WorldWideScience

Sample records for aspergillus genome database

  1. The Aspergillus Genome Database, a curated comparative genomics resource for gene, protein and sequence information for the Aspergillus research community

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaud, Martha B.; Chibucos, Marcus C; Costanzo, Maria C.; Crabtree, Jonathan; Inglis, Diane O.; Lotia, Adil; Orvis, Joshua; Shah, Prachi; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Binkley, Gail; Miyasato, Stuart R.; Wortman, Jennifer R.; Sherlock, Gavin

    2009-01-01

    The Aspergillus Genome Database (AspGD) is an online genomics resource for researchers studying the genetics and molecular biology of the Aspergilli. AspGD combines high-quality manual curation of the experimental scientific literature examining the genetics and molecular biology of Aspergilli, cutting-edge comparative genomics approaches to iteratively refine and improve structural gene annotations across multiple Aspergillus species, and web-based research tools for accessing and exploring ...

  2. Rat Genome Database (RGD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is a collaborative effort between leading research institutions involved in rat genetic and genomic research to collect, consolidate,...

  3. Aspergillus flavus Blast2GO gene ontology database: elevated growth temperature alters amino acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    The availability of a representative gene ontology (GO) database is a prerequisite for a successful functional genomics study. Using online Blast2GO resources we constructed a GO database of Aspergillus flavus. Of the predicted total 13,485 A. flavus genes 8,987 were annotated with GO terms. The mea...

  4. Comparative Reannotation of 21 Aspergillus Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamov, Asaf; Riley, Robert; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2013-03-08

    We used comparative gene modeling to reannotate 21 Aspergillus genomes. Initial automatic annotation of individual genomes may contain some errors of different nature, e.g. missing genes, incorrect exon-intron structures, 'chimeras', which fuse 2 or more real genes or alternatively splitting some real genes into 2 or more models. The main premise behind the comparative modeling approach is that for closely related genomes most orthologous families have the same conserved gene structure. The algorithm maps all gene models predicted in each individual Aspergillus genome to the other genomes and, for each locus, selects from potentially many competing models, the one which most closely resembles the orthologous genes from other genomes. This procedure is iterated until no further change in gene models is observed. For Aspergillus genomes we predicted in total 4503 new gene models ( ~;;2percent per genome), supported by comparative analysis, additionally correcting ~;;18percent of old gene models. This resulted in a total of 4065 more genes with annotated PFAM domains (~;;3percent increase per genome). Analysis of a few genomes with EST/transcriptomics data shows that the new annotation sets also have a higher number of EST-supported splice sites at exon-intron boundaries.

  5. Clinical Genomic Database

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, Benjamin D.; Nguyen, Anh-Dao; Bear, Kelly A.; Wolfsberg, Tyra G.

    2013-01-01

    Technological advances have greatly increased the availability of human genomic sequencing. However, the capacity to analyze genomic data in a clinically meaningful way lags behind the ability to generate such data. To help address this obstacle, we reviewed all conditions with genetic causes and constructed the Clinical Genomic Database (CGD) (http://research.nhgri.nih.gov/CGD/), a searchable, freely Web-accessible database of conditions based on the clinical utility of genetic diagnosis and...

  6. Genome Statute and Legislation Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Database Welcome to the Genome Statute and Legislation Database The Genome Statute and Legislation Database is comprised ... the National Society of Genetic Counselors . Search the Database Search Tips You may select one or more ...

  7. Genomic Databases for Crop Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Edwards

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Genomics is playing an increasing role in plant breeding and this is accelerating with the rapid advances in genome technology. Translating the vast abundance of data being produced by genome technologies requires the development of custom bioinformatics tools and advanced databases. These range from large generic databases which hold specific data types for a broad range of species, to carefully integrated and curated databases which act as a resource for the improvement of specific crops. In this review, we outline some of the features of plant genome databases, identify specific resources for the improvement of individual crops and comment on the potential future direction of crop genome databases.

  8. The UCSC Genome Browser Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karolchik, D; Kuhn, R M; Baertsch, R;

    2008-01-01

    The University of California, Santa Cruz, Genome Browser Database (GBD) provides integrated sequence and annotation data for a large collection of vertebrate and model organism genomes. Seventeen new assemblies have been added to the database in the past year, for a total coverage of 19 vertebrate...... and 21 invertebrate species as of September 2007. For each assembly, the GBD contains a collection of annotation data aligned to the genomic sequence. Highlights of this year's additions include a 28-species human-based vertebrate conservation annotation, an enhanced UCSC Genes set, and more human...... variation, MGC, and ENCODE data. The database is optimized for fast interactive performance with a set of web-based tools that may be used to view, manipulate, filter and download the annotation data. New toolset features include the Genome Graphs tool for displaying genome-wide data sets, session saving...

  9. The UCSC genome browser database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, R M; Karolchik, D; Zweig, A S;

    2007-01-01

    The University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser Database contains, as of September 2006, sequence and annotation data for the genomes of 13 vertebrate and 19 invertebrate species. The Genome Browser displays a wide variety of annotations at all scales from the single nucleotide level up...... to a full chromosome and includes assembly data, genes and gene predictions, mRNA and EST alignments, and comparative genomics, regulation, expression and variation data. The database is optimized for fast interactive performance with web tools that provide powerful visualization and querying capabilities......; an expanded SNP annotation track; and many new display options. The Genome Browser, other tools, downloadable data files and links to documentation and other information can be found at http://genome.ucsc.edu/....

  10. What can comparative genomics tell us about species concepts in the genus Aspergillus?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokas, Antonis; payne, gary; Federova, Natalie D.; Baker, Scott E.; Machida, Masa; yu, Jiujiang; georgianna, D. R.; Dean, Ralph A.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, T. E.; Wortman, Jennifer R.; Maiti, R.; Joardar, V.; Amedeo, Paolo; Denning, David W.; Nierman, William C.

    2007-12-15

    Understanding the nature of species" boundaries is a fundamental question in evolutionary biology. The availability of genomes from several species of the genus Aspergillus allows us for the first time to examine the demarcation of fungal species at the whole-genome level. Here, we examine four case studies, two of which involve intraspecific comparisons, whereas the other two deal with interspecific genomic comparisons between closely related species. These four comparisons reveal significant variation in the nature of species boundaries across Aspergillus. For example, comparisons between A. fumigatus and Neosartorya fischeri (the teleomorph of A. fischerianus) and between A. oryzae and A. flavus suggest that measures of sequence similarity and species-specific genes are significantly higher for the A. fumigatus - N. fischeri pair. Importantly, the values obtained from the comparison between A. oryzae and A. flavus are remarkably similar to those obtained from an intra-specific comparison of A. fumigatus strains, giving support to the proposal that A. oryzae represents a distinct ecotype of A. flavus and not a distinct species. We argue that genomic data can aid Aspergillus taxonomy by serving as a source of novel and unprecedented amounts of comparative data, as a resource for the development of additional diagnostic tools, and finally as a knowledge database about the biological differences between strains and species.

  11. Sexual structures in Aspergillus: morphology, importance and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, David M

    2009-01-01

    The genus Aspergillus comprises a few hundred species sharing a common asexual spore forming structure, the aspergillum. Approximately one-third of these species also produce a sexual stage, all but five of which are known to be homothallic. Sexual stages associated with Aspergillus fall into approximately ten different genera, reflecting a tremendous degree of phylogenetic and biological diversity. Sexual stages in Aspergillus are plectomycetous, typical for the order in which it resides, the Eurotiales. Theoretically, a homothallic Aspergillus species can produce both asexual conidia and sexual ascospores in both clonal and recombinant fashion, although the actual significance of these potential modes of reproduction is unclear. Aspergillus species with known sexual stages tend to be minor players in infections of humans, perhaps because of their tendency to produce fewer asexual spores compared to their non-teleomorphic congeners. The discovery of population genetic and genomic evidence for sex in species with no known sexual stage indicates that no assumptions can be made about the clonal versus recombinant life histories of a species based on its known mitotic and/or meiotic reproductive modes. PMID:18608901

  12. The 2008 update of the Aspergillus nidulans genome annotation: A community effort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wortman, Jennifer Russo; Gilsenan, Jane Mabey; Joardar, Vinita;

    2009-01-01

    The identification and annotation of protein-coding genes is one of the primary goals of whole-genome sequencing projects, and the accuracy of predicting the primary protein products of gene expression is vital to the interpretation of the available data and the design of downstream functional...... applications. Nevertheless, the comprehensive annotation of eukaryotic genomes remains a considerable challenge. Many genomes submitted to public databases, including those of major model organisms, contain significant numbers of wrong and incomplete gene predictions. We present a community-based reannotation...... of the Aspergillus nidulans genome with the primary goal of increasing the number and quality of protein functional assignments through the careful review of experts in the field of fungal biology....

  13. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2015 update

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Armstrong, Joel; Barber, Galt P.; Casper, Jonathan; Clawson, Hiram; Diekhans, Mark; Dreszer, Timothy R.; Fujita, Pauline A.; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Haeussler, Maximilian; Harte, Rachel A.; Heitner, Steve; Hickey, Glenn; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Hubley, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Launched in 2001 to showcase the draft human genome assembly, the UCSC Genome Browser database (http://genome.ucsc.edu) and associated tools continue to grow, providing a comprehensive resource of genome assemblies and annotations to scientists and students worldwide. Highlights of the past year include the release of a browser for the first new human genome reference assembly in 4 years in December 2013 (GRCh38, UCSC hg38), a watershed comparative genomics annotation (100-species multiple al...

  14. HaloWeb: the haloarchaeal genomes database

    OpenAIRE

    DasSarma, Satyajit L; Capes, Melinda D; DasSarma, Priya; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2010-01-01

    Background Complete genome sequencing together with post-genomic studies provide the opportunity for a comprehensive 'systems biology' understanding of model organisms. For maximum effectiveness, an integrated database containing genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data is necessary. Description To improve data access and facilitate functional genomic studies on haloarchaea in our laboratory, a dedicated database and website, named HaloWeb, was developed. It incorporates all finished and p...

  15. Searching and Indexing Genomic Databases via Kernelization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis eGagie

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The rapid advance of DNA sequencing technologies has yielded databases of thousands of genomes. To search and index these databases effectively, it is important that we take advantage of the similarity between those genomes. Several authors have recently suggested searching or indexing only one reference genome and the parts of the other genomes where they differ. In this paper we survey the twenty-year history of this idea and discuss its relation to kernelization in parameterized complexity.

  16. WGE: a CRISPR database for genome engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgkins, Alex; Farne, Anna; Perera, Sajith; Grego, Tiago; Parry-Smith, David J; Skarnes, William C.; Iyer, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The rapid development of CRISPR-Cas9 mediated genome editing techniques has given rise to a number of online and stand-alone tools to find and score CRISPR sites for whole genomes. Here we describe the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Genome Editing database (WGE), which uses novel methods to compute, visualize and select optimal CRISPR sites in a genome browser environment. The WGE database currently stores single and paired CRISPR sites and pre-calculated off-target information for ...

  17. Searching and Indexing Genomic Databases via Kernelization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagie, Travis; Puglisi, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid advance of DNA sequencing technologies has yielded databases of thousands of genomes. To search and index these databases effectively, it is important that we take advantage of the similarity between those genomes. Several authors have recently suggested searching or indexing only one reference genome and the parts of the other genomes where they differ. In this paper, we survey the 20-year history of this idea and discuss its relation to kernelization in parameterized complexity. PMID:25710001

  18. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhengsong; Chen, Dan; Shen, Yiping; Ye, Baodong

    2016-07-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a haploid filamentous fungus that is common in the environment and has been implicated in human infections. The complete mitochondrial genome of A. flavus has been determined by high-throughput sequencing technology in this work. Our study revealed that the mitochondrial genome of A. flavus is 31,602 bp long, with an A + T content of 74.83%, which consists of a usual set of mitochondrial proteins and RNA genes, including large and small ribosomal RNAs, 15 proteins, and 20 tRNA genes and contains two introns. Notably, it also contains two hypothetical proteins without obvious homology to any known proteins. All structural genes are located on one strand and are apparently transcribed in one direction. Codon usage analysis indicated that all protein coding genes employ the standard fungal mitochondrial start and stop codons; and the nucleotide bias toward AT was also reflected in the codon usage. The complete mitochondrial genomes of A. flavus would be useful for future investigation of the genetic, evolution, and clinical identification of Aspergillus species. PMID:25922962

  19. Sequence resources at the Candida Genome Database

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaud, Martha B.; Costanzo, Maria C.; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Shah, Prachi; Binkley, Gail; Lane, Christopher; Miyasato, Stuart R.; SHERLOCK, Gavin

    2006-01-01

    The Candida Genome Database (CGD, ) contains a curated collection of genomic information and community resources for researchers who are interested in the molecular biology of the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans. With the recent release of a new assembly of the C.albicans genome, Assembly 20, C.albicans genomics has entered a new era. Although the C.albicans genome assembly continues to undergo refinement, multiple assemblies and gene nomenclatures will remain in widespread use by the...

  20. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2016 update

    OpenAIRE

    Speir, Matthew L; Zweig, Ann S.; Rosenbloom, Kate R.; Raney, Brian J.; Paten, Benedict; Nejad, Parisa; Rowe, Laurence D.; Learned, Katrina; Karolchik, Donna; Hinrichs, Angie S.; Heitner, Steve; Harte, Rachel A.; Haeussler, Maximilian; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Fujita, Pauline A.

    2015-01-01

    For the past 15 years, the UCSC Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/) has served the international research community by offering an integrated platform for viewing and analyzing information from a large database of genome assemblies and their associated annotations. The UCSC Genome Browser has been under continuous development since its inception with new data sets and software features added frequently. Some release highlights of this year include new and updated genome browsers for vari...

  1. Hymenoptera Genome Database: integrating genome annotations in HymenopteraMine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsik, Christine G; Tayal, Aditi; Diesh, Colin M; Unni, Deepak R; Emery, Marianne L; Nguyen, Hung N; Hagen, Darren E

    2016-01-01

    We report an update of the Hymenoptera Genome Database (HGD) (http://HymenopteraGenome.org), a model organism database for insect species of the order Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps). HGD maintains genomic data for 9 bee species, 10 ant species and 1 wasp, including the versions of genome and annotation data sets published by the genome sequencing consortiums and those provided by NCBI. A new data-mining warehouse, HymenopteraMine, based on the InterMine data warehousing system, integrates the genome data with data from external sources and facilitates cross-species analyses based on orthology. New genome browsers and annotation tools based on JBrowse/WebApollo provide easy genome navigation, and viewing of high throughput sequence data sets and can be used for collaborative genome annotation. All of the genomes and annotation data sets are combined into a single BLAST server that allows users to select and combine sequence data sets to search. PMID:26578564

  2. The UCSC Genome Browser Database: update 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinrichs, A S; Karolchik, D; Baertsch, R;

    2006-01-01

    The University of California Santa Cruz Genome Browser Database (GBD) contains sequence and annotation data for the genomes of about a dozen vertebrate species and several major model organisms. Genome annotations typically include assembly data, sequence composition, genes and gene predictions, m......RNA and expressed sequence tag evidence, comparative genomics, regulation, expression and variation data. The database is optimized to support fast interactive performance with web tools that provide powerful visualization and querying capabilities for mining the data. The Genome Browser displays a wide variety...... of annotations at all scales from single nucleotide level up to a full chromosome. The Table Browser provides direct access to the database tables and sequence data, enabling complex queries on genome-wide datasets. The Proteome Browser graphically displays protein properties. The Gene Sorter allows filtering...

  3. Whole genome evaluation of horizontal transfers in the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deschavanne Patrick

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous cases of horizontal transfers (HTs have been described for eukaryote genomes, but in contrast to prokaryote genomes, no whole genome evaluation of HTs has been carried out. This is mainly due to a lack of parametric methods specially designed to take the intrinsic heterogeneity of eukaryote genomes into account. We applied a simple and tested method based on local variations of genomic signatures to analyze the genome of the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus. Results We detected 189 atypical regions containing 214 genes, accounting for about 1 Mb of DNA sequences. However, the fraction of atypical DNA detected was smaller than the average amount detected in the same conditions in prokaryote genomes (3.1% vs 5.6%. It appeared that about one third of these regions contained no annotated genes, a proportion far greater than in prokaryote genomes. When analyzing the origin of these HTs by comparing their signatures to a home made database of species signatures, 3 groups of donor species emerged: bacteria (40%, fungi (25%, and viruses (22%. It is to be noticed that though inter-domain exchanges are confirmed, we only put in evidence very few exchanges between eukaryotic kingdoms. Conclusions In conclusion, we demonstrated that HTs are not negligible in eukaryote genomes, bearing in mind that in our stringent conditions this amount is a floor value, though of a lesser extent than in prokaryote genomes. The biological mechanisms underlying those transfers remain to be elucidated as well as the biological functions of the transferred genes.

  4. Analysis of Aspergillus nidulans metabolism at the genome-scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Jens

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aspergillus nidulans is a member of a diverse group of filamentous fungi, sharing many of the properties of its close relatives with significance in the fields of medicine, agriculture and industry. Furthermore, A. nidulans has been a classical model organism for studies of development biology and gene regulation, and thus it has become one of the best-characterized filamentous fungi. It was the first Aspergillus species to have its genome sequenced, and automated gene prediction tools predicted 9,451 open reading frames (ORFs in the genome, of which less than 10% were assigned a function. Results In this work, we have manually assigned functions to 472 orphan genes in the metabolism of A. nidulans, by using a pathway-driven approach and by employing comparative genomics tools based on sequence similarity. The central metabolism of A. nidulans, as well as biosynthetic pathways of relevant secondary metabolites, was reconstructed based on detailed metabolic reconstructions available for A. niger and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and information on the genetics, biochemistry and physiology of A. nidulans. Thereby, it was possible to identify metabolic functions without a gene associated, and to look for candidate ORFs in the genome of A. nidulans by comparing its sequence to sequences of well-characterized genes in other species encoding the function of interest. A classification system, based on defined criteria, was developed for evaluating and selecting the ORFs among the candidates, in an objective and systematic manner. The functional assignments served as a basis to develop a mathematical model, linking 666 genes (both previously and newly annotated to metabolic roles. The model was used to simulate metabolic behavior and additionally to integrate, analyze and interpret large-scale gene expression data concerning a study on glucose repression, thereby providing a means of upgrading the information content of experimental data

  5. Exploiting proteomic data for genome annotation and gene model validation in Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoriev Igor V

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteomic data is a potentially rich, but arguably unexploited, data source for genome annotation. Peptide identifications from tandem mass spectrometry provide prima facie evidence for gene predictions and can discriminate over a set of candidate gene models. Here we apply this to the recently sequenced Aspergillus niger fungal genome from the Joint Genome Institutes (JGI and another predicted protein set from another A.niger sequence. Tandem mass spectra (MS/MS were acquired from 1d gel electrophoresis bands and searched against all available gene models using Average Peptide Scoring (APS and reverse database searching to produce confident identifications at an acceptable false discovery rate (FDR. Results 405 identified peptide sequences were mapped to 214 different A.niger genomic loci to which 4093 predicted gene models clustered, 2872 of which contained the mapped peptides. Interestingly, 13 (6% of these loci either had no preferred predicted gene model or the genome annotators' chosen "best" model for that genomic locus was not found to be the most parsimonious match to the identified peptides. The peptides identified also boosted confidence in predicted gene structures spanning 54 introns from different gene models. Conclusion This work highlights the potential of integrating experimental proteomics data into genomic annotation pipelines much as expressed sequence tag (EST data has been. A comparison of the published genome from another strain of A.niger sequenced by DSM showed that a number of the gene models or proteins with proteomics evidence did not occur in both genomes, further highlighting the utility of the method.

  6. The Saccharomyces Genome Database Variant Viewer

    OpenAIRE

    Sheppard, Travis K.; Gabdank, Idan; Engel, Stacia R.; Song, Giltae; Balakrishnan, Rama; Binkley, Gail; Costanzo, Maria C.; Dalusag, Kyla S.; Demeter, Janos; Hellerstedt, Sage T.; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S.; Paskov, Kelley M.; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Weng, Shuai

    2015-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD; http://www.yeastgenome.org) is the authoritative community resource for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae reference genome sequence and its annotation. In recent years, we have moved toward increased representation of sequence variation and allelic differences within S. cerevisiae. The publication of numerous additional genomes has motivated the creation of new tools for their annotation and analysis. Here we present the Variant Viewer: a dynamic open-source...

  7. BGD: a database of bat genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfei Fang

    Full Text Available Bats account for ~20% of mammalian species, and are the only mammals with true powered flight. For the sake of their specialized phenotypic traits, many researches have been devoted to examine the evolution of bats. Until now, some whole genome sequences of bats have been assembled and annotated, however, a uniform resource for the annotated bat genomes is still unavailable. To make the extensive data associated with the bat genomes accessible to the general biological communities, we established a Bat Genome Database (BGD. BGD is an open-access, web-available portal that integrates available data of bat genomes and genes. It hosts data from six bat species, including two megabats and four microbats. Users can query the gene annotations using efficient searching engine, and it offers browsable tracks of bat genomes. Furthermore, an easy-to-use phylogenetic analysis tool was also provided to facilitate online phylogeny study of genes. To the best of our knowledge, BGD is the first database of bat genomes. It will extend our understanding of the bat evolution and be advantageous to the bat sequences analysis. BGD is freely available at: http://donglab.ecnu.edu.cn/databases/BatGenome/.

  8. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2016 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speir, Matthew L; Zweig, Ann S; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Raney, Brian J; Paten, Benedict; Nejad, Parisa; Lee, Brian T; Learned, Katrina; Karolchik, Donna; Hinrichs, Angie S; Heitner, Steve; Harte, Rachel A; Haeussler, Maximilian; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Fujita, Pauline A; Eisenhart, Christopher; Diekhans, Mark; Clawson, Hiram; Casper, Jonathan; Barber, Galt P; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M; Kent, W James

    2016-01-01

    For the past 15 years, the UCSC Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu/) has served the international research community by offering an integrated platform for viewing and analyzing information from a large database of genome assemblies and their associated annotations. The UCSC Genome Browser has been under continuous development since its inception with new data sets and software features added frequently. Some release highlights of this year include new and updated genome browsers for various assemblies, including bonobo and zebrafish; new gene annotation sets; improvements to track and assembly hub support; and a new interactive tool, the "Data Integrator", for intersecting data from multiple tracks. We have greatly expanded the data sets available on the most recent human assembly, hg38/GRCh38, to include updated gene prediction sets from GENCODE, more phenotype- and disease-associated variants from ClinVar and ClinGen, more genomic regulatory data, and a new multiple genome alignment. PMID:26590259

  9. The Saccharomyces Genome Database Variant Viewer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Travis K; Hitz, Benjamin C; Engel, Stacia R; Song, Giltae; Balakrishnan, Rama; Binkley, Gail; Costanzo, Maria C; Dalusag, Kyla S; Demeter, Janos; Hellerstedt, Sage T; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S; Paskov, Kelley M; Skrzypek, Marek S; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith D; Cherry, J Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD; http://www.yeastgenome.org) is the authoritative community resource for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae reference genome sequence and its annotation. In recent years, we have moved toward increased representation of sequence variation and allelic differences within S. cerevisiae. The publication of numerous additional genomes has motivated the creation of new tools for their annotation and analysis. Here we present the Variant Viewer: a dynamic open-source web application for the visualization of genomic and proteomic differences. Multiple sequence alignments have been constructed across high quality genome sequences from 11 different S. cerevisiae strains and stored in the SGD. The alignments and summaries are encoded in JSON and used to create a two-tiered dynamic view of the budding yeast pan-genome, available at http://www.yeastgenome.org/variant-viewer. PMID:26578556

  10. Aspergillus and Penicillium in the Post-genomic Era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and a whole genus genome sequencing project in progress for Aspergillus. This book highlights some of the changes in the studies into these fungi, since the availability of genome sequences. The contributions vary from insights in the taxonomy of these genera, use of genomics for forward genetics and......Genome sequencing has affected studies into the biology of all classes of organisms and this is certainly true for filamentous fungi. The level with which biological systems can be studied since the availability of genomes and post-genomic technologies is beyond what most people could have imagined...... previously. The fungal genera Aspergillus and Penicillium contain some species that are amongst the most widely used industrial microorganisms and others that are serious pathogens of plants, animals and humans. These genera are also at the forefront of fungal genomics with many genome sequences available...

  11. The UCSC Genome Browser database: 2015 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Kate R; Armstrong, Joel; Barber, Galt P; Casper, Jonathan; Clawson, Hiram; Diekhans, Mark; Dreszer, Timothy R; Fujita, Pauline A; Guruvadoo, Luvina; Haeussler, Maximilian; Harte, Rachel A; Heitner, Steve; Hickey, Glenn; Hinrichs, Angie S; Hubley, Robert; Karolchik, Donna; Learned, Katrina; Lee, Brian T; Li, Chin H; Miga, Karen H; Nguyen, Ngan; Paten, Benedict; Raney, Brian J; Smit, Arian F A; Speir, Matthew L; Zweig, Ann S; Haussler, David; Kuhn, Robert M; Kent, W James

    2015-01-01

    Launched in 2001 to showcase the draft human genome assembly, the UCSC Genome Browser database (http://genome.ucsc.edu) and associated tools continue to grow, providing a comprehensive resource of genome assemblies and annotations to scientists and students worldwide. Highlights of the past year include the release of a browser for the first new human genome reference assembly in 4 years in December 2013 (GRCh38, UCSC hg38), a watershed comparative genomics annotation (100-species multiple alignment and conservation) and a novel distribution mechanism for the browser (GBiB: Genome Browser in a Box). We created browsers for new species (Chinese hamster, elephant shark, minke whale), 'mined the web' for DNA sequences and expanded the browser display with stacked color graphs and region highlighting. As our user community increasingly adopts the UCSC track hub and assembly hub representations for sharing large-scale genomic annotation data sets and genome sequencing projects, our menu of public data hubs has tripled. PMID:25428374

  12. GDR (Genome Database for Rosaceae): integrated web-database for Rosaceae genomics and genetics data

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Sook; Staton, Margaret; Lee, Taein; Blenda, Anna; Svancara, Randall; Abbott, Albert; Main, Dorrie

    2007-01-01

    The Genome Database for Rosaceae (GDR) is a central repository of curated and integrated genetics and genomics data of Rosaceae, an economically important family which includes apple, cherry, peach, pear, raspberry, rose and strawberry. GDR contains annotated databases of all publicly available Rosaceae ESTs, the genetically anchored peach physical map, Rosaceae genetic maps and comprehensively annotated markers and traits. The ESTs are assembled to produce unigene sets of each genus and the ...

  13. The Saccharomyces Genome Database: Exploring Genome Features and Their Annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, J Michael

    2015-12-01

    Genomic-scale assays result in data that provide information over the entire genome. Such base pair resolution data cannot be summarized easily except via a graphical viewer. A genome browser is a tool that displays genomic data and experimental results as horizontal tracks. Genome browsers allow searches for a chromosomal coordinate or a feature, such as a gene name, but they do not allow searches by function or upstream binding site. Entry into a genome browser requires that you identify the gene name or chromosomal coordinates for a region of interest. A track provides a representation for genomic results and is displayed as a row of data shown as line segments to indicate regions of the chromosome with a feature. Another type of track presents a graph or wiggle plot that indicates the processed signal intensity computed for a particular experiment or set of experiments. Wiggle plots are typical for genomic assays such as the various next-generation sequencing methods (e.g., chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP]-seq or RNA-seq), where it represents a peak of DNA binding, histone modification, or the mapping of an RNA sequence. Here we explore the browser that has been built into the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD). PMID:26631126

  14. The population genomics of mycotoxin diversity in Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycotoxins, and especially the aflatoxins, are an enormous problem in agriculture, with aflatoxin B1 being the most carcinogenic known natural compound. The worldwide costs associated with aflatoxin monitoring and crop losses are in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Aspergillus flavus and A. par...

  15. A genomics based discovery of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters in Aspergillus ustus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borui Pi

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolites (SMs produced by Aspergillus have been extensively studied for their crucial roles in human health, medicine and industrial production. However, the resulting information is almost exclusively derived from a few model organisms, including A. nidulans and A. fumigatus, but little is known about rare pathogens. In this study, we performed a genomics based discovery of SM biosynthetic gene clusters in Aspergillus ustus, a rare human pathogen. A total of 52 gene clusters were identified in the draft genome of A. ustus 3.3904, such as the sterigmatocystin biosynthesis pathway that was commonly found in Aspergillus species. In addition, several SM biosynthetic gene clusters were firstly identified in Aspergillus that were possibly acquired by horizontal gene transfer, including the vrt cluster that is responsible for viridicatumtoxin production. Comparative genomics revealed that A. ustus shared the largest number of SM biosynthetic gene clusters with A. nidulans, but much fewer with other Aspergilli like A. niger and A. oryzae. These findings would help to understand the diversity and evolution of SM biosynthesis pathways in genus Aspergillus, and we hope they will also promote the development of fungal identification methodology in clinic.

  16. How to Use the Candida Genome Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, Marek S; Binkley, Jonathan; Sherlock, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Studying Candida biology requires access to genomic sequence data in conjunction with experimental information that provides functional context to genes and proteins. The Candida Genome Database (CGD) integrates functional information about Candida genes and their products with a set of analysis tools that facilitate searching for sets of genes and exploring their biological roles. This chapter describes how the various types of information available at CGD can be searched, retrieved, and analyzed. Starting with the guided tour of the CGD Home page and Locus Summary page, this unit shows how to navigate the various assemblies of the C. albicans genome, how to use Gene Ontology tools to make sense of large-scale data, and how to access the microarray data archived at CGD. PMID:26519061

  17. Requirements and standards for organelle genome databases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2006-01-09

    Mitochondria and plastids (collectively called organelles)descended from prokaryotes that adopted an intracellular, endosymbioticlifestyle within early eukaryotes. Comparisons of their remnant genomesaddress a wide variety of biological questions, especially when includingthe genomes of their prokaryotic relatives and the many genes transferredto the eukaryotic nucleus during the transitions from endosymbiont toorganelle. The pace of producing complete organellar genome sequences nowmakes it unfeasible to do broad comparisons using the primary literatureand, even if it were feasible, it is now becoming uncommon for journalsto accept detailed descriptions of genome-level features. Unfortunatelyno database is currently useful for this task, since they have littlestandardization and are riddled with error. Here I outline what iscurrently wrong and what must be done to make this data useful to thescientific community.

  18. How to use the Candida Genome Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, Marek S.; Binkley, Jonathan; Sherlock, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Studying Candida biology requires access to genomic sequence data in conjunction with experimental information that provides functional context to genes and proteins. The Candida Genome Database (CGD) integrates functional information about Candida genes and their products with a set of analysis tools that facilitate searching for sets of genes and exploring their biological roles. This chapter describes how the various types of information available at CGD can be searched, retrieved, and analyzed. Starting with the guided tour of the CGD Home page and Locus Summary page, this unit shows how to navigate the various assemblies of the C. albicans genome, how to use Gene Ontology tools to make sense of large-scale data, and how to access the microarray data archived at CGD. PMID:26519061

  19. Update History of This Database - TMBETA-GENOME | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us TMBETA-GENOME Update Hist...site is opened. Joomla SEF URLs by Artio About This Database Database Description Download License Update History... of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Update History of This Database - TMBETA-GENOME | LSDB Archive ... ...ory of This Database Date Update contents 2015/03/09 TMBETA-GENOME English archive

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Aspergillus niger Strain An76

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Weili; Cheng, Zhi; Zhang, Huaiqiang; Liu, Lin; Gao, Peiji; Wang, Lushan

    2016-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger has become one of the most important fungi in industrial biotechnology, and it can efficiently secrete both polysaccharide-degrading enzymes and organic acids. We report here the 6,074,961,332-bp draft sequence of A. niger strain An76, and the findings provide important information related to its lignocellulose-degrading ability.

  1. Genome sequencing and analysis of the versatile cell factory Aspergillus niger CBS 513.88

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pel, Herman J.; de Winde, Johannes H.; Archer, David B.;

    2007-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is widely exploited by the fermentation industry for the production of enzymes and organic acids, particularly citric acid. We sequenced the 33.9-megabase genome of A. niger CBS 513.88, the ancestor of currently used enzyme production strains. A high level...

  2. The Burkholderia Genome Database: facilitating flexible queries and comparative analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Winsor, Geoffrey L.; Khaira, Bhavjinder; Van Rossum, Thea; Lo, Raymond; Whiteside, Matthew D.; Fiona S.L. Brinkman

    2008-01-01

    Summary: As the genome sequences of multiple strains of a given bacterial species are obtained, more generalized bacterial genome databases may be complemented by databases that are focused on providing more information geared for a distinct bacterial phylogenetic group and its associated research community. The Burkholderia Genome Database represents a model for such a database, providing a powerful, user-friendly search and comparative analysis interface that contains features not found in ...

  3. Genome Sequences of Eight Aspergillus flavus spp. and One A. parasiticus sp., Isolated from Peanut Seeds in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinye Monica; Palencia, Edwin R.

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus fungi produce carcinogenic mycotoxins in peanut seeds, causing considerable impact on both human health and the economy. Here, we report nine genome sequences of Aspergillus spp., isolated from Georgia peanut seeds in 2014. The information obtained will lead to further biodiversity studies that are essential for developing control strategies. PMID:27081142

  4. Genome Sequences of Eight Aspergillus flavus spp. and One A. parasiticus sp., Isolated From Peanut Seeds in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus fungi, carcinogen-mycotoxins producers, infect peanut seeds, causing considerable impact on both human health and the economy. Here we report 9 genome sequences of Aspergillus spp. isolated from peanut seeds. The information obtained will allow conducting biodiv...

  5. MTGD: The Medicago truncatula genome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, Vivek; Kim, Maria; Rosen, Benjamin D; Karamycheva, Svetlana; Bidwell, Shelby L; Tang, Haibao; Town, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    Medicago truncatula, a close relative of alfalfa (Medicago sativa), is a model legume used for studying symbiotic nitrogen fixation, mycorrhizal interactions and legume genomics. J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI; formerly TIGR) has been involved in M. truncatula genome sequencing and annotation since 2002 and has maintained a web-based resource providing data to the community for this entire period. The website (http://www.MedicagoGenome.org) has seen major updates in the past year, where it currently hosts the latest version of the genome (Mt4.0), associated data and legacy project information, presented to users via a rich set of open-source tools. A JBrowse-based genome browser interface exposes tracks for visualization. Mutant gene symbols originally assembled and curated by the Frugoli lab are now hosted at JCVI and tie into our community annotation interface, Medicago EuCAP (to be integrated soon with our implementation of WebApollo). Literature pertinent to M. truncatula is indexed and made searchable via the Textpresso search engine. The site also implements MedicMine, an instance of InterMine that offers interconnectivity with other plant 'mines' such as ThaleMine and PhytoMine, and other model organism databases (MODs). In addition to these new features, we continue to provide keyword- and locus identifier-based searches served via a Chado-backed Tripal Instance, a BLAST search interface and bulk downloads of data sets from the iPlant Data Store (iDS). Finally, we maintain an E-mail helpdesk, facilitated by a JIRA issue tracking system, where we receive and respond to questions about the website and requests for specific data sets from the community. PMID:25432968

  6. Post-genomic insights into the plant polysaccharide degradation potential of Aspergillus nidulans and comparison to Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, Pedro M.; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Kolenova, Katarina; vanKuyk, Patricia A.; Benoit, Isabelle; Gruben, Birgit S.; Trejo-Aguilar, Blanca; Visser, Hans; van Solingen, Piet; Pakula, Tiina; Seiboth, Bernard; Battaglia, Evy; Aguilar-Osorio, Guillermo; de Jong, Jan F.; Ohm, Robin A.; Aguilar, Mariana; Henrissat, Bernard; Nielsen, Jens; Stålbrand, Henrik; de Vries, Ronald P.

    The plant polysaccharide degradative potential of Aspergillus nidulans was analysed in detail and compared to that of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae using a combination of bioinformatics, physiology and transcriptomics. Manual verification indicated that 28.4% of the A. nidulans ORFs...

  7. Biocuration at the Saccharomyces genome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, Marek S; Nash, Robert S

    2015-08-01

    Saccharomyces Genome Database is an online resource dedicated to managing information about the biology and genetics of the model organism, yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). This information is derived primarily from scientific publications through a process of human curation that involves manual extraction of data and their organization into a comprehensive system of knowledge. This system provides a foundation for further analysis of experimental data coming from research on yeast as well as other organisms. In this review we will demonstrate how biocuration and biocurators add a key component, the biological context, to our understanding of how genes, proteins, genomes and cells function and interact. We will explain the role biocurators play in sifting through the wealth of biological data to incorporate and connect key information. We will also discuss the many ways we assist researchers with their various research needs. We hope to convince the reader that manual curation is vital in converting the flood of data into organized and interconnected knowledge, and that biocurators play an essential role in the integration of scientific information into a coherent model of the cell. PMID:25997651

  8. Recent advances in genome mining of secondary metabolites in Aspergillus terreus

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Wang, Clay C. C.

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are rich resources of secondary metabolites (SMs) with a variety of interesting biological activities. Recent advances in genome sequencing and techniques in genetic manipulation have enabled researchers to study the biosynthetic genes of these SMs. Aspergillus terreus is the well-known producer of lovastatin, a cholesterol-lowering drug. This fungus also produces other SMs, including acetylaranotin, butyrolactones, and territram, with interesting bioactivities. This review ...

  9. Genome-wide analysis of the Zn(II)₂Cys₆ zinc cluster-encoding gene family in Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Ehrlich, Kenneth C

    2013-05-01

    Proteins with a Zn(II)₂Cys₆ domain, Cys-X₂-Cys-X₆-Cys-X₅₋₁₂-Cys-X₂-Cys-X₆₋₉-Cys (hereafter, referred to as the C6 domain), form a subclass of zinc finger proteins found exclusively in fungi and yeast. Genome sequence databases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans have provided an overview of this family of genes. Annotation of this gene family in most fungal genomes is still far from perfect and refined bioinformatic algorithms are urgently needed. Aspergillus flavus is a saprophytic soil fungus that can produce the carcinogenic aflatoxin. It is the second leading causative agent of invasive aspergillosis. The 37-Mb genome of A. flavus is predicted to encode 12,000 proteins. Two and a half percent of the total proteins are estimated to contain the C6 domain, more than twofold greater than those estimated for yeast, which is about 1 %. The variability in the spacing between cysteines, C₃-C₄ and C₅-C₆, in the zinc cluster enables classification of the domains into distinct subgroups, which are also well conserved in Aspergillus nidulans. Sixty-six percent (202/306) of the A. flavus C6 proteins contain a specific transcription factor domain, and 7 % contain a domain of unknown function, DUF3468. Two A. nidulans C6 proteins containing the DUF3468 are involved in asexual conidiation and another two in sexual differentiation. In the anamorphic A. flavus, a homolog of the latter lacks the C6 domain. A. flavus being heterothallic and reproducing mainly through conidiation appears to have lost some components involved in homothallic sexual development. Of the 55 predicted gene clusters thought to be involved in production of secondary metabolites, only about half have a C6-encoding gene in or near the gene clusters. The features revealed by the A. flavus C6 proteins likely are common for other ascomycete fungi. PMID:23563886

  10. Database Description - TMBETA-GENOME | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us TM...BETA-GENOME Database Description General information of database Database name TMBETA-GENOME Alternative n...Advanced Industrial Science and Technology Contact address Dr. M. MICHAEL GROMIHA Associate Professor Departm...ent of Biotechnology IIT Madras Chennai - 600 036 Tel: +91-44-2257-4138(O) E-mail: http://www.iitm.ac.in/bi...: Eukaryota Taxonomy ID: 2759 Database description TMBETA-GENOME is a database for transmembrane β-barrel pr

  11. Signaling pathways for stress responses and adaptation in Aspergillus species: stress biology in the post-genomic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Kazutoshi; Abe, Keietsu; Gomi, Katsuya

    2016-09-01

    Aspergillus species are among the most important filamentous fungi in terms of industrial use and because of their pathogenic or toxin-producing features. The genomes of several Aspergillus species have become publicly available in this decade, and genomic analyses have contributed to an integrated understanding of fungal biology. Stress responses and adaptation mechanisms have been intensively investigated using the accessible genome infrastructure. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades have been highlighted as being fundamentally important in fungal adaptation to a wide range of stress conditions. Reverse genetics analyses have uncovered the roles of MAPK pathways in osmotic stress, cell wall stress, development, secondary metabolite production, and conidia stress resistance. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the stress biology of Aspergillus species, illuminating what we have learned from the genomic data in this "post-genomic era." PMID:27007956

  12. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): expanding genetic and genomic resources for the laboratory mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, Judith A.; Eppig, Janan T.; Richardson, Joel E.; Davisson, Muriel T.; the Mouse Genome Database Group,

    2000-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) is a comprehensive public database of mouse genomic, genetic and phenotypic information (http://www.informatics.jax.org ). This community database provides information about genes, serves as a mapping resource of the mouse genome, details mammalian orthologs, integrates experimental data, represents standardized mouse nomenclature for genes and alleles, incorporates links to other genomic resources such as sequence data, and includes a variety of additional inf...

  13. Recent advances in genome mining of secondary metabolites in Aspergillus terreus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clay Chia Chun Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous fungi are rich resources of secondary metabolites (SMs with a variety of interesting biological activities. Recent advances in genome sequencing and techniques in genetic manipulation have enabled researchers to study the biosynthetic genes of these SMs. Aspergillus terreus is the well-known producer of lovastatin, a cholesterol-lowering drug. This fungus also produces other SMs, including acetylaranotin, butyrolactones and territram, with interesting bioactivities. This review will cover recent progress in genome mining of SMs identified in this fungus. The identification and characterization of the gene cluster for these SMs, as well as the proposed biosynthetic pathways, will be discussed in depth.

  14. Repbase Update, a database of repetitive elements in eukaryotic genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Weidong; Kojima, Kenji K.; Kohany, Oleksiy

    2015-01-01

    Repbase Update (RU) is a database of representative repeat sequences in eukaryotic genomes. Since its first development as a database of human repetitive sequences in 1992, RU has been serving as a well-curated reference database fundamental for almost all eukaryotic genome sequence analyses. Here, we introduce recent updates of RU, focusing on technical issues concerning the submission and updating of Repbase entries and will give short examples of using RU data. RU sincerely invites a broad...

  15. Analysis of Aspergillus nidulans metabolism at the genome-scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Helga; Ozcelik, İlknur Ş; Hofmann, Gerald;

    2008-01-01

    function. Results: In this work, we have manually assigned functions to 472 orphan genes in the metabolism of A. nidulans, by using a pathway-driven approach and by employing comparative genomics tools based on sequence similarity. The central metabolism of A. nidulans, as well as biosynthetic pathways of...

  16. Tomato Functional Genomics Database: a comprehensive resource and analysis package for tomato functional genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Fei, Zhangjun; Joung, Je-Gun; Tang, Xuemei; Zheng, Yi; Huang, Mingyun; Lee, Je Min; McQuinn, Ryan; Tieman, Denise M.; Alba, Rob; Klee, Harry J.; Giovannoni, James J

    2010-01-01

    Tomato Functional Genomics Database (TFGD) provides a comprehensive resource to store, query, mine, analyze, visualize and integrate large-scale tomato functional genomics data sets. The database is functionally expanded from the previously described Tomato Expression Database by including metabolite profiles as well as large-scale tomato small RNA (sRNA) data sets. Computational pipelines have been developed to process microarray, metabolite and sRNA data sets archived in the database, respe...

  17. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): premier model organism resource for mammalian genomics and genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, J. A.; Bult, C. J.; J.A. Kadin; J.E. Richardson; Eppig, J T

    2010-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) is the community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and the authoritative source for phenotype and functional annotations of mouse genes. MGD includes a complete catalog of mouse genes and genome features with integrated access to genetic, genomic and phenotypic information, all serving to further the use of the mouse as a model system for studying human biology and disease. MGD is a major component of the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI, http://www...

  18. Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10...

  19. The YH database: the first Asian diploid genome database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Guoqing; Ma, Lijia; Song, Chao;

    2009-01-01

    , we illustrate here the genome sequences, SNPs, and sequencing reads in the MapView. The relationships between phenotype and genotype can be searched by location, dbSNP ID, HGMD ID, gene symbol and disease name. A BLAST web service is also provided for the purpose of aligning query sequence against YH...

  20. BGD: A Database of Bat Genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Jianfei Fang; Xuan Wang; Shuo Mu; Shuyi Zhang; Dong Dong

    2015-01-01

    Bats account for ~20% of mammalian species, and are the only mammals with true powered flight. For the sake of their specialized phenotypic traits, many researches have been devoted to examine the evolution of bats. Until now, some whole genome sequences of bats have been assembled and annotated, however, a uniform resource for the annotated bat genomes is still unavailable. To make the extensive data associated with the bat genomes accessible to the general biological communities, we establi...

  1. Design and implementation of the cacao genome database

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cacao Genome Database (CGD, www.cacaogenomedb.org) is being developed to provide a comprehensive data mining resource of genomic, genetic and breeding data for Theobroma cacao. Designed using Chado and a collection of Drupal modules, known as Tripal, CGD currently contains the genetically anchor...

  2. SmedGD: the Schmidtea mediterranea genome database

    OpenAIRE

    Robb, Sofia M.C.; Ross, Eric; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2007-01-01

    The planarian Schmidtea mediterranea is rapidly emerging as a model organism for the study of regeneration, tissue homeostasis and stem cell biology. The recent sequencing, assembly and annotation of its genome are expected to further buoy the biomedical importance of this organism. In order to make the extensive data associated with the genome sequence accessible to the biomedical and planarian communities, we have created the Schmidtea mediterranea Genome Database (SmedGD). SmedGD integrate...

  3. The Genome Database for Rosaceae (GDR): year 10 update

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Sook; Stephen P Ficklin; Lee, Taein; Cheng, Chun-Huai; Blenda, Anna; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Jing; Bombarely, Aureliano; Cho, Ilhyung; Ru, Sushan; Evans, Kate; Peace, Cameron; Abbott, Albert G; Mueller, Lukas A.; Olmstead, Mercy A.

    2013-01-01

    The Genome Database for Rosaceae (GDR, http:/www.rosaceae.org), the long-standing central repository and data mining resource for Rosaceae research, has been enhanced with new genomic, genetic and breeding data, and improved functionality. Whole genome sequences of apple, peach and strawberry are available to browse or download with a range of annotations, including gene model predictions, aligned transcripts, repetitive elements, polymorphisms, mapped genetic markers, mapped NCBI Rosaceae ge...

  4. SALAD database: a motif-based database of protein annotations for plant comparative genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Mihara, Motohiro; Itoh, Takeshi; Izawa, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    Proteins often have several motifs with distinct evolutionary histories. Proteins with similar motifs have similar biochemical properties and thus related biological functions. We constructed a unique comparative genomics database termed the SALAD database (http://salad.dna.affrc.go.jp/salad/) from plant-genome-based proteome data sets. We extracted evolutionarily conserved motifs by MEME software from 209 529 protein-sequence annotation groups selected by BLASTP from the proteome data sets o...

  5. Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    From the date its role in heredity was discovered, DNA has been generating interest among scientists from different fields of knowledge: physicists have studied the three dimensional structure of the DNA molecule, biologists tried to decode the secrets of life hidden within these long molecules, and technologists invent and improve methods of DNA analysis. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence of DNA occupies a special place among the methods developed. Thanks to the variety of sequencing technologies available, the process of decoding the sequence of genomic DNA (or whole genome sequencing) has become robust and inexpensive. Meanwhile the assembly of whole genome sequences remains a challenging task. In addition to the need to assemble millions of DNA fragments of different length (from 35 bp (Solexa) to 800 bp (Sanger)), great interest in analysis of microbial communities (metagenomes) of different complexities raises new problems and pushes some new requirements for sequence assembly tools to the forefront. The genome assembly process can be divided into two steps: draft assembly and assembly improvement (finishing). Despite the fact that automatically performed assembly (or draft assembly) is capable of covering up to 98% of the genome, in most cases, it still contains incorrectly assembled reads. The error rate of the consensus sequence produced at this stage is about 1/2000 bp. A finished genome represents the genome assembly of much higher accuracy (with no gaps or incorrectly assembled areas) and quality ({approx}1 error/10,000 bp), validated through a number of computer and laboratory experiments.

  6. Improved annotation through genome-scale metabolic modeling of Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Olsen, Peter; Hansen, Kim;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Since ancient times the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae has been used in the fermentation industry for the production of fermented sauces and the production of industrial enzymes. Recently, the genome sequence of A. oryzae with 12,074 annotated genes was released but the number...... of hypothetical proteins accounted for more than 50% of the annotated genes. Considering the industrial importance of this fungus, it is therefore valuable to improve the annotation and further integrate genomic information with biochemical and physiological information available for this microorganism and other...... related fungi. Here we proposed the gene prediction by construction of an A. oryzae Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) library, sequencing and assembly. We enhanced the function assignment by our developed annotation strategy. The resulting better annotation was used to reconstruct the metabolic network leading...

  7. Kazusa Marker DataBase: a database for genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Isobe, Sachiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Hirakawa, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    In order to provide useful genomic information for agronomical plants, we have established a database, the Kazusa Marker DataBase (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp). This database includes information on DNA markers, e.g., SSR and SNP markers, genetic linkage maps, and physical maps, that were developed at the Kazusa DNA Research Institute. Keyword searches for the markers, sequence data used for marker development, and experimental conditions are also available through this database. Currently, 10 plant species have been targeted: tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), pepper (Capsicum annuum), strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa), radish (Raphanus sativus), Lotus japonicus, soybean (Glycine max), peanut (Arachis hypogaea), red clover (Trifolium pratense), white clover (Trifolium repens), and eucalyptus (Eucalyptus camaldulensis). In addition, the number of plant species registered in this database will be increased as our research progresses. The Kazusa Marker DataBase will be a useful tool for both basic and applied sciences, such as genomics, genetics, and molecular breeding in crops. PMID:25320561

  8. The catfish genome database cBARBEL: an informatic platform for genome biology of ictalurid catfish

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jianguo; Peatman, Eric; Yang, Qing; Wang, Shaolin; Hu, Zhiliang; Reecy, James; Kucuktas, Huseyin; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2010-01-01

    The catfish genome database, cBARBEL (abbreviated from catfish Breeder And Researcher Bioinformatics Entry Location) is an online open-access database for genome biology of ictalurid catfish (Ictalurus spp.). It serves as a comprehensive, integrative platform for all aspects of catfish genetics, genomics and related data resources. cBARBEL provides BLAST-based, fuzzy and specific search functions, visualization of catfish linkage, physical and integrated maps, a catfish EST contig viewer with...

  9. Integration of new alternative reference strain genome sequences into the Saccharomyces genome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Giltae; Balakrishnan, Rama; Binkley, Gail; Costanzo, Maria C; Dalusag, Kyla; Demeter, Janos; Engel, Stacia; Hellerstedt, Sage T; Karra, Kalpana; Hitz, Benjamin C; Nash, Robert S; Paskov, Kelley; Sheppard, Travis; Skrzypek, Marek; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith; Michael Cherry, J

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD; http://www.yeastgenome.org/) is the authoritative community resource for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae reference genome sequence and its annotation. To provide a wider scope of genetic and phenotypic variation in yeast, the genome sequences and their corresponding annotations from 11 alternative S. cerevisiae reference strains have been integrated into SGD. Genomic and protein sequence information for genes from these strains are now available on the Sequence and Protein tab of the corresponding Locus Summary pages. We illustrate how these genome sequences can be utilized to aid our understanding of strain-specific functional and phenotypic differences.Database URL: www.yeastgenome.org. PMID:27252399

  10. The Yak genome database: an integrative database for studying yak biology and high-altitude adaption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Quanjun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The yak (Bos grunniens is a long-haired bovine that lives at high altitudes and is an important source of milk, meat, fiber and fuel. The recent sequencing, assembly and annotation of its genome are expected to further our understanding of the means by which it has adapted to life at high altitudes and its ecologically important traits. Description The Yak Genome Database (YGD is an internet-based resource that provides access to genomic sequence data and predicted functional information concerning the genes and proteins of Bos grunniens. The curated data stored in the YGD includes genome sequences, predicted genes and associated annotations, non-coding RNA sequences, transposable elements, single nucleotide variants, and three-way whole-genome alignments between human, cattle and yak. YGD offers useful searching and data mining tools, including the ability to search for genes by name or using function keywords as well as GBrowse genome browsers and/or BLAST servers, which can be used to visualize genome regions and identify similar sequences. Sequence data from the YGD can also be downloaded to perform local searches. Conclusions A new yak genome database (YGD has been developed to facilitate studies on high-altitude adaption and bovine genomics. The database will be continuously updated to incorporate new information such as transcriptome data and population resequencing data. The YGD can be accessed at http://me.lzu.edu.cn/yak.

  11. Specialized microbial databases for inductive exploration of microbial genome sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabau Cédric

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enormous amount of genome sequence data asks for user-oriented databases to manage sequences and annotations. Queries must include search tools permitting function identification through exploration of related objects. Methods The GenoList package for collecting and mining microbial genome databases has been rewritten using MySQL as the database management system. Functions that were not available in MySQL, such as nested subquery, have been implemented. Results Inductive reasoning in the study of genomes starts from "islands of knowledge", centered around genes with some known background. With this concept of "neighborhood" in mind, a modified version of the GenoList structure has been used for organizing sequence data from prokaryotic genomes of particular interest in China. GenoChore http://bioinfo.hku.hk/genochore.html, a set of 17 specialized end-user-oriented microbial databases (including one instance of Microsporidia, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, a member of Eukarya has been made publicly available. These databases allow the user to browse genome sequence and annotation data using standard queries. In addition they provide a weekly update of searches against the world-wide protein sequences data libraries, allowing one to monitor annotation updates on genes of interest. Finally, they allow users to search for patterns in DNA or protein sequences, taking into account a clustering of genes into formal operons, as well as providing extra facilities to query sequences using predefined sequence patterns. Conclusion This growing set of specialized microbial databases organize data created by the first Chinese bacterial genome programs (ThermaList, Thermoanaerobacter tencongensis, LeptoList, with two different genomes of Leptospira interrogans and SepiList, Staphylococcus epidermidis associated to related organisms for comparison.

  12. Genome Sequences of Eight Aspergillus flavus spp. and One A. parasiticus sp., Isolated from Peanut Seeds in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustinelli, Paola C; Wang, Xinye Monica; Palencia, Edwin R; Arias, Renée S

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavusandA. parasiticusfungi produce carcinogenic mycotoxins in peanut seeds, causing considerable impact on both human health and the economy. Here, we report nine genome sequences ofAspergillusspp., isolated from Georgia peanut seeds in 2014. The information obtained will lead to further biodiversity studies that are essential for developing control strategies. PMID:27081142

  13. Comparative genomics of citric-acid-producing Aspergillus niger ATCC 1015 versus enzyme-producing CBS 513.88

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Salazar, Margarita Pena; Schaap, Peter J.;

    2011-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger exhibits great diversity in its phenotype. It is found globally, both as marine and terrestrial strains, produces both organic acids and hydrolytic enzymes in high amounts, and some isolates exhibit pathogenicity. Although the genome of an industrial enzym...

  14. Specialized Hidden Markov Model Databases for Microbial Genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Gollery

    2003-01-01

    As hidden Markov models (HMMs) become increasingly more important in the analysis of biological sequences, so too have databases of HMMs expanded in size, number and importance. While the standard paradigm a short while ago was the analysis of one or a few sequences at a time, it has now become standard procedure to submit an entire microbial genome. In the future, it will be common to submit large groups of completed genomes to run simultaneously against a dozen public databas...

  15. The integrated web service and genome database for agricultural plants with biotechnology information

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, ChangKug; Park, DongSuk; Seol, YoungJoo; Hahn, JangHo

    2011-01-01

    The National Agricultural Biotechnology Information Center (NABIC) constructed an agricultural biology-based infrastructure and developed a Web based relational database for agricultural plants with biotechnology information. The NABIC has concentrated on functional genomics of major agricultural plants, building an integrated biotechnology database for agro-biotech information that focuses on genomics of major agricultural resources. This genome database provides annotated genome information...

  16. BBGD: an online database for blueberry genomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews Benjamin F

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blueberry is a member of the Ericaceae family, which also includes closely related cranberry and more distantly related rhododendron, azalea, and mountain laurel. Blueberry is a major berry crop in the United States, and one that has great nutritional and economical value. Extreme low temperatures, however, reduce crop yield and cause major losses to US farmers. A better understanding of the genes and biochemical pathways that are up- or down-regulated during cold acclimation is needed to produce blueberry cultivars with enhanced cold hardiness. To that end, the blueberry genomics database (BBDG was developed. Along with the analysis tools and web-based query interfaces, the database serves both the broader Ericaceae research community and the blueberry research community specifically by making available ESTs and gene expression data in searchable formats and in elucidating the underlying mechanisms of cold acclimation and freeze tolerance in blueberry. Description BBGD is the world's first database for blueberry genomics. BBGD is both a sequence and gene expression database. It stores both EST and microarray data and allows scientists to correlate expression profiles with gene function. BBGD is a public online database. Presently, the main focus of the database is the identification of genes in blueberry that are significantly induced or suppressed after low temperature exposure. Conclusion By using the database, researchers have developed EST-based markers for mapping and have identified a number of "candidate" cold tolerance genes that are highly expressed in blueberry flower buds after exposure to low temperatures.

  17. BRAD, the genetics and genomics database for Brassica plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Pingxia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brassica species include both vegetable and oilseed crops, which are very important to the daily life of common human beings. Meanwhile, the Brassica species represent an excellent system for studying numerous aspects of plant biology, specifically for the analysis of genome evolution following polyploidy, so it is also very important for scientific research. Now, the genome of Brassica rapa has already been assembled, it is the time to do deep mining of the genome data. Description BRAD, the Brassica database, is a web-based resource focusing on genome scale genetic and genomic data for important Brassica crops. BRAD was built based on the first whole genome sequence and on further data analysis of the Brassica A genome species, Brassica rapa (Chiifu-401-42. It provides datasets, such as the complete genome sequence of B. rapa, which was de novo assembled from Illumina GA II short reads and from BAC clone sequences, predicted genes and associated annotations, non coding RNAs, transposable elements (TE, B. rapa genes' orthologous to those in A. thaliana, as well as genetic markers and linkage maps. BRAD offers useful searching and data mining tools, including search across annotation datasets, search for syntenic or non-syntenic orthologs, and to search the flanking regions of a certain target, as well as the tools of BLAST and Gbrowse. BRAD allows users to enter almost any kind of information, such as a B. rapa or A. thaliana gene ID, physical position or genetic marker. Conclusion BRAD, a new database which focuses on the genetics and genomics of the Brassica plants has been developed, it aims at helping scientists and breeders to fully and efficiently use the information of genome data of Brassica plants. BRAD will be continuously updated and can be accessed through http://brassicadb.org.

  18. Combining applications and remote databases view in a common SQL distributed genomic database

    OpenAIRE

    Gros, Pierre-Emmanuel; Hérisson, Joan; Ferey, Nicolas; Gherbi, Rachid

    2006-01-01

    Huge volumes of bioinformatics data are emerging from sequencing efforts, gene expression assays, X-ray crystallography of proteins, and many other activities. High-throughput experimental methods produce masses of data, so that the whole of biology has changed from a data-light science into a data-driven science. Currently there are a lot of databases and software tools dealing with these genomic data. In general, each tool and database uses a different type of data in exchange protocols, an...

  19. Building a genome database using an object-oriented approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbasiewicz, Anna; Liu, Lin; Lang, B Franz; Burger, Gertraud

    2002-01-01

    GOBASE is a relational database that integrates data associated with mitochondria and chloroplasts. The most important data in GOBASE, i. e., molecular sequences and taxonomic information, are obtained from the public sequence data repository at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), and are validated by our experts. Maintaining a curated genomic database comes with a towering labor cost, due to the shear volume of available genomic sequences and the plethora of annotation errors and omissions in records retrieved from public repositories. Here we describe our approach to increase automation of the database population process, thereby reducing manual intervention. As a first step, we used Unified Modeling Language (UML) to construct a list of potential errors. Each case was evaluated independently, and an expert solution was devised, and represented as a diagram. Subsequently, the UML diagrams were used as templates for writing object-oriented automation programs in the Java programming language. PMID:12542407

  20. EU Laws on Privacy in Genomic Databases and Biobanking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townend, David

    2016-03-01

    Both the European Union and the Council of Europe have a bearing on privacy in genomic databases and biobanking. In terms of legislation, the processing of personal data as it relates to the right to privacy is currently largely regulated in Europe by Directive 95/46/EC, which requires that processing be "fair and lawful" and follow a set of principles, meaning that the data be processed only for stated purposes, be sufficient for the purposes of the processing, be kept only for so long as is necessary to achieve those purposes, and be kept securely and only in an identifiable state for such time as is necessary for the processing. The European privacy regime does not require the de-identification (anonymization) of personal data used in genomic databases or biobanks, and alongside this practice informed consent as well as governance and oversight mechanisms provide for the protection of genomic data. PMID:27256129

  1. Development of genome viewer (Web Omics Viewer) for managing databases of cucumber genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcieszek, M.; RóŻ, P.; Pawełkowicz, M.; Nowak, R.; Przybecki, Z.

    Cucumber is an important plant in horticulture and science world. Sequencing projects of C. sativus genome enable new methodological aproaches in further investigation of this species. Accessibility is crucial to fully exploit obtained information about detail structure of genes, markers and other characteristic features such contigs, scaffolds and chromosomes. Genome viewer is one of tools providing plain and easy way for presenting genome data for users and for databases administration. Gbrowse - the main viewer has several very useful features but lacks in managing simplicity. Our group developed new genome browser Web Omics Viewer (WOV), keeping functionality but improving utilization and accessibility to cucumber genome data.

  2. The Genome Database for Rosaceae (GDR): year 10 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sook; Ficklin, Stephen P; Lee, Taein; Cheng, Chun-Huai; Blenda, Anna; Zheng, Ping; Yu, Jing; Bombarely, Aureliano; Cho, Ilhyung; Ru, Sushan; Evans, Kate; Peace, Cameron; Abbott, Albert G; Mueller, Lukas A; Olmstead, Mercy A; Main, Dorrie

    2014-01-01

    The Genome Database for Rosaceae (GDR, http:/www.rosaceae.org), the long-standing central repository and data mining resource for Rosaceae research, has been enhanced with new genomic, genetic and breeding data, and improved functionality. Whole genome sequences of apple, peach and strawberry are available to browse or download with a range of annotations, including gene model predictions, aligned transcripts, repetitive elements, polymorphisms, mapped genetic markers, mapped NCBI Rosaceae genes, gene homologs and association of InterPro protein domains, GO terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway terms. Annotated sequences can be queried using search interfaces and visualized using GBrowse. New expressed sequence tag unigene sets are available for major genera, and Pathway data are available through FragariaCyc, AppleCyc and PeachCyc databases. Synteny among the three sequenced genomes can be viewed using GBrowse_Syn. New markers, genetic maps and extensively curated qualitative/Mendelian and quantitative trait loci are available. Phenotype and genotype data from breeding projects and genetic diversity projects are also included. Improved search pages are available for marker, trait locus, genetic diversity and publication data. New search tools for breeders enable selection comparison and assistance with breeding decision making. PMID:24225320

  3. Construction of an integrated database to support genomic sequence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, W.; Overbeek, R.

    1994-11-01

    The central goal of this project is to develop an integrated database to support comparative analysis of genomes including DNA sequence data, protein sequence data, gene expression data and metabolism data. In developing the logic-based system GenoBase, a broader integration of available data was achieved due to assistance from collaborators. Current goals are to easily include new forms of data as they become available and to easily navigate through the ensemble of objects described within the database. This report comments on progress made in these areas.

  4. Towards Interoperability in Genome Databases: The MAtDB (MIPS Arabidopsis Thaliana Database) Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoof, Heiko

    2003-01-01

    Increasing numbers of whole-genome sequences are available, but to interpret them fully requires more than listing all genes. Genome databases are faced with the challenges of integrating heterogenous data and enabling data mining. In comparison to a data warehousing approach, where integration is achieved through replication of all relevant data in a unified schema, distributed approaches provide greater flexibility and maintainability. These are important in a field where new data is generated rapidly and our understanding of the data changes. Interoperability between distributed data sources allows data maintenance to be separated from integration and analysis. Simple ways to access the data can facilitate the development of new data mining tools and the transition from model genome analysis to comparative genomics. With the MIPS Arabidopsis thaliana genome database (MAtDB, http://mips.gsf.de/proj/thal/db) our aim is to go beyond a data repository towards creating an integrated knowledge resource. To this end, the Arabidopsis genome has been a backbone against which to structure and integrate heterogenous data. The challenges to be met are continuous updating of data, the design of flexible data models that can evolve with new data, the integration of heterogenous data, e.g. through the use of ontologies, comprehensive views and visualization of complex information, simple interfaces for application access locally or via the Internet, and knowledge transfer across species. PMID:18629123

  5. Towards Interoperability in Genome Databases: The MAtDB (MIPS Arabidopsis Thaliana Database Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko Schoof

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of whole-genome sequences are available, but to interpret them fully requires more than listing all genes. Genome databases are faced with the challenges of integrating heterogenous data and enabling data mining. In comparison to a data warehousing approach, where integration is achieved through replication of all relevant data in a unified schema, distributed approaches provide greater flexibility and maintainability. These are important in a field where new data is generated rapidly and our understanding of the data changes. Interoperability between distributed data sources allows data maintenance to be separated from integration and analysis. Simple ways to access the data can facilitate the development of new data mining tools and the transition from model genome analysis to comparative genomics. With the MIPS Arabidopsis thaliana genome database (MAtDB, http://mips.gsf.de/proj/thal/db our aim is to go beyond a data repository towards creating an integrated knowledge resource. To this end, the Arabidopsis genome has been a backbone against which to structure and integrate heterogenous data. The challenges to be met are continuous updating of data, the design of flexible data models that can evolve with new data, the integration of heterogenous data, e.g. through the use of ontologies, comprehensive views and visualization of complex information, simple interfaces for application access locally or via the Internet, and knowledge transfer across species.

  6. Tripal: a construction toolkit for online genome databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficklin, Stephen P; Sanderson, Lacey-Anne; Cheng, Chun-Huai; Staton, Margaret E; Lee, Taein; Cho, Il-Hyung; Jung, Sook; Bett, Kirstin E; Main, Doreen

    2011-01-01

    As the availability, affordability and magnitude of genomics and genetics research increases so does the need to provide online access to resulting data and analyses. Availability of a tailored online database is the desire for many investigators or research communities; however, managing the Information Technology infrastructure needed to create such a database can be an undesired distraction from primary research or potentially cost prohibitive. Tripal provides simplified site development by merging the power of Drupal, a popular web Content Management System with that of Chado, a community-derived database schema for storage of genomic, genetic and other related biological data. Tripal provides an interface that extends the content management features of Drupal to the data housed in Chado. Furthermore, Tripal provides a web-based Chado installer, genomic data loaders, web-based editing of data for organisms, genomic features, biological libraries, controlled vocabularies and stock collections. Also available are Tripal extensions that support loading and visualizations of NCBI BLAST, InterPro, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and Gene Ontology analyses, as well as an extension that provides integration of Tripal with GBrowse, a popular GMOD tool. An Application Programming Interface is available to allow creation of custom extensions by site developers, and the look-and-feel of the site is completely customizable through Drupal-based PHP template files. Addition of non-biological content and user-management is afforded through Drupal. Tripal is an open source and freely available software package found at http://tripal.sourceforge.net. PMID:21959868

  7. Analysis and prediction of gene splice sites in four Aspergillus genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Kai; Ussery, David; Brunak, Søren

    2009-01-01

    , splice site prediction program called NetAspGene, for the genus Aspergillus. Gene sequences from Aspergillus fumigatus, the most common mould pathogen, were used to build and test our model. Compared to many animals and plants, Aspergillus contains smaller introns; thus we have applied a larger window...... better splice site prediction than other available tools. NetAspGene will be very helpful for the study in Aspergillus splice sites and especially in alternative splicing. A webpage for NetAspGene is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetAspGene....

  8. Data mining approaches for information retrieval from genomic databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Donglin; Singh, Gautam B.

    2000-04-01

    Sequence retrieval in genomic databases is used for finding sequences related to a query sequence specified by a user. Comparison is the main part of the retrieval system in genomic databases. An efficient sequence comparison algorithm is critical in bioinformatics. There are several different algorithms to perform sequence comparison, such as the suffix array based database search, divergence measurement, methods that rely upon the existence of a local similarity between the query sequence and sequences in the database, or common mutual information between query and sequences in DB. In this paper we have described a new method for DNA sequence retrieval based on data mining techniques. Data mining tools generally find patterns among data and have been successfully applied in industries to improve marketing, sales, and customer support operations. We have applied the descriptive data mining techniques to find relevant patterns that are significant for comparing genetic sequences. Relevance feedback score based on common patterns is developed and employed to compute distance between sequences. The contigs of human chromosomes are used to test the retrieval accuracy and the experimental results are presented.

  9. Functional Genomic Analysis of Aspergillus flavus Interacting with Resistant and Susceptible Peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houmiao Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In the Aspergillus flavus (A. flavus–peanut pathosystem, development and metabolism of the fungus directly influence aflatoxin contamination. To comprehensively understand the molecular mechanism of A. flavus interaction with peanut, RNA-seq was used for global transcriptome profiling of A. flavus during interaction with resistant and susceptible peanut genotypes. In total, 67.46 Gb of high-quality bases were generated for A. flavus-resistant (af_R and -susceptible peanut (af_S at one (T1, three (T2 and seven (T3 days post-inoculation. The uniquely mapped reads to A. flavus reference genome in the libraries of af_R and af_S at T2 and T3 were subjected to further analysis, with more than 72% of all obtained genes expressed in the eight libraries. Comparison of expression levels both af_R vs. af_S and T2 vs. T3 uncovered 1926 differentially expressed genes (DEGs. DEGs associated with mycelial growth, conidial development and aflatoxin biosynthesis were up-regulated in af_S compared with af_R, implying that A. flavus mycelia more easily penetrate and produce much more aflatoxin in susceptible than in resistant peanut. Our results serve as a foundation for understanding the molecular mechanisms of aflatoxin production differences between A. flavus-R and -S peanut, and offer new clues to manage aflatoxin contamination in crops.

  10. Addition of a breeding database in the Genome Database for Rosaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Kate; Jung, Sook; Lee, Taein; Brutcher, Lisa; Cho, Ilhyung; Peace, Cameron; Main, Dorrie

    2013-01-01

    Breeding programs produce large datasets that require efficient management systems to keep track of performance, pedigree, geographical and image-based data. With the development of DNA-based screening technologies, more breeding programs perform genotyping in addition to phenotyping for performance evaluation. The integration of breeding data with other genomic and genetic data is instrumental for the refinement of marker-assisted breeding tools, enhances genetic understanding of important crop traits and maximizes access and utility by crop breeders and allied scientists. Development of new infrastructure in the Genome Database for Rosaceae (GDR) was designed and implemented to enable secure and efficient storage, management and analysis of large datasets from the Washington State University apple breeding program and subsequently expanded to fit datasets from other Rosaceae breeders. The infrastructure was built using the software Chado and Drupal, making use of the Natural Diversity module to accommodate large-scale phenotypic and genotypic data. Breeders can search accessions within the GDR to identify individuals with specific trait combinations. Results from Search by Parentage lists individuals with parents in common and results from Individual Variety pages link to all data available on each chosen individual including pedigree, phenotypic and genotypic information. Genotypic data are searchable by markers and alleles; results are linked to other pages in the GDR to enable the user to access tools such as GBrowse and CMap. This breeding database provides users with the opportunity to search datasets in a fully targeted manner and retrieve and compare performance data from multiple selections, years and sites, and to output the data needed for variety release publications and patent applications. The breeding database facilitates efficient program management. Storing publicly available breeding data in a database together with genomic and genetic data will

  11. Bovine Genome Database: new tools for gleaning function from the Bos taurus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsik, Christine G; Unni, Deepak R; Diesh, Colin M; Tayal, Aditi; Emery, Marianne L; Nguyen, Hung N; Hagen, Darren E

    2016-01-01

    We report an update of the Bovine Genome Database (BGD) (http://BovineGenome.org). The goal of BGD is to support bovine genomics research by providing genome annotation and data mining tools. We have developed new genome and annotation browsers using JBrowse and WebApollo for two Bos taurus genome assemblies, the reference genome assembly (UMD3.1.1) and the alternate genome assembly (Btau_4.6.1). Annotation tools have been customized to highlight priority genes for annotation, and to aid annotators in selecting gene evidence tracks from 91 tissue specific RNAseq datasets. We have also developed BovineMine, based on the InterMine data warehousing system, to integrate the bovine genome, annotation, QTL, SNP and expression data with external sources of orthology, gene ontology, gene interaction and pathway information. BovineMine provides powerful query building tools, as well as customized query templates, and allows users to analyze and download genome-wide datasets. With BovineMine, bovine researchers can use orthology to leverage the curated gene pathways of model organisms, such as human, mouse and rat. BovineMine will be especially useful for gene ontology and pathway analyses in conjunction with GWAS and QTL studies. PMID:26481361

  12. MonarchBase: the monarch butterfly genome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuai; Reppert, Steven M

    2013-01-01

    The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is emerging as a model organism to study the mechanisms of circadian clocks and animal navigation, and the genetic underpinnings of long-distance migration. The initial assembly of the monarch genome was released in 2011, and the biological interpretation of the genome focused on the butterfly's migration biology. To make the extensive data associated with the genome accessible to the general biological and lepidopteran communities, we established MonarchBase (available at http://monarchbase.umassmed.edu). The database is an open-access, web-available portal that integrates all available data associated with the monarch butterfly genome. Moreover, MonarchBase provides access to an updated version of genome assembly (v3) upon which all data integration is based. These include genes with systematic annotation, as well as other molecular resources, such as brain expressed sequence tags, migration expression profiles and microRNAs. MonarchBase utilizes a variety of retrieving methods to access data conveniently and for integrating biological interpretations. PMID:23143105

  13. Gene Variant Databases and Sharing: Creating a Global Genomic Variant Database for Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Lora J H; Hegde, Madhuri R

    2016-06-01

    Revolutionary changes in sequencing technology and the desire to develop therapeutics for rare diseases have led to the generation of an enormous amount of genomic data in the last 5 years. Large-scale sequencing done in both research and diagnostic laboratories has linked many new genes to rare diseases, but has also generated a number of variants that we cannot interpret today. It is clear that we remain a long way from a complete understanding of the genomic variation in the human genome and its association with human health and disease. Recent studies identified susceptibility markers to infectious diseases and also the contribution of rare variants to complex diseases in different populations. The sequencing revolution has also led to the creation of a large number of databases that act as "keepers" of data, and in many cases give an interpretation of the effect of the variant. This interpretation is based on reports in the literature, prediction models, and in some cases is accompanied by functional evidence. As we move toward the practice of genomic medicine, and consider its place in "personalized medicine," it is time to ask ourselves how we can aggregate this wealth of data into a single database for multiple users with different goals. PMID:26931283

  14. GDR (Genome Database for Rosaceae: integrated web resources for Rosaceae genomics and genetics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ficklin Stephen

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peach is being developed as a model organism for Rosaceae, an economically important family that includes fruits and ornamental plants such as apple, pear, strawberry, cherry, almond and rose. The genomics and genetics data of peach can play a significant role in the gene discovery and the genetic understanding of related species. The effective utilization of these peach resources, however, requires the development of an integrated and centralized database with associated analysis tools. Description The Genome Database for Rosaceae (GDR is a curated and integrated web-based relational database. GDR contains comprehensive data of the genetically anchored peach physical map, an annotated peach EST database, Rosaceae maps and markers and all publicly available Rosaceae sequences. Annotations of ESTs include contig assembly, putative function, simple sequence repeats, and anchored position to the peach physical map where applicable. Our integrated map viewer provides graphical interface to the genetic, transcriptome and physical mapping information. ESTs, BACs and markers can be queried by various categories and the search result sites are linked to the integrated map viewer or to the WebFPC physical map sites. In addition to browsing and querying the database, users can compare their sequences with the annotated GDR sequences via a dedicated sequence similarity server running either the BLAST or FASTA algorithm. To demonstrate the utility of the integrated and fully annotated database and analysis tools, we describe a case study where we anchored Rosaceae sequences to the peach physical and genetic map by sequence similarity. Conclusions The GDR has been initiated to meet the major deficiency in Rosaceae genomics and genetics research, namely a centralized web database and bioinformatics tools for data storage, analysis and exchange. GDR can be accessed at http://www.genome.clemson.edu/gdr/.

  15. The YeastGenome app: the Saccharomyces Genome Database at your fingertips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Edith D; Karra, Kalpana; Hitz, Benjamin C; Hong, Eurie L; Cherry, J Michael

    2013-01-01

    The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) is a scientific database that provides researchers with high-quality curated data about the genes and gene products of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To provide instant and easy access to this information on mobile devices, we have developed YeastGenome, a native application for the Apple iPhone and iPad. YeastGenome can be used to quickly find basic information about S. cerevisiae genes and chromosomal features regardless of internet connectivity. With or without network access, you can view basic information and Gene Ontology annotations about a gene of interest by searching gene names and gene descriptions or by browsing the database within the app to find the gene of interest. With internet access, the app provides more detailed information about the gene, including mutant phenotypes, references and protein and genetic interactions, as well as provides hyperlinks to retrieve detailed information by showing SGD pages and views of the genome browser. SGD provides online help describing basic ways to navigate the mobile version of SGD, highlights key features and answers frequently asked questions related to the app. The app is available from iTunes (http://itunes.com/apps/yeastgenome). The YeastGenome app is provided freely as a service to our community, as part of SGD's mission to provide free and open access to all its data and annotations. PMID:23396302

  16. Xylella fastidiosa comparative genomic database is an information resource to explore the annotation, genomic features, and biology of different strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro M. Varani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Xylella fastidiosa comparative genomic database is a scientific resource with the aim to provide a user-friendly interface for accessing high-quality manually curated genomic annotation and comparative sequence analysis, as well as for identifying and mapping prophage-like elements, a marked feature of Xylella genomes. Here we describe a database and tools for exploring the biology of this important plant pathogen. The hallmarks of this database are the high quality genomic annotation, the functional and comparative genomic analysis and the identification and mapping of prophage-like elements. It is available from web site http://www.xylella.lncc.br.

  17. Tomato Functional Genomics Database: a comprehensive resource and analysis package for tomato functional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Zhangjun; Joung, Je-Gun; Tang, Xuemei; Zheng, Yi; Huang, Mingyun; Lee, Je Min; McQuinn, Ryan; Tieman, Denise M; Alba, Rob; Klee, Harry J; Giovannoni, James J

    2011-01-01

    Tomato Functional Genomics Database (TFGD) provides a comprehensive resource to store, query, mine, analyze, visualize and integrate large-scale tomato functional genomics data sets. The database is functionally expanded from the previously described Tomato Expression Database by including metabolite profiles as well as large-scale tomato small RNA (sRNA) data sets. Computational pipelines have been developed to process microarray, metabolite and sRNA data sets archived in the database, respectively, and TFGD provides downloads of all the analyzed results. TFGD is also designed to enable users to easily retrieve biologically important information through a set of efficient query interfaces and analysis tools, including improved array probe annotations as well as tools to identify co-expressed genes, significantly affected biological processes and biochemical pathways from gene expression data sets and miRNA targets, and to integrate transcript and metabolite profiles, and sRNA and mRNA sequences. The suite of tools and interfaces in TFGD allow intelligent data mining of recently released and continually expanding large-scale tomato functional genomics data sets. TFGD is available at http://ted.bti.cornell.edu. PMID:20965973

  18. Bovine Genome Database: supporting community annotation and analysis of the Bos taurus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Childs Kevin L

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A goal of the Bovine Genome Database (BGD; http://BovineGenome.org has been to support the Bovine Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium (BGSAC in the annotation and analysis of the bovine genome. We were faced with several challenges, including the need to maintain consistent quality despite diversity in annotation expertise in the research community, the need to maintain consistent data formats, and the need to minimize the potential duplication of annotation effort. With new sequencing technologies allowing many more eukaryotic genomes to be sequenced, the demand for collaborative annotation is likely to increase. Here we present our approach, challenges and solutions facilitating a large distributed annotation project. Results and Discussion BGD has provided annotation tools that supported 147 members of the BGSAC in contributing 3,871 gene models over a fifteen-week period, and these annotations have been integrated into the bovine Official Gene Set. Our approach has been to provide an annotation system, which includes a BLAST site, multiple genome browsers, an annotation portal, and the Apollo Annotation Editor configured to connect directly to our Chado database. In addition to implementing and integrating components of the annotation system, we have performed computational analyses to create gene evidence tracks and a consensus gene set, which can be viewed on individual gene pages at BGD. Conclusions We have provided annotation tools that alleviate challenges associated with distributed annotation. Our system provides a consistent set of data to all annotators and eliminates the need for annotators to format data. Involving the bovine research community in genome annotation has allowed us to leverage expertise in various areas of bovine biology to provide biological insight into the genome sequence.

  19. Download - TMBETA-GENOME | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us TM...File Simple search and download 1 README README_e.html - 2 Sequence Collection tmbeta_genome_sequence_collec...tion.zip (8.8 KB) Simple search and download 3 Sequence Classification tmbeta_genome_sequence_classification...o About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Download - TMBETA-GENOME | LSDB Archive ...

  20. A trispecies Aspergillus microarray: Comparative transcriptomics of three Aspergillus species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Vongsangnak, Wanwipa; Panagiotou, Gianni; Salazar, Margarita Pena; Lehmann, Linda Olkjær; Nielsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    The full-genome sequencing of the filamentous fungi Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus oryzae has opened possibilities for studying the cellular physiology of these fungi on a systemic level. As a tool to explore this, we are making available an Affymetrix GeneChip developed...

  1. The Princeton Protein Orthology Database (P-POD): A Comparative Genomics Analysis Tool for Biologists

    OpenAIRE

    Sven Heinicke; Livstone, Michael S.; Charles Lu; Rose Oughtred; Fan Kang; Angiuoli, Samuel V; Owen White; David Botstein; Kara Dolinski

    2007-01-01

    Many biological databases that provide comparative genomics information and tools are now available on the internet. While certainly quite useful, to our knowledge none of the existing databases combine results from multiple comparative genomics methods with manually curated information from the literature. Here we describe the Princeton Protein Orthology Database (P-POD, http://ortholog.princeton.edu), a user-friendly database system that allows users to find and visualize the phylogenetic r...

  2. Genome-scale analysis of the high-efficient protein secretion system of Aspergillus oryzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lifang; Feizi, Amir; Osterlund, Tobias; Hjort, Carsten; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background: The koji mold, Aspergillus oryzae is widely used for the production of industrial enzymes due to its particularly high protein secretion capacity and ability to perform post-translational modifications. However, systemic analysis of its secretion system is lacking, generally due to the...... related fungal species such as Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus niger. To evaluate the defined component list, we performed transcriptome analysis on three a-amylase over-producing strains with varying levels of secretion capacities. Specifically, secretory components involved in the ER...... overproducing amylase. Conclusion: In combination with the transcriptome data, the most complete secretory component list and the putative secretome, we improved the systemic understanding of the secretory machinery of A. oryzae in response to high levels of protein secretion. The roles of many newly predicted...

  3. Sequence modelling and an extensible data model for genomic database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peter Wei-Der [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) plans to sequence the human genome by the beginning of the next century. It will generate DNA sequences of more than 10 billion bases and complex marker sequences (maps) of more than 100 million markers. All of these information will be stored in database management systems (DBMSs). However, existing data models do not have the abstraction mechanism for modelling sequences and existing DBMS`s do not have operations for complex sequences. This work addresses the problem of sequence modelling in the context of the HGP and the more general problem of an extensible object data model that can incorporate the sequence model as well as existing and future data constructs and operators. First, we proposed a general sequence model that is application and implementation independent. This model is used to capture the sequence information found in the HGP at the conceptual level. In addition, abstract and biological sequence operators are defined for manipulating the modelled sequences. Second, we combined many features of semantic and object oriented data models into an extensible framework, which we called the ``Extensible Object Model``, to address the need of a modelling framework for incorporating the sequence data model with other types of data constructs and operators. This framework is based on the conceptual separation between constructors and constraints. We then used this modelling framework to integrate the constructs for the conceptual sequence model. The Extensible Object Model is also defined with a graphical representation, which is useful as a tool for database designers. Finally, we defined a query language to support this model and implement the query processor to demonstrate the feasibility of the extensible framework and the usefulness of the conceptual sequence model.

  4. Sequence modelling and an extensible data model for genomic database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Peter Wei-Der (California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) plans to sequence the human genome by the beginning of the next century. It will generate DNA sequences of more than 10 billion bases and complex marker sequences (maps) of more than 100 million markers. All of these information will be stored in database management systems (DBMSs). However, existing data models do not have the abstraction mechanism for modelling sequences and existing DBMS's do not have operations for complex sequences. This work addresses the problem of sequence modelling in the context of the HGP and the more general problem of an extensible object data model that can incorporate the sequence model as well as existing and future data constructs and operators. First, we proposed a general sequence model that is application and implementation independent. This model is used to capture the sequence information found in the HGP at the conceptual level. In addition, abstract and biological sequence operators are defined for manipulating the modelled sequences. Second, we combined many features of semantic and object oriented data models into an extensible framework, which we called the Extensible Object Model'', to address the need of a modelling framework for incorporating the sequence data model with other types of data constructs and operators. This framework is based on the conceptual separation between constructors and constraints. We then used this modelling framework to integrate the constructs for the conceptual sequence model. The Extensible Object Model is also defined with a graphical representation, which is useful as a tool for database designers. Finally, we defined a query language to support this model and implement the query processor to demonstrate the feasibility of the extensible framework and the usefulness of the conceptual sequence model.

  5. The Saccharomyces Genome Database: Advanced Searching Methods and Data Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, J Michael

    2015-12-01

    At the core of the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) are chromosomal features that encode a product. These include protein-coding genes and major noncoding RNA genes, such as tRNA and rRNA genes. The basic entry point into SGD is a gene or open-reading frame name that leads directly to the locus summary information page. A keyword describing function, phenotype, selective condition, or text from abstracts will also provide a door into the SGD. A DNA or protein sequence can be used to identify a gene or a chromosomal region using BLAST. Protein and DNA sequence identifiers, PubMed and NCBI IDs, author names, and function terms are also valid entry points. The information in SGD has been gathered and is maintained by a group of scientific biocurators and software developers who are devoted to providing researchers with up-to-date information from the published literature, connections to all the major research resources, and tools that allow the data to be explored. All the collected information cannot be represented or summarized for every possible question; therefore, it is necessary to be able to search the structured data in the database. This protocol describes the YeastMine tool, which provides an advanced search capability via an interactive tool. The SGD also archives results from microarray expression experiments, and a strategy designed to explore these data using the SPELL (Serial Pattern of Expression Levels Locator) tool is provided. PMID:26631124

  6. Genome wide association mapping of Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin accumulation resistance in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of maize with aflatoxin, produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus, has severe health and economic consequences. Efforts to reduce aflatoxin accumulation in maize have focused on identifying and selecting germplasm with natural host resistance factors, and several maize lines with sign...

  7. Aspergillus flavus whole genome and EST sequence releases and construction of homologous gene search blast server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxins are toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites. These compounds, produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus, contaminate pre-harvest agricultural crops in the field and post-harvest grains during storage. In order to reduce and eliminate aflatoxin contamination of food and feed...

  8. Mapping of polyketide biosynthesis pathways in Aspergillus nidulans using a genome wide PKS gene deletion library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Rank, Christian; Klejnstrup, Marie Louise;

    In order to map new links between PKS genes and their products in Aspergillus nidulans we have systematically deleted all thirty-two individual genes predicted to encode polyketide synthases in this model organism. This number greatly exceeds the number of currently known PKs calling for new...

  9. Aspergillus flavus Genomic Data Mining Provides Clues for Its Use in Producing Biobased Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus flavus is notorious for its ability to produce aflatoxins. It is also an opportunistic pathogen that infects plants, animals and human beings. The ability to survive in the natural environment, living on plant tissues (leaves or stalks), live or dead insects make A. flavus a ubiquitous...

  10. The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2007: status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenner, Marsha W; Liolios, Konstantinos; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2007-12-31

    The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) is a comprehensive resource of information for genome and metagenome projects world-wide. GOLD provides access to complete and ongoing projects and their associated metadata through pre-computed lists and a search page. The database currently incorporates information for more than 2900 sequencing projects, of which 639 have been completed and the data deposited in the public databases. GOLD is constantly expanding to provide metadata information related to the project and the organism and is compliant with the Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence (MIGS) specifications.

  11. MBGD update 2015: microbial genome database for flexible ortholog analysis utilizing a diverse set of genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Ikuo; Mihara, Motohiro; Nishide, Hiroyo; Chiba, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    The microbial genome database for comparative analysis (MBGD) (available at http://mbgd.genome.ad.jp/) is a comprehensive ortholog database for flexible comparative analysis of microbial genomes, where the users are allowed to create an ortholog table among any specified set of organisms. Because of the rapid increase in microbial genome data owing to the next-generation sequencing technology, it becomes increasingly challenging to maintain high-quality orthology relationships while allowing the users to incorporate the latest genomic data available into an analysis. Because many of the recently accumulating genomic data are draft genome sequences for which some complete genome sequences of the same or closely related species are available, MBGD now stores draft genome data and allows the users to incorporate them into a user-specific ortholog database using the MyMBGD functionality. In this function, draft genome data are incorporated into an existing ortholog table created only from the complete genome data in an incremental manner to prevent low-quality draft data from affecting clustering results. In addition, to provide high-quality orthology relationships, the standard ortholog table containing all the representative genomes, which is first created by the rapid classification program DomClust, is now refined using DomRefine, a recently developed program for improving domain-level clustering using multiple sequence alignment information. PMID:25398900

  12. ECRbase: Database of Evolutionary Conserved Regions, Promoters, and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Vertebrate Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, G; Ovcharenko, I

    2006-08-08

    Evolutionary conservation of DNA sequences provides a tool for the identification of functional elements in genomes. We have created a database of evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) in vertebrate genomes entitled ECRbase that is constructed from a collection of pairwise vertebrate genome alignments produced by the ECR Browser database. ECRbase features a database of syntenic blocks that recapitulate the evolution of rearrangements in vertebrates and a collection of promoters in all vertebrate genomes presented in the database. The database also contains a collection of annotated transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in all ECRs and promoter elements. ECRbase currently includes human, rhesus macaque, dog, opossum, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, and two pufferfish genomes. It is freely accessible at http://ECRbase.dcode.org.

  13. Allergens/Antigens, Toxins and Polyketides of Important Aspergillus Species

    OpenAIRE

    Bhetariya, Preetida J.; Madan, Taruna; Basir, Seemi Farhat; Varma, Anupam; Usha, Sarma P.

    2011-01-01

    The medical, agricultural and biotechnological importance of the primitive eukaryotic microorganisms, the Fungi was recognized way back in 1920. Among various groups of fungi, the Aspergillus species are studied in great detail using advances in genomics and proteomics to unravel biological and molecular mechanisms in these fungi. Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus parasiticus, Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus terreus are some of the important specie...

  14. MELOGEN: an EST database for melon functional genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puigdomènech Pere

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melon (Cucumis melo L. is one of the most important fleshy fruits for fresh consumption. Despite this, few genomic resources exist for this species. To facilitate the discovery of genes involved in essential traits, such as fruit development, fruit maturation and disease resistance, and to speed up the process of breeding new and better adapted melon varieties, we have produced a large collection of expressed sequence tags (ESTs from eight normalized cDNA libraries from different tissues in different physiological conditions. Results We determined over 30,000 ESTs that were clustered into 16,637 non-redundant sequences or unigenes, comprising 6,023 tentative consensus sequences (contigs and 10,614 unclustered sequences (singletons. Many potential molecular markers were identified in the melon dataset: 1,052 potential simple sequence repeats (SSRs and 356 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were found. Sixty-nine percent of the melon unigenes showed a significant similarity with proteins in databases. Functional classification of the unigenes was carried out following the Gene Ontology scheme. In total, 9,402 unigenes were mapped to one or more ontology. Remarkably, the distributions of melon and Arabidopsis unigenes followed similar tendencies, suggesting that the melon dataset is representative of the whole melon transcriptome. Bioinformatic analyses primarily focused on potential precursors of melon micro RNAs (miRNAs in the melon dataset, but many other genes potentially controlling disease resistance and fruit quality traits were also identified. Patterns of transcript accumulation were characterised by Real-Time-qPCR for 20 of these genes. Conclusion The collection of ESTs characterised here represents a substantial increase on the genetic information available for melon. A database (MELOGEN which contains all EST sequences, contig images and several tools for analysis and data mining has been created. This set of

  15. Draft genome sequences of two closely-related aflatoxigenic Aspergillus species obtained from the Ivory Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genomes of the A. ochraceoroseus and A. rambellii type strains were sequenced using a personal genome machine, followed by annotation of their genes. The genome size for A. ochraceoroseus was found to be approximately 23 Mb and contained 7,837 genes, while the A. rambellii genome was found to be...

  16. Mutagenesis and mitotic recombination in Aspergillus niger, an expedition from gene to genome

    OpenAIRE

    Vondervoort, Peter Jozef Ida van de

    2007-01-01

    Aspergillus niger is a cosmopolitan fungus and its spores can be found in air and soil worldwide. This saprophyte is used in food biotechnology for the production of proteins, mainly enzymes and for the production of organic acids. In the production of proteins, several problems are encountered such as repressed gene-expression, morphologic and genetic instability and undesired metabolite accumulation. To find solutions to these problems, often mutagenesis and mitotic recombination have been ...

  17. Purification and enzymatic characterization of secretory glycoside hydrolase family 3 (GH3) aryl β-glucosidases screened from Aspergillus oryzae genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Kanako; Watanabe, Akira; Ujiie, Seiryu; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2015-12-01

    By a global search of the genome database of Aspergillus oryzae, we found 23 genes encoding putative β-glucosidases, among which 10 genes with a signal peptide belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 3 (GH3) were overexpressed in A. oryzae using the improved glaA gene promoter. Consequently, crude enzyme preparations from three strains, each harboring the genes AO090038000223 (bglA), AO090103000127 (bglF), and AO090003001511 (bglJ), showed a substrate preference toward p-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucopyranoside (pNPGlc) and thus were purified to homogeneity and enzymatically characterized. All the purified enzymes (BglA, BglF, and BglJ) preferentially hydrolyzed aryl β-glycosides, including pNPGlc, rather than cellobiose, and these enzymes were proven to be aryl β-glucosidases. Although the specific activity of BglF toward all the substrates tested was significantly low, BglA and BglJ showed appreciably high activities toward pNPGlc and arbutin. The kinetic parameters of BglA and BglJ for pNPGlc suggested that both the enzymes had relatively higher hydrolytic activity toward pNPGlc among the fungal β-glucosidases reported. The thermal and pH stabilities of BglA were higher than those of BglJ, and BglA was particularly stable in a wide pH range (pH 4.5-10). In contrast, BglJ was the most heat- and alkaline-labile among the three β-glucosidases. Furthermore, BglA was more tolerant to ethanol than BglJ; as a result, it showed much higher hydrolytic activity toward isoflavone glycosides in the presence of ethanol than BglJ. This study suggested that the mining of novel β-glucosidases exhibiting higher activity from microbial genome sequences is of great use for the production of beneficial compounds such as isoflavone aglycones. PMID:25936960

  18. Brassica database (BRAD) version 2.0: integrating and mining Brassicaceae species genomic resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaobo; Wu, Jian; Liang, Jianli; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2015-01-01

    The Brassica database (BRAD) was built initially to assist users apply Brassica rapa and Arabidopsis thaliana genomic data efficiently to their research. However, many Brassicaceae genomes have been sequenced and released after its construction. These genomes are rich resources for comparative genomics, gene annotation and functional evolutionary studies of Brassica crops. Therefore, we have updated BRAD to version 2.0 (V2.0). In BRAD V2.0, 11 more Brassicaceae genomes have been integrated into the database, namely those of Arabidopsis lyrata, Aethionema arabicum, Brassica oleracea, Brassica napus, Camelina sativa, Capsella rubella, Leavenworthia alabamica, Sisymbrium irio and three extremophiles Schrenkiella parvula, Thellungiella halophila and Thellungiella salsuginea. BRAD V2.0 provides plots of syntenic genomic fragments between pairs of Brassicaceae species, from the level of chromosomes to genomic blocks. The Generic Synteny Browser (GBrowse_syn), a module of the Genome Browser (GBrowse), is used to show syntenic relationships between multiple genomes. Search functions for retrieving syntenic and non-syntenic orthologs, as well as their annotation and sequences are also provided. Furthermore, genome and annotation information have been imported into GBrowse so that all functional elements can be visualized in one frame. We plan to continually update BRAD by integrating more Brassicaceae genomes into the database. Database URL: http://brassicadb.org/brad/. PMID:26589635

  19. SorghumFDB: sorghum functional genomics database with multidimensional network analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Tian; You, Qi; Zhang, Liwei; Yi, Xin; Yan, Hengyu; Xu, Wenying; Su, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench) has excellent agronomic traits and biological properties, such as heat and drought-tolerance. It is a C4 grass and potential bioenergy-producing plant, which makes it an important crop worldwide. With the sorghum genome sequence released, it is essential to establish a sorghum functional genomics data mining platform. We collected genomic data and some functional annotations to construct a sorghum functional genomics database (SorghumFDB). SorghumFDB inte...

  20. Assessment of the pectinolytic network of Aspergillus niger by functional genomics : insights from the transcriptome

    OpenAIRE

    Martens-Uzunova, E S

    2008-01-01

    More than a century ago, in 1889, A. Fernbach presented a detailed report about the invertase of Aspergillus niger in the third edition of “Annales De L'institut Pasteur”. Since then, many of the enzymes secreted by A. niger have found a broad range of applications, and today they are produced on an industrial scale. This filamentous fungus is also used as a primary source for the production of organic acids and other economically important metabolites. Although, many of these fermentation pr...

  1. Nuclear-like Seq in mt Genome - RMG | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ce mitochondrial genome length Length of the sequence fragment sense or antisense Sense or antisense strand +: sense -: antisense... Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Nuclear-like Seq in mt Genome - RMG | LSDB Archive ... ...[ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us RMG Nuclear-like Seq... in mt Genome Data detail Data name Nuclear-like Seq in mt Genome Description of data contents List of seq...RL http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/rmg_nuclear_like_seq#en Data acquisition method Entire Sequence data in this database

  2. EuMicroSatdb: A database for microsatellites in the sequenced genomes of eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grover Atul

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellites have immense utility as molecular markers in different fields like genome characterization and mapping, phylogeny and evolutionary biology. Existing microsatellite databases are of limited utility for experimental and computational biologists with regard to their content and information output. EuMicroSatdb (Eukaryotic MicroSatellite database http://ipu.ac.in/usbt/EuMicroSatdb.htm is a web based relational database for easy and efficient positional mining of microsatellites from sequenced eukaryotic genomes. Description A user friendly web interface has been developed for microsatellite data retrieval using Active Server Pages (ASP. The backend database codes for data extraction and assembly have been written using Perl based scripts and C++. Precise need based microsatellites data retrieval is possible using different input parameters like microsatellite type (simple perfect or compound perfect, repeat unit length (mono- to hexa-nucleotide, repeat number, microsatellite length and chromosomal location in the genome. Furthermore, information about clustering of different microsatellites in the genome can also be retrieved. Finally, to facilitate primer designing for PCR amplification of any desired microsatellite locus, 200 bp upstream and downstream sequences are provided. Conclusion The database allows easy systematic retrieval of comprehensive information about simple and compound microsatellites, microsatellite clusters and their locus coordinates in 31 sequenced eukaryotic genomes. The information content of the database is useful in different areas of research like gene tagging, genome mapping, population genetics, germplasm characterization and in understanding microsatellite dynamics in eukaryotic genomes.

  3. Genome annotations - KOME | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ated to rice genomes in GenBank blastn/blastx results. Related to rice genomes is defined as follows: The word... Oryza sativa or rice is included in the definition of the entry and the word BAC, PAC, chromosome Genomic

  4. The Candida Genome Database (CGD), a community resource for Candida albicans gene and protein information

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaud, Martha B.; Costanzo, Maria C.; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Binkley, Gail; Lane, Christopher; Miyasato, Stuart R.; SHERLOCK, Gavin

    2004-01-01

    The Candida Genome Database (CGD) is a new database that contains genomic information about the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans. CGD is a public resource for the research community that is interested in the molecular biology of this fungus. CGD curators are in the process of combing the scientific literature to collect all C.albicans gene names and aliases; to assign gene ontology terms that describe the molecular function, biological process, and subcellular localization of ea...

  5. cisRED: a database system for genome-scale computational discovery of regulatory elements

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, G; Bilenky, M.; Lin, K.; He, A.; Yuen, W.; Dagpinar, M.; Varhol, R.; Teague, K.; Griffith, O L; Zhang, X; Pan, Y.; Hassel, M.; Sleumer, M. C.; Pan, W; Pleasance, E. D.

    2005-01-01

    We describe cisRED, a database for conserved regulatory elements that are identified and ranked by a genome-scale computational system (). The database and high-throughput predictive pipeline are designed to address diverse target genomes in the context of rapidly evolving data resources and tools. Motifs are predicted in promoter regions using multiple discovery methods applied to sequence sets that include corresponding sequence regions from vertebrates. We estimate motif significance by ap...

  6. Genome-based Characterization of Two Prenylation Steps in the Assembly of the Stephacidin and Notoamide Anticancer Agents in a Marine-derived Aspergillus sp

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Yousong; de Wet, Jeffrey R.; Cavalcoli, James; Li, Shengying; Greshock, Thomas J.; Miller, Kenneth A.; Finefield, Jennifer M.; Sunderhaus, James D.; McAfoos, Timothy; Tsukamoto, Sachiko; Williams, Robert M.; Sherman, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Stephacidin and notoamide natural products belong to a group of prenylated indole alkaloids containing a core bicyclo[2.2.2]diazaoctane ring system. These bioactive fungal secondary metabolites have a range of unusual structural and stereochemical features but their biosynthesis has remained uncharacterized. Herein, we report the first biosynthetic gene cluster for this class of fungal alkaloids based on whole genome sequencing of a marine-derived Aspergillus sp. Two central pathway enzymes c...

  7. Biosynthetic Pathway for the Epipolythiodioxopiperazine Acetylaranotin in Aspergillus terreus Revealed by Genome-based Deletion Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Yeh, Hsu-Hua; Chiang, Yi Ming; Sanchez, James F.; Chang, ShuLin; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wang, Clay C.

    2013-04-15

    Abstract Epipolythiodioxopiperazines (ETPs) are a class of fungal secondary metabolites derived from cyclic peptides. Acetylaranotin belongs to one structural subgroup of ETPs characterized by the presence of a seven-membered dihydrooxepine ring. Defining the genes involved in acetylaranotin biosynthesis should provide a means to increase production of these compounds and facilitate the engineering of second-generation molecules. The filamentous fungus Aspergillus terreus produces acetylaranotin and related natural products. Using targeted gene deletions, we have identified a cluster of 9 genes including one nonribosomal peptide synthase gene, ataP, that is required for acetylaranotin biosynthesis. Chemical analysis of the wild type and mutant strains enabled us to isolate seventeen natural products that are either intermediates in the normal biosynthetic pathway or shunt products that are produced when the pathway is interrupted through mutation. Nine of the compounds identified in this study are novel natural products. Our data allow us to propose a complete biosynthetic pathway for acetylaranotin and related natural products.

  8. BRAD, the genetics and genomics database for Brassica plants

    OpenAIRE

    Li Pingxia; Liu Bo; Sun Silong; Fang Lu; Wu Jian; Liu Shengyi; Cheng Feng; Hua Wei; Wang Xiaowu

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Brassica species include both vegetable and oilseed crops, which are very important to the daily life of common human beings. Meanwhile, the Brassica species represent an excellent system for studying numerous aspects of plant biology, specifically for the analysis of genome evolution following polyploidy, so it is also very important for scientific research. Now, the genome of Brassica rapa has already been assembled, it is the time to do deep mining of the genome data. D...

  9. MonarchBase: the monarch butterfly genome database

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Shuai; Reppert, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) is emerging as a model organism to study the mechanisms of circadian clocks and animal navigation, and the genetic underpinnings of long-distance migration. The initial assembly of the monarch genome was released in 2011, and the biological interpretation of the genome focused on the butterfly’s migration biology. To make the extensive data associated with the genome accessible to the general biological and lepidopteran communities, we established Mona...

  10. Comparative genomics of citric-acid producing Aspergillus niger ATCC 1015 versus enzyme-producing CBS 513.88

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.; Baker, Scott E.; Andersen, Mikael R.; Salazar, Margarita P.; Schaap, Peter J.; Vondervoot, Peter J.I. van de; Culley, David; Thykaer, Jette; Frisvad, Jens C.; Nielsen, Kristen F.; Albang, Richard; Albermann, Kaj; Berka, Randy M.; Braus, Gerhard H.; Braus-Stromeyer, Susanna A.; Corrochano, Luis M.; Dai, Ziyu; Dijck, Piet W.M. van; Hofmann, Gerald; Lasure, Linda L.; Magnusson, Jon K.; Meijer, Susan L.; Nielsen, Jakob B.; Nielsen, Michael L.; Ooyen, Albert J.J. van; Panther, Kathyrn S.; Pel, Herman J.; Poulsen, Lars; Samson, Rob A.; Stam, Hen; Tsang, Adrian; Brink, Johannes M. van den; Atkins, Alex; Aerts, Andrea; Shapiro, Harris; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Salamov, Asaf; Lou, Yigong; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Grimwood, Jane; Kubicek, Christian P.; Martinez, Diego; Peij, Noel N.M.E. van; Roubos, Johannes A.; Nielsen, Jens

    2011-04-28

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger exhibits great diversity in its phenotype. It is found globally, both as marine and terrestrial strains, produces both organic acids and hydrolytic enzymes in high amounts, and some isolates exhibit pathogenicity. Although the genome of an industrial enzyme-producing A. niger strain (CBS 513.88) has already been sequenced, the versatility and diversity of this species compels additional exploration. We therefore undertook whole genome sequencing of the acidogenic A. niger wild type strain (ATCC 1015), and produced a genome sequence of very high quality. Only 15 gaps are present in the sequence and half the telomeric regions have been elucidated. Moreover, sequence information from ATCC 1015 was utilized to improve the genome sequence of CBS 513.88. Chromosome-level comparisons uncovered several genome rearrangements, deletions, a clear case of strain-specific horizontal gene transfer, and identification of 0.8 megabase of novel sequence. Single nucleotide polymorphisms per kilobase (SNPs/kb) between the two strains were found to be exceptionally high (average: 7.8, maximum: 160 SNPs/kb). High variation within the species was confirmed with exo-metabolite profiling and phylogenetics. Detailed lists of alleles were generated, and genotypic differences were observed to accumulate in metabolic pathways essential to acid production and protein synthesis. A transcriptome analysis revealed up-regulation of the electron transport chain, specifically the alternative oxidative pathway in ATCC 1015, while CBS 513.88 showed significant up-regulation of genes relevant to glucoamylase A production, such as tRNA-synthases and protein transporters. Our results and datasets from this integrative systems biology analysis resulted in a snapshot of fungal evolution and will support further optimization of cell factories based on filamentous fungi.[Supplemental materials (10 figures, three text documents and 16 tables) have been made available

  11. License - TMBETA-GENOME | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us TM... 2.1 Japan . If you use data from this database, please be sure attribute this database as follows: TMBETA-G...A Associate Professor Department of Biotechnology IIT Madras Chennai - 600 036 Tel: +91-44-2257-4138(O) E-mail: http://www.iitm...e. Joomla SEF URLs by Artio About This Database Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us License - TMBETA-GENOME | LSDB Archive ...

  12. Use of Genomic Databases for Inquiry-Based Learning about Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledley, Fred; Ndung'u, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The genome projects of the past decades have created extensive databases of biological information with applications in both research and education. We describe an inquiry-based exercise that uses one such database, the National Center for Biotechnology Information Influenza Virus Resource, to advance learning about influenza. This database…

  13. CottonGen: a genomics, genetics and breeding database for cotton research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CottonGen (http://www.cottongen.org) is a curated and integrated web-based relational database providing access to publicly available genomic, genetic and breeding data for cotton. CottonGen supercedes CottonDB and the Cotton Marker Database, with enhanced tools for easier data sharing, mining, vis...

  14. CBS Genome Atlas Database: a dynamic storage for bioinformatic results and sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Peter Fischer; Ussery, David

    2004-01-01

    Currently, new bacterial genomes are being published on a monthly basis. With the growing amount of genome sequence data, there is a demand for a flexible and easy-to-maintain structure for storing sequence data and results from bioinformatic analysis. More than 150 sequenced bacterial genomes are...... detailed comparative genomics. DNA structural calculations like curvature and stacking energy, DNA compositions like base skews, oligo skews and repeats at the local and global level are just a few of the analysis that are presented on the CBS Genome Atlas Web page. Complex analysis, changing methods and...... frequent addition of new models are factors that require a dynamic database layout. Using basic tools like the GNU Make system, csh, Perl and MySQL, we have created a flexible database environment for storing and maintaining such results for a collection of complete microbial genomes. Currently, these...

  15. The Ruby UCSC API: accessing the UCSC genome database using Ruby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishima Hiroyuki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC genome database is among the most used sources of genomic annotation in human and other organisms. The database offers an excellent web-based graphical user interface (the UCSC genome browser and several means for programmatic queries. A simple application programming interface (API in a scripting language aimed at the biologist was however not yet available. Here, we present the Ruby UCSC API, a library to access the UCSC genome database using Ruby. Results The API is designed as a BioRuby plug-in and built on the ActiveRecord 3 framework for the object-relational mapping, making writing SQL statements unnecessary. The current version of the API supports databases of all organisms in the UCSC genome database including human, mammals, vertebrates, deuterostomes, insects, nematodes, and yeast. The API uses the bin index—if available—when querying for genomic intervals. The API also supports genomic sequence queries using locally downloaded *.2bit files that are not stored in the official MySQL database. The API is implemented in pure Ruby and is therefore available in different environments and with different Ruby interpreters (including JRuby. Conclusions Assisted by the straightforward object-oriented design of Ruby and ActiveRecord, the Ruby UCSC API will facilitate biologists to query the UCSC genome database programmatically. The API is available through the RubyGem system. Source code and documentation are available at https://github.com/misshie/bioruby-ucsc-api/ under the Ruby license. Feedback and help is provided via the website at http://rubyucscapi.userecho.com/.

  16. PGSB PlantsDB: updates to the database framework for comparative plant genome research

    OpenAIRE

    Spannagl, Manuel; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Bader, Kai C.; Martis, Mihaela-Maria; Seidel, Michael; Kugler, Karl G; Gundlach, Heidrun; Mayer, Klaus F. X.

    2016-01-01

    PGSB (Plant Genome and Systems Biology: formerly MIPS) PlantsDB (http://pgsb.helmholtz-muenchen.de/plant/index.jsp) is a database framework for the comparative analysis and visualization of plant genome data. The resource has been updated with new data sets and types as well as specialized tools and interfaces to address user demands for intuitive access to complex plant genome data. In its latest incarnation, we have re-worked both the layout and navigation structure and implemented new keyw...

  17. PGSB PlantsDB: updates to the database framework for comparative plant genome research

    OpenAIRE

    Spannagl, Manuel; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Bader, Kai C.; Martis, Mihaela M.; Seidel, Michael; Kugler, Karl G.; Gundlach, Heidrun; Mayer, Klaus F. X

    2015-01-01

    PGSB (Plant Genome and Systems Biology: formerly MIPS) PlantsDB (http://pgsb.helmholtz-muenchen.de/plant/index.jsp) is a database framework for the comparative analysis and visualization of plant genome data. The resource has been updated with new data sets and types as well as specialized tools and interfaces to address user demands for intuitive access to complex plant genome data. In its latest incarnation, we have re-worked both the layout and navigation structure and implemented new keyw...

  18. Improving microbial genome annotations in an integrated database context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Min A Chen

    Full Text Available Effective comparative analysis of microbial genomes requires a consistent and complete view of biological data. Consistency regards the biological coherence of annotations, while completeness regards the extent and coverage of functional characterization for genomes. We have developed tools that allow scientists to assess and improve the consistency and completeness of microbial genome annotations in the context of the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG family of systems. All publicly available microbial genomes are characterized in IMG using different functional annotation and pathway resources, thus providing a comprehensive framework for identifying and resolving annotation discrepancies. A rule based system for predicting phenotypes in IMG provides a powerful mechanism for validating functional annotations, whereby the phenotypic traits of an organism are inferred based on the presence of certain metabolic reactions and pathways and compared to experimentally observed phenotypes. The IMG family of systems are available at http://img.jgi.doe.gov/.

  19. Mitome: dynamic and interactive database for comparative mitochondrial genomics in metazoan animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Seok; Oh, Jeongsu; Kim, Young Uk; Kim, Namchul; Yang, Sungjin; Hwang, Ui Wook

    2008-01-01

    Mitome is a specialized mitochondrial genome database designed for easy comparative analysis of various features of metazoan mitochondrial genomes such as base frequency, A+T skew, codon usage and gene arrangement pattern. A particular function of the database is the automatic reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships among metazoans selected by a user from a taxonomic tree menu based on nucleotide sequences, amino acid sequences or gene arrangement patterns. Mitome also enables us (i) to easily find the taxonomic positions of organisms of which complete mitochondrial genome sequences are publicly available; (ii) to acquire various metazoan mitochondrial genome characteristics through a graphical genome browser; (iii) to search for homology patterns in mitochondrial gene arrangements; (iv) to download nucleotide or amino acid sequences not only of an entire mitochondrial genome but also of each component; and (v) to find interesting references easily through links with PubMed. In order to provide users with a dynamic, responsive, interactive and faster web database, Mitome is constructed using two recently highlighted techniques, Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML) and Web Services. Mitome has the potential to become very useful in the fields of molecular phylogenetics and evolution and comparative organelle genomics. The database is available at: http://www.mitome.info. PMID:17940090

  20. CarrotDB: a genomic and transcriptomic database for carrot

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Tan, Hua-Wei; Wang, Feng; Hou, Xi-Lin; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Carrot (Daucus carota L.) is an economically important vegetable worldwide and is the largest source of carotenoids and provitamin A in the human diet. Given the importance of this vegetable to humans, research and breeding communities on carrot should obtain useful genomic and transcriptomic information. The first whole-genome sequences of ‘DC-27’ carrot were de novo assembled and analyzed. Transcriptomic sequences of 14 carrot genotypes were downloaded from the Sequence Read Archive (SRA) d...

  1. The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2009: status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liolios, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hugenholtz, Phil; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2009-09-01

    The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) is a comprehensive resource for centralized monitoring of genome and metagenome projects worldwide. Both complete and ongoing projects, along with their associated metadata, can be accessed in GOLD through precomputed tables and a search page. As of September 2009, GOLD contains information for more than 5800 sequencing projects, of which 1100 have been completed and their sequence data deposited in a public repository. GOLD continues to expand, moving toward the goal of providing the most comprehensive repository of metadata information related to the projects and their organisms/environments in accordance with the Minimum Information about a (Meta)Genome Sequence (MIGS/MIMS) specification.

  2. Databases and Web Tools for Cancer Genomics Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yadong Yang; Xunong Dong; Bingbing Xie; Nan Ding; Juan Chen; Yongjun Li; Qian Zhang; Hongzhu Qu; Xiangdong Fang

    2015-01-01

    Publicly-accessible resources have promoted the advance of scientific discovery. The era of genomics and big data has brought the need for collaboration and data sharing in order to make effective use of this new knowledge. Here, we describe the web resources for cancer genomics research and rate them on the basis of the diversity of cancer types, sample size, omics data com-prehensiveness, and user experience. The resources reviewed include data repository and analysis tools;and we hope such introduction will promote the awareness and facilitate the usage of these resources in the cancer research community.

  3. PGSB PlantsDB: updates to the database framework for comparative plant genome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spannagl, Manuel; Nussbaumer, Thomas; Bader, Kai C; Martis, Mihaela M; Seidel, Michael; Kugler, Karl G; Gundlach, Heidrun; Mayer, Klaus F X

    2016-01-01

    PGSB (Plant Genome and Systems Biology: formerly MIPS) PlantsDB (http://pgsb.helmholtz-muenchen.de/plant/index.jsp) is a database framework for the comparative analysis and visualization of plant genome data. The resource has been updated with new data sets and types as well as specialized tools and interfaces to address user demands for intuitive access to complex plant genome data. In its latest incarnation, we have re-worked both the layout and navigation structure and implemented new keyword search options and a new BLAST sequence search functionality. Actively involved in corresponding sequencing consortia, PlantsDB has dedicated special efforts to the integration and visualization of complex triticeae genome data, especially for barley, wheat and rye. We enhanced CrowsNest, a tool to visualize syntenic relationships between genomes, with data from the wheat sub-genome progenitor Aegilops tauschii and added functionality to the PGSB RNASeqExpressionBrowser. GenomeZipper results were integrated for the genomes of barley, rye, wheat and perennial ryegrass and interactive access is granted through PlantsDB interfaces. Data exchange and cross-linking between PlantsDB and other plant genome databases is stimulated by the transPLANT project (http://transplantdb.eu/). PMID:26527721

  4. Accessing the SEED Genome Databases via Web Services API: Tools for Programmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vonstein Veronika

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SEED integrates many publicly available genome sequences into a single resource. The database contains accurate and up-to-date annotations based on the subsystems concept that leverages clustering between genomes and other clues to accurately and efficiently annotate microbial genomes. The backend is used as the foundation for many genome annotation tools, such as the Rapid Annotation using Subsystems Technology (RAST server for whole genome annotation, the metagenomics RAST server for random community genome annotations, and the annotation clearinghouse for exchanging annotations from different resources. In addition to a web user interface, the SEED also provides Web services based API for programmatic access to the data in the SEED, allowing the development of third-party tools and mash-ups. Results The currently exposed Web services encompass over forty different methods for accessing data related to microbial genome annotations. The Web services provide comprehensive access to the database back end, allowing any programmer access to the most consistent and accurate genome annotations available. The Web services are deployed using a platform independent service-oriented approach that allows the user to choose the most suitable programming platform for their application. Example code demonstrate that Web services can be used to access the SEED using common bioinformatics programming languages such as Perl, Python, and Java. Conclusions We present a novel approach to access the SEED database. Using Web services, a robust API for access to genomics data is provided, without requiring large volume downloads all at once. The API ensures timely access to the most current datasets available, including the new genomes as soon as they come online.

  5. CMD: a Cotton Microsatellite Database resource for Gossypium genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Shaolin

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cotton Microsatellite Database (CMD http://www.cottonssr.org is a curated and integrated web-based relational database providing centralized access to publicly available cotton microsatellites, an invaluable resource for basic and applied research in cotton breeding. Description At present CMD contains publication, sequence, primer, mapping and homology data for nine major cotton microsatellite projects, collectively representing 5,484 microsatellites. In addition, CMD displays data for three of the microsatellite projects that have been screened against a panel of core germplasm. The standardized panel consists of 12 diverse genotypes including genetic standards, mapping parents, BAC donors, subgenome representatives, unique breeding lines, exotic introgression sources, and contemporary Upland cottons with significant acreage. A suite of online microsatellite data mining tools are accessible at CMD. These include an SSR server which identifies microsatellites, primers, open reading frames, and GC-content of uploaded sequences; BLAST and FASTA servers providing sequence similarity searches against the existing cotton SSR sequences and primers, a CAP3 server to assemble EST sequences into longer transcripts prior to mining for SSRs, and CMap, a viewer for comparing cotton SSR maps. Conclusion The collection of publicly available cotton SSR markers in a centralized, readily accessible and curated web-enabled database provides a more efficient utilization of microsatellite resources and will help accelerate basic and applied research in molecular breeding and genetic mapping in Gossypium spp.

  6. The Human Ageing Genomic Resources: online databases and tools for biogerontologists

    OpenAIRE

    de Magalhães, João Pedro; Budovsky, Arie; Lehmann, Gilad; Costa, Joana; Li, Yang; Fraifeld, Vadim; Church, George M.

    2009-01-01

    Ageing is a complex, challenging phenomenon that will require multiple, interdisciplinary approaches to unravel its puzzles. To assist basic research on ageing, we developed the Human Ageing Genomic Resources (HAGR). This work provides an overview of the databases and tools in HAGR and describes how the gerontology research community can employ them. Several recent changes and improvements to HAGR are also presented. The two centrepieces in HAGR are GenAge and AnAge. GenAge is a gene database...

  7. Tomato genomic resources database: an integrated repository of useful tomato genomic information for basic and applied research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Venkata Suresh

    Full Text Available Tomato Genomic Resources Database (TGRD allows interactive browsing of tomato genes, micro RNAs, simple sequence repeats (SSRs, important quantitative trait loci and Tomato-EXPEN 2000 genetic map altogether or separately along twelve chromosomes of tomato in a single window. The database is created using sequence of the cultivar Heinz 1706. High quality single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP sites between the genes of Heinz 1706 and the wild tomato S. pimpinellifolium LA1589 are also included. Genes are classified into different families. 5'-upstream sequences (5'-US of all the genes and their tissue-specific expression profiles are provided. Sequences of the microRNA loci and their putative target genes are catalogued. Genes and 5'-US show presence of SSRs and SNPs. SSRs located in the genomic, genic and 5'-US can be analysed separately for the presence of any particular motif. Primer sequences for all the SSRs and flanking sequences for all the genic SNPs have been provided. TGRD is a user-friendly web-accessible relational database and uses CMAP viewer for graphical scanning of all the features. Integration and graphical presentation of important genomic information will facilitate better and easier use of tomato genome. TGRD can be accessed as an open source repository at http://59.163.192.91/tomato2/.

  8. RICD: A rice indica cDNA database resource for rice functional genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Qifa

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Oryza sativa L. indica subspecies is the most widely cultivated rice. During the last few years, we have collected over 20,000 putative full-length cDNAs and over 40,000 ESTs isolated from various cDNA libraries of two indica varieties Guangluai 4 and Minghui 63. A database of the rice indica cDNAs was therefore built to provide a comprehensive web data source for searching and retrieving the indica cDNA clones. Results Rice Indica cDNA Database (RICD is an online MySQL-PHP driven database with a user-friendly web interface. It allows investigators to query the cDNA clones by keyword, genome position, nucleotide or protein sequence, and putative function. It also provides a series of information, including sequences, protein domain annotations, similarity search results, SNPs and InDels information, and hyperlinks to gene annotation in both The Rice Annotation Project Database (RAP-DB and The TIGR Rice Genome Annotation Resource, expression atlas in RiceGE and variation report in Gramene of each cDNA. Conclusion The online rice indica cDNA database provides cDNA resource with comprehensive information to researchers for functional analysis of indica subspecies and for comparative genomics. The RICD database is available through our website http://www.ncgr.ac.cn/ricd.

  9. Systematic discovery of unannotated genes in 11 yeast species using a database of orthologous genomic segments

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    OhEigeartaigh, Sean S

    2011-07-26

    Abstract Background In standard BLAST searches, no information other than the sequences of the query and the database entries is considered. However, in situations where two genes from different species have only borderline similarity in a BLAST search, the discovery that the genes are located within a region of conserved gene order (synteny) can provide additional evidence that they are orthologs. Thus, for interpreting borderline search results, it would be useful to know whether the syntenic context of a database hit is similar to that of the query. This principle has often been used in investigations of particular genes or genomic regions, but to our knowledge it has never been implemented systematically. Results We made use of the synteny information contained in the Yeast Gene Order Browser database for 11 yeast species to carry out a systematic search for protein-coding genes that were overlooked in the original annotations of one or more yeast genomes but which are syntenic with their orthologs. Such genes tend to have been overlooked because they are short, highly divergent, or contain introns. The key features of our software - called SearchDOGS - are that the database entries are classified into sets of genomic segments that are already known to be orthologous, and that very weak BLAST hits are retained for further analysis if their genomic location is similar to that of the query. Using SearchDOGS we identified 595 additional protein-coding genes among the 11 yeast species, including two new genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found additional genes for the mating pheromone a-factor in six species including Kluyveromyces lactis. Conclusions SearchDOGS has proven highly successful for identifying overlooked genes in the yeast genomes. We anticipate that our approach can be adapted for study of further groups of species, such as bacterial genomes. More generally, the concept of doing sequence similarity searches against databases to which external

  10. PvTFDB: a Phaseolus vulgaris transcription factors database for expediting functional genomics in legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhawna; Bonthala, V.S.; Gajula, MNV Prasad

    2016-01-01

    The common bean [Phaseolus vulgaris (L.)] is one of the essential proteinaceous vegetables grown in developing countries. However, its production is challenged by low yields caused by numerous biotic and abiotic stress conditions. Regulatory transcription factors (TFs) symbolize a key component of the genome and are the most significant targets for producing stress tolerant crop and hence functional genomic studies of these TFs are important. Therefore, here we have constructed a web-accessible TFs database for P. vulgaris, called PvTFDB, which contains 2370 putative TF gene models in 49 TF families. This database provides a comprehensive information for each of the identified TF that includes sequence data, functional annotation, SSRs with their primer sets, protein physical properties, chromosomal location, phylogeny, tissue-specific gene expression data, orthologues, cis-regulatory elements and gene ontology (GO) assignment. Altogether, this information would be used in expediting the functional genomic studies of a specific TF(s) of interest. The objectives of this database are to understand functional genomics study of common bean TFs and recognize the regulatory mechanisms underlying various stress responses to ease breeding strategy for variety production through a couple of search interfaces including gene ID, functional annotation and browsing interfaces including by family and by chromosome. This database will also serve as a promising central repository for researchers as well as breeders who are working towards crop improvement of legume crops. In addition, this database provide the user unrestricted public access and the user can download entire data present in the database freely. Database URL: http://www.multiomics.in/PvTFDB/ PMID:27465131

  11. PvTFDB: a Phaseolus vulgaris transcription factors database for expediting functional genomics in legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhawna; Bonthala, V S; Gajula, Mnv Prasad

    2016-01-01

    The common bean [Phaseolus vulgaris (L.)] is one of the essential proteinaceous vegetables grown in developing countries. However, its production is challenged by low yields caused by numerous biotic and abiotic stress conditions. Regulatory transcription factors (TFs) symbolize a key component of the genome and are the most significant targets for producing stress tolerant crop and hence functional genomic studies of these TFs are important. Therefore, here we have constructed a web-accessible TFs database for P. vulgaris, called PvTFDB, which contains 2370 putative TF gene models in 49 TF families. This database provides a comprehensive information for each of the identified TF that includes sequence data, functional annotation, SSRs with their primer sets, protein physical properties, chromosomal location, phylogeny, tissue-specific gene expression data, orthologues, cis-regulatory elements and gene ontology (GO) assignment. Altogether, this information would be used in expediting the functional genomic studies of a specific TF(s) of interest. The objectives of this database are to understand functional genomics study of common bean TFs and recognize the regulatory mechanisms underlying various stress responses to ease breeding strategy for variety production through a couple of search interfaces including gene ID, functional annotation and browsing interfaces including by family and by chromosome. This database will also serve as a promising central repository for researchers as well as breeders who are working towards crop improvement of legume crops. In addition, this database provide the user unrestricted public access and the user can download entire data present in the database freely.Database URL: http://www.multiomics.in/PvTFDB/. PMID:27465131

  12. Update on Genomic Databases and Resources at the National Center for Biotechnology Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatusova, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), as a primary public repository of genomic sequence data, collects and maintains enormous amounts of heterogeneous data. Data for genomes, genes, gene expressions, gene variation, gene families, proteins, and protein domains are integrated with the analytical, search, and retrieval resources through the NCBI website, text-based search and retrieval system, provides a fast and easy way to navigate across diverse biological databases.Comparative genome analysis tools lead to further understanding of evolution processes quickening the pace of discovery. Recent technological innovations have ignited an explosion in genome sequencing that has fundamentally changed our understanding of the biology of living organisms. This huge increase in DNA sequence data presents new challenges for the information management system and the visualization tools. New strategies have been designed to bring an order to this genome sequence shockwave and improve the usability of associated data. PMID:27115625

  13. Development of a grape genomics database using IBM DB2 content manager software

    Science.gov (United States)

    A relational database was created for the North American Grapevine Genome project at the Viticultural Research Center, at Florida A&M University. The collaborative project with USDA, ARS researchers is an important resource for viticulture production of new grapevine varieties which will be adapted ...

  14. ChickVD: a sequence variation database for the chicken genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jing; He, Ximiao; Ruan, Jue;

    2005-01-01

    Variation Database' (ChickVD). A graphical MapView shows variants mapped onto the chicken genome in the context of gene annotations and other features, including genetic markers, trait loci, cDNAs, chicken orthologs of human disease genes and raw sequence traces. ChickVD also stores information on...

  15. Addition of a breeding database in the Genome Database for Rosaceae

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Kate; Jung, Sook; Lee, Taein; Brutcher, Lisa; Cho, Ilhyung; Peace, Cameron; Main, Dorrie

    2013-01-01

    Breeding programs produce large datasets that require efficient management systems to keep track of performance, pedigree, geographical and image-based data. With the development of DNA-based screening technologies, more breeding programs perform genotyping in addition to phenotyping for performance evaluation. The integration of breeding data with other genomic and genetic data is instrumental for the refinement of marker-assisted breeding tools, enhances genetic understanding of important c...

  16. The HuGeMap Database: interconnection and visualization of human genome maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillot, E; Pook, S; Guyon, F; Cussat-Blanc, C; Viara, E; Vaysseix, G

    1999-01-01

    The HuGeMap database stores the major genetic and physical maps of the human genome. HuGeMap is accessible on the Web at http://www. infobiogen.fr/services/Hugemap and through a CORBA server. A standard genome map data format for the interconnection of genome map databases was defined in collaboration with the EBI. The HuGeMap CORBA server provides this interconnection using the interface definition language IDL. Two graphical user interfaces were developed for the visualization of the HuGeMap data: ZoomMap (http://www.infobiogen.fr/services/zomit/Zoom Map.html) for navigation by zooming and data transformation via magic lenses, and MappetShow (http://www.infobiogen.fr/services/Mappet) for visualizing and comparing maps. PMID:9847155

  17. Genome analysis methods - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods Genome analysis methods... Data detail Data name Genome analysis methods Description of data contents The current status and re...ion of genomic database are shown in this list. Data file File name: pgdbj_dna_marker_linkage_map_genome_analysis_methods...r-linkage-map/LATEST/pgdbj_dna_marker_linkage_map_genome_analysis_methods_en.zip File size: 5.8 KB Simple se...arch URL http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/pgdbj_dna_marker_linkage_map_genome_analysis_methods_en

  18. PairWise Neighbours database: overlaps and spacers among prokaryote genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia-Vallvé Santiago

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although prokaryotes live in a variety of habitats and possess different metabolic and genomic complexity, they have several genomic architectural features in common. The overlapping genes are a common feature of the prokaryote genomes. The overlapping lengths tend to be short because as the overlaps become longer they have more risk of deleterious mutations. The spacers between genes tend to be short too because of the tendency to reduce the non coding DNA among prokaryotes. However they must be long enough to maintain essential regulatory signals such as the Shine-Dalgarno (SD sequence, which is responsible of an efficient translation. Description PairWise Neighbours is an interactive and intuitive database used for retrieving information about the spacers and overlapping genes among bacterial and archaeal genomes. It contains 1,956,294 gene pairs from 678 fully sequenced prokaryote genomes and is freely available at the URL http://genomes.urv.cat/pwneigh. This database provides information about the overlaps and their conservation across species. Furthermore, it allows the wide analysis of the intergenic regions providing useful information such as the location and strength of the SD sequence. Conclusion There are experiments and bioinformatic analysis that rely on correct annotations of the initiation site. Therefore, a database that studies the overlaps and spacers among prokaryotes appears to be desirable. PairWise Neighbours database permits the reliability analysis of the overlapping structures and the study of the SD presence and location among the adjacent genes, which may help to check the annotation of the initiation sites.

  19. solQTL: a tool for QTL analysis, visualization and linking to genomes at SGN database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Knaap Esther

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A common approach to understanding the genetic basis of complex traits is through identification of associated quantitative trait loci (QTL. Fine mapping QTLs requires several generations of backcrosses and analysis of large populations, which is time-consuming and costly effort. Furthermore, as entire genomes are being sequenced and an increasing amount of genetic and expression data are being generated, a challenge remains: linking phenotypic variation to the underlying genomic variation. To identify candidate genes and understand the molecular basis underlying the phenotypic variation of traits, bioinformatic approaches are needed to exploit information such as genetic map, expression and whole genome sequence data of organisms in biological databases. Description The Sol Genomics Network (SGN, http://solgenomics.net is a primary repository for phenotypic, genetic, genomic, expression and metabolic data for the Solanaceae family and other related Asterids species and houses a variety of bioinformatics tools. SGN has implemented a new approach to QTL data organization, storage, analysis, and cross-links with other relevant data in internal and external databases. The new QTL module, solQTL, http://solgenomics.net/qtl/, employs a user-friendly web interface for uploading raw phenotype and genotype data to the database, R/QTL mapping software for on-the-fly QTL analysis and algorithms for online visualization and cross-referencing of QTLs to relevant datasets and tools such as the SGN Comparative Map Viewer and Genome Browser. Here, we describe the development of the solQTL module and demonstrate its application. Conclusions solQTL allows Solanaceae researchers to upload raw genotype and phenotype data to SGN, perform QTL analysis and dynamically cross-link to relevant genetic, expression and genome annotations. Exploration and synthesis of the relevant data is expected to help facilitate identification of candidate genes

  20. gEVE: a genome-based endogenous viral element database provides comprehensive viral protein-coding sequences in mammalian genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, So; Takahashi, Mahoko Ueda

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, approximately 10% of genome sequences correspond to endogenous viral elements (EVEs), which are derived from ancient viral infections of germ cells. Although most EVEs have been inactivated, some open reading frames (ORFs) of EVEs obtained functions in the hosts. However, EVE ORFs usually remain unannotated in the genomes, and no databases are available for EVE ORFs. To investigate the function and evolution of EVEs in mammalian genomes, we developed EVE ORF databases for 20 genomes of 19 mammalian species. A total of 736,771 non-overlapping EVE ORFs were identified and archived in a database named gEVE (http://geve.med.u-tokai.ac.jp). The gEVE database provides nucleotide and amino acid sequences, genomic loci and functional annotations of EVE ORFs for all 20 genomes. In analyzing RNA-seq data with the gEVE database, we successfully identified the expressed EVE genes, suggesting that the gEVE database facilitates studies of the genomic analyses of various mammalian species. Database URL: http://geve.med.u-tokai.ac.jp PMID:27242033

  1. A SNP-centric database for the investigation of the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohane Isaac S

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs are an increasingly important tool for genetic and biomedical research. Although current genomic databases contain information on several million SNPs and are growing at a very fast rate, the true value of a SNP in this context is a function of the quality of the annotations that characterize it. Retrieving and analyzing such data for a large number of SNPs often represents a major bottleneck in the design of large-scale association studies. Description SNPper is a web-based application designed to facilitate the retrieval and use of human SNPs for high-throughput research purposes. It provides a rich local database generated by combining SNP data with the Human Genome sequence and with several other data sources, and offers the user a variety of querying, visualization and data export tools. In this paper we describe the structure and organization of the SNPper database, we review the available data export and visualization options, and we describe how the architecture of SNPper and its specialized data structures support high-volume SNP analysis. Conclusions The rich annotation database and the powerful data manipulation and presentation facilities it offers make SNPper a very useful online resource for SNP research. Its success proves the great need for integrated and interoperable resources in the field of computational biology, and shows how such systems may play a critical role in supporting the large-scale computational analysis of our genome.

  2. Developing genomic knowledge bases and databases to support clinical management: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huser V

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Vojtech Huser,1 Murat Sincan,2,3 James J Cimino1,4 1Laboratory for Informatics Development, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Undiagnosed Diseases Program, 3Office of the Clinical Director, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, MD, USA; 4National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, MD, USA Abstract: Personalized medicine, the ability to tailor diagnostic and treatment decisions for individual patients, is seen as the evolution of modern medicine. We characterize here the informatics resources available today or envisioned in the near future that can support clinical interpretation of genomic test results. We assume a clinical sequencing scenario (germline whole-exome sequencing in which a clinical specialist, such as an endocrinologist, needs to tailor patient management decisions within his or her specialty (targeted findings but relies on a genetic counselor to interpret off-target incidental findings. We characterize the genomic input data and list various types of knowledge bases that provide genomic knowledge for generating clinical decision support. We highlight the need for patient-level databases with detailed lifelong phenotype content in addition to genotype data and provide a list of recommendations for personalized medicine knowledge bases and databases. We conclude that no single knowledge base can currently support all aspects of personalized recommendations and that consolidation of several current resources into larger, more dynamic and collaborative knowledge bases may offer a future path forward. Keywords: personalized medicine, knowledge bases, databases, clinical decision support, clinical informatics

  3. Strategies to Avoid Wrongly Labelled Genomes Using as Example the Detected Wrong Taxonomic Affiliation for Aeromonas Genomes in the GenBank Database

    OpenAIRE

    Beaz-Hidalgo, Roxana; Hossain, Mohammad J.; Liles, Mark R.; Figueras, Maria-Jose

    2015-01-01

    Around 27,000 prokaryote genomes are presently deposited in the Genome database of GenBank at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) and this number is exponentially growing. However, it is not known how many of these genomes correspond correctly to their designated taxon. The taxonomic affiliation of 44 Aeromonas genomes (only five of these are type strains) deposited at the NCBI was determined by a multilocus phylogenetic analysis (MLPA) and by pairwise average nucleotide ...

  4. ProtRepeatsDB: a database of amino acid repeats in genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauhan Virander S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide and cross species comparisons of amino acid repeats is an intriguing problem in biology mainly due to the highly polymorphic nature and diverse functions of amino acid repeats. Innate protein repeats constitute vital functional and structural regions in proteins. Repeats are of great consequence in evolution of proteins, as evident from analysis of repeats in different organisms. In the post genomic era, availability of protein sequences encoded in different genomes provides a unique opportunity to perform large scale comparative studies of amino acid repeats. ProtRepeatsDB http://bioinfo.icgeb.res.in/repeats/ is a relational database of perfect and mismatch repeats, access to which is designed as a resource and collection of tools for detection and cross species comparisons of different types of amino acid repeats. Description ProtRepeatsDB (v1.2 consists of perfect as well as mismatch amino acid repeats in the protein sequences of 141 organisms, the genomes of which are now available. The web interface of ProtRepeatsDB consists of different tools to perform repeat s; based on protein IDs, organism name, repeat sequences, and keywords as in FASTA headers, size, frequency, gene ontology (GO annotation IDs and regular expressions (REGEXP describing repeats. These tools also allow formulation of a variety of simple, complex and logical queries to facilitate mining and large-scale cross-species comparisons of amino acid repeats. In addition to this, the database also contains sequence analysis tools to determine repeats in user input sequences. Conclusion ProtRepeatsDB is a multi-organism database of different types of amino acid repeats present in proteins. It integrates useful tools to perform genome wide queries for rapid screening and identification of amino acid repeats and facilitates comparative and evolutionary studies of the repeats. The database is useful for identification of species or organism specific

  5. Scriptable access to the Caenorhabditis elegans genome sequence and other ACEDB databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, L D; Thierry-Mieg, J

    1998-12-01

    Much of the world's genomic data are available to the community through networked databases that are accessed via Web interfaces. Although this paradigm provides browse-level access and has greatly facilitated linking between databases, it does not provide any convenient mechanism for programmatically fetching and integrating data from diverse databases. We have created a library and an application programming interface (API) named AcePerl that provides simple, direct access to ACEDB databases from the Perl programming language. With this library, programmers and computer-savvy biologists can write software to pose complex queries on local and remote ACEDB databases, retrieve the data, integrate the results, and move data objects from one database to another. In addition, a set of Web scripts running on top of AcePerl provides Web-based browsing of any local or remote ACEDB database. AcePerl and the AceBrowser Web browser run on Unix systems and are available under a license that allows for unrestricted use and redistribution. Both packages can be downloaded from URL. A Microsoft Windows port of AcePerl is in the planning stages. PMID:9872985

  6. SorghumFDB: sorghum functional genomics database with multidimensional network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; You, Qi; Zhang, Liwei; Yi, Xin; Yan, Hengyu; Xu, Wenying; Su, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench) has excellent agronomic traits and biological properties, such as heat and drought-tolerance. It is a C4 grass and potential bioenergy-producing plant, which makes it an important crop worldwide. With the sorghum genome sequence released, it is essential to establish a sorghum functional genomics data mining platform. We collected genomic data and some functional annotations to construct a sorghum functional genomics database (SorghumFDB). SorghumFDB integrated knowledge of sorghum gene family classifications (transcription regulators/factors, carbohydrate-active enzymes, protein kinases, ubiquitins, cytochrome P450, monolignol biosynthesis related enzymes, R-genes and organelle-genes), detailed gene annotations, miRNA and target gene information, orthologous pairs in the model plants Arabidopsis, rice and maize, gene loci conversions and a genome browser. We further constructed a dynamic network of multidimensional biological relationships, comprised of the co-expression data, protein-protein interactions and miRNA-target pairs. We took effective measures to combine the network, gene set enrichment and motif analyses to determine the key regulators that participate in related metabolic pathways, such as the lignin pathway, which is a major biological process in bioenergy-producing plants.Database URL: http://structuralbiology.cau.edu.cn/sorghum/index.html. PMID:27352859

  7. The MaizeGDB Genome Browser tutorial: one example of database outreach to biologists via video

    OpenAIRE

    Harper, Lisa C.; Schaeffer, Mary L.; Thistle, Jordan; Gardiner, Jack M.; Andorf, Carson M.; Campbell, Darwin A.; Cannon, Ethalinda K. S.; Braun, Bremen L.; Birkett, Scott M.; Lawrence, Carolyn J.; Sen, Taner Z.

    2011-01-01

    Video tutorials are an effective way for researchers to quickly learn how to use online tools offered by biological databases. At MaizeGDB, we have developed a number of video tutorials that demonstrate how to use various tools and explicitly outline the caveats researchers should know to interpret the information available to them. One such popular video currently available is ‘Using the MaizeGDB Genome Browser’, which describes how the maize genome was sequenced and assembled as well as how...

  8. SoyTEdb: a comprehensive database of transposable elements in the soybean genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Liucun

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transposable elements are the most abundant components of all characterized genomes of higher eukaryotes. It has been documented that these elements not only contribute to the shaping and reshaping of their host genomes, but also play significant roles in regulating gene expression, altering gene function, and creating new genes. Thus, complete identification of transposable elements in sequenced genomes and construction of comprehensive transposable element databases are essential for accurate annotation of genes and other genomic components, for investigation of potential functional interaction between transposable elements and genes, and for study of genome evolution. The recent availability of the soybean genome sequence has provided an unprecedented opportunity for discovery, and structural and functional characterization of transposable elements in this economically important legume crop. Description Using a combination of structure-based and homology-based approaches, a total of 32,552 retrotransposons (Class I and 6,029 DNA transposons (Class II with clear boundaries and insertion sites were structurally annotated and clearly categorized, and a soybean transposable element database, SoyTEdb, was established. These transposable elements have been anchored in and integrated with the soybean physical map and genetic map, and are browsable and visualizable at any scale along the 20 soybean chromosomes, along with predicted genes and other sequence annotations. BLAST search and other infrastracture tools were implemented to facilitate annotation of transposable elements or fragments from soybean and other related legume species. The majority (> 95% of these elements (particularly a few hundred low-copy-number families are first described in this study. Conclusion SoyTEdb provides resources and information related to transposable elements in the soybean genome, representing the most comprehensive and the largest manually

  9. CpGislandEVO: A Database and Genome Browser for Comparative Evolutionary Genomics of CpG Islands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Barturen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypomethylated, CpG-rich DNA segments (CpG islands, CGIs are epigenome markers involved in key biological processes. Aberrant methylation is implicated in the appearance of several disorders as cancer, immunodeficiency, or centromere instability. Furthermore, methylation differences at promoter regions between human and chimpanzee strongly associate with genes involved in neurological/psychological disorders and cancers. Therefore, the evolutionary comparative analyses of CGIs can provide insights on the functional role of these epigenome markers in both health and disease. Given the lack of specific tools, we developed CpGislandEVO. Briefly, we first compile a database of statistically significant CGIs for the best assembled mammalian genome sequences available to date. Second, by means of a coupled browser front-end, we focus on the CGIs overlapping orthologous genes extracted from OrthoDB, thus ensuring the comparison between CGIs located on truly homologous genome segments. This allows comparing the main compositional features between homologous CGIs. Finally, to facilitate nucleotide comparisons, we lifted genome coordinates between assemblies from different species, which enables the analysis of sequence divergence by direct count of nucleotide substitutions and indels occurring between homologous CGIs. The resulting CpGislandEVO database, linking together CGIs and single-cytosine DNA methylation data from several mammalian species, is freely available at our website.

  10. A genome-wide polyketide synthase deletion library uncovers novel genetic links to polyketides and meroterpenoids in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Nielsen, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Rank, Christian; Klejnstrup, Marie Louise; Holm, Dorte Koefoed; Brogaard, Katrine Husted; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2011-01-01

    Fungi possess an advanced secondary metabolism that is regulated and coordinated in a complex manner depending on environmental challenges. To understand this complexity, a holistic approach is necessary. We initiated such an analysis in the important model fungus Aspergillus nidulans by...

  11. Genome sequence of Aspergillus flavus NRRL 3357, a strain that causes aflatoxin contamination of food and feed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxin contamination of food and livestock feed results in significant annual crop losses internationally. Aspergillus flavus is the major fungus responsible for this loss. Additionally, A. flavus is the second leading cause of aspergillosis in immune compromised human patients. Here we report th...

  12. SmedGD 2.0: The Schmidtea mediterranea genome database

    OpenAIRE

    Robb, Sofia M.C.; Gotting, Kirsten; Ross, Eric; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Planarians have emerged as excellent models for the study of key biological processes such as stem cell function and regulation, axial polarity specification, regeneration, and tissue homeostasis among others. The most widely used organism for these studies is the free-living flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea. In 2007, the Schmidtea mediterranea Genome Database (SmedGD) was first released to provide a much needed resource for the small, but growing planarian community. SmedGD 1.0 has been a dep...

  13. ChiloDB: a genomic and transcriptome database for an important rice insect pest Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chuanlin; Liu, Ying; Liu, Jinding; Xiao, Huamei; Huang, Shuiqing; Lin, Yongjun; Han, Zhaojun; Li, Fei

    2014-01-01

    ChiloDB is an integrated resource that will be of use to the rice stem borer research community. The rice striped stem borer (SSB), Chilo suppressalis Walker, is a major rice pest that causes severe yield losses in most rice-producing countries. A draft genome of this insect is available. The aims of ChiloDB are (i) to store recently acquired genomic sequence and transcriptome data and integrate them with protein-coding genes, microRNAs, piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data and (ii) to provide comprehensive search tools and downloadable data sets for comparative genomics and gene annotation of this important rice pest. ChiloDB contains the first version of the official SSB gene set, comprising 80,479 scaffolds and 10 221 annotated protein-coding genes. Additionally, 262 SSB microRNA genes predicted from a small RNA library, 82 639 piRNAs identified using the piRNApredictor software, 37,040 transcripts from a midgut transcriptome and 69 977 transcripts from a mixed sample have all been integrated into ChiloDB. ChiloDB was constructed using a data structure that is compatible with data resources, which will be incorporated into the database in the future. This resource will serve as a long-term and open-access database for research on the biology, evolution and pest control of SSB. To the best of our knowledge, ChiloDB is one of the first genomic and transcriptome database for rice insect pests. Database URL: http://ento.njau.edu.cn/ChiloDB. PMID:24997141

  14. Update History of This Database - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods Update History o...Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods is opened. Joomla SEF ...t, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive ... ... link & Genome analysis methods English archive site is opened. 2012/08/08 PGDBj ...f This Database Date Update contents 2014/10/10 PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB

  15. A rapid classification protocol for the CATH Domain Database to support structural genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, F M; Martin, N; Bray, J E; Buchan, D W; Harrison, A P; Lee, D; Reeves, G A; Shepherd, A J; Sillitoe, I; Todd, A E; Thornton, J M; Orengo, C A

    2001-01-01

    In order to support the structural genomic initiatives, both by rapidly classifying newly determined structures and by suggesting suitable targets for structure determination, we have recently developed several new protocols for classifying structures in the CATH domain database (http://www.biochem.ucl.ac.uk/bsm/cath). These aim to increase the speed of classification of new structures using fast algorithms for structure comparison (GRATH) and to improve the sensitivity in recognising distant structural relatives by incorporating sequence information from relatives in the genomes (DomainFinder). In order to ensure the integrity of the database given the expected increase in data, the CATH Protein Family Database (CATH-PFDB), which currently includes 25,320 structural domains and a further 160,000 sequence relatives has now been installed in a relational ORACLE database. This was essential for developing more rigorous validation procedures and for allowing efficient querying of the database, particularly for genome analysis. The associated Dictionary of Homologous Superfamilies [Bray,J.E., Todd,A.E., Pearl,F.M.G., Thornton,J.M. and Orengo,C.A. (2000) Protein Eng., 13, 153-165], which provides multiple structural alignments and functional information to assist in assigning new relatives, has also been expanded recently and now includes information for 903 homologous superfamilies. In order to improve coverage of known structures, preliminary classification levels are now provided for new structures at interim stages in the classification protocol. Since a large proportion of new structures can be rapidly classified using profile-based sequence analysis [e.g. PSI-BLAST: Altschul,S.F., Madden,T.L., Schaffer,A.A., Zhang,J., Zhang,Z., Miller,W. and Lipman,D.J. (1997) Nucleic Acids Res., 25, 3389-3402], this provides preliminary classification for easily recognisable homologues, which in the latest release of CATH (version 1.7) represented nearly three-quarters of the non

  16. Comprehensive coverage of cardiovascular disease data in the disease portals at the Rat Genome Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shur-Jen; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Hayman, G Thomas; Petri, Victoria; Smith, Jennifer R; Tutaj, Marek; Nigam, Rajni; Dwinell, Melinda R; Shimoyama, Mary

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are complex diseases caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. To facilitate progress in complex disease research, the Rat Genome Database (RGD) provides the community with a disease portal where genome objects and biological data related to cardiovascular diseases are systematically organized. The purpose of this study is to present biocuration at RGD, including disease, genetic, and pathway data. The RGD curation team uses controlled vocabularies/ontologies to organize data curated from the published literature or imported from disease and pathway databases. These organized annotations are associated with genes, strains, and quantitative trait loci (QTLs), thus linking functional annotations to genome objects. Screen shots from the web pages are used to demonstrate the organization of annotations at RGD. The human cardiovascular disease genes identified by annotations were grouped according to data sources and their annotation profiles were compared by in-house tools and other enrichment tools available to the public. The analysis results show that the imported cardiovascular disease genes from ClinVar and OMIM are functionally different from the RGD manually curated genes in terms of pathway and Gene Ontology annotations. The inclusion of disease genes from other databases enriches the collection of disease genes not only in quantity but also in quality. PMID:27287925

  17. HGD-Chn: The Database of Genome Diversity and Variation for Chinese Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong-Sheng, Gui; Peng, Zhou; Cheng-Bo, Yang; Sheng-Bin, Li

    2009-04-01

    The Database of Genome Diversity and Variation for Chinese Populations is toward a more efficient utilization and sharing of the valuable yet diminishing genetic resources in China (including sample information of healthy populations, healthy pedigrees, disease population and disease pedigrees; genomic diversity data; disease-related allelic and haplotype data). Organization of the database can be divided into two parts: (1) Genetic resources of healthy people--Organizing genetic resources of healthy people. A variety of genetic markers (VNTR, STR, SNP, HLA, and enzyme markers, etc.) are chosen for their diversity among populations, with their distribution among different ethnic groups in China stored in the form of allelic frequency. A further analysis as well as an overall description of the Chinese population genetic structure is also being made possible. (2) Disease genetic resources--Four categories are mainly concerned: chromosomal diseases, monogenic diseases, polygenic diseases, and birth defects. For each kind of disease, the basic introduction and description, sample information, and allelic data of related gene are involved. Aside from research-oriented information, introductory courses oriented at general public covering fields of genomic diversity and variation, the related experimental techniques, standards and specifications could also be accessed in our website. Further more, flexible query and submit system with user-friendly interfaces are also integrated in our website to simplify the process of user-query and administrators' database maintenance work. Online data analyzing and managing tools are developed using bioinformatics algorithm and programming language for a better interpretation of the biological data. PMID:19342283

  18. Adding semantics to genome databases: towards an ontology for molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze-Kremer, S

    1997-01-01

    Molecular biology has a communication problem. There are many databases using their own labels and categories for storing data objects and some using identical labels and categories but with a different meaning. Conversely, one concept is often found under different names. Prominent examples are the concepts "gene" and "protein sequence" which are used with different semantics by major international genomic and protein databases thereby making database integration difficult and strenuous. This situation can only be improved by either defining individual semantic interfaces between each pair of databases (complexity of order n2) or by implementing one agreeable, transparent and computationally tractable semantic repository and linking each database to it (complexity of order n). Ontologies are one means to provide such semantic repository by explicitly specifying the meaning of and relation between the fundamental concepts in an application domain. Here, heuristics for building an ontology and the upper level and a database branch of a prospective Ontology for Molecular Biology are presented and compared to other ontologies with respect to suitability for molecular biology (http:/(/)igd.rz-berlin.mpg.de/www/oe/mbo.html). PMID:9322049

  19. Databases

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The databases of computational and experimental data from the first Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop are located here. The databases file names tell their contents...

  20. Databases

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kunte, P.D.

    Information on bibliographic as well as numeric/textual databases relevant to coastal geomorphology has been included in a tabular form. Databases cover a broad spectrum of related subjects like coastal environment and population aspects, coastline...

  1. SmedGD 2.0: The Schmidtea mediterranea genome database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Sofia M.C.; Gotting, Kirsten; Ross, Eric; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Planarians have emerged as excellent models for the study of key biological processes such as stem cell function and regulation, axial polarity specification, regeneration, and tissue homeostasis among others. The most widely used organism for these studies is the free-living flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea. In 2007, the Schmidtea mediterranea Genome Database (SmedGD) was first released to provide a much needed resource for the small, but growing planarian community. SmedGD 1.0 has been a depository for genome sequence, a draft assembly, and related experimental data (e.g., RNAi phenotypes, in situ hybridization images, and differential gene expression results). We report here a comprehensive update to SmedGD (SmedGD 2.0) that aims to expand its role as an interactive community resource. The new database includes more recent, and up-to-date transcription data, provides tools that enhance interconnectivity between different genome assemblies and transcriptomes, including next generation assemblies for both the sexual and asexual biotypes of S. mediterranea. SmedGD 2.0 (http://smedgd.stowers.org) not only provides significantly improved gene annotations, but also tools for data sharing, attributes that will help both the planarian and biomedical communities to more efficiently mine the genomics and transcriptomics of S. mediterranea. PMID:26138588

  2. PATtyFams: Protein families for the microbial genomes in the PATRIC database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Davis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to build accurate protein families is a fundamental operation in bioinformatics that influences comparative analyses, genome annotation and metabolic modeling. For several years we have been maintaining protein families for all microbial genomes in the PATRIC database (Pathosystems Resource Integration Center, patricbrc.org in order to drive many of the comparative analysis tools that are available through the PATRIC website. However, due to the burgeoning number of genomes, traditional approaches for generating protein families are becoming prohibitive. In this report, we describe a new approach for generating protein families, which we call PATtyFams. This method uses the k-mer-based function assignments available through RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology to rapidly guide family formation, and then differentiates the function-based groups into families using a Markov Cluster algorithm (MCL. This new approach for generating protein families is rapid, scalable and has properties that are consistent with alignment-based methods.

  3. Construction of a promoter probe vector autonomously maintained in Aspergillus and characterization of promoter regions derived from A. niger and A. oryzae genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, K; Kanda, A; Hamachi, M; Nunokawa, Y

    1996-03-01

    We used a plasmid carrying a sequence for autonomous maintenance in Aspergillus (AMA1) and the E. coli uidA gene as a reporter gene to search the A. oryzae and A. niger genomes for DNA fragments having strong promoter activity. Beta-glucuronidase (GUS)-producing A. oryzae transformants containing the No. 8AN derived from A. niger, or the No. 9AO derived from A. oryzae, were constitutive for the expression of the uidA gene when cultivated in the presence of a variety of carbon and nitrogen sources. When the GUS-producing transformants were grown in liquid culture, the No. 8AN showed an increase of approximately 3-fold in GUS activity compared to the amyB (alpha-amylase encoding gene) promoter. There was also a corresponding increase in the amount of GUS gene-specific mRNA. When these transformants were grown as rice-koji, the No. 8AN showed an increase of approximately 6-fold compared to the amyB promoter, and the amount of GUS protein produced also increased. These strong promoter regions might be applicable to the production of other heterologous proteins in Aspergillus species. PMID:8901095

  4. Fine de novo sequencing of a fungal genome using only SOLiD short read data: verification on Aspergillus oryzae RIB40.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myco Umemura

    Full Text Available The development of next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies has dramatically increased the throughput, speed, and efficiency of genome sequencing. The short read data generated from NGS platforms, such as SOLiD and Illumina, are quite useful for mapping analysis. However, the SOLiD read data with lengths of <60 bp have been considered to be too short for de novo genome sequencing. Here, to investigate whether de novo sequencing of fungal genomes is possible using only SOLiD short read sequence data, we performed de novo assembly of the Aspergillus oryzae RIB40 genome using only SOLiD read data of 50 bp generated from mate-paired libraries with 2.8- or 1.9-kb insert sizes. The assembled scaffolds showed an N50 value of 1.6 Mb, a 22-fold increase than those obtained using only SOLiD short read in other published reports. In addition, almost 99% of the reference genome was accurately aligned by the assembled scaffold fragments in long lengths. The sequences of secondary metabolite biosynthetic genes and clusters, whose products are of considerable interest in fungal studies due to their potential medicinal, agricultural, and cosmetic properties, were also highly reconstructed in the assembled scaffolds. Based on these findings, we concluded that de novo genome sequencing using only SOLiD short reads is feasible and practical for molecular biological study of fungi. We also investigated the effect of filtering low quality data, library insert size, and k-mer size on the assembly performance, and recommend for the assembly use of mild filtered read data where the N50 was not so degraded and the library has an insert size of ∼2.0 kb, and k-mer size 33.

  5. ATGC: a database of orthologous genes from closely related prokaryotic genomes and a research platform for microevolution of prokaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novichkov, Pavel S.; Ratnere, Igor; Wolf, Yuri I.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Dubchak, Inna

    2009-07-23

    The database of Alignable Tight Genomic Clusters (ATGCs) consists of closely related genomes of archaea and bacteria, and is a resource for research into prokaryotic microevolution. Construction of a data set with appropriate characteristics is a major hurdle for this type of studies. With the current rate of genome sequencing, it is difficult to follow the progress of the field and to determine which of the available genome sets meet the requirements of a given research project, in particular, with respect to the minimum and maximum levels of similarity between the included genomes. Additionally, extraction of specific content, such as genomic alignments or families of orthologs, from a selected set of genomes is a complicated and time-consuming process. The database addresses these problems by providing an intuitive and efficient web interface to browse precomputed ATGCs, select appropriate ones and access ATGC-derived data such as multiple alignments of orthologous proteins, matrices of pairwise intergenomic distances based on genome-wide analysis of synonymous and nonsynonymous substitution rates and others. The ATGC database will be regularly updated following new releases of the NCBI RefSeq. The database is hosted by the Genomics Division at Lawrence Berkeley National laboratory and is publicly available at http://atgc.lbl.gov.

  6. SGCEdb: a flexible database and web interface integrating experimental results and analysis for structural genomics focusing on Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    David H Johnson; Tsao, Jun; Luo, Ming; Carson, Mike

    2005-01-01

    The SGCEdb () database/interface serves the primary purpose of reporting progress of the Structural Genomics of Caenorhabditis elegans project at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. It stores and analyzes results of experiments ranging from solubility screening arrays to individual protein purification and structure solution. External databases and algorithms are referenced and evaluated for target selection in the human, C.elegans and Pneumocystis carinii genomes. The flexible and reusa...

  7. Construction of an ortholog database using the semantic web technology for integrative analysis of genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Hirokazu; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Recently, various types of biological data, including genomic sequences, have been rapidly accumulating. To discover biological knowledge from such growing heterogeneous data, a flexible framework for data integration is necessary. Ortholog information is a central resource for interlinking corresponding genes among different organisms, and the Semantic Web provides a key technology for the flexible integration of heterogeneous data. We have constructed an ortholog database using the Semantic Web technology, aiming at the integration of numerous genomic data and various types of biological information. To formalize the structure of the ortholog information in the Semantic Web, we have constructed the Ortholog Ontology (OrthO). While the OrthO is a compact ontology for general use, it is designed to be extended to the description of database-specific concepts. On the basis of OrthO, we described the ortholog information from our Microbial Genome Database for Comparative Analysis (MBGD) in the form of Resource Description Framework (RDF) and made it available through the SPARQL endpoint, which accepts arbitrary queries specified by users. In this framework based on the OrthO, the biological data of different organisms can be integrated using the ortholog information as a hub. Besides, the ortholog information from different data sources can be compared with each other using the OrthO as a shared ontology. Here we show some examples demonstrating that the ortholog information described in RDF can be used to link various biological data such as taxonomy information and Gene Ontology. Thus, the ortholog database using the Semantic Web technology can contribute to biological knowledge discovery through integrative data analysis. PMID:25875762

  8. Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Ryan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Databases are deeply embedded in archaeology, underpinning and supporting many aspects of the subject. However, as well as providing a means for storing, retrieving and modifying data, databases themselves must be a result of a detailed analysis and design process. This article looks at this process, and shows how the characteristics of data models affect the process of database design and implementation. The impact of the Internet on the development of databases is examined, and the article concludes with a discussion of a range of issues associated with the recording and management of archaeological data.

  9. The Eukaryotic Pathogen Databases: a functional genomic resource integrating data from human and veterinary parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, Omar S; Roos, David S

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, advances in high-throughput biological techniques and the availability of computational resources including fast Internet access have resulted in an explosion of large genome-scale data sets "big data." While such data are readily available for download and personal use and analysis from a variety of repositories, often such analysis requires access to seldom-available computational skills. As a result a number of databases have emerged to provide scientists with online tools enabling the interrogation of data without the need for sophisticated computational skills beyond basic knowledge of Internet browser utility. This chapter focuses on the Eukaryotic Pathogen Databases (EuPathDB: http://eupathdb.org) Bioinformatic Resource Center (BRC) and illustrates some of the available tools and methods. PMID:25388105

  10. DNA Lossless Differential Compression Algorithm based on Similarity of Genomic Sequence Database

    CERN Document Server

    Afify, Heba; Wahed, Manal Abdel

    2011-01-01

    Modern biological science produces vast amounts of genomic sequence data. This is fuelling the need for efficient algorithms for sequence compression and analysis. Data compression and the associated techniques coming from information theory are often perceived as being of interest for data communication and storage. In recent years, a substantial effort has been made for the application of textual data compression techniques to various computational biology tasks, ranging from storage and indexing of large datasets to comparison of genomic databases. This paper presents a differential compression algorithm that is based on production of difference sequences according to op-code table in order to optimize the compression of homologous sequences in dataset. Therefore, the stored data are composed of reference sequence, the set of differences, and differences locations, instead of storing each sequence individually. This algorithm does not require a priori knowledge about the statistics of the sequence set. The...

  11. Research Update: The materials genome initiative: Data sharing and the impact of collaborative ab initio databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anubhav; Persson, Kristin A.; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2016-05-01

    Materials innovations enable new technological capabilities and drive major societal advancements but have historically required long and costly development cycles. The Materials Genome Initiative (MGI) aims to greatly reduce this time and cost. In this paper, we focus on data reuse in the MGI and, in particular, discuss the impact of three different computational databases based on density functional theory methods to the research community. We also discuss and provide recommendations on technical aspects of data reuse, outline remaining fundamental challenges, and present an outlook on the future of MGI's vision of data sharing.

  12. dbWGFP: a database and web server of human whole-genome single nucleotide variants and their functional predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiaxin; Wu, Mengmeng; Li, Lianshuo; Liu, Zhuo; Zeng, Wanwen; Jiang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement of the next generation sequencing technology has enabled the fast and low-cost detection of all genetic variants spreading across the entire human genome, making the application of whole-genome sequencing a tendency in the study of disease-causing genetic variants. Nevertheless, there still lacks a repository that collects predictions of functionally damaging effects of human genetic variants, though it has been well recognized that such predictions play a central role in the analysis of whole-genome sequencing data. To fill this gap, we developed a database named dbWGFP (a database and web server of human whole-genome single nucleotide variants and their functional predictions) that contains functional predictions and annotations of nearly 8.58 billion possible human whole-genome single nucleotide variants. Specifically, this database integrates 48 functional predictions calculated by 17 popular computational methods and 44 valuable annotations obtained from various data sources. Standalone software, user-friendly query services and free downloads of this database are available at http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/dbwgfp. dbWGFP provides a valuable resource for the analysis of whole-genome sequencing, exome sequencing and SNP array data, thereby complementing existing data sources and computational resources in deciphering genetic bases of human inherited diseases. PMID:26989155

  13. SNPpy--database management for SNP data from genome wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faheem Mitha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We describe SNPpy, a hybrid script database system using the Python SQLAlchemy library coupled with the PostgreSQL database to manage genotype data from Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS. This system makes it possible to merge study data with HapMap data and merge across studies for meta-analyses, including data filtering based on the values of phenotype and Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP data. SNPpy and its dependencies are open source software. RESULTS: The current version of SNPpy offers utility functions to import genotype and annotation data from two commercial platforms. We use these to import data from two GWAS studies and the HapMap Project. We then export these individual datasets to standard data format files that can be imported into statistical software for downstream analyses. CONCLUSIONS: By leveraging the power of relational databases, SNPpy offers integrated management and manipulation of genotype and phenotype data from GWAS studies. The analysis of these studies requires merging across GWAS datasets as well as patient and marker selection. To this end, SNPpy enables the user to filter the data and output the results as standardized GWAS file formats. It does low level and flexible data validation, including validation of patient data. SNPpy is a practical and extensible solution for investigators who seek to deploy central management of their GWAS data.

  14. Strategies to avoid wrongly labelled genomes using as example the detected wrong taxonomic affiliation for aeromonas genomes in the GenBank database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Beaz-Hidalgo

    Full Text Available Around 27,000 prokaryote genomes are presently deposited in the Genome database of GenBank at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI and this number is exponentially growing. However, it is not known how many of these genomes correspond correctly to their designated taxon. The taxonomic affiliation of 44 Aeromonas genomes (only five of these are type strains deposited at the NCBI was determined by a multilocus phylogenetic analysis (MLPA and by pairwise average nucleotide identity (ANI. Discordant results in relation to taxa assignation were found for 14 (35.9% of the 39 non-type strain genomes on the basis of both the MLPA and ANI results. Data presented in this study also demonstrated that if the genome of the type strain is not available, a genome of the same species correctly identified can be used as a reference for ANI calculations. Of the three ANI calculating tools compared (ANI calculator, EzGenome and JSpecies, EzGenome and JSpecies provided very similar results. However, the ANI calculator provided higher intra- and inter-species values than the other two tools (differences within the ranges 0.06-0.82% and 0.92-3.38%, respectively. Nevertheless each of these tools produced the same species classification for the studied Aeromonas genomes. To avoid possible misinterpretations with the ANI calculator, particularly when values are at the borderline of the 95% cutoff, one of the other calculation tools (EzGenome or JSpecies should be used in combination. It is recommended that once a genome sequence is obtained the correct taxonomic affiliation is verified using ANI or a MLPA before it is submitted to the NCBI and that researchers should amend the existing taxonomic errors present in databases.

  15. InvFEST, a database integrating information of polymorphic inversions in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Fundichely, Alexander; Casillas, Sònia; Egea, Raquel; Ràmia, Miquel; Barbadilla, Antonio; Pantano, Lorena; Puig, Marta; Cáceres, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The newest genomic advances have uncovered an unprecedented degree of structural variation throughout genomes, with great amounts of data accumulating rapidly. Here we introduce InvFEST (http://invfestdb.uab.cat), a database combining multiple sources of information to generate a complete catalogue of non-redundant human polymorphic inversions. Due to the complexity of this type of changes and the underlying high false-positive discovery rate, it is necessary to integrate all the available data to get a reliable estimate of the real number of inversions. InvFEST automatically merges predictions into different inversions, refines the breakpoint locations, and finds associations with genes and segmental duplications. In addition, it includes data on experimental validation, population frequency, functional effects and evolutionary history. All this information is readily accessible through a complete and user-friendly web report for each inversion. In its current version, InvFEST combines information from 34 different studies and contains 1092 candidate inversions, which are categorized based on internal scores and manual curation. Therefore, InvFEST aims to represent the most reliable set of human inversions and become a central repository to share information, guide future studies and contribute to the analysis of the functional and evolutionary impact of inversions on the human genome. PMID:24253300

  16. DNA LOSSLESS DIFFERENTIAL COMPRESSION ALGORITHM BASED ON SIMILARITY OF GENOMIC SEQUENCE DATABASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Afify

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern biological science produces vast amounts of genomic sequence data. This is fuelling the need forefficient algorithms for sequence compression and analysis. Data compression and the associatedtechniques coming from information theory are often perceived as being of interest for datacommunication and storage. In recent years, a substantial effort has been made for the application oftextual data compression techniques to various computational biology tasks, ranging from storage andindexing of large datasets to comparison of genomic databases. This paper presents a differentialcompression algorithm that is based on production of difference sequences according to op-code table inorder to optimize the compression of homologous sequences in dataset. Therefore, the stored data arecomposed of reference sequence, the set of differences, and differences locations, instead of storing eachsequence individually. This algorithm does not require a priori knowledge about the statistics of thesequence set. The algorithm was applied to three different datasets of genomic sequences, it achieved upto 195-fold compression rate corresponding to 99.4% space saving.

  17. Transcriptional profiling of Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der D.

    2009-01-01

    The industrially important fungus Aspergillus niger feeds naturally on decomposing plant material, of which a significant proportion is lipid. Examination of the A. niger genome sequence suggested that all proteins required for metabolic conversion of lipids are present, including 63 predicted lipas

  18. TP53 Variations in Human Cancers: New Lessons from the IARC TP53 Database and Genomics Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaoun, Liacine; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Ardin, Maude; Hollstein, Monica; Byrnes, Graham; Zavadil, Jiri; Olivier, Magali

    2016-09-01

    TP53 gene mutations are one of the most frequent somatic events in cancer. The IARC TP53 Database (http://p53.iarc.fr) is a popular resource that compiles occurrence and phenotype data on TP53 germline and somatic variations linked to human cancer. The deluge of data coming from cancer genomic studies generates new data on TP53 variations and attracts a growing number of database users for the interpretation of TP53 variants. Here, we present the current contents and functionalities of the IARC TP53 Database and perform a systematic analysis of TP53 somatic mutation data extracted from this database and from genomic data repositories. This analysis showed that IARC has more TP53 somatic mutation data than genomic repositories (29,000 vs. 4,000). However, the more complete screening achieved by genomic studies highlighted some overlooked facts about TP53 mutations, such as the presence of a significant number of mutations occurring outside the DNA-binding domain in specific cancer types. We also provide an update on TP53 inherited variants including the ones that should be considered as neutral frequent variations. We thus provide an update of current knowledge on TP53 variations in human cancer as well as inform users on the efficient use of the IARC TP53 Database. PMID:27328919

  19. Utilizing linkage disequilibrium information from Indian Genome Variation Database for mapping mutations: SCA12 case study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Samira Bahl; Ikhlak Ahmed; The Indian Genome Variation Consortium; Mitali Mukerji

    2009-04-01

    Stratification in heterogeneous populations poses an enormous challenge in linkage disequilibrium (LD) based identification of causal loci using surrogate markers. In this study, we demonstrate the enormous potential of endogamous Indian populations for mapping mutations in candidate genes using minimal SNPs, mainly due to larger regions of LD. We show this by a case study of the PPP2R2B gene (∼400 kb) that harbours a CAG repeat, expansion of which has been implicated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 12 (SCA12). Using LD information derived from Indian Genome Variation database (IGVdb) on populations which share similar ethnic and linguistic backgrounds as the SCA12 study population, we could map the causal loci using a minimal set of three SNPs, without the generation of additional basal data from the ethnically matched population. We could also demonstrate transferability of tagSNPs from a related HapMap population for mapping the mutation.

  20. Trichinella spiralis: genome database searches for the presence and immunolocalization of protein disulphide isomerase family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, C P; Clemente, I; Mendes, T; Novo, C

    2016-01-01

    The formation of nurse cells in host muscle cells during Trichinella spiralis infection is a key step in the infective mechanism. Collagen trimerization is set up via disulphide bond formation, catalysed by protein disulphide isomerase (PDI). In T. spiralis, some PDI family members have been identified but no localization is described and no antibodies specific for T. spiralis PDIs are available. In this work, computational approaches were used to search for non-described PDIs in the T. spiralis genome database and to check the cross-reactivity of commercial anti-human antibodies with T. spiralis orthologues. In addition to a previously described PDI (PDIA2), endoplasmic reticulum protein (ERp57/PDIA3), ERp72/PDIA4, and the molecular chaperones calreticulin (CRT), calnexin (CNX) and immunoglobulin-binding protein/glucose-regulated protein (BIP/GRP78), we identified orthologues of the human thioredoxin-related-transmembrane proteins (TMX1, TMX2 and TMX3) in the genome protein database, as well as ERp44 (PDIA10) and endoplasmic reticulum disulphide reductase (ERdj5/PDIA19). Immunocytochemical staining of paraffin sections of muscle infected by T. spiralis enabled us to localize some orthologues of the human PDIs (PDIA3 and TMX1) and the chaperone GRP78. A theoretical three-dimensional model for T. spiralis PDIA3 was constructed. The localization and characteristics of the predicted linear B-cell epitopes and amino acid sequence of the immunogens used for commercial production of anti-human PDIA3 antibodies validated the use of these antibodies for the immunolocalization of T. spiralis PDIA3 orthologues. These results suggest that further study of the role of the PDIs and chaperones during nurse cell formation is desirable. PMID:25475092

  1. The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD) v.5: a metadata management system based on a four level (meta)genome project classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Tatiparthi B. K. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Thomas, Alex D. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Stamatis, Dimitri [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Bertsch, Jon [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Isbandi, Michelle [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Jansson, Jakob [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Mallajosyula, Jyothi [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Pagani, Ioanna [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Lobos, Elizabeth A. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Kyrpides, Nikos C. [USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-10-27

    The Genomes OnLine Database (GOLD; http://www.genomesonline.org) is a comprehensive online resource to catalog and monitor genetic studies worldwide. GOLD provides up-to-date status on complete and ongoing sequencing projects along with a broad array of curated metadata. Within this paper, we report version 5 (v.5) of the database. The newly designed database schema and web user interface supports several new features including the implementation of a four level (meta)genome project classification system and a simplified intuitive web interface to access reports and launch search tools. The database currently hosts information for about 19 200 studies, 56 000 Biosamples, 56 000 sequencing projects and 39 400 analysis projects. More than just a catalog of worldwide genome projects, GOLD is a manually curated, quality-controlled metadata warehouse. The problems encountered in integrating disparate and varying quality data into GOLD are briefly highlighted. Lastly, GOLD fully supports and follows the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) Minimum Information standards.

  2. The Saccharomyces Genome Database: Gene Product Annotation of Function, Process, and Component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, J Michael

    2015-12-01

    An ontology is a highly structured form of controlled vocabulary. Each entry in the ontology is commonly called a term. These terms are used when talking about an annotation. However, each term has a definition that, like the definition of a word found within a dictionary, provides the complete usage and detailed explanation of the term. It is critical to consult a term's definition because the distinction between terms can be subtle. The use of ontologies in biology started as a way of unifying communication between scientific communities and to provide a standard dictionary for different topics, including molecular functions, biological processes, mutant phenotypes, chemical properties and structures. The creation of ontology terms and their definitions often requires debate to reach agreement but the result has been a unified descriptive language used to communicate knowledge. In addition to terms and definitions, ontologies require a relationship used to define the type of connection between terms. In an ontology, a term can have more than one parent term, the term above it in an ontology, as well as more than one child, the term below it in the ontology. Many ontologies are used to construct annotations in the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD), as in all modern biological databases; however, Gene Ontology (GO), a descriptive system used to categorize gene function, is the most extensively used ontology in SGD annotations. Examples included in this protocol illustrate the structure and features of this ontology. PMID:26631125

  3. CrAgDb--a database of annotated chaperone repertoire in archaeal genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Shikha; Srivastava, Abhishikha; Kumar, Manish; Goel, Manisha

    2016-03-01

    Chaperones are a diverse class of ubiquitous proteins that assist other cellular proteins in folding correctly and maintaining their native structure. Many different chaperones cooperate to constitute the 'proteostasis' machinery in the cells. It has been proposed earlier that archaeal organisms could be ideal model systems for deciphering the basic functioning of the 'protein folding machinery' in higher eukaryotes. Several chaperone families have been characterized in archaea over the years but mostly one protein at a time, making it difficult to decipher the composition and mechanistics of the protein folding system as a whole. In order to deal with these lacunae, we have developed a database of all archaeal chaperone proteins, CrAgDb (Chaperone repertoire in Archaeal genomes). The data have been presented in a systematic way with intuitive browse and search facilities for easy retrieval of information. Access to these curated datasets should expedite large-scale analysis of archaeal chaperone networks and significantly advance our understanding of operation and regulation of the protein folding machinery in archaea. Researchers could then translate this knowledge to comprehend the more complex protein folding pathways in eukaryotic systems. The database is freely available at http://14.139.227.92/mkumar/cragdb/. PMID:26862144

  4. GRASP: analysis of genotype–phenotype results from 1390 genome-wide association studies and corresponding open access database

    OpenAIRE

    Leslie, Richard; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Johnson, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: We created a deeply extracted and annotated database of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) results. GRASP v1.0 contains >6.2 million SNP-phenotype association from among 1390 GWAS studies. We re-annotated GWAS results with 16 annotation sources including some rarely compared to GWAS results (e.g. RNAediting sites, lincRNAs, PTMs).

  5. dbSUPER: a database of super-enhancers in mouse and human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aziz; Zhang, Xuegong

    2016-01-01

    Super-enhancers are clusters of transcriptional enhancers that drive cell-type-specific gene expression and are crucial to cell identity. Many disease-associated sequence variations are enriched in super-enhancer regions of disease-relevant cell types. Thus, super-enhancers can be used as potential biomarkers for disease diagnosis and therapeutics. Current studies have identified super-enhancers in more than 100 cell types and demonstrated their functional importance. However, a centralized resource to integrate all these findings is not currently available. We developed dbSUPER (http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/dbsuper/), the first integrated and interactive database of super-enhancers, with the primary goal of providing a resource for assistance in further studies related to transcriptional control of cell identity and disease. dbSUPER provides a responsive and user-friendly web interface to facilitate efficient and comprehensive search and browsing. The data can be easily sent to Galaxy instances, GREAT and Cistrome web-servers for downstream analysis, and can also be visualized in the UCSC genome browser where custom tracks can be added automatically. The data can be downloaded and exported in variety of formats. Furthermore, dbSUPER lists genes associated with super-enhancers and also links to external databases such as GeneCards, UniProt and Entrez. dbSUPER also provides an overlap analysis tool to annotate user-defined regions. We believe dbSUPER is a valuable resource for the biology and genetic research communities. PMID:26438538

  6. Gene evolution and gene expression after whole genome duplication in fish: the PhyloFish database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquier, Jeremy; Cabau, Cédric; Nguyen, Thaovi; Jouanno, Elodie; Severac, Dany; Braasch, Ingo; Journot, Laurent; Pontarotti, Pierre; Klopp, Christophe; Postlethwait, John H; Guiguen, Yann; Bobe, Julien

    2016-01-01

    With more than 30,000 species, ray-finned fish represent approximately half of vertebrates. The evolution of ray-finned fish was impacted by several whole genome duplication (WGD) events including a teleost-specific WGD event (TGD) that occurred at the root of the teleost lineage about 350 million years ago (Mya) and more recent WGD events in salmonids, carps, suckers and others. In plants and animals, WGD events are associated with adaptive radiations and evolutionary innovations. WGD-spurred innovation may be especially relevant in the case of teleost fish, which colonized a wide diversity of habitats on earth, including many extreme environments. Fish biodiversity, the use of fish models for human medicine and ecological studies, and the importance of fish in human nutrition, fuel an important need for the characterization of gene expression repertoires and corresponding evolutionary histories of ray-finned fish genes. To this aim, we performed transcriptome analyses and developed the PhyloFish database to provide (i) de novo assembled gene repertoires in 23 different ray-finned fish species including two holosteans (i.e. a group that diverged from teleosts before TGD) and 21 teleosts (including six salmonids), and (ii) gene expression levels in ten different tissues and organs (and embryos for many) in the same species. This resource was generated using a common deep RNA sequencing protocol to obtain the most exhaustive gene repertoire possible in each species that allows between-species comparisons to study the evolution of gene expression in different lineages. The PhyloFish database described here can be accessed and searched using RNAbrowse, a simple and efficient solution to give access to RNA-seq de novo assembled transcripts. PMID:27189481

  7. License - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods License License ...stered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods © Satoshi Tabata (Kazusa D...Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us License - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive ...

  8. The Portable Dictionary of the Mouse Genome: a personal database for gene mapping and molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R W

    1994-06-01

    The Portable Dictionary of the Mouse Genome is a database for personal computers that contains information on approximately 10,000 loci in the mouse, along with data on homologs in several other mammalian species, including human, rat, cat, cow, and pig. Key features of the dictionary are its compact size, its network independence, and the ability to convert the entire dictionary to a wide variety of common application programs. Another significant feature is the integration of DNA sequence accession data. Loci in the dictionary can be rapidly resorted by chromosomal position, by type, by human homology, or by gene effect. The dictionary provides an accessible, easily manipulated set of data that has many uses--from a quick review of loci and gene nomenclature to the design of experiments and analysis of results. The Portable Dictionary is available in several formats suitable for conversion to different programs and computer systems. It can be obtained on disk or from Internet Gopher servers (mickey.utmen.edu or anat4.utmen.edu), an anonymous FTP site (nb.utmem.edu in the directory pub/genedict), and a World Wide Web server (http://mickey.utmem.edu/front.html). PMID:8043953

  9. TcruziDB, an Integrated Database, and the WWW Information Server for the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Degrave Wim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Data analysis, presentation and distribution is of utmost importance to a genome project. A public domain software, ACeDB, has been chosen as the common basis for parasite genome databases, and a first release of TcruziDB, the Trypanosoma cruzi genome database, is available by ftp from ftp://iris.dbbm.fiocruz.br/pub/genomedb/TcruziDB as well as versions of the software for different operating systems (ftp://iris.dbbm.fiocruz.br/pub/unixsoft/. Moreover, data originated from the project are available from the WWW server at http://www.dbbm.fiocruz.br. It contains biological and parasitological data on CL Brener, its karyotype, all available T. cruzi sequences from Genbank, data on the EST-sequencing project and on available libraries, a T. cruzi codon table and a listing of activities and participating groups in the genome project, as well as meeting reports. T. cruzi discussion lists (tcruzi-l@iris.dbbm.fiocruz.br and tcgenics@iris.dbbm.fiocruz.br are being maintained for communication and to promote collaboration in the genome project

  10. A database of phylogenetically atypical genes in archaeal and bacterial genomes, identified using the DarkHorse algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Eric E

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of horizontal gene transfer (HGT is believed to be widespread in Bacteria and Archaea, but little comparative data is available addressing its occurrence in complete microbial genomes. Collection of high-quality, automated HGT prediction data based on phylogenetic evidence has previously been impractical for large numbers of genomes at once, due to prohibitive computational demands. DarkHorse, a recently described statistical method for discovering phylogenetically atypical genes on a genome-wide basis, provides a means to solve this problem through lineage probability index (LPI ranking scores. LPI scores inversely reflect phylogenetic distance between a test amino acid sequence and its closest available database matches. Proteins with low LPI scores are good horizontal gene transfer candidates; those with high scores are not. Description The DarkHorse algorithm has been applied to 955 microbial genome sequences, and the results organized into a web-searchable relational database, called the DarkHorse HGT Candidate Resource http://darkhorse.ucsd.edu. Users can select individual genomes or groups of genomes to screen by LPI score, search for protein functions by descriptive annotation or amino acid sequence similarity, or select proteins with unusual G+C composition in their underlying coding sequences. The search engine reports LPI scores for match partners as well as query sequences, providing the opportunity to explore whether potential HGT donor sequences are phylogenetically typical or atypical within their own genomes. This information can be used to predict whether or not sufficient information is available to build a well-supported phylogenetic tree using the potential donor sequence. Conclusion The DarkHorse HGT Candidate database provides a powerful, flexible set of tools for identifying phylogenetically atypical proteins, allowing researchers to explore both individual HGT events in single genomes, and

  11. Transcriptional profiling of Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    Veen, van der, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    The industrially important fungus Aspergillus niger feeds naturally on decomposing plant material, of which a significant proportion is lipid. Examination of the A. niger genome sequence suggested that all proteins required for metabolic conversion of lipids are present, including 63 predicted lipases. In contrast to polysaccharide-degrading enzyme networks, not much is known about the signaling and regulatory processes that control lipase expression and activity in fungi. This project was ai...

  12. The TTSMI database: a catalog of triplex target DNA sites associated with genes and regulatory elements in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Chew, Chee Siang; Yong, Tai Pang; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Thammasorn, Wimada; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A

    2015-01-01

    A triplex target DNA site (TTS), a stretch of DNA that is composed of polypurines, is able to form a triple-helix (triplex) structure with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and is able to influence the site-specific modulation of gene expression and/or the modification of genomic DNA. The co-localization of a genomic TTS with gene regulatory signals and functional genome structures suggests that TFOs could potentially be exploited in antigene strategies for the therapy of cancers and other genetic diseases. Here, we present the TTS Mapping and Integration (TTSMI; http://ttsmi.bii.a-star.edu.sg) database, which provides a catalog of unique TTS locations in the human genome and tools for analyzing the co-localization of TTSs with genomic regulatory sequences and signals that were identified using next-generation sequencing techniques and/or predicted by computational models. TTSMI was designed as a user-friendly tool that facilitates (i) fast searching/filtering of TTSs using several search terms and criteria associated with sequence stability and specificity, (ii) interactive filtering of TTSs that co-localize with gene regulatory signals and non-B DNA structures, (iii) exploration of dynamic combinations of the biological signals of specific TTSs and (iv) visualization of a TTS simultaneously with diverse annotation tracks via the UCSC genome browser. PMID:25324314

  13. Japonica genome blast search result - KOME | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us KOME Japonica ... genome ... blast search result Data detail Data name Japonica ... genome ... blast search result Description of data contents R ...

  14. Sequence Collection - TMBETA-GENOME | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us TM...ultiple chromosomes, the entry set for each chormosome is given individually. Data file File name: tm...beta_genome_sequence_collection.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/tmbeta-genome/LATEST/tm...beta_genome_sequence_collection.zip File size: 8.8 KB Simple search URL http://togodb.biosci...base Site Policy | Contact Us Sequence Collection - TMBETA-GENOME | LSDB Archive ...

  15. Indica genome blast search result - KOME | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us KOME Indica genome ... e blast search result Data detail Data name Indica genome ... blast search result Description of data contents R ... esults of blastn searches against indica genome ... sequences (top hits only) Data file File name: kom ...

  16. Sequence Classification - TMBETA-GENOME | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us TM...nd dipeptide compositions has been used as main attributes. Data file File name: tm...beta_genome_sequence_classification.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/tmbeta-genome/LATEST/tm...beta_genome_sequence_classification.zip File size: 177 MB Simple search URL http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/tm...ne protein with a statistical method using amino acid composition. ( TMBETADISC-C

  17. The two genome sequence release and blast server construction for aflatoxin-producing L and S strains Aspergillus parasiticus and A. flavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxins are toxic and carcinogenic secondary metabolites. These compounds, produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus, contaminate pre-harvest agricultural crops in the field and post-harvest grains during storage. In order to reduce and eliminate aflatoxin contamination of food and feed...

  18. Aspergillus niger genome-wide analysis reveals a large number of novel alpha-glucan acting enzymes with unexpected expression profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, X.-L.; Kaaij, R.M. van der; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.; Maarel, M.J.E.C. van der; Dijkhuizen, L.; Ram, A.F.J.

    2008-01-01

    The filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus niger is well known for its ability to produce a large variety of enzymes for the degradation of plant polysaccharide material. A major carbon and energy source for this soil fungus is starch, which can be degraded by the concerted action of α-amylase, glucoamy

  19. PlanTE-MIR DB: a database for transposable element-related microRNAs in plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    R Lorenzetti, Alan P; A de Antonio, Gabriel Y; Paschoal, Alexandre R; Domingues, Douglas S

    2016-05-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) comprise a major fraction of many plant genomes and are known to drive their organization and evolution. Several studies show that these repetitive elements have a prominent role in shaping noncoding regions of the genome such as microRNA (miRNA) loci, which are components of post-transcriptional regulation mechanisms. Although some studies have reported initial formation of miRNA loci from TE sequences, especially in model plants, the approaches that were used did not employ systems that would allow results to be delivered by a user-friendly database. In this study, we identified 152 precursor miRNAs overlapping TEs in 10 plant species. PlanTE-MIR DB was designed to assemble this data and deliver it to the scientific community interested in miRNA origin, evolution, and regulation pathways. Users can browse the database through a web interface and search for entries using various parameters. This resource is cross-referenced with repetitive element (Repbase Update) and miRNA (miRBase) repositories, where sequences can be checked for further analysis. All data in PlanTE-MIR DB are publicly available for download in several file formats to facilitate their understanding and use. The database is hosted at http://bioinfo-tool.cp.utfpr.edu.br/plantemirdb/ . PMID:26887375

  20. VitisExpDB: A Database Resource for Grape Functional Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    VitisExpDB is an online MySQL-PHP driven relational database that houses annotated EST and gene expression data for Vitis vinifera and non-vinifera grape varieties. Currently, the database stores ~320,000 EST sequences derived from 8 species/hybrids, their annotation details and gene ontology based...

  1. Genome mapping data table of Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap lines (Clone List) - GETDB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GETDB Genome mapping data table of Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap lines (Clone List) Data detail Data name Genome mapping data table... of Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap lines (Clone List) Description of data contents A table...date History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Genome mapping data table of Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap lines (Clone List) - GETDB | LSDB Archive ...

  2. FGF: a web tool for Fishing Gene Family in a whole genome database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hongkun; Shi, Junjie; Fang, Xiaodong;

    2007-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important process in evolution. The availability of genome sequences of a number of organisms has made it possible to conduct comprehensive searches for duplicated genes enabling informative studies of their evolution. We have established the FGF (Fishing Gene Family) program...... structure. FGF is freely available on a web server at http://fgf.genomics.org.cn/...

  3. FGF: A web tool for Fishing Gene Family in a whole genome database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hongkun; Shi, Junjie; Fang, Xiaodong;

    2007-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important process in evolution. The availability of genome sequences of a number of organisms has made it possible to conduct comprehensive searches for duplicated genes enabling informative studies of their evolution. We have established the FGF (Fishing Gene Family) program...... structure. FGF is freely available on a web server at http://fgf.genomics.org.cn/...

  4. ASPERGILLUS BOMBYCIS GENOTYPES (RFLP) FROM SILKWORM CULTIVATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eighteen isolates of Aspergillus bombycis from samples of dust, insect frass, and soil collected from 8 silkworm rearing facilities in Japan, as well as single silkworm rearing facilities in Indonesia and Malaysia, were subjected to DNA fingerprinting. PstI digests of total genomic DNA from each is...

  5. Practical Value of Food Pathogen Traceability through Building a Whole-Genome Sequencing Network and Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Marc W; Strain, Errol; Melka, David; Bunning, Kelly; Musser, Steven M; Brown, Eric W; Timme, Ruth

    2016-08-01

    The FDA has created a United States-based open-source whole-genome sequencing network of state, federal, international, and commercial partners. The GenomeTrakr network represents a first-of-its-kind distributed genomic food shield for characterizing and tracing foodborne outbreak pathogens back to their sources. The GenomeTrakr network is leading investigations of outbreaks of foodborne illnesses and compliance actions with more accurate and rapid recalls of contaminated foods as well as more effective monitoring of preventive controls for food manufacturing environments. An expanded network would serve to provide an international rapid surveillance system for pathogen traceback, which is critical to support an effective public health response to bacterial outbreaks. PMID:27008877

  6. The CATH database: an extended protein family resource for structural and functional genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Pearl, F. M. G.; Bennett, C.F.; Bray, J.E.; Harrison, A.P.; Martin, N.; Shepherd, A.; Sillitoe, I.; Thornton, J.; Orengo, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    The CATH database of protei domain structures ( http: / / www. biochem. ucl. ac. uk/ bsm/ cath_ new) currently contains 34 287 domain structures classified into 1383 superfamilies and 3285 sequence families. Each structural family is expanded with domain sequence relatives recruited from GenBank using a variety of efficient sequence search protocols and reliable thresholds. This extended resource, known as the CATH- protein family database ( CATH- PFDB) contains a total of 310 000 domain sequ...

  7. Citrus sinensis Annotation Project (CAP): A Comprehensive Database for Sweet Orange Genome

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jia; Chen, DiJun; Lei, Yang; Chang, Ji-Wei; Hao, Bao-Hai; Xing, Feng; Li, Sen; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiu-Xin; Chen, Ling-ling

    2014-01-01

    Citrus is one of the most important and widely grown fruit crop with global production ranking firstly among all the fruit crops in the world. Sweet orange accounts for more than half of the Citrus production both in fresh fruit and processed juice. We have sequenced the draft genome of a double-haploid sweet orange (C. sinensis cv. Valencia), and constructed the Citrus sinensis annotation project (CAP) to store and visualize the sequenced genomic and transcriptome data. CAP provides GBrowse-...

  8. SBEAMS-Microarray: database software supporting genomic expression analyses for systems biology

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell David; Moss Patrick; Deutsch Eric W; Marzolf Bruz; Johnson Michael H; Galitski Timothy

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The biological information in genomic expression data can be understood, and computationally extracted, in the context of systems of interacting molecules. The automation of this information extraction requires high throughput management and analysis of genomic expression data, and integration of these data with other data types. Results SBEAMS-Microarray, a module of the open-source Systems Biology Experiment Analysis Management System (SBEAMS), enables MIAME-compliant st...

  9. ChiloDB: a genomic and transcriptome database for an important rice insect pest Chilo suppressalis

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Chuanlin; Liu, Ying; Liu, Jinding; Xiao, Huamei; Huang, Shuiqing; Lin, Yongjun; Han, Zhaojun; LI Fei

    2014-01-01

    ChiloDB is an integrated resource that will be of use to the rice stem borer research community. The rice striped stem borer (SSB), Chilo suppressalis Walker, is a major rice pest that causes severe yield losses in most rice-producing countries. A draft genome of this insect is available. The aims of ChiloDB are (i) to store recently acquired genomic sequence and transcriptome data and integrate them with protein-coding genes, microRNAs, piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) and RNA sequencing (RNA-...

  10. Aspergillus antigen skin test (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aspergillus antigen skin test determines whether or not a person has been exposed to the mold aspergillus. It is performed by injecting an aspergillus antigen under the skin with a needle. After 48 ...

  11. Panzea: A Database and Resource for Molecular and Functional Diversity in the Maize Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maize, a classical model for genetic studies, is an important agronomic crop, and the genome is known to contain many natural differences in the DNA between different strains. On average, two randomly chosen maize lines have an average of one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) every ~100 bp; this...

  12. An Integrated Database for Grass and Endophyte Genomics at www.grassendophyte.org

    Science.gov (United States)

    The endophytic microbes are able to promote plant growth and health under various stresses via their symbiotic association with host plants. Genome-wide comparative analysis has been extensively employed to decipher complex mechanisms of interactions between endophytic microbes and host plants, resu...

  13. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host

  14. GeMInA, Genomic Metadata for Infectious Agents, a geospatial surveillance pathogen database

    OpenAIRE

    Schriml, Lynn M.; Arze, Cesar; Nadendla, Suvarna; Ganapathy, Anu; Felix, Victor; Mahurkar, Anup; Phillippy, Katherine; Gussman, Aaron; Angiuoli, Sam; Ghedin, Elodie; White, Owen; Hall, Neil

    2009-01-01

    The Gemina system (http://gemina.igs.umaryland.edu) identifies, standardizes and integrates the outbreak metadata for the breadth of NIAID category A–C viral and bacterial pathogens, thereby providing an investigative and surveillance tool describing the Who [Host], What [Disease, Symptom], When [Date], Where [Location] and How [Pathogen, Environmental Source, Reservoir, Transmission Method] for each pathogen. The Gemina database will provide a greater understanding of the interactions of vir...

  15. LC-MS/MS-based proteome profiling in Daphnia pulex and Daphnia longicephala: the Daphnia pulex genome database as a key for high throughput proteomics in Daphnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayr Tobias

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Daphniids, commonly known as waterfleas, serve as important model systems for ecology, evolution and the environmental sciences. The sequencing and annotation of the Daphnia pulex genome both open future avenues of research on this model organism. As proteomics is not only essential to our understanding of cell function, and is also a powerful validation tool for predicted genes in genome annotation projects, a first proteomic dataset is presented in this article. Results A comprehensive set of 701,274 peptide tandem-mass-spectra, derived from Daphnia pulex, was generated, which lead to the identification of 531 proteins. To measure the impact of the Daphnia pulex filtered models database for mass spectrometry based Daphnia protein identification, this result was compared with results obtained with the Swiss-Prot and the Drosophila melanogaster database. To further validate the utility of the Daphnia pulex database for research on other Daphnia species, additional 407,778 peptide tandem-mass-spectra, obtained from Daphnia longicephala, were generated and evaluated, leading to the identification of 317 proteins. Conclusion Peptides identified in our approach provide the first experimental evidence for the translation of a broad variety of predicted coding regions within the Daphnia genome. Furthermore it could be demonstrated that identification of Daphnia longicephala proteins using the Daphnia pulex protein database is feasible but shows a slightly reduced identification rate. Data provided in this article clearly demonstrates that the Daphnia genome database is the key for mass spectrometry based high throughput proteomics in Daphnia.

  16. solQTL: a tool for QTL analysis, visualization and linking to genomes at SGN database

    OpenAIRE

    van der Knaap Esther; Buels Robert M; Menda Naama; Tecle Isaak Y; Mueller Lukas A

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background A common approach to understanding the genetic basis of complex traits is through identification of associated quantitative trait loci (QTL). Fine mapping QTLs requires several generations of backcrosses and analysis of large populations, which is time-consuming and costly effort. Furthermore, as entire genomes are being sequenced and an increasing amount of genetic and expression data are being generated, a challenge remains: linking phenotypic variation to the underlying...

  17. DaizuBase, an integrated soybean genome database including BAC-based physical maps

    OpenAIRE

    Katayose, Yuichi; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Shimomura, Michihiko; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Ikawa, Hiroshi; Minami, Hiroshi; Shibata, Michie; Ito, Tomoko; Kurita, Kanako; Ito, Kazue; Tsubokura, Yasutaka; Kaga, Akito; Wu, Jianzhong; Matsumoto, Takashi; Harada, Kyuya

    2012-01-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L) Merrill] is one of the most important leguminous crops and ranks fourth after to rice, wheat and maize in terms of world crop production. Soybean contains abundant protein and oil, which makes it a major source of nutritious food, livestock feed and industrial products. In Japan, soybean is also an important source of traditional staples such as tofu, natto, miso and soy sauce. The soybean genome was determined in 2010. With its enormous size, physical mapping and gen...

  18. Panzea: a database and resource for molecular and functional diversity in the maize genome

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Wei; Canaran, Payan; Jurkuta, Rebecca; Fulton, Theresa; Glaubitz, Jeffrey; Buckler, Edward; Doebley, John; Gaut, Brandon; Goodman, Major; Holland, Jim; Kresovich, Stephen; McMullen, Michael; Stein, Lincoln; Ware, Doreen

    2005-01-01

    Serving as a community resource, Panzea () is the bioinformatics arm of the Molecular and Functional Diversity in the Maize Genome project. Maize, a classical model for genetic studies, is an important crop species and also the most diverse crop species known. On average, two randomly chosen maize lines have one single-nucleotide polymorphism every ∼100 bp; this divergence is roughly equivalent to the differences between humans and chimpanzees. This exceptional genotypic diversity underlies t...

  19. Developing genomic knowledge bases and databases to support clinical management: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Huser V; Sincan M; Cimino JJ

    2014-01-01

    Vojtech Huser,1 Murat Sincan,2,3 James J Cimino1,4 1Laboratory for Informatics Development, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Undiagnosed Diseases Program, 3Office of the Clinical Director, National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, MD, USA; 4National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, MD, USA Abstract: Personalized medicine, the ability to tailor diagnostic and treatment decisions for individual patients, is seen...

  20. Citrus sinensis annotation project (CAP: a comprehensive database for sweet orange genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Wang

    Full Text Available Citrus is one of the most important and widely grown fruit crop with global production ranking firstly among all the fruit crops in the world. Sweet orange accounts for more than half of the Citrus production both in fresh fruit and processed juice. We have sequenced the draft genome of a double-haploid sweet orange (C. sinensis cv. Valencia, and constructed the Citrus sinensis annotation project (CAP to store and visualize the sequenced genomic and transcriptome data. CAP provides GBrowse-based organization of sweet orange genomic data, which integrates ab initio gene prediction, EST, RNA-seq and RNA-paired end tag (RNA-PET evidence-based gene annotation. Furthermore, we provide a user-friendly web interface to show the predicted protein-protein interactions (PPIs and metabolic pathways in sweet orange. CAP provides comprehensive information beneficial to the researchers of sweet orange and other woody plants, which is freely available at http://citrus.hzau.edu.cn/.

  1. Maize databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter is a succinct overview of maize data held in the species-specific database MaizeGDB (the Maize Genomics and Genetics Database), and selected multi-species data repositories, such as Gramene/Ensembl Plants, Phytozome, UniProt and the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), ...

  2. Metabolomics of Aspergillus fumigatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Rank, Christian; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2009-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most important species in Aspergillus causing infective lung diseases. This species has been reported to produce a large number of extrolites, including secondary metabolites, acids, and proteins such as hydrophobins and extracellular enzymes. At least 226 potentially...

  3. Large-scale compression of genomic sequence databases with the Burrows-Wheeler transform

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Anthony J; Jakobi, Tobias; Rosone, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Motivation The Burrows-Wheeler transform (BWT) is the foundation of many algorithms for compression and indexing of text data, but the cost of computing the BWT of very large string collections has prevented these techniques from being widely applied to the large sets of sequences often encountered as the outcome of DNA sequencing experiments. In previous work, we presented a novel algorithm that allows the BWT of human genome scale data to be computed on very moderate hardware, thus enabling us to investigate the BWT as a tool for the compression of such datasets. Results We first used simulated reads to explore the relationship between the level of compression and the error rate, the length of the reads and the level of sampling of the underlying genome and compare choices of second-stage compression algorithm. We demonstrate that compression may be greatly improved by a particular reordering of the sequences in the collection and give a novel `implicit sorting' strategy that enables these benefits to be re...

  4. Regulation of Development in Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2010-01-01

    Members of the genus Aspergillus are the most common fungi and all reproduce asexually by forming long chains of conidiospores (or conidia). The impact of various Aspergillus species on humans ranges from beneficial to harmful. For example, several species including Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus niger are used in industry for enzyme production and food processing. In contrast, Aspergillus flavus produce the most potent naturally present carcinogen aflatoxins, which contaminate various pl...

  5. Restriction endonuclease analysis of Aspergillus fumigatus DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Burnie, J P; Coke, A.; Matthews, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To develop a genome based DNA fingerprinting system for Aspergillus fumigatus mould. METHODS: DNA was extracted from 21 isolates obtained from eight patients with an aspergilloma. This was with a freeze-dried mycelial extract fragmented in liquid nitrogen. DNA was subsequently purified by phenol-chloroform extraction followed by ultracentrifugation on a caesium chloride gradient. The DNA was restricted by EcoRI and Xba I. RESULTS: All isolates were identical when cut by EcoRI; Xba I del...

  6. Comprehensive two-dimensional gel protein databases offer a global approach to the analysis of human cells: the transformed amnion cells (AMA) master database and its link to genome DNA sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J E; Gesser, B; Rasmussen, H H;

    1990-01-01

    recovered from the gels (based on quantitations of polypeptides labeled with a mixture of 16 14C-amino acids), protein name (including credit to investigators that aided identification), antibody against protein, cellular localization, (nuclear, 40S hnRNP, 20S snRNP U5, proteasomes, endoplasmic reticulum...... particular, the 2-D gel protein database may become increasingly important in view of the concerted effort to map and sequence the entire human genome. Udgivelsesdato: 1990-Dec...

  7. MitoZoa 2.0: a database resource and search tools for comparative and evolutionary analyses of mitochondrial genomes in Metazoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onorio de Meo, Paolo; D'Antonio, Mattia; Griggio, Francesca; Lupi, Renato; Borsani, Massimiliano; Pavesi, Giulio; Castrignanò, Tiziana; Pesole, Graziano; Gissi, Carmela

    2012-01-01

    The MITOchondrial genome database of metaZOAns (MitoZoa) is a public resource for comparative analyses of metazoan mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA) at both the sequence and genomic organizational levels. The main characteristics of the MitoZoa database are the careful revision of mtDNA entry annotations and the possibility of retrieving gene order and non-coding region (NCR) data in appropriate formats. The MitoZoa retrieval system enables basic and complex queries at various taxonomic levels using different search menus. MitoZoa 2.0 has been enhanced in several aspects, including: a re-annotation pipeline to check the correctness of protein-coding gene predictions; a standardized annotation of introns and of precursor ORFs whose functionality is post-transcriptionally recovered by RNA editing or programmed translational frameshifting; updates of taxon-related fields and a BLAST sequence similarity search tool. Database novelties and the definition of standard mtDNA annotation rules, together with the user-friendly retrieval system and the BLAST service, make MitoZoa a valuable resource for comparative and evolutionary analyses as well as a reference database to assist in the annotation of novel mtDNA sequences. MitoZoa is freely accessible at http://www.caspur.it/mitozoa. PMID:22123747

  8. DLGP: A database for lineage-conserved and lineage-specific gene pairs in animal and plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dapeng

    2016-01-15

    The conservation of gene organization in the genome with lineage-specificity is an invaluable resource to decipher their potential functionality with diverse selective constraints, especially in higher animals and plants. Gene pairs appear to be the minimal structure for such kind of gene clusters that tend to reside in their preferred locations, representing the distinctive genomic characteristics in single species or a given lineage. Despite gene families having been investigated in a widespread manner, the definition of gene pair families in various taxa still lacks adequate attention. To address this issue, we report DLGP (http://lcgbase.big.ac.cn/DLGP/) that stores the pre-calculated lineage-based gene pairs in currently available 134 animal and plant genomes and inspect them under the same analytical framework, bringing out a set of innovational features. First, the taxonomy or lineage has been classified into four levels such as Kingdom, Phylum, Class and Order. It adopts all-to-all comparison strategy to identify the possible conserved gene pairs in all species for each gene pair in certain species and reckon those that are conserved in over a significant proportion of species in a given lineage (e.g. Primates, Diptera or Poales) as the lineage-conserved gene pairs. Furthermore, it predicts the lineage-specific gene pairs by retaining the above-mentioned lineage-conserved gene pairs that are not conserved in any other lineages. Second, it carries out pairwise comparison for the gene pairs between two compared species and creates the table including all the conserved gene pairs and the image elucidating the conservation degree of gene pairs in chromosomal level. Third, it supplies gene order browser to extend gene pairs to gene clusters, allowing users to view the evolution dynamics in the gene context in an intuitive manner. This database will be able to facilitate the particular comparison between animals and plants, between vertebrates and arthropods, and

  9. The master two-dimensional gel database of human AMA cell proteins: towards linking protein and genome sequence and mapping information (update 1991)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Celis, J E; Leffers, H; Rasmussen, H H;

    1991-01-01

    under normal running conditions and (ii) low-abundant proteins that can only be detected after prolonged gel exposure. Annotation categories updated in this version include "protein name", "antibody against protein", "cellular localization", and "microsequenced proteins". New entries include "human...... autoantigens" and "cDNAs". For convenience we have included an alphabetical list of all known proteins recorded in this database. In the long run, the main goal of this database is to link protein and DNA sequencing and mapping information (Human Genome Program) and to provide an integrated picture of the...

  10. Fine De Novo Sequencing of a Fungal Genome Using only SOLiD Short Read Data: Verification on Aspergillus oryzae RIB40

    OpenAIRE

    Myco Umemura; Yoshinori Koyama; Itaru Takeda; Hiroko Hagiwara; Tsutomu Ikegami; Hideaki Koike; Masayuki Machida

    2013-01-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has dramatically increased the throughput, speed, and efficiency of genome sequencing. The short read data generated from NGS platforms, such as SOLiD and Illumina, are quite useful for mapping analysis. However, the SOLiD read data with lengths of

  11. Database Description - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available published literature. And we provide databases for general plant information and web...about DNA marker, QTL, and website links by keywords such as marker name, agricultural trait, and classification of web...Cell Physiol (2014) 55 (1): e8 Pubmed ID: 24363285 Original website information Database maintenance site Ka...zusa DNA Research Institute URL of the original website http://pgdbj.jp/en/dna-marker-linkage-map.html Opera

  12. Final Technical Report on the Genome Sequence DataBase (GSDB): DE-FG03 95 ER 62062 September 1997-September 1999; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since September 1997 NCGR has produced two web-based tools for researchers to use to access and analyze data in the Genome Sequence DataBase (GSDB). These tools are: Sequence Viewer, a nucleotide sequence and annotation visualization tool, and MAR-Finder, a tool that predicts, base upon statistical inferences, the location of matrix attachment regions (MARS) within a nucleotide sequence.[The annual report for June 1996 to August 1997 is included as an attachment to this final report.

  13. Final Technical Report on the Genome Sequence DataBase (GSDB): DE-FG03 95 ER 62062 September 1997-September 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harger, Carol A.

    1999-10-28

    Since September 1997 NCGR has produced two web-based tools for researchers to use to access and analyze data in the Genome Sequence DataBase (GSDB). These tools are: Sequence Viewer, a nucleotide sequence and annotation visualization tool, and MAR-Finder, a tool that predicts, base upon statistical inferences, the location of matrix attachment regions (MARS) within a nucleotide sequence. [The annual report for June 1996 to August 1997 is included as an attachment to this final report.

  14. Toward systems metabolic engineering of Aspergillus and Pichia species for the production of chemicals and biofuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caspeta, Luis; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Recently genome sequence data have become available for Aspergillus and Pichia species of industrial interest. This has stimulated the use of systems biology approaches for large-scale analysis of the molecular and metabolic responses of Aspergillus and Pichia under defined conditions, which has...... resulted in much new biological information. Case-specific contextualization of this information has been performed using comparative and functional genomic tools. Genomics data are also the basis for constructing genome-scale metabolic models, and these models have helped in the contextualization of...... knowledge on the fundamental biology of Aspergillus and Pichia species. Furthermore, with the availability of these models, the engineering of Aspergillus and Pichia is moving from traditional approaches, such as random mutagenesis, to a systems metabolic engineering approach. Here we review the recent...

  15. Database Description - RMG | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us RMG Database... Description General information of database Database name RMG Alternative name Rice Mitochondri...ational Institute of Agrobiological Sciences E-mail : Database classification Nucleotide Sequence Databases ...Organism Taxonomy Name: Oryza sativa Japonica Group Taxonomy ID: 39947 Database description This database co...e of rice mitochondrial genome and information on the analysis results. Features and manner of utilization of database

  16. (+)-Geodin from Aspergillus terreus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnest, Mads Holger; Nielsen, Morten Thrane; Leber, Blanka; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro; Krämer, Alwin; Clausen, Mads Hartvig; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Harris, Pernille

    The fungal metabolite (+)-geodin [systematic name: (2R)-methyl 5,7-dichloro-4-hydroxy-6'-methoxy-6-methyl-3,4'-dioxospiro[benzofuran-2,1'-cyclohexa-2',5'-diene]-2'-carboxylate], C(17)H(12)Cl(2)O(7), was isolated from Aspergillus terreus. The crystal structure contains two independent molecules in...

  17. A novel non-thermostable deuterolysin from Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Katase, Toru; Sakai, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Michio; Kusumoto, Ken-Ichi; Amano, Hitoshi; Ishida, Hiroki; Abe, Keietsu; Yamagata, Youhei

    2016-09-01

    Three putative deuterolysin (EC 3.4.24.29) genes (deuA, deuB, and deuC) were found in the Aspergillus oryzae genome database ( http://www.bio.nite.go.jp/dogan/project/view/AO ). One of these genes, deuA, was corresponding to NpII gene, previously reported. DeuA and DeuB were overexpressed by recombinant A. oryzae and were purified. The degradation profiles against protein substrates of both enzymes were similar, but DeuB showed wider substrate specificity against peptidyl MCA-substrates compared with DeuA. Enzymatic profiles of DeuB except for thermostability also resembled those of DeuA. DeuB was inactivated by heat treatment above 80° C, different from thermostable DeuA. Transcription analysis in wild type A. oryzae showed only deuB was expressed in liquid culture, and the addition of the proteinous substrate upregulated the transcription. Furthermore, the NaNO3 addition seems to eliminate the effect of proteinous substrate for the transcription of deuB. PMID:27050120

  18. The PlaNet Consortium: A Network of European Plant Databases Connecting Plant Genome Data in an Integrated Biological Knowledge Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. F. X. Mayer

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The completion of the Arabidopsis genome and the large collections of other plant sequences generated in recent years have sparked extensive functional genomics efforts. However, the utilization of this data is inefficient, as data sources are distributed and heterogeneous and efforts at data integration are lagging behind. PlaNet aims to overcome the limitations of individual efforts as well as the limitations of heterogeneous, independent data collections. PlaNet is a distributed effort among European bioinformatics groups and plant molecular biologists to establish a comprehensive integrated database in a collaborative network. Objectives are the implementation of infrastructure and data sources to capture plant genomic information into a comprehensive, integrated platform. This will facilitate the systematic exploration of Arabidopsis and other plants. New methods for data exchange, database integration and access are being developed to create a highly integrated, federated data resource for research. The connection between the individual resources is realized with BioMOBY. BioMOBY provides an architecture for the discovery and distribution of biological data through web services. While knowledge is centralized, data is maintained at its primary source without a need for warehousing. To standardize nomenclature and data representation, ontologies and generic data models are defined in interaction with the relevant communities.Minimal data models should make it simple to allow broad integration, while inheritance allows detail and depth to be added to more complex data objects without losing integration. To allow expert annotation and keep databases curated, local and remote annotation interfaces are provided. Easy and direct access to all data is key to the project.

  19. New taxa in Aspergillus section Usti

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, R. A.; Varga, J.; Meijer, M.;

    2011-01-01

    Based on phylogenetic analysis of sequence data, Aspergillus section Usti includes 21 species, inducing two teleomorphic species Aspergillus heterothallicus (=Emericella heterothallica) and Fennellia monodii. Aspergillus germanicus sp. nov. was isolated from indoor air in Germany. This species ha...

  20. The TTSMI database: a catalog of triplex target DNA sites associated with genes and regulatory elements in the human genome

    OpenAIRE

    Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Chew, Chee Siang; Yong, Tai Pang; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Thammasorn, Wimada; Kuznetsov, Vladimir A.

    2014-01-01

    A triplex target DNA site (TTS), a stretch of DNA that is composed of polypurines, is able to form a triple-helix (triplex) structure with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and is able to influence the site-specific modulation of gene expression and/or the modification of genomic DNA. The co-localization of a genomic TTS with gene regulatory signals and functional genome structures suggests that TFOs could potentially be exploited in antigene strategies for the therapy of cancers and ot...

  1. RegTransBase—a database of regulatory sequences and interactions in a wide range of prokaryotic genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Kazakov, Alexei E.; Cipriano, Michael J.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Minovitsky, Simon; Vinogradov, Dmitry V.; Arkin, Adam; Mironov, Andrey A; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Dubchak, Inna

    2006-01-01

    RegTransBase, a manually curated database of regulatory interactions in prokaryotes, captures the knowledge in published scientific literature using a controlled vocabulary. Although a number of databases describing interactions between regulatory proteins and their binding sites are currently being maintained, they focus mostly on the model organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, or are entirely computationally derived. RegTransBase describes a large number of regulatory inter...

  2. ngs.plot: Quick mining and visualization of next-generation sequencing data by integrating genomic databases

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Li; Shao, Ningyi; Liu, Xiaochuan; Nestler, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the relationship between the millions of functional DNA elements and their protein regulators, and how they work in conjunction to manifest diverse phenotypes, is key to advancing our understanding of the mammalian genome. Next-generation sequencing technology is now used widely to probe these protein-DNA interactions and to profile gene expression at a genome-wide scale. As the cost of DNA sequencing continues to fall, the interpretation of the ever increasing amount...

  3. A Genome-wide Gene-Expression Analysis and Database in Transgenic Mice during Development of Amyloid or Tau Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Mar Matarin; Dervis A. Salih; Marina Yasvoina; Damian M. Cummings; Sebastian Guelfi; Wenfei Liu; Muzammil A. Nahaboo Solim; Thomas G. Moens; Rocio Moreno Paublete; Shabinah S. Ali; Marina Perona; Roshni Desai; Kenneth J. Smith; Judy Latcham; Michael Fulleylove

    2015-01-01

    We provide microarray data comparing genome-wide differential expression and pathology throughout life in four lines of “amyloid” transgenic mice (mutant human APP, PSEN1, or APP/PSEN1) and “TAU” transgenic mice (mutant human MAPT gene). Microarray data were validated by qPCR and by comparison to human studies, including genome-wide association study (GWAS) hits. Immune gene expression correlated tightly with plaques whereas synaptic genes correlated negatively with neurofibrillary tangles. N...

  4. A Genome-wide gene-expression analysis and database in transgenic mice during development of amyloid or tau pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Matarin, M.; Perona, M.; D.A. Salih; Yasvoina, M.; Cummings, D. M.; Liu, W.; NahabooSolim, M. A.; Moens, T. G.; Paublete, R. M.; Ali, S. S.; Edwards, F. A.; Guelfi, S.; Hardy, J.; Latcham, J.; Fulleylove, M.

    2015-01-01

    We provide microarray data comparing genome-wide differential expression and pathology throughout life in four lines of "amyloid" transgenic mice (mutant human APP, PSEN1, or APP/PSEN1) and "TAU" transgenic mice (mutant human MAPT gene). Microarray data were validated by qPCR and by comparison to human studies, including genome-wide association study (GWAS) hits. Immune gene expression correlated tightly with plaques whereas synaptic genes correlated negatively with neurofibrillary tangles. N...

  5. Studies on Aspergillus flavus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro studies were conducted on conidia of Aspergillus flavus Link (aflatoxin producing) and Aspergillus flavus oryzae (non-toxigenic) strains isolated and identified in this laboratory. These strains differed in resistance to heat and gamma radiation, the toxigenic strain being more resistant to both treatments. Results of tests on dose-modifying factors indicated that composition, temperature and pH of suspending media affected radiation resistance. On the other hand, the size of the initial population and the age of the conidia did not influence the radiation resistance of either strain. Studies on thermal inactivation of the conidia suggested that the temperature employed was more important than the time of heat treatment. Conidia of both strains showed a synergistic effect of combined heat and radiation treatments, although a heat-radiation sequence was more effective than a radiation-heat sequence. (author)

  6. Pituitary aspergillus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Lauren A; Erstine, Emily M; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-07-01

    Fungal infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a pituitary or sellar mass, albeit fungal infections involving the pituitary gland and sella are a rare occurrence. We report a case of Aspergillus infection involving the pituitary gland and sellar region discovered in a 74-year-old man. The patient had a history of hypertension, chronic renal disease, autoimmune hemolytic anemia and presented with right eye pain, headaches and worsening hemiparesis. Imaging studies revealed a right internal carotid artery occlusion and an acute right pontine stroke along with smaller infarcts in the right middle cerebral artery distribution. Clinically, the patient was thought to have vasculitis. An infectious etiology was not identified. He developed respiratory distress and died. At autopsy, necrotizing meningitis was discovered. A predominantly chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate consisting of benign-appearing lymphocytes, plasma cells and macrophages was accompanied by acute angle branching, angioinvasive hyphae which were highlighted on Gomori methenamine silver staining and were morphologically consistent with Aspergillus species. In previously reported cases of Aspergillus infection involving the pituitary or sella, most presented with headaches or impaired vision and were not immunocompromised. A transsphenoidal surgical approach is recommended in suspected cases in order to minimize the risk of dissemination of the infection. Some patients have responded well to antifungal medications once diagnosed. PMID:26896907

  7. Diversity and specificity of microsatellites within Aspergillus section Fumigati

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araujo Ricardo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellites (or short tandem repeats, STRs are the genetic markers of choice for studying Aspergillus fumigatus molecular epidemiology due to its reproducibility and high discrimination power. However, the specificity of these markers must be investigated in a group of isolates from closely related species. The aim of this work was to test a microsatellite-based PCR multiplex previously designed for A. fumigatus in a set of species belonging to section Fumigati, namely Aspergillus fumigatiaffinis, Aspergillus lentulus, Aspergillus novofumigatus, Aspergillus unilateralis, Aspergillus viridinutans, Neosartorya fischeri, Neosartorya hiratsukae, Neosartorya pseudofischeri and Neosartorya udagawae. Results The reference A. fumigatus strain ATCC 46645 was easily genotyped in standard conditions showing a final electrophoretic profile of 8 expected peaks corresponding to each microsatellite locus. Inversely, no peaks were observed for all other species from section Fumigati, with an exception for marker MC6b in A. unilateralis. By screening the genome sequence of Neosartorya fischeri NRRL 181, the results showed that MC3, MC6a and MC7 might be employed for N. fischeri genotyping since these markers present several repeats of each motif. The accumulation of insertions and deletions was frequently observed in the genomic regions surrounding the microsatellites, including those where the A. fumigatus primers are located. The amplification of microsatellite markers in less stringent amplification conditions resulted in a distinct electrophoretic profile for species within section Fumigati. Conclusions Therefore, the microsatellite-based PCR multiplex allow simple identification of A. fumigatus and, with a slight modification of temperature conditions, it also allows discriminating other pathogenic species within section Fumigati, particularly A. fumigatiaffinis, N. fischeri and N. udagawae.

  8. What's My Substrate? Computational Function Assignment of Candida parapsilosis ADH5 by Genome Database Search, Virtual Screening, and QM/MM Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhoke, Gaurao V; Ensari, Yunus; Davari, Mehdi D; Ruff, Anna Joëlle; Schwaneberg, Ulrich; Bocola, Marco

    2016-07-25

    Zinc-dependent medium chain reductase from Candida parapsilosis can be used in the reduction of carbonyl compounds to pharmacologically important chiral secondary alcohols. To date, the nomenclature of cpADH5 is differing (CPCR2/RCR/SADH) in the literature, and its natural substrate is not known. In this study, we utilized a substrate docking based virtual screening method combined with KEGG, MetaCyc pathway, and Candida genome databases search for the discovery of natural substrates of cpADH5. The virtual screening of 7834 carbonyl compounds from the ZINC database provided 94 aldehydes or methyl/ethyl ketones as putative carbonyl substrates. Out of which, 52 carbonyl substrates of cpADH5 with catalytically active docking pose were identified by employing mechanism based substrate docking protocol. Comparison of the virtual screening results with KEGG, MetaCyc database search, and Candida genome pathway analysis suggest that cpADH5 might be involved in the Ehrlich pathway (reduction of fusel aldehydes in leucine, isoleucine, and valine degradation). Our QM/MM calculations and experimental activity measurements affirmed that butyraldehyde substrates are the potential natural substrates of cpADH5, suggesting a carbonyl reductase role for this enzyme in butyraldehyde reduction in aliphatic amino acid degradation pathways. Phylogenetic tree analysis of known ADHs from Candida albicans shows that cpADH5 is close to caADH5. We therefore propose, according to the experimental substrate identification and sequence similarity, the common name butyraldehyde dehydrogenase cpADH5 for Candida parapsilosis CPCR2/RCR/SADH. PMID:27387009

  9. SpinachDB: A Well-Characterized Genomic Database for Gene Family Classification and SNP Information of Spinach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), which originated in central and western Asia, belongs to the family Amaranthaceae. Spinach is one of most important leafy vegetables with a high nutritional value as well as being a perfect research material for plant sex chromosome models. As the completion of genome assembly and gene prediction of spinach, we developed SpinachDB (http://222.73.98.124/spinachdb) to store, annotate, mine and analyze genomics and genetics datasets efficiently. In this study, all of 21702 spinach genes were annotated. A total of 15741 spinach genes were catalogued into 4351 families, including identification of a substantial number of transcription factors. To construct a high-density genetic map, a total of 131592 SSRs and 1125743 potential SNPs located in 548801 loci of spinach genome were identified in 11 cultivated and wild spinach cultivars. The expression profiles were also performed with RNA-seq data using the FPKM method, which could be used to compare the genes. Paralogs in spinach and the orthologous genes in Arabidopsis, grape, sugar beet and rice were identified for comparative genome analysis. Finally, the SpinachDB website contains seven main sections, including the homepage; the GBrowse map that integrates genome, genes, SSR and SNP marker information; the Blast alignment service; the gene family classification search tool; the orthologous and paralogous gene pairs search tool; and the download and useful contact information. SpinachDB will be continually expanded to include newly generated robust genomics and genetics data sets along with the associated data mining and analysis tools. PMID:27148975

  10. SpinachDB: A Well-Characterized Genomic Database for Gene Family Classification and SNP Information of Spinach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue-Dong; Tan, Hua-Wei; Zhu, Wei-Min

    2016-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.), which originated in central and western Asia, belongs to the family Amaranthaceae. Spinach is one of most important leafy vegetables with a high nutritional value as well as being a perfect research material for plant sex chromosome models. As the completion of genome assembly and gene prediction of spinach, we developed SpinachDB (http://222.73.98.124/spinachdb) to store, annotate, mine and analyze genomics and genetics datasets efficiently. In this study, all of 21702 spinach genes were annotated. A total of 15741 spinach genes were catalogued into 4351 families, including identification of a substantial number of transcription factors. To construct a high-density genetic map, a total of 131592 SSRs and 1125743 potential SNPs located in 548801 loci of spinach genome were identified in 11 cultivated and wild spinach cultivars. The expression profiles were also performed with RNA-seq data using the FPKM method, which could be used to compare the genes. Paralogs in spinach and the orthologous genes in Arabidopsis, grape, sugar beet and rice were identified for comparative genome analysis. Finally, the SpinachDB website contains seven main sections, including the homepage; the GBrowse map that integrates genome, genes, SSR and SNP marker information; the Blast alignment service; the gene family classification search tool; the orthologous and paralogous gene pairs search tool; and the download and useful contact information. SpinachDB will be continually expanded to include newly generated robust genomics and genetics data sets along with the associated data mining and analysis tools. PMID:27148975

  11. Computational prediction of candidate miRNAs and their targets from the completed Linum ussitatissimum genome and EST database

    OpenAIRE

    Tiffanie Y. Moss; Cullis, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Flax is an important agronomic crop grown for its fiber (linen) and oil (linseed oil). In spite of many thousands of years of breeding some fiber varieties have been shown to rapidly respond to environmental stress with heritable changes to its genome. Many miRNAs appear to be induced by abiotic or biotic conditions experienced through the plant life cycle. Computational miRNA analysis of the flax genome provides a foundation for subsequent research on miRNA function in Linum usitatissimum an...

  12. Genome-Wide Analysis of Microsatellite Markers Based on Sequenced Database in Chinese Spring Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bin; Wang, Changbiao; Tang, Zhaohui; Ren, Yongkang; Li, Yali; Zhang, Dayong; Dong, Yanhui; Zhao, Xinghua

    2015-01-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are distributed across both prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes and have been widely used for genetic studies and molecular marker-assisted breeding in crops. Though an ordered draft sequence of hexaploid bread wheat have been announced, the researches about systemic analysis of SSRs for wheat still have not been reported so far. In the present study, we identified 364,347 SSRs from among 10,603,760 sequences of the Chinese spring wheat (CSW) genome, which were present at a density of 36.68 SSR/Mb. In total, we detected 488 types of motifs ranging from di- to hexanucleotides, among which dinucleotide repeats dominated, accounting for approximately 42.52% of the genome. The density of tri- to hexanucleotide repeats was 24.97%, 4.62%, 3.25% and 24.65%, respectively. AG/CT, AAG/CTT, AGAT/ATCT, AAAAG/CTTTT and AAAATT/AATTTT were the most frequent repeats among di- to hexanucleotide repeats. Among the 21 chromosomes of CSW, the density of repeats was highest on chromosome 2D and lowest on chromosome 3A. The proportions of di-, tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexanucleotide repeats on each chromosome, and even on the whole genome, were almost identical. In addition, 295,267 SSR markers were successfully developed from the 21 chromosomes of CSW, which cover the entire genome at a density of 29.73 per Mb. All of the SSR markers were validated by reverse electronic-Polymerase Chain Reaction (re-PCR); 70,564 (23.9%) were found to be monomorphic and 224,703 (76.1%) were found to be polymorphic. A total of 45 monomorphic markers were selected randomly for validation purposes; 24 (53.3%) amplified one locus, 8 (17.8%) amplified multiple identical loci, and 13 (28.9%) did not amplify any fragments from the genomic DNA of CSW. Then a dendrogram was generated based on the 24 monomorphic SSR markers among 20 wheat cultivars and three species of its diploid ancestors showing that monomorphic SSR markers represented a promising source to

  13. Aspergillus: a primer for the novice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J W

    2009-01-01

    Aspergillus is a genus of molds named after the morphological structure that bears asexual spores, the aspergillum, which resembles a liturgical device. This genus contains several species of positive or negative economic importance in industry, agriculture and medicine. The majority of aspergilli, including most species of economic importance, are known to reproduce only by asexual spores. Genome projects have been completed for A. fumigatus, A. nidulans, A. niger and A. oryzae; several other species are also being sequenced. The data from these genome projects have been useful in elucidating aspects of phylogeny, the evolution of sexuality and the extent of secondary metabolite diversity. To date, however, the impact on drug discovery, diagnosis of aspergillosis, and our understanding of fungal pathogenesis has been less pronounced. PMID:19253144

  14. Characterization of oxylipins and dioxygenase genes in the asexual fungus Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    Kalkhove Stefanie IC; de Vries Ronald P; Wadman Mayken W; Veldink Gerrit A; Vliegenthart Johannes FG

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Aspergillus niger is an ascomycetous fungus that is known to reproduce through asexual spores, only. Interestingly, recent genome analysis of A. niger has revealed the presence of a full complement of functional genes related to sexual reproduction 1. An example of such genes are the dioxygenase genes which in Aspergillus nidulans, have been shown to be connected to oxylipin production and regulation of both sexual and asexual sporulation 234. Nevertheless, the presence of...

  15. Development of a database system for mapping insertional mutations onto the mouse genome with large-scale experimental data

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Wenwei; Jin, Ke; Xie, Xing; Li, Dongsheng; Yang, Jigang; Wang, Li; Gu, Ning; Zhong, Yang; Sun, Ling V.

    2009-01-01

    Background Insertional mutagenesis is an effective method for functional genomic studies in various organisms. It can rapidly generate easily tractable mutations. A large-scale insertional mutagenesis with the piggyBac (PB) transposon is currently performed in mice at the Institute of Developmental Biology and Molecular Medicine (IDM), Fudan University in Shanghai, China. This project is carried out via collaborations among multiple groups overseeing interconnected experimental steps and gene...

  16. Aspergillus saccharolyticus sp. nov., a new black Aspergillus species isolated in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Annette; Lübeck, Peter S.; Lübeck, Mette; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Teller, Philip J.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2011-01-01

    A novel species, Aspergillus saccharolyticus sp. nov., belonging to the Aspergillus section Nigri group is described. This species was isolated in Denmark from treated hardwood. Its taxonomic status was determined using a polyphasic taxonomic approach including phenotypic (morphology and extrolite...... Aspergillus species that is morphologically similar to Aspergillus japonicus and Aspergillus aculeatus, but has a totally different extrolite profile compared to any known Aspergillus species. The type strain of A. saccharolyticus sp. nov. is CBS 127449T ( = IBT 28509T)....

  17. The transmission of cytoplasmic genes in Aspergillus nidulans.

    OpenAIRE

    Coenen, A

    1997-01-01

    IntroductionThis manuscript concerns the spread of selfish cytoplasmic genes in the fungus Aspergillus nidulans. A.nidulans is a common soil fungus that grows vegetatively by forming a network (mycelium) of hyphae and reproduces via sexual ascospores and asexual conidiospores. Cytoplasmic genes are genes that are located in the cell cytoplasm and not in the cell nucleus where most genes are situated. The cytoplasmic genes investigated in this research are the genomes of mitochondria and virus...

  18. Myosinome: a database of myosins from select eukaryotic genomes to facilitate analysis of sequence-structure-function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syamaladevi, Divya P; Sunitha, Margaret S; Kalaimathy, S; Reddy, Chandrashekar C; Iftekhar, Mohammed; Pasha, Shaik N; Sowdhamini, R

    2012-01-01

    Myosins are one of the largest protein superfamilies with 24 classes. They have conserved structural features and catalytic domains yet show huge variation at different domains resulting in a variety of functions. Myosins are molecules driving various kinds of cellular processes and motility until the level of organisms. These are ATPases that utilize the chemical energy released by ATP hydrolysis to bring about conformational changes leading to a motor function. Myosins are important as they are involved in almost all cellular activities ranging from cell division to transcriptional regulation. They are crucial due to their involvement in many congenital diseases symptomatized by muscular malfunctions, cardiac diseases, deafness, neural and immunological dysfunction, and so on, many of which lead to death at an early age. We present Myosinome, a database of selected myosin classes (myosin II, V, and VI) from five model organisms. This knowledge base provides the sequences, phylogenetic clustering, domain architectures of myosins and molecular models, structural analyses, and relevant literature of their coiled-coil domains. In the current version of Myosinome, information about 71 myosin sequences belonging to three myosin classes (myosin II, V, and VI) in five model organisms (Homo Sapiens, Mus musculus, D. melanogaster, C. elegans and S. cereviseae) identified using bioinformatics surveys are presented, and several of them are yet to be functionally characterized. As these proteins are involved in congenital diseases, such a database would be useful in short-listing candidates for gene therapy and drug development. The database can be accessed from http://caps.ncbs.res.in/myosinome. PMID:23189029

  19. A Genome-wide Gene-Expression Analysis and Database in Transgenic Mice during Development of Amyloid or Tau Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Matarin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We provide microarray data comparing genome-wide differential expression and pathology throughout life in four lines of “amyloid” transgenic mice (mutant human APP, PSEN1, or APP/PSEN1 and “TAU” transgenic mice (mutant human MAPT gene. Microarray data were validated by qPCR and by comparison to human studies, including genome-wide association study (GWAS hits. Immune gene expression correlated tightly with plaques whereas synaptic genes correlated negatively with neurofibrillary tangles. Network analysis of immune gene modules revealed six hub genes in hippocampus of amyloid mice, four in common with cortex. The hippocampal network in TAU mice was similar except that Trem2 had hub status only in amyloid mice. The cortical network of TAU mice was entirely different with more hub genes and few in common with the other networks, suggesting reasons for specificity of cortical dysfunction in FTDP17. This Resource opens up many areas for investigation. All data are available and searchable at http://www.mouseac.org.

  20. Characterization of Expressed Sequence Tag-Derived Simple Sequence Repeat Markers for Aspergillus flavus: Emphasis on Variability of Isolates from the Southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers were developed from Aspergillus flavus expressed sequence tag (EST) database to conduct an analysis of genetic relationships of Aspergillus isolates from numerous host species and geographical regions, but primarily from the United States. Twenty-nine primers wer...

  1. Aspergillus-Related Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alia Al-Alawi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus is a ubiquitous dimorphic fungus that causes a variety of human diseases ranging in severity from trivial to life-threatening, depending on the host response. An intact host defence is important to prevent disease, but individuals with pre-existing structural lung disease, atopy, occupational exposure or impaired immunity are susceptible. Three distinctive patterns of aspergillus-related lung disease are recognized: saprophytic infestation of airways, cavities and necrotic tissue; allergic disease including extrinsic allergic alveolitis, asthma, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, bronchocentric granulomatosis and chronic eosinophilic pneumonia; and airway and tissue invasive disease -- pseudomembranous tracheobronchitis, acute bronchopneumonia, angioinvasive aspergillosis, chronic necrotizing aspergillosis and invasive pleural disease. A broad knowledge of these clinical presentations and a high index of suspicion are required to ensure timely diagnosis and treatment of the potentially lethal manifestations of aspergillus-related pulmonary disease. In the present report, the clinical, radiographic and pathological aspects of the various aspergillus-related lung diseases are briefly reviewed.

  2. Aspergillus pneumonia in renal transplant recipients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-dong; HU Xiao-peng; YIN Hang; WANG Wei; ZHANG Xin; MA Lin-lin; WANG Yong

    2008-01-01

    Background Filamentous fungal infections are associated with a high morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplants.The present study aimed to investigate the aspergillus pneumonia in renal transplant recipients, and its diagnosis as well as treatment.Methods Approximately 2000 cases of renal transplants were retrospectively studied and we focused on cases hospitalized during August 1, 2005 and February 1, 2007, as the study period. The clinical database and electronic records were analyzed. Recently published literature was reviewed.Results There was more diabetes and hypertension in the infected group than in the non-infected group (86% vs 62% and 57% vs 39%, respectively). Eighty-six percent of recipients from the infected group had delayed graft function. Seven cases with aspergillus pneumonia were identified based on either fungal culture or radiology. Of the 7 cases, 4 died in a few days after diagnosis. Liposomal amphotericin B was used as a first-line therapy.Conclusions Incidences of fungal infection are increasing among renal transplant recipients. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical steps in curing aspergillosis.

  3. Aspergillus fumigatus in Poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Arné

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus remains a major respiratory pathogen in birds. In poultry, infection by A. fumigatus may induce significant economic losses particularly in turkey production. A. fumigatus develops and sporulates easily in poor quality bedding or contaminated feedstuffs in indoor farm environments. Inadequate ventilation and dusty conditions increase the risk of bird exposure to aerosolized spores. Acute cases are seen in young animals following inhalation of spores, causing high morbidity and mortality. The chronic form affects older birds and looks more sporadic. The respiratory tract is the primary site of A. fumigatus development leading to severe respiratory distress and associated granulomatous airsacculitis and pneumonia. Treatments for infected poultry are nonexistent; therefore, prevention is the only way to protect poultry. Development of avian models of aspergillosis may improve our understanding of its pathogenesis, which remains poorly understood.

  4. Linkage of cDNA expression profiles of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons to a genome-wide in situ hybridization database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Horst H

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Midbrain dopaminergic neurons are involved in control of emotion, motivation and motor behavior. The loss of one of the subpopulations, substantia nigra pars compacta, is the pathological hallmark of one of the most prominent neurological disorders, Parkinson's disease. Several groups have looked at the molecular identity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons and have suggested the gene expression profile of these neurons. Here, after determining the efficiency of each screen, we provide a linked database of the genes, expressed in this neuronal population, by combining and comparing the results of six previous studies and verification of expression of each gene in dopaminergic neurons, using the collection of in situ hybridization in the Allen Brain Atlas.

  5. Computational prediction of candidate miRNAs and their targets from the completed Linum ussitatissimum genome and EST database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffanie Y. Moss

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Flax is an important agronomic crop grown for its fiber (linen and oil (linseed oil. In spite of many thousands of years of breeding some fiber varieties have been shown to rapidly respond to environmental stress with heritable changes to its genome. Many miRNAs appear to be induced by abiotic or biotic conditions experienced through the plant life cycle. Computational miRNA analysis of the flax genome provides a foundation for subsequent research on miRNA function in Linum usitatissimum and may also provide novel insight into any regulatory role the RNAi pathway may play in generating adaptive structural variation in response to environmental stress. Here a bioinformatics approach is used to screen for miRNAs previously identified in other plant species, as well as to predict putative miRNAs unique to a particular species which may not have been identified as they are less abundant or dependent upon a specific set of environmental conditions. Twelve miRNA genes were identified in flax on the basis of unique pre-miRNA positions with structural homology to plant pre-miRNAs and complete sequence homology to published plant miRNAs. These miRNAs were found to belong to 7 miRNA families, with an additional 2 matches corresponding to as yet unnamed poplar miRNAs and a parologous miRNA with partial sequence homology to mtr-miR4414b. An additional 649 novel and distinct flax miRNA genes were identified to form from canonical hairpin structures and to have putative targets among the ~30,000 flax Unigenes.

  6. Update on antifungal drug resistance mechanisms of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamilos, G; Kontoyiannis, D P

    2005-12-01

    Although the arsenal of agents with anti-Aspergillus activity has expanded over the last decade, mortality due to invasive aspergillosis (IA) remains unacceptably high. Aspergillus fumigatus still accounts for the majority of cases of IA; however less susceptible to antifungals non-fumigatus aspergilli began to emerge. Antifungal drug resistance of Aspergillus might partially account for treatment failures. Recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms of antifungal drug action in Aspergillus, along with the standardization of in vitro susceptibility testing methods, has brought resistance testing to the forefront of clinical mycology. In addition, molecular biology has started to shed light on the mechanisms of resistance of A. fumigatus to azoles and the echinocandins, while genome-based assays show promise for high-throughput screening for genotypic antifungal resistance. Several problems remain, however, in the study of this complex area. Large multicenter clinical studies--point prevalence or longitudinal--to capture the incidence and prevalence of antifungal resistance in A. fumigatus isolates are lacking. Correlation of in vitro susceptibility with clinical outcome and susceptibility breakpoints has not been established. In addition, the issue of cross-resistance between the newer triazoles is of concern. Furthermore, in vitro resistance testing for polyenes and echinocandins is difficult, and their mechanisms of resistance are largely unknown. This review examines challenges in the diagnosis, epidemiology, and mechanisms of antifungal drug resistance in A. fumigatus. PMID:16488654

  7. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH), reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR), and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in more patients. We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1) functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1) involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3) functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1) involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (P<0.001~P=0.06). In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of PAFAH1B1 protein overexpression was 68

  8. The database of chromosome imbalance regions and genes resided in lung cancer from Asian and Caucasian identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Fang-Yi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-related genes show racial differences. Therefore, identification and characterization of DNA copy number alteration regions in different racial groups helps to dissect the mechanism of tumorigenesis. Methods Array-comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH was analyzed for DNA copy number profile in 40 Asian and 20 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Three methods including MetaCore analysis for disease and pathway correlations, concordance analysis between array-CGH database and the expression array database, and literature search for copy number variation genes were performed to select novel lung cancer candidate genes. Four candidate oncogenes were validated for DNA copy number and mRNA and protein expression by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH, reverse transcriptase-qPCR (RT-qPCR, and immunohistochemistry (IHC in more patients. Results We identified 20 chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 459 genes for Caucasian and 17 regions containing 476 genes for Asian lung cancer patients. Seven common chromosomal imbalance regions harboring 117 genes, included gain on 3p13-14, 6p22.1, 9q21.13, 13q14.1, and 17p13.3; and loss on 3p22.2-22.3 and 13q13.3 were found both in Asian and Caucasian patients. Gene validation for four genes including ARHGAP19 (10q24.1 functioning in Rho activity control, FRAT2 (10q24.1 involved in Wnt signaling, PAFAH1B1 (17p13.3 functioning in motility control, and ZNF322A (6p22.1 involved in MAPK signaling was performed using qPCR and RT-qPCR. Mean gene dosage and mRNA expression level of the four candidate genes in tumor tissues were significantly higher than the corresponding normal tissues (PP=0.06. In addition, CISH analysis of patients indicated that copy number amplification indeed occurred for ARHGAP19 and ZNF322A genes in lung cancer patients. IHC analysis of paraffin blocks from Asian Caucasian patients demonstrated that the frequency of

  9. Genetics of Polyketide Metabolism in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klejnstrup, Marie L.; Frandsen, Rasmus John Normand; Holm, Dorte Koefoed;

    2012-01-01

    including polyketides. The majority of genes required for production of these metabolites are mostly organized in gene clusters, which often are silent or barely expressed under laboratory conditions, making discovery and analysis difficult. Fortunately, the genome sequences of several filamentous fungi are...... publicly available, greatly facilitating the establishment of links between genes and metabolites. This review covers the attempts being made to trigger the activation of polyketide metabolism in the fungal model organism Aspergillus nidulans. Moreover, it will provide an overview of the pathways where ten...... polyketide synthase genes have been coupled to polyketide products. Therefore, the proposed biosynthesis of the following metabolites will be presented; naphthopyrone, sterigmatocystin, aspyridones, emericellamides, asperthecin, asperfuranone, monodictyphenone/emodin, orsellinic acid, and the austinols....

  10. RegTransBase - A Database Of Regulatory Sequences and Interactionsin a Wide Range of Prokaryotic Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazakov, Alexei E.; Cipriano, Michael J.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Minovitsky, Simon; Vinogradov, Dmitry V.; Arkin, Adam; Mironov, AndreyA.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Dubchak, Inna

    2006-07-01

    RegTransBase, a manually curated database of regulatoryinteractions in prokaryotes, captures the knowledge in publishedscientific literature using a controlled vocabulary. Although a number ofdatabases describing interactions between regulatory proteins and theirbinding sites are currently being maintained, they focus mostly on themodel organisms Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, or are entirelycomputationally derived. RegTransBase describes a large number ofregulatory interactions reported in many organisms and contains varioustypes of experimental data, in particular: the activation or repressionof transcription by an identified direct regulator; determining thetranscriptional regulatory function of a protein (or RNA) directlybinding to DNA (RNA); mapping or prediction of binding site for aregulatory protein; characterization of regulatory mutations. Currently,the RegTransBase content is derived from about 3000 relevant articlesdescribing over 7000 experiments in relation to 128 microbes. It containsdata on the regulation of about 7500 genes and evidence for 6500interactions with 650 regulators. RegTransBase also contains manuallycreated position weight matrices (PWM) that can be used to identifycandidate regulatory sites in over 60 species. RegTransBase is availableat http://regtransbase.lbl.gov.

  11. Peanut gene expression profiling in developing seeds at different reproduction stages during Aspergillus parasiticus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xuanqiang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. is an important crop economically and nutritionally, and is one of the most susceptible host crops to colonization of Aspergillus parasiticus and subsequent aflatoxin contamination. Knowledge from molecular genetic studies could help to devise strategies in alleviating this problem; however, few peanut DNA sequences are available in the public database. In order to understand the molecular basis of host resistance to aflatoxin contamination, a large-scale project was conducted to generate expressed sequence tags (ESTs from developing seeds to identify resistance-related genes involved in defense response against Aspergillus infection and subsequent aflatoxin contamination. Results We constructed six different cDNA libraries derived from developing peanut seeds at three reproduction stages (R5, R6 and R7 from a resistant and a susceptible cultivated peanut genotypes, 'Tifrunner' (susceptible to Aspergillus infection with higher aflatoxin contamination and resistant to TSWV and 'GT-C20' (resistant to Aspergillus with reduced aflatoxin contamination and susceptible to TSWV. The developing peanut seed tissues were challenged by A. parasiticus and drought stress in the field. A total of 24,192 randomly selected cDNA clones from six libraries were sequenced. After removing vector sequences and quality trimming, 21,777 high-quality EST sequences were generated. Sequence clustering and assembling resulted in 8,689 unique EST sequences with 1,741 tentative consensus EST sequences (TCs and 6,948 singleton ESTs. Functional classification was performed according to MIPS functional catalogue criteria. The unique EST sequences were divided into twenty-two categories. A similarity search against the non-redundant protein database available from NCBI indicated that 84.78% of total ESTs showed significant similarity to known proteins, of which 165 genes had been previously reported in peanuts. There were

  12. Analysis of SSRs in grape genome and development of SSR database%葡萄全基因组SSR分析和数据库构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡斌; 李成慧; 姚泉洪; 周军; 陶建敏; 章镇

    2009-01-01

    We developed a Perl script-SSRFinder to detect SSRs in grape genome sequence. A total of 114 520 SSRs were isolated from publicly available Vitis vinifera L. ' Pinor Nori PN40024' genomic DNA sequence. Among them, 37 648 mononucleotide repeats, 30 123 dinucleotide repeats, 18 705 trinucleotide repeats, 14 566 tetranucleotide repeats, 3 492 pentanucleotide repeats, and 9 986 hexanucleotide repeats were found, accounting for 32. 9% , 26. 3% , 16. 3% , 12. 7% , 3. 0% , and 8. 7% of the total SSRs respectively. SSRs with poly ( A/T)_n repeats represented the most abundant type, whereas C/G-rich motifs were the rarest type. We also assessed the distribution of SSRs on genome fragment. The results showed that the SSRs distributed mainly in inter-genic region and were moderately abundant in UTRs. In coding region, the distribution of all repeat types was less frequent except tri- and hexa-nucleotide repeats. To make use of these SSRs, we developed a database on the Internet. The database of grape SSRs ( DGSSR) is a database comprehensively collecting and annotating grape SSRs. The DGSSR contains all the SSRs with their related information detected in the study. It provides flexible query interface and detailed annotations for individual SSR. It also contains SSRs detected from Vitis vinifera L. ESTs dataset. The DGSSR is available at http: //www. yaolab. sh. cn/ssr.%利用Perl语言开发了用于探寻基因组SSR的程序SSRFinder,并利用其从法国国家基因测序中心(Genoscope)公布的欧亚种葡萄(Vitis vinifera L.)黑比诺品系PN40024的基因组序列中检索到114 520个SSR.其中含单核苷酸、二核苷酸、三核苷酸、四核苷酸、五核苷酸和六核苷酸重复单元的SSR数目分别为37 648(329%)、30 123(263%)、18 705(163%)、14 566(127%)、3 492(30%)和9 986(87%)个.在各类SSR中,不同核苷酸组成的重复单元频率间存在较大的差异,其中富含A/T重复单元的SSR频率最高,而富含C/G重复单元的SSR频率

  13. Database Description - Dicty_cDB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unicellular eukaryotes genome databases Database description Dicty_cDB is a publicly available gene informa...renced database GENBANK/DDBJ/EBI Entry list Available Query search Available Web services Not available URL

  14. Database Description - GETDB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us GETDB Database... Description General information of database Database name GETDB Alternative name Gal4 Enhancer Trap Insertion Database... +81-78-306-3183 E-mail: Database classification Expression Invertebrate genome database Organism Taxonomy N...ame: Drosophila melanogaster Taxonomy ID: 7227 Database description About 4,600 i...nsertion lines of enhancer trap lines based on the Gal4-UAS method were generated in Drosophila, and all of

  15. An automated system designed for large scale NMR data deposition and annotation: application to over 600 assigned chemical shift data entries to the BioMagResBank from the Riken Structural Genomics/Proteomics Initiative internal database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomolecular NMR chemical shift data are key information for the functional analysis of biomolecules and the development of new techniques for NMR studies utilizing chemical shift statistical information. Structural genomics projects are major contributors to the accumulation of protein chemical shift information. The management of the large quantities of NMR data generated by each project in a local database and the transfer of the data to the public databases are still formidable tasks because of the complicated nature of NMR data. Here we report an automated and efficient system developed for the deposition and annotation of a large number of data sets including 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments used for the structure determination of proteins. We have demonstrated the feasibility of our system by applying it to over 600 entries from the internal database generated by the RIKEN Structural Genomics/Proteomics Initiative (RSGI) to the public database, BioMagResBank (BMRB). We have assessed the quality of the deposited chemical shifts by comparing them with those predicted from the PDB coordinate entry for the corresponding protein. The same comparison for other matched BMRB/PDB entries deposited from 2001–2011 has been carried out and the results suggest that the RSGI entries greatly improved the quality of the BMRB database. Since the entries include chemical shifts acquired under strikingly similar experimental conditions, these NMR data can be expected to be a promising resource to improve current technologies as well as to develop new NMR methods for protein studies.

  16. Registered plant list - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods Registered plant... simple search page) Genome analysis methods Presence or absence of Genome analysis methods information in t...his DB (link to the Genome analysis methods information in simple search page) Joomla SEF URLs by Artio Abou...base Site Policy | Contact Us Registered plant list - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive ...

  17. Comparative chemistry of Aspergillus oryzae (RIB40) and A. flavus (NRRL 3357)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Christian; Klejnstrup, Marie Louise; Petersen, Lene Maj;

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus oryzae and A. flavus are important species in industrial biotechnology and food safety and have been some of the first aspergilli to be fully genome sequenced. Bioinformatic analysis has revealed 99.5% gene homology between the two species pointing towards a large coherence in the...

  18. Overexpression of a novel endogenous NADH kinase in Aspergillus nidulans enhances growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Grotkjær, Thomas; Hofmann, Gerald;

    2009-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the filamentous fungi Aspergillus nidulans has paved the way for fundamental research on this industrially important species. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time a gene encoding for ATP-dependent NADH kinase (ATP: NADH 2'-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7...

  19. The molecular and genetic basis of conidial pigmentation in Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas R.; Park, Joohae; Arentshorst, Mark;

    2011-01-01

    A characteristic hallmark of Aspergillus niger is the formation of black conidiospores. We have identified four loci involved in spore pigmentation of A. niger by using a combined genomic and classical complementation approach. First, we characterized a newly isolated color mutant, colA, which la...

  20. HMMerThread: detecting remote, functional conserved domains in entire genomes by combining relaxed sequence-database searches with fold recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Richard Bradshaw

    Full Text Available Conserved domains in proteins are one of the major sources of functional information for experimental design and genome-level annotation. Though search tools for conserved domain databases such as Hidden Markov Models (HMMs are sensitive in detecting conserved domains in proteins when they share sufficient sequence similarity, they tend to miss more divergent family members, as they lack a reliable statistical framework for the detection of low sequence similarity. We have developed a greatly improved HMMerThread algorithm that can detect remotely conserved domains in highly divergent sequences. HMMerThread combines relaxed conserved domain searches with fold recognition to eliminate false positive, sequence-based identifications. With an accuracy of 90%, our software is able to automatically predict highly divergent members of conserved domain families with an associated 3-dimensional structure. We give additional confidence to our predictions by validation across species. We have run HMMerThread searches on eight proteomes including human and present a rich resource of remotely conserved domains, which adds significantly to the functional annotation of entire proteomes. We find ∼4500 cross-species validated, remotely conserved domain predictions in the human proteome alone. As an example, we find a DNA-binding domain in the C-terminal part of the A-kinase anchor protein 10 (AKAP10, a PKA adaptor that has been implicated in cardiac arrhythmias and premature cardiac death, which upon stress likely translocates from mitochondria to the nucleus/nucleolus. Based on our prediction, we propose that with this HLH-domain, AKAP10 is involved in the transcriptional control of stress response. Further remotely conserved domains we discuss are examples from areas such as sporulation, chromosome segregation and signalling during immune response. The HMMerThread algorithm is able to automatically detect the presence of remotely conserved domains in

  1. The chemical heritage of Aspergillus flavus in A. oryzae RIB 40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Christian; Klejnstrup, Marie Louise; Petersen, Lene Maj; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    Aspergillus oryzae is a very important species in biotechnology and has been used for centuries in traditional Asian fermentation. The RIB40 strain is particularly interesting as it was one of the first genome sequenced Aspergilli together with A. flavus, a prominent food and feed contaminant...... with indications to specific genetic changes. Several new metabolites and changes in biosynthetic routes have been found in A. oryzae, indicating subtle changes in the genomic heritage from A. flavus....

  2. 76 FR 16297 - Aspergillus flavus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... exemptions for experimental use of Aspergillus flavus AF36 on pistachio (72 FR 28871, May 23, 2007) (FRL-8129... Findings In the Federal Register of March 3, 2010 (75 FR 9596) (FRL-8811-2), EPA issued a notice pursuant..., 2003 (68 FR 41541) (FRL-7311-6). Those health effects data were the basis for establishing...

  3. Aspergillus infections in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jill; Brunel, Shan F; Warris, Adilia

    2016-07-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer from chronic lung infection and airway inflammation. Respiratory failure secondary to chronic or recurrent infection remains the commonest cause of death and accounts for over 90% of mortality. Bacteria as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex have been regarded the main CF pathogens and their role in progressive lung decline has been studied extensively. Little attention has been paid to the role of Aspergillus spp. and other filamentous fungi in the pathogenesis of non-ABPA (allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis) respiratory disease in CF, despite their frequent recovery in respiratory samples. It has become more apparent however, that Aspergillus spp. may play an important role in chronic lung disease in CF. Research delineating the underlying mechanisms of Aspergillus persistence and infection in the CF lung and its link to lung deterioration is lacking. This review summarizes the Aspergillus disease phenotypes observed in CF, discusses the role of CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator)-protein in innate immune responses and new treatment modalities. PMID:27177733

  4. Aspergillus mediastinitis after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Josée Caballero

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: The clinical features of postoperative Aspergillus mediastinitis may be paucisymptomatic, emphasizing the need for a low index of suspicion in cases of culture-negative mediastinitis or in indolent wound infections. In addition to surgical debridement, the central component of antifungal therapy should include amphotericin B or voriconazole.

  5. Plant DB link - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods Plant DB link Da... Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive ...

  6. Download - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods Download First o... (36.3 KB) Simple search and download 6 Genome analysis methods pgdbj_dna_marker_...linkage_map_genome_analysis_methods_en.zip (5.8 KB) Simple search and download Downlaod via FTP Joomla SEF U...Policy | Contact Us Download - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive ...

  7. Legume and Lotus japonicus Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirakawa, Hideki; Mun, Terry; Sato, Shusei;

    2014-01-01

    section, we introduce representative, publicly accessible online resources related to plant materials, integrated databases containing legume genome information, and databases for genome sequence and derived marker information of legume species including L. japonicus...

  8. Identification of thermostable beta-xylosidase activities produced by Aspergillus brasiliensis and Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads; Lauritzen, H.K.; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Meyer, Anne S.

    2007-01-01

    Twenty Aspergillus strains were evaluated for production of extracellular cellulolytic and xylanolytic activities. Aspergillus brasiliensis, A. niger and A. japonicus produced the highest xylanase activities with the A. brasiliensis and A. niger strains producing thermostable beta-xylosidases. The...

  9. Identification of thermostable β-xylosidase activities produced by Aspergillus brasiliensis and Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads; Lauritzen, Henrik Klitgaard; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Meyer, Anne Boye Strunge

    2007-01-01

    Twenty Aspergillus strains were evaluated for production of extracellular cellulolytic and xylanolytic activities. Aspergillus brasiliensis, A. niger and A. japonicus produced the highest xylanase activities with the A. brasiliensis and A. niger strains producing thermostable beta-xylosidases. The...

  10. Ochratoxin A-Produktion durch Aspergillus ochraceus

    OpenAIRE

    Mühlencoert, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Ochratoxin A, one of the 5 most important mycotoxins in food safety, is produced by several Aspergillus and Penicillium strains growing on grain, grapes and coffee. OTA biosynthesis in Aspergillus spp. depends more on the complex interaction of diverse environmental conditions than on a single growth factor or even the genetic ability to produce OTA. No apparent connection between biomass and OTA production was observed. OTA production by Aspergillus ochraceus could be controlled by the pH of...

  11. Database Description - PGDBj - Ortholog DB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available er (NBDC) of Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST): Database Integration Coor...dination Program (FY2011-FY2013). Reference(s) Article title: Plant Genome DataBase Japan (PGDBj): A Portal Website for the Integrati...on of Plant Genome-Related Databases Author name(s): Erika Asamizu, Hisako Ichihara

  12. Developmental regulators in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee-Soo; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2016-03-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne fungal pathogen causing severe and usually fatal invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. This fungus produces a large number of small hydrophobic asexual spores called conidia as the primary means of reproduction, cell survival, propagation, and infectivity. The initiation, progression, and completion of asexual development (conidiation) is controlled by various regulators that govern expression of thousands of genes associated with formation of the asexual developmental structure conidiophore, and biogenesis of conidia. In this review, we summarize key regulators that directly or indirectly govern conidiation in this important pathogenic fungus. Better understanding these developmental regulators may provide insights into the improvement in controlling both beneficial and detrimental aspects of various Aspergillus species. PMID:26920882

  13. Data-based Reconstruction of Gene Regulatory Networks of Fungal Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthke, Reinhard; Gerber, Silvia; Conrad, Theresia; Vlaic, Sebastian; Durmuş, Saliha; Çakır, Tunahan; Sevilgen, F. E.; Shelest, Ekaterina; Linde, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    In the emerging field of systems biology of fungal infection, one of the central roles belongs to the modeling of gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Utilizing omics-data, GRNs can be predicted by mathematical modeling. Here, we review current advances of data-based reconstruction of both small-scale and large-scale GRNs for human pathogenic fungi. The advantage of large-scale genome-wide modeling is the possibility to predict central (hub) genes and thereby indicate potential biomarkers and drug targets. In contrast, small-scale GRN models provide hypotheses on the mode of gene regulatory interactions, which have to be validated experimentally. Due to the lack of sufficient quantity and quality of both experimental data and prior knowledge about regulator–target gene relations, the genome-wide modeling still remains problematic for fungal pathogens. While a first genome-wide GRN model has already been published for Candida albicans, the feasibility of such modeling for Aspergillus fumigatus is evaluated in the present article. Based on this evaluation, opinions are drawn on future directions of GRN modeling of fungal pathogens. The crucial point of genome-wide GRN modeling is the experimental evidence, both used for inferring the networks (omics ‘first-hand’ data as well as literature data used as prior knowledge) and for validation and evaluation of the inferred network models. PMID:27148247

  14. Animal QTLdb:an improved database tool for livestock animal QTL/association data dissemination in the post-genome era

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Zhi-Liang; Park, Carissa A.; Wu, Xiao-Lin; Reecy, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The Animal QTL database (QTLdb; http://www.animalgenome.org/QTLdb) is designed to house all publicly available QTL and single-nucleotide polymorphism/gene association data on livestock animal species. An earlier version was published in the Nucleic Acids Research Database issue in 2007. Since then, we have continued our efforts to develop new and improved database tools to allow more data types, parameters and functions. Our efforts have transformed the Animal QTLdb into a tool that actively ...

  15. Regulatory processes in Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars

    Filamentous fungi are extensively used in the fermentation industry for synthesis of numerous products. One of the most important, is the fungus Aspergillus niger, used industrially for production of organic acids, and homologous as well as heterologous enzymes. This fungus has numerous of advant...... fumonisin production, identified. These formed the basis for the subsequent examinations, which resulted in the identification of azelaic acid, a plant hormone and a very potent fumonisin inducer....

  16. Germination of Aspergillus niger conidia

    OpenAIRE

    Hayer, Kimran

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus niger is a black-spored filamentous fungus that forms asexual spores called conidospores (‘conidia’). Germination of conidia, leading to the formation of hyphae, is initiated by conidial swelling and mobilisation of endogenous carbon and energy stores, followed by polarisation and emergence of a hyphal germ tube. These morphological and biochemical changes which define the model of germination have been studied with the aim of understanding how conidia sense and utilise different...

  17. Asexual Sporulation in Aspergillus nidulans

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Thomas H; Wieser, Jenny K.; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    1998-01-01

    The formation of mitotically derived spores, called conidia, is a common reproductive mode in filamentous fungi, particularly among the large fungal class Ascomycetes. Asexual sporulation strategies are nearly as varied as fungal species; however, the formation of conidiophores, specialized multicellular reproductive structures, by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans has emerged as the leading model for understanding the mechanisms that control fungal sporulation. Initiation of A. nid...

  18. The Volatome of Aspergillus fumigatus

    OpenAIRE

    Heddergott, C.; Calvo, A. M.; Latgé, J P

    2014-01-01

    Early detection of invasive aspergillosis is absolutely required for efficient therapy of this fungal infection. The identification of fungal volatiles in patient breath can be an alternative for the detection of Aspergillus fumigatus that still remains problematic. In this work, we investigated the production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by A. fumigatus in vitro, and we show that volatile production depends on the nutritional environment. A. fumigatus produces a multiplicity of VO...

  19. Protein sequence databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apweiler, Rolf; Bairoch, Amos; Wu, Cathy H

    2004-02-01

    A variety of protein sequence databases exist, ranging from simple sequence repositories, which store data with little or no manual intervention in the creation of the records, to expertly curated universal databases that cover all species and in which the original sequence data are enhanced by the manual addition of further information in each sequence record. As the focus of researchers moves from the genome to the proteins encoded by it, these databases will play an even more important role as central comprehensive resources of protein information. Several the leading protein sequence databases are discussed here, with special emphasis on the databases now provided by the Universal Protein Knowledgebase (UniProt) consortium. PMID:15036160

  20. Genetics of Polyketide Metabolism in Aspergillus nidulans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie L. Klejnstrup

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolites are small molecules that show large structural diversity and a broad range of bioactivities. Some metabolites are attractive as drugs or pigments while others act as harmful mycotoxins. Filamentous fungi have the capacity to produce a wide array of secondary metabolites including polyketides. The majority of genes required for production of these metabolites are mostly organized in gene clusters, which often are silent or barely expressed under laboratory conditions, making discovery and analysis difficult. Fortunately, the genome sequences of several filamentous fungi are publicly available, greatly facilitating the establishment of links between genes and metabolites. This review covers the attempts being made to trigger the activation of polyketide metabolism in the fungal model organism Aspergillus nidulans. Moreover, it will provide an overview of the pathways where ten polyketide synthase genes have been coupled to polyketide products. Therefore, the proposed biosynthesis of the following metabolites will be presented; naphthopyrone, sterigmatocystin, aspyridones, emericellamides, asperthecin, asperfuranone, monodictyphenone/emodin, orsellinic acid, and the austinols.

  1. Identification of Two Different 14-α Sterol Demethylase-Related Genes (cyp51A and cyp51B) in Aspergillus fumigatus and Other Aspergillus Species

    OpenAIRE

    Mellado, E.; Diaz-Guerra, T. M.; Cuenca-Estrella, M.; Rodriguez-Tudela, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Two cyp51-related genes (cyp51A and cyp51B) encoding 14-α sterol demethylase-like enzymes were identified in the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. PCR amplification using degenerate oligonucleotides based on conserved areas of cytochrome P450 demethylases of other filamentous fungi and yeasts allowed the cloning and sequencing of two different homologue genes in A. fumigatus. Southern analysis confirmed that both genes hybridized to distinct genomic loci and that both are re...

  2. QTL list - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods QTL list Data de...Policy | Contact Us QTL list - PGDBj Registered plant list, Marker list, QTL list, Plant DB link & Genome analysis methods | LSDB Archive ...

  3. Liver injury in invasive aspergillus. Echographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspergillus is the second most common mycoses in immuno compromised patients. The invasive form is associated with a mortality of approximately 100%. We present a case of invasive aspergillus in a heart transplant recipient in whom ultrasound disclosed the presence of liver injury which was later confirmed by necropsy. We review the available literature. (Author) 15 refs

  4. Database replication

    OpenAIRE

    Popov, P. T.; Stankovic, V.

    2014-01-01

    A fault-tolerant node for synchronous heterogeneous database replication and a method for performing a synchronous heterogenous database replication at such a node are provided. A processor executes a computer program to generate a series of database transactions to be carried out at the fault-tolerant node. The fault-tolerant node comprises at least two relational database management systems, each of which are different relational database management system products, each implementing snapsh...

  5. Communicative Databases

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Kwang-I

    1981-01-01

    A hierarchical organization stores its information in a la rge number of databases. These databases are interrelated , forming a closely-coupled database system. Traditional information systems and current database management systems do not have a means of expressing these relationships. This thesis describes a model of the information structure of the hierarchical organization that identifies the nature of database relationships. It also describes the design and implementatio...

  6. New resources for functional analysis of omics data for the genus Aspergillus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Vera

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed and comprehensive genome annotation can be considered a prerequisite for effective analysis and interpretation of omics data. As such, Gene Ontology (GO annotation has become a well accepted framework for functional annotation. The genus Aspergillus comprises fungal species that are important model organisms, plant and human pathogens as well as industrial workhorses. However, GO annotation based on both computational predictions and extended manual curation has so far only been available for one of its species, namely A. nidulans. Results Based on protein homology, we mapped 97% of the 3,498 GO annotated A. nidulans genes to at least one of seven other Aspergillus species: A. niger, A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. clavatus, A. terreus, A. oryzae and Neosartorya fischeri. GO annotation files compatible with diverse publicly available tools have been generated and deposited online. To further improve their accessibility, we developed a web application for GO enrichment analysis named FetGOat and integrated GO annotations for all Aspergillus species with public genome sequences. Both the annotation files and the web application FetGOat are accessible via the Broad Institute's website (http://www.broadinstitute.org/fetgoat/index.html. To demonstrate the value of those new resources for functional analysis of omics data for the genus Aspergillus, we performed two case studies analyzing microarray data recently published for A. nidulans, A. niger and A. oryzae. Conclusions We mapped A. nidulans GO annotation to seven other Aspergilli. By depositing the newly mapped GO annotation online as well as integrating it into the web tool FetGOat, we provide new, valuable and easily accessible resources for omics data analysis and interpretation for the genus Aspergillus. Furthermore, we have given a general example of how a well annotated genome can help improving GO annotation of related species to subsequently facilitate the

  7. Clustering Table of the genome insert site of Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap lines (Cluster List) - GETDB | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GETDB Clustering Table of the genome insert site of Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap lines (Cluster List) Data ...detail Data name Clustering Table of the genome insert site of Drosophila GAL4 enhancer trap lines (Cluster ...List) Description of data contents Cluster data in which the insert positions of ...Description ClusterId Cluster ID of genome insert coordinate Cluster Member(Clone Name : Cluster Id) Clone n...ame corresponding to each of the insert point sequences belonging to the cluster Cluster Size Number of insert

  8. Two novel species of Aspergillus section Nigri from indoor air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus collinsii, Aspergillus floridensis, and Aspergillus trinidadensis are described as novel uniseriate species of Aspergillus section Nigri isolated from air samples. To describe the species we used phenotypes from 7-d Czapek yeast extract agar culture (CYA) and malt extract agar culture (M...

  9. Biological Databases for Human Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Zou; Lina Ma; Jun Yu; Zhang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The completion of the Human Genome Project lays a foundation for systematically studying the human genome from evolutionary history to precision medicine against diseases. With the explosive growth of biological data, there is an increasing number of biological databases that have been developed in aid of human-related research. Here we present a collection of human-related biological databases and provide a mini-review by classifying them into different categories according to their data types. As human-related databases continue to grow not only in count but also in volume, challenges are ahead in big data storage, processing, exchange and curation.

  10. Aspergillus Osteomyelitis of the Skull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Simon; King, Richard; Chumas, Paul; Russell, John; Liddington, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Osteomyelitis of the craniofacial skeleton is rare, with fungal pathogens least commonly implicated. The authors present 2 patients of osteomyelitis of the skull caused by Aspergillus spp. and discuss the diagnosis, clinicopathological course, and management strategies.Late recurrence seen in this type of infection warrants long-term follow-up and a high index of suspicion for the clinical signs associated with recurrence.Such patients would benefit from their surgical debridement being planned and managed via a specialist craniofacial unit, so as to utilize the most aesthetically sensitive approach and the experience of specialists from several surgical disciplines. PMID:27391523

  11. Ribonuclease Production by Aspergillus species

    OpenAIRE

    Eleni Gomes; Roberto da Silva; Alcides Serzedello

    1998-01-01

    Ribonuclease production by Aspergillus flavipes, A. sulphureus and A. fischeri in semi-synthetic medium, after 24-144 hours at 30ºC under shaking, was studied. After cultivation, the medium was separated from micelia by filtration and the resultant solution was used as enzymatic extract. The highest amount of biomass and RNase was obtained after 96 hours of cultivation. The enzymes produced by three species presented similar characteristics, with optimum temperature at 55ºC and two peaks of a...

  12. A database of phylogenetically atypical genes in archaeal and bacterial genomes, identified using the DarkHorse algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Allen Eric E; Gaasterland Terry; Podell Sheila

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The process of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is believed to be widespread in Bacteria and Archaea, but little comparative data is available addressing its occurrence in complete microbial genomes. Collection of high-quality, automated HGT prediction data based on phylogenetic evidence has previously been impractical for large numbers of genomes at once, due to prohibitive computational demands. DarkHorse, a recently described statistical method for discovering phylogeneti...

  13. The PlaNet Consortium: A Network of European Plant Databases Connecting Plant Genome Data in an Integrated Biological Knowledge Resource

    OpenAIRE

    Schoof, H.; Ernst, R; Mayer, K.F.X.

    2004-01-01

    The completion of the Arabidopsis genome and the large collections of other plant sequences generated in recent years have sparked extensive functional genomics efforts. However, the utilization of this data is inefficient, as data sources are distributed and heterogeneous and efforts at data integration are lagging behind. PlaNet aims to overcome the limitations of individual efforts as well as the limitations of heterogeneous, independent data collections. PlaNet is a distributed effort amo...

  14. PRIMED: PRIMEr database for deleting and tagging all fission and budding yeast genes developed using the open-source genome retrieval script (GRS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Cummings

    Full Text Available The fission (Schizosaccharomyces pombe and budding (Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts have served as excellent models for many seminal discoveries in eukaryotic biology. In these organisms, genes are deleted or tagged easily by transforming cells with PCR-generated DNA inserts, flanked by short (50-100 bp regions of gene homology. These PCR reactions use especially designed long primers, which, in addition to the priming sites, carry homology for gene targeting. Primer design follows a fixed method but is tedious and time-consuming especially when done for a large number of genes. To automate this process, we developed the Python-based Genome Retrieval Script (GRS, an easily customizable open-source script for genome analysis. Using GRS, we created PRIMED, the complete PRIMEr D atabase for deleting and C-terminal tagging genes in the main S. pombe and five of the most commonly used S. cerevisiae strains. Because of the importance of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs in many biological processes, we also included the deletion primer set for these features in each genome. PRIMED are accurate and comprehensive and are provided as downloadable Excel files, removing the need for future primer design, especially for large-scale functional analyses. Furthermore, the open-source GRS can be used broadly to retrieve genome information from custom or other annotated genomes, thus providing a suitable platform for building other genomic tools by the yeast or other research communities.

  15. Navigating public microarray databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkett, Christopher J; Bähler, Jürg

    2004-01-01

    With the ever-escalating amount of data being produced by genome-wide microarray studies, it is of increasing importance that these data are captured in public databases so that researchers can use this information to complement and enhance their own studies. Many groups have set up databases of expression data, ranging from large repositories, which are designed to comprehensively capture all published data, through to more specialized databases. The public repositories, such as ArrayExpress at the European Bioinformatics Institute contain complete datasets in raw format in addition to processed data, whilst the specialist databases tend to provide downstream analysis of normalized data from more focused studies and data sources. Here we provide a guide to the use of these public microarray resources. PMID:18629145

  16. Two novel, putatively cell wall-associated and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored alpha-glucanotransferase enzymes of aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kaaij, R. A.; Yuan, X.-L.; Franken, A.; Ram, A. F. J.; Punt, P. J.; Dijkhuizen, L.; Maarel, M.J.E.C. van der

    2007-01-01

    In the genome sequence of Aspergillus niger CBS 513.88, three genes were identified with high similarity to fungal alpha-amylases. The protein sequences derived from these genes were different in two ways from all described fungal alpha-amylases: they were predicted to be glycosylphosphatidyllinosit

  17. Two novel, putatively cell wall-associated and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored α-glucanotransferase enzymes of Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaij, R.M. van der; Yuan, X.L.; Franken, A.; Ram, A.F.J.; Punt, P.J.; Maarel, M.J.E.C. van der; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2007-01-01

    In the genome sequence of Aspergillus niger CBS 513.88, three genes were identified with high similarity to fungal α-amylases. The protein sequences derived from these genes were different in two ways from all described fungal α-amylases: they were predicted to be glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor

  18. Diversity of Aspergillus oryzae genotypes (RFLP) isolated from traditional soy sauce production within Malaysia and Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    DNA fingerprinting was performed on 64 strains of Aspergillus oryzae and one strain of A. sojae isolated from soysauce factories within Malaysia and Southeast Asia that use primitive traditional methods in producing 'tamari type' Cantonese soy sauce. PstI digests of total genomic DNA from each isol...

  19. Relational databases

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, D A

    1986-01-01

    Relational Databases explores the major advances in relational databases and provides a balanced analysis of the state of the art in relational databases. Topics covered include capture and analysis of data placement requirements; distributed relational database systems; data dependency manipulation in database schemata; and relational database support for computer graphics and computer aided design. This book is divided into three sections and begins with an overview of the theory and practice of distributed systems, using the example of INGRES from Relational Technology as illustration. The

  20. Aspergillus niger: an unusual cause of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Person, A. K.; Chudgar, S. M.; Norton, B. L.; Tong, B. C.; Stout, J E

    2010-01-01

    Infections due to Aspergillus species cause significant morbidity and mortality. Most are attributed to Aspergillus fumigatus, followed by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus terreus. Aspergillus niger is a mould that is rarely reported as a cause of pneumonia. A 72-year-old female with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and temporal arteritis being treated with steroids long term presented with haemoptysis and pleuritic chest pain. Chest radiography revealed areas of heterogeneous consolid...

  1. Community Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This excel spreadsheet is the result of merging at the port level of several of the in-house fisheries databases in combination with other demographic databases...

  2. Biofuel Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofuel Database (Web, free access)   This database brings together structural, biological, and thermodynamic data for enzymes that are either in current use or are being considered for use in the production of biofuels.

  3. Database Administrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Pam

    2010-01-01

    The Internet and electronic commerce (e-commerce) generate lots of data. Data must be stored, organized, and managed. Database administrators, or DBAs, work with database software to find ways to do this. They identify user needs, set up computer databases, and test systems. They ensure that systems perform as they should and add people to the…

  4. Deeper insight into the structure of the anaerobic digestion microbial community; the biogas microbiome database is expanded with 157 new genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treu, Laura; Kougias, Panagiotis G; Campanaro, Stefano; Bassani, Ilaria; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-09-01

    This research aimed to better characterize the biogas microbiome by means of high throughput metagenomic sequencing and to elucidate the core microbial consortium existing in biogas reactors independently from the operational conditions. Assembly of shotgun reads followed by an established binning strategy resulted in the highest, up to now, extraction of microbial genomes involved in biogas producing systems. From the 236 extracted genome bins, it was remarkably found that the vast majority of them could only be characterized at high taxonomic levels. This result confirms that the biogas microbiome is comprised by a consortium of unknown species. A comparative analysis between the genome bins of the current study and those extracted from a previous metagenomic assembly demonstrated a similar phylogenetic distribution of the main taxa. Finally, this analysis led to the identification of a subset of common microbes that could be considered as the core essential group in biogas production. PMID:27243603

  5. Checkpoint Defects Leading to Premature Mitosis Also Cause Endoreplication of DNA in Aspergillus nidulans

    OpenAIRE

    De Souza, Colin P. C.; Ye, Xiang S.; Osmani, Stephen A.

    1999-01-01

    The G2 DNA damage and slowing of S-phase checkpoints over mitosis function through tyrosine phosphorylation of NIMXcdc2 in Aspergillus nidulans. We demonstrate that breaking these checkpoints leads to a defective premature mitosis followed by dramatic rereplication of genomic DNA. Two additional checkpoint functions, uvsB and uvsD, also cause the rereplication phenotype after their mutation allows premature mitosis in the presence of low concentrations of hydroxyurea. uvsB is shown to encode ...

  6. Genetic diversity of Aspergillus species isolated from onychomycosis and Aspergillus hongkongensis sp. nov., with implications to antifungal susceptibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Chi-Ching; Hui, Teresa W S; Lee, Kim-Chung; Chen, Jonathan H K; Ngan, Antonio H Y; Tam, Emily W T; Chan, Jasper F W; Wu, Andrea L; Cheung, Mei; Tse, Brian P H; Wu, Alan K L; Lai, Christopher K C; Tsang, Dominic N C; Que, Tak-Lun; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-02-01

    Thirteen Aspergillus isolates recovered from nails of 13 patients (fingernails, n=2; toenails, n=11) with onychomycosis were characterized. Twelve strains were identified by multilocus sequencing as Aspergillus spp. (Aspergillus sydowii [n=4], Aspergillus welwitschiae [n=3], Aspergillus terreus [n=2], Aspergillus flavus [n=1], Aspergillus tubingensis [n=1], and Aspergillus unguis [n=1]). Isolates of A. terreus, A. flavus, and A. unguis were also identifiable by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The 13th isolate (HKU49(T)) possessed unique morphological characteristics different from other Aspergillus spp. Molecular characterization also unambiguously showed that HKU49(T) was distinct from other Aspergillus spp. We propose the novel species Aspergillus hongkongensis to describe this previously unknown fungus. Antifungal susceptibility testing showed most Aspergillus isolates had low MICs against itraconazole and voriconazole, but all Aspergillus isolates had high MICs against fluconazole. A diverse spectrum of Aspergillus species is associated with onychomycosis. Itraconazole and voriconazole are probably better drug options for Aspergillus onychomycosis. PMID:26658315

  7. Aspergillus uvarum sp. nov., an uniseriate black Aspergillus species isolated from grapes in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrone, Giancarlo; Varga, János; Susca, Antonia;

    2008-01-01

    A novel species, Aspergillus uvarum sp. nov., is described within Aspergillus section Nigri. This species can be distinguished from other black aspergilli based on internal transcribed spacers (ITS), beta-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequences, by AFLP analysis and by extrolite profiles. Aspergill...... atypical strains of Aspergillus aculeatus, CBS 114.80 and CBS 620.78, and was isolated from grape berries in Portugal, Italy, France, Israel, Greece and Spain. The type strain of Aspergillus uvarum sp. nov. is IMI 388523(T)=CBS 127591(T)= ITEM 4834(T)= IBT26606(T)....

  8. Deeper insight into the structure of the anaerobic digestion microbial community; the biogas microbiome database is expanded with 157 new genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treu, Laura; Kougias, Panagiotis; Campanaro, Stefano;

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to better characterize the biogas microbiome by means of high throughput metagenomic sequencing and to elucidate the core microbial consortium existing in biogas reactors independently from the operational conditions. Assembly of shotgun reads followed by an established binning...... strategy resulted in the highest, up to now, extraction of microbial genomes involved in biogas producing systems. From the 236 extracted genome bins, it was remarkably found that the vast majority of them could only be characterized at high taxonomic levels. This result confirms that the biogas microbiome...

  9. Challenges in Whole-Genome Annotation of Pyrosequenced Eukaryotic Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2009-04-17

    Pyrosequencing technologies such as 454/Roche and Solexa/Illumina vastly lower the cost of nucleotide sequencing compared to the traditional Sanger method, and thus promise to greatly expand the number of sequenced eukaryotic genomes. However, the new technologies also bring new challenges such as shorter reads and new kinds and higher rates of sequencing errors, which complicate genome assembly and gene prediction. At JGI we are deploying 454 technology for the sequencing and assembly of ever-larger eukaryotic genomes. Here we describe our first whole-genome annotation of a purely 454-sequenced fungal genome that is larger than a yeast (>30 Mbp). The pezizomycotine (filamentous ascomycote) Aspergillus carbonarius belongs to the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex, members of which are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as agricultural toxigens. Application of a modified version of the standard JGI Annotation Pipeline has so far predicted ~;;10k genes. ~;;12percent of these preliminary annotations suffer a potential frameshift error, which is somewhat higher than the ~;;9percent rate in the Sanger-sequenced and conventionally assembled and annotated genome of fellow Aspergillus section Nigri member A. niger. Also,>90percent of A. niger genes have potential homologs in the A. carbonarius preliminary annotation. Weconclude, and with further annotation and comparative analysis expect to confirm, that 454 sequencing strategies provide a promising substrate for annotation of modestly sized eukaryotic genomes. We will also present results of annotation of a number of other pyrosequenced fungal genomes of bioenergy interest.

  10. Phylogeny and subgeneric taxonomy of Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, S.W.; Varga, Janos; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Samson, Robert A.

    The phylogeny of the genus Aspergillus and its teleomorphs is discussed based on multilocus sequence data. DNA sequence analysis was used to formulate a nucleotide sequence framework of the genus and to analyze character changes in relationship to the phylogeny hypothesized from the DNA sequence...... analysis. The sequence data used to delimitate subgeneric taxa included partial calmodulin, rDNA and RNA polymerase gene sequences. In our phylogenic structure of Aspergillus extrolite data of the various Aspergillus taxa collected from ex-type cultures and numerous other isolates are also discussed. A new...... subgeneric classification is proposed which includes 8 subgenera and 22 sections within the Aspergillus genus. Characteristics of these taxa are shortly discussed in this chapter....

  11. Putative virulence factors of Aspergillus fumigatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomee, JFC; Kauffman, HF

    2000-01-01

    Various putative virulence factors of Aspergillus fumigatus have been studied over the past decades. A. fumigatus gliotoxin is a potent inhibitor of the mucociliary system. Several fungal metabolites interfere with phagocytosis and opsonization including toxins, 'conidial inhibitory factor', 'A. fum

  12. Polyketides in Aspergillus terreus: biosynthesis pathway discovery and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ying; Cai, Menghao; Zhou, Xiangshan; Li, Zhiyong; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2016-09-01

    The knowledge of biosynthesis gene clusters, production improving methods, and bioactivity mechanisms is very important for the development of filamentous fungi metabolites. Metabolic engineering and heterologous expression methods can be applied to improve desired metabolite production, when their biosynthesis pathways have been revealed. And, stable supplement is a necessary basis of bioactivity mechanism discovery and following clinical trial. Aspergillus terreus is an outstanding producer of many bioactive agents, and a large part of them are polyketides. In this review, we took polyketides from A. terreus as examples, focusing on 13 polyketide synthase (PKS) genes in A. terreus NIH 2624 genome. The biosynthesis pathways of nine PKS genes have been reported, and their downstream metabolites are lovastatin, terreic acid, terrein, geodin, terretonin, citreoviridin, and asperfuranone, respectively. Among them, lovastatin is a well-known hypolipidemic agent. Terreic acid, terrein, citreoviridin, and asperfuranone show good bioactivities, especially anticancer activities. On the other hand, geodin and terretonin are mycotoxins. So, biosynthesis gene cluster information is important for the production or elimination of them. We also predicted three possible gene clusters that contain four PKS genes by homologous gene alignment with other Aspergillus strains. We think that this is an effective way to mine secondary metabolic gene clusters. PMID:27455860

  13. Data on the presence or absence of genes encoding essential proteins for ochratoxin and fumonisin biosynthesis in Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus welwitschiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massi, Fernanda Pelisson; Sartori, Daniele; Ferranti, Larissa de Souza; Iamanaka, Beatriz Thie; Taniwaki, Marta Hiromi; Vieira, Maria Lucia Carneiro; Fungaro, Maria Helena Pelegrinelli

    2016-06-01

    We present the multiplex PCR data for the presence/absence of genes involved in OTA and FB2 biosynthesis in Aspergillus niger/Aspergillus welwitschiae strains isolated from different food substrates in Brazil. Among the 175 strains analyzed, four mPCR profiles were found: Profile 1 (17%) highlights strains harboring in their genome the pks, radH and the fum8 genes. Profile 2 (3.5%) highlights strains harboring genes involved in OTA biosynthesis i.e. radH and pks. Profile 3 (51.5%) highlights strains harboring the fum8 gene. Profile 4 (28%) highlights strains not carrying the genes studied herein. This research content is supplemental to our original research article, "Prospecting for the incidence of genes involved in ochratoxin and fumonisin biosynthesis in Brazilian strains of A. niger and A. welwitschiae" [1]. PMID:27054181

  14. Data on the presence or absence of genes encoding essential proteins for ochratoxin and fumonisin biosynthesis in Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus welwitschiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massi, Fernanda Pelisson; Sartori, Daniele; Ferranti, Larissa de Souza; Iamanaka, Beatriz Thie; Taniwaki, Marta Hiromi; Vieira, Maria Lucia Carneiro; Fungaro, Maria Helena Pelegrinelli

    2016-01-01

    We present the multiplex PCR data for the presence/absence of genes involved in OTA and FB2 biosynthesis in Aspergillus niger/Aspergillus welwitschiae strains isolated from different food substrates in Brazil. Among the 175 strains analyzed, four mPCR profiles were found: Profile 1 (17%) highlights strains harboring in their genome the pks, radH and the fum8 genes. Profile 2 (3.5%) highlights strains harboring genes involved in OTA biosynthesis i.e. radH and pks. Profile 3 (51.5%) highlights strains harboring the fum8 gene. Profile 4 (28%) highlights strains not carrying the genes studied herein. This research content is supplemental to our original research article, “Prospecting for the incidence of genes involved in ochratoxin and fumonisin biosynthesis in Brazilian strains of A. niger and A. welwitschiae” [1]. PMID:27054181

  15. KdmB, a Jumonji Histone H3 Demethylase, Regulates Genome-Wide H3K4 Trimethylation and Is Required for Normal Induction of Secondary Metabolism in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacek-Matthews, Agnieszka; Berger, Harald; Sasaki, Takahiko; Wittstein, Kathrin; Gruber, Clemens; Lewis, Zachary A; Strauss, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications (HPTMs) are involved in chromatin-based regulation of fungal secondary metabolite biosynthesis (SMB) in which the corresponding genes-usually physically linked in co-regulated clusters-are silenced under optimal physiological conditions (nutrient-rich) but are activated when nutrients are limiting. The exact molecular mechanisms by which HPTMs influence silencing and activation, however, are still to be better understood. Here we show by a combined approach of quantitative mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq) and transcriptional network analysis (RNA-seq) that the core regions of silent A. nidulans SM clusters generally carry low levels of all tested chromatin modifications and that heterochromatic marks flank most of these SM clusters. During secondary metabolism, histone marks typically associated with transcriptional activity such as H3 trimethylated at lysine-4 (H3K4me3) are established in some, but not all gene clusters even upon full activation. KdmB, a Jarid1-family histone H3 lysine demethylase predicted to comprise a BRIGHT domain, a zinc-finger and two PHD domains in addition to the catalytic Jumonji domain, targets and demethylates H3K4me3 in vivo and mediates transcriptional downregulation. Deletion of kdmB leads to increased transcription of about ~1750 genes across nutrient-rich (primary metabolism) and nutrient-limiting (secondary metabolism) conditions. Unexpectedly, an equally high number of genes exhibited reduced expression in the kdmB deletion strain and notably, this group was significantly enriched for genes with known or predicted functions in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Taken together, this study extends our general knowledge about multi-domain KDM5 histone demethylases and provides new details on the chromatin-level regulation of fungal secondary metabolite production. PMID:27548260

  16. Screening of Aspergillus nidulans metabolites from habitat mimicking media using LC-DAD-TOFMS system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Andreas; Holm, Dorte Koefoed; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    Fungi are a valuable source of metabolites and other bioactive compounds. These compounds are essential for human society, and it is estimated that around 49% of the drugs used to treat cancer are natural products or derived therefrom. Six different wild types of Aspergillus nidulans have been...... cultured on a range of different habitat mimicking media. Extracts from the fungi were analyzed using a LC-DAD-TOFMS system, and by screening the extracts using an in-house database of known fungal metabolites. Using this database we were able to easily select unknown compounds, and dereplicate these using...

  17. DistiLD Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palleja, Albert; Horn, Heiko; Eliasson, Sabrina;

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of hundreds of diseases. However, there is currently no database that enables non-specialists to answer the following simple questions: which SNPs associated with...... blocks, so that SNPs in LD with each other are preferentially in the same block, whereas SNPs not in LD are in different blocks. By projecting SNPs and genes onto LD blocks, the DistiLD database aims to increase usage of existing GWAS results by making it easy to query and visualize disease......-associated SNPs and genes in their chromosomal context. The database is available at http://distild.jensenlab.org/....

  18. Mining a database of single amplified genomes from Red Sea brine pool extremophiles-improving reliability of gene function prediction using a profile and pattern matching algorithm (PPMA).

    KAUST Repository

    Grötzinger, Stefan W

    2014-04-07

    Reliable functional annotation of genomic data is the key-step in the discovery of novel enzymes. Intrinsic sequencing data quality problems of single amplified genomes (SAGs) and poor homology of novel extremophile\\'s genomes pose significant challenges for the attribution of functions to the coding sequences identified. The anoxic deep-sea brine pools of the Red Sea are a promising source of novel enzymes with unique evolutionary adaptation. Sequencing data from Red Sea brine pool cultures and SAGs are annotated and stored in the Integrated Data Warehouse of Microbial Genomes (INDIGO) data warehouse. Low sequence homology of annotated genes (no similarity for 35% of these genes) may translate into false positives when searching for specific functions. The Profile and Pattern Matching (PPM) strategy described here was developed to eliminate false positive annotations of enzyme function before progressing to labor-intensive hyper-saline gene expression and characterization. It utilizes InterPro-derived Gene Ontology (GO)-terms (which represent enzyme function profiles) and annotated relevant PROSITE IDs (which are linked to an amino acid consensus pattern). The PPM algorithm was tested on 15 protein families, which were selected based on scientific and commercial potential. An initial list of 2577 enzyme commission (E.C.) numbers was translated into 171 GO-terms and 49 consensus patterns. A subset of INDIGO-sequences consisting of 58 SAGs from six different taxons of bacteria and archaea were selected from six different brine pool environments. Those SAGs code for 74,516 genes, which were independently scanned for the GO-terms (profile filter) and PROSITE IDs (pattern filter). Following stringent reliability filtering, the non-redundant hits (106 profile hits and 147 pattern hits) are classified as reliable, if at least two relevant descriptors (GO-terms and/or consensus patterns) are present. Scripts for annotation, as well as for the PPM algorithm, are available

  19. In-silico analysis of Aspergillus niger beta-glucosidases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo S., L.; Shazilah, K.; Suhaila, S.; Abu Bakar F., D.; Murad A. M., A.

    2014-09-01

    Genomic data mining was carried out and revealed a total of seventeen β-glucosidases in filamentous fungi Aspergillus niger. Two of them belonged to glycoside hydrolase family 1 (GH1) while the rest belonged to genes in family 3 (GH3). These proteins were then named according to the nomenclature as proposed by the International Union of Biochemistry (IUB), starting from the lowest pI and glycoside hydrolase family. Their properties were predicted using various bionformatic tools showing the presence of domains for signal peptide and active sites. Interestingly, one particular domain, PA14 (protective antigen) was present in four of the enzymes, predicted to be involved in carbohydrate binding. A phylogenetic tree grouped the two glycoside hydrolase families with GH1 and GH3 related organisms. This study showed that the various domains present in these β-glucosidases are postulated to be crucial for the survival of this fungus, as supported by other analysis.

  20. Virgil database for rich links (1999 update).

    OpenAIRE

    Achard, F; Vaysseix, G; Dessen, P; Barillot, E

    1999-01-01

    With so many databases available for research in the Human Genome Project, it is crucial to efficiently relate information from different resources. For that purpose, we maintain Virgil, a database of rich links for data browsing, data analysis and database interconnection. Virgil current version contains more than 40 000 rich links from five major databases: SWISS-PROT, GenBank, PDB, GDB and OMIM. Materials described in this paper are available from http://www.infobiogen.fr/services/virgil/

  1. Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human...

  2. Scientific Advances with Aspergillus Species that Are Used for Food and Biotech Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesebeke, Rob Te; Record, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Yeast and filamentous fungi have been used for centuries in diverse biotechnological processes. Fungal fermentation technology is traditionally used in relation to food production, such as for bread, beer, cheese, sake and soy sauce. Last century, the industrial application of yeast and filamentous fungi expanded rapidly, with excellent examples such as purified enzymes and secondary metabolites (e.g. antibiotics), which are used in a wide range of food as well as non-food industries. Research on protein and/or metabolite secretion by fungal species has focused on identifying bottlenecks in (post-) transcriptional regulation of protein production, metabolic rerouting, morphology and the transit of proteins through the secretion pathway. In past years, genome sequencing of some fungi (e.g. Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus niger) has been completed. The available genome sequences have enabled identification of genes and functionally important regions of the genome. This has directed research to focus on a post-genomics era in which transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics methodologies will help to explore the scientific relevance and industrial application of fungal genome sequences. PMID:21558706

  3. Ribonuclease Production by Aspergillus species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Gomes

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Ribonuclease production by Aspergillus flavipes, A. sulphureus and A. fischeri in semi-synthetic medium, after 24-144 hours at 30ºC under shaking, was studied. After cultivation, the medium was separated from micelia by filtration and the resultant solution was used as enzymatic extract. The highest amount of biomass and RNase was obtained after 96 hours of cultivation. The enzymes produced by three species presented similar characteristics, with optimum temperature at 55ºC and two peaks of activity at pH 4.5 and 7.0. A. flavipes RNases were more sensitive to temperature: 50% of the initial activity was lost after 1 hour at 70ºC. After this heat treatment, RNase of A. sulphureus lost 30% of this activity and that of A. fischeri only 16%. The nucleotides released by enzimatic hydrolysis of RNA were separated by ion exchange chromatography in a AG-1X8-formiate column and identified by paper chromatography. This procedure indicated that the raw enzymatic extract of Aspergillus flavipes is able to hydrolyze RNA, releasing 3'-nucleotides monophosphate at pH 4.5 and 3' and 5'-nucleotides monophosphate at pH 7.0 and 8.5. This result suggests that this strain produces two different types of RNase, one acidic and other alcaline, with different specificities.A produção de ribonucleases extracelulares pelos fungos Aspergillus flavipes, A. sulphureus e A. fischeri foi estudada em meio semi-sintético por períodos de 24 a 144 horas, em "shaker" a 30ºC. Após o cultivo, o meio foi separado da massa micelial por filtração, sendo o filtrado utilizado como solução enzimática bruta. As três espécies produziram maior quantidade de biomassa e ribonuclease após 96 horas de cultivo. O estudo das RNases como extrato enzimático bruto demonstrou que existe grande similaridade entre as enzimas das três espécies, com temperaturas ótimas de 55ºC e dois picos de atividade a pH 4,5 e a pH 7,0. A RNAse produzida pelo fungo A. flavipes demonstrou ser mais

  4. Database Manager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    It is normal practice today for organizations to store large quantities of records of related information as computer-based files or databases. Purposeful information is retrieved by performing queries on the data sets. The purpose of DATABASE MANAGER is to communicate to students the method by which the computer performs these queries. This…

  5. Mining a database of single amplified genomes from Red Sea brine pool extremophiles – Improving reliability of gene function prediction using a profile and pattern matching algorithm (PPMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Wolfgang Grötzinger

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Reliable functional annotation of genomic data is the key-step in the discovery of novel enzymes. Intrinsic sequencing data quality problems of single amplified genomes (SAGs and poor homology of novel extremophile’s genomes pose significant challenges for the attribution of functions to the coding sequences identified. The anoxic deep-sea brine pools of the Red Sea are a promising source of novel enzymes with unique evolutionary adaptation. Sequencing data from Red Sea brine pool cultures and SAGs are annotated and stored in the INDIGO data warehouse. Low sequence homology of annotated genes (no similarity for 35% of these genes may translate into false positives when searching for specific functions. The Profile & Pattern Matching (PPM strategy described here was developed to eliminate false positive annotations of enzyme function before progressing to labor-intensive hyper-saline gene expression and characterization. It utilizes InterPro-derived Gene Ontology (GO-terms (which represent enzyme function profiles and annotated relevant PROSITE IDs (which are linked to an amino acid consensus pattern. The PPM algorithm was tested on 15 protein families, which were selected based on scientific and commercial potential. An initial list of 2,577 E.C. numbers was translated into 171 GO-terms and 49 consensus patterns. A subset of INDIGO-sequences consisting of 58 SAGs from six different taxons of bacteria and archaea were selected from 6 different brine pool environments. Those SAGs code for 74,516 genes, which were independently scanned for the GO-terms (profile filter and PROSITE IDs (pattern filter. Following stringent reliability filtering, the non-redundant hits (106 profile hits and 147 pattern hits are classified as reliable, if at least two relevant descriptors (GO-terms and/or consensus patterns are present. Scripts for annotation, as well as for the PPM algorithm, are available through the INDIGO website.

  6. Neuroimaging features of cerebral aspergillus abscess: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Bai

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Cerebral aspergillus abscesses possess some degree neuroimaging features on traditional CT/MR imaging. Combined with patient's clinical history, CT/MRI examination could facilitate early diagnosis of aspergillus abscesses in central nervous system.

  7. Protein Databases on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Dong

    2004-01-01

    Protein databases have become a crucial part of modern biology. Huge amounts of data for protein structures, functions, and particularly sequences are being generated. Searching databases is often the first step in the study of a new protein. Comparison between proteins or between protein families provides information about the relationship between proteins within a genome or across different species, and hence offers much more information than can be obtained by studying only an isolated pro...

  8. CRISPI: a CRISPR interactive database

    OpenAIRE

    Rousseau, Christine; Gonnet, Mathieu; Le Romancer, Marc; Nicolas, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    Summary: The CRISPR genomic structures (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) form a family of repeats that is largely present in archaea and frequent in bacteria. On the basis of a formal model of CRISPR using very few parameters, a systematic study of all their occurrences in all available genomes of Archaea and Bacteria has been carried out. This has resulted in a relational database, CRISPI, which also includes a complete repertory of associated CRISPR-associated gene...

  9. Chemodiversity in the genus Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld

    2015-01-01

    characterized. The genus Aspergillus is cladistically holophyletic but phenotypically polythetic and very diverse and is associated to quite different sexual states. Following the one fungus one name system, the genus Aspergillus is restricted to a holophyletic clade that include the morphologically different...... biosynthetic family isoextrolites. However, it appears that secondary metabolites from one Aspergillus section have analogous metabolites in other sections (here also called heteroisoextrolites). In this review, we give a genus-wide overview of secondary metabolite production in Aspergillus species. Extrolites...

  10. Genome update: the 1000th genome - a cautionary tale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagesen, Karin; Ussery, David; Wassenaar, Gertrude Maria

    2010-01-01

    There are now more than 1000 sequenced prokaryotic genomes deposited in public databases and available for analysis. Currently, although the sequence databases GenBank, DNA Database of Japan and EMBL are synchronized continually, there are slight differences in content at the genomes level...... for a variety of logistical reasons, including differences in format and loading errors, such as those caused by file transfer protocol interruptions. This means that the 1000th genome will be different in the various databases. Some of the data on the highly accessed web pages are inaccurate, leading to false...... conclusions for example about the largest bacterial genome sequenced. Biological diversity is far greater than many have thought. For example, analysis of multiple Escherichia coli genomes has led to an estimate of around 45 000 gene families more genes than are recognized in the human genome. Moreover...

  11. Aspergillus species: An emerging pathogen in onychomycosis among diabetics

    OpenAIRE

    Wijesuriya, T. M.; Kottahachchi, J.; T. D. C. P. Gunasekara; Bulugahapitiya, U.; K. N. P. Ranasinghe; Neluka Fernando, S. S.; M M Weerasekara

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Approximately, 33% patients with diabetes are afflicted with onychomycosis. In the past, nondermatophyte molds have been regarded as opportunistic pathogens; recently, Aspergillus species are considered as emerging pathogens of toenail infections. In Sri Lanka, the prevalence of Aspergillus species in onychomycosis among diabetics is not well documented. Objective: To determine the proportion of Aspergillus onychomycosis, risk factors and knowledge among diabetics. Materials and...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3040 - Aspergillus spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aspergillus spp. serological reagents. 866.3040... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3040 Aspergillus spp. serological reagents. (a) Identification. Aspergillus spp. serological reagents are devices...

  13. Database Replication

    CERN Document Server

    Kemme, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Database replication is widely used for fault-tolerance, scalability and performance. The failure of one database replica does not stop the system from working as available replicas can take over the tasks of the failed replica. Scalability can be achieved by distributing the load across all replicas, and adding new replicas should the load increase. Finally, database replication can provide fast local access, even if clients are geographically distributed clients, if data copies are located close to clients. Despite its advantages, replication is not a straightforward technique to apply, and

  14. Probabilistic Databases

    CERN Document Server

    Suciu, Dan; Koch, Christop

    2011-01-01

    Probabilistic databases are databases where the value of some attributes or the presence of some records are uncertain and known only with some probability. Applications in many areas such as information extraction, RFID and scientific data management, data cleaning, data integration, and financial risk assessment produce large volumes of uncertain data, which are best modeled and processed by a probabilistic database. This book presents the state of the art in representation formalisms and query processing techniques for probabilistic data. It starts by discussing the basic principles for rep

  15. WheatGenome.info: A Resource for Wheat Genomics Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kaitao

    2016-01-01

    An integrated database with a variety of Web-based systems named WheatGenome.info hosting wheat genome and genomic data has been developed to support wheat research and crop improvement. The resource includes multiple Web-based applications, which are implemented as a variety of Web-based systems. These include a GBrowse2-based wheat genome viewer with BLAST search portal, TAGdb for searching wheat second generation genome sequence data, wheat autoSNPdb, links to wheat genetic maps using CMap and CMap3D, and a wheat genome Wiki to allow interaction between diverse wheat genome sequencing activities. This portal provides links to a variety of wheat genome resources hosted at other research organizations. This integrated database aims to accelerate wheat genome research and is freely accessible via the web interface at http://www.wheatgenome.info/ . PMID:26519407

  16. Secretome data from Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger cultivated in submerged and sequential fermentation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florencio, Camila; Cunha, Fernanda M; Badino, Alberto C; Farinas, Cristiane S; Ximenes, Eduardo; Ladisch, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    The cultivation procedure and the fungal strain applied for enzyme production may influence levels and profile of the proteins produced. The proteomic analysis data presented here provide critical information to compare proteins secreted by Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger when cultivated through submerged and sequential fermentation processes, using steam-explosion sugarcane bagasse as inducer for enzyme production. The proteins were organized according to the families described in CAZy database as cellulases, hemicellulases, proteases/peptidases, cell-wall-protein, lipases, others (catalase, esterase, etc.), glycoside hydrolases families, predicted and hypothetical proteins. Further detailed analysis of this data is provided in "Secretome analysis of Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger cultivated by submerged and sequential fermentation process: enzyme production for sugarcane bagasse hydrolysis" C. Florencio, F.M. Cunha, A.C Badino, C.S. Farinas, E. Ximenes, M.R. Ladisch (2016) [1]. PMID:27419196

  17. Combined molecular and biochemical approach identifies Aspergillus japonicus and Aspergillus aculeatus as two species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parenicova, L.; Skouboe, P.; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Samson, R.A.; Rossen, L.; Hoor-Suykerbuyk, M.; Visser, J.

    2001-01-01

    We examined nine Aspergillus japonicus isolates and 10 Aspergillus aculeatus isolates by using molecular and biochemical markers, including DNA sequences of the ITS1-5.8S rRNA gene-ITS2 region, restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP), and secondary-metabolite profiles. The DNA sequence of...... the internal transcribed spacers (ITS1 and ITS2) and the 5.8S rRNA gene could not be used to distinguish between A. japonicus and A. aculeatus but did show that these two taxa are more closely related to each other than to other species of black aspergilli. Aspergillus niger pyruvate kinase (pkiA) and...

  18. RDD Databases

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database was established to oversee documents issued in support of fishery research activities including experimental fishing permits (EFP), letters of...

  19. Dealer Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dealer reporting databases contain the primary data reported by federally permitted seafood dealers in the northeast. Electronic reporting was implemented May...

  20. Expectations from structural genomics.

    OpenAIRE

    Brenner, S. E.; Levitt, M.

    2000-01-01

    Structural genomics projects aim to provide an experimental structure or a good model for every protein in all completed genomes. Most of the experimental work for these projects will be directed toward proteins whose fold cannot be readily recognized by simple sequence comparison with proteins of known structure. Based on the history of proteins classified in the SCOP structure database, we expect that only about a quarter of the early structural genomics targets will have a new fold. Among ...

  1. National database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Helen Grundtvig; Stjernø, Henrik

    1995-01-01

    Artikel om national database for sygeplejeforskning oprettet på Dansk Institut for Sundheds- og Sygeplejeforskning. Det er målet med databasen at samle viden om forsknings- og udviklingsaktiviteter inden for sygeplejen.......Artikel om national database for sygeplejeforskning oprettet på Dansk Institut for Sundheds- og Sygeplejeforskning. Det er målet med databasen at samle viden om forsknings- og udviklingsaktiviteter inden for sygeplejen....

  2. A rare case of bilateral aspergillus endophthalmitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Saurabh; Loudill, Cameron; Tammara, Anita; Chow, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus endophthalmitis is a devastating inflammatory condition of the intraocular cavities that may result in irreparable loss of vision and rapid destruction of the eye. Almost all cases in the literature have shown an identified source causing aspergillus endophthalmitis as a result of direct extension of disease. We present a rare case of bilateral aspergillus endophthalmitis. A 72-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus, congenital Hirschsprung disease, and recent culture-positive candida pyelonephritis with hydronephrosis status post-surgical stent placement presented with difficulty opening her eyes. She complained of decreased vision (20/200) with pain and redness in both eyes – right worse then left. Examination demonstrated multiple white fungal balls in both retinas consistent with bilateral fungal endophthalmitis. Bilateral vitreous taps for cultures and staining were performed. Patient was given intravitreal injections of amphotericin B, vancomycin, ceftazidime, and started on oral fluconazole. Patient was scheduled for vitrectomy to decrease organism burden and to remove loculated areas of infection that would not respond to systemic antifungal agents. Four weeks after initial presentation, the fungal cultures revealed mold growth consistent with aspergillus. Patient was subsequently started on voriconazole and fluconazole was discontinued due to poor efficacy against aspergillus. Further workup was conducted to evaluate for the source of infection and seeding. Transthoracic cardiogram was unremarkable for any vegetation or valvular abnormalities. MRI of the orbits and sinuses did not reveal any mass lesions or bony destruction. CT of the chest was unremarkable for infection. Aspergillus endophthalmitis may occur because of one of these several mechanisms: hematogenous dissemination, direct inoculation by trauma, and contamination during surgery. Our patient's cause of bilateral endophthalmitis was through an unknown iatrogenic seed

  3. A rare case of bilateral aspergillus endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Saurabh; Loudill, Cameron; Tammara, Anita; Chow, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus endophthalmitis is a devastating inflammatory condition of the intraocular cavities that may result in irreparable loss of vision and rapid destruction of the eye. Almost all cases in the literature have shown an identified source causing aspergillus endophthalmitis as a result of direct extension of disease. We present a rare case of bilateral aspergillus endophthalmitis. A 72-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus, congenital Hirschsprung disease, and recent culture-positive candida pyelonephritis with hydronephrosis status post-surgical stent placement presented with difficulty opening her eyes. She complained of decreased vision (20/200) with pain and redness in both eyes - right worse then left. Examination demonstrated multiple white fungal balls in both retinas consistent with bilateral fungal endophthalmitis. Bilateral vitreous taps for cultures and staining were performed. Patient was given intravitreal injections of amphotericin B, vancomycin, ceftazidime, and started on oral fluconazole. Patient was scheduled for vitrectomy to decrease organism burden and to remove loculated areas of infection that would not respond to systemic antifungal agents. Four weeks after initial presentation, the fungal cultures revealed mold growth consistent with aspergillus. Patient was subsequently started on voriconazole and fluconazole was discontinued due to poor efficacy against aspergillus. Further workup was conducted to evaluate for the source of infection and seeding. Transthoracic cardiogram was unremarkable for any vegetation or valvular abnormalities. MRI of the orbits and sinuses did not reveal any mass lesions or bony destruction. CT of the chest was unremarkable for infection. Aspergillus endophthalmitis may occur because of one of these several mechanisms: hematogenous dissemination, direct inoculation by trauma, and contamination during surgery. Our patient's cause of bilateral endophthalmitis was through an unknown iatrogenic seed

  4. A rare case of bilateral aspergillus endophthalmitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Gupta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus endophthalmitis is a devastating inflammatory condition of the intraocular cavities that may result in irreparable loss of vision and rapid destruction of the eye. Almost all cases in the literature have shown an identified source causing aspergillus endophthalmitis as a result of direct extension of disease. We present a rare case of bilateral aspergillus endophthalmitis. A 72-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus, congenital Hirschsprung disease, and recent culture-positive candida pyelonephritis with hydronephrosis status post-surgical stent placement presented with difficulty opening her eyes. She complained of decreased vision (20/200 with pain and redness in both eyes – right worse then left. Examination demonstrated multiple white fungal balls in both retinas consistent with bilateral fungal endophthalmitis. Bilateral vitreous taps for cultures and staining were performed. Patient was given intravitreal injections of amphotericin B, vancomycin, ceftazidime, and started on oral fluconazole. Patient was scheduled for vitrectomy to decrease organism burden and to remove loculated areas of infection that would not respond to systemic antifungal agents. Four weeks after initial presentation, the fungal cultures revealed mold growth consistent with aspergillus. Patient was subsequently started on voriconazole and fluconazole was discontinued due to poor efficacy against aspergillus. Further workup was conducted to evaluate for the source of infection and seeding. Transthoracic cardiogram was unremarkable for any vegetation or valvular abnormalities. MRI of the orbits and sinuses did not reveal any mass lesions or bony destruction. CT of the chest was unremarkable for infection. Aspergillus endophthalmitis may occur because of one of these several mechanisms: hematogenous dissemination, direct inoculation by trauma, and contamination during surgery. Our patient's cause of bilateral endophthalmitis was through an

  5. RPG: the Ribosomal Protein Gene database

    OpenAIRE

    Nakao, Akihiro; Yoshihama, Maki; Kenmochi, Naoya

    2004-01-01

    RPG (http://ribosome.miyazaki-med.ac.jp/) is a new database that provides detailed information about ribosomal protein (RP) genes. It contains data from humans and other organisms, including Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Saccharo myces cerevisiae, Methanococcus jannaschii and Escherichia coli. Users can search the database by gene name and organism. Each record includes sequences (genomic, cDNA and amino acid sequences), intron/exon structures, genomic locations and informa...

  6. Aspergillus species: An emerging pathogen in onychomycosis among diabetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesuriya, T. M.; Kottahachchi, J.; Gunasekara, T. D. C. P.; Bulugahapitiya, U.; Ranasinghe, K. N. P.; Neluka Fernando, S. S.; Weerasekara, M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Approximately, 33% patients with diabetes are afflicted with onychomycosis. In the past, nondermatophyte molds have been regarded as opportunistic pathogens; recently, Aspergillus species are considered as emerging pathogens of toenail infections. In Sri Lanka, the prevalence of Aspergillus species in onychomycosis among diabetics is not well documented. Objective: To determine the proportion of Aspergillus onychomycosis, risk factors and knowledge among diabetics. Materials and Methods: This was descriptive cross-sectional study. Three hundred diabetic patients were included. Clinical examinations of patients’ toenails were performed by a clinical microbiologist. Laboratory identification was done, and pathogens were identified to the species level by morpho-physiological methods. All inferential statistics were tested at P onychomycosis. Aspergillus species were most commonly isolated n = 180 (71%) followed by dermatophytes, yeasts, and other molds n = 75 (29%). Of the patients having Aspergillus onychomycosis, 149 (83%) were in the > age group. In men, Aspergillus onycomycosis was seen in 82%. Among patients who had Aspergillus nail infection, 114 (63%) had diabetes for a period of > years. Among patients who were engaged in agricultural activities, 77% were confirmed to have infected nails due to Aspergillus species. Conclusion: Aspergillus niger was the most common pathogen isolated from toenail infection. Aspergillus species should be considered as an important pathogen in toenail onychomycosis in diabetic patients. Risk factors associated with Aspergillus onychomycosis were age, gender, duration of diabetes, length of exposure to fungi, and occupation. PMID:26693433

  7. The transcriptional activator GaaR of Aspergillus niger is required for release and utilization of D-galacturonic acid from pectin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alazi, Ebru; Niu, Jing; Kowalczyk, Joanna E; Peng, Mao; Aguilar Pontes, Maria Victoria; van Kan, Jan A L; Visser, Jaap; de Vries, Ronald P; Ram, Arthur F J

    2016-01-01

    We identified the D-galacturonic acid (GA) responsive transcriptional activator GaaR of the saprotrophic fungus Aspergillus niger, which was found to be essential for growth on GA and polygalacturonic acid (PGA). Growth of the ΔgaaR strain was reduced on complex pectins. Genome-wide expression analy

  8. The transcriptional activator GaaR of Aspergillus niger is required for release and utilization of d-galacturonic acid from pectin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alazi, Ebru; Niu, Jing; Kowalczyk, Joanna E.; Peng, Mao; Aguilar Pontes, Maria Victoria; Kan, Van Jan A.L.; Visser, Jaap; Vries, De Ronald P.; Ram, Arthur F.J.

    2016-01-01

    We identified the d-galacturonic acid (GA)-responsive transcriptional activator GaaR of the saprotrophic fungus, Aspergillus niger, which was found to be essential for growth on GA and polygalacturonic acid (PGA). Growth of the ΔgaaR strain was reduced on complex pectins. Genome-wide expression anal

  9. Aspergillus niger mstA encodes a high affinity sugar/H+ symporter which is regulated in persponse to extracellular pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuyk, van P.A.; Diderich, J.A.; MacCabe, A.P.; Hererro, O.; Ruijter, G.J.G.; Visser, J.

    2004-01-01

    A sugar-transporter-encoding gene, mstA, which is a member of the major facilitator superfamily, has been cloned from a genomic DNA library of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. To enable the functional characterization of MSTA, a full-length cDNA was expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae s

  10. Identification and toxigenic potential of the industrially important fungi, Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus sojae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas R

    2007-01-01

    Mold strains belonging to the species Aspergillus oryzae and Aspergillus sojae are highly valued as koji molds in the traditional preparation of fermented foods, such as miso, sake, and shoyu, and as protein production hosts in modern industrial processes. A. oryzae and A. sojae are relatives of...... the wild molds Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus. All four species are classified to the A. flavus group. Strains of the A. flavus group are characterized by a high degree of morphological similarity. Koji mold species are generally perceived of as being nontoxigenic, whereas wild molds...... are associated with the carcinogenic aflatoxins. Thus, reliable identification of individual strains is very important for application purposes. This review considers the pheno- and genotypic markers used in the classification of A. flavus group strains and specifically in the identification of A...

  11. Genomic sequences of Aspergillus flavus accessions in Georgia USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The data was produced as part of the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Collaborative Research on Peanut Productivity and Aflatoxin Control (the Peanut &...

  12. Aspergillus pragensis sp nov discovered during molecular reidentification of clinical isolates belonging to Aspergillus section Candidi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hubka, Vít; Lysková, P.; Frisvad, J.C.; Peterson, S.W.; Skořepová, M.; Kolařík, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 6 (2014), s. 565-576. ISSN 1369-3786 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0055; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Aspergillus candidus * Aspergillus tritici * antifungal susceptibility testing Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.335, year: 2014

  13. The Production of Itaconic Acid from Sweet Potato Peel Using Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus

    OpenAIRE

    OMOJASOLA PATRICIA FOLAKEMI; ADENIRAN EUNICE ADERONKE

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of large quantities of agricultural residues results in deterioration of the environment and biomass loss which could be processed to yield value-added products like fuels and a variety of acids. The quest for a solution led to the fermentation of Ipomoea batatas using fungi. Aspergillus niger (ATCC 16404) and Aspergillus terreus (ATCC 20542) were used to ferment sweet potato peel (SPP), an agro-based waste. The physico-chemical analysis of the SPP was carried out. SPP was dried...

  14. Full Data of Yeast Interacting Proteins Database (Original Version) - Yeast Interacting Proteins Database | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tem Description Bait ORF The ORF name of Bait, and the systematic name in the SGD (Saccharomyces Genome Data...Prey ORF The ORF name of Prey, and the systematic name in the SGD (Saccharomyces Genome Database; http://www

  15. Study of effect ultraviolet radiation on Aspergillus Flavus and Aspergillus Parasiticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article the results of ultraviolet radiation effects on Aspergillus Flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus to reach the quality control standards are presented. The purpose was to test the effect of ultraviolet radiation in 254 nanometer wavelength for fungi decontamination with respect to the exposure time of radiation and the distance between samples and radiation source. The ultraviolet radiation effects on plates containing Aspergillus Flavus and Aspergillus Parasiticus fungi were studied in the exposure time duration of 30, to 360 seconds of a fixed distance, and also for variable distances from 10 to 40 cm at a given exposure time. It is shown that in the exposure time of more than 360 second the ultraviolet radiation exposure highly decreases the number of Aspergillus Flavus and Aspergillus Parasiticus fungi colonies. By reducing the distance, the number of colonies decreases and it is minimized at a 10 cm distance in the time exposure of 360 second. The above results show that the ultraviolet radiation is an effective method for food decontamination and can be used in industry

  16. Taxonomic Characterization and Secondary Metabolite Profiling of Aspergillus Section Aspergillus Contaminating Feeds and Feedstuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Mariana; Kemppainen, Minna; Pose, Graciela; Pardo, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Xerophilic fungal species of the genus Aspergillus are economically highly relevant due to their ability to grow on low water activity substrates causing spoilage of stored goods and animal feeds. These fungi can synthesize a variety of secondary metabolites, many of which show animal toxicity, creating a health risk for food production animals and to humans as final consumers, respectively. Animal feeds used for rabbit, chinchilla and rainbow trout production in Argentina were analysed for the presence of xerophilic Aspergillus section Aspergillus species. High isolation frequencies (>60%) were detected in all the studied rabbit and chinchilla feeds, while the rainbow trout feeds showed lower fungal charge (25%). These section Aspergillus contaminations comprised predominantly five taxa. Twenty isolates were subjected to taxonomic characterization using both ascospore SEM micromorphology and two independent DNA loci sequencing. The secondary metabolite profiles of the isolates were determined qualitatively by HPLC-MS. All the isolates produced neoechinulin A, 17 isolates were positive for cladosporin and echinulin, and 18 were positive for neoechinulin B. Physcion and preechinulin were detected in a minor proportion of the isolates. This is the first report describing the detailed species composition and the secondary metabolite profiles of Aspergillus section Aspergillus contaminating animal feeds. PMID:26364643

  17. Identification of genomic biomarkers for concurrent diagnosis of drug-induced renal tubular injury using a large-scale toxicogenomics database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drug-induced renal tubular injury is one of the major concerns in preclinical safety evaluations. Toxicogenomics is becoming a generally accepted approach for identifying chemicals with potential safety problems. In the present study, we analyzed 33 nephrotoxicants and 8 non-nephrotoxic hepatotoxicants to elucidate time- and dose-dependent global gene expression changes associated with proximal tubular toxicity. The compounds were administered orally or intravenously once daily to male Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were exposed to four different doses of the compounds, and kidney tissues were collected on days 4, 8, 15, and 29. Gene expression profiles were generated from kidney RNA by using Affymetrix GeneChips and analyzed in conjunction with the histopathological changes. We used the filter-type gene selection algorithm based on t-statistics conjugated with the SVM classifier, and achieved a sensitivity of 90% with a selectivity of 90%. Then, 92 genes were extracted as the genomic biomarker candidates that were used to construct the classifier. The gene list contains well-known biomarkers, such as Kidney injury molecule 1, Ceruloplasmin, Clusterin, Tissue inhibitor of metallopeptidase 1, and also novel biomarker candidates. Most of the genes involved in tissue remodeling, the immune/inflammatory response, cell adhesion/proliferation/migration, and metabolism were predominantly up-regulated. Down-regulated genes participated in cell adhesion/proliferation/migration, membrane transport, and signal transduction. Our classifier has better prediction accuracy than any of the well-known biomarkers. Therefore, the toxicogenomics approach would be useful for concurrent diagnosis of renal tubular injury.

  18. New species in Aspergillus section Terrei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, R. A.; Peterson, S. W.; Frisvad, Jens Christian;

    2011-01-01

    Section Terrei of Aspergillus was studied using a polyphasic approach including sequence analysis of parts of the beta-tubulin and calmodulin genes and the ITS region, macro- and micromorphological analyses and examination of extrolite profiles to describe three new species in this section. Based...

  19. Organic acid production by Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongh, Wian de

    2006-01-01

    . Specielt Aspergillus niger er interessant i forbindelse med produktion af organiske syrer, idet denne organisme tolerer lavt pH, kan give høje produktudbytter, og kan give høje produktiviteter som allerede illustreret i anvendelsen af denne organisme i produktionen af citronsyre. Disse faktorer gør A...

  20. Phylogeny and subgeneric taxonomy of Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, S.W.; Varga, Janos; Frisvad, Jens Christian;

    2008-01-01

    The phylogeny of the genus Aspergillus and its teleomorphs is discussed based on multilocus sequence data. DNA sequence analysis was used to formulate a nucleotide sequence framework of the genus and to analyze character changes in relationship to the phylogeny hypothesized from the DNA sequence...

  1. Negative regulation and developmental competence in Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi-Kyung; Kwon, Nak-Jung; Lee, Im-Soon; Jung, Seunho; Kim, Sun-Chang; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Asexual development (conidiation) in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans is governed by orchestrated gene expression. The three key negative regulators of conidiation SfgA, VosA, and NsdD act at different control point in the developmental genetic cascade. Here, we have revealed that NsdD is a key repressor affecting the quantity of asexual spores in Aspergillus. Moreover, nullifying both nsdD and vosA results in abundant formation of the development specific structure conidiophores even at 12 h of liquid culture, and near constitutive activation of conidiation, indicating that acquisition of developmental competence involves the removal of negative regulation exerted by both NsdD and VosA. NsdD's role in repressing conidiation is conserved in other aspergilli, as deleting nsdD causes enhanced and precocious activation of conidiation in Aspergillus fumigatus or Aspergillus flavus. In vivo NsdD-DNA interaction analyses identify three NsdD binding regions in the promoter of the essential activator of conidiation brlA, indicating a direct repressive role of NsdD in conidiation. Importantly, loss of flbC or flbD encoding upstream activators of brlA in the absence of nsdD results in delayed activation of brlA, suggesting distinct positive roles of FlbC and FlbD in conidiation. A genetic model depicting regulation of conidiation in A. nidulans is presented. PMID:27364479

  2. Biological Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviena Baskaran

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biology has entered a new era in distributing information based on database and this collection of database become primary in publishing information. This data publishing is done through Internet Gopher where information resources easy and affordable offered by powerful research tools. The more important thing now is the development of high quality and professionally operated electronic data publishing sites. To enhance the service and appropriate editorial and policies for electronic data publishing has been established and editors of article shoulder the responsibility.

  3. The Porcine Immunology and Nutrition Resource Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diverse genomics-based databases have been developed to facilitate research with human and rodent models. Current porcine gene databases, however, lack the nutritional and immunological orientation and robust annotation to design effective molecular tools to study relevant pig models. To address t...

  4. Proteomic analysis of the secretory response of Aspergillus niger to D-maltose and D-xylose

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira de Oliveira, J.M.P.; Passel,; Schaap, P.J.; Graaff, de, F.M.

    2011-01-01

    Fungi utilize polysaccharide substrates through extracellular digestion catalyzed by secreted enzymes. Thus far, protein secretion by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger has mainly been studied at the level of individual proteins and by genome and transcriptome analyses. To extend these studies, a complementary proteomics approach was applied with the aim to investigate the changes in secretome and microsomal protein composition resulting from a shift to a high level secretion condition....

  5. Proteomic Analysis of the Secretory Response of Aspergillus niger to D-Maltose and D-Xylose

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira de Oliveira, José Miguel P.; van Passel, Mark W. J.; Schaap, Peter J; de Graaff, Leo H

    2011-01-01

    Fungi utilize polysaccharide substrates through extracellular digestion catalyzed by secreted enzymes. Thus far, protein secretion by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger has mainly been studied at the level of individual proteins and by genome and transcriptome analyses. To extend these studies, a complementary proteomics approach was applied with the aim to investigate the changes in secretome and microsomal protein composition resulting from a shift to a high level secretion condition....

  6. PLANEX: the plant co-expression database

    OpenAIRE

    Yim, Won Cheol; Yu, Yongbin; Song, Kitae; Jang, Cheol Seong; Lee, Byung-Moo

    2013-01-01

    Background The PLAnt co-EXpression database (PLANEX) is a new internet-based database for plant gene analysis. PLANEX (http://planex.plantbioinformatics.org) contains publicly available GeneChip data obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). PLANEX is a genome-wide co-expression database, which allows for the functional identification of genes from a wide variety of experimental designs. It can be used for the characterization...

  7. QIS: A Framework for Biomedical Database Federation

    OpenAIRE

    Marenco, Luis; Wang, Tzuu-Yi; Shepherd, Gordon; Miller, Perry L.; Nadkarni, Prakash

    2004-01-01

    Query Integrator System (QIS) is a database mediator framework intended to address robust data integration from continuously changing heterogeneous data sources in the biosciences. Currently in the advanced prototype stage, it is being used on a production basis to integrate data from neuroscience databases developed for the SenseLab project at Yale University with external neuroscience and genomics databases. The QIS framework uses standard technologies and is intended to be deployable by ad...

  8. User Guidelines for the Brassica Database: BRAD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaobo; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequence of Brassica rapa was first released in 2011. Since then, further Brassica genomes have been sequenced or are undergoing sequencing. It is therefore necessary to develop tools that help users to mine information from genomic data efficiently. This will greatly aid scientific exploration and breeding application, especially for those with low levels of bioinformatic training. Therefore, the Brassica database (BRAD) was built to collect, integrate, illustrate, and visualize Brassica genomic datasets. BRAD provides useful searching and data mining tools, and facilitates the search of gene annotation datasets, syntenic or non-syntenic orthologs, and flanking regions of functional genomic elements. It also includes genome-analysis tools such as BLAST and GBrowse. One of the important aims of BRAD is to build a bridge between Brassica crop genomes with the genome of the model species Arabidopsis thaliana, thus transferring the bulk of A. thaliana gene study information for use with newly sequenced Brassica crops. PMID:26519408

  9. Identifying and characterizing the most significant β-glucosidase of the novel species Aspergillus saccharolyticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, Anette; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Lubeck, Mette; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Culley, David E.; Lubeck, Peter S.

    2012-08-20

    A newly discovered fungal species, Aspergillus saccharolyticus, was found to produce a culture broth rich in beta-glucosidase activity. In this present work, the main beta-glucosidase of A. saccharolyticus responsible for the efficient hydrolytic activity was identified, isolated, and characterized. Ion exchange chromatography was used to fractionate the culture broth, yielding fractions with high beta-glucosidase activity and only one visible band on an SDS-PAGE gel. Mass spectrometry analysis of this band gave peptide matches to beta-glucosidases from aspergilli. Through a PCR approach using degenerate primers and genome walking, a 2919 base pair sequence encoding the 860 amino acid BGL1 polypeptide was determined. BGL1 of A. saccharolyticus has 91% and 82% identity with BGL1 from Aspergillus aculeatus and BGL1 from Aspergillus niger, respectively, both belonging to Glycoside hydrolase family 3. Homology modeling studies suggested beta-glucosidase activity with preserved retaining mechanism and a wider catalytic pocket compared to other beta-glucosidases. The bgl1 gene was heterologously expressed in Trichoderma reesei QM6a, purified, and characterized by enzyme kinetics studies. The enzyme can hydrolyze cellobiose, pNPG, and cellodextrins. The enzyme showed good thermostability, was stable at 50°C, and at 60°C it had a half-life of approximately 6 hours.

  10. Cloning and analysis of the positively acting regulatory gene amdR from Aspergillus nidulans.

    OpenAIRE

    Andrianopoulos, A; Hynes, M J

    1988-01-01

    The positively acting regulatory gene amdR of Aspergillus nidulans coordinately regulates the expression of four unlinked structural genes involved in acetamide (amdS), omega amino acid (gatA and gabA), and lactam (lamA) catabolism. By the use of DNA-mediated transformation of A. nidulans, the amdR regulatory gene was cloned from a genomic cosmid library. Southern blot analysis of DNA from various loss-of-function amdR mutants revealed the presence of four detectable DNA rearrangements, inclu...

  11. Two divergent catalase genes are differentially regulated during Aspergillus nidulans development and oxidative stress.

    OpenAIRE

    Kawasaki, L; Wysong, D; Diamond, R.; Aguirre, J.

    1997-01-01

    Catalases are ubiquitous hydrogen peroxide-detoxifying enzymes that are central to the cellular antioxidant response. Of two catalase activities detected in the fungus Aspergillus nidulans, the catA gene encodes the spore-specific catalase A (CatA). Here we characterize a second catalase gene, identified after probing a genomic library with catA, and demonstrate that it encodes catalase B. This gene, designated catB, predicts a 721-amino-acid polypeptide (CatB) showing 78% identity to an Aspe...

  12. Velvet-mediated repression of β-glucan synthesis in Aspergillus nidulans spores

    OpenAIRE

    Hee-Soo Park; Yeong Man Yu; Mi-Kyung Lee; Pil Jae Maeng; Sun Chang Kim; Jae-Hyuk Yu

    2015-01-01

    Beta-glucans are a heterologous group of fibrous glucose polymers that are a major constituent of cell walls in Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes fungi. Synthesis of β (1,3)- and (1,6)-glucans is coordinated with fungal cell growth and development, thus, is under tight genetic regulation. Here, we report that β-glucan synthesis in both asexual and sexual spores is turned off by the NF-kB like fungal regulators VosA and VelB in Aspergillus nidulans. Our genetic and genomic analyses have revealed ...

  13. Bisulfite sequencing reveals that Aspergillus flavus holds a hollow in DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Si-Yang; Lin, Jian-Qing; Wu, Hong-Long;

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus first gained scientific attention for its production of aflatoxin. The underlying regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis has been serving as a theoretical model for biosynthesis of other microbial secondary metabolites. Nevertheless, for several decades, the DNA methylation status......, one of the important epigenomic modifications involved in gene regulation, in A. flavus remains to be controversial. Here, we applied bisulfite sequencing in conjunction with a biological replicate strategy to investigate the DNA methylation profiling of A. flavus genome. Both the bisulfite sequencing...... detection in species with low DNA methylation may serve as a reference for later scientific investigations in other hypomethylated species....

  14. Two novel species of Aspergillus section Nigri from Thai coffee beans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noonim, Paramee; Mahakarnchanakul, Warapa; Varga, Janos; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Samson, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Two novel species of Aspergillus section Nigri from Thai coffee beans are described as Aspergillus aculeatinus sp. nov. and Aspergillus sclerotiicarbonarius sp. nov. Their taxonomic status was determined using a polyphasic taxonomic approach with phenotypic (morphology and extrolite profiles) and...

  15. Two novel species of Aspergillus section Nigri from Thai coffee beans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noonim, Paramee; Mahakarnchanakul, Warapa; Varga, Janos;

    2008-01-01

    Two novel species of Aspergillus section Nigri from Thai coffee beans are described as Aspergillus aculeatinus sp. nov. and Aspergillus sclerotiicarbonarius sp. nov. Their taxonomic status was determined using a polyphasic taxonomic approach with phenotypic (morphology and extrolite profiles...

  16. Phylogeny, identification and nomenclature of the genus Aspergillus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, R.A.; Visagie, C.M.; Houbraken, J.;

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus comprises a diverse group of species based on morphological, physiological and phylogenetic characters, which significantly impact biotechnology, food production, indoor environments and human health. Aspergillus was traditionally associated with nine teleomorph genera, but phylogenetic...... data suggest that together with genera such as Polypaecilum, Phialosimplex, Dichotomomyces and Cristaspora, Aspergillus forms a monophyletic clade closely related to Penicillium. Changes in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants resulted in the move to one name per species......, meaning that a decision had to be made whether to keep Aspergillus as one big genus or to split it into several smaller genera. The International Commission of Penicillium and Aspergillus decided to keep Aspergillus instead of using smaller genera. In this paper, we present the arguments for this decision...

  17. Aspergillus triggers phenazine production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib;

    Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen, commonly infecting cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Aspergilli, especially Aspergillus fumigatus, are also frequently isolated from CF patients. Our aim was to examine the possible interaction between P. aeruginosa and different...... the contact area of A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, but not A. fumigatus. In addition, other metabolites with UV chromophores similar to the phenazines were only found in the contact zone between Aspergillus and Pseudomonas. No change in secondary metabolite profiles were seen for the Aspergilli, when...... comparing with or without the presence of Pseudomonas. Conclusion: All Aspergilli tested, with the exception of A. fumigatus, triggered the upregulation of phenazine-1-carboxamide and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid production by P. aeruginosa. Surprisingly no changes in secondary metabolite profiles were...

  18. Aspergillus species: An emerging pathogen in onychomycosis among diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T M Wijesuriya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Approximately, 33% patients with diabetes are afflicted with onychomycosis. In the past, nondermatophyte molds have been regarded as opportunistic pathogens; recently, Aspergillus species are considered as emerging pathogens of toenail infections. In Sri Lanka, the prevalence of Aspergillus species in onychomycosis among diabetics is not well documented. Objective: To determine the proportion of Aspergillus onychomycosis, risk factors and knowledge among diabetics. Materials and Methods: This was descriptive cross-sectional study. Three hundred diabetic patients were included. Clinical examinations of patients' toenails were performed by a clinical microbiologist. Laboratory identification was done, and pathogens were identified to the species level by morpho-physiological methods. All inferential statistics were tested at P age group. In men, Aspergillus onycomycosis was seen in 82%. Among patients who had Aspergillus nail infection, 114 (63% had diabetes for a period of > years. Among patients who were engaged in agricultural activities, 77% were confirmed to have infected nails due to Aspergillus species. Conclusion: Aspergillus niger was the most common pathogen isolated from toenail infection. Aspergillus species should be considered as an important pathogen in toenail onychomycosis in diabetic patients. Risk factors associated with Aspergillus onychomycosis were age, gender, duration of diabetes, length of exposure to fungi, and occupation.

  19. SYNTHESIS OF COPPER NANOPARTICLES BY ASPERGILLUS SPECIES

    OpenAIRE

    Kantabathini Venkata Pavani; Nandigam Srujana; Guntur Preethi; Tandale Swati

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in the biosynthesis of nanomaterials have demonstrated the important role of microorganisms in nanotechnology. The organisms show a unique potential in environmentally friendly production and accumulation of nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes. The present study proposed a green process for synthesis of copper nanoparticles using Aspergillus species. Syntheses of copper nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy. The extracellular synthesis of co...

  20. SYNTHESIS OF COPPER NANOPARTICLES BY ASPERGILLUS SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kantabathini Venkata Pavani

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in the biosynthesis of nanomaterials have demonstrated the important role of microorganisms in nanotechnology. The organisms show a unique potential in environmentally friendly production and accumulation of nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes. The present study proposed a green process for synthesis of copper nanoparticles using Aspergillus species. Syntheses of copper nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy. The extracellular synthesis of copper nanoparticles was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Transmission electron microscopy.

  1. L-histidine utilization in Aspergillus nidulans.

    OpenAIRE

    Polkinghorne, M A; Hynes, M J

    1982-01-01

    Histidase activity rather than uptake of L-histidine is the limiting factor for the utilization of histidine as the sole nitrogen source for Aspergillus nidulans. Histidine cannot act as the sole carbon source, and evidence is presented indicating that this is attributable to an inability to convert histidine to L-glutamate in vivo. It has been shown that this fungus lacks an active urocanase enzyme and that histidine is quantitatively converted to urocanate, which accumulates in the extracel...

  2. Degradation of melanin by Aspergillus fumigatus.

    OpenAIRE

    Luther, J P; Lipke, H.

    1980-01-01

    A strain of Aspergillus fumigatus from composted coffee and garden wastes utilized natural deproteinized insect, banana, hair, octopus, and synthetic tyrosine and dopa melanins as sole sources of carbon. With a sucrose supplement, degradation was essentially complete after 50 days in Czapek medium pH 6.5 at 30 degrees C. The catabolic rate differed for each substrate pigment, as did the molecular weight distribution of products accumulating in the medium. After incubation with L-[U-14C]melani...

  3. Aspergillus bertholletius sp. nov. from Brazil Nuts

    OpenAIRE

    Taniwaki, Marta H.; Pitt, John I.; Iamanaka, Beatriz T.; Sartori, Daniele; Copetti, Marina V.; Balajee, Arun; Fungaro, Maria Helena P.; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2012-01-01

    During a study on the mycobiota of brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa) in Brazil, a new Aspergillus species, A. bertholletius, was found, and is described here. A polyphasic approach was applied using morphological characters, extrolite data as well as partial beta-tubulin, calmodulin and ITS sequences to characterize this taxon. A. bertholletius is represented by nineteen isolates from samples of brazil nuts at various stages of production and soil close to Bertholletia excelsa trees. The fol...

  4. Pectinolytic activity of Aspergillus section Nigri strains

    OpenAIRE

    Maciel, M. H. C.; Ottoni, C. A.; Santos, C.; Moreira, K.; Lima, Nelson; Motta, Cristina Souza

    2012-01-01

    Pectinases are a heterogeneous group of related enzymes that hydrolyze pectic substances present mostly in plants. Pectinases are produced by plants, fungi, yeasts and bacteria. Filamentous fungi are good producers of pectinolytic enzymes (e.g., exopolygalacturonase (exo-PG) and endopolygalacturonase (endo-PG) and Aspergillus niger is the most commonly used fungal species for industrial production of pectinolytic enzymes. The application of pectinolytic enzymes plays an importa...

  5. Initial intracellular proteome profile of Aspergillus niger biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretty K. Villena

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An initial profiling of the intracellular proteome of Aspergillus niger ATCC 10864 biofilm cultures developed on polyester cloth was carried out by using 2D-PAGE and MS-TOF analysis and it was compared to the proteome of conventionally grown free-living submerged cultures. A number of 2D-PAGE protein spots from both types of cultures were subjected to MS-TOF analysis and data interrogation of the NCBI nr database available for this species. Proteomic maps showed different expression patterns in both culture systems with differentially expressed proteins in each case. In biofilm cultures, 19% and 32% of the selected protein spots were over- expressed and differentially expressed, respectively. On the contrary, in free-living cultures, 44% and 7% of the selected protein spots were over-expressed and differentially expressed, respectively. Although preliminary, results presented in this paper show that there are significant differences between the proteomes of A. niger biofilm and free-living mycelia. It seems that cell adhesion is the most important stimulus responsible for biofilm development which is the basis of Surface Adhesion Fermentation.

  6. Transcriptome analysis of Aspergillus niger grown on sugarcane bagasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldman Gustavo H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering that the costs of cellulases and hemicellulases contribute substantially to the price of bioethanol, new studies aimed at understanding and improving cellulase efficiency and productivity are of paramount importance. Aspergillus niger has been shown to produce a wide spectrum of polysaccharide hydrolytic enzymes. To understand how to improve enzymatic cocktails that can hydrolyze pretreated sugarcane bagasse, we used a genomics approach to investigate which genes and pathways are transcriptionally modulated during growth of A. niger on steam-exploded sugarcane bagasse (SEB. Results Herein we report the main cellulase- and hemicellulase-encoding genes with increased expression during growth on SEB. We also sought to determine whether the mRNA accumulation of several SEB-induced genes encoding putative transporters is induced by xylose and dependent on glucose. We identified 18 (58% of A. niger predicted cellulases and 21 (58% of A. niger predicted hemicellulases cellulase- and hemicellulase-encoding genes, respectively, that were highly expressed during growth on SEB. Conclusions Degradation of sugarcane bagasse requires production of many different enzymes which are regulated by the type and complexity of the available substrate. Our presently reported work opens new possibilities for understanding sugarcane biomass saccharification by A. niger hydrolases and for the construction of more efficient enzymatic cocktails for second-generation bioethanol.

  7. Plant-like biosynthesis of isoquinoline alkaloids in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccile, Joshua A; Spraker, Joseph E; Le, Henry H; Brandenburger, Eileen; Gomez, Christian; Bok, Jin Woo; Macheleidt, Juliane; Brakhage, Axel A; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Keller, Nancy P; Schroeder, Frank C

    2016-06-01

    Natural product discovery efforts have focused primarily on microbial biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) containing large multimodular polyketide synthases and nonribosomal peptide synthetases; however, sequencing of fungal genomes has revealed a vast number of BGCs containing smaller NRPS-like genes of unknown biosynthetic function. Using comparative metabolomics, we show that a BGC in the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus named fsq, which contains an NRPS-like gene lacking a condensation domain, produces several new isoquinoline alkaloids known as the fumisoquins. These compounds derive from carbon-carbon bond formation between two amino acid-derived moieties followed by a sequence that is directly analogous to isoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis in plants. Fumisoquin biosynthesis requires the N-methyltransferase FsqC and the FAD-dependent oxidase FsqB, which represent functional analogs of coclaurine N-methyltransferase and berberine bridge enzyme in plants. Our results show that BGCs containing incomplete NRPS modules may reveal new biosynthetic paradigms and suggest that plant-like isoquinoline biosynthesis occurs in diverse fungi. PMID:27065235

  8. Genomics Portals: integrative web-platform for mining genomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Krishnendu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large amount of experimental data generated by modern high-throughput technologies is available through various public repositories. Our knowledge about molecular interaction networks, functional biological pathways and transcriptional regulatory modules is rapidly expanding, and is being organized in lists of functionally related genes. Jointly, these two sources of information hold a tremendous potential for gaining new insights into functioning of living systems. Results Genomics Portals platform integrates access to an extensive knowledge base and a large database of human, mouse, and rat genomics data with basic analytical visualization tools. It provides the context for analyzing and interpreting new experimental data and the tool for effective mining of a large number of publicly available genomics datasets stored in the back-end databases. The uniqueness of this platform lies in the volume and the diversity of genomics data that can be accessed and analyzed (gene expression, ChIP-chip, ChIP-seq, epigenomics, computationally predicted binding sites, etc, and the integration with an extensive knowledge base that can be used in such analysis. Conclusion The integrated access to primary genomics data, functional knowledge and analytical tools makes Genomics Portals platform a unique tool for interpreting results of new genomics experiments and for mining the vast amount of data stored in the Genomics Portals backend databases. Genomics Portals can be accessed and used freely at http://GenomicsPortals.org.

  9. The Chordate Proteome History Database

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Levasseur; Julien Paganini; Jacques Dainat; Thompson, Julie D; Olivier Poch; Pierre Pontarotti; Philippe Gouret

    2012-01-01

    The chordate proteome history database (http://ioda.univ-provence.fr) comprises some 20,000 evolutionary analyses of proteins from chordate species. Our main objective was to characterize and study the evolutionary histories of the chordate proteome, and in particular to detect genomic events and automatic functional searches. Firstly, phylogenetic analyses based on high quality multiple sequence alignments and a robust phylogenetic pipeline were performed for the whole protein and for each i...

  10. The Adaptive Evolution Database (TAED)

    OpenAIRE

    Liberles, David A; Schreiber, David R.; Govindarajan, Sridhar; Chamberlin, Stephen G.; Steven A Benner

    2001-01-01

    Background The Master Catalog is a collection of evolutionary families, including multiple sequence alignments, phylogenetic trees and reconstructed ancestral sequences, for all protein-sequence modules encoded by genes in GenBank. It can therefore support large-scale genomic surveys, of which we present here The Adaptive Evolution Database (TAED). In TAED, potential examples of positive adaptation are identified by high values for the normalized ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotid...

  11. Bisulfite sequencing reveals that Aspergillus flavus holds a hollow in DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yang Liu

    Full Text Available Aspergillus flavus first gained scientific attention for its production of aflatoxin. The underlying regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis has been serving as a theoretical model for biosynthesis of other microbial secondary metabolites. Nevertheless, for several decades, the DNA methylation status, one of the important epigenomic modifications involved in gene regulation, in A. flavus remains to be controversial. Here, we applied bisulfite sequencing in conjunction with a biological replicate strategy to investigate the DNA methylation profiling of A. flavus genome. Both the bisulfite sequencing data and the methylome comparisons with other fungi confirm that the DNA methylation level of this fungus is negligible. Further investigation into the DNA methyltransferase of Aspergillus uncovers its close relationship with RID-like enzymes as well as its divergence with the methyltransferase of species with validated DNA methylation. The lack of repeat contents of the A. flavus' genome and the high RIP-index of the small amount of remanent repeat potentially support our speculation that DNA methylation may be absent in A. flavus or that it may possess de novo DNA methylation which occurs very transiently during the obscure sexual stage of this fungal species. This work contributes to our understanding on the DNA methylation status of A. flavus, as well as reinforces our views on the DNA methylation in fungal species. In addition, our strategy of applying bisulfite sequencing to DNA methylation detection in species with low DNA methylation may serve as a reference for later scientific investigations in other hypomethylated species.

  12. Characterization of oxylipins and dioxygenase genes in the asexual fungus Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalkhove Stefanie IC

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aspergillus niger is an ascomycetous fungus that is known to reproduce through asexual spores, only. Interestingly, recent genome analysis of A. niger has revealed the presence of a full complement of functional genes related to sexual reproduction 1. An example of such genes are the dioxygenase genes which in Aspergillus nidulans, have been shown to be connected to oxylipin production and regulation of both sexual and asexual sporulation 234. Nevertheless, the presence of sex related genes alone does not confirm sexual sporulation in A. niger. Results The current study shows experimentally that A. niger produces the oxylipins 8,11-dihydroxy octadecadienoic acid (8,11-diHOD, 5,8-dihydroxy octadecadienoic acid (5,8-diHOD, lactonized 5,8-diHOD, 8-hydroxy octadecadienoic acid (8-HOD, 10-hydroxy octadecadienoic acid (10-HOD, small amounts of 8-hydroxy octadecamonoenoic acid (8-HOM, 9-hydroxy octadecadienoic acid (9-HOD and 13-hydroxy octadecadienoic acid (13-HOD. Importantly, this study shows that the A. niger genome contains three putative dioxygenase genes, ppoA, ppoC and ppoD. Expression analysis confirmed that all three genes are indeed expressed under the conditions tested. Conclusion A. niger produces the same oxylipins and has similar dioxygenase genes as A. nidulans. Their presence could point towards the existence of sexual reproduction in A. niger or a broader role for the gene products in physiology, than just sexual development.

  13. Systemic analysis of the response of Aspergillus niger to ambient pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Lehmann, Linda Olkjær; Nielsen, Jens

    2009-01-01

    highly efficient acidification as well as production process applicable knowledge on the transcriptional regulation of pH response in the industrially important A. niger. It has also made clear that filamentous fungi have evolved to employ several offensive strategies for out-competing rival organisms.......Background: The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is an exceptionally efficient producer of organic acids, which is one of the reasons for its relevance to industrial processes and commercial importance. While it is known that the mechanisms regulating this production are tied to the levels of...... ambient pH, the reasons and mechanisms for this are poorly understood. Methods: To cast light on the connection between extracellular pH and acid production, we integrate results from two genome-based strategies: A novel method of genome-scale modeling of the response, and transcriptome analysis across...

  14. Stackfile Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    deVarvalho, Robert; Desai, Shailen D.; Haines, Bruce J.; Kruizinga, Gerhard L.; Gilmer, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This software provides storage retrieval and analysis functionality for managing satellite altimetry data. It improves the efficiency and analysis capabilities of existing database software with improved flexibility and documentation. It offers flexibility in the type of data that can be stored. There is efficient retrieval either across the spatial domain or the time domain. Built-in analysis tools are provided for frequently performed altimetry tasks. This software package is used for storing and manipulating satellite measurement data. It was developed with a focus on handling the requirements of repeat-track altimetry missions such as Topex and Jason. It was, however, designed to work with a wide variety of satellite measurement data [e.g., Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment -- GRACE). The software consists of several command-line tools for importing, retrieving, and analyzing satellite measurement data.

  15. Clonality and sex impact aflatoxigenicity in Aspergillus populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species in Aspergillus section Flavi commonly infect agricultural staples such as corn, peanuts, cottonseed, and tree nuts and produce an array of mycotoxins, the most potent of which are aflatoxins. Aspergillus flavus is the dominant aflatoxin-producing species in the majority of crops. Populatio...

  16. The current status of species recognition and identification in Aspergillus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genus Aspergillus is a large economically important genus of fungi. In agriculture, some of the 250 species in this genus cause disease in plants and animals and some also produce poisons (mycotoxins) in foods and feeds. Aspergillus is a major killer of immunosuppressed people, such as diabeti...

  17. Aspergillus fumigatus conidial melanin modulates host cytokine response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.Y.A. Chai (Louis); M.G. Netea (Mihai); J. Sugui (Janyce); A.G. Vonk (Alieke); W.W.J. van de Sande (Wendy); A. Warris (Adilia); K.J. Kwon-Chung (Kyung); B. Jan Kullberg (Bart)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMelanin biopigments have been linked to fungal virulence. Aspergillus fumigatus conidia are melanised and are weakly immunogenic. We show that melanin pigments on the surface of resting Aspergillus fumigatus conidia may serve to mask pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs)-induced

  18. Phylogeny, identification and nomenclature of the genus Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, R A; Visagie, C M; Houbraken, J; Hong, S-B; Hubka, V; Klaassen, C H W; Perrone, G; Seifert, K A; Susca, A; Tanney, J B; Varga, J; Kocsubé, S; Szigeti, G; Yaguchi, T; Frisvad, J C

    2014-06-01

    Aspergillus comprises a diverse group of species based on morphological, physiological and phylogenetic characters, which significantly impact biotechnology, food production, indoor environments and human health. Aspergillus was traditionally associated with nine teleomorph genera, but phylogenetic data suggest that together with genera such as Polypaecilum, Phialosimplex, Dichotomomyces and Cristaspora, Aspergillus forms a monophyletic clade closely related to Penicillium. Changes in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants resulted in the move to one name per species, meaning that a decision had to be made whether to keep Aspergillus as one big genus or to split it into several smaller genera. The International Commission of Penicillium and Aspergillus decided to keep Aspergillus instead of using smaller genera. In this paper, we present the arguments for this decision. We introduce new combinations for accepted species presently lacking an Aspergillus name and provide an updated accepted species list for the genus, now containing 339 species. To add to the scientific value of the list, we include information about living ex-type culture collection numbers and GenBank accession numbers for available representative ITS, calmodulin, β-tubulin and RPB2 sequences. In addition, we recommend a standard working technique for Aspergillus and propose calmodulin as a secondary identification marker. PMID:25492982

  19. Effect of serum components on biofilm formation by Aspergillus fumigatus and other Aspergillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuren, Tuya; Toyotome, Takahito; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Muraosa, Yasunori; Yahiro, Maki; Wang, Dan-Ni; Watanabe, Akira; Taguchi, Hideaki; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm production by microorganisms is critical for their pathogenicity. Serum promotes biofilm production by Aspergillus fumigatus; however, its effects on other Aspergillus spp. have not been reported. We analyzed biofilm formation by five Aspergillus spp., i.e., A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. nidulans, A. niger, and A. terreus, and examined the effects of serum/serum proteins such as fetal bovine serum (FBS), fetuin A, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) on hyphal growth, hyphal branching, and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation. The antifungal susceptibility of A. fumigatus isolates that formed biofilms was also examined. All serum/serum proteins promoted the growth of all these fungal species; growth promotion was most evident with FBS, followed by fetuin A and BSA. This effect was most evident in case of A. fumigatus and least evident in case of A. terreus. Electron microscopy showed thick ECM layers surrounding fungal cell walls after culture with FBS, particularly in A. fumigatus. An increase in hyphal branching caused by fetuin A was the highest in case of A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. Biofilm-forming A. fumigatus showed resistance to most antifungal agents, although a synergism of micafungin and amphotericin B was suggested. Our results indicate that serum promotes biofilm formation, including thick ECM, by many Aspergillus spp., particularly A. fumigatus, and that this may be closely related to its virulence. PMID:24858605

  20. Aspergillus brasiliensis sp. nov., a biseriate black Aspergillus species with world-wide distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varga, János; Kocsubé, Sándor; Tóth, Beáta;

    2007-01-01

    to produce ochratoxin A, kotanins, funalenone or pyranonigrins. The novel species was most closely related to A. niger, and was isolated from soil from Brazil, Australia, USA and The Netherlands, and from grape berries from Portugal. The type strain of Aspergillus brasiliensis sp. nov. is CBS 101740...

  1. Data Management for High-Throughput Genomics

    CERN Document Server

    Roehm, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Today's sequencing technology allows sequencing an individual genome within a few weeks for a fraction of the costs of the original Human Genome project. Genomics labs are faced with dozens of TB of data per week that have to be automatically processed and made available to scientists for further analysis. This paper explores the potential and the limitations of using relational database systems as the data processing platform for high-throughput genomics. In particular, we are interested in the storage management for high-throughput sequence data and in leveraging SQL and user-defined functions for data analysis inside a database system. We give an overview of a database design for high-throughput genomics, how we used a SQL Server database in some unconventional ways to prototype this scenario, and we will discuss some initial findings about the scalability and performance of such a more database-centric approach.

  2. Two novel aflatoxin-producing Aspergillus species from Argentinean peanuts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pildain, M.B.; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Vaamonde, G.; Cabral, D.; Varga, J.; Samson, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    (morphology and extrolite profiles) and molecular (beta-tubulin and calmodulin gene sequences) characters. A. minisclerotigenes resembles Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parvisclerotigenus in producing aflatoxins B-1 and B-2, cyclopiazonic acid, kojic acid and aspergillic acid, but in addition it produces......Two novel species from Aspergillus section Flavi from different species of Arachis (peanuts) in Argentina are described as Aspergillus arachidicola sp. nov. and Aspergillus minisclerotigenes sp. nov. Their novel taxonomic status was determined using a polyphasic taxonomic approach with phenotypic...... aflatoxins G(1) and G(2), aflavarins, aflatrem, aflavinines, parasiticolides and paspaline. This species also includes several isolates previously assigned to A. flavus group II and three Australian soil isolates. A. arachidicola produces aflatoxins B-1, B-2, G(1) and G(2), kojic acid, chrysogine and...

  3. CottonDB: A resource for cotton genome research

    Science.gov (United States)

    CottonDB (http://cottondb.org/) is a database and web resource for cotton genomic and genetic research. Created in 1995, CottonDB was among the first plant genome databases established by the USDA-ARS. Accessed through a website interface, the database aims to be a convenient, inclusive medium of ...

  4. Cloning and Characterization of the Aspergillus ochraceoroseus Aflatoxin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Production of the carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B1 has been reported from members of Aspergillus section Flavi, Aspergillus section Nidulantes, and a newly proposed section, Aspergillus section Ochraceorosei that consists of Aspergillus ochraceoroseus and the closely related A. rambellii. A. och...

  5. Aspergillus bertholletius sp. nov. from Brazil Nuts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taniwaki, Marta H.; Pitt, John I.; Iamanaka, Beatriz T.;

    2012-01-01

    During a study on the mycobiota of brazil nuts (Bertholletia excelsa) in Brazil, a new Aspergillus species, A. bertholletius, was found, and is described here. A polyphasic approach was applied using morphological characters, extrolite data as well as partial beta-tubulin, calmodulin and ITS...... sequences to characterize this taxon. A. bertholletius is represented by nineteen isolates from samples of brazil nuts at various stages of production and soil close to Bertholletia excelsa trees. The following extrolites were produced by this species: aflavinin, cyclopiazonic acid, kojic acid, tenuazonic...

  6. Suppression of Aspergillus by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Britt Guillaume; Jelsbak, Lars; Søndergaard, Ib;

    suppressed growth of A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. flavus, A. oryzae, A. terreus and E. nidulans. HPLC and LC-DAD-MS results showed an increase in phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and phenazine-1-carboxamide production by P. aeruginosa in the contact area of Aspergillus. Different quinolones were also identified......, here among 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (PQS). An unidentified green pseudomonas compound was also observed. Interestingly the P. aeruginosa mutant rpoN was unable to suppress A. fumigatus, but suppressed A. flavus, A. oryzae and A. niger. However several other P. aeruginosa mutants suppressed A...

  7. Production of amylases by Aspergillus tamarii

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira Fabiana Guillen; Lima Francieli Arrias de; Pedrinho Sophia Renata Fazzano; Lenartovicz Veridiana; Souza Cristina Giatti Marques de; Peralta Rosane Marina

    1999-01-01

    A strain of Aspergillus tamarii, a filamentous fungus isolated from soil, was able to produce both a-amylase and glucoamylase activities in mineral media supplemented with 1% (w/v) starch or maltose as the carbon source. Static cultivation led to significantly higher yields than those obtained using shaking culture. The production of amylases was tolerant to a wide range of initial culture pH values (from 4 to 10) and temperature (from 25 to 42oC). Two amylases, one a-amylase and one glucoamy...

  8. Aspergillus endophthalmitis in orthotopic liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini Hamid

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we describe a patient with drug-induced liver failure who developed endogenous endophthalmitis after liver transplantation. Our patient′s clinical course was so fulminant that the eye was lost in less than 1 month, without any response to therapy. Recognition of this infection is important because many patients die of disseminated Aspergillus infection, which may be detected early with bedside funduscopic examination by an ophthalmologist. Probably if the patient had referred to us earlier, it may have been possible to save the eye.

  9. BISC: binary subcomplexes in proteins database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juettemann, Thomas; Gerloff, Dietlind L

    2011-01-01

    Binary subcomplexes in proteins database (BISC) is a new protein-protein interaction (PPI) database linking up the two communities most active in their characterization: structural biology and functional genomics researchers. The BISC resource offers users (i) a structural perspective and related information about binary subcomplexes (i.e. physical direct interactions between proteins) that are either structurally characterized or modellable entries in the main functional genomics PPI databases BioGRID, IntAct and HPRD; (ii) selected web services to further investigate the validity of postulated PPI by inspection of their hypothetical modelled interfaces. Among other uses we envision that this resource can help identify possible false positive PPI in current database records. BISC is freely available at http://bisc.cse.ucsc.edu. PMID:21081561

  10. Database development and management

    CERN Document Server

    Chao, Lee

    2006-01-01

    Introduction to Database Systems Functions of a DatabaseDatabase Management SystemDatabase ComponentsDatabase Development ProcessConceptual Design and Data Modeling Introduction to Database Design Process Understanding Business ProcessEntity-Relationship Data Model Representing Business Process with Entity-RelationshipModelTable Structure and NormalizationIntroduction to TablesTable NormalizationTransforming Data Models to Relational Databases .DBMS Selection Transforming Data Models to Relational DatabasesEnforcing ConstraintsCreating Database for Business ProcessPhysical Design and Database

  11. Cloud Database Database as a Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Al Shehri

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing has been the most adoptable technology in the recent times, and the database has alsomoved to cloud computing now, so we will look intothe details of database as a service and its functioning.This paper includes all the basic information aboutthe database as a service. The working of databaseas aservice and the challenges it is facing are discussed with an appropriate. The structure of database incloud computing and its working in collaboration with nodes is observed under database as a service. Thispaper also will highlight the important things to note down before adopting a database as a serviceprovides that is best amongst the other. The advantages and disadvantages of database as a service will letyou to decide either to use database as a service or not. Database as a service has already been adopted bymany e-commerce companies and those companies are getting benefits from this service.

  12. GOVERNING GENETIC DATABASES: COLLECTION, STORAGE AND USE

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbons, Susan M.C.; Kaye, Jane

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to a collection of five papers, published as a special symposium journal issue, under the title: “Governing Genetic Databases: Collection, Storage and Use”. It begins by setting the scene, to provide a backdrop and context for the papers. It describes the evolving scientific landscape around genetic databases and genomic research, particularly within the biomedical and criminal forensic investigation fields. It notes the lack of any clear, coherent or coord...

  13. Scleral buckle infection with aspergillus flavus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouhaimed Manal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To present a case of scleral buckle infection with Aspergillus flavus in a tertiary eye center in Saudi Arabia. Methods: A retrospective case report of a 28-year-old Saudi male who presented with a six-month history of conjunctival injection and discharge from the left eye which had undergone uncomplicated conventional retinal detachment surgery, at the King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in the form of cryopexy, subretinal fluid drainage and scleral buckle (grooved segmental sponge and circumferential band with sleeve for a macula on retinal detachment four years earlier. A diagnosis of infected extruded scleral buckle was made and the buckle was removed. Results: The infected scleral buckle was removed under local anesthesia with administration of sub-conjunctival irrigation of 50 mg solution of Vancomycin, and sub-conjunctival injection of 25mg of Vancomycin. Post operative microbiological studies revealed infection with silver staining of moderate Aspergillus flavus hyphae. Visual acuity of the left eye improved from 20/200 before surgery to 20/60 in the two years follow-up visit. Conclusion: This case report indicates the importance of considering infection with multiple organisms - including fungal ones - in cases of scleral buckle infections in our population.

  14. Databases and their application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Grimm; R.H.W Bradshaw; S. Brewer; S. Flantua; T. Giesecke; A.M. Lézine; H. Takahara; J.W.,Jr Williams

    2013-01-01

    During the past 20 years, several pollen database cooperatives have been established. These databases are now constituent databases of the Neotoma Paleoecology Database, a public domain, multiproxy, relational database designed for Quaternary-Pliocene fossil data and modern surface samples. The poll

  15. Unit 66 - Database Creation

    OpenAIRE

    Unit 61, CC in GIS; National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis (UC Santa Barbara, SUNY at Buffalo, University of Maine)

    1990-01-01

    This unit examines the planning and management issues involved in the physical creation of the database. It describes some issues in database creation, key hardware parameters of the system, partitioning the database for tiles and layers and converting data for the database. It illustrates these through an example from the Flathead National Forest in northwestern Montana, where a resource management database was required.

  16. Aspergillus in the lung: diverse and coincident forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary disease caused by the fungus Aspergillus has traditionally been regarded as belonging to one of the following, apparently distinct, entities: saprophytic aspergilloma; allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA); and invasive aspergillosis (IPA); which may be further categorised as angioinvasive, acute or chronic airway invasive [1]. It is not always obvious that there is overlap between these entities, and that in any given patient more than one Aspergillus-related pathological process can co-exist [2]. The aim of this article is to review the clinical and imaging features of the main categories of Aspergillus-related pulmonary disease and, in particular, to highlight the overlap between them. (orig.)

  17. Pulmonary hypersensitivity to Alternaria and Aspergillus in baker's asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaustermeyer, W B; Bardana, E J; Hale, F C

    1977-05-01

    In two cases of baker's asthma pulmonary hypersensitivity was found to the fungi Alternaria and Aspergillus. Provocative bronchial challenge revealed a dual response; an immediate and an Arthus type hypersensitivity to Aspergillus in the first case. A primary binding assay revealed high titres of anti-Aspergillus antibody in the serum. In the second case intradermal and bronchial challenge suggested an immediate type I hypersensitivity response to Alternaria. The suspected organisms were present in the room air of the bakeries. It is suggested that an immunological response to these airborne fungi may have contributed to the pathogenesis of baker's asthma. PMID:561668

  18. Effect of gamma radiation on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure and mycotoxin production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of gamma radiation (2 kGy) on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure. Moreover, the influence on aflatoxin B1 and ochratoxin A production was also observed. Irradiated A. flavus strain showed a dull orangish colony while control strain showed the typical green color. Minor differences were observed on stipes, metulae and conidia size between control and irradiated A. flavus and A. ochraceus strains. Irradiated fungi showed ultrastructural changes on cell wall, plasmalema and cytoplasm levels. The levels of mycotoxins produced by irradiated strains were two times greater than those produced by control strains. Successive transferences of irradiated strains on malt extract agar allowed the fungus to recuperate morphological characteristics. Although minor changes in the fungal morphology were observed, ultrastructural changes at cell wall level and the increase of mycotoxin production ability were observed. Inappropriate storage of irradiated food and feed would allow the development of potentially more toxicogenic fungal propagules.

  19. Effect of gamma radiation on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure and mycotoxin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, J.; Cavaglieri, L.; Vital, H.; Cristofolini, A.; Merkis, C.; Astoreca, A.; Orlando, J.; Carú, M.; Dalcero, A.; Rosa, C. A. R.

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of gamma radiation (2 kGy) on Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus ochraceus ultrastructure. Moreover, the influence on aflatoxin B 1 and ochratoxin A production was also observed. Irradiated A. flavus strain showed a dull orangish colony while control strain showed the typical green color. Minor differences were observed on stipes, metulae and conidia size between control and irradiated A. flavus and A. ochraceus strains. Irradiated fungi showed ultrastructural changes on cell wall, plasmalema and cytoplasm levels. The levels of mycotoxins produced by irradiated strains were two times greater than those produced by control strains. Successive transferences of irradiated strains on malt extract agar allowed the fungus to recuperate morphological characteristics. Although minor changes in the fungal morphology were observed, ultrastructural changes at cell wall level and the increase of mycotoxin production ability were observed. Inappropriate storage of irradiated food and feed would allow the development of potentially more toxicogenic fungal propagules.

  20. Aspergillus pragensis sp nov discovered during molecular reidentification of clinical isolates belonging to Aspergillus section Candidi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyskova, Pavlina; Hubka, Vit; Kolarik, Miroslav;

    2014-01-01

    The identity of nine clinical isolates recovered from Czech patients and presumptively identified as Aspergillus sp. section Candidi based on colony morphology was revised using sequences of beta-tubulin, calmodulin gene sequence, and internal transcribed spacer rDNA. Six isolates were from...... secondary metabolite analysis was also provided with comparison of metabolite spectrum to other species. Section Candidi now encompasses five species for which a dichotomous key based on colony characteristics is provided. All clinical isolates were tested for susceptibilities to selected antifungal agents...... suspected and proven onychomycosis, one from otitis externa, and two associated with probable invasive aspergillosis. The results showed that one Aspergillus candidus isolate was the cause of otitis externa, and both isolates obtained from sputa of patients with probable invasive aspergillosis were...

  1. Three extracellular dipeptidyl peptidases found in Aspergillus oryzae show varying substrate specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Takuji; Morita, Hiroto; Okamoto, Ayako; Takeuchi, Michio; Kusumoto, Ken-Ichi; Amano, Hitoshi; Ishida, Hiroki; Yamagata, Youhei

    2016-06-01

    Three extracellular dipeptidyl peptidase genes, dppB, dppE, and dppF, were unveiled by sequence analysis of the Aspergillus oryzae genome. We investigated their differential enzymatic profiles, in order to gain an understanding of the diversity of these genes. The three dipeptidyl peptidases were expressed using Aspergillus nidulans as the host. Each recombinant enzyme was purified and subsequently characterized. The enzymes displayed similar optimum pH values, but optimum temperatures, pH stabilities, and substrate specificities varied. DppB was identified as a Xaa-Prolyl dipeptidyl peptidase, while DppE scissile substrates were similar to the substrates for Aspergillus fumigatus DPPV (AfDPPV). DppF was found to be a novel enzyme that could digest both substrates for A. fumigatus DPPIV and AfDPPV. Semi-quantitative PCR revealed that the transcription of dppB in A. oryzae was induced by protein substrates and repressed by the addition of an inorganic nitrogen source, despite the presence of protein substrates. The transcription of dppE depended on its growth time, while the transcription of dppF was not affected by the type of the nitrogen source in the medium, and it started during the early stage of the fungal growth. Based on these results, we conclude that these enzymes may represent the nutrition acquisition enzymes. Additionally, DppF may be one of the sensor peptidases responsible for the detection of the protein substrates in A. oryzae environment. DppB may be involved in nitrogen assimilation control, since the transcription of dppB was repressed by NaNO3, despite the presence of protein substrates. PMID:26846741

  2. A novel fungal fruiting structure formed by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus carbonarius in grape berries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Cristina; Nguyen, Trang Thoaivan; Gubler, Walter Douglas

    2015-09-01

    Sour rot, is a pre-harvest disease that affects many grape varieties. Sour rot symptoms include initial berry cracking and breakdown of berry tissue. This is a disease complex with many filamentous fungi and bacteria involved, but is usually initiated by Aspergillus niger or Aspergillus carbonarius. Usually, by the time one sees the rot there are many other organisms involved and it is difficult to attribute the disease to one species. In this study two species of Aspergillus were shown to produce a previously unknown fruiting structure in infected berries. The nodulous morphology, bearing conidia, suggests them to be an 'everted polymorphic stroma'. This structure forms freely inside the berry pulp and assumes multiple shapes and sizes, sometimes sclerotium-like in form. It is composed of a mass of vegetative hyphae with or without tissue of the host containing spores or fruiting bodies bearing spores. Artificially inoculated berries placed in soil in winter showed the possible overwintering function of the fruiting body. Inoculated berry clusters on standing vines produced fruiting structures within 21 d post inoculation when wounds were made at veraison or after (July-September). Histological studies confirmed that the fruiting structure was indeed fungal tissue. PMID:26321727

  3. Extrolites of Aspergillus fumigatus and Other Pathogenic Species in Aspergillus Section Fumigati

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisvad, Jens C.; Larsen, Thomas O.

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an important opportunistic human pathogen known for its production of a large array of extrolites. Up to 63 species have been described in Aspergillus section Fumigati, some of which have also been reliably reported to be pathogenic, including A. felis, A. fischeri, A. fumigatiaffinis, A. fumisynnematus, A. hiratsukae, A. laciniosus, A. lentulus, A. novofumigatus, A. parafelis, A. pseudofelis, A. pseudoviridinutans, A. spinosus, A. thermomutatus, and A. udagawae. These species share the production of hydrophobins, melanins, and siderophores and ability to grow well at 37°C, but they only share some small molecule extrolites, that could be important factors in pathogenicity. According to the literature gliotoxin and other exometabolites can be contributing factors to pathogenicity, but these exometabolites are apparently not produced by all pathogenic species. It is our hypothesis that species unable to produce some of these metabolites can produce proxy-exometabolites that may serve the same function. We tabulate all exometabolites reported from species in Aspergillus section Fumigati and by comparing the profile of those extrolites, suggest that those producing many different kinds of exometabolites are potential opportunistic pathogens. The exometabolite data also suggest that the profile of exometabolites are highly specific and can be used for identification of these closely related species. PMID:26779142

  4. Model organism databases: essential resources that need the support of both funders and users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Stephen G; Lock, Antonia; Harris, Midori A; Nurse, Paul; Wood, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    Modern biomedical research depends critically on access to databases that house and disseminate genetic, genomic, molecular, and cell biological knowledge. Even as the explosion of available genome sequences and associated genome-scale data continues apace, the sustainability of professionally maintained biological databases is under threat due to policy changes by major funding agencies. Here, we focus on model organism databases to demonstrate the myriad ways in which biological databases not only act as repositories but actively facilitate advances in research. We present data that show that reducing financial support to model organism databases could prove to be not just scientifically, but also economically, unsound. PMID:27334346

  5. Nonfunctionality of Aspergillus sojae aflR in a Strain of Aspergillus parasiticus with a Disrupted aflR Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Tadashi; Chang, Perng-Kuang; Matsushima, Kenichiro; Yu, Jiujiang; Abe, Keietsu; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, Thomas E.; Koyama, Yasuji

    2002-01-01

    Aspergillus sojae belongs to the Aspergillus section Flavi but does not produce aflatoxins. The functionality of the A. sojae aflR gene (aflRs) was examined by transforming it into an ΔaflR strain of A. parasiticus, derived from a nitrate-nonutilizing, versicolorin A (VERA)-accumulating strain. The A. parasiticus aflR gene (aflRp) transformants produced VERA, but the aflRs transformants did not. Even when aflRs was placed under the control of the amylase gene (amyB) promoter of Aspergillus or...

  6. The 2014 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue and an updated NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Suárez, Xosé M; Rigden, Daniel J; Galperin, Michael Y

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 Nucleic Acids Research Database Issue includes descriptions of 58 new molecular biology databases and recent updates to 123 databases previously featured in NAR or other journals. For convenience, the issue is now divided into eight sections that reflect major subject categories. Among the highlights of this issue are six databases of the transcription factor binding sites in various organisms and updates on such popular databases as CAZy, Database of Genomic Variants (DGV), dbGaP, DrugBank, KEGG, miRBase, Pfam, Reactome, SEED, TCDB and UniProt. There is a strong block of structural databases, which includes, among others, the new RNA Bricks database, updates on PDBe, PDBsum, ArchDB, Gene3D, ModBase, Nucleic Acid Database and the recently revived iPfam database. An update on the NCBI's MMDB describes VAST+, an improved tool for protein structure comparison. Two articles highlight the development of the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database: one describes SCOPe, which automates assignment of new structures to the existing SCOP hierarchy; the other one describes the first version of SCOP2, with its more flexible approach to classifying protein structures. This issue also includes a collection of articles on bacterial taxonomy and metagenomics, which includes updates on the List of Prokaryotic Names with Standing in Nomenclature (LPSN), Ribosomal Database Project (RDP), the Silva/LTP project and several new metagenomics resources. The NAR online Molecular Biology Database Collection, http://www.oxfordjournals.org/nar/database/c/, has been expanded to 1552 databases. The entire Database Issue is freely available online on the Nucleic Acids Research website (http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/). PMID:24316579

  7. World Religion Database

    OpenAIRE

    Dekker, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the new database released by Brill entitled World Religion Database (WRD). It compares WRD to other religious demography tools available and rates the database on a 5 point scale.

  8. Apollo2Go: a web service adapter for the Apollo genome viewer to enable distributed genome annotation

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer Klaus FX; Spannagl Manuel; Ernst Rebecca; Klee Kathrin

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Apollo, a genome annotation viewer and editor, has become a widely used genome annotation and visualization tool for distributed genome annotation projects. When using Apollo for annotation, database updates are carried out by uploading intermediate annotation files into the respective database. This non-direct database upload is laborious and evokes problems of data synchronicity. Results To overcome these limitations we extended the Apollo data adapter with a generic, co...

  9. Main-memory database VS Traditional database

    OpenAIRE

    Rehn, Marcus; Sunesson, Emil

    2013-01-01

    There has been a surge of new databases in recent years. Applications today create a higher demand on database performance than ever before. Main-memory databases have come into the market quite recently and they are just now catching a lot of interest from many different directions. Main-memory databases are a type of database that stores all of its data in the primary memory. They provide a big increase in performance to a lot of different applications. This work evaluates the difference in...

  10. Aspergillus antigen testing in bone marrow transplant recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Williamson, E; Oliver, D.; Johnson, E.; Foot, A.; D. Marks; Warnock, D.

    2000-01-01

    Aims—To assess the clinical usefulness of a commercial aspergillus antigen enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis (IA) in bone marrow transplant recipients, and to compare it with a commercial latex agglutination (LA) test.

  11. Septic arthritis due to tubercular and Aspergillus co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus septic arthritis is a rare and serious medical and surgical problem. It occurs mainly in immunocompromised patients. Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common causative organism followed by Aspergillus flavus. The most common site affected is knee followed by shoulder, ankle, wrist, hip and sacroiliac joint. Debridement and voriconazole are primary treatment of articular aspergilosis. To the best of our knowledge, there are no reported cases of co-infection of tuberculosis (TB and Aspergillus infecting joints. We report a case of co-infection of TB and A. flavus of hip and knee of a 60-year-old male, with type 2 diabetes mellitus. He was treated with debridement, intravenous voriconazole, and antitubercular drugs.

  12. Polyphasic taxonomy of Aspergillus fumigatus and related species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hong, S.B.; Go, S.J.; Shin, H.D.;

    2005-01-01

    The variability within Aspergillus fumigalus Fresenius and related species was examined using macro-, micro-morphology, growth temperature regimes and extrolite patterns. In addition, DNA analyses including partial beta-tubulin, calmodulin and actin gene sequences were used. Detailed examination ...

  13. Nutrient environment influences competition among Aspergillus flavus genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Structures of Aspergillus flavus populations, shaped by intraspecific competition, influence the incidences and severities of crop aflatoxin contamination. Competition for nutrients may be one factor modulating intraspecific interactions, but influences of specific types and concentrations of nutrie...

  14. Aspergillus niger contains the cryptic phylogenetic species A. awamori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrone, Giancarlo; Stea, Gaetano; Epifani, Filomena;

    2011-01-01

    . Phylogenetic analyses of sequences generated from portions of three genes coding for the proteins β-tubulin (benA), calmodulin (CaM), and the translation elongation factor-1 alpha (TEF-1α) of a population of A. niger strains isolated from grapes in Europe revealed the presence of a cryptic phylogenetic species......Aspergillus section Nigri is an important group of species for food and medical mycology, and biotechnology. The Aspergillus niger ‘aggregate’ represents its most complicated taxonomic subgroup containing eight morphologically indistinguishable taxa: A. niger, Aspergillus tubingensis, Aspergillus...... mycotoxins ochratoxin A and fumonisin B2, and they also share the production of pyranonigrin A, tensidol B, funalenone, malformins, and naphtho-γ-pyrones. In addition, sequence analysis of four putative A. awamori strains from Japan, used in the koji industrial fermentation, revealed that none of these...

  15. Collecting Taxes Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Collecting Taxes Database contains performance and structural indicators about national tax systems. The database contains quantitative revenue performance...

  16. USAID Anticorruption Projects Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Anticorruption Projects Database (Database) includes information about USAID projects with anticorruption interventions implemented worldwide between 2007 and...

  17. Developmental characterization and chromosomal mapping of the 5-azacytidine-sensitive fluF locus of Aspergillus nidulans.

    OpenAIRE

    Tamame, M; Antequera, F; Santos, E.

    1988-01-01

    In Aspergillus nidulans, a fungus that possesses negligible, if any, levels of methylation in its genome, low concentrations of 5-azacytidine (5-AC) convert a high percentage of the cell population to fluffy phenotypic variants through a heritable modification of a single nuclear gene (M. Tamame, F. Antequera, J. R. Villanueva, and T. Santos, Mol. Cell. Biol. 3:2287-2297, 1983). This new 5-AC-altered locus, designated here fluF1, was mapped as the closest marker to the centromere that has bee...

  18. Microbial transformation of curcumol by Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Xia; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Qian; Yin, Shi-Yu; Zhang, Zhong; Li, Tian-Xian; Qiu, Feng

    2013-02-01

    Curcumol is a representative index component for the quality control of the essential oil of Curcuma wenyujin Y.H. Chen et C. Ling, an antivirus and anticancer drug in China. Microbial transformation of curcumol (1) by Aspergillus niger AS 3.739 yielded two products. Their structures were elucidated as 3alpha-hydroxycurcumol (2) and 3alpha-(4'-methoxy-succinyloxy)-curcumol (3) by extensive spectroscopic methods including 2D-NMR and HRESI-MS. Among them, 3 is a new compound. Esterification of the substrate with succinic acid is a novel reaction in the field of microbial transformation of natural products. Compound 2, the major transformation product of 1, was a high regio- and stereo-specific hydroxylation product and showed significant antiviral effects. PMID:23513713

  19. Synthesis of lead nanoparticles by Aspergillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavani, K V; Kumar, N Sunil; Sangameswaran, B B

    2012-01-01

    In the context of the current demand to develop green technologies in material synthesis, a natural process in the synthesis of lead particles by Aspergillus species to suit such technology is reported. The fungal strain was grown in medium containing different concentrations of lead (0.2-1.5 mM) to determine its resistance to heavy metals. The organism was found to utilize some mechanism and accumulate lead particles outside and inside the cell. The extracellular presence of lead particles in the range of 1.77-5.8 microm was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The presence of particles of lead in the 5-20 nm size range was found on the cell surface, in the periplasmic space and in the cytoplasm and was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. PMID:22708348

  20. Production of amylases by Aspergillus tamarii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira Fabiana Guillen

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A strain of Aspergillus tamarii, a filamentous fungus isolated from soil, was able to produce both a-amylase and glucoamylase activities in mineral media supplemented with 1% (w/v starch or maltose as the carbon source. Static cultivation led to significantly higher yields than those obtained using shaking culture. The production of amylases was tolerant to a wide range of initial culture pH values (from 4 to 10 and temperature (from 25 to 42oC. Two amylases, one a-amylase and one glucoamylase, were separated by ion exchange chromatography. Both partially purified enzymes had optimal activities at pH values between 4.5 and 6.0 and were stable under acid conditions (pH 4.0-7.0. The enzymes exhibited optimal activities at temperatures between 50o and 60o C and were stable for more than ten hours at 55oC.

  1. BISC: Binary SubComplexes in proteins database

    OpenAIRE

    Juettemann, Thomas; Gerloff, Dietlind L

    2010-01-01

    Binary subcomplexes in proteins database (BISC) is a new protein–protein interaction (PPI) database linking up the two communities most active in their characterization: structural biology and functional genomics researchers. The BISC resource offers users (i) a structural perspective and related information about binary subcomplexes (i.e. physical direct interactions between proteins) that are either structurally characterized or modellable entries in the main functional genomics PPI databas...

  2. Genomic Prediction from Whole Genome Sequence in Livestock: The 1000 Bull Genomes Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayes, Benjamin J; MacLeod, Iona M; Daetwyler, Hans D;

    Advantages of using whole genome sequence data to predict genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) include better persistence of accuracy of GEBV across generations and more accurate GEBV across breeds. The 1000 Bull Genomes Project provides a database of whole genome sequenced key ancestor bulls......, for imputing sequence variant genotypes into reference sets for genomic prediction. Run 3.0 included 429 sequences, with 31.8 million variants detected. BayesRC, a new method for genomic prediction, addresses some challenges associated with using the sequence data, and takes advantage of biological...... information. In a dairy data set, predictions using BayesRC and imputed sequence data from 1000 Bull Genomes were 2% more accurate than with 800k data. We could demonstrate the method identified causal mutations in some cases. Further improvements will come from more accurate imputation of sequence variant...

  3. HERVd: database of human endogenous retroviruses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pačes, Jan; Pavlíček, Adam; Pačes, Václav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 1 (2002), s. 205-206. ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A079; GA ČR GA301/99/M023 Keywords : HERV * database * human genome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.051, year: 2002

  4. Studies on Aspergillus Flavus Link. Isolated From Maize in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Houshyar-Fard Mahmoud; Rouhani Hamid; Falahati-Rastegar Mahrokh; Mahdikhani-Moghaddam Esmat; Malekzadeh-Shafaroudi Saeed; Probst Claudia

    2014-01-01

    The Aspergillus flavus population structure from maize kernels was examined. During 2011, samples were collected from two main grain maize production areas in Iran (Fars and Ardebil provinces), shortly before harvest. One-hundred nine A. flavus isolates were recovered on Dichloran Rose Bengal Chloramphenicole (DRBC) agar and Aspergillus flavus/parasiticus medium (AFPA) and grouped into morphotypes and Vegetative Compatibility Groups (VCGs) based on morphological (e.g. sclerotia production), p...

  5. New ochratoxin A producing species of Aspergillus section Circumdati

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jens Christian; Frank, J.M.; Houbraken, J.A.M.P.; Kuijpers, A.F.A.; Samson, R.A.

    Aspergillus section Circumdati contains species with yellow to ochre conidia and non-black sclerotia that produce at least one of the following extrolites: ochratoxins, penicillic acids, xanthomegnins or melleins. The exception to this is A. robustus, which produces black sclerotia, phototropic...... A: Aspergillus cretensis, A. flocculosus, A. pseudoelegans, A. roseoglobulosus, A. westerdijkiae, A. sulphurous, and Neopetromyces muricatus. Two species produce large or small amounts of ochratoxin A, but less consistently: A. ochraceus and A. sclerotiorum. Ochratoxin production in these species...

  6. Significance and occurrence of fumonisins from Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    Mogensen, Jesper Mølgaard; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2012-01-01

    Fumonisins is a well-studied group of mycotoxins, mainly produced in maize by Fusarium species. However with the recent discovery of a fumonisin production by Aspergillus niger, other food commodities are at risk, since A. niger is a ubiquitous contaminant of many food and feed products. The objective of this thesis was to determine the significance and occurrence of fumonisins from Aspergillus niger in food, the frequency of fumonisin production in A. niger isolates, as well as studies of th...

  7. Aspergillus Mycoviruses Are Targets and Suppressors of RNA Silencing▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Hammond, T. M.; Andrewski, M. D.; Roossinck, M J; Keller, N P

    2007-01-01

    RNA silencing can function as a virus defense mechanism in a diverse range of eukaryotes, and many viruses are capable of suppressing the silencing machinery targeting them. However, the extent to which this occurs between fungal RNA silencing and mycoviruses is unclear. Here, three Aspergillus dsRNA mycoviruses were partially characterized, and their relationship to RNA silencing was investigated. Aspergillus virus 1816 is related to Agaricus bisporus white button mushroom virus 1 and suppre...

  8. Aspergillus fumigatus Conidial Melanin Modulates Host Cytokine Response

    OpenAIRE

    Chai, Louis; Netea, Mihai; SUGUI, JANYCE; Vonk, Alieke; van de Sande, Wendy; Warris, Adilia; Kwon-Chung, Kyung; Jan Kullberg, Bart

    2009-01-01

    textabstractMelanin biopigments have been linked to fungal virulence. Aspergillus fumigatus conidia are melanised and are weakly immunogenic. We show that melanin pigments on the surface of resting Aspergillus fumigatus conidia may serve to mask pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs)-induced cytokine response. The albino conidia induced significantly more proinflammatory cytokines in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), as compared to melanised wild-type conidia. Blocking ...

  9. Immobilization of Isolated Lipase From Moldy Copra (Aspergillus Oryzae)

    OpenAIRE

    Seniwati

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme immobilization is a recovery technique that has been studied in several years, using support as a media to help enzyme dissolutions to the reaction substrate. Immobilization method used in this study was adsorption method, using specific lipase from Aspergillus oryzae. Lipase was partially purified from the culture supernatant of Aspergillus oryzae. Enzyme was immobilized by adsorbed on silica gel. Studies on free and immobilized lipase systems for determination of op...

  10. Immobilization of Isolated Lipase From Moldy Copra (Aspergillus Oryzae)

    OpenAIRE

    Seniwati Dali; A. B. D. Rauf Patong; M.Noor Jalaluddin; Pirman; Baharuddin Hamzah

    2011-01-01

    Enzyme immobilization is a recovery technique that has been studied in several years, using support as a media to help enzyme dissolutions to the reaction substrate. Immobilization method used in this study was adsorption method, using specific lipase from Aspergillus oryzae. Lipase was partially purified from the culture supernatant of Aspergillus oryzae. Enzyme was immobilized by adsorbed on silica gel. Studies on free and immobilized lipase systems for determination of optimum pH, optimum ...

  11. Accessory enzymes from Aspergillus involved in xylan and pectin degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Vries, de, G.

    1999-01-01

    The xylanolytic and pectinolytic enzyme systems from Aspergillus have been the subject of study for many years. Although the main chain cleaving enzymes and their encoding genes have been studied in detail, little information is available about most of the accessory enzymes and their corresponding genes. This thesis describes the purification and characterisation of two accessory enzymes from Aspergillus , feruloyl esterase A (FaeA) andα-glucuronidase A (AguA), and the activities of these enz...

  12. Utilization of Low-Cost Ellagitannins for Ellagic Acid Production and Antimicrobial Phenolics Enhancing By Aspergillus awamorii and Aspergillus oryzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three fungal strains, Aspergillus awamorii A9, Aspergillus awamorii A23 and Aspergillus oryzae O2, were selected out of ten fungal strains for their activeness in converting pomegranate peel ellagitannins into ellagic acid. When pomegranate peel was fermented by Aspergillus awamorii A9, the highest yields of ellagic acid (7.93±0.23 mg/g solid substrate) and total soluble phenolics (14.61±0.36 mg/g solid substrate) were produced at 5 and 10 days of incubation, respectively. Also, blue berry pomace, red grape pomace, strawberry pomace were evaluated as low cost ellagitannin sources for ellagic acid and soluble phenolics production. The antimicrobial activity of soluble phenolics extracted from fermented pomegranate peel and strawberry pomace was tested against two food-borne pathogens (Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium). This study also revealed that 3 kGy enhanced the activity of antimicrobial phenolics

  13. Identification and characterization of the polyketide synthase involved in ochratoxin A biosynthesis in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Antonia; Knox, Benjamin P; Bruno, Kenneth S; Solfrizzo, Michele; Baker, Scott E; Perrone, Giancarlo

    2014-06-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a potent mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium species and is a common contaminant of a wide variety of food commodities, with Aspergillus carbonarius being the main producer of OTA contamination in grapes and wine. The molecular structure of OTA comprises a dihydroisocoumarin ring linked to phenylalanine and, as shown in different producing fungal species, a polyketide synthase (PKS) is a component of the OTA biosynthetic pathway. Similar to observations in other filamentous ascomycetes, the genome sequence of A. carbonarius contains a large number of genes predicted to encode PKSs. In this work a pks gene identified within the putative OTA cluster of A. carbonarius, designated as AcOTApks, was inactivated and the resulting mutant strain was unable to produce OTA, confirming the role of AcOTApks in this biosynthetic pathway. AcOTApks protein is characteristic of the highly reduced (HR)-PKS family, and also contains a putative methyltransferase domain likely responsible for the addition of the methyl group to the OTA polyketide structure. AcOTApks is different from the ACpks protein that we previously described in A. carbonarius, which showed an expression profile compatible with OTA production. We performed phylogenetic analyses of the β-ketosynthase and acyl-transferase domains of the OTA PKSs that had been identified and characterized in different OTA producing fungal species. The phylogenetic results were similar for both domains analyzed and showed that OTA PKS of A. carbonarius, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus ochraceus clustered in a monophyletic group with 100% bootstrap support suggesting a common origin, while the other OTA PKSs analyzed were phylogenetically distant. A quantitative RT-PCR assay monitored AcOTApks expression during fungal growth and concomitant production of OTA by A. carbonarius in synthetic grape medium. A clear correlation between the expression profile of AcOTApks and kinetics of OTA production was

  14. Identification and characterization of the polyketide synthase involved in ochratoxin A biosynthesis in Aspergillus carbonarius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, Antonia; Knox, Benjamin P.; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Solfrizzo, Michele; Baker, Scott E.; Perrone, Giancarlo

    2014-06-02

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a potent mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus and Penicillium species and is a common contaminant of a wide variety of food commodities, with Aspergillus carbonarius being the main producer of OTA contamination in grapes and wine. The molecular structure of OTA is composed of a dihydroisocoumarin ring linked to phenylalanine and, as shown in different producing fungal species, a polyketide synthase (PKS) is a component of the OTA biosynthetic pathway. Similar to observations in other filamentous ascomycetes, the genome sequence of A. carbonarius contains a large number of genes predicted to encode PKSs. In this work a pks gene identified within the putative OTA cluster of A. carbonarius, designated as AcOTApks, was inactivated and the resulting mutant strain was unable to produce OTA, confirming the role of AcOTApks in this biosynthetic pathway. AcOTApks protein is characteristic of the highly reduced (HR)-PKS family, and also contains a putative methyltransferase domain likely responsible for the addition of the methyl group to the OTA polyketide structure. AcOTApks is different from the ACpks protein that we previously described which showed an expression profile compatible with OTA production. We performed phylogenetic analyses of the β-ketosynthase and acyl-transferase domains of the OTA PKSs which had been identified and characterized in different OTA producing fungal species. The phylogenetic results were similar for both the two domains analyzed and showed that OTA PKS of A. carbonarius, Aspergillus niger, and Aspergillus ochraceus clustered in a monophyletic group with 100% bootstrap support suggesting a common origin, while the other OTA PKSs analyzed were phylogenetically distant. A qRT-PCR assay monitored AcOTApks expression during fungal growth and concomitant production of OTA by A. carbonarius in synthetic grape medium. A clear correlation between the expression profile of AcOTApks and kinetics of OTA production was observed with

  15. Human protein reference database--2006 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Gopa R; Suresh, M; Kumaran, K; Kannabiran, N; Suresh, Shubha; Bala, P; Shivakumar, K; Anuradha, N; Reddy, Raghunath; Raghavan, T Madhan; Menon, Shalini; Hanumanthu, G; Gupta, Malvika; Upendran, Sapna; Gupta, Shweta; Mahesh, M; Jacob, Bincy; Mathew, Pinky; Chatterjee, Pritam; Arun, K S; Sharma, Salil; Chandrika, K N; Deshpande, Nandan; Palvankar, Kshitish; Raghavnath, R; Krishnakanth, R; Karathia, Hiren; Rekha, B; Nayak, Rashmi; Vishnupriya, G; Kumar, H G Mohan; Nagini, M; Kumar, G S Sameer; Jose, Rojan; Deepthi, P; Mohan, S Sujatha; Gandhi, T K B; Harsha, H C; Deshpande, Krishna S; Sarker, Malabika; Prasad, T S Keshava; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2006-01-01

    Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) (http://www.hprd.org) was developed to serve as a comprehensive collection of protein features, post-translational modifications (PTMs) and protein-protein interactions. Since the original report, this database has increased to >20 000 proteins entries and has become the largest database for literature-derived protein-protein interactions (>30 000) and PTMs (>8000) for human proteins. We have also introduced several new features in HPRD including: (i) protein isoforms, (ii) enhanced search options, (iii) linking of pathway annotations and (iv) integration of a novel browser, GenProt Viewer (http://www.genprot.org), developed by us that allows integration of genomic and proteomic information. With the continued support and active participation by the biomedical community, we expect HPRD to become a unique source of curated information for the human proteome and spur biomedical discoveries based on integration of genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic data. PMID:16381900

  16. Biosynthetic Pathway of the Reduced Polyketide Product Citreoviridin in Aspergillus terreus var. aureus Revealed by Heterologous Expression in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Shyang; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Wang, Clay C C

    2016-03-18

    Citreoviridin (1) belongs to a class of F1-ATPase β-subunit inhibitors that are synthesized by highly reducing polyketide synthases. These potent mycotoxins share an α-pyrone polyene structure, and they include aurovertin, verrucosidin, and asteltoxin. The identification of the citreoviridin biosynthetic gene cluster in Aspergillus terreus var. aureus and its reconstitution using heterologous expression in Aspergillus nidulans are reported. Two intermediates were isolated that allowed the proposal of the biosynthetic pathway of citreoviridin. PMID:26954888

  17. A new highly efficient beta-glucosidase from the novel species, Aspergillus saccharolyticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Annette

    stream of a cellulosic ethanol production was explored as enzyme production medium, finding Aspergillus niger as well as an unidentified strain AP as promising candidates for the utilization of the filter cake for growth and enzyme production. The filter cake inoculated with the respective fungi could...... of pretreated biomass. The Michaelis Menten kinetics affinity constants of strain AP extract and Novozym 188 were approximately the same, and the two preparations performed equally well in cellobiose hydrolysis with regard to product inhibition. However, the extract of strain AP showed higher specific activity...... differed significantly from other known aspergilli in section Nigri, as several well-known compounds from this series were not present, and the peaks detected did not match the approximately 13500 fungal extrolites in the natural product chemist’s database, Antibase2010. Genotypic analysis of the ITS...

  18. Increase in mitotic recombination in diploid cells of Aspergillus nidulans in response to ethidium bromide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia C.A. Becker

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethidium bromide (EB is an intercalating inhibitor of topoisomerase II and its activities are related to chemotherapeutic drugs used in anti-cancer treatments. EB promotes several genotoxic effects in exposed cells by stabilising the DNA-enzyme complex. The recombinagenic potential of EB was evaluated in our in vivo study by the loss of heterozygosity of nutritional markers in diploid Aspergillus nidulans cells through Homozygotization Index (HI. A DNA repair mutation, uvsZ and a chromosome duplication DP (II-I were introduced in the genome of tested cells to obtain a sensitive system for the recombinagenesis detection. EB-treated diploid cells had HI values significantly greater than the control at both concentrations (4.0 x 10-3 and 5.0 x 10-3 mM. Results indicate that the intercalating agent is potentially capable of inducing mitotic crossing-over in diploid A. nidulans cells.

  19. KALIMER database development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KALIMER database is an advanced database to utilize the integration management for liquid metal reactor design technology development using Web applications. KALIMER design database is composed of results database, Inter-Office Communication (IOC), 3D CAD database, and reserved documents database. Results database is a research results database during all phase for liquid metal reactor design technology development of mid-term and long-term nuclear R and D. IOC is a linkage control system inter sub project to share and integrate the research results for KALIMER. 3D CAD database is a schematic overview for KALIMER design structure. And reserved documents database is developed to manage several documents and reports since project accomplishment

  20. Logical database design principles

    CERN Document Server

    Garmany, John; Clark, Terry

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION TO LOGICAL DATABASE DESIGNUnderstanding a Database Database Architectures Relational Databases Creating the Database System Development Life Cycle (SDLC)Systems Planning: Assessment and Feasibility System Analysis: RequirementsSystem Analysis: Requirements Checklist Models Tracking and Schedules Design Modeling Functional Decomposition DiagramData Flow Diagrams Data Dictionary Logical Structures and Decision Trees System Design: LogicalSYSTEM DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION The ER ApproachEntities and Entity Types Attribute Domains AttributesSet-Valued AttributesWeak Entities Constraint