially available at one time or the other for HIV-1/2 testing in Nigeria. Overall, the sensitivity of the two EIA kits were 100% and 91.0% with specificity of 96.7% and 91.1% respectively. The sensitivity of the rapid test kits ranged from 88% to 98.0% with specificity of 92.2% to 100%. Further analysis showed significant variation in the sensitivity and specificity of the same kit based on whether an individual had asymptomatic or symptomatic infection The results of this study highlight the problem of diagnosis of HIV infections in Africa. It shows that the sensitivity of most of the rapid assays shall not be adequate for detection of early infection. The implications of possible misdiagnosis on the various intervention strategies that rely predominantly on correct HIV status of an individual are enormous. Thus, there is an urgent need for review of the current HIV testing assays or algorithms in Nigeria and other parts of Africa.

  5. Field evaluation of the Abbott ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab Combo immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kfutwah, Anfumbom; Lemée, Véronique; Ngono, Hélène Valérie; De Oliveira, Fabienne; Njouom, Richard; Plantier, Jean-Christophe

    2013-12-01

    Fourth generation assays for HIV diagnosis are progressively being introduced into routine services, due to their improvement of diagnosis. In spite of this, HIV diagnosis remains a challenge in sub-Saharan Africa, due to false positive reactivity. There is a continuous need for field evaluations and routine validations of fourth generation HIV tests in African populations. Evaluate the performances of the ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab kit (Abbott) in a population living in an African setting-Cameroon compared to a population living in a European setting-France. 645 HIV samples from both France and Cameroon were evaluated. The positive panel (378 samples) included a diverse series of HIV-1 variants (groups M, N, O, and P) as well as HIV-2 samples. Results were compared to original diagnosis done with other 4th generation assays (AxSYM HIV Ag/Ab (Abbott) and Vidas HIV DUO QUICK) (bioMérieux). Sensitivity of the ARCHITECT was 100% in both sites. It diagnosed all variants of the panel with different reactivity profiles following strain diversity. A wider range of reactivity was observed for group O. Specificity was slightly lower (97.6%) in Cameroon than in France (98.6%), probably due to a higher rate of false positive reactivity. ARCHITECT HIV Ag/Ab assay had high performances in clinical sensitivity and specificity and is adapted to the wide genetic diversity of viruses circulating in West Central Africa. Our results further highlight the need to evaluate HIV diagnostic tests before introduction into routine diagnostic services both in the North and in the South. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Digital Assays Part II: Digital Protein and Cell Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Amar S

    2017-08-01

    A digital assay is one in which the sample is partitioned into many containers such that each partition contains a discrete number of biological entities (0, 1, 2, 3, . . .). A powerful technique in the biologist's toolkit, digital assays bring a new level of precision in quantifying nucleic acids, measuring proteins and their enzymatic activity, and probing single-cell genotype and phenotype. Where part I of this review focused on the fundamentals of partitioning and digital PCR, part II turns its attention to digital protein and cell assays. Digital enzyme assays measure the kinetics of single proteins with enzymatic activity. Digital enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISAs) quantify antigenic proteins with 2 to 3 log lower detection limit than conventional ELISA, making them well suited for low-abundance biomarkers. Digital cell assays probe single-cell genotype and phenotype, including gene expression, intracellular and surface proteins, metabolic activity, cytotoxicity, and transcriptomes (scRNA-seq). These methods exploit partitioning to 1) isolate single cells or proteins, 2) detect their activity via enzymatic amplification, and 3) tag them individually by coencapsulating them with molecular barcodes. When scaled, digital assays reveal stochastic differences between proteins or cells within a population, a key to understanding biological heterogeneity. This review is intended to give a broad perspective to scientists interested in adopting digital assays into their workflows.

  7. Disagreement between Human Papillomavirus Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Preisler, Sarah; Ejegod, Ditte Møller

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the disagreement in primary cervical screening between four human papillomavirus assays: Hybrid Capture 2, cobas, CLART, and APTIMA. Material from 5,064 SurePath samples of women participating in routine cervical screening in Copenhagen, Denmark, was tested with the four...... of considerable disagreement between human papillomavirus assays. This suggested that the extent of disagreement in primary screening is neither population- nor storage media-specific, leaving assay design differences as the most probable cause. The substantially different selection of women testing positive...... on the various human papillomavirus assays represents an unexpected challenge for the choice of an assay in primary cervical screening, and for follow up of in particular HPV positive/cytology normal women....

  8. Cost-effectiveness of a fourth-generation combination immunoassay for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody and p24 antigen for the detection of HIV infections in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragin, Lael; Pan, Feng; Peng, Siyang; Zenilman, Jonathan M; Green, Julia; Doucet, Cynthia; Chalfin, Donald B; de Lissovoy, Greg

    2012-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration recently approved the first 4th-generation HIV test. This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of the 4th-generation assay versus a 3rd-generation test in screening for HIV infections in the United States. An exploratory microsimulation model was developed that follows hypothetical individuals and simulates the course of HIV/AIDS, treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy, and transmissions. With a 1% HIV prevalence, screening 1.5 million individuals with the 4th- versus 3rd-generation assay resulted in detection of 266 additional HIV cases at an incremental cost per additional HIV case detected of $63,763, an additional 489 life years and 395 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and 26 HIV transmissions prevented. Although lifetime costs were increased by $33.6 million, the incremental cost/QALY gained was $85,206. The 4th-generation test was more cost-effective in high incidence settings. The number needed to screen to detect one additional HIV case was 5,635. Screening using the 4th-generation assay may be cost-effective for HIV detection in appropriate settings, resulting in increased case identification, fewer transmissions, extended life, and increased quality of life. With early and accurate detection, this 4th-generation test may provide a suitable alternative to current 3rd-generation tests.

  9. HIV-1 viral DNA load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from seroconverters and long-term infected individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurriaans, S.; Dekker, J. T.; de Ronde, A.

    1992-01-01

    To determine viral DNA load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from HIV-1-infected individuals. HIV-1 copy numbers were determined using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the PCR-aided template titration assay (PATTY). PATTY utilizes an internal plasmid control DNA, which is

  10. Peripheral Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells Are a Novel Reservoir of Latent HIV Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Soriano-Sarabia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Eradication of HIV infection will require the identification of all cellular reservoirs that harbor latent infection. Despite low or lack of CD4 receptor expression on Vδ2 T cells, infection of these cells has previously been reported. We found that upregulation of the CD4 receptor may render primary Vδ2 cells target for HIV infection in vitro and we propose that HIV-induced immune activation may allow infection of γδ T cells in vivo. We assessed the presence of latent HIV infection by measurements of DNA and outgrowth assays within Vδ2 cells in 18 aviremic patients on long-standing antiretroviral therapy. In 14 patients we recovered latent but replication-competent HIV from highly purified Vδ2 cells demonstrating that peripheral Vδ2 T cells are a previously unrecognized reservoir in which latent HIV infection is unexpectedly frequent.

  11. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are HIV and AIDS? HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome). AIDS ... but no cure, at the present time. The virus (HIV) and the disease it causes (AIDS) are ...

  12. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... please visit: https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/hiv-aids-101/statistics/ . Reference Centers for Disease ... About HIV/AIDS. ( https://www.cdc.gov/actagainstaids/basics/whatishiv.html ). Atlanta, GA: CDC, DHHS. Retrieved November ...

  13. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... Education Projects » Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter ... research findings and news updates. Read on to Learn the Link between drug use and HIV and ...

  14. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... public discussions on using new media effectively in response to HIV/AIDS, as well as HIV/AIDS ... HIV/AIDS and the discovery of promising treatment interventions for breaking the harmful links between them, we ...

  15. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... of HIV infection in the United States. Drugs can change the way the brain works, disrupting the ... linked and referred to as "HIV/AIDS." HIV can be transferred between people if an infected person's ...

  16. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... HIV to their babies during pregnancy, delivery, and breastfeeding. HIV destroys a certain kind of white blood ... clinical trials, and other research information for health care providers, researchers, people affected by HIV/AIDS, and ...

  17. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors ... GA: CDC, DHHS. Retrieved June 2012 How are Drug Abuse and HIV Related? Drug abuse and addiction ...

  18. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... the Link - Drugs and HIV Learn the Link - Drugs and HIV Email Facebook Twitter 2005 –Ongoing Behaviors ... GA: CDC, DHHS. Retrieved November 2017. How are Drug Misuse and HIV Related? Drug misuse and addiction ...

  19. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... Misuse and HIV Related? Drug misuse and addiction have been linked with HIV/AIDS since the beginning ... the link between drug misuse and HIV. We have produced a set of multicultural public service announcements ( ...

  20. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... by HIV/AIDS, and the general public. U.S. National Library of Medicine HIV/AIDS Information : Specialized Information Services. VA National HIV/AIDS : This site provides information both for ...

  1. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... between drug abuse and HIV/AIDS. In the early years of the HIV epidemic, it became clear ... HIV/AIDS and the discovery of promising treatment interventions for breaking the harmful links between them, we ...

  2. Women and HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS from other websites National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day Blog topics HIV and AIDS Breaking Down ... t Miss a Beat National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day National Women's Health Week Supporting Nursing Moms ...

  3. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... HIV to their babies during pregnancy, delivery, and breastfeeding. HIV destroys a certain kind of white blood ... brain. Research has shown that HIV causes greater injury to cells in the brain and cognitive impairment ...

  4. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... behavior by altering judgment and decision-making. To learn about HIV among youth, please visit: http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/risk/age/youth/index.html​ . Resources Publications Drug Facts: HIV/ ...

  5. HIV, AIDS, and the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues HIV / AIDS HIV, AIDS, and the Future Past Issues / Summer 2009 ... turn Javascript on. Photo: The NAMES Project Foundation HIV and AIDS are a global catastrophe. While advances ...

  6. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

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    Full Text Available ... access to the latest, federally approved HIV/AIDS medical practice guidelines, HIV treatment and prevention clinical trials, and other research information for health care providers, researchers, people affected by HIV/AIDS, and ...

  7. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... effects of drugs. Drug abuse and addiction can affect a person's overall health, thereby altering susceptibility to HIV and progression of AIDS. Drugs of abuse and HIV both affect the brain. Research has shown that HIV causes ...

  8. HIV tropism and decreased risk of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Hessol

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available During the first two decades of the U.S. AIDS epidemic, and unlike some malignancies, breast cancer risk was significantly lower for women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection compared to the general population. This deficit in HIV-associated breast cancer could not be attributed to differences in survival, immune deficiency, childbearing or other breast cancer risk factors. HIV infects mononuclear immune cells by binding to the CD4 molecule and to CCR5 or CXCR4 chemokine coreceptors. Neoplastic breast cells commonly express CXCR4 but not CCR5. In vitro, binding HIV envelope protein to CXCR4 has been shown to induce apoptosis of neoplastic breast cells. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that breast cancer risk would be lower among women with CXCR4-tropic HIV infection.We conducted a breast cancer nested case-control study among women who participated in the WIHS and HERS HIV cohort studies with longitudinally collected risk factor data and plasma. Cases were HIV-infected women (mean age 46 years who had stored plasma collected within 24 months of breast cancer diagnosis and an HIV viral load≥500 copies/mL. Three HIV-infected control women, without breast cancer, were matched to each case based on age and plasma collection date. CXCR4-tropism was determined by a phenotypic tropism assay. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI for breast cancer were estimated by exact conditional logistic regression. Two (9% of 23 breast cancer cases had CXCR4-tropic HIV, compared to 19 (28% of 69 matched controls. Breast cancer ri