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Sample records for asian phantom results

  1. Magnetic navigation in a coronary phantom: experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Héctor M; Tsuchida, Keiichi; Meulenbrug, Hans; Ong, Andrew T L; Van der Giessen, Willem J; Serruys, Patrick W

    2005-11-01

    The objective was to investigate the efficacy of a magnetic navigation system (MNS) in a coronary phantom. The number of coronary interventional procedures performed is steadily increasing with the availability of new devices to treat more complex lesions. Vessel tortuosity remains an important limiting factor in percutaneous coronary intervention. The MNS can orient the tip of magnetized wire. The coronary phantom is a representation of the coronary tree. Two operators using both a magnetic wire and a standard wire, measured the procedural time (PT), the fluoroscopic time (FT) and the radiation exposure/area product (DAP) required to navigate through to fourteen segments. Ten wire advancements were performed per segment. In all but two segments, the PT was significantly longer using magnetic navigation than using manual navigation. The median FT in the left main artery (LMA) - first septal segment was 7 seconds vs. 18 seconds, with magnetic and manual navigation respectively, (p=0.05); in the LMA - obtuse marginal segment the median FT was 15 seconds with magnetic navigation vs. 29.5 seconds with manual navigation, (p=0.01); in the segment from proximal right coronary artery (RCA1) to the acute marginal branch, the median FT was 8 seconds with magnetic vs. 11 seconds with manual navigation, (p=0.05); and in the RCA1 -posterior descending segment the median FT was 9.5 seconds with magnetic vs. 15 seconds with manual navigation, (p=0.006). The MNS facilitates wire access to distal segments in a coronary phantom, with a reduction in FT and radiation exposure using magnetic navigation in tortuous segments.

  2. Development of a QA Phantom for online image registration and resultant couch shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumugam, S.; Jameson, M.G.; Holloway, L.C.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Purpose Recently our centre purchased an Elekta-Synergy accelerator with kV-CBCT and a hexapod couch attachment. This system allows six degrees of freedom for couch lOp shifts, based on registration of on line imaging. We designed and built a phantom in our centre to test the accuracy and precision of this system. The goal of this project was to investigate the accuracy and practical utilisation of this phantom. Method The phantom was constructed from perspex sheets and high density dental putty (Fig. I). Five high density regions (three small regions to simulate prostate seeds and two larger regions to simulate boney anatomy) were incorporated to test the manual and automatic registrations within the software. The phantom was utilised to test the accuracy and precision of repositioning with the hexapod couch and imaging system. To achieve this, the phantom was placed on the couch at known orientations and the shifts were quantified using the registration of verification and reference image data sets. True shifts and those predicted by the software were compared. Results The geometrical accuracy of the phantom was verified with measurements of the CT scan to be with I mm of the intended geometry. The image registration and resultant couch shifts were found to be accurate within I mm and 0.5 degrees. The phantom was found to be practical and easy to use. Conclusion The presented phantom provides a less expensive and effective alternative to commercially available systems for verifying imaging registration and corresponding six degrees of freedom couch shifts. (author)

  3. SU-G-TeP2-12: IROCHouston and MDAPL SRS Anthropomorphic Phantom Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molineu, A; Kry, S; Alvarez, P; Hernandez, N; Nguyen, T; Followill, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the results of SRS phantom irradiations Methods: Anthropomorphic SRS head phantoms were sent to institutions participating in NCI sponsored SRS clinical trials and institutions interested in verifying SRS treatment delivery. The phantom shell was purchased from Phantom Laboratory and altered to house dosimetry and imaging inserts. The imaging insert has 1.9 cm diameter spherical target. The dosimetry insert holds two TLD capsules and radiochromic film in the coronal and sagittal planes through the center of the target. Institutions were asked to image, plan and treat the phantom as they would an SRS patient. GammaKnife, CyberKnife and c-arm accelerator institutions were asked to cover the target with 15 Gy, 20 Gy and 25 Gy, respectively. Following these guidelines and typical planning protocols for these three types of machines gives roughly 30 Gy to the center of the target for all units. Submission of the DICOM digital data set was required for analysis. Criteria of 5% for TLD results and 85% of pixels passing 5%/3mm gamma analysis were applied beginning in 2013. Results: The phantom was analyzed 269 times between the beginning of 2013 to present. The pass rate is 81%. Nineteen of the irradiation results failed only the TLD criteria, 19 failed only the film criteria and 12 failed both. Irradiations included 32 CyberKnife 23 GammaKnife, 3 TomoTherapy and 211 c-arm units. Planning systems included Eclipse, Ergo, GammaPlan, Hi-Art, iPlan, Monaco, MultiPlan, Pinnacle, RayStation, XiO and XKnife. Irradiations that were not accompanied with DICOM data were not included in this analysis. Conclusion: The phantom is a valuable end-to-end test used to independently verify the accuracy of SRS treatment delivery. This investigation was supported by IROC grant CA180803 awarded by the NCI.

  4. TU-G-BRD-05: Results From Multi-Institutional Measurements with An Anthropomorphic Spine Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molineu, A; Hernandez, N; Alvarez, P; Followill, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the results from an anthropomorphic spine phantom used for credentialing institutions for National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored clinical trial. Methods: An anthropomorphic phantom that contains left and right lungs, a heart, an esophagus, spinal cord, bony material and a PTV was sent to institutions wishing to be credentialed for NCI trials. The PTV holds 4 TLD and radiochromic film in the axial and sagittal planes. The heart holds one TLD. Institutions created IMRT plans to cover ≥90% of the PTV with 6 Gy and limit the cord dose to <0.35cc receiving 3.75 Gy and <1.2cc receiving 2.63 Gy. They were instructed to treat the phantom as they would a patient, including making plan specific IMRT/SBRT QA measurements before treatment. The TLD results in the PTV were required to be within ±7% of the plan dose. A gamma calculation was performed using the film results and the submitted DICOM plan. ≥85% of the analyzed region was required to pass a 5%/3 mm criteria. Results: 176 institutions irradiated the spine phantom for a total of 255 results. The pass rate was 73% (187 irradiations) overall. 44 irradiations failed only the gamma criteria, 2 failed only the dose criteria and 22 failed both. The most used planning systems were Eclipse (116) and Pinnacle (52) and they had pass rates of 76% and 71%, respectively. The AAA algorithm had a pass rate of 77% while superposition type algorithms had a 71% pass rate. The average TLD measurement to institution calculation ratio was 0.99 (0.04 std dev.). The average percent pixels passing the gamma criteria for films was 89% (12% std dev.) Conclusion: Results show that this phantom is an important part of credentialing and that we have room for improvement in IMRT/SBRT spine treatments. This work was supported by PHS CA180803 and CA037422 awarded by NCI, DHHS

  5. Investigation of partial volume effect in different PET/CT systems: a comparison of results using the madeira phantom and the NEMA NU-2 2001 phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipiga, L.; Sydoff, M.; Zvonova, I.; Bernhardsson, C.

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) is a quantitative technique used for diagnosing various diseases and for monitoring treatment response for different types of tumours. However, the accuracy of the data is limited by the spatial resolution of the system. In addition, the so-called partial volume effect (PVE) causes a blurring of image structures, which in turn may cause an underestimation of activity of a structure with high-activity content. In this study, a new phantom, MADEIRA (Minimising Activity and Dose with Enhanced Image quality by Radiopharmaceutical Administrations) for activity quantification in PET and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was used to investigate the influence on the PVE by lesion size and tumour-to-background activity concentration ratio (TBR) in four different PET/CT systems. These measurements were compared with data from measurements with the NEMA NU-2 2001 phantom. The results with the MADEIRA phantom showed that the activity concentration (AC) values were closest to the true values at low ratios of TBR (<10) and reduced to 50 % of the actual AC values at high TBR (30-35). For all scanners, recovery of true values became closer to 1 with an increasing diameter of the lesion. The MADEIRA phantom showed good agreement with the results obtained from measurements with the NEMA NU-2 2001 phantom but allows for a wider range of possibilities in measuring image quality parameters. (authors)

  6. Initial quality performance results using a phantom to simulate chest computed radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhogora Wilbroad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a homemade phantom for quantitative quality control in chest computed radiography (CR. The phantom was constructed from copper, aluminium, and polymenthylmethacrylate (PMMA plates as well as Styrofoam materials. Depending on combinations, the literature suggests that these materials can simulate the attenuation and scattering characteristics of lung, heart, and mediastinum. The lung, heart, and mediastinum regions were simulated by 10 mm x 10 mm x 0.5 mm, 10 mm x 10 mm x 0.5 mm and 10 mm x 10 mm x 1 mm copper plates, respectively. A test object of 100 mm x 100 mm and 0.2 mm thick copper was positioned to each region for CNR measurements. The phantom was exposed to x-rays generated by different tube potentials that covered settings in clinical use: 110-120 kVp (HVL=4.26-4.66 mm Al at a source image distance (SID of 180 cm. An approach similar to the recommended method in digital mammography was applied to determine the CNR values of phantom images produced by a Kodak CR 850A system with post-processing turned off. Subjective contrast-detail studies were also carried out by using images of Leeds TOR CDR test object acquired under similar exposure conditions as during CNR measurements. For clinical kVp conditions relevant to chest radiography, the CNR was highest over 90-100 kVp range. The CNR data correlated with the results of contrast detail observations. The values of clinical tube potentials at which CNR is the highest are regarded to be optimal kVp settings. The simplicity in phantom construction can offer easy implementation of related quality control program.

  7. Compound analysis of gallstones using dual energy computed tomography-Results in a phantom model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Ralf W., E-mail: ralfwbauer@aol.co [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Clinic of the Goethe University Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60596 Frankfurt (Germany); Schulz, Julian R., E-mail: julian.schulz@t-online.d [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Clinic of the Goethe University Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60596 Frankfurt (Germany); Zedler, Barbara, E-mail: zedler@em.uni-frankfurt.d [Department of Forensic Medicine, Clinic of the Goethe University Frankfurt, Kennedyallee 104, 60596 Frankfurt (Germany); Graf, Thomas G., E-mail: thomas.gt.graf@siemens.co [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Computed Tomography, Physics and Applications, Siemensstrasse 1, 91313 Forchheim (Germany); Vogl, Thomas J., E-mail: t.vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.d [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Clinic of the Goethe University Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60596 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The potential of dual energy computed tomography (DECT) for the analysis of gallstone compounds was investigated. The main goal was to find parameters, that can reliably define high percentage (>70%) cholesterol stones without calcium components. Materials and methods: 35 gallstones were analyzed with DECT using a phantom model. Stone samples were put into specimen containers filled with formalin. Containers were put into a water-filled cylindrical acrylic glass phantom. DECT scans were performed using a tube voltage/current of 140 kV/83 mAs (tube A) and 80 kV/340 mAs (tube B). ROI-measurements to determine CT attenuation of each sector of the stones that had different appearance on the CT images were performed. Finally, semi-quantitative infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of these sectors was performed for chemical analysis. Results: ROI-measurements were performed in 45 different sectors in 35 gallstones. Sectors containing >70% of cholesterol and no calcium component (n = 20) on FTIR could be identified with 95% sensitivity and 100% specificity on DECT. These sectors showed typical attenuation of -8 {+-} 4 HU at 80 kV and +22 {+-} 3 HU at 140 kV. Even the presence of a small calcium component (<10%) hindered the reliable identification of cholesterol components as such. Conclusion: Dual energy CT allows for reliable identification of gallstones containing a high percentage of cholesterol and no calcium component in this pre-clinical phantom model. Results from in vivo or anthropomorphic phantom trials will have to confirm these results. This may enable the identification of patients eligible for non-surgical treatment options in the future.

  8. Compound analysis of gallstones using dual energy computed tomography-Results in a phantom model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Ralf W.; Schulz, Julian R.; Zedler, Barbara; Graf, Thomas G.; Vogl, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The potential of dual energy computed tomography (DECT) for the analysis of gallstone compounds was investigated. The main goal was to find parameters, that can reliably define high percentage (>70%) cholesterol stones without calcium components. Materials and methods: 35 gallstones were analyzed with DECT using a phantom model. Stone samples were put into specimen containers filled with formalin. Containers were put into a water-filled cylindrical acrylic glass phantom. DECT scans were performed using a tube voltage/current of 140 kV/83 mAs (tube A) and 80 kV/340 mAs (tube B). ROI-measurements to determine CT attenuation of each sector of the stones that had different appearance on the CT images were performed. Finally, semi-quantitative infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of these sectors was performed for chemical analysis. Results: ROI-measurements were performed in 45 different sectors in 35 gallstones. Sectors containing >70% of cholesterol and no calcium component (n = 20) on FTIR could be identified with 95% sensitivity and 100% specificity on DECT. These sectors showed typical attenuation of -8 ± 4 HU at 80 kV and +22 ± 3 HU at 140 kV. Even the presence of a small calcium component (<10%) hindered the reliable identification of cholesterol components as such. Conclusion: Dual energy CT allows for reliable identification of gallstones containing a high percentage of cholesterol and no calcium component in this pre-clinical phantom model. Results from in vivo or anthropomorphic phantom trials will have to confirm these results. This may enable the identification of patients eligible for non-surgical treatment options in the future.

  9. Phantom position dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorson, M.R.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1981-01-01

    Sensitivity of the Hanford dosimeter response to its position relative to the phantom and the neutron source has always been recognized. A thorough investigation was performed to quantify dosimeter response according to: (a) dosimeter position on phantom, (b) dosimeter distance from phantom, and (c) angular relationship of dosimeter relative to neutron source and phantom. Results were obtained for neutron irradiation at several different energies

  10. Optimisation need of dental radiodiagnostic procedures: results of effective dose evaluation from Rando phantom measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borio, R.; Chiocchini, S.; Cicioni, R.; Degli Esposti, P.; Rongoni, A.; Sabatini, P.; Saetta, D.M.S.; Regi, L.; Caprino, G.

    1994-01-01

    Radiological examinations of different types are needed in dental practice both to make a correct diagnosis and to carry out an adequate therapy. Particularly in orthodentic practices, because of the youth of the majority of the patients, an assessment of the detriment to health (through the effective dose equivalent) caused by medical diagnostic exposure to ionising radiation is needed to make decisions about the optimisation of dental radiodiagnostic procedures. Experimental data from measurements on a Rando phantom were collected for the radiological examinations required for dental and for orthodontic practices (with and without protective apron and collar). The results show the effectiveness of the leaded apron and collar in all the examinations carried out, particularly in reducing thyroid dose. (author)

  11. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause in five Asian countries: results from the Pan-Asian REVIVE survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Y; Limpaphayom, K K; Cheng, B; Ho, C M; Sumapradja, K; Altomare, C; Huang, K

    2017-08-01

    The Pan-Asian REVIVE survey aimed to examine women's experiences with genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) and their interactions with health-care professionals (HCPs). Self-completed surveys were administered face-to-face to 5992 women (aged 45-75 years) in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, and Thailand. Of 638 postmenopausal women with GSM symptoms, only 35% were aware of the GSM condition, most of whom first heard of GSM through their physician (32%). The most common symptoms were vaginal dryness (57%) and irritation (43%). GSM had the greatest impact on sexual enjoyment (65%) and intimacy (61%). Only 25% had discussed their GSM symptoms with a HCP, and such discussions were mostly patient-initiated (64%) rather than HCP-initiated (24%). Only 21% had been clinically diagnosed with GSM and only 24% had ever used treatment for their symptoms. Three-quarters of those who had used treatment for GSM had discussed their symptoms with a HCP compared to only 9% of those who were treatment-naïve. GSM is underdiagnosed and undertreated in Asia. As discussion of GSM with HCPs appears to be a factor influencing women's awareness and treatment status, a more active role by HCPs to facilitate early discussions on GSM and its treatment options is needed.

  12. Phantom Pain

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    ... Because this is yet another version of tangled sensory wires, the result can be pain. A number of other factors are believed to contribute to phantom pain, including damaged nerve endings, scar tissue at the site of the amputation and the physical memory of pre-amputation pain in the affected area. ...

  13. Results From the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston's Anthropomorphic Phantoms Used for Proton Therapy Clinical Trial Credentialing

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    Taylor, Paige A., E-mail: pataylor@mdanderson.org; Kry, Stephen F.; Alvarez, Paola; Keith, Tyler; Lujano, Carrie; Hernandez, Nadia; Followill, David S.

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to summarize the findings of anthropomorphic proton phantom irradiations analyzed by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston QA Center (IROC Houston). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 phantoms were irradiated by proton therapy centers participating in clinical trials. The anthropomorphic phantoms simulated heterogeneous anatomy of a head, liver, lung, prostate, and spine. Treatment plans included those for scattered, uniform scanning, and pencil beam scanning beam delivery modalities using 5 different treatment planning systems. For every phantom irradiation, point doses and planar doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and film, respectively. Differences between measured and planned doses were studied as a function of phantom, beam delivery modality, motion, repeat attempt, treatment planning system, and date of irradiation. Results: The phantom pass rate (overall, 79%) was high for simple phantoms and lower for phantoms that introduced higher levels of difficulty, such as motion, multiple targets, or increased heterogeneity. All treatment planning systems overestimated dose to the target, compared to TLD measurements. Errors in range calculation resulted in several failed phantoms. There was no correlation between treatment planning system and pass rate. The pass rates for each individual phantom are not improving over time, but when individual institutions received feedback about failed phantom irradiations, pass rates did improve. Conclusions: The proton phantom pass rates are not as high as desired and emphasize potential deficiencies in proton therapy planning and/or delivery. There are many areas for improvement with the proton phantom irradiations, such as treatment planning system dose agreement, range calculations, accounting for motion, and irradiation of multiple targets.

  14. The impact of audio-visual biofeedback on 4D PET images: Results of a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jaewon; Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Cho, Byungchul; Seo, Youngho; Keall, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Irregular breathing causes motion blurring artifacts in 4D PET images. Audiovisual (AV) biofeedback has been demonstrated to improve breathing regularity. To investigate the hypothesis that, compared with free breathing, motion blurring artifacts are reduced with AV biofeedback, the authors performed the first experimental phantom-based quantification of the impact of AV biofeedback on 4D PET image quality. Methods: The authors acquired 4D PET dynamic phantom images with AV biofeedback and free breathing by moving a phantom programmed with AV biofeedback trained and free breathing respiratory traces of ten healthy subjects. The authors also acquired stationary phantom images for reference. The phantom was cylindrical with six hollow sphere targets (10, 13, 17, 22, 28, and 37 mm in diameter). The authors quantified motion blurring using the target diameter, Dice coefficient and recovery coefficient (RC) metrics to estimate the effect of motion. Results: The average increase in target diameter for AV biofeedback was 0.6±1.6mm(4.7±13%), which was significantly (pbiofeedback was 0.90±0.07, which was significantly (pbiofeedback were consistently higher than those for free breathing and comparable to those for stationary targets. However, for RCs the impact of target sizes was more dominant than that of motion. In addition, the authors observed large variations in the results with respect to target sizes, subject traces and respiratory bins due to partial volume effects and respiratory motion irregularity. Conclusions: The results indicate that AV biofeedback can significantly reduce motion blurring artifacts and may facilitate improved identification and localization of lung tumors in 4D PET images. The results justify proceeding with clinical studies to quantify the impact of AV biofeedback on 4D PET image quality and tumor detectability. PMID:22320815

  15. Non-invasive ultrasound-based temperature imaging for monitoring radiofrequency heating-phantom results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, M J; Varghese, T; Madsen, E L; Zagzebski, J A

    2007-01-01

    Minimally invasive therapies (such as radiofrequency ablation) are becoming more commonly used in the United States for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinomas and liver metastases. Unfortunately, these procedures suffer from high recurrence rates of hepatocellular carcinoma (∼34-55%) or metastases following ablation therapy. The ability to perform real-time temperature imaging while a patient is undergoing radiofrequency ablation could provide a significant reduction in these recurrence rates. In this paper, we demonstrate the feasibility of ultrasound-based temperature imaging on a tissue-mimicking phantom undergoing radiofrequency heating. Ultrasound echo signals undergo time shifts with increasing temperature, which are tracked using 2D correlation-based speckle tracking methods. Time shifts or displacements in the echo signal are accumulated, and the gradient of these time shifts are related to changes in the temperature of the tissue-mimicking phantom material using a calibration curve generated from experimental data. A tissue-mimicking phantom was developed that can undergo repeated radiofrequency heating procedures. Both sound speed and thermal expansion changes of the tissue-mimicking material were measured experimentally and utilized to generate the calibration curve relating temperature to the displacement gradient. Temperature maps were obtained, and specific regions-of-interest on the temperature maps were compared to invasive temperatures obtained using fiber-optic temperature probes at the same location. Temperature elevation during a radiofrequency ablation procedure on the phantom was successfully tracked to within ±0.5 0 C

  16. Pazopanib Maintenance Therapy in East Asian Women With Advanced Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: Results From AGO-OVAR16 and an East Asian Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Weon; Mahner, Sven; Wu, Ling-Ying; Shoji, Tadahiro; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Zhu, Jian-Qing; Takano, Tadao; Park, Sang-Yoon; Kong, Bei-Hua; Wu, Qiang; Wang, Kung-Liahng; Ngan, Hextan Ys; Liu, Ji-Hong; Wei, Li-Hui; Mitrica, Ionel; Zhang, Pingkuan; Crescenzo, Rocco; Wang, Qiong; Cox, Charles J; Harter, Philipp; du Bois, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    The recent phase 3 trial AGO-OVAR16 demonstrated that pazopanib maintenance improved median progression-free survival in patients with ovarian cancer whose disease did not progress during first-line treatment. However, this improvement was not seen in the subset of East Asian patients. The current analysis evaluated the efficacy and safety of pazopanib maintenance in East Asian patients from AGO-OVAR16 and a separate East Asian study. East Asian patients from AGO-OVAR16 (n = 209) and the East Asian study (N = 145) were randomized 1:1 to receive pazopanib 800 mg/d or placebo for up to 24 months. The primary end point for each study was progression-free survival by RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) based on investigator assessment. Clinical and genetics data were analyzed separately by study or pooled according to separate predetermined statistical plans. Pazopanib maintenance had a detrimental effect on median progression-free survival versus placebo in East Asian patients from the combined studies (n = 354; 17.9 vs 21.5 months; hazard ratio, 1.114; 95% confidence interval, 0.818-1.518; P = 0.4928). Pazopanib maintenance showed a disadvantage in overall survival in East Asian patients from AGO-OVAR16 versus placebo (hazard ratio, 1.706; 95% confidence interval, 1.010-2.883; P = 0.0465); overall survival analysis was not performed in the East Asian study because of insufficient event numbers. Pazopanib-treated patients had a significantly higher incidence of grade 3 or higher hypertension (27%) and neutropenia (13%) versus placebo. The treatment effect of maintenance pazopanib in East Asian patients seemed to differ from that in non-Asian patients. In study-specific and pooled analyses, none of the potential factors analyzed could satisfactorily explain the different efficacy results of pazopanib in East Asian patients.

  17. Symbol phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Hongo, Syozo; Takeshita, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    We have developed Japanese phantoms in two procedures for computation of organ doses exposed to internal and/or external radiation sources. One method is to make mathematical phantoms on the basis of ORNL mathematical phantoms. Parameters to specify organs of Japanese mathematical phantom are determined by interpolations of the ORNL data, which define the organs of Caucasian males and females of various ages, i.e. new born, 1, 5, 10, 15 years and adult, with survey data for Japanese physiques. Another procedure is to build 'symbol phantoms' for the Japanese public. The concept and its method of the symbol phantom enables us to make a phantom for an individual when we have all of his transversal section images obtained by a medical imaging device like MRI, and thus we may achieve more realistic phantoms for Japanese public than the mathematical phantoms. Both studies are in progress in NIRS. (author)

  18. Virtual endoscopy of the small bowel: phantom study and preliminary clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogalla, P.; Werner-Rustner, M.; Meiri, N.; Hamm, B.; Huitema, A.; van Est, A.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal scanning technique for lesion detection in a small bowel phantom and to evaluate the virtual endoscopy (VE) technique in patients. A small bowel phantom with a fold thickness of 7 mm and length of 115 cm was prepared with nine round lesions (3 x 1 mm, 2 x 2 mm, 2 x 3 mm, 2 x 4 mm). Spiral CT parameters were 7/7/4, 3/5/2, 3/5/1, 1.5/3/1 (slice thickness/table feed/reconstruction interval). VE was done using volume rendering technique with 1 cm distance between images and 120 viewing angle. Two masked readers were asked to determine the number and location of the lesions. Seven patients underwent an abdominal CT during one breathhold after placement of a duodenal tube and filling of the small bowel with methyl cellulose contrast solution. VE images were compared with the axial slices with respect to detectability of pathology. With the 7/7/4 protocol only the 4-mm lesions were visualised with fuzzy contours. The 3/5/2 protocol showed both 4-mm lesions, one 3-mm lesion and one false positive lesion. The 3/5/1 protocol showed both 4-mm and both 3-mm (one uncertain) lesions with improved sharpness, and no false positive lesions. One 2-mm and one 1-mm lesion were additionally seen with the 1.5/3/1 protocol. Path definition was difficult in sharp turns or kinks in the lumen. In all patients, no difference was found between VE and axial slices for bowel pathology; however, axial slices showed 'outside' information that was not included in VE. We conclude that the 3/5/2 protocol may be regarded as an optimal compromise between lesion detection, coverage during one breathhold, and number of reconstructed images in patients; round lesions of 4 mm in diameter can be detected with high certainty. (orig.)

  19. Double-Eyelid Surgery Using Septoaponeurosis Junctional Thickening Results in Dynamic Fold in Asians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Seok Kim, MD, PhD

    2013-05-01

    Conclusions: The authors introduce a double-eyelid surgery technique using the SAJT. This SAJT fixation technique creates a dynamic double-eyelid fold. Our study showed a high patient satisfaction rate and that the resulting fold mimics the movement of the congenital supratarsal fold in Asians.

  20. Present and future connection of Asian-Pacific Oscillation to large-scale atmospheric circulations and East Asian rainfall: results of CMIP5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Botao; Xu, Ying; Shi, Ying

    2018-01-01

    The summer Asian-Pacific oscillation (APO), one of the major modes of climate variability over the Asian-Pacific sector, has a pronounced effect on variations of large-scale atmospheric circulations and climate. This study evaluated the capability of 30 state-of-the-art climate models among the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) in simulating its association with the atmospheric circulations over the Asian-Pacific region and the precipitation over East Asia. Furthermore, their future connections under the RCP8.5 scenario were examined. The evaluation results show that 5 out of 30 climate models can well capture the observed APO-related features in a comprehensive way, including the strengthened South Asian high (SAH), deepened North Pacific trough (NPT) and northward East Asian jet (EAJ) in the upper troposphere; an intensification of the Asian low and the North Pacific subtropical high (NPSH) as well as a northward shift of the western Pacific subtropical high (WPSH) in the lower troposphere; and a decrease in East Asian summer rainfall (EASR) under the positive APO phase. Based on the five CMIP5 models' simulations, the dynamic linkages of the APO to the SAH, NPT, AL, and NPSH are projected to maintain during the second half of the twenty-first century. However, its connection with the EASR tends to reduce significantly. Such a reduction might result from the weakening of the linkage of the APO to the meridional displacement of the EAJ and WPSH as a response to the warming scenario.

  1. Semi-robotic 6 degree of freedom positioning for intracranial high precision radiotherapy; first phantom and clinical results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flentje Michael

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To introduce a novel method of patient positioning for high precision intracranial radiotherapy. Methods An infrared(IR-array, reproducibly attached to the patient via a vacuum-mouthpiece(vMP and connected to the table via a 6 degree-of-freedom(DoF mechanical arm serves as positioning and fixation system. After IR-based manual prepositioning to rough treatment position and fixation of the mechanical arm, a cone-beam CT(CBCT is performed. A robotic 6 DoF treatment couch (HexaPOD™ then automatically corrects all remaining translations and rotations. This absolute position of infrared markers at the first fraction acts as reference for the following fractions where patients are manually prepositioned to within ± 2 mm and ± 2° of this IR reference position prior to final HexaPOD-based correction; consequently CBCT imaging is only required once at the first treatment fraction. The preclinical feasibility and attainable repositioning accuracy of this method was evaluated on a phantom and human volunteers as was the clinical efficacy on 7 pilot study patients. Results Phantom and volunteer manual IR-based prepositioning to within ± 2 mm and ± 2° in 6DoF was possible within a mean(± SD of 90 ± 31 and 56 ± 22 seconds respectively. Mean phantom translational and rotational precision after 6 DoF corrections by the HexaPOD was 0.2 ± 0.2 mm and 0.7 ± 0.8° respectively. For the actual patient collective, the mean 3D vector for inter-treatment repositioning accuracy (n = 102 was 1.6 ± 0.8 mm while intra-fraction movement (n = 110 was 0.6 ± 0.4 mm. Conclusions This novel semi-automatic 6DoF IR-based system has been shown to compare favourably with existing non-invasive intracranial repeat fixation systems with respect to handling, reproducibility and, more importantly, intra-fraction rigidity. Some advantages are full cranial positioning flexibility for single and fractionated IGRT treatments and possibly increased patient

  2. Initial results from the StratoClim aircraft campaign in the Asian Monsoon in summer 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rex, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Asian Monsoon System is one of the Earth's largest and most energetic weather systems. Monsoon rainfall is critical to feeding over a billion people in Asia and the monsoon circulation affects weather patterns over the entire northern hemisphere. The Monsoon also acts like an enormous elevator, pumping vast amounts of air and pollutants from the surface up to the tropopause region at levels above 16km altitude, from where air can ascend into the stratosphere, where it spreads globally. Thus the monsoon affects the chemical composition of the global tropopause region and the stratosphere, and hence plays a key role for the composition of the UTS. Dynamically the monsoon circulation leads to the formation of a large anticyclone at tropopause levels above South Asia - the Asian Monsoon Anticyclone (AMA). Satellite images show a large cloud of aerosols directly above the monsoon, the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL). In July to August 2017 the international research project StratoClim carried out the first in-situ aircraft measurements in the AMA and the ATAL with the high altitude research aircraft M55-Geophysica. Around 8 scientific flights took place in the airspaces of Nepal, India and Bangladesh and have horizontally and vertically probed the AMA and have well characterized the ATAL along flight patterns that have been carefully designed by a theory, modelling and satellite data analysing team in the field. The aircraft campaign has been complemented by launches of research balloons from ground stations in Nepal, Bangladesh, China and Palau. The presentation will give an overview of the StratoClim project, the aircraft and balloon activities and initial results from the StratoClim Asian Monsoon campaign in summer 2017.

  3. Results of the IAEA/RCA personal dosemeter intercomparison in the Asian and Pacific region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, H.; Minami, K.; Griffith, R.V.

    1994-01-01

    In 1988, the International Atomic Energy Agency started the Regional Co-operative Agreement project for strengthening the radiation protection infrastructure in the Asian and Pacific region. One component of the initial programme was a regional personal dosimetry intercomparison, which was subsequently conducted in three phases over three years during the period 1990 to 1992. Seventeen organisations of all 14 member states participated in the programmes. Irradiations and data compilation were conducted by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. This paper describes the results of the intercomparison programmes and discusses some features and personal dosimetry problems in the RCA member states. (author)

  4. Aortic stentgraft movement detection using digital roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis on plane film radiographs - initial results of a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georg, C.; Welker, V.; Eidam, H.; Alfke, H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of aortic stentgraft micromovement detection using digital roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis on plane film radiographs. Material and Methods: An aortic stentgraft used for demonstration purposes was marked with 10 tantalum markers of 0.8 mm in diameter. The stentgraft was placed on a Plexiglas phantom with 5 tantalum markers of 1 mm in diameter simulating a fixed segment needed for mathematical analysis. In a subsequent step, the stentgraft was placed onto an orthopaedic spine model to simulate in vivo conditions in a next step.Two radiographs taken simultaneously from different angles were used for simulating different stentgraft movement, e.g. translation, angulation, aortic pulsation and migration in the spine model. Movement of the stentgraft markers was analysed using a commercially available digital RSA setup (UmRSA registered 4.1, RSA Biomedical, Umea, Sweden). Results: Our study shows the feasibility of measuring aortic stentgraft movement and changes in stentgraft shape in the submillimeter range using digital roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis. Translation along the 3 cardinal axes, change in stentgraft shape, simulation of aortic pulsation and simulation of in vivo conditions could be described precisely. Conclusion: Aortic stentgraft movement detection using digital roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis on plane film radiographs is a very promising, precise method. (orig.)

  5. Phantom pain after eye amputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marie L R; Prause, Jan U; Toft, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the quality of phantom pain, its intensity and frequency following eye amputation. Possible triggers and relievers of phantom pain are investigated. Methods: The hospital database was searched using surgery codes for patients who received ocular evisceration, enucleation...... was conducted by a trained interviewer. Results: Of the 173 patients in the study, 39 experienced phantom pain. The median age of patients who had experienced phantom pain was 45 years (range: 19–88). Follow-up time from eye amputation to participation in the investigation was 4 years (range: 2–46). Phantom...... scale, ranging from 0 to 100, was 36 (range: 1–89). One-third of the patients experienced phantom pain every day. Chilliness, windy weather and psychological stress/fatigue were the most commonly reported triggers for pain. Conclusions: Phantom pain after eye amputation is relatively common. The pain...

  6. Monte Carlo electron-photon transport using GPUs as an accelerator: Results for a water-aluminum-water phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, L.; Du, X.; Liu, T.; Xu, X. G. [Nuclear Engineering Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    An electron-photon coupled Monte Carlo code ARCHER - Accelerated Radiation-transport Computations in Heterogeneous Environments - is being developed at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute as a software test bed for emerging heterogeneous high performance computers that utilize accelerators such as GPUs. In this paper, the preliminary results of code development and testing are presented. The electron transport in media was modeled using the class-II condensed history method. The electron energy considered ranges from a few hundred keV to 30 MeV. Moller scattering and bremsstrahlung processes above a preset energy were explicitly modeled. Energy loss below that threshold was accounted for using the Continuously Slowing Down Approximation (CSDA). Photon transport was dealt with using the delta tracking method. Photoelectric effect, Compton scattering and pair production were modeled. Voxelised geometry was supported. A serial ARHCHER-CPU was first written in C++. The code was then ported to the GPU platform using CUDA C. The hardware involved a desktop PC with an Intel Xeon X5660 CPU and six NVIDIA Tesla M2090 GPUs. ARHCHER was tested for a case of 20 MeV electron beam incident perpendicularly on a water-aluminum-water phantom. The depth and lateral dose profiles were found to agree with results obtained from well tested MC codes. Using six GPU cards, 6x10{sup 6} histories of electrons were simulated within 2 seconds. In comparison, the same case running the EGSnrc and MCNPX codes required 1645 seconds and 9213 seconds, respectively, on a CPU with a single core used. (authors)

  7. Automatic exposure control to reduce the dose in subsecond multislice spiral CT: phantom measurements and clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greess, H.; Bautz, W.; Baum, U.; Wolf, H.; Suess, C.; Kalender, W.A.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of dose reduction in multislice spiral CT (MSCT) with automatic exposure control. Materials and Methods: The study was performed on a Sensation 4 multislice scanner. This prototype implementation analyzed the distribution of the attenuation along the z-axis in the lateral and sagittal directions of the digital radiogram. Depending on this distribution of the attenuation, the tube current (mA) is defined for every tube rotation. In addition, the tube current was modulated during each tube rotation. First, a three step oval water phantom was measured to evaluate the potential of this method with respect to dose reduction and image quality. In a patient study (n=26), four different scan regions (shoulder, thorax, abdomen, pelvis) were examined and dose (mAs) and image quality evaluated in comparison to examinations with a standard protocol for these regions in adults and a weight-adjusted standard protocol in children. The image quality was classified in consensus as good, sufficient and poor image quality. Results: By adapting and modulating the tube current, we substantially reduced the variation of noise in one spiral scan and in one scan region of our patient collective. The dose (average mAs) was reduced by 31% to 66% in children (mean 44%) and between 35% and 64% in adults (mean 53%), depending on the scan region. The image quality was substantially improved in regions with high attenuation and did not suffer in low attenuation regions. Conclusion: The dose can be reduced substantially by an automatic exposure control including angular tube current modulation with the same or improved image quality. (orig.) [de

  8. Overview of the StratoClim Asian Monsoon Aircraft Campaign: Strategy, Instrumentation and preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, F.

    2017-12-01

    The StratoClim Aircraft Field Campaign employing the high-flying research aircraft M55 Geophysica was carried out from mid July to mid August of 2017 from Kathmandu, Nepal, covering the airspace of Nepal, India, Bangladesh and Myanmar in the frame of the EC FP7 funded StratoClim project (see the Rex. et al. overview in this session). In order to sample the first detailed data set on climate relevant processes of the Asian Summer Monsoon anticyclone a comprehensive chemical and aerosol payload of more than 2 metric tons consisting of 26 different instrumets was flown to altitudes in excess of 20km to measure remote sensing and in-situ data on dynamical, chemical, and micro-chemical processes governing this experimentally underresearched atmospheric domain. An overview of the instrumentation, observation strategies, and preliminary results on open challenges as the horizontal and vertical trace gas and aerosol structures, effects of convective events and the ATAL will be given.

  9. Electromagnetic tracking for CT-guided spine interventions: phantom, ex-vivo and in-vivo results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruners, Philipp; Penzkofer, Tobias; Nagel, Markus; Elfring, Robert; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Gronloh, Nina; Guenther, Rolf W.; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2009-01-01

    An electromagnetic-based tracking and navigation system was evaluated for interventional radiology. The electromagnetic tracking system (CAPPA IRAD EMT, CASinnovations, Erlangen, Germany) was used for real-time monitoring of punctures of the lumbar facet joints and intervertebral disks in a spine phantom, three pig cadavers and three anaesthesized pigs. Therefore, pre-interventional computed tomography (CT) datasets were transferred to the navigation system and puncture trajectories were planned. A coaxial needle was advanced along the trajectories while the position of the needle tip was monitored in real time. After puncture tracts were marked with pieces of wire another CT examination was performed and distances between wires and anatomical targets were measured. Performing punctures of the facet joints mean needle positioning errors were 0.4 ± 0.8 mm in the spine phantom, 2.8 ± 2.1 mm ex vivo and 3.0 ± 2.0 mm in vivo with mean length of the puncture tract of 54.0 ± 10.4 mm (phantom), 51.6 ± 12.6 mm (ex vivo) and 50.9 ± 17.6 mm (in vivo). At first attempt, intervertebral discs were successfully punctured in 15/15 in the phantom study, in 12/15 in the ex-vivo study and 14/15 in the in-vivo study, respectively. Immobilization of the patient and optimal positioning of the field generator are essential to achieve a high accuracy of needle placement in a clinical CT setting. (orig.)

  10. Quality control within the multicentre perfusion CT study of primary colorectal cancer (PROSPeCT): results of an iodine density phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Maria; Honey, Ian [Trust, Medical Physics Department, Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation, London (United Kingdom); Goh, Vicky [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Beggs, Shaun [Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Radiation Physics Services, Bradford (United Kingdom); Bridges, Andrew; Wayte, Sarah [Radiology Physics University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry (United Kingdom); Clewer, Philip [Medical Physics Department, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Davis, Anne [Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Medical Physics Department, Portsmouth (United Kingdom); Foy, Trevelyan [Royal Cornwall Hospital NHS Trust, Medical Physics Department, Truro (United Kingdom); Fuller, Karen [Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Medical Physics Department, Sheffield (United Kingdom); George, Jennifer [University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust, Medical Physics Department, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom); Higginson, Antony [Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Portsmouth (United Kingdom); Iball, Gareth [Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mutch, Steve [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Radiation Physics and Protection Department, Oxford (United Kingdom); Neil, Shellagh; Sutton, David [NHS Tayside, Medical Physics Department, Dundee, Scotland (United Kingdom); Rivett, Cat [Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Clinical and Radiation Physics, Plymouth (United Kingdom); Slater, Andrew [Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Oxford (United Kingdom); Weir, Nick [Queen' s Medical Research Institute, Clinical Research Imaging Centre, Edinburgh, Scotland (United Kingdom); Collaboration: on behalf of the PROSPeCT Investigators

    2014-09-15

    To assess the cross-centre consistency of iodine enhancement, contrast-to-noise ratio and radiation dose in a multicentre perfusion CT trial of colorectal cancer. A cylindrical water phantom containing different iodine inserts was examined on seven CT models in 13 hospitals. The relationship between CT number (Hounsfield units, HU) and iodine concentration (milligrams per millilitre) was established and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) calculated. Radiation doses (CTDI{sub vol}, DLP) were compared across all sites. There was a linear relationship between CT number and iodine density. Iodine enhancement varied by a factor of at most 1.10, and image noise by at most 1.5 across the study sites. At an iodine concentration of 1 mg ml{sup -1} and 100 kV, CNRs ranged from 3.6 to 4.8 in the 220-mm phantom and from 1.4 to 1.9 in the 300-mm phantom. Doses varied by a factor of at most 2.4, but remained within study dose constraints. Iterative reconstruction algorithms did not alter iodine enhancement but resulted in reduced image noise by a factor of at most 2.2, allowing a potential dose decrease of at most 80 % compared to filtered back projection (FBP). Quality control of CT performance across centres indicates that CNR values remain relatively consistent across all sites, giving acceptable image quality within the agreed dose constraints. (orig.)

  11. Quality control within the multicentre perfusion CT study of primary colorectal cancer (PROSPeCT): results of an iodine density phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Maria; Honey, Ian; Goh, Vicky; Beggs, Shaun; Bridges, Andrew; Wayte, Sarah; Clewer, Philip; Davis, Anne; Foy, Trevelyan; Fuller, Karen; George, Jennifer; Higginson, Antony; Iball, Gareth; Mutch, Steve; Neil, Shellagh; Sutton, David; Rivett, Cat; Slater, Andrew; Weir, Nick

    2014-01-01

    To assess the cross-centre consistency of iodine enhancement, contrast-to-noise ratio and radiation dose in a multicentre perfusion CT trial of colorectal cancer. A cylindrical water phantom containing different iodine inserts was examined on seven CT models in 13 hospitals. The relationship between CT number (Hounsfield units, HU) and iodine concentration (milligrams per millilitre) was established and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) calculated. Radiation doses (CTDI vol , DLP) were compared across all sites. There was a linear relationship between CT number and iodine density. Iodine enhancement varied by a factor of at most 1.10, and image noise by at most 1.5 across the study sites. At an iodine concentration of 1 mg ml -1 and 100 kV, CNRs ranged from 3.6 to 4.8 in the 220-mm phantom and from 1.4 to 1.9 in the 300-mm phantom. Doses varied by a factor of at most 2.4, but remained within study dose constraints. Iterative reconstruction algorithms did not alter iodine enhancement but resulted in reduced image noise by a factor of at most 2.2, allowing a potential dose decrease of at most 80 % compared to filtered back projection (FBP). Quality control of CT performance across centres indicates that CNR values remain relatively consistent across all sites, giving acceptable image quality within the agreed dose constraints. (orig.)

  12. Semi-robotic 6 degree of freedom positioning for intracranial high precision radiotherapy; first phantom and clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbert, Jürgen; Guckenberger, Matthias; Polat, Bülent; Sauer, Otto; Vogele, Michael; Flentje, Michael; Sweeney, Reinhart A

    2010-01-01

    To introduce a novel method of patient positioning for high precision intracranial radiotherapy. An infrared(IR)-array, reproducibly attached to the patient via a vacuum-mouthpiece(vMP) and connected to the table via a 6 degree-of-freedom(DoF) mechanical arm serves as positioning and fixation system. After IR-based manual prepositioning to rough treatment position and fixation of the mechanical arm, a cone-beam CT(CBCT) is performed. A robotic 6 DoF treatment couch (HexaPOD™) then automatically corrects all remaining translations and rotations. This absolute position of infrared markers at the first fraction acts as reference for the following fractions where patients are manually prepositioned to within ± 2 mm and ± 2° of this IR reference position prior to final HexaPOD-based correction; consequently CBCT imaging is only required once at the first treatment fraction. The preclinical feasibility and attainable repositioning accuracy of this method was evaluated on a phantom and human volunteers as was the clinical efficacy on 7 pilot study patients. Phantom and volunteer manual IR-based prepositioning to within ± 2 mm and ± 2° in 6DoF was possible within a mean(± SD) of 90 ± 31 and 56 ± 22 seconds respectively. Mean phantom translational and rotational precision after 6 DoF corrections by the HexaPOD was 0.2 ± 0.2 mm and 0.7 ± 0.8° respectively. For the actual patient collective, the mean 3D vector for inter-treatment repositioning accuracy (n = 102) was 1.6 ± 0.8 mm while intra-fraction movement (n = 110) was 0.6 ± 0.4 mm. This novel semi-automatic 6DoF IR-based system has been shown to compare favourably with existing non-invasive intracranial repeat fixation systems with respect to handling, reproducibility and, more importantly, intra-fraction rigidity. Some advantages are full cranial positioning flexibility for single and fractionated IGRT treatments and possibly increased patient comfort

  13. Macroeconomic Stabilization and Monetary Policyof Four Asian CountriesJapan, Korea, Indonesia, and the Philippines- Targets, Effectiveness and Results - (in Japanese)

    OpenAIRE

    Masaaki Kuroyanagi; Junji Yano; Yasuo Nakanishi; Masaaki Komatsu; Hidehiko Futamura; Tsuyoshi Mihira

    1996-01-01

    The rapid, stable economic development of Asian countries has been an important topic of empirical study in recent years. The remarkable results of this steady economic development have been called a "miracle" in the recent literature of development economics. This cross-country study attempts to investigate the roots of the rapid, sustained economic growth of East Asian countries. In "The East Asian Miracle" (The World Bank, 1993), rapid growth of human capital, productivity improvement and ...

  14. Construction of Chinese reference female phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheng Yinxiangzi; Liu Lixing; Xia Xiaobin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a Voxel-based Chinese Reference female Phantom (VCRP-woman) is developed from an individual female phantom which was based on high resolution cross-sectional color photographs. An in-house C ++ program was developed to adjust the phantom. Finally, a reference female phantom with have the same height, weighte and similar organs masses with the Chinese reference adult female data. The adjusted phantom is then imported to MCNPX to calculate the organs absorbed dose and effective dose conversion coefficients. Results are compared between VCRP-woman and the ICRP adult reference female phantom. (authors)

  15. The East Asian Summer Monsoon at mid-Holocene: results from PMIP3 simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zheng

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ten Coupled General Circulation Models (CGCMs participated in the third phase of Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project (PMIP3 are assessed for the East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM in both the pre-Industrial (PI, 0 ka and mid-Holocene (MH, 6 ka simulations. Results show that the PMIP3 model median captures well the large-scale characteristics of the EASM, including the two distinct features of the Meiyu rainbelt and the stepwise meridional displacement of the monsoonal rainbelt. At mid-Holocene, the PMIP3 model median shows significant warming (cooling during boreal summer (winter over Eurasia continent that are dominated by the changes of insolation. However, the PMIP3 models fail to simulate a warmer annual mean and winter surface air temperature (TAS over eastern China as derived from proxy records. The EASM at MH are featured by the changes of large-scale circulation over Eastern China while the changes of precipitation are not significant over its sub-domains of the Southern China and the lower reaches of Yangzi River. The inter-model differences for the monsoon precipitation can be associated with different configurations of the changes in large-scale circulation and the water vapour content, of which the former determines the sign of precipitation changes. The large model spread for the TAS over Tibetan Plateau has a positive relationship with the precipitation in the lower reaches of Yangzi River, yet this relationship does not apply to those PMIP3 models in which the monsoonal precipitation is more sensitive to the changes of large-scale circulation. Except that the PMIP3 model median captured the warming of annual mean TAS over Tibetan Plateau, no significant improvements can be concluded when compared with the PMIP2 models results.

  16. Phantom crash confirms models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    To test computer models of how a nuclear reactor's containment building would fare if an airplane crashed into it, the Muto Institute in Tokyo sponsored a 3.2 million dollar project at Sandia National Laboratory to slam an F-4 Phantom jet into a 500 ton concrete wall. The results showed that the computer calculations were accurate

  17. Use of scatter correction in quantitative I-123 MIBG scintigraphy for differentiating patients with Parkinsonism: Results from Phantom experiment and clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, J.; Hashimoto, J.; Suzuki, T.; Nakahara, T.; Kubo, A.; Ohira, M.; Takao, M.; Ogawa, K.

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to elucidate the feasibility of scatter correction in improving the quantitative accuracy of the Heart-to-Mediastinum (H/M) ratio in I-123 MIBG imaging and to clarify whether the H/M ratio calculated from the scatter corrected image improves the accuracy of differentiating patients with Parkinsonism from other neurological disorders. The H/M ratio was calculated using the counts from planar images processed with and without scatter correction in the phantom and on patients. The triple energy window (TEW) method was used for scatter correction. Fifty five patients were enrolled in the clinical study. The Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curve analysis was used to evaluate diagnostic performance. The H/M ratio was found to be increased after scatter correction in the phantom simulating normal cardiac uptake, while no changes were observed in the phantom simulating no uptake. It was observed that scatter correction stabilized the H/M ratio by eliminating the influence of scatter photons originating from the liver, especially in the condition of no cardiac uptake. Similarly, scatter correction increased the H/M ratio in conditions other than Parkinson's disease but did not show any change in Parkinson's disease itself to widen the differences in the H/M ratios between the two groups. The overall power of the test did not show any significant improvement after scatter correction in differentiating patients with Parkinsonism. Based on the results of this study it has been concluded that scatter correction improves the quantitative accuracy of H/M ratio in MIBG imaging, but it does not offer any significant incremental diagnostic value over conventional imaging (without scatter correction). Nevertheless it is felt that the scatter correction technique deserves special consideration in order to make the test more robust and obtain stable H/M ratios. (author)

  18. A comparative study on patient specific absolute dosimetry using slab phantom, acrylic body phantom and goat head phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Gurjar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the results of patient specific absolute dosimetry using slab phantom, acrylic body phantom and goat head phantom. Methods: Fifteen intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT plans already planned on treatment planning system (TPS for head-and-neck cancer patients were exported on all three kinds of phantoms viz. slab phantom, acrylic body phantom and goat head phantom, and dose was calculated using anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA. All the gantry angles were set to zero in case of slab phantom while set to as it is in actual plan in case of other two phantoms. All the plans were delivered by linear accelerator (LA and dose for each plan was measured by 0.13 cc ion chamber. The percentage (% variations between planned and measured doses were calculated and analyzed. Results: The mean % variations between planned and measured doses of all IMRT quality assurance (QA plans were as 0.65 (Standard deviation (SD: 0.38 with confidence limit (CL 1.39, 1.16 (SD: 0.61 with CL 2.36 and 2.40 (SD: 0.86 with CL 4.09 for slab phantom, acrylic head phantom and goat head phantom respectively. Conclusion: Higher dose variations found in case of real tissue phantom compare to results in case of slab and acrylic body phantoms. The algorithm AAA does not calculate doses in heterogeneous medium as accurate as it calculates in homogeneous medium. Therefore the patient specific absolute dosimetry should be done using heterogeneous phantom mimicking density wise as well as design wise to the actual human body.  

  19. Contrast-enhanced voiding urosonography phantom study: intravenous iodinated and gadolinium-based contrast agents may cause false-negative results in assessment of vesicoureteral reflux in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veldhoen, Simon; Sauer, Alexander; Gassenmaier, Tobias; Petritsch, Bernhard; Herz, Stefan; Blanke, Philipp; Bley, Thorsten A.; Wirth, Clemens; Derlin, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced voiding urosonography (ce-VUS) is commonly requested simultaneously to other diagnostic imaging necessitating intravenous contrast agents. To date there is limited knowldedge about intravesical interactions between different types of contrast agents. To assess the effect of excreted intravenous iodinated and gadolinium-based contrast agents on the intravesical distribution of ultrasound contrast within contrast-enhanced voiding urosonography. Iodinated (iomeprol, iopamidol) and gadolinium-based (gadoterate meglumine) contrast agents were diluted to bladder concentration and injected into balloons filled with saline solution. CT scans were performed to assess the contrast distribution in these phantoms. Regions of interest were placed at the top and bottom side of each balloon and Hounsfield units (HU) were measured. Three other balloons were filled with saline solution and contrast media likewise. The ultrasound contrast agent sulphur hexafluoride was added and its distribution was assessed using sonography. MDCT scans showed a separation of two liquid layers in all bladder phantoms with the contrast layers located at the bottom and the saline solution at the top. Significant differences of the HU measurements at the top and bottom side were observed (P < 0.001-0.007). Following injection of ultrasound contrast agent, US showed its distribution exclusively among the saline solution. False-negative results of contrast-enhanced voiding urosonography may occur if it is performed shortly after imaging procedures requiring intravenous contrast. (orig.)

  20. Conversion of ICRP male reference phantom to polygon-surface phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2013-10-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms, developed based on computed tomography images of human bodies, provide much more realism of human anatomy than the previously used MIRD5 (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) mathematical phantoms. It has been, however, realized that the ICRP reference phantoms have some critical limitations showing a considerable amount of holes for the skin and wall organs mainly due to the nature of voxels of which the phantoms are made, especially due to their low voxel resolutions. To address this problem, we are planning to develop the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP reference phantoms (voxel phantoms) to polygon-surface phantoms. The objective of this preliminary study is to see if it is indeed possible to construct the high-quality polygon-surface phantoms based on the ICRP reference phantoms maintaining identical organ morphology and also to identify any potential issues, and technologies to address these issues, in advance. For this purpose, in the present study, the ICRP reference male phantom was roughly converted to a polygon-surface phantom. Then, the constructed phantom was implemented in Geant4, Monte Carlo particle transport code, for dose calculations, and the calculated dose values were compared with those of the original ICRP reference phantom to see how much the calculated dose values are sensitive to the accuracy of the conversion process. The results of the present study show that it is certainly possible to convert the ICRP reference phantoms to surface phantoms with enough accuracy. In spite of using relatively less resources (original ICRP reference phantoms, it is believed that the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms properly developed will not only provide the same or similar dose values (say, difference <5 or 10%) for highly penetrating radiations, but also provide correct dose values for the weakly penetrating

  1. Solid water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arguiropulo, M.Y.; Ghilardi Neto, T.; Pela, C.A.; Ghilardi, A.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    A phantom were developed for simulating water, based in plastics. The material was evaluated for different energies, and the measures of relative transmission showed that the transmission and the water were inside of 0,6% for gamma rays. The results of this new material were presented, showing that it could be used in photon beam calibration with energies on radiotherapy range. (C.G.C.)

  2. WE-FG-207B-12: Quantitative Evaluation of a Spectral CT Scanner in a Phantom Study: Results of Spectral Reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, X; Arbique, G; Guild, J; Anderson, J; Yagil, Y

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the quantitative image quality of spectral reconstructions of phantom data from a spectral CT scanner. Methods: The spectral CT scanner (IQon Spectral CT, Philips Healthcare) is equipped with a dual-layer detector and generates conventional 80-140 kVp images and variety of spectral reconstructions, e.g., virtual monochromatic (VM) images, virtual non-contrast (VNC) images, iodine maps, and effective atomic number (Z) images. A cylindrical solid water phantom (Gammex 472, 33 cm diameter and 5 cm thick) with iodine (2.0-20.0 mg I/ml) and calcium (50-600 mg/ml) rod inserts was scanned at 120 kVp and 27 mGy CTDIvol. Spectral reconstructions were evaluated by comparing image measurements with theoretical values calculated from nominal rod compositions provided by the phantom manufacturer. The theoretical VNC was calculated using water and iodine basis material decomposition, and the theoretical Z was calculated using two common methods, the chemical formula method (Z1) and the dual-energy ratio method (Z2). Results: Beam-hardening-like artifacts between high-attenuation calcium rods (≥300 mg/ml, >800 HU) influenced quantitative measurements, so the quantitative analysis was only performed on iodine rods using the images from the scan with all the calcium rods removed. The CT numbers of the iodine rods in the VM images (50∼150 keV) were close to theoretical values with average difference of 2.4±6.9 HU. Compared with theoretical values, the average difference for iodine concentration, VNC CT number and effective Z of iodine rods were −0.10±0.38 mg/ml, −0.1±8.2 HU, 0.25±0.06 (Z1) and −0.23±0.07 (Z2). Conclusion: The results indicate that the spectral CT scanner generates quantitatively accurate spectral reconstructions at clinically relevant iodine concentrations. Beam-hardening-like artifacts still exist when high-attenuation objects are present and their impact on patient images needs further investigation. YY is an employee of Philips

  3. WE-FG-207B-12: Quantitative Evaluation of a Spectral CT Scanner in a Phantom Study: Results of Spectral Reconstructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, X; Arbique, G; Guild, J; Anderson, J [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Yagil, Y [Philips Healthcare, Haifa (Israel)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the quantitative image quality of spectral reconstructions of phantom data from a spectral CT scanner. Methods: The spectral CT scanner (IQon Spectral CT, Philips Healthcare) is equipped with a dual-layer detector and generates conventional 80-140 kVp images and variety of spectral reconstructions, e.g., virtual monochromatic (VM) images, virtual non-contrast (VNC) images, iodine maps, and effective atomic number (Z) images. A cylindrical solid water phantom (Gammex 472, 33 cm diameter and 5 cm thick) with iodine (2.0-20.0 mg I/ml) and calcium (50-600 mg/ml) rod inserts was scanned at 120 kVp and 27 mGy CTDIvol. Spectral reconstructions were evaluated by comparing image measurements with theoretical values calculated from nominal rod compositions provided by the phantom manufacturer. The theoretical VNC was calculated using water and iodine basis material decomposition, and the theoretical Z was calculated using two common methods, the chemical formula method (Z1) and the dual-energy ratio method (Z2). Results: Beam-hardening-like artifacts between high-attenuation calcium rods (≥300 mg/ml, >800 HU) influenced quantitative measurements, so the quantitative analysis was only performed on iodine rods using the images from the scan with all the calcium rods removed. The CT numbers of the iodine rods in the VM images (50∼150 keV) were close to theoretical values with average difference of 2.4±6.9 HU. Compared with theoretical values, the average difference for iodine concentration, VNC CT number and effective Z of iodine rods were −0.10±0.38 mg/ml, −0.1±8.2 HU, 0.25±0.06 (Z1) and −0.23±0.07 (Z2). Conclusion: The results indicate that the spectral CT scanner generates quantitatively accurate spectral reconstructions at clinically relevant iodine concentrations. Beam-hardening-like artifacts still exist when high-attenuation objects are present and their impact on patient images needs further investigation. YY is an employee of Philips

  4. Hardcore smoking in three South-East asian countries: results from the global adult tobacco survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Jugal; Jena, Pratap Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Chandan; Swain, Monali; Das, Sagarika; Banerjee, Indrani

    2013-01-01

    Hardcore smoking is represented by a subset of daily smokers with high nicotine dependence, inability to quit and unwillingness to quit. Estimating the related burden could help us in identifying a high risk population prone to tobacco induced diseases and improve cessation planning for them. This study assessed the prevalence and associated factors of hardcore smoking in three South-East Asian countries and discussed its implication for smoking cessation intervention in this region. Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) data of India, Bangladesh and Thailand were analyzed to quantify the hardcore smoking prevalence in the region. On the basis of review, an operational definition of hardcore smoking was adopted that includes (1) current daily smoker, (2) no quit attempt in the past 12 months of survey or last quit attempt of less than 24 hours duration, (3) no intention to quit in next 12 months or not interested in quitting, (4) time to first smoke within 30 minutes of waking up, and (5) knowledge of smoking hazards. Logistic regression analysis was carried out using hardcore smoking status as response variable and gender, type of residence, occupation, education, wealth index and age-group as possible predictors. There were 31.3 million hardcore smokers in the three Asian countries. The adult prevalence of hardcore smoking in these countries ranges between 3.1% in India to 6% in Thailand. These hardcore smokers constitute 18.3-29.7% of daily smokers. The logistic regression model indicated that age, gender, occupation and wealth index are the major predictors of hardcore smoking with varied influence across countries. Presence of a higher number of hardcore smoking populations in Asia is a major public health challenge for tobacco control and cancer prevention. There is need of intensive cessation interventions with due consideration of contextual predictors.

  5. Computer tomographic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonn, A.H.R.; Jacobsen, D.R.; Zech, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    A reference phantom for computer tomography employs a flexible member with means for urging the flexible member into contact along the curved surface of the lumbar region of a human patient. In one embodiment, the reference phantom is pre-curved in an arc greater than required. Pressure from the weight of a patient laying upon the reference phantom is effective for straightening out the curvature sufficiently to achieve substantial contact along the lumbar region. The curvature of the reference phantom may be additionally distorted by a resilient pad between the resilient phantom and a table for urging it into contact with the lumbar region. In a second embodiment of the invention, a flexible reference phantom is disposed in a slot in the top of a resilient cushion. The resilient cushion and reference phantom may be enclosed in a flexible container. A partially curved reference phantom in a slot in a resilient cushion is also contemplated. (author)

  6. Evolution of dosimetric phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    In this oration evolution of the dosimetric phantoms for radiation protection and for medical use is briefly reviewed. Some details of the development of Indian Reference Phantom for internal dose estimation are also presented

  7. An improved Virtual Torso phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Gary H; Crowley, Paul

    2000-01-01

    The virtual phantom that was previously designed by the Human Monitoring Laboratory had some limitations. It contained no sternum and the ribs extended all the way round the torso, whereas in reality the central part of the chest is covered with a mixture of cartilage (ribs) and bone (sternum). The ribs were located below the chest wall which added to the thickness of the chest wall. The lungs did not touch the inner surface of the chest wall along their length due to the differences in curvature between the ellipsoidal lungs and the ellipsoidal cylinder that defined the torso. As a result there was extra intervening tissue between the lungs and the chest wall. This was shown to have a noticeable effect on the simulation of low energy photons. The virtual phantom has been redesigned and comparison of measured and calculated counting efficiencies shows that it is a good representation of both of LLNL or JAERI at all photon energies measured. The redesigned virtual phantom agrees to within 11% of the torsos' counting efficiency over the energy range 17 - 240 keV. Before modification, the virtual phantom's counting efficiency was a of factor three lower at 17 keV and a factor of two lower at 20 keV; now it is within 5% at 17 keV and within 10% at 20 keV. This phantom can now be reliably used to simulate lung counting. The virtual phantom still contains no sternum and the ribs extend all the way round the torso, whereas in reality the central part of the chest is covered with cartilage (ribs) and bone (sternum). However, the above results indicate that this is not a major flaw in the design of the virtual phantom, as agreement between the Monte Carlo results and experimental data is good. (author)

  8. Development of the two Korean adult tomographic computational phantoms for organ dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Choonik; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2006-01-01

    Following the previously developed Korean tomographic phantom, KORMAN, two additional whole-body tomographic phantoms of Korean adult males were developed from magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) images, respectively. Two healthy male volunteers, whose body dimensions were fairly representative of the average Korean adult male, were recruited and scanned for phantom development. Contiguous whole body MR images were obtained from one subject exclusive of the arms, while whole-body CT images were acquired from the second individual. A total of 29 organs and tissues and 19 skeletal sites were segmented via image manipulation techniques such as gray-level thresholding, region growing, and manual drawing, in which each of segmented image slice was subsequently reviewed by an experienced radiologist for anatomical accuracy. The resulting phantoms, the MR-based KTMAN-1 (Korean Typical MAN-1) and the CT-based KTMAN-2 (Korean Typical MAN-2), consist of 300x150x344 voxels with a voxel resolution of 2x2x5 mm 3 for both phantoms. Masses of segmented organs and tissues were calculated as the product of a nominal reference density, the prevoxel volume, and the cumulative number of voxels defining each organs or tissue. These organs masses were then compared with those of both the Asian and the ICRP reference adult male. Organ masses within both KTMAN-1 and KTMAN-2 showed differences within 40% of Asian and ICRP reference values, with the exception of the skin, gall bladder, and pancreas which displayed larger differences. The resulting three-dimensional binary file was ported to the Monte Carlo code MCNPX2.4 to calculate organ doses following external irradiation for illustrative purposes. Colon, lung, liver, and stomach absorbed doses, as well as the effective dose, for idealized photon irradiation geometries (anterior-posterior and right lateral) were determined, and then compared with data from two other tomographic phantoms (Asian and Caucasian), and

  9. [Midterm follow-up results on Asian femoral intramedullary nail for the treatment of segmental and comminuted femoral fractures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lang; Gao, Feng; Huang, Qi; Li, Qiang; Xie, Lin; Zhang, Bin

    2016-06-01

    To investigate midterm follow-up results on Asian femoral intramedullary nail in treating segmental and comminuted femoral fractures. Between June 2011 and October 2012,16 patients with segmental and comminuted femoral fractures were treated with minimally invasive reset and Asian femoral intramedullary nail under extension table. Among them, there were 10 males and 6 females aged from 21 to 49 years old with an average of 34.5 years old; the time from injury to operation ranged from 3 to 24 d with an average of 9.1 d. There were 6 cases were type C1,2 cases were type C2 and 8 cases were type C3 according to AO classification. X-ray of femoral segment at 3,6 and 12 months after operation were applied for evaluating fracture healing. Harris score of hip joint and HSS score of knee joint were used to evaluate postoperative function. All patients were followed up from 24 to 36 months with an average of 28.4 months. Operative time was from 88 to 112 min with an average of 90.7 min; blood loss ranged from 150 to 200 ml with an average of 188.75 ml; the time of fracture healing was from 5 to 9 months with an average of 5.4 months. All incision were healed at stage I. No loosening, breakage of internal fixation and displacement of fracture were occurred. There were no significant differences in Harris score of hip joint at 3, 6 and 12 months after operation (F = 0.07, P = 0.893 > 0.05), 10 cases obtained excellent results, 5 good and 1 moderate. There was no obvious meaning in HSS score of knee joint (F = 0.08,P = 0.876 > 0.05), 9 cases obtained excellent results, 6 good and 1 poor. Asian femoral intramedullary nail could treat segmental and comminuted femoral fractures by using variety of less invasive ways,which has advantages of less trauma, quick recovery of function and satisfied midterm following-up results. But long term following-up effects remains to be seen.

  10. Intercalibration of in vivo counting systems using an Asian phantom results of a co-ordinated research project 1996-1998

    CERN Document Server

    International Atomic Energ Agency. Vienna

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive materials are used in many industries, and, whenever unsealed radioactive sources are present, intakes of radionuclides by workers can occur. Adequate radiation protection of workers is an essential requirement for the safe and acceptable use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy. Guidance on the application of the requirements of the International Basis Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) to occupational protection is given in three interrelated Safety Guides: Occupational Radiation Protection (RS-G-1.1); Assessment of Occupational Exposure due to Intakes of Radionuclides (RS-G-1.2); Assessment of Occupational Exposure due to External Sources of Radiation (RS-G-1.3) published in 1999 and further guidance is given in Safety Reports. Uranium, thorium and transuranic elements such as plutonium and americium are encountered throughout the nuclear fuel cycle and in industry. Radionuclides of these elements have a sig...

  11. Phantom cosmologies and fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chimento, Luis P; Forte, Monica; Devecchi, Fernando P; Kremer, Gilberto M

    2008-01-01

    Form invariance transformations can be used for constructing phantom cosmologies starting with conventional cosmological models. In this work we reconsider the scalar field case and extend the discussion to fermionic fields, where the 'phantomization' process exhibits a new class of possible accelerated regimes. As an application we analyze the cosmological constant group for a fermionic seed fluid

  12. 21. Phantom pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, A.P.; Vanduynhoven, E.; Kleef, M. van; Huygen, F.; Pope, J.E.; Mekhail, N.

    2011-01-01

    Phantom pain is pain caused by elimination or interruption of sensory nerve impulses by destroying or injuring the sensory nerve fibers after amputation or deafferentation. The reported incidence of phantom limb pain after trauma, injury or peripheral vascular diseases is 60% to 80%. Over half the

  13. Body and organ dimensions of the 1945 Japanese population used in dosimetry system DS86 and data available for an expanded series of phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullings, H. M.; Kawamura, H.; Chen, J.

    2012-01-01

    The computational phantoms used in dosimetry system DS86 and re-used in DS02 were derived from models and methods developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) in the US, but referred to Japanese anthropometric data for the Japanese population of 1945, from studies conducted at the Japanese National Inst. of Radiological Sciences and other sources. The phantoms developed for DS86 were limited to three hermaphroditic models: infant, child and adult. After comparing data from Japanese and Western populations, phantoms were adapted from the pre-existing ORNL series, adjusting some organs in the adult phantom to reflect differences between Japanese and Western data, but not in the infant and child phantoms. To develop a new and larger series of more age- and sex-specific models, it appears necessary to rely on the original Japanese data and values derived from them, which can directly provide population-average body dimensions for various ages. Those data were re-analysed in conjunction with other Asian data for an Asian Reference Man model, providing a rather complete table of organ weights that could be used to scale organs for growth during childhood and adolescence. Although the resulting organ volumes might have some inaccuracies in relation to true population-average values, this is a minor concern because in the DS02 context organ size per se is less important than the correct body size and correct placement of the organ in the body. (authors)

  14. Pandemic influenza preparedness and health systems challenges in Asia: results from rapid analyses in 6 Asian countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putthasri Weerasak

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 2003, Asia-Pacific, particularly Southeast Asia, has received substantial attention because of the anticipation that it could be the epicentre of the next pandemic. There has been active investment but earlier review of pandemic preparedness plans in the region reveals that the translation of these strategic plans into operational plans is still lacking in some countries particularly those with low resources. The objective of this study is to understand the pandemic preparedness programmes, the health systems context, and challenges and constraints specific to the six Asian countries namely Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Taiwan, Thailand, and Viet Nam in the prepandemic phase before the start of H1N1/2009. Methods The study relied on the Systemic Rapid Assessment (SYSRA toolkit, which evaluates priority disease programmes by taking into account the programmes, the general health system, and the wider socio-cultural and political context. The components under review were: external context; stewardship and organisational arrangements; financing, resource generation and allocation; healthcare provision; and information systems. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected in the second half of 2008 based on a review of published data and interviews with key informants, exploring past and current patterns of health programme and pandemic response. Results The study shows that health systems in the six countries varied in regard to the epidemiological context, health care financing, and health service provision patterns. For pandemic preparation, all six countries have developed national governance on pandemic preparedness as well as national pandemic influenza preparedness plans and Avian and Human Influenza (AHI response plans. However, the governance arrangements and the nature of the plans differed. In the five developing countries, the focus was on surveillance and rapid containment of poultry related transmission

  15. Mammographic compression in Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate: (1) the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2) the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD) in Asian women based on phantom study. We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35-80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement software (Volpara) to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT), breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs. Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (pAsian women. The median compression force should be about 8.1 daN compared to the current 12.0 daN. Decreasing compression force from 12.0 daN to 9.0 daN increased CBT by 3.3±1.4 mm, MGD by 6.2-11.0%, and caused no significant effects on image quality (p>0.05). Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD.

  16. IMRT credentialing for prospective trials using institutional virtual phantoms: results of a joint European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer and Radiological Physics Center project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Damien C; Vallet, Veronique; Molineu, Andrea; Melidis, Christos; Teglas, Vanda; Naudy, Suzanne; Moeckli, Raphael; Followill, David S; Hurkmans, Coen W

    2014-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) credentialing for a EORTC study was performed using an anthropomorphic head phantom from the Radiological Physics Center (RPC; RPC PH ). Institutions were retrospectively requested to irradiate their institutional phantom (INST PH ) using the same treatment plan in the framework of a Virtual Phantom Project (VPP) for IMRT credentialing. CT data set of the institutional phantom and measured 2D dose matrices were requested from centers and sent to a dedicated secure EORTC uploader. Data from the RPC PH and INST PH were thereafter centrally analyzed and inter-compared by the QA team using commercially available software (RIT; ver.5.2; Colorado Springs, USA). Eighteen institutions participated to the VPP. The measurements of 6 (33%) institutions could not be analyzed centrally. All other centers passed both the VPP and the RPC ±7%/4 mm credentialing criteria. At the 5%/5 mm gamma criteria (90% of pixels passing), 11(92%) as compared to 12 (100%) centers pass the credentialing process with RPC PH and INST PH (p = 0.29), respectively. The corresponding pass rate for the 3%/3 mm gamma criteria (90% of pixels passing) was 2 (17%) and 9 (75%; p = 0.01), respectively. IMRT dosimetry gamma evaluations in a single plane for a H&N prospective trial using the INST PH measurements showed agreement at the gamma index criteria of ±5%/5 mm (90% of pixels passing) for a small number of VPP measurements. Using more stringent, criteria, the RPC PH and INST PH comparison showed disagreement. More data is warranted and urgently required within the framework of prospective studies

  17. The Japanese adult, child and infant phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristy, Mark; Egbert, Stephen D.

    1987-01-01

    The mathematical phantom for adult Japanese atomic-bomb survivors is a modification of the 57-kg ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) phantom for Western 15-year-old males and adult females. For younger Japanese survivors mathematical phantoms were similarly modified from the 18 and 9 kg ORNL phantoms for Western 5- and 1-year-olds, respectively. To make the phantom correspond more closely with dimensions and organ sizes recommended for Japanese adults by Maruyama and coworkers (cf E184), changes were made in the size of the lungs, the pancreas, the thyroid, and the testes and in the length of the legs. Also, the head-and-neck region was modified to improve the dose estimates for the thyroid from external radiation, after the ideas of Nagarajan et al. The arms were separated from the trunk to represent more accurately the shielding by the phantom in external exposures. Furthermore, provisions were made to provide a phantom in a kneeling posture. The elemental composition of the tissues was changed to that given by Kerr. The resulting phantom is slightly smaller in mass (55 kg). Details of these changes are given

  18. Computational anthropomorphic phantoms for radiation protection dosimetry: evolution and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Jaiki

    2006-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms are computer models of human anatomy used in the calculation of radiation dose distribution in the human body upon exposure to a radiation source. Depending on the manner to represent human anatomy, they are categorized into two classes: stylized and tomographic phantoms. Stylized phantoms, which have mainly been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), describe human anatomy by using simple mathematical equations of analytical geometry. Several improved stylized phantoms such as male and female adults, pediatric series, and enhanced organ models have been developed following the first hermaphrodite adult stylized phantom, Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD)-5 phantom. Although stylized phantoms have significantly contributed to dosimetry calculation, they provide only approximations of the true anatomical features of the human body and the resulting organ dose distribution. An alternative class of computational phantom, the tomographic phantom, is based upon three-dimensional imaging techniques such as Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging and Computed Tomography (CT). The tomographic phantoms represent the human anatomy with a large number of voxels that are assigned tissue type and organ identity. To date, a total of around 30 tomographic phantoms including male and female adults, pediatric phantoms, and even a pregnant female, have been developed and utilized for realistic radiation dosimetry calculation. They are based on MRI/CT images or sectional color photos from patients, volunteers or cadavers. Several investigators have compared tomographic phantoms with stylized phantoms, and demonstrated the superiority of tomographic phantoms in terms of realistic anatomy and dosimetry calculation. This paper summarizes the history and current status of both stylized and tomographic phantoms, including Korean computational phantoms. Advantages, limitations, and future prospects are also discussed

  19. Implementation of Japanese male and female tomographic phantoms to multi-particle Monte Carlo code for ionizing radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2006-01-01

    Japanese male and female tomographic phantoms, which have been developed for radio-frequency electromagnetic-field dosimetry, were implemented into multi-particle Monte Carlo transport code to evaluate realistic dose distribution in human body exposed to radiation field. Japanese tomographic phantoms, which were developed from the whole body magnetic resonance images of Japanese average adult male and female, were processed as follows to be implemented into general purpose multi-particle Monte Carlo code, MCNPX2.5. Original array size of Japanese male and female phantoms, 320 x 160 x 866 voxels and 320 x 160 x 804 voxels, respectively, were reduced into 320 x 160 x 433 voxels and 320 x 160 x 402 voxels due to the limitation of memory use in MCNPX2.5. The 3D voxel array of the phantoms were processed by using the built-in repeated structure algorithm, where the human anatomy was described by the repeated lattice of tiny cube containing the information of material composition and organ index number. Original phantom data were converted into ASCII file, which can be directly ported into the lattice card of MCNPX2.5 input deck by using in-house code. A total of 30 material compositions obtained from International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement (ICRU) report 46 were assigned to 54 and 55 organs and tissues in the male and female phantoms, respectively, and imported into the material card of MCNPX2.5 along with the corresponding cross section data. Illustrative calculation of absorbed doses for 26 internal organs and effective dose were performed for idealized broad parallel photon and neutron beams in anterior-posterior irradiation geometry, which is typical for workers at nuclear power plant. The results were compared with the data from other Japanese and Caucasian tomographic phantom, and International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) report 74. The further investigation of the difference in organ dose and effective dose among tomographic

  20. Conversion of ICRP male reference phantom to polygon-surface phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi

    2013-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference phantoms, developed based on computed tomography images of human bodies, provide much more realism of human anatomy than the previously used MIRD5 (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) mathematical phantoms. It has been, however, realized that the ICRP reference phantoms have some critical limitations showing a considerable amount of holes for the skin and wall organs mainly due to the nature of voxels of which the phantoms are made, especially due to their low voxel resolutions. To address this problem, we are planning to develop the polygon-surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP reference phantoms (voxel phantoms) to polygon-surface phantoms. The objective of this preliminary study is to see if it is indeed possible to construct the high-quality polygon-surface phantoms based on the ICRP reference phantoms maintaining identical organ morphology and also to identify any potential issues, and technologies to address these issues, in advance. For this purpose, in the present study, the ICRP reference male phantom was roughly converted to a polygon-surface phantom. Then, the constructed phantom was implemented in Geant4, Monte Carlo particle transport code, for dose calculations, and the calculated dose values were compared with those of the original ICRP reference phantom to see how much the calculated dose values are sensitive to the accuracy of the conversion process. The results of the present study show that it is certainly possible to convert the ICRP reference phantoms to surface phantoms with enough accuracy. In spite of using relatively less resources (<2 man-months), we were able to construct the polygon-surface phantom with the organ masses perfectly matching the ICRP reference values. The analysis of the calculated dose values also implies that the dose values are indeed not very sensitive to the detailed morphology of the organ models in the phantom

  1. A statistically defined anthropomorphic software breast phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Beverly A.; Reiser, Ingrid; Nishikawa, Robert M.; Bakic, Predrag R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Digital anthropomorphic breast phantoms have emerged in the past decade because of recent advances in 3D breast x-ray imaging techniques. Computer phantoms in the literature have incorporated power-law noise to represent glandular tissue and branching structures to represent linear components such as ducts. When power-law noise is added to those phantoms in one piece, the simulated fibroglandular tissue is distributed randomly throughout the breast, resulting in dense tissue placement that may not be observed in a real breast. The authors describe a method for enhancing an existing digital anthropomorphic breast phantom by adding binarized power-law noise to a limited area of the breast. Methods: Phantoms with (0.5 mm) 3 voxel size were generated using software developed by Bakic et al. Between 0% and 40% of adipose compartments in each phantom were replaced with binarized power-law noise (β = 3.0) ranging from 0.1 to 0.6 volumetric glandular fraction. The phantoms were compressed to 7.5 cm thickness, then blurred using a 3 × 3 boxcar kernel and up-sampled to (0.1 mm) 3 voxel size using trilinear interpolation. Following interpolation, the phantoms were adjusted for volumetric glandular fraction using global thresholding. Monoenergetic phantom projections were created, including quantum noise and simulated detector blur. Texture was quantified in the simulated projections using power-spectrum analysis to estimate the power-law exponent β from 25.6 × 25.6 mm 2 regions of interest. Results: Phantoms were generated with total volumetric glandular fraction ranging from 3% to 24%. Values for β (averaged per projection view) were found to be between 2.67 and 3.73. Thus, the range of textures of the simulated breasts covers the textures observed in clinical images. Conclusions: Using these new techniques, digital anthropomorphic breast phantoms can be generated with a variety of glandular fractions and patterns. β values for this new phantom are comparable

  2. Contrast-enhanced near-infrared laser mammography with a prototype breast scanner: feasibility study with tissue phantoms and preliminary results of imaging experimental tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, T; Hochmuth, A; Malich, A; Reichenbach, J R; Fleck, M; Kaiser, W A

    2001-10-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) optical mammography without contrast has a low specificity. The application of optical contrast medium may improve the performance. The concentration-dependent detectability of a new NIR contrast medium was determined with a prototype optical breast scanner. In vivo imaging of experimental tumors was performed. The NIR contrast agent NIR96010 is a newly synthesized, hydrophilic contrast agent for NIR mammography. A concentration-dependent contrast resolution was determined for tissue phantoms consisting of whole milk powder and gelatin. A central part of the phantoms measuring 2 x 2 cm2 without contrast was replaced with phantom material containing 1 micromol/L to 25 nmol/L NIR96010. The composite phantoms were measured with a prototype NIR breast scanner with lasers of lambda1 = 785 nm and lambda2 = 850 nm wavelength. Intensity profiles and standard deviations of the transmission signal in areas with and without contrast were determined by linear fit procedures. Signal-to-noise ratios and spatial resolution as a function of contrast concentration were determined. Near-infrared imaging of five tumor-bearing SCID mice (MX1 breast adenocarcinoma, tumor diameter 5-10 mm) was performed before and after intravenous application of 2 micromol/kg NIR96010. Spectrometry showed an absorption maximum of the contrast agent at 755 nm. No spectral shifts occurred in protein-containing solution. Signal-to-noise ratio in the transmission intensity profiles ranged from 1.1 at 25 nmol/L contrast to 28 at 1 micromol/L. At concentrations contrast-enhanced images, with better delineation after contrast administration. In postcontrast absorption profiles, a 44.1% +/- 11.3% greater absorption increase was seen in tumor tissue compared with normal tissue. The laser wavelength lambda1 of the prototype laser mammography device was not situated at maximum absorption of the contrast agent NIR96010 but on the descending shoulder of the absorption spectrum. This implies a 20

  3. Forced response of the East Asian summer rainfall over the past millennium: results from a coupled model simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Hongli; Ti, Ruyuan [Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Lake Science and Environment, Nanjing (China); Wang, Bin [University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Meteorology and IPRC, Honolulu, HI (United States); Kuang, Xueyuan [Nanjing University, School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing (China)

    2011-01-15

    The centennial-millennial variation of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) precipitation over the past 1000 years was investigated through the analysis of a millennium simulation of the coupled ECHO-G model. The model results indicate that the centennial-millennial variation of the EASM is essentially a forced response to the external radiative forcing (insolation, volcanic aerosol, and green house gases). The strength of the response depends on latitude; and the spatial structure of the centennial-millennial variation differs from the interannual variability that arises primarily from the internal feedback processes within the climate system. On millennial time scale, the extratropical and subtropical precipitation was generally strong during Medieval Warm Period (MWP) and weak during Little Ice Age (LIA). The tropical rainfall is insensitive to the effective solar radiation forcing (insolation plus radiative effect of volcanic aerosols) but significantly responds to the modern anthropogenic radiative forcing. On centennial time scale, the variation of the extratropical and subtropical rainfall also tends to follow the effective solar radiation forcing closely. The forced response features in-phase rainfall variability between the extratropics and subtropics, which is in contrast to the anti-correlation on the interannual time scale. Further, the behavior of the interannual-decadal variation in the extratropics is effectively modulated by change of the mean states on the millennial time scale, suggesting that the structure of the internal mode may vary with significant changes in the external forcing. These findings imply that on the millennial time scale, (a) the proxy data in the extratropical EA may more sensitively reflect the EASM rainfall variations, and (b) the Meiyu and the northern China rainfall provide a consistent measure for the EASM strength. (orig.)

  4. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin; Nolte, Adam C.; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Segars, William P.; Nolte, Loren W.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  5. Development of realistic physical breast phantoms matched to virtual breast phantoms based on human subject data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiarashi, Nooshin [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Adam C. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Ghate, Sujata V. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Segars, William P. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Nolte, Loren W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Physical phantoms are essential for the development, optimization, and evaluation of x-ray breast imaging systems. Recognizing the major effect of anatomy on image quality and clinical performance, such phantoms should ideally reflect the three-dimensional structure of the human breast. Currently, there is no commercially available three-dimensional physical breast phantom that is anthropomorphic. The authors present the development of a new suite of physical breast phantoms based on human data. Methods: The phantoms were designed to match the extended cardiac-torso virtual breast phantoms that were based on dedicated breast computed tomography images of human subjects. The phantoms were fabricated by high-resolution multimaterial additive manufacturing (3D printing) technology. The glandular equivalency of the photopolymer materials was measured relative to breast tissue-equivalent plastic materials. Based on the current state-of-the-art in the technology and available materials, two variations were fabricated. The first was a dual-material phantom, the Doublet. Fibroglandular tissue and skin were represented by the most radiographically dense material available; adipose tissue was represented by the least radiographically dense material. The second variation, the Singlet, was fabricated with a single material to represent fibroglandular tissue and skin. It was subsequently filled with adipose-equivalent materials including oil, beeswax, and permanent urethane-based polymer. Simulated microcalcification clusters were further included in the phantoms via crushed eggshells. The phantoms were imaged and characterized visually and quantitatively. Results: The mammographic projections and tomosynthesis reconstructed images of the fabricated phantoms yielded realistic breast background. The mammograms of the phantoms demonstrated close correlation with simulated mammographic projection images of the corresponding virtual phantoms. Furthermore, power

  6. ICRU activity in the field of phantoms in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.

    1992-01-01

    The ICRU Report on 'Phantoms and Computational Models in Radiation Therapy, Diagnosis and Protection' is presented. Different types of phantoms may be defined. They may be broadly categorized according to their primary function: dosimetry, calibration and imaging. Within each functional category, there are 3 types or designs of phantoms: body phantoms (anthropomorphic), standard phantoms and reference phantoms (used in the definition and specification of certain radiation quantities). In radiological imaging, anthropomorphic body phantoms are used for measuring the absorbed dose distribution resulting from imaging procedures. Standard phantoms have simple reproducible geometry and are used for comparing measurements under standard conditions of exposure. Imaging phantoms are useful for evaluating a given imaging system; they contain different types of test pieces. The report contains a major section on human anatomy, from fetus to adult with the variations due to ethnic origin. Tolerance levels for the phantoms (composition, dimensions) are proposed and quality assurance programs are outlined. The report contains extensive appendices; human anatomical data and full specification of over 80 phantoms and computational models. ICRU Report 46 on 'Photon, electron, proton and neutron interaction data for body tissues' is closely related to the field of phantoms. It is a logical continuation on ICRU Report 44 (1989) on 'Tissue substitutes in radiation dosimetry and measurements' and contains the interaction data for more than 100 tissues, from fetal to adult, including some diseased tissues

  7. Individual virtual phantom reconstruction for organ dosimetry based on standard available phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babapour Mofrad, F.; Aghaeizadeh Zoroofi, R.; Abbaspour Tehran Fard, A.; Akhlaghpoor, Sh.; Chen, Y. W.; Sato, Y.

    2010-01-01

    In nuclear medicine application often it is required to use computational methods for evaluation of organ absorbed dose. Monte Carlo Simulation and phantoms have been used in many works before. The shape, size and volume In organs are varied, and this variation will produce error in dose calculation if no correction is applied. Materials and Methods: A computational framework for constructing individual phantom for dosimetry was performed on five liver CT scan data sets of Japanese normal individuals. The Zubal phantom was used as an original phantom to be adjusted by each individual data set. This registration was done by Spherical Harmonics and Thin-Plate Spline methods. Hausdorff distance was calculated for each case. Results: Result of Hausdorff distance for five lndividual phantoms showed that before registration ranged from 140.9 to 192.1, and after registration it changed to 52.5 to 76.7. This was caused by Index similarity ranged from %56.4 to %70.3. Conclusion: A new and automatic three-dimensional (3D) phantom construction approach was-suggested for individual internal dosimetry simulation via Spherical Harmonics and Thin-Plate Spline methods. The results showed that the Individual comparable phantom can be calculated with acceptable accuracy using geometric registration. This method could be used for race-specific statistical phantom modeling with major application in nuclear medicine for absorbed dose calculation.

  8. Prevalence of phantom limb pain, stump pain, and phantom limb sensation among the amputated cancer patients in India: A prospective, observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The phantom limb pain (PLP and phantom limb sensation (PLS are very common among amputated cancer patients, and they lead to considerable morbidity. In spite of this, there is a lack of epidemiological data of this phenomenon among the Asian population. This study was done to provide the data from Indian population. Methods: The prevalence of PLP, stump pain (SP, and PLS was prospectively analyzed from the amputated cancer patients over a period of 2 years in Dr. B.R.A. Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. The risk factors and the impact of phantom phenomenon on patients were also noted. Results: The prevalence of PLP was 41% at 3 and 12 months and 45.3% at 6 months, whereas that of SP and PLS was 14.4% and 71.2% at 3 months, 18.75% and 37.1% at 6 months, 15.8% and 32.4% at 12 months, respectively. There was higher prevalence of PLP and PLS among the patients with history of preamputation pain, smoking with proximal level of amputation, receiving general anesthesia, receiving intravenous (IV opioid postoperative analgesia, and developing neuroma or infection. Conclusion: The prevalence of PLP and PLS was higher among the cancer amputees as compared to SP, and a few risk factors responsible for their higher prevalence were found in our study. The PLP and PLS lead to considerable morbidity in terms of sleep disturbance and depression.

  9. Dose distribution in organs: patient-specific phantoms versus reference phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, I.V.B., E-mail: isabelle.lacerda@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil); Vieira, J.W. [Instituto Federal de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife (Brazil); Oliveira, M.L.; Lima, F.R.A. [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PB), Recife (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Discrepancies between ICRP phantoms and real patients lead to disparities on patient-dose estimations. This paper aims to compare distribution of dose in organs of male/female specific-phantoms and ICRP reference phantoms. The absorbed dose estimation was performed using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code and a parallel source algorithm. In this work were used a patient-specific phantom for a man (1.73m/70.3kg) and another for a woman (1.63m/60.3kg) and the male and female ICRP reference phantoms. The comparison of the absorbed dose from each phantom gender was performed using the relative error. The results were expressed in terms of conversion coefficients to brain, lungs, liver and kidneys. The greatest absolute relative error between the organs of the patient-specific phantom and the reference phantom was 22.92% in the liver and 62.84% in the kidneys, respectively for man and woman. There are errors that cannot be disregarded. This paper shows the need for a specific study for each patient or for the population of each country, since there are different body types, which affects the distribution of the organ doses. (author)

  10. Dose distribution in organs: patient-specific phantoms versus reference phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, I.V.B.; Vieira, J.W.; Oliveira, M.L.; Lima, F.R.A.

    2017-01-01

    Discrepancies between ICRP phantoms and real patients lead to disparities on patient-dose estimations. This paper aims to compare distribution of dose in organs of male/female specific-phantoms and ICRP reference phantoms. The absorbed dose estimation was performed using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code and a parallel source algorithm. In this work were used a patient-specific phantom for a man (1.73m/70.3kg) and another for a woman (1.63m/60.3kg) and the male and female ICRP reference phantoms. The comparison of the absorbed dose from each phantom gender was performed using the relative error. The results were expressed in terms of conversion coefficients to brain, lungs, liver and kidneys. The greatest absolute relative error between the organs of the patient-specific phantom and the reference phantom was 22.92% in the liver and 62.84% in the kidneys, respectively for man and woman. There are errors that cannot be disregarded. This paper shows the need for a specific study for each patient or for the population of each country, since there are different body types, which affects the distribution of the organ doses. (author)

  11. Patient specific 3D printed phantom for IMRT quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehler, Eric D; Higgins, Patrick D; Dusenbery, Kathryn E; Barney, Brett M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a patient specific phantom for patient specific dosimetric verification. Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. Calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was compared for a parallel-opposed head and neck field geometry to establish tissue equivalence. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom as well as traditional standard phantoms. The maximum difference in calculated dose was 1.8% for the parallel-opposed configuration. Passing rates of various dosimetric parameters were compared for the IMRT plan measurements; the 3D printed phantom results showed greater disagreement at superficial depths than other methods. A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine use. (paper)

  12. Toxicology Analysis of Tissue-Mimicking Phantom Made From Gelatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolbashid, A. S.; Hamzah, N.; Zaman, W. S. W. K.; Mokhtar, M. S.

    2017-06-01

    Skin phantom mimics the biological skin tissues as it have the ability to respond to changes in its environment. The development of tissue-mimicking phantom could contributes towards the reduce usage of animal in cosmetics and pharmacokinetics. In this study, the skin phantoms made from gelatin were tested with four different commonly available cosmetic products to determine the toxicity of each substance. The four substances used were; mercury-based whitening face cream, carcinogenic liquid make-up foundation, paraben-based acne cleanser, and organic lip balm. Toxicity test were performed on all of the phantoms. For toxicity testing, topographical and electrophysiological changes of the phantoms were evaluated. The ability of each respective phantom to react with mild toxic substances and its electrical resistance were analysed in to determine the toxicity of all the phantom models. Four-electrode method along with custom made electrical impedance analyser was used to differentiate electrical resistance between intoxicated phantom and non-intoxicated phantom in this study. Electrical resistance values obtained from the phantom models were significantly higher than the control group. The result obtained suggests the phantom as a promising candidate to be used as alternative for toxicology testing in the future.

  13. Safety and efficacy of first-line bevacizumab with chemotherapy in Asian patients with advanced nonsquamous NSCLC: results from the phase IV MO19390 (SAiL) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chun-Ming; Au, Joseph Siu-kie; Chang, Gee-Chen; Cheng, Ashley Chi-kin; Zhou, Caicun; Wu, Yi-long

    2011-06-01

    First-line treatment with bevacizumab combined with chemotherapy has been shown to improve outcomes in patients with advanced, nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSNSCLC) in phase III clinical trials. SAiL (MO19390), an open-label, multicenter, single-arm study, evaluated the safety and efficacy of first-line bevacizumab-based treatment in clinical practice. This report presents the results of a preplanned subanalysis of Asian patients enrolled in SAiL. Patients with untreated, locally advanced, metastatic or recurrent NSNSCLC received bevacizumab 7.5 or 15 mg/kg every 3 weeks plus chemotherapy for up to six cycles, followed by single-agent bevacizumab until disease progression. Eligibility criteria for SAiL permitted enrolment of a broad patient population. The primary end point was safety; secondary end points included time to disease progression and overall survival. The Asian intent-to-treat population comprised 314 of the 2212 patients enrolled in the SAiL trial. In the Asian subanalysis, patients received a median of nine cycles of bevacizumab, and the median follow-up was 16.4 months. The incidence of clinically significant adverse events (grade ≥3) of special interest was relatively low in this population (15.6% overall); proteinuria (7.6%), hypertension (4.8%), and bleeding (2.5%) were the most common. A total of five adverse events related to bevacizumab were reported as grade 5. Disease control rate was 94.1%, median time to disease progression was 8.3 months, and median overall survival was 18.9 months. The safety and efficacy of first-line bevacizumab-based treatment in Asian patients with advanced NSNSCLC is consistent with that demonstrated in phase III studies and in the overall SAiL population. There were no new safety signals.

  14. Applicability of dose conversion coefficients of ICRP 74 to Asian adult males: Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Choonik; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2007-01-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reported comprehensive dose conversion coefficients for adult population, which is exposed to external photon sources in the Publication 74. However, those quantities were calculated from so-called stylized (or mathematical) phantoms composed of simplified mathematical surface equations so that the discrepancy between the phantoms and real human anatomy has been investigated by several authors using Caucasian-based voxel phantoms. To address anatomical and racial limitations of the stylized phantoms, several Asian-based voxel phantoms have been developed by Korean and Japanese investigators, independently. In the current study, photon dose conversion coefficients of ICRP 74 were compared with those from a total of five Asian-based male voxel phantoms, whose body dimensions were almost identical. Those of representative radio-sensitive organs (testes, red bone marrow, colon, lungs, and stomach), and effective dose conversion coefficients were obtained for comparison. Even though organ doses for testes, colon and lungs, and effective doses from ICRP 74 agreed well with those from Asian voxel phantoms within 10%, absorbed doses for red bone marrow and stomach showed significant discrepancies up to 30% which was mainly attributed to difference of phantom description between stylized and voxel phantoms. This study showed that the ICRP 74 dosimetry data, which have been reported to be unrealistic compared to those from Caucasian-based voxel phantoms, are also not appropriate for Asian population

  15. The Phantom Menace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vium, Christian

    2013-01-01

    as a phantom menace, which asserts itself through a form of omnipresent fear, nurtured by an inherent opaqueness. As this fundamental fear progressively permeates the nomadic landscape, it engenders a recasting of mobile strategies among the nomadic pastoralist groups who inhabit the interstitial desert spaces....

  16. Development of a physical 3D anthropomorphic breast phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carton, Ann-Katherine; Bakic, Predrag; Ullberg, Christer; Derand, Helen; Maidment, Andrew D. A. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 1 Silverstein Building, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4206 (United States); XCounter AB, Svaerdvaegen 11, SE-182 33 Danderyd (Sweden); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, 1 Silverstein Building, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104-4206 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Develop a technique to fabricate a 3D anthropomorphic breast phantom with known ground truth for image quality assessment of 2D and 3D breast x-ray imaging systems. Methods: The phantom design is based on an existing computer model that can generate breast voxel phantoms of varying composition, size, and shape. The physical phantom is produced in two steps. First, the portion of the voxel phantom consisting of the glandular tissue, skin, and Cooper's ligaments is separated into sections. These sections are then fabricated by high-resolution rapid prototyping using a single material with 50% glandular equivalence. The remaining adipose compartments are then filled using an epoxy-based resin (EBR) with 100% adipose equivalence. The phantom sections are stacked to form the physical anthropomorphic phantom. Results: The authors fabricated a prototype phantom corresponding to a 450 ml breast with 45% dense tissue, deformed to a 5 cm compressed thickness. Both the rapid prototype (RP) and EBR phantom materials are radiographically uniform. The coefficient of variation (CoV) of the relative attenuation between RP and EBR phantom samples was <1% and the CoV of the signal intensity within RP and EBR phantom samples was <1.5% on average. Digital mammography and reconstructed digital breast tomosynthesis images of the authors' phantom were reviewed by two radiologists; they reported that the images are similar in appearance to clinical images, noting there are still artifacts from air bubbles in the EBR. Conclusions: The authors have developed a technique to produce 3D anthropomorphic breast phantoms with known ground truth, yielding highly realistic x-ray images. Such phantoms may serve both qualitative and quantitative performance assessments for 2D and 3D breast x-ray imaging systems.

  17. Progression-free survival results in postmenopausal Asian women: subgroup analysis from a phase III randomized trial of fulvestrant 500 mg vs anastrozole 1 mg for hormone receptor-positive advanced breast cancer (FALCON).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Shinzaburo; Ellis, Matthew J; Robertson, John F R; Thirlwell, Jackie; Fazal, Mehdi; Shao, Zhimin

    2018-05-01

    The international, phase III FALCON study (NCT01602380) in postmenopausal patients with hormone receptor-positive, locally advanced/metastatic breast cancer (LA/MBC) who had not received prior endocrine therapy, demonstrated statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) for patients who received fulvestrant 500 mg vs anastrozole 1 mg. This subgroup analysis evaluated PFS in Asian (randomized in China, Japan, or Taiwan) and non-Asian patients from the FALCON study. Eligible patients (estrogen receptor- and/or progesterone receptor-positive LA/MBC; World Health Organization performance status 0-2; ≥ 1 measurable/non-measurable lesion[s]) were randomized. PFS was assessed via Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours version 1.1, surgery/radiotherapy for disease worsening, or death (any cause). Secondary endpoints included: objective response rate, clinical benefit rate, duration of response, and duration of clinical benefit. Consistency of effect across subgroups was assessed via hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a log-rank test. Adverse events (AEs) were evaluated. Of the 462 randomized patients, the Asian and non-Asian subgroups comprised 67 and 395 patients, respectively. In the Asian subgroup, median PFS was 16.6 and 15.9 months with fulvestrant and anastrozole, respectively (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% CI 0.44-1.50). In the non-Asian subgroup, median PFS was 16.5 and 13.8 months, respectively (hazard ratio 0.79; 95% CI 0.62-1.01). Secondary outcomes were numerically improved with fulvestrant vs anastrozole in both subgroups. AE profiles were generally consistent between Asian and non-Asian subgroups. Results of this subgroup analysis suggest that treatment effects in the Asian patient subgroup are broadly consistent with the non-Asian population.

  18. Asian Ginseng

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care provider before using Asian ginseng. Keep in Mind Tell all your health care providers about any ... Privacy and Policies Accessibility en Español FOIA Site Map Contact Us U.S. Department of Health & Human Services , ...

  19. The South Asian genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Chambers

    Full Text Available The genetic sequence variation of people from the Indian subcontinent who comprise one-quarter of the world's population, is not well described. We carried out whole genome sequencing of 168 South Asians, along with whole-exome sequencing of 147 South Asians to provide deeper characterisation of coding regions. We identify 12,962,155 autosomal sequence variants, including 2,946,861 new SNPs and 312,738 novel indels. This catalogue of SNPs and indels amongst South Asians provides the first comprehensive map of genetic variation in this major human population, and reveals evidence for selective pressures on genes involved in skin biology, metabolism, infection and immunity. Our results will accelerate the search for the genetic variants underlying susceptibility to disorders such as type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease which are highly prevalent amongst South Asians.

  20. Anthropomorphic phantom materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D.R.; Constantinou, C.

    1982-01-01

    The need, terminology and history of tissue substitutes are outlined. Radiation properties of real tissues are described and simulation procedures are outlined. Recent tissue substitutes are described and charted, as are calculated radiation classifications. Manufacturing procedures and quality control are presented. Recent phantom studies are reviewed and a discussion recorded. Elemental compositions of the recommended tissue substitutes are charted with elemental composition given for each tissue substitute

  1. Coupled oscillators as models of phantom and scalar field cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraoni, Valerio

    2004-01-01

    We study a toy model for phantom cosmology recently introduced in the literature and consisting of two oscillators, one of which carries negative kinetic energy. The results are compared with the exact phase space picture obtained for similar dynamical systems describing, respectively, a massive canonical scalar field conformally coupled to the spacetime curvature and a conformally coupled massive phantom. Finally, the dynamical system describing exactly a minimally coupled phantom is studied and compared with the toy model

  2. Creating 3D gelatin phantoms for experimental evaluation in biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stein Nils

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe and evaluate a setup to create gelatin phantoms by robotic 3D printing. Key aspects are the large workspace, reproducibility and resolution of the created phantoms. Given its soft tissue nature, the gelatin is kept fluid during inside the system and we present parameters for additive printing of homogeneous, solid objects. The results indicate that 3D printing of gelatin can be an alternative for quickly creating larger soft tissue phantoms without the need for casting a mold.

  3. The Asian methanol market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Hideki

    1995-01-01

    For the purpose of this presentation, Asia has been broadly defined as a total of 15 countries, namely Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Myanmar, India, Vietnam, Australia and New Zealand. In 1994 and the first half of 1995, the methanol industry and its derivative industries experienced hard time, because of extraordinarily high methanol prices. In spite of this circumstance, methanol demand in Asian countries has been growing steadily and remarkably, following Asian high economic growth. Most of this growth in demand has been and will continue to be met by outside supply. However, even with increased import of methanol from outside of Asia, as a result of this growth, Asian trade volume will be much larger in the coming years. Asian countries must turn their collective attention to making logistics and transportation for methanol and its derivatives more efficient in the Asian region to make better use of existing supply resources. The author reviews current economic growth as his main topic, and explains the forecast of the growth of methanol demand and supply in Asian countries in the near future

  4. Targeting of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders by the tobacco industry: results from the Minnesota Tobacco Document Depository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggli, M; Pollay, R; Lew, R; Joseph, A

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The study objective was to review internal tobacco industry documents written between 1985 and 1995 regarding the Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) population in the USA. These documents detail opportunities and barriers to promotion of tobacco products, as viewed by the tobacco industry and its market research firms. Data sources/methods: Researchers reviewed tobacco industry documents from the document depository in Minneapolis, Minnesota and the tobacco industry's website, The Tobacco Archive, in a systematic fashion. A combined technique was employed using title keywords, dates, and names to search the 4(b) index. Findings: A review of internal tobacco company documents reveal that during the late 1980s, the industry and its market research firms recognised the importance of the AAPI community as a potential business market. Documents describe the population growth in this community, the high prevalence of smoking in countries of origin, high purchasing power of AAPI immigrants, cultural predisposition to smoking, opportunities afforded by the high proportion of retail businesses under AAPI ownership, barriers to developing the AAPI market, comprehensive campaigns, and political and lobbying efforts. Comprehensive campaigns were designed to integrate promotion efforts in AAPI consumer, retail, and business communities. Conclusions: The documents show that the tobacco industry developed specific promotion strategies to target the AAPI population. Tobacco control initiatives in the AAPI group have been slower to develop than in other targeted ethnic groups, and may benefit by increased awareness of industry methods to promote tobacco use. PMID:12198269

  5. Deformable and durable phantoms with controlled density of scatterers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisaillon, Charles-Etienne; Lamouche, Guy; Dufour, Marc; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre [Industrial Materials Institute, National Research Council Canada, 75 de Mortagne, Boucherville, Quebec J4B 6Y4 (Canada); Maciejko, Romain [Optoelectronics Laboratory, Engineering Physics, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, PO Box 6079, Station ' Centre-ville' Montreal, Quebec H3C 3A7 (Canada)], E-mail: charles-etienne.bisaillon@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca, E-mail: guy.lamouche@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca, E-mail: marc.dufour@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca, E-mail: jean-pierre.monchalin@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca, E-mail: romain.maciejko@polytml.ca

    2008-07-07

    We have developed deformable and durable optical tissue phantoms with a simple and well-defined microstructure including a novel combination of scatterers and a matrix material. These were developed for speckle and elastography investigations in optical coherence tomography, but should prove useful in many other fields. We present in detail the fabrication process which involves embedding silica microspheres in a silicone matrix. We also characterize the resulting phantoms with scanning electron microscopy and optical measurements. To our knowledge, no such phantoms were proposed in the literature before. Our technique has a wide range of applicability and could also be adapted to fabricate phantoms with various optical and mechanical properties. (note)

  6. Profile: Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American Profile: Asian Americans Asian American Profile (Map of the US with the top 10 states displaying the largest Asian American population according to the Census Bureau) CA - ...

  7. Phantom breast syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phantom breast syndrome is a type of condition in which patients have a sensation of residual breast tissue and can include both non-painful sensations as well as phantom breast pain. The incidence varies in different studies, ranging from approximately 30% to as high as 80% of patients after mastectomy. It seriously affects quality of life through the combined impact of physical disability and emotional distress. The breast cancer incidence rate in India as well as Western countries has risen in recent years while survival rates have improved; this has effectively increased the number of women for whom post-treatment quality of life is important. In this context, chronic pain following treatment for breast cancer surgery is a significantly under-recognized and under-treated problem. Various types of chronic neuropathic pain may arise following breast cancer surgery due to surgical trauma. The cause of these syndromes is damage to various nerves during surgery. There are a number of assumed factors causing or perpetuating persistent neuropathic pain after breast cancer surgery. Most well-established risk factors for developing phantom breast pain and other related neuropathic pain syndromes are severe acute postoperative pain and greater postoperative use of analgesics. Based upon current evidence, the goals of prophylactic strategies could first target optimal peri-operative pain control and minimizing damage to nerves during surgery. There is some evidence that chronic pain and sensory abnormalities do decrease over time. The main group of oral medications studied includes anti-depressants, anticonvulsants, opioids, N-methyl-D-asparate receptor antagonists, mexilitine, topical lidocaine, cannabinoids, topical capsaicin and glysine antagonists. Neuromodulation techniques such as motor cortex stimulation, spinal cord stimulation, and intrathecal drug therapies have been used to treat various neuropathic pain syndromes.

  8. Role of Social Support in Examining Acculturative Stress and Psychological Distress Among Asian American Immigrants and Three Sub-groups: Results from NLAAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shipra; McBride, Kimberly; Kak, Vivek

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the impact of acculturative stress and social support (family and friend) on psychological distress among Asian American immigrants and three Asian sub-groups (Vietnamese, Filipino and Chinese) immigrants. The National Latino and Asian American Study 2002-2003 dataset was used. The study findings were: (1) among all Asian American immigrants high language barrier and discrimination stress were associated with increased level of psychological distress, but similar association was not present for legal stress; (2) among all Asian American immigrants high family social support decreased the levels of psychological distress, and in addition, friend social support buffered the relationship of discrimination and psychological distress; and (3) among Vietnamese, Filipino, and Chinese, differential association of social support and acculturative stress to psychological distress were observed. These findings highlight the importance of social support among Asian American immigrants, while also paying attention to the variation that may exist between different sub-groups.

  9. Transorbital therapy delivery: phantom testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Martha-Conley; Atuegwu, Nkiruka; Mawn, Louise; Galloway, Robert L.

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a combined image-guided and minimally invasive system for the delivery of therapy to the back of the eye. It is composed of a short 4.5 mm diameter endoscope with a magnetic tracker embedded in the tip. In previous work we have defined an optimized fiducial placement for accurate guidance to the back of the eye and are now moving to system testing. The fundamental difficulty in testing performance is establishing a target in a manner which closely mimics the physiological task. We have to have a penetrable material which obscures line of sight, similar to the orbital fat. In addition we need to have some independent measure of knowing when a target has been reached to compare to the ideal performance. Lastly, the target cannot be rigidly attached to the skull phantom since the optic nerve lies buried in the orbital fat. We have developed a skull phantom with white cloth stellate balls supporting a correctly sized globe. Placed in the white balls are red, blue, orange and yellow balls. One of the colored balls has been soaked in barium to make it bright on CT. The user guides the tracked endoscope to the target as defined by the images and tells us its color. We record task accuracy and time to target. We have tested this with 28 residents, fellows and attending physicians. Each physician performs the task twice guided and twice unguided. Results will be presented.

  10. Phantoms for IMRT dose distribution measurement and treatment verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, Daniel A.; Gerber, Russell L.; Mutic, Sasa; Purdy, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Background: The verification of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient treatment dose distributions is currently based on custom-built or modified dose measurement phantoms. The only commercially available IMRT treatment planning and delivery system (Peacock, NOMOS Corp.) is supplied with a film phantom that allows accurate spatial localization of the dose distribution using radiographic film. However, measurements using other dosimeters are necessary for the thorough verification of IMRT. Methods: We have developed a phantom to enable dose measurements using a cylindrical ionization chamber and the localization of prescription isodose curves using a matrix of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) chips. The external phantom cross-section is identical to that of the commercial phantom, to allow direct comparisons of measurements. A supplementary phantom has been fabricated to verify the IMRT dose distributions for pelvis treatments. Results: To date, this phantom has been used for the verification of IMRT dose distributions for head and neck and prostate cancer treatments. Designs are also presented for a phantom insert to be used with polymerizing gels (e.g., BANG-2) to obtain volumetric dose distribution measurements. Conclusion: The phantoms have proven useful in the quantitative evaluation of IMRT treatments

  11. Designing a compact MRI motion phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmiedel Max

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Even today, dealing with motion artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a challenging task. Image corruption due to spontaneous body motion complicates diagnosis. In this work, an MRI phantom for rigid motion is presented. It is used to generate motion-corrupted data, which can serve for evaluation of blind motion compensation algorithms. In contrast to commercially available MRI motion phantoms, the presented setup works on small animal MRI systems. Furthermore, retrospective gating is performed on the data, which can be used as a reference for novel motion compensation approaches. The motion of the signal source can be reconstructed using motor trigger signals and be utilized as the ground truth for motion estimation. The proposed setup results in motion corrected images. Moreover, the importance of preprocessing the MRI raw data, e.g. phase-drift correction, is demonstrated. The gained knowledge can be used to design an MRI phantom for elastic motion.

  12. Determination of photon conversion factors relating exposure and dose for several extremity phantom designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberson, P.L.; Eichner, F.N.; Reece, W.D.

    1986-09-01

    This report presents the results of measurements of dosimetric properties of simple extremity phantoms suitable for use in extremity dosimeter performance testing. Two sizes of phantoms were used in this study. One size represented the forearm or lower leg and the other size represented the finger or toe. For both phantom sizes, measurements were performed on solid plastic phantoms and on phantoms containing simulated bone material to determine the effect of backscattered radiations from the bone on the surface dose. Exposure-to-dose conversion factors (C/sub x/ factors) were determined for photon energies ranging from 16 to 1250 keV (average for 60 Co). The effect of the presence of a phantom was also measured for a 90 Sr/ 90 Y source. Significant differences in the measured C/sub x/ factors were found among the phantoms investigated. The factors for the finger-sized phantoms were uniformly less than for the arm-sized phantoms

  13. Benchmark calculations with simple phantom for neutron dosimetry (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukio, Sakamoto; Shuichi, Tsuda; Tatsuhiko, Sato; Nobuaki, Yoshizawa; Hideo, Hirayama

    2004-01-01

    Benchmark calculations for high-energy neutron dosimetry were undertaken after SATIF-5. Energy deposition in a cylindrical phantom with 100 cm radius and 30 cm depth was calculated for the irradiation of neutrons from 100 MeV to 10 GeV. Using the ICRU four-element loft tissue phantom and four single-element (hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen) phantoms, the depth distributions of deposition energy and those total at the central region of phantoms within l cm radius and at the whole region of phantoms within 100 cm radius were calculated. The calculated results of FLUKA, MCNPX, MARS, HETC-3STEP and NMTC/JAM codes were compared. It was found that FLUKA, MARS and NMTC/JAM showed almost the same results. For the high-energy neutron incident, the MCNP-X results showed the largest ones in the total deposition energy and the HETC-3STEP results show'ed smallest ones. (author)

  14. Phantom limb phenomenon as an example of body image distortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razmus Magdalena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The perception of one’s own body, its mental representation, and emotional attitude to it are the components of so-called “body image” [1]. The aim of the research was to analyse phantom pain and non-painful phantom sensations as results of limb loss and to explain them in terms of body image distortion.

  15. The subresolution DaTSCAN phantom: a cost-effective, flexible alternative to traditional phantom technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jonathan C; Vennart, Nicholas; Negus, Ian; Holmes, Robin; Bandmann, Oliver; Lo, Christine; Fenner, John

    2018-03-01

    The Alderson striatal phantom is frequently used to assess I-FP-CIT (Ioflupane) image quality and to test semi-quantification software. However, its design is associated with a number of limitations, in particular: unrealistic image appearances and inflexibility. A new physical phantom approach is proposed on the basis of subresolution phantom technology. The design incorporates thin slabs of attenuating material generated through additive manufacturing, and paper sheets with radioactive ink patterns printed on their surface, created with a conventional inkjet printer. The paper sheets and attenuating slabs are interleaved before scanning. Use of thin layers ensures that they cannot be individually resolved on reconstructed images. An investigation was carried out to demonstrate the performance of such a phantom in producing simplified I-FP-CIT uptake patterns. Single photon emission computed tomography imaging was carried out on an assembled phantom designed to mimic a healthy patient. Striatal binding ratio results and linear striatal dimensions were calculated from the reconstructed data and compared with that of 22 clinical patients without evidence of Parkinsonian syndrome, determined from clinical follow-up. Striatal binding ratio results for the fully assembled phantom were: 3.1, 3.3, 2.9 and 2.6 for the right caudate, left caudate, right putamen and right caudate, respectively. All were within two SDs of results derived from a cohort of clinical patients. Medial-lateral and anterior-posterior dimensions of the simulated striata were also within the range of values seen in clinical data. This work provides the foundation for the generation of a range of more clinically realistic, physical phantoms.

  16. Comparison of different phantoms used in digital diagnostic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bor, Dogan, E-mail: bor@eng.ankara.edu.tr [Ankara University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Engineering Physics. Tandogan, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Unal, Elif, E-mail: elf.unall@gmail.com [Radat Dosimetry Laboratory Services, 06830, Golbasi, Ankara (Turkey); Uslu, Anil, E-mail: m.aniluslu@gmail.com [Radat Dosimetry Laboratory Services, 06830, Golbasi, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-09-21

    The organs of extremity, chest, skull and lumbar were physically simulated using uniform PMMA slabs with different thicknesses alone and using these slabs together with aluminum plates and air gaps (ANSI Phantoms). The variation of entrance surface air kerma and scatter fraction with X-ray beam qualities was investigated for these phantoms and the results were compared with those measured from anthropomorphic phantoms. A flat panel digital radiographic system was used for all the experiments. Considerable variations of entrance surface air kermas were found for the same organs of different designs, and highest doses were measured for the PMMA slabs. A low contrast test tool and a contrast detail test object (CDRAD) were used together with each organ simulation of PMMA slabs and ANSI phantoms in order to test the clinical image qualities. Digital images of these phantom combinations and anthropomorphic phantoms were acquired in raw and clinically processed formats. Variation of image quality with kVp and post processing was evaluated using the numerical metrics of these test tools and measured contrast values from the anthropomorphic phantoms. Our results indicated that design of some phantoms may not be efficient enough to reveal the expected performance of the post processing algorithms.

  17. The impact of anthropometric patient-phantom matching on organ dose: A hybrid phantom study for fluoroscopy guided interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Perry B.; Geyer, Amy; Borrego, David; Ficarrotta, Kayla; Johnson, Kevin; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the benefits and limitations of patient-phantom matching for determining organ dose during fluoroscopy guided interventions. Methods: In this study, 27 CT datasets representing patients of different sizes and genders were contoured and converted into patient-specific computational models. Each model was matched, based on height and weight, to computational phantoms selected from the UF hybrid patient-dependent series. In order to investigate the influence of phantom type on patient organ dose, Monte Carlo methods were used to simulate two cardiac projections (PA/left lateral) and two abdominal projections (RAO/LPO). Organ dose conversion coefficients were then calculated for each patient-specific and patient-dependent phantom and also for a reference stylized and reference hybrid phantom. The coefficients were subsequently analyzed for any correlation between patient-specificity and the accuracy of the dose estimate. Accuracy was quantified by calculating an absolute percent difference using the patient-specific dose conversion coefficients as the reference. Results: Patient-phantom matching was shown most beneficial for estimating the dose to heavy patients. In these cases, the improvement over using a reference stylized phantom ranged from approximately 50% to 120% for abdominal projections and for a reference hybrid phantom from 20% to 60% for all projections. For lighter individuals, patient-phantom matching was clearly superior to using a reference stylized phantom, but not significantly better than using a reference hybrid phantom for certain fields and projections. Conclusions: The results indicate two sources of error when patients are matched with phantoms: Anatomical error, which is inherent due to differences in organ size and location, and error attributed to differences in the total soft tissue attenuation. For small patients, differences in soft tissue attenuation are minimal and are exceeded by inherent anatomical differences

  18. Development of a phantom to test fully automated breast density software – A work in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waade, G.G.; Hofvind, S.; Thompson, J.D.; Highnam, R.; Hogg, P.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Mammographic density (MD) is an independent risk factor for breast cancer and may have a future role for stratified screening. Automated software can estimate MD but the relationship between breast thickness reduction and MD is not fully understood. Our aim is to develop a deformable breast phantom to assess automated density software and the impact of breast thickness reduction on MD. Methods: Several different configurations of poly vinyl alcohol (PVAL) phantoms were created. Three methods were used to estimate their density. Raw image data of mammographic images were processed using Volpara to estimate volumetric breast density (VBD%); Hounsfield units (HU) were measured on CT images; and physical density (g/cm 3 ) was calculated using a formula involving mass and volume. Phantom volume versus contact area and phantom volume versus phantom thickness was compared to values of real breasts. Results: Volpara recognized all deformable phantoms as female breasts. However, reducing the phantom thickness caused a change in phantom density and the phantoms were not able to tolerate same level of compression and thickness reduction experienced by female breasts during mammography. Conclusion: Our results are promising as all phantoms resulted in valid data for automated breast density measurement. Further work should be conducted on PVAL and other materials to produce deformable phantoms that mimic female breast structure and density with the ability of being compressed to the same level as female breasts. Advances in knowledge: We are the first group to have produced deformable phantoms that are recognized as breasts by Volpara software. - Highlights: • Several phantoms of different configurations were created. • Three methods to assess phantom density were implemented. • All phantoms were identified as breasts by the Volpara software. • Reducing phantom thickness caused a change in phantom density.

  19. IMRT delivery verification using a spiral phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Susan L.; Tome, Wolfgang A.; Orton, Nigel P.; McNutt, Todd R.; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we report on the testing and verification of a system for IMRT delivery quality assurance that uses a cylindrical solid water phantom with a spiral trajectory for radiographic film placement. This spiral film technique provides more complete dosimetric verification of the entire IMRT treatment than perpendicular film methods, since it samples a three-dimensional dose subspace rather than using measurements at only one or two depths. As an example, the complete analysis of the predicted and measured spiral films is described for an intracranial IMRT treatment case. The results of this analysis are compared to those of a single field perpendicular film technique that is typically used for IMRT QA. The comparison demonstrates that both methods result in a dosimetric error within a clinical tolerance of 5%, however the spiral phantom QA technique provides a more complete dosimetric verification while being less time consuming. To independently verify the dosimetry obtained with the spiral film, the same IMRT treatment was delivered to a similar phantom in which LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters were arranged along the spiral trajectory. The maximum difference between the predicted and measured TLD data for the 1.8 Gy fraction was 0.06 Gy for a TLD located in a high dose gradient region. This further validates the ability of the spiral phantom QA process to accurately verify delivery of an IMRT plan

  20. Australian Asian Options

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Moreno; Javier F. Navas

    2003-01-01

    We study European options on the ratio of the stock price to its average and viceversa. Some of these options are traded in the Australian Stock Exchange since 1992, thus we call them Australian Asian options. For geometric averages, we obtain closed-form expressions for option prices. For arithmetic means, we use different approximations that produce very similar results.

  1. Image fusion tool: Validation by phantom measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zander, A.; Geworski, L.; Richter, M.; Ivancevic, V.; Munz, D.L.; Muehler, M.; Ditt, H.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Validation of a new image fusion tool with regard to handling, application in a clinical environment and fusion precision under different acquisition and registration settings. Methods: The image fusion tool investigated allows fusion of imaging modalities such as PET, CT, MRI. In order to investigate fusion precision, PET and MRI measurements were performed using a cylinder and a body contour-shaped phantom. The cylinder phantom (diameter and length 20 cm each) contained spheres (10 to 40 mm in diameter) which represented 'cold' or 'hot' lesions in PET measurements. The body contour-shaped phantom was equipped with a heart model containing two 'cold' lesions. Measurements were done with and without four external markers placed on the phantoms. The markers were made of plexiglass (2 cm diameter and 1 cm thickness) and contained a Ga-Ge-68 core for PET and Vitamin E for MRI measurements. Comparison of fusion results with and without markers was done visually and by computer assistance. This algorithm was applied to the different fusion parameters and phantoms. Results: Image fusion of PET and MRI data without external markers yielded a measured error of 0 resulting in a shift at the matrix border of 1.5 mm. Conclusion: The image fusion tool investigated allows a precise fusion of PET and MRI data with a translation error acceptable for clinical use. The error is further minimized by using external markers, especially in the case of missing anatomical orientation. Using PET the registration error depends almost only on the low resolution of the data

  2. A low-cost phantom for simple routine testing of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, A.H.; Ng, K.H.; Dharmendra, H.; Perkins, A.C.

    2009-01-01

    A simple sphere test phantom has been developed for routine performance testing of SPECT systems in situations where expensive commercial phantoms may not be available. The phantom was based on a design with six universal syringe hubs set in the frame to support a circular array of six glass blown spheres of different sizes. The frame was then placed into a water-filled CT abdomen phantom and scanned with a triple head camera system (Philips IRIX TM , USA). Comparison was made with a commercially available phantom (Deluxe Jaszczak phantom). Whereas the commercial phantom demonstrates cold spot resolution, an important advantage of the sphere test phantom was that hot spot resolution could be easily measured using almost half (370 MBq) of the activity recommended for use in the commercial phantom. Results showed that the contrast increased non-linearly with sphere volume and radionuclide concentration. The phantom was found to be suitable as an inexpensive option for daily performance tests.

  3. Exploratory modeling and simulation to support development of motesanib in Asian patients with non-small cell lung cancer based on MONET1 study results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claret, L; Bruno, R; Lu, J-F; Sun, Y-N; Hsu, C-P

    2014-04-01

    The motesanib phase III MONET1 study failed to show improvement in overall survival (OS) in non-small cell lung cancer, but a subpopulation of Asian patients had a favorable outcome. We performed exploratory modeling and simulations based on MONET1 data to support further development of motesanib in Asian patients. A model-based estimate of time to tumor growth was the best of tested tumor size response metrics in a multivariate OS model (P Simulations indicated that a phase III study in 500 Asian patients would exceed 80% power to confirm superior efficacy of motesanib combination therapy (expected HR: 0.74), suggesting that motesanib combination therapy may benefit Asian patients.

  4. Alderson-Rando phantom 'voxelization' for use in numerical dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A.M.; Vieira, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology used for creating a voxel phantom from the tomographic physical Alderson-Rando phantom images (HR) and to develop a computer model formed by exposure of the resulting phantom 'voxelization' of AR coupled to the Monte Carlo code EGS4 plus algorithms to simulate radioactive sources in internal dosimetry

  5. A paper sheet phantom for scintigraphic planar imaging. Usefulness of pouch-laminated paper source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaki, Akihiro; Soma, Tsutomu; Murase, Kenya; Teraoka, Satomi; Murakami, Tomonori; Kojima, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Masanori

    2007-01-01

    In order to perform experimental measurements for evaluation of imaging device's performance, data acquisition technique, and clinical images on scintigraphic imaging, many kinds of phantoms are employed. However, since these materials are acrylic and plastic, the thickness and quality of those materials cause attenuation and scatter in itself. We developed a paper sheet phantom sealed with a pouch laminator, which can be a true radioactive source in air. In this study, the paper sheet phantom was compared to the acrylic liver phantom, with the thickness of 2 cm, which is commercially available. The results showed that although some scatter counts were contained within the image of the acrylic liver phantom, there were few scattered photons in the paper sheet phantom image. Furthermore, this laminated paper sheet phantom made handling of the source and its waste easier. If the paper sheet phantom will be designed more sophisticatedly, it becomes a useful tool for planar imaging experiments. (author)

  6. Influence of different types of phantoms on the calibration of dosemeters for eye lens dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshitomi, H.; Kowatari, M.

    2016-01-01

    Both a cylinder and a slab phantom have been recommended to be used as calibration phantoms for eye lens dosimetry in the International Atomic Energy Agency TECDOC. This study describes investigations on the influence of the type of phantom on the calibration of dosemeters. In order to fulfil the purpose, backscatter radiation from practically used water-filled phantoms was evaluated by calculations and experiments. For photons, the calculations showed that the cylinder phantom had 10 % lower backscattered effect at maximum than a slab phantom, and simulated well the backscattered effect of the human head or neck to within ±10 %. The irradiation results of non-filtered optically stimulated luminescence and radio-photoluminescence glass dosemeters indicated that the differences of the calibration factors between the two types of phantoms were up to 20 and 10 %, respectively, reflecting the response to backscattered photons. For electrons, no difference was found between the two types of phantoms. (authors)

  7. Health care expenditures among Asian American subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Vargas-Bustamante, Arturo; Ortega, Alexander N

    2013-06-01

    Using two nationally representative data sets, this study examined health care expenditure disparities between Caucasians and different Asian American subgroups. Multivariate analyses demonstrate that Asian Americans, as a group, have significantly lower total expenditures compared with Caucasians. Results also point to considerable heterogeneities in health care spending within Asian American subgroups. Findings suggest that language assistance programs would be effective in reducing disparities among Caucasians and Asian American subgroups with the exception of Indians and Filipinos, who tend to be more proficient in English. Results also indicate that citizenship and nativity were major factors associated with expenditure disparities. Socioeconomic status, however, could not explain expenditure disparities. Results also show that Asian Americans have lower physician and pharmaceutical costs but not emergency department or hospital expenditures. These findings suggest the need for culturally competent policies specific to Asian American subgroups and the necessity to encourage cost-effective treatments among Asian Americans.

  8. Atypical Odontalgia (Phantom Tooth Pain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atypical facial pain, phantom tooth pain, or neuropathic orofacial pain, is characterized by chronic pain in a tooth ... such as a specialist in oral medicine or orofacial pain. The information contained in this monograph is for ...

  9. White pine blister rust resistance in North American, Asian and european species - results from artificial inoculartion trials in Oregon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Sniezko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dorena Genetic Resource Center (DGRC has used artificial inoculation trials to evaluate progenies of thousands of Pinus monticola and P. lambertiana selections from Oregon and Washington for resistance to white pine blister rust caused by Cronartium ribicola. In addition, early results are now available for P. albicaulis and P. strobiformis. DGRC has also recently evaluated seed orchard progenies of P. strobus, as well as bulked seedlots from P. armandii and P. peuce. The majority of P. monticola, P. lambertiana, P. albicaulis, and P. strobus progenies are very susceptible to blister rust. However, resistance exists in all these species. P. strobiformis showed relatively high levels of resistance for the eight progenies tested. Resistance in P. armandii was mainly reflected in the very low percentage of cankered seedlings; for P. peuce, the high percentage of cankered seedlings alive three years after inoculation was notable. R-genes are present in some of the North American five-needle pine species, but partial resistance traits (e.g. bark reaction will play a major role in breeding activities for P. monticola and P. lambertiana and will likely be the key to developing durable resistance.

  10. Efficiency factors for Phoswich based lung monitor using ICRP Voxel phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohari, M.; Mathiyarasu, R.; Rajagopal, V.; Jose, M.T.; Venkatraman, B.

    2016-01-01

    The actinide contamination in lungs is measured either using array of HPGe detector or Phoswich based lung monitors. This paper discusses the results obtained during numerical calibration of Phoswich based lung counting system using ICRP VOXEL phantoms. The results are also compared with measured efficiency values obtained using LLNL phantom. The efficiency factors of 241 Am present in the lungs for phoswich detector was simulated using ICRP male voxel phantom and compared with experimentally observed values using LLNL Phantom. The observed deviation is 12%. The efficiency of the same for female subjects was estimated using ICRP female voxel phantom for both supine and posterior geometries

  11. Phantom shocks in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Moons, Philip; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2013-01-01

    of phantom shocks.METHODS AND RESULTS: The design was secondary explorative analyses of data from a randomized controlled trial. One hundred and ninety-six patients with first-time ICD implantation (79% male, mean age 58 years) were randomized (1 : 1) to either combined rehabilitation or a control group...... questions regarding the experience of phantom shocks, date, time, and place. Twelve patients (9.4%) experienced a phantom shock, 7 in the intervention group and 5 in the control group (NS). Neither age, sex, quality of life nor perceived health at baseline was significantly related to the probability...

  12. Hubungan Phantom Vibration Syndrome Terhadap Sleep Disorder dan Kondisi Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajeng Yeni Setianingrum

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Phantom vibration syndrome is a condition where a person would feel the sensation of vibration of a cell phone as if there were incoming notification but the fact is not. This research investigated the relationship between phantom vibration syndromes, sleep disorder and stress condition. Questionnaires were distributed to 120 participants with age range 18 to 23 years old. Data of participants showed that all of participants using a smart mobile phone and 24% of them have more than one cell phone. Time usage of cell phone is at least 1 hour. 23% of participants using a cell phone for social media activity, followed by 21% related to entertainment (music, video and games. The results showed a positive relationship between phantom vibration syndrome, sleep disorder and stress condition. Insomnia contributed a greater influence on stress condition. However, the phantom vibration syndrome is more directly affecting the sleep apnea compared to insomnia and stress condition. Therefore, the phantom vibration syndrome more affects stress condition indirectly, through sleep disorder (sleep apnea and insomnia. Consequently, phantom vibration syndrome has a strong relationship with stress condition at the time of the phantom vibration syndrome can cause sleep disorder.

  13. Dose conversion coefficients calculated using a series of adult Japanese voxel phantoms against external photon exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kaoru; Endo, Akira; Saito, Kimiaki

    2008-10-01

    This report presents a complete set of conversion coefficients of organ doses and effective doses calculated for external photon exposure using five Japanese adult voxel phantoms developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). At the JAEA, high-resolution Japanese voxel phantoms have been developed to clarify the variation of organ doses due to the anatomical characteristics of Japanese, and three male phantoms (JM, JM2 and Otoko) and two female phantoms (JF and Onago) have been constructed up to now. The conversion coefficients of organ doses and effective doses for the five voxel phantoms have been calculated for six kinds of idealized irradiation geometries from monoenergetic photons ranging from 0.01 to 10 MeV using EGS4, a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of coupled electron-photon transport. The dose conversion coefficients are given as absorbed dose and effective dose per unit air-kerma free-in-air, and are presented in tables and figures. The calculated dose conversion coefficients are compared with those of voxel phantoms based on the Caucasian and the recommended values in ICRP74 in order to discuss (1) variation of organ dose due to the body size and individual anatomy, such as position and shape of organs, and (2) effect of posture on organ doses. The present report provides valuable data to study the influence of the body characteristics of Japanese upon the organ doses and to discuss developing reference Japanese and Asian phantoms. (author)

  14. Young Asian Dutch constructing Asianness: Understanding the role of Asian popular culture

    OpenAIRE

    Kartosen, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    This doctoral thesis is about young Asian Dutch, panethnic Asian identities and identifications, and Asian/Asian Dutch popular culture. It addresses several pressing questions, including: why do young Asian Dutch, who were born and/or raised in the Netherlands, identify as Asian and construct Asian identities? What is the content or meaning of these Asian identities and identifications young Asian Dutch imagine? And how do these relate to young Asian Dutch’ Dutch and homeland identities and i...

  15. Photoacoustic microscopy of bilirubin in tissue phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Chi; Yao, Da-Kang; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-12-01

    Determining both bilirubin's concentration and its spatial distribution are important in disease diagnosis. Here, for the first time, we applied quantitative multiwavelength photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to detect bilirubin concentration and distribution simultaneously. By measuring tissue-mimicking phantoms with different bilirubin concentrations, we showed that the root-mean-square error of prediction has reached 0.52 and 0.83 mg/dL for pure bilirubin and for blood-mixed bilirubin detection (with 100% oxygen saturation), respectively. We further demonstrated the capability of the PAM system to image bilirubin distribution both with and without blood. Finally, by underlaying bilirubin phantoms with mouse skins, we showed that bilirubin can be imaged with consistent accuracy down to >400 μm in depth. Our results show that PAM has potential for noninvasive bilirubin monitoring in vivo, as well as for further clinical applications.

  16. New mechanism to cross the phantom divide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Yunshuang; Zhang, Hongsheng; Li, Xin-Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Recently, type Ia supernova data appear to support a dark energy whose equation of state w crosses -1, which is a much more amazing problem than the acceleration of the universe. We show that it is possible for the equation of state to cross the phantom divide by a scalar field in gravity with an additional inverse power-law term of the Ricci scalar in the Lagrangian. The necessary and sufficient condition for a universe in which the dark energy can cross the phantom divide is obtained. Some analytical solutions with w -1 are obtained. A minimally coupled scalar with different potentials, including quadratic, cubic, quantic, exponential and logarithmic potentials are investigated via numerical methods, respectively. All these potentials lead to the crossing behavior. We show that it is a robust result which is hardly dependent on the concrete form of the potential of the scalar. (orig.)

  17. Design of a tracked ultrasound calibration phantom made of LEGO bricks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Ryan; Soehl, Marie; Rankin, Adam; Lasso, Andras; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2014-03-01

    PURPOSE: Spatial calibration of tracked ultrasound systems is commonly performed using precisely fabricated phantoms. Machining or 3D printing has relatively high cost and not easily available. Moreover, the possibilities for modifying the phantoms are very limited. Our goal was to find a method to construct a calibration phantom from affordable, widely available components, which can be built in short time, can be easily modified, and provides comparable accuracy to the existing solutions. METHODS: We designed an N-wire calibration phantom made of LEGO® bricks. To affirm the phantom's reproducibility and build time, ten builds were done by first-time users. The phantoms were used for a tracked ultrasound calibration by an experienced user. The success of each user's build was determined by the lowest root mean square (RMS) wire reprojection error of three calibrations. The accuracy and variance of calibrations were evaluated for the calibrations produced for various tracked ultrasound probes. The proposed model was compared to two of the currently available phantom models for both electromagnetic and optical tracking. RESULTS: The phantom was successfully built by all ten first-time users in an average time of 18.8 minutes. It cost approximately $10 CAD for the required LEGO® bricks and averaged a 0.69mm of error in the calibration reproducibility for ultrasound calibrations. It is one third the cost of similar 3D printed phantoms and takes much less time to build. The proposed phantom's image reprojections were 0.13mm more erroneous than those of the highest performing current phantom model The average standard deviation of multiple 3D image reprojections differed by 0.05mm between the phantoms CONCLUSION: It was found that the phantom could be built in less time, was one third the cost, compared to similar 3D printed models. The proposed phantom was found to be capable of producing equivalent calibrations to 3D printed phantoms.

  18. Effectiveness of quantitative MAA SPECT/CT for the definition of vascularized hepatic volume and dosimetric approach: phantom validation and clinical preliminary results in patients with complex hepatic vascularization treated with yttrium-90-labeled microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garin, Etienne; Lenoir, Laurence; Rolland, Yan; Laffont, Sophie; Pracht, Marc; Mesbah, Habiba; Porée, Philippe; Ardisson, Valérie; Bourguet, Patrick; Clement, Bruno; Boucher, Eveline

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the use of quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) analysis for vascularized volume measurements in the use of the yttrium-90-radiolabeled microspheres (TheraSphere). A phantom study was conducted for the validation of SPECT/CT volume measurement. SPECT/CT quantitative analysis was used for the measurement of the volume of distribution of the albumin macroaggregates (MAA; i.e., the vascularized volume) in the liver and the tumor, and the total activity contained in the liver and the tumor in four consecutive patients presenting with a complex liver vascularization referred for a treatment with TheraSphere. SPECT/CT volume measurement proved to be accurate (mean error <7%) and reproducible (interobserver concordance 0.99). For eight treatments, in cases of complex hepatic vascularization, the hepatic volumes based on angiography and CT led to a relative overestimation or underestimation of the vascularized hepatic volume by 43.2 ± 32.7% (5-87%) compared with SPECT/CT analyses. The vascularized liver volume taken into account calculated from SPECT/CT data, instead of angiography and CT data, results in modifying the activity injected for three treatments of eight. Moreover, quantitative analysis of SPECT/CT allows us to calculate the absorbed dose in the tumor and in the healthy liver, leading to doubling of the injected activity for one treatment of eight. MAA SPECT/CT is accurate for volume measurements. It provides a valuable contribution to the therapeutic planning of patients presenting with complex hepatic vascularization, in particular for calculating the vascularized liver volume, the activity to be injected and the absorbed doses. Studies should be conducted to assess the role of quantitative MAA/SPECT CT in therapeutic planning.

  19. External audit of clinical practice and medical decision making in a new Asian oncology center: Results and implications for both developing and developed nations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakespeare, Thomas P.; Back, Michael F.; Lu, Jiade J.; Lee, Khai Mun; Mukherjee, Rahul K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The external audit of oncologist clinical practice is increasingly important because of the incorporation of audits into national maintenance of certification (MOC) programs. However, there are few reports of external audits of oncology practice or decision making. Our institution (The Cancer Institute, Singapore) was asked to externally audit an oncology department in a developing Asian nation, providing a unique opportunity to explore the feasibility of such a process. Methods and Materials: We audited 100 randomly selected patients simulated for radiotherapy in 2003, using a previously reported audit instrument assessing clinical documentation/quality assurance and medical decision making. Results: Clinical documentation/quality assurance, decision making, and overall performance criteria were adequate 74.4%, 88.3%, and 80.2% of the time, respectively. Overall 52.0% of cases received suboptimal management. Multivariate analysis revealed palliative intent was associated with improved documentation/clinical quality assurance (p = 0.07), decision making (p 0.007), overall performance (p = 0.003), and optimal treatment rates (p 0.07); non-small-cell lung cancer or central nervous system primary sites were associated with better decision making (p = 0.001), overall performance (p = 0.03), and optimal treatment rates (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Despite the poor results, the external audit had several benefits. It identified learning needs for future targeting, and the auditor provided facilitating feedback to address systematic errors identified. Our experience was also helpful in refining our national revalidation audit instrument. The feasibility of the external audit supports the consideration of including audit in national MOC programs

  20. Radiation dose verification using real tissue phantom in modern radiotherapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurjar, Om Prakash; Mishra, S.P.; Bhandari, Virendra; Pathak, Pankaj; Patel, Prapti; Shrivastav, Garima

    2014-01-01

    In vitro dosimetric verification prior to patient treatment has a key role in accurate and precision radiotherapy treatment delivery. Most of commercially available dosimetric phantoms have almost homogeneous density throughout their volume, while real interior of patient body has variable and varying densities inside. In this study an attempt has been made to verify the physical dosimetry in actual human body scenario by using goat head as 'head phantom' and goat meat as 'tissue phantom'. The mean percentage variation between planned and measured doses was found to be 2.48 (standard deviation (SD): 0.74), 2.36 (SD: 0.77), 3.62 (SD: 1.05), and 3.31 (SD: 0.78) for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) (head phantom), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT; head phantom), 3DCRT (tissue phantom), and IMRT (tissue phantom), respectively. Although percentage variations in case of head phantom were within tolerance limit (< ± 3%), but still it is higher than the results obtained by using commercially available phantoms. And the percentage variations in most of cases of tissue phantom were out of tolerance limit. On the basis of these preliminary results it is logical and rational to develop radiation dosimetry methods based on real human body and also to develop an artificial phantom which should truly represent the interior of human body. (author)

  1. Radiation dose verification using real tissue phantom in modern radiotherapy techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Gurjar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro dosimetric verification prior to patient treatment has a key role in accurate and precision radiotherapy treatment delivery. Most of commercially available dosimetric phantoms have almost homogeneous density throughout their volume, while real interior of patient body has variable and varying densities inside. In this study an attempt has been made to verify the physical dosimetry in actual human body scenario by using goat head as "head phantom" and goat meat as "tissue phantom". The mean percentage variation between planned and measured doses was found to be 2.48 (standard deviation (SD: 0.74, 2.36 (SD: 0.77, 3.62 (SD: 1.05, and 3.31 (SD: 0.78 for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT (head phantom, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT; head phantom, 3DCRT (tissue phantom, and IMRT (tissue phantom, respectively. Although percentage variations in case of head phantom were within tolerance limit (< ± 3%, but still it is higher than the results obtained by using commercially available phantoms. And the percentage variations in most of cases of tissue phantom were out of tolerance limit. On the basis of these preliminary results it is logical and rational to develop radiation dosimetry methods based on real human body and also to develop an artificial phantom which should truly represent the interior of human body.

  2. Development of realistic chest phantom for calibration of in-vivo plutonium counting facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirotani, Takashi

    1987-06-01

    We have developed realistic chest phantom with removable model organs. The phantom is a torso and is terminated just above the femoral region. Tissue equivalent materials used in the phantom have been made of polyurethane with different amounts of ester of phosphoric acid, in order to simulate human soft tissues such as muscle, muscle-adipose mixtures and cartilage. Lung simulant has been made of foamed polyurethane. Capsulized small sources can be inserted into the holes, drilled in each sliced section of the model organ. Counting efficiencies, obtained with a pair of 12 cm diameter phoswich detectors set above the phantom chest, are 0.195 cpm/nCi for Pu-239 and 44.07 cpm/nCi for Am-241, respectively. The results agree well with efficiencies obtained with IAEA-Phantom. We conclude that the phantom can be used as a standard phantom for the calibration of Pu chest counting equipment. (author)

  3. Absorbed fractions in a voxel-based phantom calculated with the MCNP-4B code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoriyaz, H; dos Santos, A; Stabin, M G; Cabezas, R

    2000-07-01

    A new approach for calculating internal dose estimates was developed through the use of a more realistic computational model of the human body. The present technique shows the capability to build a patient-specific phantom with tomography data (a voxel-based phantom) for the simulation of radiation transport and energy deposition using Monte Carlo methods such as in the MCNP-4B code. MCNP-4B absorbed fractions for photons in the mathematical phantom of Snyder et al. agreed well with reference values. Results obtained through radiation transport simulation in the voxel-based phantom, in general, agreed well with reference values. Considerable discrepancies, however, were found in some cases due to two major causes: differences in the organ masses between the phantoms and the occurrence of organ overlap in the voxel-based phantom, which is not considered in the mathematical phantom.

  4. Voxel anthropomorphic phantoms: review of models used for ionising radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemosquet, A.; Carlan, L. de; Clairand, I.

    2003-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms have been used since the 1970's for dosimetric calculations. Realistic geometries are required for this operation, resulting in the development of ever more accurate phantoms. Voxel phantoms, consisting of a set of small-volume elements, appeared towards the end of the 1980's, and significantly improved on the original mathematical models. Voxel phantoms are models of the human body, obtained using computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance images (MRI). These phantoms are an extremely accurate representation of the human anatomy. This article provides a review of the literature available on the development of these phantoms and their applications in ionising radiation dosimetry. The bibliographical study has shown that there is a wide range of phantoms, covering various characteristics of the general population in terms of sex, age or morphology, and that they are used in applications relating to all aspects of ionising radiation. (author)

  5. Determination of optimum filter in myocardial SPECT: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takavar, A.; Shamsipour, Gh.; Sohrabi, M.; Eftekhari, M.

    2004-01-01

    Background: In myocardial perfusion SPECT images are degraded by photon attenuation, the distance-dependent collimator, detector response and photons scatter. Filters greatly affect quality of nuclear medicine images. Materials and Methods: A phantom simulating heart left ventricle was built. About 1mCi of 99m Tc was injected into the phantom. Images was taken from this phantom. Some filters including Parzen, Hamming, Hanning, Butter worth and Gaussian were exerted on the phantom images. By defining some criteria such as contrast, signal to noise ratio, and defect size detectability, the best filter can be determined. Results: 0.325 Nyquist frequency and 0.5 nq was obtained as the optimum cut off frequencies respectively for hamming and handing filters. Order 11, cut off 0.45 Nq and order 20 cut off 0.5 Nq obtained optimum respectively for Butter worth and Gaussian filters. Conclusion: The optimum member of every filter's family was obtained

  6. BOMAB phantom manufacturing quality assurance study using Monte Carlo computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallett, M.W.

    1994-01-01

    Monte Carlo calculations have been performed to assess the importance of and quantify quality assurance protocols in the manufacturing of the Bottle-Manikin-Absorption (BOMAB) phantom for calibrating in vivo measurement systems. The parameters characterizing the BOMAB phantom that were examined included height, fill volume, fill material density, wall thickness, and source concentration. Transport simulation was performed for monoenergetic photon sources of 0.200, 0.662, and 1,460 MeV. A linear response was observed in the photon current exiting the exterior surface of the BOMAB phantom due to variations in these parameters. Sensitivity studies were also performed for an in vivo system in operation at the Pacific Northwest Laboratories in Richland, WA. Variations in detector current for this in vivo system are reported for changes in the BOMAB phantom parameters studied here. Physical justifications for the observed results are also discussed

  7. Phantom dark ghost in Einstein-Cartan gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yu-Chiao [National Taiwan University, Department of Physics, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, LeCosPA, Taipei (China); Bouhmadi-Lopez, Mariam [University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Department of Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box 644, Bilbao (Spain); Basque Foundation for Science, IKERBASQUE, Bilbao (Spain); Chen, Pisin [National Taiwan University, Department of Physics, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, LeCosPA, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Astrophysics, Taipei (China); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    A class of dynamical dark energy models is constructed through an extended version of fermion fields corresponding to phantom dark ghost spinors, which are spin 1/2 with mass dimension 1. We find that if these spinors interact with torsion fields in a homogeneous and isotropic universe, then it does not imply any future dark energy singularity or any abrupt event, though the fermion has a negative kinetic energy. In fact, the equation of state of this dark energy model will asymptotically approach the value w = -1 from above without crossing the phantom divide and inducing therefore a de Sitter state. Consequently, we expect the model to be stable because no real phantom fields will be created. At late time, the torsion fields will vanish as the corresponding phantom dark ghost spinors dilute. As would be expected, intuitively, this result is unaffected by the presence of cold dark matter although the proof is not as straightforward as in general relativity. (orig.)

  8. Development of phantom periapical for control quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendes, J.M.S.; Sales Junior, E.S.; Ferreira, F.C.L.; Paschoal, C.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a dental phantom with cysts for evaluation of periapical radiographs that was tested in private dental offices in the city of Maraba, northern Brazil. Through some tests with the object simulator (phantom) were obtained 12 periapical radiographs (one in each of the offices visited) that waking up to the standards of Ordinance No. 453 were visually evaluated by observing the physical parameters of exposure (kVp and mA), time revelation of the radiographic film, later the other radiographs were visually compared with C6 ray set as the default. Among the results, it was found that only two of the twelve rays cysts could not be viewed and, therefore, these two images were deemed unsuitable for accurate diagnosis in the 10 images the cysts could be displayed, however according the images have different qualities comparisons. In addition, it can be concluded that the performance of the phantom was highly satisfactory showing to be efficient for use in quality control testing of dental X-rays, the quality control of radiographs and continuing education of dental professionals for a price much more accessible. (authors)

  9. Asian gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, T.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on natural gas which now appears ready to take a leading role on the world energy stage. Demand for natural gas, and specifically LNG, will be strong throughout the world, particularly in Asia. Indonesia and Malaysia will become much more dependent on natural gas in the Asian market. In Thailand, where remarkable economic growth has been fueled by imported oil and domestically produced natural gas, LNG may soon have to be imported from neighboring countries. The author sees Thailand's imports of natural gas increasing from 1.5 to 4.5 million tons annually. Similarly, Korea's imports of LNG will rise from 2 to 8 million tons between 1987 and 2000. In Japan, energy demand is expected to increase at an even faster rate in the 1990s. Given the opposition to nuclear power generation and growing concern about the greenhouse effect, it is likely that LNG will satisfy a major portion of Japan's increasing demand for energy. Japanese gas companies are studying the possibility of establishing a national pipeline network to move gas beyond metropolitan areas

  10. Bullying Prevention as a Social Justice Issue: Implications with Asian American Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cixin; Wang, Weimeng; Zheng, Lianzhe; Atwal, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    This study examined Asian American elementary students' experience with victimization. Data were collected from 313 fourth and fifth graders from an ethnically diverse elementary school in southern California. Most participants self-identified as Asian/Asian American and spoke an Asian language at home. Results indicated that Asian American…

  11. Young Asian Dutch constructing Asianness: Understanding the role of Asian popular culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kartosen, R.A.

    2016-01-01

    This doctoral thesis is about young Asian Dutch, panethnic Asian identities and identifications, and Asian/Asian Dutch popular culture. It addresses several pressing questions, including: why do young Asian Dutch, who were born and/or raised in the Netherlands, identify as Asian and construct Asian

  12. Liver phantom for quality control and training in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Ferreira, Fernanda Carla; Nascimento Souza, Divanizia do

    2011-01-01

    In nuclear medicine, liver scintigraphy aims to verify organ function based on the radionuclide concentration in the liver and bile flow and is also used to detect tumors. Therefore it is necessary to perform quality control tests in the gamma camera before running the exam to prevent false results. Quality control tests of the gamma camera should thus be performed before running the exam to prevent false results. Such tests generally use radioactive material inside phantoms for evaluation of gamma camera parameters in quality control procedures. Phantoms can also be useful for training doctors and technicians in nuclear medicine procedures. The phantom proposed here has artifacts that simulate nodules; it may take on different quantities, locations and sizes and it may also be mounted without the introduction of nodules. Thus, its images may show hot or cold nodules or no nodules. The phantom consists of acrylic plates hollowed out in the centre, with the geometry of an adult liver. Images for analyses of simulated liver scintigraphy were obtained with the detector device at 5 cm from the anterior surface of the phantom. These simulations showed that this object is suitable for quality control in nuclear medicine because it was possible to visualize artifacts larger than 7.9 mm using a 256x256 matrix and 1000 kcpm. The phantom constructed in this work will also be useful for training practitioners and technicians in order to prevent patients from repeat testing caused by error during examinations.

  13. Liver phantom for quality control and training in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Ferreira, Fernanda Carla [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Sao Cristovao, SE, 49100 000 (Brazil); Nascimento Souza, Divanizia do, E-mail: divanizi@ufs.br [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Sao Cristovao, SE, 49100 000 (Brazil)

    2011-10-01

    In nuclear medicine, liver scintigraphy aims to verify organ function based on the radionuclide concentration in the liver and bile flow and is also used to detect tumors. Therefore it is necessary to perform quality control tests in the gamma camera before running the exam to prevent false results. Quality control tests of the gamma camera should thus be performed before running the exam to prevent false results. Such tests generally use radioactive material inside phantoms for evaluation of gamma camera parameters in quality control procedures. Phantoms can also be useful for training doctors and technicians in nuclear medicine procedures. The phantom proposed here has artifacts that simulate nodules; it may take on different quantities, locations and sizes and it may also be mounted without the introduction of nodules. Thus, its images may show hot or cold nodules or no nodules. The phantom consists of acrylic plates hollowed out in the centre, with the geometry of an adult liver. Images for analyses of simulated liver scintigraphy were obtained with the detector device at 5 cm from the anterior surface of the phantom. These simulations showed that this object is suitable for quality control in nuclear medicine because it was possible to visualize artifacts larger than 7.9 mm using a 256x256 matrix and 1000 kcpm. The phantom constructed in this work will also be useful for training practitioners and technicians in order to prevent patients from repeat testing caused by error during examinations.

  14. Liver phantom for quality control and training in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima Ferreira, Fernanda Carla; Souza, Divanizia do Nascimento

    2011-10-01

    In nuclear medicine, liver scintigraphy aims to verify organ function based on the radionuclide concentration in the liver and bile flow and is also used to detect tumors. Therefore it is necessary to perform quality control tests in the gamma camera before running the exam to prevent false results. Quality control tests of the gamma camera should thus be performed before running the exam to prevent false results. Such tests generally use radioactive material inside phantoms for evaluation of gamma camera parameters in quality control procedures. Phantoms can also be useful for training doctors and technicians in nuclear medicine procedures. The phantom proposed here has artifacts that simulate nodules; it may take on different quantities, locations and sizes and it may also be mounted without the introduction of nodules. Thus, its images may show hot or cold nodules or no nodules. The phantom consists of acrylic plates hollowed out in the centre, with the geometry of an adult liver. Images for analyses of simulated liver scintigraphy were obtained with the detector device at 5 cm from the anterior surface of the phantom. These simulations showed that this object is suitable for quality control in nuclear medicine because it was possible to visualize artifacts larger than 7.9 mm using a 256×256 matrix and 1000 kcpm. The phantom constructed in this work will also be useful for training practitioners and technicians in order to prevent patients from repeat testing caused by error during examinations.

  15. Bounds for Asian basket options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deelstra, Griselda; Diallo, Ibrahima; Vanmaele, Michèle

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we propose pricing bounds for European-style discrete arithmetic Asian basket options in a Black and Scholes framework. We start from methods used for basket options and Asian options. First, we use the general approach for deriving upper and lower bounds for stop-loss premia of sums of non-independent random variables as in Kaas et al. [Upper and lower bounds for sums of random variables, Insurance Math. Econom. 27 (2000) 151-168] or Dhaene et al. [The concept of comonotonicity in actuarial science and finance: theory, Insurance Math. Econom. 31(1) (2002) 3-33]. We generalize the methods in Deelstra et al. [Pricing of arithmetic basket options by conditioning, Insurance Math. Econom. 34 (2004) 55-57] and Vanmaele et al. [Bounds for the price of discrete sampled arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Appl. Math. 185(1) (2006) 51-90]. Afterwards we show how to derive an analytical closed-form expression for a lower bound in the non-comonotonic case. Finally, we derive upper bounds for Asian basket options by applying techniques as in Thompson [Fast narrow bounds on the value of Asian options, Working Paper, University of Cambridge, 1999] and Lord [Partially exact and bounded approximations for arithmetic Asian options, J. Comput. Finance 10 (2) (2006) 1-52]. Numerical results are included and on the basis of our numerical tests, we explain which method we recommend depending on moneyness and time-to-maturity.

  16. Contrast detail phantom for SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrejas, M.L. de; Arashiro, J G; Giannone, C. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Camuyrano, M; Nohara, G [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Facultad Ciencias Exactas

    1996-06-01

    A new low variable contrast phantom for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was constructed, tested and compared with other existing phantoms. It contains simulated cylindrical lesions of four different diameters (D{sub i}), embedded in a cylindrical scattering medium and a uniform section to evaluate tomographic uniformity. The concentration of tracer in the simulated lesions and the scattering medium (background) can be varied to simulate hot and cold lesions. Different applications of the phantom were tested, including determination of the minimum object contrast (OCm) necessary to detect lesions as a function of lesion size, lesion type (hot or cold) and acquisition and processing protocols by visual inspection. This parameter allows categorization of instruments comparing an `image quality index` (IQI). Preliminary comparison with the Britten contrast processing method showed that the detectable OCm was of the same order of magnitude, but the presented device seems more suitable for training and intercomparison purposes. The constructed phantom, of simple design, has proved to be useful for acquisition and processing condition evaluation, OCm estimation and external quality control. (author). 11 refs, 4 figs.

  17. SU-E-P-59: A Graphical Interface for XCAT Phantom Configuration, Generation and Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myronakis, M; Cai, W; Dhou, S; Cifter, F; Lewis, J; Hurwitz, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To design a comprehensive open-source, publicly available, graphical user interface (GUI) to facilitate the configuration, generation, processing and use of the 4D Extended Cardiac-Torso (XCAT) phantom. Methods: The XCAT phantom includes over 9000 anatomical objects as well as respiratory, cardiac and tumor motion. It is widely used for research studies in medical imaging and radiotherapy. The phantom generation process involves the configuration of a text script to parameterize the geometry, motion, and composition of the whole body and objects within it, and to generate simulated PET or CT images. To avoid the need for manual editing or script writing, our MATLAB-based GUI uses slider controls, drop-down lists, buttons and graphical text input to parameterize and process the phantom. Results: Our GUI can be used to: a) generate parameter files; b) generate the voxelized phantom; c) combine the phantom with a lesion; d) display the phantom; e) produce average and maximum intensity images from the phantom output files; f) incorporate irregular patient breathing patterns; and f) generate DICOM files containing phantom images. The GUI provides local help information using tool-tip strings on the currently selected phantom, minimizing the need for external documentation. The DICOM generation feature is intended to simplify the process of importing the phantom images into radiotherapy treatment planning systems or other clinical software. Conclusion: The GUI simplifies and automates the use of the XCAT phantom for imaging-based research projects in medical imaging or radiotherapy. This has the potential to accelerate research conducted with the XCAT phantom, or to ease the learning curve for new users. This tool does not include the XCAT phantom software itself. We would like to acknowledge funding from MRA, Varian Medical Systems Inc

  18. SU-E-P-59: A Graphical Interface for XCAT Phantom Configuration, Generation and Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myronakis, M; Cai, W; Dhou, S; Cifter, F; Lewis, J [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hurwitz, M [Newton, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To design a comprehensive open-source, publicly available, graphical user interface (GUI) to facilitate the configuration, generation, processing and use of the 4D Extended Cardiac-Torso (XCAT) phantom. Methods: The XCAT phantom includes over 9000 anatomical objects as well as respiratory, cardiac and tumor motion. It is widely used for research studies in medical imaging and radiotherapy. The phantom generation process involves the configuration of a text script to parameterize the geometry, motion, and composition of the whole body and objects within it, and to generate simulated PET or CT images. To avoid the need for manual editing or script writing, our MATLAB-based GUI uses slider controls, drop-down lists, buttons and graphical text input to parameterize and process the phantom. Results: Our GUI can be used to: a) generate parameter files; b) generate the voxelized phantom; c) combine the phantom with a lesion; d) display the phantom; e) produce average and maximum intensity images from the phantom output files; f) incorporate irregular patient breathing patterns; and f) generate DICOM files containing phantom images. The GUI provides local help information using tool-tip strings on the currently selected phantom, minimizing the need for external documentation. The DICOM generation feature is intended to simplify the process of importing the phantom images into radiotherapy treatment planning systems or other clinical software. Conclusion: The GUI simplifies and automates the use of the XCAT phantom for imaging-based research projects in medical imaging or radiotherapy. This has the potential to accelerate research conducted with the XCAT phantom, or to ease the learning curve for new users. This tool does not include the XCAT phantom software itself. We would like to acknowledge funding from MRA, Varian Medical Systems Inc.

  19. Development of polygonal surface version of ICRP reference phantoms: Preliminary study for posture change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Tat Thang; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong

    2013-01-01

    Even though International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) officially adopted a set of adult male and female voxel phantoms as the ICRP reference phantoms, there are several critical limitations due to the nature of voxel geometry and their low voxel resolutions. In order to overcome these limitations of the ICRP phantoms, we are currently developing polygonal surface version of ICRP reference phantoms by directly converting the ICRP voxel phantoms to polygonal surface geometries. Among the many advantages of the ICRP polygonal surface phantom, especially, it is flexible and deformable. In principle, it is, therefore, possible to make the posture-changed ICRP phantoms which can provide more accurate dose values for exposure situations strongly relevant to worker's postures. As a preliminary study for developing the posture-changed ICRP phantoms, in this work we changed the posture of the preliminary version of ICRP male polygon-surface phantom constructed in the previous study. Organ doses were then compared between original and posture-changed phantoms. In the present study, we successfully changed a posture of the preliminary version of ICRP male polygon-surface phantom to the walking posture. From this results, it was explicitly shown that the polygon-surface version of the ICRP phantoms can be sufficiently modified to be various postures with the posture-changing method used in this study. In addition, it was demonstrated that phantom's posture must be considered in certain exposure situations, which can differ dose values from the conventional standing-posture phantom

  20. Ethnopsychopharmacology considerations for Asians and Asian Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Felicia K; Pi, Edmond H

    2012-03-01

    Asians comprise more than 60% of the world's population and are the fastest growing minority group in the United States. Today's psychiatrist must learn to recognize and appreciate the unique factors that influence mental health outcomes in this group. Asian Americans are affected by psychiatric disorders at similar rates as non-Asians, but are significantly underrepresented in psychiatric clinics. When Asians and Asian Americans do present for psychiatric treatment, they often do so with higher severity of illness, and variable levels of compliance. Studies over the past three decades have suggested that pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of various psychotropic medications may be different in Asians, leading to differences in dosage requirements and side-effect profiles. These variations appear to be largely determined by genetic predisposition, but are also influenced by other factors such as environment, social support, cultural perceptions, and physicians' prescribing habits. In this paper, we provide an overview of biological and socio-cultural issues as they relate to psychopharmacology in Asians and Asian Americans, with the hope that a better understanding of these issues will lead to improved mental health care delivery to this population both in the United States, as well as in Asian countries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Prevalent hallucinations during medical internships: phantom vibration and ringing syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsuan Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phantom vibration syndrome is a type of hallucination reported among mobile phone users in the general population. Another similar perception, phantom ringing syndrome, has not been previously described in the medical literature. METHODS: A prospective longitudinal study of 74 medical interns (46 males, 28 females; mean age, 24.8±1.2 years was conducted using repeated investigations of the prevalence and associated factors of phantom vibration and ringing. The accompanying symptoms of anxiety and depression were evaluated with the Beck Anxiety and Depression Inventories before the internship began, and again at the third, sixth, and twelfth internship months, and two weeks after the internship ended. RESULTS: The baseline prevalence of phantom vibration was 78.1%, which increased to 95.9% and 93.2% in the third and sixth internship months. The prevalence returned to 80.8% at the twelfth month and decreased to 50.0% 2 weeks after the internship ended. The baseline prevalence of phantom ringing was 27.4%, which increased to 84.9%, 87.7%, and 86.3% in the third, sixth, and twelfth internship months, respectively. This returned to 54.2% two weeks after the internship ended. The anxiety and depression scores also increased during the internship, and returned to baseline two weeks after the internship. There was no significant correlation between phantom vibration/ringing and symptoms of anxiety or depression. The incidence of both phantom vibration and ringing syndromes significantly increased during the internship, and subsequent recovery. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that phantom vibration and ringing might be entities that are independent of anxiety or depression during evaluation of stress-associated experiences during medical internships.

  2. Osteoporosis and Asian American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Asian American Women Osteoporosis and Asian American Women Asian American women are at high risk for ... medications. Are There Any Special Issues for Asian Women Regarding Bone Health? Recent studies indicate a number ...

  3. Magnetoencephalography Phantom Comparison and Validation: Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) Requisite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hazim; Ahmad, Alwani Liyan; Hayashi, Noburo; Idris, Zamzuri; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2015-12-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) has been extensively used to measure small-scale neuronal brain activity. Although it is widely acknowledged as a sensitive tool for deciphering brain activity and source localisation, the accuracy of the MEG system must be critically evaluated. Typically, on-site calibration with the provided phantom (Local phantom) is used. However, this method is still questionable due to the uncertainty that may originate from the phantom itself. Ideally, the validation of MEG data measurements would require cross-site comparability. A simple method of phantom testing was used twice in addition to a measurement taken with a calibrated reference phantom (RefPhantom) obtained from Elekta Oy of Helsinki, Finland. The comparisons of two main aspects were made in terms of the dipole moment (Qpp) and the difference in the dipole distance from the origin (d) after the tests of statistically equal means and variance were confirmed. The result of Qpp measurements for the LocalPhantom and RefPhantom were 978 (SD24) nAm and 988 (SD32) nAm, respectively, and were still optimally within the accepted range of 900 to 1100 nAm. Moreover, the shifted d results for the LocalPhantom and RefPhantom were 1.84 mm (SD 0.53) and 2.14 mm (SD 0.78), respectively, and these values were below the maximum acceptance range of within 5.0 mm of the nominal dipole location. The Local phantom seems to outperform the reference phantom as indicated by the small standard error of the former (SE 0.094) compared with the latter (SE 0.138). The result indicated that HUSM MEG system was in excellent working condition in terms of the dipole magnitude and localisation measurements as these values passed the acceptance limits criteria of the phantom test.

  4. Did opening of the South China Sea impact development of the Asian Monsoon? Results from Oligocene microfossils, IODP Site U1435, northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulhanek, Denise K.; Su, Xin; Li, Qianyu; Gregory, Mitch; Warny, Sophie; Clift, Peter D.

    2016-04-01

    Development of the Asian Monsoon is linked to uplift of the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau in the Cenozoic, with good evidence for a strong monsoon system by the late Oligocene to early Miocene (e.g., Guo et al., 2002; Clift et al., 2008). However, Licht et al. (2014) suggested the presence of an Asian Monsoon in the late Eocene. Recent scientific ocean drilling in the Indian Ocean and surrounding marginal seas gives us the opportunity to test this hypothesis with newly recovered Paleogene sediment cores. International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 349 to the South China Sea recovered a 30 m section of primarily lower Oligocene nannofossil-rich claystone at Site U1435, located near the northern continent/ocean boundary. A thick sandstone unit devoid of typical marine microfossils underlies the marine claystone. The sandstone is interpreted as a deltaic or restricted marine deposit and is dated to the Eocene based on the presence of organic-walled palynomorphs, suggesting that a hiatus of several million years likely separates the sandstone below from the Oligocene marine claystone. This hiatus is interpreted as the breakup unconformity, with paleodepths in the South China Sea increasing during the Oligocene. Thus, this claystone should record if opening of the South China Sea during the early Oligocene influenced development of the Asian Monsoon. Combined calcareous nannofossil and planktonic foraminifer biostratigraphy indicates that the 30 m section is primarily early Oligocene in age (~33.5-30 Ma) and was deposited on the middle slope, with paleodepths >500 m. Stable oxygen isotopes from planktonic foraminifers become heavier up-hole, suggestive of cooling/deepening in the region, whereas carbon isotopes record variable conditions with no distinct maxima or minima. Calcareous nannoplankton primarily live in the upper 50 m of the ocean and are sensitive to sea-surface temperature and nutrient conditions, thus making them useful recorders of paleoceanographic

  5. SU-F-BRE-04: Construction of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for Dosimetric Verification Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To validate a method to create per patient phantoms for dosimetric verification measurements. Methods: Using a RANDO phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a model of the external features of the head and neck region of the phantom was created. A phantom was used instead of a human for two reasons: to allow for dosimetric measurements that would not be possible in-vivo and to avoid patient privacy issues. Using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene thermoplastic as the building material, a hollow replica was created using the 3D printer filled with a custom tissue equivalent mixture of paraffin wax, magnesium oxide, and calcium carbonate. A traditional parallel-opposed head and neck plan was constructed. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in both the RANDO phantom and in the 3D printed phantom. Calculated and measured dose was compared at 17 points phantoms including regions in high and low dose regions and at the field edges. On-board cone beam CT was used to localize both phantoms within 1mm and 1° prior to radiation. Results: The maximum difference in calculated dose between phantoms was 1.8% of the planned dose (180 cGy). The mean difference between calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was 1.9% ± 2.8% and −0.1% ± 4.9%, respectively. The difference between measured and calculated dose was determined in the RANDO and 3D printed phantoms. The differences between measured and calculated dose in each respective phantom was within 2% for 12 of 17 points. The overlap of the RANDO and 3D printed phantom was 0.956 (Jaccard Index). Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. Dosimetric calculations and measurements showed good agreement between the dose in the RANDO phantom (patient substitute) and the 3D printed phantom

  6. SU-F-BRE-04: Construction of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for Dosimetric Verification Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To validate a method to create per patient phantoms for dosimetric verification measurements. Methods: Using a RANDO phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a model of the external features of the head and neck region of the phantom was created. A phantom was used instead of a human for two reasons: to allow for dosimetric measurements that would not be possible in-vivo and to avoid patient privacy issues. Using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene thermoplastic as the building material, a hollow replica was created using the 3D printer filled with a custom tissue equivalent mixture of paraffin wax, magnesium oxide, and calcium carbonate. A traditional parallel-opposed head and neck plan was constructed. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters in both the RANDO phantom and in the 3D printed phantom. Calculated and measured dose was compared at 17 points phantoms including regions in high and low dose regions and at the field edges. On-board cone beam CT was used to localize both phantoms within 1mm and 1° prior to radiation. Results: The maximum difference in calculated dose between phantoms was 1.8% of the planned dose (180 cGy). The mean difference between calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was 1.9% ± 2.8% and −0.1% ± 4.9%, respectively. The difference between measured and calculated dose was determined in the RANDO and 3D printed phantoms. The differences between measured and calculated dose in each respective phantom was within 2% for 12 of 17 points. The overlap of the RANDO and 3D printed phantom was 0.956 (Jaccard Index). Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. Dosimetric calculations and measurements showed good agreement between the dose in the RANDO phantom (patient substitute) and the 3D printed phantom.

  7. SU-G-206-05: A Comparison of Head Phantoms Used for Dose Determination in Imaging Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Z; Vijayan, S; Kilian-Meneghin, J; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D [Toshiba Stroke and Vascular Research Center, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine similarities and differences between various head phantoms that might be used for dose measurements in diagnostic imaging procedures. Methods: We chose four frequently used anthropomorphic head phantoms (SK-150, PBU-50, RS-240T and Alderson Rando), a computational patient phantom (Zubal) and the CTDI head phantom for comparison in our study. We did a CT scan of the head phantoms using the same protocol and compared their dimensions and CT numbers. The scan data was used to calculate dose values for each of the phantoms using EGSnrc Monte Carlo software. An .egsphant file was constructed to describe these phantoms using a Visual C++ program for DOSXYZnrc/EGSnrc simulation. The lens dose was calculated for a simulated CBCT scan using DOSXYZnrc/EGSnrc and the calculated doses were validated with measurements using Gafchromic film and an ionization chamber. Similar calculations and measurements were made for PA radiography to investigate the attenuation and backscatter differences between these phantoms. We used the Zubal phantom as the standard for comparison since it was developed based on a CT scan of a patient. Results: The lens dose for the Alderson Rando phantom is around 9% different than the Zubal phantom, while the lens dose for the PBU-50 phantom was about 50% higher, possibly because its skull thickness and the density of bone and soft tissue are lower than anthropometric values. The lens dose for the CTDI phantom is about 500% higher because of its totally different structure. The entrance dose profiles are similar for the five anthropomorphic phantoms, while that for the CTDI phantom was distinctly different. Conclusion: The CTDI and PBU-50 head phantoms have substantially larger lens dose estimates in CBCT. The other four head phantoms have similar entrance dose with backscatter hence should be preferred for dose measurement in imaging procedures of the head. Partial support from NIH Grant R01-EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems

  8. Riding the Asian Wave....

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Ben

    1999-01-01

    Discusses strategies U.S. universities are using to deal with declining enrollments by Asian students, brought on by the Asian financial crisis. Strategies include recruiting students from other countries. (Author/VWL)

  9. Obesity and Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American > Obesity Obesity and Asian Americans Non-Hispanic whites are 60% ... youthonline . [Accessed 08/18/2017] HEALTH IMPACT OF OBESITY People who are overweight are more likely to ...

  10. Glaucoma in Asian Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Involved News About Us Donate In This Section Glaucoma In Asian Populations email Send this article to ... lower than in their Asian counterparts. Normal Tension Glaucoma affects Japanese Japanese populations, however, have a substantially ...

  11. Standardization of calibration method of whole-body counter. 1. Calibration by using anthropometric phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Masaki; Uchiyama, Masafumi; Kobayashi, Sadayoshi; Mizushita, Seiichi.

    1995-01-01

    To standardize the calibration methods of whole-body counters, three anthropometric phantoms were manufactured based on dozens of Japanese average value of body size data. Using these phantoms, the calibrations of some whole-body counters were carried out and the comparison of counting efficiency between anthropometric phantoms and block phantoms, which used to be used for the calibration of whole-body counters generally, was implemented. Five whole-body counters, one scanning system, two stationary systems and two chair systems, were used for this study. The following results were derived: As an example, in NIRS scanning system, the counting efficiency of anthropometric phantom of 162cm height was 12.7% greater than that of block phantom of the same height. This means 137 Cs body burdens in adult men used to be estimated with the excess of about 10%. Body burdens tended to be estimated excessively in adult because the difference of counting efficiency between anthropometric phantom and block phantom increases with increase of height. To standardize body burden data measured with various whole-body counters, the calibration of each whole-body counter should be conducted using anthropometric phantoms and phantoms which used to be used for the calibration of that whole-body counter. (author)

  12. Agency over Phantom Limb Enhanced by Short-Term Mirror Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, Shu; Asai, Tomohisa; Koyama, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    Most amputees experience phantom limb, whereby they feel that the amputated limb is still present. In some cases, these experiences include pain that can be alleviated by "mirror therapy." Mirror therapy consists of superimposing a mirrored image of the moving intact limb onto the phantom limb. This therapy provides a closed loop between the motor command to the amputated limb and its predicted visual feedback. This loop is also involved in the sense of agency, a feeling of controlling one's own body. However, it is unclear how mirror therapy is related to the sense of agency over a phantom limb. Using mirror therapy, we investigated phantom limb pain and the senses of agency and ownership (i.e., a feeling of having one's own body) of the phantom limb. Nine upper-limb amputees, five of whom reported recent phantom limb pain, underwent a single 15-min trial of mirror therapy. Before and after the trial, the participants completed a questionnaire regarding agency, ownership, and pain related to their phantom limb. They reported that the sense of agency over the phantom limb increased following the mirror therapy trial, while the ownership slightly increased but not as much as did the agency. The reported pain did not change; that is, it was comparably mild before and after the trial. These results suggest that short-term mirror therapy can, at least transiently, selectively enhance the sense of agency over a phantom limb, but may not alleviate phantom limb pain.

  13. Design, manufacture, and evaluation of an anthropomorphic pelvic phantom purpose-built for radiotherapy dosimetric intercomparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, K. M.; Ebert, M. A.; Kron, T.; Howlett, S. J.; Cornes, D.; Hamilton, C. S.; Denham, J. W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales 2298, Australia and School of Physics, University of Newcastle, New South Wales 2308 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Western Australia, Australia and School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Victoria 8006 (Australia); Australiasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine, Sydney, New South Wales 2020 (Australia); Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group, Calvary Mater Newcastle, New South Wales 2298 (Australia); Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, Victoria 3081 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales 2298, Australia and School of Medicine and Population Health, University of Newcastle, New South Wales 2308 (Australia)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: An anthropomorphic pelvic phantom was designed and constructed to meet specific criteria for multicenter radiotherapy dosimetric intercomparison. Methods: Three dimensional external and organ outlines were generated from a computed tomography image set of a male pelvis, forming the basis of design for an anatomically realistic phantom. Clinically relevant points of interest were selected throughout the dataset where point-dose values could be measured with thermoluminescence dosimeters and a small-volume ionization chamber. Following testing, three materials were selected and the phantom was manufactured using modern prototyping techniques into five separate coronal slices. Time lines and resource requirements for the phantom design and manufacture were recorded. The ability of the phantom to mimic the entire treatment chain was tested. Results: The phantom CT images indicated that organ densities and geometries were comparable to those of the original patient. The phantom proved simple to load for dosimetry and rapid to assemble. Due to heat release during manufacture, small air gaps and density heterogeneities were present throughout the phantom. The overall cost for production of the prototype phantom was comparable to other commercial anthropomorphic phantoms. The phantom was shown to be suitable for use as a ''patient'' to mimic the entire treatment chain for typical external beam radiotherapy for prostate and rectal cancer. Conclusions: The phantom constructed for the present study incorporates all characteristics necessary for accurate Level III intercomparison studies. Following use in an extensive Level III dosimetric comparison over a large time scale and geographic area, the phantom retained mechanical stability and did not show signs of radiation-induced degradation.

  14. NMR-CT image and symbol phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongo, Syozo; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    We have developed Japanese phantoms in two procedures. One is described as a mathematical expression. Another is 'symbol phantoms' in 3 dimensional picture-elements, each of which symbolize an organ name. The concept and the algorithm of the symbol phantom enables us to make a phantom for a individual in terms of all his transversal section images. We got 85 transversal section images of head and trunk parts, and those of 40 legs parts by using NMR-CT. We have made the individual phantom for computation of organ doses. The transversal section images were not so clear to identify all organs needed to dose estimation that we had to do hand-editing the shapes of organs with viewing a typical section images: we could not yet make symbol phantom in a automatic editing. Symbols were coded to be visual cords as ASCII characters. After we got the symbol phantom of the first stage, we can edit it easily using a word-processor. Symbol phantom could describe more freely the shape of organs than mathematical phantom. Symbol phantom has several advantages to be an individual phantom, but the only difficult point is how to determine its end-point as a reference man when we apply the method to build the reference man. (author)

  15. 3D Printing Openable Imaging Phantom Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myoung Keun; Won, Jun Hyeok; Lee, Seung Wook

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design an openable phantom that can replace the internal measurement bar used for contrast comparison in order to increase the efficiency of manufacturing imaging phantom used in the medical industry and to improve convenience using 3D printer. Phantom concept design, 3D printing, and Image reconstruction were defined as the scope of the thesis. Also, we study metal artifact reduction with openable phantom. We have designed a Openable phantom using 3D printing, and have investigated metal artifact reduction after inserting a metallic material inside the phantom. The openable phantom can be adjusted at any time to suit the user's experiment and can be easily replaced and useful.

  16. South Asian high and Asian-Pacific-American climate teleconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peiqun; Song, Yang; Kousky, Vernon E.

    2005-11-01

    Growing evidence indicates that the Asian monsoon plays an important role in affecting the weather and climate outside of Asia. However, this active role of the monsoon has not been demonstrated as thoroughly as has the variability of the monsoon caused by various impacting factors such as sea surface temperature and land surface. This study investigates the relationship between the Asian monsoon and the climate anomalies in the Asian-Pacific-American (APA) sector. A hypothesis is tested that the variability of the upper-tropospheric South Asian high (SAH), which is closely associated with the overall heating of the large-scale Asian monsoon, is linked to changes in the subtropical western Pacific high (SWPH), the mid-Pacific trough, and the Mexican high. The changes in these circulation systems cause variability in surface temperature and precipitation in the APA region. A stronger SAH is accompanied by a stronger and more extensive SWPH. The enlargement of the SWPH weakens the mid-Pacific trough. As a result, the southern portion of the Mexican high becomes stronger. These changes are associated with changes in atmospheric teleconnections, precipitation, and surface temperature throughout the APA region. When the SAH is stronger, precipitation increases in southern Asia, decreases over the Pacific Ocean, and increases over the Central America. Precipitation also increases over Australia and central Africa and decreases in the Mediterranean region. While the signals in surface temperature are weak over the tropical land portion, they are apparent in the mid latitudes and over the eastern Pacific Ocean.

  17. Monte Carlo dose calculations for phantoms with hip prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazalova, M; Verhaegen, F; Coolens, C; Childs, P; Cury, F; Beaulieu, L

    2008-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) images of patients with hip prostheses are severely degraded by metal streaking artefacts. The low image quality makes organ contouring more difficult and can result in large dose calculation errors when Monte Carlo (MC) techniques are used. In this work, the extent of streaking artefacts produced by three common hip prosthesis materials (Ti-alloy, stainless steel, and Co-Cr-Mo alloy) was studied. The prostheses were tested in a hypothetical prostate treatment with five 18 MV photon beams. The dose distributions for unilateral and bilateral prosthesis phantoms were calculated with the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc MC code. This was done in three phantom geometries: in the exact geometry, in the original CT geometry, and in an artefact-corrected geometry. The artefact-corrected geometry was created using a modified filtered back-projection correction technique. It was found that unilateral prosthesis phantoms do not show large dose calculation errors, as long as the beams miss the artefact-affected volume. This is possible to achieve in the case of unilateral prosthesis phantoms (except for the Co-Cr-Mo prosthesis which gives a 3% error) but not in the case of bilateral prosthesis phantoms. The largest dose discrepancies were obtained for the bilateral Co-Cr-Mo hip prosthesis phantom, up to 11% in some voxels within the prostate. The artefact correction algorithm worked well for all phantoms and resulted in dose calculation errors below 2%. In conclusion, a MC treatment plan should include an artefact correction algorithm when treating patients with hip prostheses

  18. SU-F-BRE-08: Feasibility of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for IMRT/IGRT QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Test the feasibility of 3D printed, per-patient phantoms for IMRT QA to analyze the treatment delivery quality within the patient geometry. Methods: Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom. During the delivery of the IMRT QA on to the 3D printed phantom, the same patient positioning indexing system was used on the phantom and image guidance (cone beam CT) was used to localize the phantom, serving as a test of the IGRT system as well. The 3D printed phantom was designed to accommodate four radiochromic film planes (two axial, one coronal and one sagittal) and an ionization chamber measurement. As a frame of comparison, the IMRT QA was also performed on traditional phantoms. Dosimetric tolerance levels such as 3mm / 3% Gamma Index as well as 3% and 5% dose difference were considered. All detector systems were calibrated against a NIST traceable ionization chamber. Results: Comparison of results 3D printed patient phantom with the standard IMRT QA systems showed similar passing rates for the 3D printed phantom and the standard phantoms. However, the locations of the failing regions did not necessarily correlate. The 3D printed phantom was localized within 1 mm and 1° using on-board cone beam CT. Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine clinical use

  19. SU-F-BRE-08: Feasibility of 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantoms for IMRT/IGRT QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehler, E; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Test the feasibility of 3D printed, per-patient phantoms for IMRT QA to analyze the treatment delivery quality within the patient geometry. Methods: Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom. During the delivery of the IMRT QA on to the 3D printed phantom, the same patient positioning indexing system was used on the phantom and image guidance (cone beam CT) was used to localize the phantom, serving as a test of the IGRT system as well. The 3D printed phantom was designed to accommodate four radiochromic film planes (two axial, one coronal and one sagittal) and an ionization chamber measurement. As a frame of comparison, the IMRT QA was also performed on traditional phantoms. Dosimetric tolerance levels such as 3mm / 3% Gamma Index as well as 3% and 5% dose difference were considered. All detector systems were calibrated against a NIST traceable ionization chamber. Results: Comparison of results 3D printed patient phantom with the standard IMRT QA systems showed similar passing rates for the 3D printed phantom and the standard phantoms. However, the locations of the failing regions did not necessarily correlate. The 3D printed phantom was localized within 1 mm and 1° using on-board cone beam CT. Conclusion: A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine clinical use.

  20. Technical Note: Characterization of custom 3D printed multimodality imaging phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieniosek, Matthew F. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 350 Serra Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Lee, Brian J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, 440 Escondido Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Levin, Craig S., E-mail: cslevin@stanford.edu [Departments of Radiology, Physics, Bioengineering and Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Dr., Stanford, California 94305-5128 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Imaging phantoms are important tools for researchers and technicians, but they can be costly and difficult to customize. Three dimensional (3D) printing is a widely available rapid prototyping technique that enables the fabrication of objects with 3D computer generated geometries. It is ideal for quickly producing customized, low cost, multimodal, reusable imaging phantoms. This work validates the use of 3D printed phantoms by comparing CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial “Micro Deluxe” phantom. This report also presents results from a customized 3D printed PET/MRI phantom, and a customized high resolution imaging phantom with sub-mm features. Methods: CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial Micro Deluxe (Data Spectrum Corporation, USA) phantom with 1.2, 1.6, 2.4, 3.2, 4.0, and 4.8 mm diameter hot rods were acquired. The measured PET and CT rod sizes, activities, and attenuation coefficients were compared. A PET/MRI scan of a custom 3D printed phantom with hot and cold rods was performed, with photon attenuation and normalization measurements performed with a separate 3D printed normalization phantom. X-ray transmission scans of a customized two level high resolution 3D printed phantom with sub-mm features were also performed. Results: Results show very good agreement between commercial and 3D printed micro deluxe phantoms with less than 3% difference in CT measured rod diameter, less than 5% difference in PET measured rod diameter, and a maximum of 6.2% difference in average rod activity from a 10 min, 333 kBq/ml (9 μCi/ml) Siemens Inveon (Siemens Healthcare, Germany) PET scan. In all cases, these differences were within the measurement uncertainties of our setups. PET/MRI scans successfully identified 3D printed hot and cold rods on PET and MRI modalities. X-ray projection images of a 3D printed high resolution phantom identified features as small as 350 μm wide. Conclusions: This work shows that 3D printed

  1. Technical Note: Characterization of custom 3D printed multimodality imaging phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieniosek, Matthew F.; Lee, Brian J.; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Imaging phantoms are important tools for researchers and technicians, but they can be costly and difficult to customize. Three dimensional (3D) printing is a widely available rapid prototyping technique that enables the fabrication of objects with 3D computer generated geometries. It is ideal for quickly producing customized, low cost, multimodal, reusable imaging phantoms. This work validates the use of 3D printed phantoms by comparing CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial “Micro Deluxe” phantom. This report also presents results from a customized 3D printed PET/MRI phantom, and a customized high resolution imaging phantom with sub-mm features. Methods: CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial Micro Deluxe (Data Spectrum Corporation, USA) phantom with 1.2, 1.6, 2.4, 3.2, 4.0, and 4.8 mm diameter hot rods were acquired. The measured PET and CT rod sizes, activities, and attenuation coefficients were compared. A PET/MRI scan of a custom 3D printed phantom with hot and cold rods was performed, with photon attenuation and normalization measurements performed with a separate 3D printed normalization phantom. X-ray transmission scans of a customized two level high resolution 3D printed phantom with sub-mm features were also performed. Results: Results show very good agreement between commercial and 3D printed micro deluxe phantoms with less than 3% difference in CT measured rod diameter, less than 5% difference in PET measured rod diameter, and a maximum of 6.2% difference in average rod activity from a 10 min, 333 kBq/ml (9 μCi/ml) Siemens Inveon (Siemens Healthcare, Germany) PET scan. In all cases, these differences were within the measurement uncertainties of our setups. PET/MRI scans successfully identified 3D printed hot and cold rods on PET and MRI modalities. X-ray projection images of a 3D printed high resolution phantom identified features as small as 350 μm wide. Conclusions: This work shows that 3D printed

  2. Technical Note: Characterization of custom 3D printed multimodality imaging phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniosek, Matthew F; Lee, Brian J; Levin, Craig S

    2015-10-01

    Imaging phantoms are important tools for researchers and technicians, but they can be costly and difficult to customize. Three dimensional (3D) printing is a widely available rapid prototyping technique that enables the fabrication of objects with 3D computer generated geometries. It is ideal for quickly producing customized, low cost, multimodal, reusable imaging phantoms. This work validates the use of 3D printed phantoms by comparing CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial "Micro Deluxe" phantom. This report also presents results from a customized 3D printed PET/MRI phantom, and a customized high resolution imaging phantom with sub-mm features. CT and PET scans of a 3D printed phantom and a commercial Micro Deluxe (Data Spectrum Corporation, USA) phantom with 1.2, 1.6, 2.4, 3.2, 4.0, and 4.8 mm diameter hot rods were acquired. The measured PET and CT rod sizes, activities, and attenuation coefficients were compared. A PET/MRI scan of a custom 3D printed phantom with hot and cold rods was performed, with photon attenuation and normalization measurements performed with a separate 3D printed normalization phantom. X-ray transmission scans of a customized two level high resolution 3D printed phantom with sub-mm features were also performed. Results show very good agreement between commercial and 3D printed micro deluxe phantoms with less than 3% difference in CT measured rod diameter, less than 5% difference in PET measured rod diameter, and a maximum of 6.2% difference in average rod activity from a 10 min, 333 kBq/ml (9 μCi/ml) Siemens Inveon (Siemens Healthcare, Germany) PET scan. In all cases, these differences were within the measurement uncertainties of our setups. PET/MRI scans successfully identified 3D printed hot and cold rods on PET and MRI modalities. X-ray projection images of a 3D printed high resolution phantom identified features as small as 350 μm wide. This work shows that 3D printed phantoms can be functionally equivalent to

  3. Asians in Higher Education: Conflicts over Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoachlander, E. Gareth; Brown, Cynthia L.

    1989-01-01

    Many Asian Americans believe that the admissions policies of many selective colleges are unfair to them. Demographic trends and the resultant political activity are discussed. The admissions policies and practices that Asian Americans consider objectionable are examined and some policy options are offered. (MLW)

  4. Compilation of anatomical, physiological and metabolic characteristics for a Reference Asian Man. Volume 2: Country reports. Results of a co-ordinated research programme 1988-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    The coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on Compilation of Anatomical, Physiological and Metabolic Characteristics for a Reference Asian Man has been conducted as a programme of the IAEA Regional Co-operative Agreement (RCA) for Asia and the Pacific. The CRP was conducted to provide data for radiation protection purposes that is relevant to the biokinetic and dosimetric characteristics of the ethnic populations in the Asian region The radiological protection decisions that had to be made in the RCA member States following the Chernobyl accident were a significant motivation for establishing the CRP. Funding for the RCM by the Government of Japan is gratefully acknowledged. The IAEA wishes to thank S. Kobayashi for his efforts in support of the CRP. The IAEA extends its appreciation to the Japanese National Institute of Radiological Sciences for acting as the technical secretariat to co-ordinate the work of data compilation. Specifically, the IAEA acknowledges the contributions of H. Kawamura, G. Tanaka and T. Koyanagi. Appreciation is also extended to the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan, the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India, and the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences for the valuable contribution they made to the CRP as hosts for the RCMS. The IAEA officers responsible for this publication were A. Moiseev and R.V. Griffith of the Division of Radiation and Waste Safety. This publication is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 contains a summary of the data and conclusions from the project and Volume 2 the reports from participating countries

  5. Fuzzy classification of phantom parent groups in an animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikse Freddy

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic evaluation models often include genetic groups to account for unequal genetic level of animals with unknown parentage. The definition of phantom parent groups usually includes a time component (e.g. years. Combining several time periods to ensure sufficiently large groups may create problems since all phantom parents in a group are considered contemporaries. Methods To avoid the downside of such distinct classification, a fuzzy logic approach is suggested. A phantom parent can be assigned to several genetic groups, with proportions between zero and one that sum to one. Rules were presented for assigning coefficients to the inverse of the relationship matrix for fuzzy-classified genetic groups. This approach was illustrated with simulated data from ten generations of mass selection. Observations and pedigree records were randomly deleted. Phantom parent groups were defined on the basis of gender and generation number. In one scenario, uncertainty about generation of birth was simulated for some animals with unknown parents. In the distinct classification, one of the two possible generations of birth was randomly chosen to assign phantom parents to genetic groups for animals with simulated uncertainty, whereas the phantom parents were assigned to both possible genetic groups in the fuzzy classification. Results The empirical prediction error variance (PEV was somewhat lower for fuzzy-classified genetic groups. The ranking of animals with unknown parents was more correct and less variable across replicates in comparison with distinct genetic groups. In another scenario, each phantom parent was assigned to three groups, one pertaining to its gender, and two pertaining to the first and last generation, with proportion depending on the (true generation of birth. Due to the lower number of groups, the empirical PEV of breeding values was smaller when genetic groups were fuzzy-classified. Conclusion Fuzzy

  6. A new head phantom with realistic shape and spatially varying skull resistivity distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Bo; Tang, Chi; Dai, Meng; Liu, Geng; Shi, Xue-Tao; Yang, Bin; Xu, Can-Hua; Fu, Feng; You, Fu-Sheng; Tang, Meng-Xing; Dong, Xiu-Zhen

    2014-02-01

    Brain electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is an emerging method for monitoring brain injuries. To effectively evaluate brain EIT systems and reconstruction algorithms, we have developed a novel head phantom that features realistic anatomy and spatially varying skull resistivity. The head phantom was created with three layers, representing scalp, skull, and brain tissues. The fabrication process entailed 3-D printing of the anatomical geometry for mold creation followed by casting to ensure high geometrical precision and accuracy of the resistivity distribution. We evaluated the accuracy and stability of the phantom. Results showed that the head phantom achieved high geometric accuracy, accurate skull resistivity values, and good stability over time and in the frequency domain. Experimental impedance reconstructions performed using the head phantom and computer simulations were found to be consistent for the same perturbation object. In conclusion, this new phantom could provide a more accurate test platform for brain EIT research.

  7. Quantification of breast density using dual-energy mammography with liquid phantom calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, Alfonso R; Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee

    2014-01-01

    Breast density is a widely recognized potential risk factor for breast cancer. However, accurate quantification of breast density is a challenging task in mammography. The current use of plastic breast-equivalent phantoms for calibration provides limited accuracy in dual-energy mammography due to the chemical composition of the phantom. We implemented a breast-equivalent liquid phantom for dual-energy calibration in order to improve the accuracy of breast density measurement. To design these phantoms, three liquid compounds were chosen: water, isopropyl alcohol, and glycerol. Chemical compositions of glandular and adipose tissues, obtained from NIST database, were used as reference materials. Dual-energy signal of the liquid phantom at different breast densities (0% to 100%) and thicknesses (1 to 8 cm) were simulated. Glandular and adipose tissue thicknesses were estimated from a higher order polynomial of the signals. Our results indicated that the linear attenuation coefficients of the breast-equivalent liquid phantoms match those of the target material. Comparison between measured and known breast density data shows a linear correlation with a slope close to 1 and a non-zero intercept of 7%, while plastic phantoms showed a slope of 0.6 and a non-zero intercept of 8%. Breast density results derived from the liquid calibration phantoms showed higher accuracy than those derived from the plastic phantoms for different breast thicknesses and various tube voltages. We performed experimental phantom studies using liquid phantoms and then compared the computed breast density with those obtained using a bovine tissue model. The experimental data and the known values were in good correlation with a slope close to 1 (∼1.1). In conclusion, our results indicate that liquid phantoms are a reliable alternative for calibration in dual-energy mammography and better reproduce the chemical properties of the target material. (paper)

  8. Hybrid computational phantoms of the male and female newborn patient: NURBS-based whole-body models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Hasenauer, Deanna; Williams, Jonathan L; Lee, Choonik; Bolch, Wesley E

    2007-01-01

    Anthropomorphic computational phantoms are computer models of the human body for use in the evaluation of dose distributions resulting from either internal or external radiation sources. Currently, two classes of computational phantoms have been developed and widely utilized for organ dose assessment: (1) stylized phantoms and (2) voxel phantoms which describe the human anatomy via mathematical surface equations or 3D voxel matrices, respectively. Although stylized phantoms based on mathematical equations can be very flexible in regard to making changes in organ position and geometrical shape, they are limited in their ability to fully capture the anatomic complexities of human internal anatomy. In turn, voxel phantoms have been developed through image-based segmentation and correspondingly provide much better anatomical realism in comparison to simpler stylized phantoms. However, they themselves are limited in defining organs presented in low contrast within either magnetic resonance or computed tomography images-the two major sources in voxel phantom construction. By definition, voxel phantoms are typically constructed via segmentation of transaxial images, and thus while fine anatomic features are seen in this viewing plane, slice-to-slice discontinuities become apparent in viewing the anatomy of voxel phantoms in the sagittal or coronal planes. This study introduces the concept of a hybrid computational newborn phantom that takes full advantage of the best features of both its stylized and voxel counterparts: flexibility in phantom alterations and anatomic realism. Non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surfaces, a mathematical modeling tool traditionally applied to graphical animation studies, was adopted to replace the limited mathematical surface equations of stylized phantoms. A previously developed whole-body voxel phantom of the newborn female was utilized as a realistic anatomical framework for hybrid phantom construction. The construction of a hybrid

  9. Effect of phantom voxelization in CT simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goertzen, Andrew L.; Beekman, Freek J.; Cherry, Simon R.

    2002-01-01

    In computer simulations of x-ray CT systems one can either use continuous geometrical descriptions for phantoms or a voxelized representation. The voxelized approach allows arbitrary phantoms to be defined without being confined to geometrical shapes. The disadvantage of the voxelized approach is that inherent errors are introduced due to the phantom voxelization. To study effects of phantom discretization, analytical CT simulations were run for a fan-beam geometry with phantom voxel sizes ranging from 0.0625 to 2 times the reconstructed pixel size and noise levels corresponding to 10 3 -10 7 photons per detector pixel prior to attenuation. The number of rays traced per detector element was varied from 1 to 16. Differences in the filtered backprojection images caused by changing the phantom matrix sizes and number of rays traced were assessed by calculating the difference between reconstructions based on the finest matrix and coarser matrix simulations. In noise free simulations, all phantom matrix sizes produced a measurable difference in comparison with the finest phantom matrix used. When even a small amount of noise was added to the projection data, the differences due to the phantom discretization were masked by the noise, and in all cases there was almost no improvement by using a phantom matrix that was more than twice as fine as the reconstruction matrix. No substantial improvement was achieved by tracing more than 4 rays per detector pixel

  10. Phantom positioning variation in the Gamma Knife® Perfexion dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Nathalia Almeida; Potiens, Maria da Penha Albuquerque [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleres (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Saraiva, Crystian [Hospital do Coracao, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The use of small volume ionization chamber has become required for the dosimetry of equipment that use small radiation fields. A pinpoint ionization chamber is ideal for the dosimetry of a Gamma Knife® Perfexion (GKP) unit. In this work, this chamber was inserted into the phantom, and measurements were performed with the phantom in different positions, in order to verify if the change in the phantom positioning affects the dosimetry of the GKP. Three different phantom positions were performed. The variation in the result is within the range allowed for the dosimetry of a GKP equipment. (author)

  11. Design of a phantom multitrous for a gamma camera quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Krir, Wafa; Ben Ameur, Narjes

    2009-01-01

    In this study we presented the technique of scintigraphy in its various theoretical and practical aspects. We have also shown the importance the quality control procedure according to international standards, as NEMA. Starting from different phantoms currently used, developed according to standards, we designed our phantom. On the other part, this implementation has helped to highlight our expectations in Concerning the functionality of the phantom. Indeed, these results were very conclusive since they made it possible to make a very fast cost and quality control without ambiguity lower. We have thus proved the very advanced stage of reliability of our phantom.

  12. Suicidal thoughts/acts and clinical correlates in patients with depressive disorders in Asians: results from the REAP-AD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Lee, Min-Soo; Hahn, Sang Woo; Si, Tian-Mei; Kanba, Shigenobu; Chong, Mian-Yoon; Yoon, Chee Kok; Udomratn, Pichet; Tripathi, Adarsh; Sartorius, Norman; Shinfuku, Naotaka; Maramis, Margarita M; Park, Yong Chon

    2016-12-01

    Using data from the Research on Asian Psychotropic Prescription Patterns for Antidepressants (REAP-AD) study, we aimed to present the rates and clinical correlates of suicidal thoughts/acts in patients recruited from a total of 40 centres in 10 Asian countries/areas: China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan, and Thailand. Data from 1122 patients with depressive disorders in the REAP-AD study were used. The ICD-10 was employed to diagnose depressive episodes and recurrent depressive disorder. The presence or absence of suicidal thoughts/acts and profile of other depressive symptoms was established using the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines for depression. Country/area differences in rates of suicidal thoughts/acts were evaluated with the χ2 test. In addition, depressive symptom profiles, other clinical characteristics, and patterns of psychotropic drug prescription in depressed patients with and without suicidal thoughts/acts were compared using analysis of covariance for continuous variables and logistic regression analysis for discrete variables to adjust the effects of covariates. The rates of suicidal thoughts/acts in 10 countries/areas varied from 12.8% in Japan to 36.3% in China. Patients with suicidal thoughts/acts presented more persistent sadness (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=2.64, p<0.001), loss of interest (aOR=2.33, p<0.001), fatigue (aOR=1.58, p<0.001), insomnia (aOR=1.74, p<0.001), poor concentration (aOR=1.88, p<0.001), low self-confidence (aOR=1.78, p<0.001), poor appetite (aOR=2.27, p<0.001), guilt/self-blame (aOR=3.03, p<0.001), and use of mood stabilisers (aOR=1.79, p<0.001) than those without suicidal thoughts/acts. Suicidal thoughts/acts can indicate greater severity of depression, and are associated with a poorer response to antidepressants and increased burden of illness. Hence, suicidal thoughts/acts can provide a clinical index reflecting the clinical status of depressive

  13. A novel composite material specifically developed for ultrasound bone phantoms: cortical, trabecular and skull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wydra, A; Maev, R Gr

    2013-01-01

    In the various stages of developing diagnostic and therapeutic equipment, the use of phantoms can play a very important role in improving the process, help in implementation, testing and calibrations. Phantoms are especially useful in developing new applications and training new doctors in medical schools. However, devices that use different physical factors, such as MRI, Ultrasound, CT Scan, etc will require the phantom to be made of different physical properties. In this paper we introduce the properties of recently designed new materials for developing phantoms for ultrasonic human body investigation, which in today's market make up more than 30% in the world of phantoms. We developed a novel composite material which allows fabrication of various kinds of ultrasound bone phantoms to mimic most of the acoustical properties of human bones. In contrast to the ex vivo tissues, the proposed material can maintain the physical and acoustical properties unchanged for long periods of time; moreover, these properties can be custom designed and created to suit specific needs. As a result, we introduce three examples of ultrasound phantoms that we manufactured in our laboratory: cortical, trabecular and skull bone phantoms. The paper also presents the results of a comparison study between the acoustical and physical properties of actual human bones (reported in the referenced literatures) and the phantoms manufactured by us. (note)

  14. Radiological equipment analyzed by specific developed phantoms and software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, M.; Campayo, J. M.; Mayo, P.; Verdu, G.; Rodenas, F.

    2010-10-01

    The use of radiographic phantoms specifically designed to evaluate the operation of the radiographic equipment lets the study of the image quality obtained by this equipment in an objective way. In digital radiographic equipment, the analysis of the image quality can be computerized because the acquisition of the image is possible in different technologies that are, computerized radiography or phosphor plate and direct radiography or detector. In case of film-screen equipment s this analysis could be applied digitalising the image in a professional scanner. In this work we have shown an application to assess automatically the constancy quality image in the image chain of the radiographic equipment s. This application is integrated by designed radiographic phantoms which are adapted to conventional, dental equipment s and specific developed software for the automatic evaluation of the phantom image quality. The software is based on digital image processing techniques that let the automatic detection of the different phantom tests by edge detector, morphological operators, threshold histogram techniques... etc. The utility developed is enough sensitive to the radiographic equipment of operating conditions of voltage (kV) and charge (m As). It is a friendly user programme connected with a data base of the hospital or clinic where it has been used. After the phantom image processing the user can obtain an inform with a resume of the imaging system state with accepting and constancy results. (Author)

  15. Radiological equipment analyzed by specific developed phantoms and software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, M.; Campayo, J. M. [Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales SAU, Sorolla Center, Local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain); Mayo, P. [TITANIA Servicios Tecnologicos SL, Sorolla Center, Local 10, Av. de las Cortes Valencianas No. 58, 46015 Valencia (Spain); Verdu, G.; Rodenas, F., E-mail: m.soto@lainsa.co [ISIRYIM Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, Valencia (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    The use of radiographic phantoms specifically designed to evaluate the operation of the radiographic equipment lets the study of the image quality obtained by this equipment in an objective way. In digital radiographic equipment, the analysis of the image quality can be computerized because the acquisition of the image is possible in different technologies that are, computerized radiography or phosphor plate and direct radiography or detector. In case of film-screen equipment s this analysis could be applied digitalising the image in a professional scanner. In this work we have shown an application to assess automatically the constancy quality image in the image chain of the radiographic equipment s. This application is integrated by designed radiographic phantoms which are adapted to conventional, dental equipment s and specific developed software for the automatic evaluation of the phantom image quality. The software is based on digital image processing techniques that let the automatic detection of the different phantom tests by edge detector, morphological operators, threshold histogram techniques... etc. The utility developed is enough sensitive to the radiographic equipment of operating conditions of voltage (kV) and charge (m As). It is a friendly user programme connected with a data base of the hospital or clinic where it has been used. After the phantom image processing the user can obtain an inform with a resume of the imaging system state with accepting and constancy results. (Author)

  16. Close relationships between Asian American and European American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C; Edwards, K; Young, B; Greenberger, E

    2001-02-01

    The authors examined attitudes and behaviors regarding close relationships between European and Asian Americans, with a particular emphasis on 5 major subgroups of Asian Americans (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, and Filipino Americans). Participants were 218 Asian American college students and 171 European American college students attending a culturally diverse university. The European Americans did not differentiate among the various subgroups of Asian Americans. Their attitudes regarding close relationships were less positive toward Asian Americans than toward Mexican and African Americans, a finding contrary to the prediction of social exchange theory (H. Tajfel, 1975). In contrast to the European Americans' view of homogeneity among Asian Americans, the 5 major subgroups of Asian Americans expressed a distinctive hierarchy of social preference among themselves. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for future research on interethnic relations involving Asian Americans.

  17. A Software Phantom : Application in Digital Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazos, D; Kolitsi, Z; Badea, C; Pallikarakis, N [Medical Physics Laboratory, School of Medicine, Univercity of Patras (Greece)

    1999-12-31

    A software phantom intended to be used in radiographic applications has been developed. The application was used for research in the field of Digital Tomosynthesis and specifically for studying tomographic noise removal methods. The application consists of a phantom design and a phantom imaging module. The radiation-matter interaction is based on the exponential relation of attenuation. Projections are formed by simulated irradiation with selectable geometrical parameters, source spectrum and detector response. Phantoms are defined either as sets containing certain geometrical objects or as groups of voxels. Comparison with real projections taken from a physical phantom with identical geometry and composition with the simulated one, showed good approximation with improved contrast due to the absence of scatter in the simulated projections. The software phantom proved to be a very useful tool for DTS investigations. Further development to include scatter is expected to expand the use of the application to more areas in radiological imaging research. (author) 4 refs., 3 figs

  18. A Software Phantom : Application in Digital Tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazos, D.; Kolitsi, Z.; Badea, C.; Pallikarakis, N.

    1998-01-01

    A software phantom intended to be used in radiographic applications has been developed. The application was used for research in the field of Digital Tomosynthesis and specifically for studying tomographic noise removal methods. The application consists of a phantom design and a phantom imaging module. The radiation-matter interaction is based on the exponential relation of attenuation. Projections are formed by simulated irradiation with selectable geometrical parameters, source spectrum and detector response. Phantoms are defined either as sets containing certain geometrical objects or as groups of voxels. Comparison with real projections taken from a physical phantom with identical geometry and composition with the simulated one, showed good approximation with improved contrast due to the absence of scatter in the simulated projections. The software phantom proved to be a very useful tool for DTS investigations. Further development to include scatter is expected to expand the use of the application to more areas in radiological imaging research. (author)

  19. Phantom black holes and critical phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azreg-Aïnou, Mustapha [Engineering Faculty, Başkent University, Bağlıca Campus, Ankara (Turkey); Marques, Glauber T. [Universidade Federal Rural da Amazônia ICIBE-LASIC, Av. Presidente Tancredo Neves 2501, CEP 66077-901—Belém/PA (Brazil); Rodrigues, Manuel E., E-mail: azreg@baskent.edu.tr, E-mail: gtadaiesky@hotmail.com, E-mail: esialg@gmail.com [Faculdade de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Pará, Campus Universitário de Abaetetuba, CEP 68440-000, Abaetetuba, Pará (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    We consider the two classes cosh and sinh of normal and phantom black holes of Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory. The thermodynamics of these holes is characterized by heat capacities that may have both signs depending on the parameters of the theory. Leaving aside the normal Reissner-Nordström black hole, it is shown that only some phantom black holes of both classes exhibit critical phenomena. The two classes share a nonextremality, but special, critical point where the transition is continuous and the heat capacity, at constant charge, changes sign with an infinite discontinuity. This point yields a classification scheme for critical points. It is concluded that the two unstable and stable phases coexist on one side of the criticality state and disappear on the other side, that is, there is no configuration where only one phase exists. The sinh class has an extremality critical point where the entropy diverges. The transition from extremality to nonextremality with the charge held constant is accompanied by a loss of mass and an increase in the temperature. A special case of this transition is when the hole is isolated (microcanonical ensemble), it will evolve by emission of energy, which results in a decrease of its mass, to the final state of minimum mass and vanishing heat capacity. The Ehrenfest scheme of classification is inaccurate in this case but the generalized one due to Hilfer leads to conclude that the transition is of order less than unity. Fluctuations near criticality are also investigated.

  20. Dual Energy Tomosynthesis breast phantom imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukou, V.; Martini, N.; Fountos, G.; Messaris, G.; Michail, C.; Kandarakis, I.; Nikiforidis, G.

    2017-12-01

    Dual energy (DE) imaging technique has been applied to many theoretical and experimental studies. The aim of the current study is to evaluate dual energy in breast tomosynthesis using commercial tomosynthesis system in terms of its potential to better visualize microcalcifications (μCs). The system uses a tungsten target X-ray tube and a selenium direct conversion detector. Low-energy (LE) images were acquired at different tube voltages (28, 30, 32 kV), while high-energy images at 49 kV. Fifteen projections, for the low- and high-energy respectively, were acquired without grid while tube scanned continuously. Log-subtraction algorithm was used in order to obtain the DE images with the weighting factor, w, derived empirically. The subtraction was applied to each pair of LE and HE slices after reconstruction. The TORMAM phantom was imaged with the different settings. Four regions-of-interest including μCs were identified in the inhomogeneous part of the phantom. The μCs in DE images were more clearly visible compared to the low-energy images. Initial results showed that DE tomosynthesis imaging is a promising modality, however more work is required.

  1. Characterization of tracked radiofrequency ablation in phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chun-Cheng R.; Miga, Michael I.; Galloway, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    In radiofrequency ablation (RFA), successful therapy requires accurate, image-guided placement of the ablation device in a location selected by a predictive treatment plan. Current planning methods rely on geometric models of ablations that are not sensitive to underlying physical processes in RFA. Implementing plans based on computational models of RFA with image-guided techniques, however, has not been well characterized. To study the use of computational models of RFA in planning needle placement, this work compared ablations performed with an optically tracked RFA device with corresponding models of the ablations. The calibration of the tracked device allowed the positions of distal features of the device, particularly the tips of the needle electrodes, to be determined to within 1.4±0.6 mm of uncertainty. Ablations were then performed using the tracked device in a phantom system based on an agarose-albumin mixture. Images of the sliced phantom obtained from the ablation experiments were then compared with the predictions of a bioheat transfer model of RFA, which used the positional data of the tracked device obtained during ablation. The model was demonstrated to predict 90% of imaged pixels classified as being ablated. The discrepancies between model predictions and observations were analyzed and attributed to needle tracking inaccuracy as well as to uncertainties in model parameters. The results suggest the feasibility of using finite element modeling to plan ablations with predictable outcomes when implemented using tracked RFA

  2. Solid tissue simulating phantoms having absorption at 970 nm for diffuse optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Gordon T.; Lentsch, Griffin R.; Trieu, Brandon; Ponticorvo, Adrien; Saager, Rolf B.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2017-07-01

    Tissue simulating phantoms can provide a valuable platform for quantitative evaluation of the performance of diffuse optical devices. While solid phantoms have been developed for applications related to characterizing exogenous fluorescence and intrinsic chromophores such as hemoglobin and melanin, we report the development of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) tissue phantom that mimics the spectral characteristics of tissue water. We have developed these phantoms to mimic different water fractions in tissue, with the purpose of testing new devices within the context of clinical applications such as burn wound triage. Compared to liquid phantoms, cured PDMS phantoms are easier to transport and use and have a longer usable life than gelatin-based phantoms. As silicone is hydrophobic, 9606 dye was used to mimic the optical absorption feature of water in the vicinity of 970 nm. Scattering properties are determined by adding titanium dioxide, which yields a wavelength-dependent scattering coefficient similar to that observed in tissue in the near-infrared. Phantom properties were characterized and validated using the techniques of inverse adding-doubling and spatial frequency domain imaging. Results presented here demonstrate that we can fabricate solid phantoms that can be used to simulate different water fractions.

  3. Design and evaluation of corn starch-bonded Rhizophora spp. particleboard phantoms for SPECT/CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abd; Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd; Aziz Tajuddin, Abd; Hashim, Rokiah; Zainon, Rafidah

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design and evaluate of corn starch-bonded Rhizophora spp. particleboards as phantom for SPECT/CT imaging. The phantom was designed according to the Jaszczak phantom commonly used in SPECT imaging with dimension of 22 cm diameter and 18 cm length. Six inserts with different diameter were made for insertion of vials filled with 1.6 µCi/ml of 99mTc unsealed source. The particleboard phantom was scanned using SPECT/CT imaging protocol. The contrast of each vial for particleboards phantom were calculated based on the ratio of counts in radionuclide volume and phantom background and compared to Perspex® and water phantom. The results showed that contrast values for each vial in particleboard phantomis near to 1.0 and in good agreement with Perspex® and water phantoms as common phantom materials for SPECT/CT. The paired sample t-test result showed no significant difference of contrast values between images in particleboard phantoms and that in water. The overall results showed the potential of corn starch-bonded Rhizophora spp. as phantom for quality control and dosimetry works in SPECT/CT imaging.

  4. The internal radiation dose calculations based on Chinese mathematical phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haiyan; Li Junli; Cheng Jianping; Fan Jiajin

    2006-01-01

    The internal radiation dose calculations built on Chinese facts become more and more important according to the development of nuclear medicine. the MIRD method developed and consummated by the society of Nuclear Medicine (America) is based on the European and American mathematical phantom and can't fit Chinese well. The transport of γ-ray in the Chinese mathematical phantom was simulated with Monte Carlo method in programs as MCNP4C. the specific absorbed fraction (Φ) of Chinese were calculated and the Chinese Φ database was created. The results were compared with the recommended values by ORNL. the method was proved correct by the coherence when the target organ was the same with the source organ. Else, the difference was due to the different phantom and the choice of different physical model. (authors)

  5. A Dynamic Compliance Cervix Phantom Robot for Latent Labor Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Michelle Jennifer; Lobb, Derek; Smith, James Andrew

    2018-05-09

    Physical simulation systems are commonly used in training of midwifery and obstetrics students, but none of these systems offers a dynamic compliance aspect that would make them more truly representative of cervix ripening. In this study, we introduce a unique soft robot phantom that simulates the cervix softening during the latent labor phase of birth. This proof-of-concept robotic phantom can be dilated by 1 cm and effaced by 35% through the application of a Foley catheter-like loading mechanism. Furthermore, psychophysics trials demonstrate how untrained subjects can identify hard and soft states of the phantom with specificities of 91% and 87%, respectively. Both results indicated the appropriateness for application of this soft robot technology to birth training simulators.

  6. Dosimetry using radiochromic film and planning algorithms in heterogeneous phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Vinicius Freitas

    2012-01-01

    This work analyzes, through the study of the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter, two schemes of heterogeneous phantoms schematised to simulate real cases of planning with different electronic densities through the Pencil Beam, Collapsed Cone and Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm algorithms and compare with measurements Of relative absorbed dose in an IBA CC13 ionization chamber and Gafchromic® EBT2 radiochromic film. Epichlorohydrin rubber and its compatibility in comparison with human bone has also been evaluated. The assembly of the heterogeneous phantoms was feasible and the results regarding the density and attenuation of the rubber presented consistent values. However, the study of PDPs in constructed phantoms showed a considerable percentage discrepancy between measurements and planning

  7. Do you believe in phantoms?

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2015-01-01

    “Phantoms” are tools that simulate a therapy’s response by mimicking the conditions of the human body. They are required in hadron therapy in order to optimise and verify the therapy before performing it on the patient. The better the phantom, the more accurate the treatment plan and the more effective the therapy. In the framework of the EU-funded project ENTERVISION*, a team of CERN researchers has designed an innovative piece of equipment able to evaluate radiobiology-related parameters in a very accurate way.   The ENTERVISION phantom being tested at HIT. A key challenge in hadron therapy – i.e. the medical use of hadrons to treat cancer – is to evaluate the biological effect of the delivered radiation. This can be achieved by using accurate dosimetry techniques to study the biological response in terms of the dose deposited and other physical parameters of the beam, such as the Linear Energy Transfer (LET). The job of the “phan...

  8. Construction of Chinese adult male phantom library and its application in the virtual calibration of in vivo measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yizheng; Qiu, Rui; Li, Chunyan; Wu, Zhen; Li, Junli

    2016-01-01

    In vivo measurement is a main method of internal contamination evaluation, particularly for large numbers of people after a nuclear accident. Before the practical application, it is necessary to obtain the counting efficiency of the detector by calibration. The virtual calibration based on Monte Carlo simulation usually uses the reference human computational phantom, and the morphological difference between the monitored personnel with the calibrated phantom may lead to the deviation of the counting efficiency. Therefore, a phantom library containing a wide range of heights and total body masses is needed. In this study, a Chinese reference adult male polygon surface (CRAM-S) phantom was constructed based on the CRAM voxel phantom, with the organ models adjusted to match the Chinese reference data. CRAM-S phantom was then transformed to sitting posture for convenience in practical monitoring. Referring to the mass and height distribution of the Chinese adult male, a phantom library containing 84 phantoms was constructed by deforming the reference surface phantom. Phantoms in the library have 7 different heights ranging from 155 cm to 185 cm, and there are 12 phantoms with different total body masses in each height. As an example of application, organ specific and total counting efficiencies of Ba-133 were calculated using the MCNPX code, with two series of phantoms selected from the library. The influence of morphological variation on the counting efficiency was analyzed. The results show only using the reference phantom in virtual calibration may lead to an error of 68.9% for total counting efficiency. Thus the influence of morphological difference on virtual calibration can be greatly reduced using the phantom library with a wide range of masses and heights instead of a single reference phantom. (paper)

  9. Construction of Chinese adult male phantom library and its application in the virtual calibration of in vivo measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yizheng; Qiu, Rui; Li, Chunyan; Wu, Zhen; Li, Junli

    2016-03-01

    In vivo measurement is a main method of internal contamination evaluation, particularly for large numbers of people after a nuclear accident. Before the practical application, it is necessary to obtain the counting efficiency of the detector by calibration. The virtual calibration based on Monte Carlo simulation usually uses the reference human computational phantom, and the morphological difference between the monitored personnel with the calibrated phantom may lead to the deviation of the counting efficiency. Therefore, a phantom library containing a wide range of heights and total body masses is needed. In this study, a Chinese reference adult male polygon surface (CRAM_S) phantom was constructed based on the CRAM voxel phantom, with the organ models adjusted to match the Chinese reference data. CRAMS phantom was then transformed to sitting posture for convenience in practical monitoring. Referring to the mass and height distribution of the Chinese adult male, a phantom library containing 84 phantoms was constructed by deforming the reference surface phantom. Phantoms in the library have 7 different heights ranging from 155 cm to 185 cm, and there are 12 phantoms with different total body masses in each height. As an example of application, organ specific and total counting efficiencies of Ba-133 were calculated using the MCNPX code, with two series of phantoms selected from the library. The influence of morphological variation on the counting efficiency was analyzed. The results show only using the reference phantom in virtual calibration may lead to an error of 68.9% for total counting efficiency. Thus the influence of morphological difference on virtual calibration can be greatly reduced using the phantom library with a wide range of masses and heights instead of a single reference phantom.

  10. Effective dose measurement at workplaces within an instrumented anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villagrasa, C.; Darreon, J.; Martin-Burtat, N.; Clairand, I.; Colin, J.; Fontbonne, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry of the IRSN (France) is developing an instrumented anthropomorphic phantom in order to measure the effective dose for photon fields at workplaces. This anthropomorphic phantom will be equipped with small active detectors located inside at chosen positions. The aim of this paper is to present the development of these new detectors showing the results of the characterisation of the prototype under metrological conditions. New evaluations of the effective dose for standard and non-homogenous irradiation configurations taking into account the real constraints of the project have been done validating the feasibility and utility of the instrument. (authors)

  11. Phantom-based interactive simulation system for dental treatment training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sae-Kee, Bundit; Riener, Robert; Frey, Martin; Pröll, Thomas; Burgkart, Rainer

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new interactive simulation system for dental treatment training. The system comprises a virtual reality environment and a force-torque measuring device to enhance the capabilities of a passive phantom of tooth anatomy in dental treatment training processes. The measuring device is connected to the phantom, and provides essential input data for generating the graphic animations of physical behaviors such as drilling and bleeding. The animation methods of those physical behaviors are also presented. This system is not only able to enhance interactivity and accessibility of the training system compared to conventional methods but it also provides possibilities of recording, evaluating, and verifying the training results.

  12. English language proficiency and smoking prevalence among California's Asian Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hao; Shimizu, Robin; Chen, Moon S

    2005-12-15

    The authors documented California's tobacco control initiatives for Asian Americans and the current tobacco use status among Asian subgroups and provide a discussion of the challenges ahead. The California Tobacco Control Program has employed a comprehensive approach to decrease tobacco use in Asian Americans, including ethnic-specific media campaigns, culturally competent interventions, and technical assistance and training networks. Surveillance of tobacco use among Asian Americans and the interpretation of the results have always been a challenge. Data from the 2001 The California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) were analyzed to provide smoking prevalence estimates for all Asian Americans and Asian-American subgroups, including Korean, Filipino, Japanese, South Asian, Chinese, and Vietnamese. Current smoking prevalence was analyzed by gender and by English proficiency level. Cigarette smoking prevalence among Asian males in general was almost three times of that among Asian females. Korean and Vietnamese males had higher cigarette smoking prevalence rates than males in other subgroups. Although Asian females in general had low smoking prevalence rates, significant differences were found among Asian subgroups, from 1.1% (Vietnamese) to 12.7% (Japanese). Asian men who had high English proficiency were less likely to be smokers than men with lower English proficiency. Asian women with high English proficiency were more likely to be smokers than women with lower English proficiency. Smoking prevalence rates among Asian Americans in California differed significantly on the basis of ethnicity, gender, and English proficiency. English proficiency seemed to have the effect of reducing smoking prevalence rates among Asian males but had just the opposite effect among Asian females. Cancer 2005. (c) 2005 American Cancer Society.

  13. Phantom pain and phantom sensations in upper limb amputees : an epidemiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, CM; Dijkstra, PU; Geertzen, JHB; Elzinga, A; van der Schans, CP

    Phantom pain in subjects with an amputated limb is a well-known problem. However, estimates of the prevalence of phantom pain differ considerably in the literature. Various factors associated with phantom pain have been described including pain before the amputation, gender, dominance, and time

  14. Development of skeletal system for mesh-type ICRP reference adult phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Yeon Soo; Wang, Zhao Jun; Tat Nguyen, Thang; Kim, Han Sung; Choi, Chansoo; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Jai Ki; Chung, Beom Sun; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Bolch, Wesley E.; Lee, Choonsik

    2016-10-01

    The reference adult computational phantoms of the international commission on radiological protection (ICRP) described in Publication 110 are voxel-type computational phantoms based on whole-body computed tomography (CT) images of adult male and female patients. The voxel resolutions of these phantoms are in the order of a few millimeters and smaller tissues such as the eye lens, the skin, and the walls of some organs cannot be properly defined in the phantoms, resulting in limitations in dose coefficient calculations for weakly penetrating radiations. In order to address the limitations of the ICRP-110 phantoms, an ICRP Task Group has been recently formulated and the voxel phantoms are now being converted to a high-quality mesh format. As a part of the conversion project, in the present study, the skeleton models, one of the most important and complex organs of the body, were constructed. The constructed skeleton models were then tested by calculating red bone marrow (RBM) and endosteum dose coefficients (DCs) for broad parallel beams of photons and electrons and comparing the calculated values with those of the original ICRP-110 phantoms. The results show that for the photon exposures, there is a generally good agreement in the DCs between the mesh-type phantoms and the original voxel-type ICRP-110 phantoms; that is, the dose discrepancies were less than 7% in all cases except for the 0.03 MeV cases, for which the maximum difference was 14%. On the other hand, for the electron exposures (⩽4 MeV), the DCs of the mesh-type phantoms deviate from those of the ICRP-110 phantoms by up to ~1600 times at 0.03 MeV, which is indeed due to the improvement of the skeletal anatomy of the developed skeleton mesh models.

  15. Realistic deformable 3D numeric phantom for transcutaneous ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Fernando Mitsuyama; Moraes, Matheus Cardoso; Furuie, Sergio Shiguemi, E-mail: fernando.okara@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    2017-01-15

    Introduction: Numerical phantoms are important tools to design, calibrate and evaluate several methods in various image-processing applications, such as echocardiography and mammography. We present a framework for creating ultrasound numerical deformable phantoms based on Finite Element Method (FEM), Linear Isomorphism and Field II. The proposed method considers that the scatterers map is a property of the tissue; therefore, the scatterers should move according to the tissue strain. Methods: First, a volume representing the target tissue is loaded. Second, parameter values, such as Young's Modulus, scatterers density, attenuation and scattering amplitudes are inserted for each different regions of the phantom. Then, other parameters related to the ultrasound equipment, such as ultrasound frequency and number of transducer elements, are also defined in order to perform the ultrasound acquisition using Field II. Third, the size and position of the transducer and the pressures that are applied against the tissue are defined. Subsequently, FEM is executed and deformation is computed. Next, 3D linear isomorphism is performed to displace the scatterers according to the deformation. Finally, Field II is carried out to generate the non-deformed and deformed ultrasound data. Results: The framework is evaluated by comparing strain values obtained the numerical simulation and from the physical phantom from CIRS. The mean difference between both phantoms is lesser than 10%. Conclusion: The acoustic and deformation outcomes are similar to those obtained using a physical phantom. This framework led to a tool, which is available online and free of charges for educational and research purposes. (author)

  16. Design and development of an ultrasound calibration phantom and system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Alexis; Ackerman, Martin K.; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    Image-guided surgery systems are often used to provide surgeons with informational support. Due to several unique advantages such as ease of use, real-time image acquisition, and no ionizing radiation, ultrasound is a common medical imaging modality used in image-guided surgery systems. To perform advanced forms of guidance with ultrasound, such as virtual image overlays or automated robotic actuation, an ultrasound calibration process must be performed. This process recovers the rigid body transformation between a tracked marker attached to the ultrasound transducer and the ultrasound image. A phantom or model with known geometry is also required. In this work, we design and test an ultrasound calibration phantom and software. The two main considerations in this work are utilizing our knowledge of ultrasound physics to design the phantom and delivering an easy to use calibration process to the user. We explore the use of a three-dimensional printer to create the phantom in its entirety without need for user assembly. We have also developed software to automatically segment the three-dimensional printed rods from the ultrasound image by leveraging knowledge about the shape and scale of the phantom. In this work, we present preliminary results from using this phantom to perform ultrasound calibration. To test the efficacy of our method, we match the projection of the points segmented from the image to the known model and calculate a sum squared difference between each point for several combinations of motion generation and filtering methods. The best performing combination of motion and filtering techniques had an error of 1.56 mm and a standard deviation of 1.02 mm.

  17. Polyvinyl chloride plastisol breast phantoms for ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Isabela Miller; De Matheo, Lucas Lobianco; Costa Júnior, José Francisco Silva; Borba, Cecília de Melo; von Krüger, Marco Antonio; Infantosi, Antonio Fernando Catelli; Pereira, Wagner Coelho de Albuquerque

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasonic phantoms are objects that mimic some features of biological tissues, allowing the study of their interactions with ultrasound (US). In the diagnostic-imaging field, breast phantoms are an important tool for testing performance and optimizing US systems, as well as for training medical professionals. This paper describes the design and manufacture of breast lesions by using polyvinyl chloride plastisol (PVCP) as the base material. Among the materials available for this study, PVCP was shown to be stable, durable, and easy to handle. Furthermore, it is a nontoxic, nonpolluting, and low-cost material. The breast's glandular tissue (image background) was simulated by adding graphite powder with a concentration of 1% to the base material. Mixing PVCP and graphite powder in differing concentrations allows one to simulate lesions with different echogenicity patterns (anechoic, hypoechoic, and hyperechoic). From this mixture, phantom materials were obtained with speed of sound varying from 1379.3 to 1397.9ms(-1) and an attenuation coefficient having values between 0.29 and 0.94dBcm(-1) for a frequency of 1MHz at 24°C. A single layer of carnauba wax was added to the lesion surface in order to evaluate its applicability for imaging. The images of the phantoms were acquired using commercial ultrasound equipment; a specialist rated the images, elaborating diagnoses representative of both benign and malignant lesions. The results indicated that it was possible to easily create a phantom by using low-cost materials, readily available in the market and stable at room temperature, as the basis of ultrasonic phantoms that reproduce the image characteristics of fatty breast tissue and typical lesions of the breast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Introduction of a stack-phantom for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, C.; Schnell, P.O.; Jacobsson, H.; Engelin, L.; Danielsson, A.M.; Johansson, L.; Larsson, S.A.; Pagani, M.; Stone-Elander, S.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: We have previously developed a new flexible phantom system for SPECT, i.e. 'the stack phantom' (Eur. J. Nucl. Med. 27, No.2, 131-139, 2000). The unique feature of this phantom system is that it allows studies with, as well as without major degrading impacts from photon attenuation and Compton scattering. The specific aim of this work was to further develop the system with special reference to PET. Material and methods: The principle of the phantom concept is discrete sampling of 3D objects by a series of equidistant 2D planes. The 2D planes are a digitised set of 2D sections, representing the radioactivity distribution in the object of interest. Using a grey scale related to the radioactivity concentration, selected images are printed by radioactive ink on thin paper sheets and stacked into the 3D structure with low-density or with tissue equivalent material in between. Using positron emitting radionuclides, the paper sheets alone may not be sufficiently thick to avoid annihilation losses due to escaping positrons. In order to investigate the amount of additional material needed, a spot of radioactivity ( 18 F) was printed out and subsequently covered by adding thin plastic films (0.055mm) on both sides of the paper. Short PET scans (ECAT 921) were performed and the count-rate was registered after each additional layer of plastic cover. A first prototype, a cylindrical cold-spot phantom was constructed on the basis of these results. Nine identical sheets were printed out and first mounted in between 4 mm plates of polystyrene (density 1.04 g/cm 3 ). After a PET-scan, the paper sheets were re-mounted in between a low-density material (Divinycell, H30, density 0.03 g/cm 3 ) before repeating the PET scan. Results: For 18 F, the number of registered annihilation photons increased with increasing number of plastic sheets from 70% for the pure paper sheet to about 100% with 0.5 mm plastic cover on each side. PET of the low-density stacked cold spot phantom

  19. Development of PIMAL: Mathematical Phantom with Moving Arms and Legs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akkurt, Hatice [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eckerman, Keith F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2007-05-01

    The computational model of the human anatomy (phantom) has gone through many revisions since its initial development in the 1970s. The computational phantom model currently used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is based on a model published in 1974. Hence, the phantom model used by the NRC staff was missing some organs (e.g., neck, esophagus) and tissues. Further, locations of some organs were inappropriate (e.g., thyroid).Moreover, all the computational phantoms were assumed to be in the vertical-upright position. However, many occupational radiation exposures occur with the worker in other positions. In the first phase of this work, updates on the computational phantom models were reviewed and a revised phantom model, which includes the updates for the relevant organs and compositions, was identified. This revised model was adopted as the starting point for this development work, and hence a series of radiation transport computations, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5, was performed. The computational results were compared against values reported by the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) in Publication 74. For some of the organs (e.g., thyroid), there were discrepancies between the computed values and the results reported in ICRP-74. The reasons behind these discrepancies have been investigated and are discussed in this report.Additionally, sensitivity computations were performed to determine the sensitivity of the organ doses for certain parameters, including composition and cross sections used in the simulations. To assess the dose for more realistic exposure configurations, the phantom model was revised to enable flexible positioning of the arms and legs. Furthermore, to reduce the user time for analyses, a graphical user interface (GUI) was developed. The GUI can be used to visualize the positioning of the arms and legs as desired posture is achieved to generate the input file, invoke the computations, and extract the organ dose

  20. Characterisation of an anthropomorphic chest phantom for dose measurements in radiology beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, L. M. S.; Cerqueira, R. A. D.; Santos, W. S.; Pereira, A. J. S.; Rodrigues, T. M. A.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.; Maia, A. F.

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to characterise an anthropomorphic chest phantom for dosimetric measurements of conventional radiology beams. This phantom was developed by a previous research project at the Federal University of Sergipe for image quality control tests. As the phantom consists of tissue-equivalent material, it is possible to characterise it for dosimetric studies. For comparison, a geometric chest phantom, consisting of PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) with dimensions of 30×30×15 cm³ was used. Measurements of incident air kerma (Ki) and entrance surface dose (ESD) were performed using ionisation chambers. From the results, backscatter factors (BSFs) of the two phantoms were determined and compared with values estimated by CALDose_X software, based on a Monte Carlo simulation. For the technical parameters evaluated in this study, the ESD and BSF values obtained experimentally showed a good similarity between the two phantoms, with minimum and maximum difference of 0.2% and 7.0%, respectively, and showed good agreement with the results published in the literature. Organ doses and effective doses for the anthropomorphic phantom were also estimated by the determination of conversion coefficients (CCs) using the visual Monte Carlo (VMC) code. Therefore, the results of this study prove that the anthropomorphic thorax phantom proposed is a good tool to use in dosimetry and can be used for risk evaluation of X-ray diagnostic procedures.

  1. Pre-evaluation study in SPECT images using a phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebelo, Marina de Sa; Furuie, Sergio Shiguemi; Abe, Rubens; Moura, Lincoln

    1996-01-01

    An alternative solution for the reconstruction of SPECT images using a Poisson Noise Model is presented. The proposed algorithm was applied on a real phantom and compared to the standard clinical procedures. Results have shown that the proposed method improves the quality of the SPECT images

  2. Enceladus' 101 Geysers: Phantoms? Hardly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porco, C.; Nimmo, F.; DiNino, D.

    2015-12-01

    The discovery by the Cassini mission of present-day geysering activity capping the southern hemisphere of Saturn's moon Enceladus (eg, Porco, C. C. et al. Science 311, 1393, 2006) and sourced within a subsurface body of liquid water (eg, Postberg, F. et al. Nature 459, 1098, 2009; Porco, C.C. et al. AJ 148, 45, 2014, hereafter PEA], laced with organic compounds (eg, Waite, J.H. et al. Science 311, 1419, 2006), has been a significant one, with far-reaching astrobiological implications. In an extensive Cassini imaging survey of the moon's south polar terrain (SPT), PEA identified 101 distinct, narrow jets of small icy particles erupting, with varying strengths, from the four major fractures crossing the SPT. A sufficient spread in stereo angles of the 107 images used in that work allowed (in some cases, many) pair-wise triangulations to be computed; precise surface locations were derived for 98 jets. Recently, it has been claimed (Spitale, J.N. et al. Nature 521, 57, 2015) that the majority of the geysers are not true discrete jets, but are "phantoms" that appear in shallow-angle views of a dense continuous curtain of material with acute bends in it. These authors also concluded that the majority of the eruptive material is not in the form of jets but in the form of fissure-style 'curtain' eruptions. We argue below the contrary, that because almost all the moon's geysers were identified by PEA using multiple images with favorable viewing geometries, the vast majority of them, and likely all, are discrete jets. Specifically, out of 98 jets, no fewer than 90 to 95 were identified with viewing geometries that preclude the appearance of phantoms. How the erupting solids (i.e., icy particles) that are seen in Cassini images are partitioned between jets and inter-jet curtains is still an open question.

  3. CT images of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric male pelvis phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matos, Andrea S.D. de; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. de, E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares

    2009-07-01

    Actually, among of the most often neoplasm types are the cancer of prostate, bladder and intestine. The incidence of the intestine neoplasm in Brazil is at fourth among the most frequent tumors of the male sex, barely close to the stomach, lung and prostate incidences. Phantoms are objects used as simulators for investigating ionizing radiation transport on humans, especially during radiation therapy or radiological diagnostic. The purpose of this work is the achievement of a set of computerized tomography (CT) images of a male pelvis phantom, with anthropomorphic and anthropometric features. It investigates and analyses the set of phantom CT images in according to a correspondent human pelvis one. The reason to develop a pelvis phantom is the needs of reproducing well established spatial dose distribution in radiation therapy, especially during calibration and protocol setup for various pelvis neoplasms. It aims to produce dose optimization on radiation therapy, improving health tissue protection and keeping control tumor dose. A male pelvis phantom with similar shape made of equivalent tissues was built for simulating the ionizing radiation transport to the human body. At the phantom, pelvis organs were reproduced including the bladder, the intestine, the prostate, the muscular and greasy tissue, as well as the bone tissue and the skin. A set of CT images was carried out in axial thin sections of 2mm thickness. As results, the constituent tissues had a tomography response on Hounsfield scale similar to values found on the human pelvis. Each tissue has its respective Hounsfield value, demonstrated here. The CT images also show that the organs have equivalent anthropometric measures and anthropomorphic features of the radiological human anatomy. The anatomical physical arrangement of the organs is also similar to of the pelvis human male, having the scales of gray and numerical scale of Hounsfield compatible with the scale of the human tissue. The phantom presents

  4. Dosimetric characteristics of water equivalent for two solid water phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jianhua; Wang Xun; Ren Jiangping

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the water equivalent of two solid water phantoms. Methods: The X-ray and electron beam depth-ion curves were measured in water and two solid water phantoms, RW3 and Virtual Water. The water-equivalency correction factors for the two solid water phantoms were compared. We measured and calculated the range sealing factors and the fluence correction factors for the two solid water phantoms in the case of electron beams. Results: The average difference between the measured ionization in solid water phantoms and water was 0.42% and 0.16% on 6 MV X-ray (t=-6.15, P=0.001 and t=-1.65, P=0.419) and 0.21% and 0.31% on 10 MV X-ray (t=1.728, P=0.135 and t=-2.296, P=0.061), with 17.4% and 14.5% on 6 MeV electron beams (t=-1.37, P=0.208 and t=-1.47, P=0.179) and 7.0% and 6.0% on 15 MeV electron beams (t=-0.58, P=0.581 and t=-0.90, P=0.395). The water-equivalency correction factors for the two solid water phantoms varied slightly largely, F=58.54, P=0.000 on 6 MV X-ray, F=0.211, P=0.662 on 10 MV X-ray, F=0.97, P=0.353 on 6 MeV electron beams, F=0.14, P=0.717 on 15 MeV electron beams. However, they were almost equal to 1 near the reference depths. The two solid water phantoms showed a similar tread of C pl increasing (F=26.40, P=0.014) and h pl decreasing (F=7.45, P=0.072) with increasing energy. Conclusion: The solid water phantom should undergo a quality control test before being clinical use. (authors)

  5. CT images of an anthropomorphic and anthropometric male pelvis phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Andrea S.D. de; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. de

    2009-01-01

    Actually, among of the most often neoplasm types are the cancer of prostate, bladder and intestine. The incidence of the intestine neoplasm in Brazil is at fourth among the most frequent tumors of the male sex, barely close to the stomach, lung and prostate incidences. Phantoms are objects used as simulators for investigating ionizing radiation transport on humans, especially during radiation therapy or radiological diagnostic. The purpose of this work is the achievement of a set of computerized tomography (CT) images of a male pelvis phantom, with anthropomorphic and anthropometric features. It investigates and analyses the set of phantom CT images in according to a correspondent human pelvis one. The reason to develop a pelvis phantom is the needs of reproducing well established spatial dose distribution in radiation therapy, especially during calibration and protocol setup for various pelvis neoplasms. It aims to produce dose optimization on radiation therapy, improving health tissue protection and keeping control tumor dose. A male pelvis phantom with similar shape made of equivalent tissues was built for simulating the ionizing radiation transport to the human body. At the phantom, pelvis organs were reproduced including the bladder, the intestine, the prostate, the muscular and greasy tissue, as well as the bone tissue and the skin. A set of CT images was carried out in axial thin sections of 2mm thickness. As results, the constituent tissues had a tomography response on Hounsfield scale similar to values found on the human pelvis. Each tissue has its respective Hounsfield value, demonstrated here. The CT images also show that the organs have equivalent anthropometric measures and anthropomorphic features of the radiological human anatomy. The anatomical physical arrangement of the organs is also similar to of the pelvis human male, having the scales of gray and numerical scale of Hounsfield compatible with the scale of the human tissue. The phantom presents

  6. Asian Students' Voices: An Empirical Study of Asian Students' Learning Experiences at a New Zealand University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jacqui; Li, Mingsheng

    2008-01-01

    More than 85% of the international students in New Zealand are Asian in origin. The level of satisfaction of Asian international students with their learning experiences in New Zealand has been of enormous concern for the New Zealand export education industry. The results of this current research, based on a qualitative research study conducted at…

  7. The New Asian Immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Morrison G.; Hirschman, Charles

    In the early 1960s, Asian immigration to the United States was severely limited. The passage of the Immigration Act of 1965 expanded Asian immigration and ended a policy of racial discrimination and exclusion. Currently, over one third of the total immigrant population to the United States is from Asia, particularly China, Japan, Korea, the…

  8. Emerging Asian Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trezise, Philip H.

    What we can expect in the future from the miracle economies of Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, and Hong Kong, whether they pose a threat to the older industrial states of Western Europe and North American, and whether China is to be the next emerging Asian economy are discussed. The amazing economic recovery of these East Asian countries…

  9. Asian American Cultural Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libretti, Tim

    1997-01-01

    Explores the encounter of Marxism and Asian American literary theory and imagines an Asian American Marxism. To do so requires theorizing race, class, and gender not as substantive categories of antagonisms but as complementary and coordinated elements of a totality of social relations structuring racial patriarchal capitalism. (SLD)

  10. A phantom for quality control in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambaccini, M.; Rimondi, O.; Marziani, M.; Toti, A.

    1989-01-01

    A phantom for evaluating image quality in mammography has been designed and will be used in the Italian national programme ''Dose and Quality in Mammography''. The characteristics of the phantom are (a) about the same X-ray transmission as a 5 cm 50% fat and 50% water breast for energies between 15 and 50 keV and (b) optimum energies for imaging of the test objects (included in the phantom) in very close agreement with the optimum energies for imaging of calcifications and tumours in a 5 cm 50% fat and 50% water breast. An experimental comparison between the prototype and some commercial phantoms was carried out. Measurements are in progress to test the phantom's ability to evaluate the performances of mammographic systems quantitatively. (author)

  11. Population of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segars, W. P.; Bond, Jason; Frush, Jack; Hon, Sylvia; Eckersley, Chris; Samei, E. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Williams, Cameron H.; Frush, D. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Feng Jianqiao; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I. [Center for Imaging Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The authors previously developed the 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom for multimodality imaging research. The XCAT consisted of highly detailed whole-body models for the standard male and female adult, including the cardiac and respiratory motions. In this work, the authors extend the XCAT beyond these reference anatomies by developing a series of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research, the first library of 4D computational phantoms. Methods: The initial anatomy of each phantom was based on chest-abdomen-pelvis computed tomography data from normal patients obtained from the Duke University database. The major organs and structures for each phantom were segmented from the corresponding data and defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the head, arms, and legs using the original XCAT adult male and female anatomies. The structures were scaled to best match the age and anatomy of the patient. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from the template XCAT phantom (male or female) to the target patient model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. Each new phantom was refined by checking for anatomical accuracy via inspection of the models. Results: Using these methods, the authors created a series of computerized phantoms with thousands of anatomical structures and modeling cardiac and respiratory motions. The database consists of 58 (35 male and 23 female) anatomically variable phantoms in total. Like the original XCAT, these phantoms can be combined with existing simulation packages to simulate realistic imaging data. Each new phantom contains parameterized models for the anatomy and the cardiac and respiratory motions and can, therefore, serve

  12. Population of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segars, W. P.; Bond, Jason; Frush, Jack; Hon, Sylvia; Eckersley, Chris; Samei, E.; Williams, Cameron H.; Frush, D.; Feng Jianqiao; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The authors previously developed the 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantom for multimodality imaging research. The XCAT consisted of highly detailed whole-body models for the standard male and female adult, including the cardiac and respiratory motions. In this work, the authors extend the XCAT beyond these reference anatomies by developing a series of anatomically variable 4D XCAT adult phantoms for imaging research, the first library of 4D computational phantoms. Methods: The initial anatomy of each phantom was based on chest–abdomen–pelvis computed tomography data from normal patients obtained from the Duke University database. The major organs and structures for each phantom were segmented from the corresponding data and defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the head, arms, and legs using the original XCAT adult male and female anatomies. The structures were scaled to best match the age and anatomy of the patient. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from the template XCAT phantom (male or female) to the target patient model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. Each new phantom was refined by checking for anatomical accuracy via inspection of the models. Results: Using these methods, the authors created a series of computerized phantoms with thousands of anatomical structures and modeling cardiac and respiratory motions. The database consists of 58 (35 male and 23 female) anatomically variable phantoms in total. Like the original XCAT, these phantoms can be combined with existing simulation packages to simulate realistic imaging data. Each new phantom contains parameterized models for the anatomy and the cardiac and respiratory motions and can, therefore

  13. Optimization of phantom backscatter thickness and lateral scatter volume for radiographic film dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, R.P.; De Wagter, C.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the optimal backscatter thickness and lateral phantom dimension beyond the irradiated volume for the dosimetric verification with radiographic film when applying large field sizes. Polystyrene and Virtual Water™ phantoms were used to study the influence of the phantom backscatter thickness. EDR2 and XV films were used in 6 and 18 MV photon beams. The results show 11.4% and 6.4% over-response of the XV2 film when compared to the ion chamber for 6 MV 30×30 and 10×10 cm 2 field sizes, respectively, when the phantom backscatter thickness is 5 cm. For the same setup, measurements with EDR2 films indicate 8.5% and 1.7% over-response. The XV2 film response in the polystyrene phantom is about 2.0% higher than in the Virtual Water™ phantom for the 6 MV beam and 20 cm backscatter thickness. Similar results were obtained for EDR2 film. In the lateral scatter study, film response was nearly constant within 5 cm of lateral thickness and it increases when lateral thickness increases due to more multiple scatter of low energy photons. The backscatter thickness of the phantom should be kept below 7 cm for the accuracy of the film dosimetry. The lateral extension of the phantom should not be more than 5 cm from the field boundary in case of large irradiated volumes.

  14. Comparison of methods for individualized astronaut organ dosimetry: Morphometry-based phantom library versus body contour autoscaling of a reference phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Michelle M.; Borrego, David; Maynard, Matthew R.; Bahadori, Amir A.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2017-11-01

    One of the hazards faced by space crew members in low-Earth orbit or in deep space is exposure to ionizing radiation. It has been shown previously that while differences in organ-specific and whole-body risk estimates due to body size variations are small for highly-penetrating galactic cosmic rays, large differences in these quantities can result from exposure to shorter-range trapped proton or solar particle event radiations. For this reason, it is desirable to use morphometrically accurate computational phantoms representing each astronaut for a risk analysis, especially in the case of a solar particle event. An algorithm was developed to automatically sculpt and scale the UF adult male and adult female hybrid reference phantom to the individual outer body contour of a given astronaut. This process begins with the creation of a laser-measured polygon mesh model of the astronaut's body contour. Using the auto-scaling program and selecting several anatomical landmarks, the UF adult male or female phantom is adjusted to match the laser-measured outer body contour of the astronaut. A dosimetry comparison study was conducted to compare the organ dose accuracy of both the autoscaled phantom and that based upon a height-weight matched phantom from the UF/NCI Computational Phantom Library. Monte Carlo methods were used to simulate the environment of the August 1972 and February 1956 solar particle events. Using a series of individual-specific voxel phantoms as a local benchmark standard, autoscaled phantom organ dose estimates were shown to provide a 1% and 10% improvement in organ dose accuracy for a population of females and males, respectively, as compared to organ doses derived from height-weight matched phantoms from the UF/NCI Computational Phantom Library. In addition, this slight improvement in organ dose accuracy from the autoscaled phantoms is accompanied by reduced computer storage requirements and a more rapid method for individualized phantom generation

  15. The Rhetorical Making of the Asian/Asian American Face: Reading and Writing Asian Eyelids

    OpenAIRE

    Sano-Franchini, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    In The Rhetorical Making of the Asian/Asian American Face: Reading and Writing Asian Eyelids, I examine representations of East Asian blepharoplasty in online video in order to gain a sense of how cultural values change over time. Drawing on scholarship in and around rhetorical theory, cultural rhetorics, Asian American rhetoric, cultural studies, Asian American studies, and postcolonial theory alongside qualitative data analysis of approximately fifty videos and the numerous viewer comments ...

  16. Genome-wide association study of 25(OH) Vitamin D concentrations in Punjabi Sikhs: Results of the Asian Indian diabetic heart study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Bishwa R; Hopkins, Ruth; Bjonnes, Andrew; Ralhan, Sarju; Wander, Gurpreet S; Mehra, Narinder K; Singh, Jai Rup; Blackett, Piers R; Saxena, Richa; Sanghera, Dharambir K

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is implicated in multiple disease conditions and accumulating evidence supports that the variation in serum vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels, including deficiency, is under strong genetic control. However, the underlying genetic mechanism associated with vitamin 25(OH)D concentrations is poorly understood. We earlier reported a very high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency associated with an increased risk for type 2 diabetes and obesity in a Punjabi Sikh diabetic cohort as part of the Asian Indian diabetic heart study (AIDHS). Here we have performed the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of serum 25(OH)D on 3538 individuals from this Punjabi Sikh population. Our discovery GWAS comprised of 1387 subjects followed by validation of 24 putative SNPs (P<10(-4)) using an independent replication sample (n=2151) from the same population by direct genotyping. A novel locus at chromosome 20p11.21 represented by rs2207173 with minor allele frequency (MAF) 0.29, [β=-0.13, p=4.47×10(-9)] between FOXA2 and SSTR4 was identified to be associated with 25(OH)D levels. Another suggestive association signal at rs11586313 (MAF 0.54) [β=0.90; p=1.36×10(-6)] was found within the regulatory region of the IVL gene on chromosome 1q21.3. Additionally, our study replicated 3 of 5 known GWAS genes associated with 25(OH)D concentrations including GC (p=0.007) and CYP2R1 (p=0.019) reported in Europeans and the DAB1 (p=0.003), reported in Hispanics. Identification of novel association signals in biologically plausible regions with 25(OH)D metabolism will provide new molecular insights on genetic drivers of vitamin D status and its implications in health disparities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cosmological perturbations on the phantom brane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bag, Satadru; Sahni, Varun [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune (India); Viznyuk, Alexander; Shtanov, Yuri, E-mail: satadru@iucaa.in, E-mail: viznyuk@bitp.kiev.ua, E-mail: shtanov@bitp.kiev.ua, E-mail: varun@iucaa.in [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kiev 03680 (Ukraine)

    2016-07-01

    We obtain a closed system of equations for scalar perturbations in a multi-component braneworld. Our braneworld possesses a phantom-like equation of state at late times, w {sub eff} < −1, but no big-rip future singularity. In addition to matter and radiation, the braneworld possesses a new effective degree of freedom—the 'Weyl fluid' or 'dark radiation'. Setting initial conditions on super-Hubble spatial scales at the epoch of radiation domination, we evolve perturbations of radiation, pressureless matter and the Weyl fluid until the present epoch. We observe a gradual decrease in the amplitude of the Weyl-fluid perturbations after Hubble-radius crossing, which results in a negligible effect of the Weyl fluid on the evolution of matter perturbations on spatial scales relevant for structure formation. Consequently, the quasi-static approximation of Koyama and Maartens provides a good fit to the exact results during the matter-dominated epoch. We find that the late-time growth of density perturbations on the brane proceeds at a faster rate than in ΛCDM. Additionally, the gravitational potentials Φ and Ψ evolve differently on the brane than in ΛCDM, for which Φ = Ψ. On the brane, by contrast, the ratio Φ/Ψ exceeds unity during the late matter-dominated epoch ( z ∼< 50). These features emerge as smoking gun tests of phantom brane cosmology and allow predictions of this scenario to be tested against observations of galaxy clustering and large-scale structure.

  18. Phantom motor execution facilitated by machine learning and augmented reality as treatment for phantom limb pain: a single group, clinical trial in patients with chronic intractable phantom limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Catalan, Max; Guðmundsdóttir, Rannveig A; Kristoffersen, Morten B; Zepeda-Echavarria, Alejandra; Caine-Winterberger, Kerstin; Kulbacka-Ortiz, Katarzyna; Widehammar, Cathrine; Eriksson, Karin; Stockselius, Anita; Ragnö, Christina; Pihlar, Zdenka; Burger, Helena; Hermansson, Liselotte

    2016-12-10

    Phantom limb pain is a debilitating condition for which no effective treatment has been found. We hypothesised that re-engagement of central and peripheral circuitry involved in motor execution could reduce phantom limb pain via competitive plasticity and reversal of cortical reorganisation. Patients with upper limb amputation and known chronic intractable phantom limb pain were recruited at three clinics in Sweden and one in Slovenia. Patients received 12 sessions of phantom motor execution using machine learning, augmented and virtual reality, and serious gaming. Changes in intensity, frequency, duration, quality, and intrusion of phantom limb pain were assessed by the use of the numeric rating scale, the pain rating index, the weighted pain distribution scale, and a study-specific frequency scale before each session and at follow-up interviews 1, 3, and 6 months after the last session. Changes in medication and prostheses were also monitored. Results are reported using descriptive statistics and analysed by non-parametric tests. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02281539. Between Sept 15, 2014, and April 10, 2015, 14 patients with intractable chronic phantom limb pain, for whom conventional treatments failed, were enrolled. After 12 sessions, patients showed statistically and clinically significant improvements in all metrics of phantom limb pain. Phantom limb pain decreased from pre-treatment to the last treatment session by 47% (SD 39; absolute mean change 1·0 [0·8]; p=0·001) for weighted pain distribution, 32% (38; absolute mean change 1·6 [1·8]; p=0·007) for the numeric rating scale, and 51% (33; absolute mean change 9·6 [8·1]; p=0·0001) for the pain rating index. The numeric rating scale score for intrusion of phantom limb pain in activities of daily living and sleep was reduced by 43% (SD 37; absolute mean change 2·4 [2·3]; p=0·004) and 61% (39; absolute mean change 2·3 [1·8]; p=0·001), respectively. Two of four

  19. Tracked ultrasound calibration studies with a phantom made of LEGO bricks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soehl, Marie; Walsh, Ryan; Rankin, Adam; Lasso, Andras; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2014-03-01

    In this study, spatial calibration of tracked ultrasound was compared by using a calibration phantom made of LEGO® bricks and two 3-D printed N-wire phantoms. METHODS: The accuracy and variance of calibrations were compared under a variety of operating conditions. Twenty trials were performed using an electromagnetic tracking device with a linear probe and three trials were performed using varied probes, varied tracking devices and the three aforementioned phantoms. The accuracy and variance of spatial calibrations found through the standard deviation and error of the 3-D image reprojection were used to compare the calibrations produced from the phantoms. RESULTS: This study found no significant difference between the measured variables of the calibrations. The average standard deviation of multiple 3-D image reprojections with the highest performing printed phantom and those from the phantom made of LEGO® bricks differed by 0.05 mm and the error of the reprojections differed by 0.13 mm. CONCLUSION: Given that the phantom made of LEGO® bricks is significantly less expensive, more readily available, and more easily modified than precision-machined N-wire phantoms, it prompts to be a viable calibration tool especially for quick laboratory research and proof of concept implementations of tracked ultrasound navigation.

  20. The design and fabrication of two portal vein flow phantoms by different methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunker, Bryan E., E-mail: bryan.yunker@ucdenver.edu; Lanning, Craig J.; Shandas, Robin; Hunter, Kendall S. [Department of Bioengineering, University of Colorado – Denver/Anschutz, 12700 East 19th Avenue, MS 8607, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Dodd, Gerald D., E-mail: gerald.dodd@ucdenver.edu; Chang, Samuel; Scherzinger, Ann L. [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado – SOM, 12401 East 17th Avenue, Mail Stop L954, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Chen, S. James, E-mail: james.chen@ucdenver.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Colorado 80045 and Department of Medicine/Cardiology, University of Colorado – SOM, 12401 East 17th Avenue, Mail Stop B132, Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States); Feng, Yusheng, E-mail: yusheng.feng@utsa.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas – San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, Mail Stop: AET 2.332, San Antonio, Texas 78249–0670 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: This study outlines the design and fabrication techniques for two portal vein flow phantoms. Methods: A materials study was performed as a precursor to this phantom fabrication effort and the desired material properties are restated for continuity. A three-dimensional portal vein pattern was created from the Visual Human database. The portal vein pattern was used to fabricate two flow phantoms by different methods with identical interior surface geometry using computer aided design software tools and rapid prototyping techniques. One portal flow phantom was fabricated within a solid block of clear silicone for use on a table with Ultrasound or within medical imaging systems such as MRI, CT, PET, or SPECT. The other portal flow phantom was fabricated as a thin walled tubular latex structure for use in water tanks with Ultrasound imaging. Both phantoms were evaluated for usability and durability. Results: Both phantoms were fabricated successfully and passed durability criteria for flow testing in the next project phase. Conclusions: The fabrication methods and materials employed for the study yielded durable portal vein phantoms.

  1. Distributions of neutron and gamma doses in phantom under a mixed field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraud-Sudreau, E.

    1982-06-01

    A calculation program, based on Monte Carlo method, allowed to estimate the absorbed doses relatives to the reactor primary radiation, in a water cubic phantom and in cylindrical phantoms modelized from tissue compositions. This calculation is a theoretical approach of gamma and neutron dose gradient study in an animal phantom. PIN junction dosimetric characteristics have been studied experimentally. Air and water phantom radiation doses measured by PIN junction and lithium 7 fluoride, in reactor field have been compared to doses given by dosimetry classical techniques as tissue equivalent plastic and aluminium ionization chambers. Dosimeter responses have been employed to evaluate neutron and gamma doses in plastinaut (tissue equivalent plastic) and animal (piglet). Dose repartition in the piglet bone medulla has been also determined. This work has been completed by comparisons with Doerschell, Dousset and Brown results and by neutron dose calculations; the dose distribution related to lineic energy transfer in Auxier phantom has been also calculated [fr

  2. Using NURBS type phantoms for the investigation of morphological factors affecting pulmonary anthropo-radiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farah, J.; Broggio, D.; Franck, D.

    2010-01-01

    As existing phantoms used for the calibration of dosimetry measurements, notably in anthropo-radiometry, exhibit a poor anatomic realism because of their crude geometries, compositions and densities, and some other drawbacks, the authors, within the frame of improvement of calibration techniques, report the combined use of Mesh and NURBS-type phantoms (Non Uniform Rational B-Splines) which allow smooth shapes and finer geometries to be replicated. More precisely, they report the application of this type of phantoms to the modelling of a thorax and of a ribcage. They describe the protocols used to generate these phantoms and how some variations are introduced to take morphological characteristics (for example a female thorax) as well as various gamma ray distributions into account. Results are discussed in terms of validation of phantoms, and morphology variation

  3. Spherical phantom for research of radiation situation in outer space. Design-structural special features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartsev, I.S.; Eremenko, V.G.; Petrov, V.I.; Polenov, B.V.; Yudin, V.N.; Akatov, Yu.A.; Petrov, V.M.; Shurshakov, V.A.

    2005-01-01

    The design-structural features of the updated spherical phantom applied within the frameworks of the space experiment Matreshka-R at the Russian segment of International space station during ISS-8 and ISS-9 expeditions are described. The replacement of 48 polyethylene containers with TLD and STD assemblies by 16 cases installed from external side of the phantom and 4 tissue-equivalent caps of the central disk by 4 cases with detector assemblies is carried out. The updated tissue-equivalent phantom contains the active dosemeter based on 5 MOS detectors. The phantom cover is made from the non-flammable material NT-7. The basic characteristics of the flight specimen of the phantom are presented. The results of its on-Earth testing and real space flights are analyzed [ru

  4. Phantom sensations in people with complete spinal cord lesions: a grounded theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, Daren G; Shem, Kazuko; Walbom, Agnes; Miner, Maureen D; Maclachlan, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Phantom sensations are somatic phenomena arising from denervated parts of the body. There is very little research, and much diagnostic confusion, regarding such experiences in people with spinal cord injuries. In the case of 'complete' spinal cord lesions, phantom experiences may challenge, and indeed, contradict, the understanding that both clinicians and patients have of such injuries. This paper seeks to provide a better understanding of such 'phantom' sensations in spinal cord injury. We used grounded theory methods to explore 'phantom' sensations as experienced by individuals with complete (ASIA A) spinal lesions. Eight people with complete lesions, who were selected through theoretical sampling, participated in a semi-structured interview. Emergent themes included injury context, sensations experienced, the meaning of sensations, body connectivity, attitude and communication about sensations. Our results provide an enhanced understanding of the embodied experience of phantom sensations, and important insights regarding self-construction and rehabilitative processes in people with spinal cord injury who experience such anomalous sensations.

  5. Neutron measurements with a tissue-equivalent phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J W [Health Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1962-03-15

    This Appendix 3E of the dosimetry experiment at the R-B reactor describes the apparatus used and presents the obtained results. The phantom used was a 1/4-inch thick polythene container, 60 cm high, of elliptical cross-section, with a major axis of 36 cm and a minor axis of 20 cm. This was filled with an approximately tissue-equivalent liquid. A light but rigid internal framework of Perspex supported a series of small detectors through the phantom. The detectors used in the first high-level run at Vinca, to measure flux above 0.5 MeV, were 0.5-cm wide track plates wrapped in cadmium foil. Each track plate was a sandwich of two Ilford El 50 - mu emulsions, with glass backing, separated by a 250-mu polythene radiator, and was oriented at an angle of 45 deg to the front surface of the phantom. Under these conditions the response is constant with neutron energy between 0.5 MeV and 8 MeV at 1.26 X 10 sup - sup 3 tracks/neutron to within +- 15%. The detectors used in the second high-level run were gold foils (260 mg/cm sup 2 thick) for determination of the show neutron distribution. Previous experiments with 0.13 MeV, 2.5 MeV, 14 MeV and Po-Be neutrons have shown that the shape of the curve through a phantom obtained from these gold foils is the same as that given by either manganese foils or sodium samples despite the difference in resonance integrals. From the relaxation length of the neutron flux in the phantom, as measured by the track plates, the mean energy of the neutrons with energies greater than 0.5 MeV may be found by comparison with the relaxation lengths obtained by irradiation of the phantom with monoenergetic neutrons. The results of these experiments are given. Track plate results from the Vinca experiment are shown. It can be seen that the backscattered fast flux is about one-third of the incident fast flux and that the energy indicated by the shape of the curve is considerably lower than the energy of the direct neutrons. It seems possible that the high

  6. Neutron measurements with a tissue-equivalent phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J W [Health Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1962-03-01

    This Appendix 3E of the dosimetry experiment at the R-B reactor describes the apparatus used and presents the obtained results. The phantom used was a 1/4-inch thick polythene container, 60 cm high, of elliptical cross-section, with a major axis of 36 cm and a minor axis of 20 cm. This was filled with an approximately tissue-equivalent liquid. A light but rigid internal framework of Perspex supported a series of small detectors through the phantom. The detectors used in the first high-level run at Vinca, to measure flux above 0.5 MeV, were 0.5-cm wide track plates wrapped in cadmium foil. Each track plate was a sandwich of two Ilford El 50 - {mu} emulsions, with glass backing, separated by a 250-{mu} polythene radiator, and was oriented at an angle of 45 deg to the front surface of the phantom. Under these conditions the response is constant with neutron energy between 0.5 MeV and 8 MeV at 1.26 X 10{sup -3} tracks/neutron to within {+-} 15%. The detectors used in the second high-level run were gold foils (260 mg/cm{sup 2} thick) for determination of the show neutron distribution. Previous experiments with 0.13 MeV, 2.5 MeV, 14 MeV and Po-Be neutrons have shown that the shape of the curve through a phantom obtained from these gold foils is the same as that given by either manganese foils or sodium samples despite the difference in resonance integrals. From the relaxation length of the neutron flux in the phantom, as measured by the track plates, the mean energy of the neutrons with energies greater than 0.5 MeV may be found by comparison with the relaxation lengths obtained by irradiation of the phantom with monoenergetic neutrons. The results of these experiments are given. Track plate results from the Vinca experiment are shown. It can be seen that the backscattered fast flux is about one-third of the incident fast flux and that the energy indicated by the shape of the curve is considerably lower than the energy of the direct neutrons. It seems possible that the

  7. Development of digital phantom for DRR evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Katsuta, Shoichi; Oyama, Masaya; Ogino, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Generally, digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) is evaluated by physical phantom. The CT image is camouflaged by the performance of the radiation treatment planning system and contains a variety of error factors. The CT image (as follows the digital phantom), where an arbitrary CT value is arranged in the matrix, is necessary to evaluate the pure performance of the radiation treatment planning system. In this study, the development of a digital phantom is described, and the utility is discussed. CTport and the radiation treatment planning system are evaluated with the use of a digital phantom as follows: geometrical accuracy evaluation of DRR, consisting of the center position, size of irradiation field, distortion, extension of X-ray, and beam axis, and the image quality evaluation of DRR, which consists of the contrast resolution. As for DRR made with CTport and the treatment planning system, the part that shifted geometrically was confirmed. In the image quality evaluation, there was a remarkable difference. Because the making accuracy and the installation accuracy of the phantom do not influence the digital phantom, the geometrical accuracy of the DRR is reliable. Because the CT conditions and the phantom factor have no influence, the peculiar DRR image quality can be evaluated and used to evaluate the best image processing parameters. (author)

  8. Evaluation of tomosynthesis elastography in a breast-mimicking phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelken, Florian Jan; Sack, Ingolf; Klatt, Dieter; Fischer, Thomas; Fallenberg, Eva Maria; Bick, Ulrich; Diekmann, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether measurement of strain under static compression in tomosynthesis of a breast-mimicking phantom can be used to distinguish tumor-simulating lesions of different elasticities and to compare the results to values predicted by rheometric analysis as well as results of ultrasound elastography. Materials and methods: We prepared three soft breast-mimicking phantoms containing simulated tumors of different elasticities. The phantoms were imaged using a wide angle tomosynthesis system with increasing compression settings ranging from 0 N to 105 N in steps of 15 N. Strain of the inclusions was measured in two planes using a commercially available mammography workstation. The elasticity of the phantom matrix and inclusion material was determined by rheometric analysis. Ultrasound elastography of the inclusions was performed using two different ultrasound elastography algorithms. Results: Strain at maximal compression was 24.4%/24.5% in plane 1/plane 2, respectively, for the soft inclusion, 19.6%/16.9% for the intermediate inclusion, and 6.0%/10.2% for the firm inclusion. The strain ratios predicted by rheometrical testing were 0.41, 0.83 and 1.26 for the soft, intermediate, and firm inclusions, respectively. The strain ratios obtained for the soft, intermediate, and firm inclusions were 0.72 ± 0.13, 1.02 ± 0.21 and 2.67 ± 1.70, respectively for tomosynthesis elastography, 0.91, 1.64 and 2.07, respectively, for ultrasound tissue strain imaging, and 0.97, 2.06 and 2.37, respectively, for ultrasound real-time elastography. Conclusions: Differentiation of tumor-simulating inclusions by elasticity in a breast mimicking phantom may be possible by measuring strain in tomosynthesis. This method may be useful for assessing elasticity of breast lesions tomosynthesis of the breast

  9. Quality assessment of brain images by Hoffman phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimian, A.R.; Saddad, F.; Mosalla, B.; Moradkhani, S.; Degbankhan, R.; Pouladi, M.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is using Hoffman brain phantom for quality assessment of brian images in SPECT system. There are the following standards for quality control in nuclear medicine: American Association of Physicists in Medicine, National Electrical Manufacturers Association, International Electromechanical Commission, International Atomic Energy Agency. Each of the above standards has the following important orders: Physical inspection, Acceptance and Reference Testing, Periodic Q C tests (Daily, Weekly, Monthly, Quarterly, Annually). The above tests are simple physics measures. To more meaningful ones based on performance of some tasks related to clinical application it is better to use from organs' phantoms, such as: brain, cardiac, etc. In this research we made a comparison between normal and abnormal states of Hoffman brain phantom. Methods of Hoffman brain phantom was filled with a solution of Tc- 99 m (5 mCi) and water (1300 cc). this results: The investigation of small abnormalities strongly related to the operating conditions and deviation from best tuning state of the system

  10. Gravitational Quasinormal Modes of Regular Phantom Black Hole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the gravitational quasinormal modes (QNMs for a type of regular black hole (BH known as phantom BH, which is a static self-gravitating solution of a minimally coupled phantom scalar field with a potential. The studies are carried out for three different spacetimes: asymptotically flat, de Sitter (dS, and anti-de Sitter (AdS. In order to consider the standard odd parity and even parity of gravitational perturbations, the corresponding master equations are derived. The QNMs are discussed by evaluating the temporal evolution of the perturbation field which, in turn, provides direct information on the stability of BH spacetime. It is found that in asymptotically flat, dS, and AdS spacetimes the gravitational perturbations have similar characteristics for both odd and even parities. The decay rate of perturbation is strongly dependent on the scale parameter b, which measures the coupling strength between phantom scalar field and the gravity. Furthermore, through the analysis of Hawking radiation, it is shown that the thermodynamics of such regular phantom BH is also influenced by b. The obtained results might shed some light on the quantum interpretation of QNM perturbation.

  11. Are phantoms useful for predicting the potential of dose reduction in full-field digital mammography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gennaro, Gisella; Katz, Luc; Souchay, Henri; Alberelli, Claudio; Maggio, Cosimo di

    2005-01-01

    A phantom study was performed in full-field digital mammography to investigate the opportunity and the magnitude of a possible dose reduction that would leave the image quality above the accepted thresholds associated with some classical phantoms. This preliminary work is intended to lay the groundwork for a future clinical study on the impact of dose reduction on clinical results. Three different mammography phantoms (ACR RMI 156, CIRS 11A and CDMAM 3.4) were imaged by a full-field digital mammography unit (GE Senographe 2000D) at different dose levels. Images were rated by three observers with softcopy reading and scoring methods specific to each phantom. Different types of data analysis were applied to the ACR (American College of Radiology) and the other two phantoms, respectively. With reference to the minimum acceptance score in screen/film accreditation programmes, the ACR phantom showed that about 45% dose reduction could be applied, while keeping the phantom scores above that threshold. A relative comparison was done for CIRS and CDMAM, for which no threshold is defined. CIRS scoring remained close to the reference level down to 40% dose reduction, the inter- and intra-observer variability being the main source of uncertainty. Contrast-detail curves provided by CDMAM overlapped down to 50% dose reduction, at least for object contrast values ranging between 30% and 3%. This multi-phantom study shows the potential of further reducing the dose in full-field digital mammography beyond the current values. A common dose reduction factor around 50% seems acceptable for all phantoms. However, caution is required before extrapolating the results for clinical use, given the limitations of these widely used phantoms, mainly related to their limited dynamic range and uniform background

  12. Red blood cell antigen genotype analysis for 9087 Asian, Asian American, and Native American blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Meghan; Harris, Samantha; Haile, Askale; Johnsen, Jill; Teramura, Gayle; Nelson, Karen

    2015-10-01

    There has yet to be a comprehensive analysis of blood group antigen prevalence in Asian Americans and Native Americans. There may be ethnic differences in blood group frequencies that would result in clinically important mismatches through transfusion. Blood donors who self-identified as Asian or Native American were tested using a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) DNA array (HEA BeadChip kit, Bioarray Solutions Ltd) that predicts expression of 38 human erythrocyte antigens (HEAs) and by serology for ABO, D, C, M, N, Jk(a) , and Jk(b) . The prevalence of blood group antigens was compared to published European prevalence. Discrepancies between SNP-predicted and serology-detected antigens were tallied. A total of 9087 blood donors were tested from nine Asian and Native American heritages. The predicted prevalence of selected antigens in the RHCE, JK, FY, MNS, LU, CO, and DO blood group systems were variable between Asian populations, but overall not significantly different than Europeans. Compared to European frequencies, Kell blood group allele frequencies were significantly different in the Chinese, Native American, Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, South Asian, and Southeast Asian heritage blood donors; Diego antigens Di(a) and Di(b) were different in donors of Native American and South Asian ancestries (p Asian and Native Americans donors. Several ethnic groups exhibited differences in HEA frequencies compared to Europeans. Genotype-serotype discrepancies were detected in all systems studied. © 2015 AABB.

  13. SU-F-T-292: Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Phantom Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrens, H; Lewis, B; Lujano, C; Nguyen, T; Hernandez, N; Alvarez, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the results of IROC Houston’s international and domestic end-to-end QA phantom irradiations. Methods: IROC Houston has anthropomorphic lung, liver, head and neck, prostate, SRS and spine phantoms that are used for credentialing and quality assurance purposes. The phantoms include structures that closely mimic targets and organs at risk and are made from tissue equivalent materials: high impact polystyrene, solid water, cork and acrylic. Motion tables are used to mimic breathing motion for some lung and liver phantoms. Dose is measured with TLD and radiochromic film in various planes within the target of the phantoms. Results: The most common phantom requested is the head and neck followed by the lung phantom. The head and neck phantom was sent to 800 domestic and 148 international sites between 2011 and 2015, with average pass rates of 89% and 92%, respectively. During the past five years, a general upward trend exists regarding demand for the lung phantom for both international and domestic sites with international sites more than tripling from 5 (2011) to 16 (2015) and domestic sites doubling from 66 (2011) to 152 (2015). The pass rate for lung phantoms has been consistent from year to year despite this large increase in the number of phantoms irradiated with an average pass rate of 85% (domestic) and 95% (international) sites. The percentage of lung phantoms used in combination with motions tables increased from 38% to 79% over the 5 year time span. Conclusion: The number of domestic and international sites irradiating the head and neck and lung phantoms continues to increase and the pass rates remained constant. These end-to-end QA tests continue to be a crucial part of clinical trial credentialing and institution quality assurance. This investigation was supported by IROC grant CA180803 awarded by the NCI.

  14. SU-F-T-292: Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core (IROC) Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Phantom Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehrens, H; Lewis, B; Lujano, C; Nguyen, T; Hernandez, N; Alvarez, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the results of IROC Houston’s international and domestic end-to-end QA phantom irradiations. Methods: IROC Houston has anthropomorphic lung, liver, head and neck, prostate, SRS and spine phantoms that are used for credentialing and quality assurance purposes. The phantoms include structures that closely mimic targets and organs at risk and are made from tissue equivalent materials: high impact polystyrene, solid water, cork and acrylic. Motion tables are used to mimic breathing motion for some lung and liver phantoms. Dose is measured with TLD and radiochromic film in various planes within the target of the phantoms. Results: The most common phantom requested is the head and neck followed by the lung phantom. The head and neck phantom was sent to 800 domestic and 148 international sites between 2011 and 2015, with average pass rates of 89% and 92%, respectively. During the past five years, a general upward trend exists regarding demand for the lung phantom for both international and domestic sites with international sites more than tripling from 5 (2011) to 16 (2015) and domestic sites doubling from 66 (2011) to 152 (2015). The pass rate for lung phantoms has been consistent from year to year despite this large increase in the number of phantoms irradiated with an average pass rate of 85% (domestic) and 95% (international) sites. The percentage of lung phantoms used in combination with motions tables increased from 38% to 79% over the 5 year time span. Conclusion: The number of domestic and international sites irradiating the head and neck and lung phantoms continues to increase and the pass rates remained constant. These end-to-end QA tests continue to be a crucial part of clinical trial credentialing and institution quality assurance. This investigation was supported by IROC grant CA180803 awarded by the NCI.

  15. Charged black holes in phantom cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, Mubasher; Qadir, Asghar; Rashid, Muneer Ahmad [National University of Sciences and Technology, Center for Advanced Mathematics and Physics, Rawalpindi (Pakistan)

    2008-11-15

    In the classical relativistic regime, the accretion of phantom-like dark energy onto a stationary black hole reduces the mass of the black hole. We have investigated the accretion of phantom energy onto a stationary charged black hole and have determined the condition under which this accretion is possible. This condition restricts the mass-to-charge ratio in a narrow range. This condition also challenges the validity of the cosmic-censorship conjecture since a naked singularity is eventually produced due to accretion of phantom energy onto black hole. (orig.)

  16. A set of 4D pediatric XCAT reference phantoms for multimodality research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, Hannah; Zhang, Yakun; Bond, Jason; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Samei, E.; Segars, W. P.; Minhas, Anum; Frush, D.; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors previously developed an adult population of 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms for multimodality imaging research. In this work, the authors develop a reference set of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms consisting of male and female anatomies at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years. These models will serve as the foundation from which the authors will create a vast population of pediatric phantoms for optimizing pediatric CT imaging protocols. Methods: Each phantom was based on a unique set of CT data from a normal patient obtained from the Duke University database. The datasets were selected to best match the reference values for height and weight for the different ages and genders according to ICRP Publication 89. The major organs and structures were segmented from the CT data and used to create an initial pediatric model defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. The CT data covered the entire torso and part of the head. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the top of the head and the arms and legs using scaled versions of the XCAT adult models or additional models created from cadaver data. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from a template XCAT phantom (male or female 50th percentile adult) to the target pediatric model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. The masses of the organs in each phantom were matched to the reference values given in ICRP Publication 89. The new reference models were checked for anatomical accuracy via visual inspection. Results: The authors created a set of ten pediatric reference phantoms that have the same level of detail and functionality as the original XCAT phantom adults. Each consists of thousands of anatomical structures and includes parameterized models

  17. A set of 4D pediatric XCAT reference phantoms for multimodality research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Hannah, E-mail: Hannah.norris@duke.edu; Zhang, Yakun; Bond, Jason; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Samei, E.; Segars, W. P. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Minhas, Anum; Frush, D. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I. [Center for Imaging Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The authors previously developed an adult population of 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms for multimodality imaging research. In this work, the authors develop a reference set of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms consisting of male and female anatomies at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years. These models will serve as the foundation from which the authors will create a vast population of pediatric phantoms for optimizing pediatric CT imaging protocols. Methods: Each phantom was based on a unique set of CT data from a normal patient obtained from the Duke University database. The datasets were selected to best match the reference values for height and weight for the different ages and genders according to ICRP Publication 89. The major organs and structures were segmented from the CT data and used to create an initial pediatric model defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. The CT data covered the entire torso and part of the head. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the top of the head and the arms and legs using scaled versions of the XCAT adult models or additional models created from cadaver data. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from a template XCAT phantom (male or female 50th percentile adult) to the target pediatric model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. The masses of the organs in each phantom were matched to the reference values given in ICRP Publication 89. The new reference models were checked for anatomical accuracy via visual inspection. Results: The authors created a set of ten pediatric reference phantoms that have the same level of detail and functionality as the original XCAT phantom adults. Each consists of thousands of anatomical structures and includes parameterized models

  18. Wormholes supported by phantom energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J. A.; Guzman, F. S.; Montelongo-Garcia, N.; Zannias, T.

    2009-01-01

    By a combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we demonstrate the existence of spherical, asymptotically flat traversable wormholes supported by exotic matter whose stress tensor relative to the orthonormal frame of Killing observers takes the form of a perfect fluid possessing anisotropic pressures and subject to linear equations of state: τ=λρc 2 , P=μρc 2 . We show that there exists a four parameter family of asymptotically flat spherical wormholes parametrized by the area of the throat A(0), the gradient Λ(0) of the red shift factor evaluated on the throat as well as the values of (λ,μ). The latter are subject to restrictions: λ>1 and 2μ>λ or λ<0 and 2μ<-|λ|. For particular values of (λ,μ), the stress tensor may be interpreted as representing a phantom configuration, while for other values represents exotic matter. All solutions have the property that the two asymptotically flat ends possess finite Arnowitt-Deser-Misner mass.

  19. Estimation of internal dose from radiocesium and phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Masafumi; Nakamura, Yuji

    1994-01-01

    A complicated model describing the movement of a radionuclide in both the natural environment and socioeconomical systems is usually used to estimate the internal dose to the public in terms of collective dose, taking demographic data into account. The result can be certified for reliability in some compartments of the model. One of the compartments is the body content. In the case of radiocesium, the individual body burden can be measured using a whole-body counter. The measurement must be calibrated with a phantom. The public is composed of individuals of various ages. Accordingly, the whole-body counter should be calibrated with a set of phantoms approximating individuals of different body sizes. Relationships between counting efficiency and body size were analyzed on 137 Cs 134 Cs or 40 K incorporated into the whole-body using a set of phantoms. Four sizes covering average Japanese physiques from infant to adult male, were chosen to prepare an anthropomorphic phantom system. The distribution of 137 Cs in aquatic solution was homogeneous through the phantom. A whole-body counter at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, was used at a rate of 5 cm per minute in a scanning mode. The measurements were carried out in an iron room. Relations were analyzed between counting efficiency and some anthropometric parameters. The best fit was given by a linear equation of both reciprocals of height in cm and weight in kg, with a correlation coefficient of 1.00 for 137 Cs. The result indicates that radioactivity of 137 Cs can be determined for individuals with different anthropometric parameters using the whole-body counter system. This means that effective equivalent doses for individuals can be computed accurately from the measurements. Further, an estimate on the body content from an dose estimation model using measurements of radioactivity in environmental substances can be evaluated by comparing the body burden measured. (J.P.N.)

  20. Are ethnic and gender specific equations needed to derive fat free mass from bioelectrical impedance in children of South asian, black african-Caribbean and white European origin? Results of the assessment of body composition in children study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Nightingale

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA is a potentially valuable method for assessing lean mass and body fat levels in children from different ethnic groups. We examined the need for ethnic- and gender-specific equations for estimating fat free mass (FFM from BIA in children from different ethnic groups and examined their effects on the assessment of ethnic differences in body fat. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of children aged 8-10 years in London Primary schools including 325 South Asians, 250 black African-Caribbeans and 289 white Europeans with measurements of height, weight and arm-leg impedance (Z; Bodystat 1500. Total body water was estimated from deuterium dilution and converted to FFM. Multilevel models were used to derive three types of equation {A: FFM = linear combination(height+weight+Z; B: FFM = linear combination(height(2/Z; C: FFM = linear combination(height(2/Z+weight}. RESULTS: Ethnicity and gender were important predictors of FFM and improved model fit in all equations. The models of best fit were ethnicity and gender specific versions of equation A, followed by equation C; these provided accurate assessments of ethnic differences in FFM and FM. In contrast, the use of generic equations led to underestimation of both the negative South Asian-white European FFM difference and the positive black African-Caribbean-white European FFM difference (by 0.53 kg and by 0.73 kg respectively for equation A. The use of generic equations underestimated the positive South Asian-white European difference in fat mass (FM and overestimated the positive black African-Caribbean-white European difference in FM (by 4.7% and 10.1% respectively for equation A. Consistent results were observed when the equations were applied to a large external data set. CONCLUSIONS: Ethnic- and gender-specific equations for predicting FFM from BIA provide better estimates of ethnic differences in FFM and FM in children, while generic equations

  1. Are Ethnic and Gender Specific Equations Needed to Derive Fat Free Mass from Bioelectrical Impedance in Children of South Asian, Black African-Caribbean and White European Origin? Results of the Assessment of Body Composition in Children Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Claire M.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Owen, Christopher G.; Donin, Angela S.; Newton, Sian L.; Furness, Cheryl A.; Howard, Emma L.; Gillings, Rachel D.; Wells, Jonathan C. K.; Cook, Derek G.; Whincup, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is a potentially valuable method for assessing lean mass and body fat levels in children from different ethnic groups. We examined the need for ethnic- and gender-specific equations for estimating fat free mass (FFM) from BIA in children from different ethnic groups and examined their effects on the assessment of ethnic differences in body fat. Methods Cross-sectional study of children aged 8–10 years in London Primary schools including 325 South Asians, 250 black African-Caribbeans and 289 white Europeans with measurements of height, weight and arm-leg impedance (Z; Bodystat 1500). Total body water was estimated from deuterium dilution and converted to FFM. Multilevel models were used to derive three types of equation {A: FFM = linear combination(height+weight+Z); B: FFM = linear combination(height2/Z); C: FFM = linear combination(height2/Z+weight)}. Results Ethnicity and gender were important predictors of FFM and improved model fit in all equations. The models of best fit were ethnicity and gender specific versions of equation A, followed by equation C; these provided accurate assessments of ethnic differences in FFM and FM. In contrast, the use of generic equations led to underestimation of both the negative South Asian-white European FFM difference and the positive black African-Caribbean-white European FFM difference (by 0.53 kg and by 0.73 kg respectively for equation A). The use of generic equations underestimated the positive South Asian-white European difference in fat mass (FM) and overestimated the positive black African-Caribbean-white European difference in FM (by 4.7% and 10.1% respectively for equation A). Consistent results were observed when the equations were applied to a large external data set. Conclusions Ethnic- and gender-specific equations for predicting FFM from BIA provide better estimates of ethnic differences in FFM and FM in children, while generic equations can

  2. Material-specific Conversion Factors for Different Solid Phantoms Used in the Dosimetry of Different Brachytherapy Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Sina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Based on Task Group No. 43 (TG-43U1 recommendations, water phantom is proposed as a reference phantom for the dosimetry of brachytherapy sources. The experimental determination of TG-43 parameters is usually performed in water-equivalent solid phantoms. The purpose of this study was to determine the conversion factors for equalizing solid phantoms to water. Materials and Methods TG-43 parameters of low- and high-energy brachytherapy sources (i.e., Pd-103, I-125 and Cs-137 were obtained in different phantoms, using Monte Carlo simulations. The brachytherapy sources were simulated at the center of different phantoms including water, solid water, poly(methyl methacrylate, polystyrene and polyethylene. Dosimetric parameters such as dose rate constant, radial dose function and anisotropy function of each source were compared in different phantoms. Then, conversion factors were obtained to make phantom parameters equivalent to those of water. Results Polynomial coefficients of conversion factors were obtained for all sources to quantitatively compare g(r values in different phantom materials and the radial dose function in water. Conclusion Polynomial coefficients of conversion factors were obtained for all sources to quantitatively compare g(r values in different phantom materials and the radial dose function in water.

  3. Three-dimensional printer-generated patient-specific phantom for artificial in vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamomae, Takeshi; Shimizu, Hidetoshi; Nakaya, Takayoshi; Okudaira, Kuniyasu; Aoyama, Takahiro; Oguchi, Hiroshi; Komori, Masataka; Kawamura, Mariko; Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Monzen, Hajime; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Naganawa, Shinji

    2017-12-01

    Pretreatment intensity-modulated radiotherapy quality assurance is performed using simple rectangular or cylindrical phantoms; thus, the dosimetric errors caused by complex patient-specific anatomy are absent in the evaluation objects. In this study, we construct a system for generating patient-specific three-dimensional (3D)-printed phantoms for radiotherapy dosimetry. An anthropomorphic head phantom containing the bone and hollow of the paranasal sinus is scanned by computed tomography (CT). Based on surface rendering data, a patient-specific phantom is formed using a fused-deposition-modeling-based 3D printer, with a polylactic acid filament as the printing material. Radiophotoluminescence glass dosimeters can be inserted in the 3D-printed phantom. The phantom shape, CT value, and absorbed doses are compared between the actual and 3D-printed phantoms. The shape difference between the actual and printed phantoms is less than 1 mm except in the bottom surface region. The average CT value of the infill region in the 3D-printed phantom is -6 ± 18 Hounsfield units (HU) and that of the vertical shell region is 126 ± 18 HU. When the same plans were irradiated, the dose differences were generally less than 2%. These results demonstrate the feasibility of the 3D-printed phantom for artificial in vivo dosimetry in radiotherapy quality assurance. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. South Asian Canadian experiences of depression

    OpenAIRE

    Grewal, Amarjit

    2010-01-01

    This narrative research study explored the socio-cultural context surrounding depression through semi-structured interviews with six South Asian Canadian participants, who self identified as having experienced depression. The study sought to expand on the knowledge of depression and South Asian Canadians by considering the roles of the family, the community, and the culture in the experiences of depression. Thematic analysis of the participant interviews resulted in five major themes: the exp...

  5. A deformable head and neck phantom with in-vivo dosimetry for adaptive radiotherapy quality assurance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, Yan Jiang [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies and Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037-0843 and Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Smith, Arthur-Allen; Mcilvena, David; Manilay, Zherrina; Lai, Yuet Kong [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Rice, Roger; Mell, Loren; Cerviño, Laura, E-mail: lcervino@ucsd.edu, E-mail: steve.jiang@utsouthwestern.edu [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies and Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037-0843 (United States); Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B., E-mail: lcervino@ucsd.edu, E-mail: steve.jiang@utsouthwestern.edu [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technologies and Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92037-0843 and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75235 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Patients’ interfractional anatomic changes can compromise the initial treatment plan quality. To overcome this issue, adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been introduced. Deformable image registration (DIR) is an important tool for ART and several deformable phantoms have been built to evaluate the algorithms’ accuracy. However, there is a lack of deformable phantoms that can also provide dosimetric information to verify the accuracy of the whole ART process. The goal of this work is to design and construct a deformable head and neck (HN) ART quality assurance (QA) phantom with in vivo dosimetry. Methods: An axial slice of a HN patient is taken as a model for the phantom construction. Six anatomic materials are considered, with HU numbers similar to a real patient. A filled balloon inside the phantom tissue is inserted to simulate tumor. Deflation of the balloon simulates tumor shrinkage. Nonradiopaque surface markers, which do not influence DIR algorithms, provide the deformation ground truth. Fixed and movable holders are built in the phantom to hold a diode for dosimetric measurements. Results: The measured deformations at the surface marker positions can be compared with deformations calculated by a DIR algorithm to evaluate its accuracy. In this study, the authors selected a Demons algorithm as a DIR algorithm example for demonstration purposes. The average error magnitude is 2.1 mm. The point dose measurements from the in vivo diode dosimeters show a good agreement with the calculated doses from the treatment planning system with a maximum difference of 3.1% of prescription dose, when the treatment plans are delivered to the phantom with original or deformed geometry. Conclusions: In this study, the authors have presented the functionality of this deformable HN phantom for testing the accuracy of DIR algorithms and verifying the ART dosimetric accuracy. The authors’ experiments demonstrate the feasibility of this phantom serving as an end

  6. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-01: IROC Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Proton Phantom Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lujano, C; Hernandez, N; Keith, T; Nguyen, T; Taylor, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the proton phantoms that IROC Houston uses to approve and credential proton institutions to participate in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Methods: Photon phantoms cannot necessarily be used for proton measurements because protons react differently than photons in some plastics. As such plastics that are tissue equivalent for protons were identified. Another required alteration is to ensure that the film dosimeters are housed in the phantom with no air gap to avoid proton streaming. Proton-equivalent plastics/materials used include RMI Solid Water, Techron HPV, blue water, RANDO soft tissue material, balsa wood, compressed cork and polyethylene. Institutions wishing to be approved or credentialed request a phantom and are prioritized for delivery. At the institution, the phantom is imaged, a treatment plan is developed, positioned on the treatment couch and the treatment is delivered. The phantom is returned and the measured dose distributions are compared to the institution’s electronically submitted treatment plan dosimetry data. Results: IROC Houston has developed an extensive proton phantom approval/credentialing program consisting of five different phantoms designs: head, prostate, lung, liver and spine. The phantoms are made with proton equivalent plastics that have HU and relative stopping powers similar (within 5%) of human tissues. They also have imageable targets, avoidance structures, and heterogeneities. TLD and radiochromic film are contained in the target structures. There have been 13 head, 33 prostate, 18 lung, 2 liver and 16 spine irradiations with either passive scatter, or scanned proton beams. The pass rates have been: 100%, 69.7%, 72.2%, 50%, and 81.3%, respectively. Conclusion: IROC Houston has responded to the recent surge in proton facilities by developing a family of anthropomorphic phantoms that are able to be used for remote audits of proton beams. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA081647

  7. MO-F-CAMPUS-T-01: IROC Houston QA Center’s Anthropomorphic Proton Phantom Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lujano, C; Hernandez, N; Keith, T; Nguyen, T; Taylor, P; Molineu, A; Followill, D [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To describe the proton phantoms that IROC Houston uses to approve and credential proton institutions to participate in NCI-sponsored clinical trials. Methods: Photon phantoms cannot necessarily be used for proton measurements because protons react differently than photons in some plastics. As such plastics that are tissue equivalent for protons were identified. Another required alteration is to ensure that the film dosimeters are housed in the phantom with no air gap to avoid proton streaming. Proton-equivalent plastics/materials used include RMI Solid Water, Techron HPV, blue water, RANDO soft tissue material, balsa wood, compressed cork and polyethylene. Institutions wishing to be approved or credentialed request a phantom and are prioritized for delivery. At the institution, the phantom is imaged, a treatment plan is developed, positioned on the treatment couch and the treatment is delivered. The phantom is returned and the measured dose distributions are compared to the institution’s electronically submitted treatment plan dosimetry data. Results: IROC Houston has developed an extensive proton phantom approval/credentialing program consisting of five different phantoms designs: head, prostate, lung, liver and spine. The phantoms are made with proton equivalent plastics that have HU and relative stopping powers similar (within 5%) of human tissues. They also have imageable targets, avoidance structures, and heterogeneities. TLD and radiochromic film are contained in the target structures. There have been 13 head, 33 prostate, 18 lung, 2 liver and 16 spine irradiations with either passive scatter, or scanned proton beams. The pass rates have been: 100%, 69.7%, 72.2%, 50%, and 81.3%, respectively. Conclusion: IROC Houston has responded to the recent surge in proton facilities by developing a family of anthropomorphic phantoms that are able to be used for remote audits of proton beams. Work supported by PHS grant CA10953 and CA081647.

  8. SU-C-209-07: Phantoms for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis Imaging System Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, D; Liu, Y [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) is gaining importance in breast imaging. There is a need for phantoms that can be used for image evaluation and comparison. Existing commercially available phantoms for DBT are expensive and may lack clinically relevant test objects. The purpose of this study is to develop phantoms for DBT evaluation. Methods Four phantoms have been designed and constructed to assess the image quality (IQ) of two DBT systems. The first contains a spiral of 0.3 mm SiC beads in gelatin to measure the tomographic slice thickness profile and uniformity of coverage in a series of tomographic planes. The second contains simulated tumors inclined with respect to the phantom base to assess tomographic image quality. The third has a tilted array of discs with varying contrast and diameter. This phantom was imaged alone and in a stack of TE slabs giving 2 to 10 cm thickness. The fourth has a dual wedge of glandular and adipose simulating materials. One wedge contains discs with varying diameter and thickness; the other supports a mass with six simulated spicules of varying size and a cluster of simulated calcifications. The simulated glandular tissue material varies between 35 and 100% of the total thickness (5.5 cm). Results: All phantoms were scanned successfully. The best IQ comparison was achieved with the dual wedge phantom as demonstrated by the spiculated mass and calcifications. Images were evaluated by two radiologists and one physicist. The projection images and corresponding set of tomographic planes were comparable and the synthesized projection images were inferior to the projection images for both systems. Conclusion: Four phantoms were designed, constructed and imaged on two DBT systems. They successfully demonstrated performance differences between two systems, and between true and synthesized projection images. Future work will incorporate these designs into a single phantom.

  9. Estimation of computed tomography dose in various phantom shapes and compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Lae [Dept. of Radiological Science, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate CTDI (computed tomography dose index at center) for various phantom shapes, sizes, and compositions by using GATE (geant4 application for tomographic emission) simulations. GATE simulations were performed for various phantom shapes (cylinder, elliptical, and hexagonal prism PMMA phantoms) and phantom compositions (water, PMMA, polyethylene, polyoxymethylene) with various diameters (1-50 cm) at various kVp and mAs levels. The CTDI100center values of cylinder, elliptical, and hexagonal prism phantom at 120 kVp, 200 mAs resulted in 11.1, 13.4, and 12.2 mGy, respectively. The volume is the same, but CTDI{sub 100center} values are different depending on the type of phantom. The water, PMMA, and polyoxymethylene phantom CTDI{sub 100center} values were relatively low as the material density increased. However, in the case of Polyethylene, the CTDI{sub 100center} value was higher than that of PMMA at diameters exceeding 15 cm (CTDI{sub 100center} : 35.0 mGy). And a diameter greater than 30 cm (CTDI{sub 100center} : 17.7 mGy) showed more CTDI{sub 100center} than Water. We have used limited phantoms to evaluate CT doses. In this study, CTDI{sub 100center} values were estimated and simulated by GATE simulation according to the material and shape of the phantom. CT dosimetry can be estimated more accurately by using various materials and phantom shapes close to human body.

  10. A tissue phantom for visualization and measurement of ultrasound-induced cavitation damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Yuan, Lingqian; Duryea, Alexander P; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2010-12-01

    Many ultrasound studies involve the use of tissue-mimicking materials to research phenomena in vitro and predict in vivo bioeffects. We have developed a tissue phantom to study cavitation-induced damage to tissue. The phantom consists of red blood cells suspended in an agarose hydrogel. The acoustic and mechanical properties of the gel phantom were found to be similar to soft tissue properties. The phantom's response to cavitation was evaluated using histotripsy. Histotripsy causes breakdown of tissue structures by the generation of controlled cavitation using short, focused, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. Histotripsy lesions were generated in the phantom and kidney tissue using a spherically focused 1-MHz transducer generating 15 cycle pulses, at a pulse repetition frequency of 100 Hz with a peak negative pressure of 14 MPa. Damage appeared clearly as increased optical transparency of the phantom due to rupture of individual red blood cells. The morphology of lesions generated in the phantom was very similar to that generated in kidney tissue at both macroscopic and cellular levels. Additionally, lesions in the phantom could be visualized as hypoechoic regions on a B-mode ultrasound image, similar to histotripsy lesions in tissue. High-speed imaging of the optically transparent phantom was used to show that damage coincides with the presence of cavitation. These results indicate that the phantom can accurately mimic the response of soft tissue to cavitation and provide a useful tool for studying damage induced by acoustic cavitation. Copyright © 2010 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Asian Art on Display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borggreen, Gunhild Ravn

    2010-01-01

    Med udgangspunkt i seminaret Visualising Asian Modernity diskuteres forholdet mellem antropologi og samtidskunst i lyset af hvorledes asiatisk kunst fremvises og formidles i vestlig og dansk sammenhæng....

  12. Central Asian Republic Info

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — CAR Info is designed and managed by the Central Asian Republic Mission to fill in the knowledge and reporting gaps in existing agency systems for that Mission. It...

  13. Internal dosimetry estimates using voxelized reference phantoms for thyroid agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoseinian-Azghadi, E.; Rafat-Motavalli, L.; Miri-Hakimabad, H.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents internal dosimetry estimates for diagnostic procedures performed for thyroid disorders by relevant radiopharmaceuticals. The organ doses for 131 Iodine, 123 Iodine and 99m Tc incorporated into the body were calculated for the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reference voxel phantoms using the Monte Carlo transport method. A comparison between different thyroid uptakes of iodine in the range of 0–55% was made, and the effect of various techniques for administration of 99m Tc on organ doses was studied. To investigate the necessity of calculating organ dose from all source regions, the major source organ and its contribution to total dose were specified for each target organ. Moreover, we compared effective dose in ICRP voxel phantoms with that in stylized phantoms. In our method, we directly calculated the organ dose without using the S values or SAFs, as is commonly done. Hence, a distribution of the absorbed dose to entire tissues was obtained. The chord length distributions (CLDs) were also computed for the selected source–target pairs to make comparison across the genders. The results showed that the S values for radionuclides in the thyroid are not sufficient for calculating the organ doses, especially for 123 I and 99m Tc. The thyroid and its neighboring organs receive a greater dose as thyroid uptake increases. Our comparisons also revealed an underestimation of organ doses reported for the stylized phantoms compared with the values based on the ICRP voxel phantoms in the uptake range of 5–55%, and an overestimation of absorbed dose by up to 2-fold for Iodine administration using blocking agent and for 99m Tc incorporation. (author)

  14. A phantom design for assessment of detectability in PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenweber, Scott D.; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The primary clinical role of positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is the detection of anomalous regions of 18 F-FDG uptake, which are often indicative of malignant lesions. The goal of this work was to create a task-configurable fillable phantom for realistic measurements of detectability in PET imaging. Design goals included simplicity, adjustable feature size, realistic size and contrast levels, and inclusion of a lumpy (i.e., heterogeneous) background. Methods: The detection targets were hollow 3D-printed dodecahedral nylon features. The exostructure sphere-like features created voids in a background of small, solid non-porous plastic (acrylic) spheres inside a fillable tank. The features filled at full concentration while the background concentration was reduced due to filling only between the solid spheres. Results: Multiple iterations of feature size and phantom construction were used to determine a configuration at the limit of detectability for a PET/CT system. A full-scale design used a 20 cm uniform cylinder (head-size) filled with a fixed pattern of features at a contrast of approximately 3:1. Known signal-present and signal-absent PET sub-images were extracted from multiple scans of the same phantom and with detectability in a challenging (i.e., useful) range. These images enabled calculation and comparison of the quantitative observer detectability metrics between scanner designs and image reconstruction methods. The phantom design has several advantages including filling simplicity, wall-less contrast features, the control of the detectability range via feature size, and a clinically realistic lumpy background. Conclusions: This phantom provides a practical method for testing and comparison of lesion detectability as a function of imaging system, acquisition parameters, and image reconstruction methods and parameters.

  15. Possible association between phantom vibration syndrome and occupational burnout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen CP

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chao-Pen Chen,1 Chi-Cheng Wu,2 Li-Ren Chang,3 Yu-Hsuan Lin4 1Department of Education, National Taiwan University Hospital, 2Department of Family Medicine, Min-Sheng General Hospital, Taoyuan City, 3Department of Psychiatry, National Taiwan University, College of Medicine, 4Institute of Brain Science, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Background: Phantom vibration syndrome (PVS and phantom ringing syndrome (PRS occur in many cell phone users. Previous studies have indicated an association between PVS/PRS and job stress. The aim of this study was to determine if PVS/PRS were also associated with occupational burnout.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 384 employees of a high-tech company in northern Taiwan. They all completed a phantom vibration and ringing questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Chinese version of the Occupational Burnout Inventory.Results: Significantly more women and people with at least a college education were in the population with PRS and PVS, respectively. Anxiety and depression had no associations with PVS/PRS. Higher scores for personal fatigue, job fatigue, and service target fatigue had an independent impact on the presence of PVS, but only a higher score for service target fatigue had an independent impact on the presence of PRS.Conclusion: The independent association between work-related burnout and PVS/PRS suggests that PVS/PRS may be a harbinger of mental stress or a component of the clinical burnout syndrome, and may even be a more convenient and accurate predictor of occupational burnout. Keywords: phantom vibration syndrome, phantom ringing syndrome, occupational burnout

  16. Are ethnic and gender specific equations needed to derive fat free mass from bioelectrical impedance in children of South asian, black african-Caribbean and white European origin? Results of the assessment of body composition in children study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Claire M; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Owen, Christopher G; Donin, Angela S; Newton, Sian L; Furness, Cheryl A; Howard, Emma L; Gillings, Rachel D; Wells, Jonathan C K; Cook, Derek G; Whincup, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is a potentially valuable method for assessing lean mass and body fat levels in children from different ethnic groups. We examined the need for ethnic- and gender-specific equations for estimating fat free mass (FFM) from BIA in children from different ethnic groups and examined their effects on the assessment of ethnic differences in body fat. Cross-sectional study of children aged 8-10 years in London Primary schools including 325 South Asians, 250 black African-Caribbeans and 289 white Europeans with measurements of height, weight and arm-leg impedance (Z; Bodystat 1500). Total body water was estimated from deuterium dilution and converted to FFM. Multilevel models were used to derive three types of equation {A: FFM = linear combination(height+weight+Z); B: FFM = linear combination(height(2)/Z); C: FFM = linear combination(height(2)/Z+weight)}. Ethnicity and gender were important predictors of FFM and improved model fit in all equations. The models of best fit were ethnicity and gender specific versions of equation A, followed by equation C; these provided accurate assessments of ethnic differences in FFM and FM. In contrast, the use of generic equations led to underestimation of both the negative South Asian-white European FFM difference and the positive black African-Caribbean-white European FFM difference (by 0.53 kg and by 0.73 kg respectively for equation A). The use of generic equations underestimated the positive South Asian-white European difference in fat mass (FM) and overestimated the positive black African-Caribbean-white European difference in FM (by 4.7% and 10.1% respectively for equation A). Consistent results were observed when the equations were applied to a large external data set. Ethnic- and gender-specific equations for predicting FFM from BIA provide better estimates of ethnic differences in FFM and FM in children, while generic equations can misrepresent these ethnic differences.

  17. Phantom cosmology without Big Rip singularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astashenok, Artyom V. [Baltic Federal University of I. Kant, Department of Theoretical Physics, 236041, 14, Nevsky st., Kaliningrad (Russian Federation); Nojiri, Shin' ichi, E-mail: nojiri@phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Odintsov, Sergei D. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats - ICREA and Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (IEEC-CSIC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-Par-2a pl, E-08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Tomsk State Pedagogical University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Yurov, Artyom V. [Baltic Federal University of I. Kant, Department of Theoretical Physics, 236041, 14, Nevsky st., Kaliningrad (Russian Federation)

    2012-03-23

    We construct phantom energy models with the equation of state parameter w which is less than -1, w<-1, but finite-time future singularity does not occur. Such models can be divided into two classes: (i) energy density increases with time ('phantom energy' without 'Big Rip' singularity) and (ii) energy density tends to constant value with time ('cosmological constant' with asymptotically de Sitter evolution). The disintegration of bound structure is confirmed in Little Rip cosmology. Surprisingly, we find that such disintegration (on example of Sun-Earth system) may occur even in asymptotically de Sitter phantom universe consistent with observational data. We also demonstrate that non-singular phantom models admit wormhole solutions as well as possibility of Big Trip via wormholes.

  18. Phantom inflation and the 'Big Trip'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F.; Jimenez-Madrid, Jose A.

    2004-01-01

    Primordial inflation is regarded to be driven by a phantom field which is here implemented as a scalar field satisfying an equation of state p=ωρ, with ω-1. Being even aggravated by the weird properties of phantom energy, this will pose a serious problem with the exit from the inflationary phase. We argue, however, in favor of the speculation that a smooth exit from the phantom inflationary phase can still be tentatively recovered by considering a multiverse scenario where the primordial phantom universe would travel in time toward a future universe filled with usual radiation, before reaching the big rip. We call this transition the 'Big Trip' and assume it to take place with the help of some form of anthropic principle which chooses our current universe as being the final destination of the time transition

  19. Phantom cosmology without Big Rip singularity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astashenok, Artyom V.; Nojiri, Shin'ichi; Odintsov, Sergei D.; Yurov, Artyom V.

    2012-01-01

    We construct phantom energy models with the equation of state parameter w which is less than -1, w<-1, but finite-time future singularity does not occur. Such models can be divided into two classes: (i) energy density increases with time (“phantom energy” without “Big Rip” singularity) and (ii) energy density tends to constant value with time (“cosmological constant” with asymptotically de Sitter evolution). The disintegration of bound structure is confirmed in Little Rip cosmology. Surprisingly, we find that such disintegration (on example of Sun-Earth system) may occur even in asymptotically de Sitter phantom universe consistent with observational data. We also demonstrate that non-singular phantom models admit wormhole solutions as well as possibility of Big Trip via wormholes.

  20. Pediatric phantoms for use in dosimetric calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoup, R.L.; Hwang, J.L.; Poston, J.W.; Warner, G.G.

    1976-01-01

    Estimating absorbed doses to children from external and internal radiation sources has become important to the nuclear industry and pediatric nuclear medicine. The Medical Physics and Internal Dosimetry Section at ORNL has recently completed the design of mathematical representations of children of ages newborn, 1 year, and 5 years old. These mathematical representations will be referred to as pediatric phantoms. Using these phantoms, relevant energy deposition data have been developed which establish a meaningful model for use in estimating radiation dose to children

  1. Optimisation of radioprotection of patients in nuclear medicine: assessment of doses for the new ICRP's reference voxelized phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadid, L.; Blanchardon, E.; Desbree, A.; Makovicka, L.; Zankl, M.

    2010-01-01

    As the ICPR (International Commission on Radiological Protection) decided to adopt voxelized phantoms to emulate a reference adult, the authors report the validation of calculations of the SFAs (specific absorbed fractions) for the new ICPR's reference phantoms. After a presentation of these phantoms, the authors briefly present the OEDIPE software which is used to compute the SAFs and notably the absorbed doses. They discuss the results obtained for the SAFs (for photons and for electrons) and for the doses

  2. NOTE: On the need to revise the arm structure in stylized anthropomorphic phantoms in lateral photon irradiation geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Choonik; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2006-11-01

    -Man, were obtained from literature sources. The absorbed doses for lungs, oesophagus, liver and kidneys that could be affected by arm structures in the lateral irradiation geometry were obtained for both classes of phantoms in lateral monoenergetic photon irradiation geometries. As expected, those organs in the ORNL phantoms received apparently higher absorbed doses than those in the voxel phantoms. The overestimation is mainly attributed to the relatively poor representation of the arm structure in the ORNL phantom in which the arm bones are embedded within the regions describing the phantom's torso. The results of this study suggest that the overestimation of organ doses, due to unrealistic arm representation, should be taken into account when stylized phantoms are employed for equivalent or effective dose estimates, especially in the case of an irradiation scenario with dominating lateral exposure. For such a reason, the stylized phantom arm structure definition should be revised in order to obtain more realistic evaluations.

  3. On the need to revise the arm structure in stylized anthropomorphic phantoms in lateral photon irradiation geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lee, Choonik; Lee, Jai-Ki

    2006-01-01

    -Man, were obtained from literature sources. The absorbed doses for lungs, oesophagus, liver and kidneys that could be affected by arm structures in the lateral irradiation geometry were obtained for both classes of phantoms in lateral monoenergetic photon irradiation geometries. As expected, those organs in the ORNL phantoms received apparently higher absorbed doses than those in the voxel phantoms. The overestimation is mainly attributed to the relatively poor representation of the arm structure in the ORNL phantom in which the arm bones are embedded within the regions describing the phantom's torso. The results of this study suggest that the overestimation of organ doses, due to unrealistic arm representation, should be taken into account when stylized phantoms are employed for equivalent or effective dose estimates, especially in the case of an irradiation scenario with dominating lateral exposure. For such a reason, the stylized phantom arm structure definition should be revised in order to obtain more realistic evaluations. (note)

  4. ANTHROPOMORPHIC PHANTOMS FOR ASSESSMENT OF STRAIN IMAGING METHODS INVOLVING SALINE-INFUSED SONOHYSTEROGRAPHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Maritza A.; Madsen, Ernest L.; Frank, Gary R.; Jiang, Jingfeng; Shi, Hairong; Hall, Timothy J.; Varghese, Tomy

    2008-01-01

    Two anthropomorphic uterine phantoms were developed which allow assessment and comparison of strain imaging systems adapted for use with saline-infused sonohysterography (SIS). Tissue-mimicking (TM) materials consist of dispersions of safflower oil in gelatin. TM fibroids are stiffer than the TM myometrium/cervix and TM polyps are softer. The first uterine phantom has 3-mm diameter TM fibroids randomly distributed in TM myometrium. The second uterine phantom has a 5-mm and an 8-mm spherical TM fibroid in addition to a 5-mm spherical and a 12.5-mm long (medicine-capsule-shaped) TM endometrial polyp protruding into the endometrial cavity; also, a 10-mm spherical TM fibroid projects from the serosal surface. Strain images using the first phantom show the stiffer 3-mm TM fibroids in the myometrium. Results from the second uterine phantom show that, as expected, parts of inclusions projecting into the uterine cavity will appear very stiff, whether they are stiff or soft. Results from both phantoms show that even though there is a five-fold difference in the Young’s moduli values, there is not a significant difference in the strain in the transition from the TM myometrium to the TM fat. These phantoms allow for realistic comparison and evolution of SIS strain imaging techniques and can aid clinical personnel to develop skills for SIS strain imaging. PMID:18514999

  5. Simulation of a Quality Control Jaszczak Phantom with SIMIND Monte Carlo and Adding the Phantom as an Accessory to the Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalil Pirayesh Islamian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Quality control is an important phenomenon in nuclear medicine imaging. A Jaszczak SPECT Phantom provides consistent performance information for any SPECT or PET system. This article describes the simulation of a Jaszczak phantom and creating an executable phantom file for comparing assessment of SPECT cameras using SIMIND Monte Carlo simulation program which is well-established for SPECT. Materials and Methods The simulation was based on a Deluxe model of Jaszczak Phantom with defined geometry. Quality control tests were provided together with initial imaging example and suggested use for the assessment of parameters such as spatial resolution, limits of lesion detection, and contrast comparing with a Siemens E.Cam SPECT system. Results The phantom simulation was verified by matching tomographic spatial resolution, image contrast, and also uniformity compared with the experiment SPECT of the phantom from filtered backprojection reconstructed images of the spheres and rods. The calculated contrasts of the rods were 0.774, 0.627, 0.575, 0.372, 0.191, and 0.132 for an experiment with the rods diameters of 31.8, 25.4, 19.1, 15.9, 12.7, and 9.5 mm, respectively. The calculated contrasts of simulated rods were 0.661, 0.527, 0.487, 0.400, 0.23, and 0.2 for cold rods and also 0.92, 0.91, 0.88, 0.81, 0.76, and 0.56 for hot rods. Reconstructed spatial tomographic resolution of both experiment and simulated SPECTs of the phantom obtained about 9.5 mm. An executable phantom file and an input phantom file were created for the SIMIND Monte Carlo program. Conclusion This phantom may be used for simulated SPECT systems and would be ideal for verification of the simulated systems with real ones by comparing the results of quality control and image evaluation. It is also envisaged that this phantom could be used with a range of radionuclide doses in simulation situations such as cold, hot, and background uptakes for the assessment of detection

  6. Development of a high resolution voxelised head phantom for medical physics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, V; Guatelli, S; Bazalova-Carter, M; Rosenfeld, A B; Schulte, R W

    2017-01-01

    Computational anthropomorphic phantoms have become an important investigation tool for medical imaging and dosimetry for radiotherapy and radiation protection. The development of computational phantoms with realistic anatomical features contribute significantly to the development of novel methods in medical physics. For many applications, it is desirable that such computational phantoms have a real-world physical counterpart in order to verify the obtained results. In this work, we report the development of a voxelised phantom, the HIGH_RES_HEAD, modelling a paediatric head based on the commercial phantom 715-HN (CIRS). HIGH_RES_HEAD is unique for its anatomical details and high spatial resolution (0.18×0.18mm 2 pixel size). The development of such a phantom was required to investigate the performance of a new proton computed tomography (pCT) system, in terms of detector technology and image reconstruction algorithms. The HIGH_RES_HEAD was used in an ad-hoc Geant4 simulation modelling the pCT system. The simulation application was previously validated with respect to experimental results. When compared to a standard spatial resolution voxelised phantom of the same paediatric head, it was shown that in pCT reconstruction studies, the use of the HIGH_RES_HEAD translates into a reduction from 2% to 0.7% of the average relative stopping power difference between experimental and simulated results thus improving the overall quality of the head phantom simulation. The HIGH_RES_HEAD can also be used for other medical physics applications such as treatment planning studies. A second version of the voxelised phantom was created that contains a prototypic base of skull tumour and surrounding organs at risk. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Porous phantoms for PET and SPECT performance evaluation and quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiFilippo, Frank P.; Price, James P.; Kelsch, Daniel N.; Muzic, Raymond F. Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Characterization of PET and SPECT imaging performance often requires phantoms with complex radionuclide distributions. For example, lesion detection studies use multiple spherical regions of specific target-to-background ratios to simulate cancerous lesions. Such complex distributions are typically created using phantoms with multiple fillable chambers. However, such phantoms are typically difficult and time-consuming to prepare accurately and reproducibly. A new approach using a single-chamber phantom with a porous core can overcome these difficulties. Methods: Prototypes of two designs of porous core phantoms were produced and evaluated. The 'hot spheres' phantom contained a multitude of simulated spherical lesions with diameters ranging from 6.35 to 25.4 mm ('multi-resolution' slice) and with lesion-to-background ratios ranging from 1.6 to 4.4 ('multi-contrast' slice). The 'multi-attenuation' phantom consisted of two halves. One half contained a porous core to produce regions of different attenuation but uniform activity. The other half mimicked the NEMA-94 design with cold inserts of different attenuation. Results: Both phantoms produced the expected radionuclide distributions while requiring the preparation of only a single radionuclide solution and with much reduced preparation time. In images taken on clinical PET and SPECT scanners, the porous core structures were found to contribute negligible background noise or artifact. The measured lesion-to-background ratios from the hot spheres phantom differed slightly from calculated values, with the differences attributed mainly to uncertainty in pore diameter. The measured attenuation coefficients from the multi-attenuation phantom agreed well with expected values. However, it was found that trapped air bubbles due to manufacturing defects in the porous core could potentially cause quantitative errors. Conclusion: The hot spheres and multi-attenuation porous phantoms exhibited a wide range of imaging features

  8. Asian Consensus Report on Functional Dyspepsia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Hiroto; Ghoshal, Uday C; Gonlachanvit, Sutep; Gwee, Kok-Ann; Ang, Tiing-Leong; Chang, Full-Young; Fock, Kwong Ming; Hongo, Michio; Hou, Xiaohua; Kachintorn, Udom; Ke, Meiyun; Lai, Kwok-Hung; Lee, Kwang Jae; Lu, Ching-Liang; Mahadeva, Sanjiv; Miura, Soichiro; Park, Hyojin; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Sugano, Kentaro; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Wong, Benjamin CY

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Environmental factors such as food, lifestyle and prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection are widely different in Asian countries compared to the West, and physiological functions and genetic factors of Asians may also be different from those of Westerners. Establishing an Asian consensus for functional dyspepsia is crucial in order to attract attention to such data from Asian countries, to articulate the experience and views of Asian experts, and to provide a relevant guide on management of functional dyspepsia for primary care physicians working in Asia. Methods Consensus team members were selected from Asian experts and consensus development was carried out using a modified Delphi method. Consensus teams collected published papers on functional dyspepsia especially from Asia and developed candidate consensus statements based on the generated clinical questions. At the first face-to-face meeting, each statement was reviewed and e-mail voting was done twice. At the second face-to-face meeting, final voting on each statement was done using keypad voting system. A grade of evidence and a strength of recommendation were applied to each statement according to the method of the GRADE Working Group. Results Twenty-nine consensus statements were finalized, including 7 for definition and diagnosis, 5 for epidemiology, 9 for pathophysiology and 8 for management. Algorithms for diagnosis and management of functional dyspepsia were added. Conclusions This consensus developed by Asian experts shows distinctive features of functional dyspepsia in Asia and will provide a guide to the diagnosis and management of functional dyspepsia for Asian primary care physicians. PMID:22523724

  9. Epidemiology of prostate cancer in Asian countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Takahiro; Egawa, Shin

    2018-06-01

    The incidence of prostate cancer has been increasing worldwide in recent years. The GLOBOCAN project showed that prostate cancer was the second most frequently diagnosed cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer mortality among men worldwide in 2012. This trend has been growing even in Asian countries, where the incidence had previously been low. However, the accuracy of data about incidence and mortality as a result of prostate cancer in some Asian countries is limited. The cause of this increasing trend is multifactorial. One possible explanation is changes in lifestyles due to more Westernized diets. The incidence is also statistically biased by the wide implementation of early detection systems and the accuracy of national cancer registration systems, which are still immature in most Asian countries. Mortality rate decreases in Australia, New Zealand and Japan since the 1990s are possibly due to the improvements in treatment and/or early detection efforts employed. However, this rate is increasing in the majority of other Asian countries. Studies of latent and incidental prostate cancer provide less biased information. The prevalence of latent and incidental prostate cancer in contemporary Japan and Korea is similar to those in Western countries, suggesting the influence of lifestyle changes on carcinogenesis. Many studies reported evidence of both congenital and acquired risk factors for carcinogenesis of prostate cancer. Recent changes in the acquired risk factors might be associated with the increasing occurrence of prostate cancer in Asian countries. This trend could continue, especially in developing Asian countries. © 2018 The Japanese Urological Association.

  10. Asian motility studies in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Oh Young

    2010-04-01

    Altered motility remains one of the important pathophysiologic factors in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who commonly complain of abdominal pain and stool changes such as diarrhea and constipation. The prevalence of IBS has increased among Asian populations these days. Gastrointestinal (GI) physiology may vary between Asian and Western populations because of differences in diets, socio-cultural backgrounds, and genetic factors. The characteristics and differences of GI dysmotility in Asian IBS patients were reviewed. MEDLINE search work was performed including following terms, 'IBS,' 'motility,' 'transit time,' 'esophageal motility,' 'gastric motility,' 'small intestinal motility,' 'colonic motility,' 'anorectal function,' and 'gallbladder motility' and over 100 articles were categorized under 'esophagus,' 'stomach,' 'small intestine,' 'colon,' 'anorectum,' 'gallbladder,' 'transit,' 'motor pattern,' and 'effect of stressors.' Delayed gastric emptying, slow tansit in constipation predominant IBS patients, rapid transit in diarrhea predominant IBS patients, accelerated motility responses to various stressors such as meals, mental stress, or corticotrophin releasing hormones, and altered rectal compliance and altered rectal accomodation were reported in many Asian studies regarding IBS. Many conflicting results were found among these studies and there are still controversies to conclude these as unique features of Asian IBS patients. Multinational and multicenter studies are needed to be performed vigorously in order to elaborate characteristics as well as differences of altered motililty in Asian patients with IBS.

  11. Sea level trends in Southeast Asian seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strassburg, M. W.; Hamlington, B. D.; Leben, R. R.; Manurung, P.; Lumban Gaol, J.; Nababan, B.; Vignudelli, S.; Kim, K.-Y.

    2015-05-01

    Southeast Asian seas span the largest archipelago in the global ocean and provide a complex oceanic pathway connecting the Pacific and Indian oceans. The Southeast Asian sea regional sea level trends are some of the highest observed in the modern satellite altimeter record that now spans almost 2 decades. Initial comparisons of global sea level reconstructions find that 17-year sea level trends over the past 60 years exhibit good agreement with decadal variability associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and related fluctuations of trade winds in the region. The Southeast Asian sea region exhibits sea level trends that vary dramatically over the studied time period. This historical variation suggests that the strong regional sea level trends observed during the modern satellite altimeter record will abate as trade winds fluctuate on decadal and longer timescales. Furthermore, after removing the contribution of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) to sea level trends in the past 20 years, the rate of sea level rise is greatly reduced in the Southeast Asian sea region. As a result of the influence of the PDO, the Southeast Asian sea regional sea level trends during the 2010s and 2020s are likely to be less than the global mean sea level (GMSL) trend if the observed oscillations in wind forcing and sea level persist. Nevertheless, long-term sea level trends in the Southeast Asian seas will continue to be affected by GMSL rise occurring now and in the future.

  12. An Alternative Method of Evaluating 1540NM Exposure Laser Damage using an Optical Tissue Phantom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jindra, Nichole M; Figueroa, Manuel A; Rockwell, Benjamin A; Chavey, Lucas J; Zohner, Justin J

    2006-01-01

    An optical phantom was designed to physically and optically resemble human tissue, in an effort to provide an alternative for detecting visual damage resulting from inadvertent exposure to infrared lasers...

  13. Simulation of a Quality Control Jaszczak Phantom with SIMIND Monte Carlo and Adding the Phantom as an Accessory to the Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirayesh Islamian, J.; Bahreyni Toosi, M. T.; Momennezhad, M.; Naseri, Sh.; Ljungberg, M.

    2012-01-01

    Quality control is an important phenomenon in nuclear medicine imaging. A Jaszczak SPECT Phantom provides consistent performance information for any SPECT or PET system. This article describes the simulation of a Jaszczak phantom and creating an executable phantom file for comparing assessment of SPECT cameras using SIMIND Monte Carlo simulation program which is well-established for SPECT. The simulation was based on a Deluxe model of Jaszczak Phantom with defined geometry. Quality control tests were provided together with initial imaging example and suggested use for the assessment of parameters such as spatial resolution, limits of lesion detection, and contrast comparing with a Siemens E.Cam SPECT system. The phantom simulation was verified by matching tomographic spatial resolution, image contrast, and also uniformity compared with the experiment SPECT of the phantom from filtered backprojection reconstructed images of the spheres and rods. The calculated contrasts of the rods were 0.774, 0.627, 0.575, 0.372, 0.191, and 0.132 for an experiment with the rods diameters of 31.8, 25.4, 19.1, 15.9, 12.7, and 9.5 mm, respectively. The calculated contrasts of simulated rods were 0.661, 0.527, 0.487, 0.400, 0.23, and 0.2 for cold rods and also 0.92, 0.91, 0.88, 0.81, 0.76, and 0.56 for hot rods. Reconstructed spatial tomographic resolution of both experiment and simulated SPECTs of the phantom obtained about 9.5 mm. An executable phantom file and an input phantom file were created for the SIMIND Monte Carlo program. This phantom may be used for simulated SPECT systems and would be ideal for verification of the simulated systems with real ones by comparing the results of quality control and image evaluation. It is also envisaged that this phantom could be used with a range of radionuclide doses in simulation situations such as cold, hot, and background uptakes for the assessment of detection characteristics when a new similar clinical SPECT procedure is being simulated.

  14. Development of 5 and 10 years old infant phantoms based on polygonal meshes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Vanildo Junior de Melo; Kramer, Richard; Cassola, Vagner Ferreira; Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira; Khoury, Helen Jamil; Vieira, Jose Wilson; Universidade de Pernambuco

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses the development of reference infant phantoms of 5 and 10 years old to be used in calculation of equivalent doses in the area of radiological protection. The method uses tools developed for the modelling of 3D objects. The forms and positions are available in the literature. The mass values of each organ and tissue were adjusted according to the reference data published by the International Commission Radiological Protection. The results are presented in image of organs and tissues, and in tables. Dosimetric calculations show concordance with adult and infant phantoms, considering the differences among phantoms

  15. Low cost phantom for computed radiology; Objeto de teste de baixo custo para radiologia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travassos, Paulo Cesar B.; Magalhaes, Luis Alexandre G., E-mail: pctravassos@ufrj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (IBRGA/UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas; Augusto, Fernando M.; Sant' Yves, Thalis L.A.; Goncalves, Elicardo A.S. [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Botelho, Marina A. [Hospital Universitario Pedro Ernesto (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-08-15

    This article presents the results obtained from a low cost phantom, used to analyze Computed Radiology (CR) equipment. The phantom was constructed to test a few parameters related to image quality, as described in [1-9]. Materials which can be easily purchased were used in the construction of the phantom, with total cost of approximately U$100.00. A bar pattern was placed only to verify the efficacy of the grids in the spatial resolution determination, and was not included in the budget because the data was acquired from the grids. (author)

  16. Thermodynamics of Phantom Energy Accreting onto a Black Hole in Einstein—Power—Maxwell Gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, G.; Ramzan, R. M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the phantom energy accretion onto a 3D black hole formulated in the Einstein—Power—Maxwell theory, and present the conditions for critical accretion of phantom energy onto the black hole. Further, we discuss the thermodynamics of phantom energy accreting onto the black hole and find that the first law of thermodynamics is easily satisfied while the second law and the generalized second law of thermodynamics remain invalid and conditionally valid, respectively. The results for the Banados—Teitelboim—Zanelli black hole can be recovered by taking Maxwellian contribution equal to zero

  17. ``Phantom'' Modes in Ab Initio Tunneling Calculations: Implications for Theoretical Materials Optimization, Tunneling, and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, Sergey V.; Pramanik, Dipankar

    2015-03-01

    Development of low-leakage dielectrics for semiconductor industry, together with many other areas of academic and industrial research, increasingly rely upon ab initio tunneling and transport calculations. Complex band structure (CBS) is a powerful formalism to establish the nature of tunneling modes, providing both a deeper understanding and a guided optimization of materials, with practical applications ranging from screening candidate dielectrics for lowest ``ultimate leakage'' to identifying charge-neutrality levels and Fermi level pinning. We demonstrate that CBS is prone to a particular type of spurious ``phantom'' solution, previously deemed true but irrelevant because of a very fast decay. We demonstrate that (i) in complex materials, phantom modes may exhibit very slow decay (appearing as leading tunneling terms implying qualitative and huge quantitative errors), (ii) the phantom modes are spurious, (iii) unlike the pseudopotential ``ghost'' states, phantoms are an apparently unavoidable artifact of large numerical basis sets, (iv) a presumed increase in computational accuracy increases the number of phantoms, effectively corrupting the CBS results despite the higher accuracy achieved in resolving the true CBS modes and the real band structure, and (v) the phantom modes cannot be easily separated from the true CBS modes. We discuss implications for direct transport calculations. The strategy for dealing with the phantom states is discussed in the context of optimizing high-quality high- κ dielectric materials for decreased tunneling leakage.

  18. Application of a sitting MIRD phantom for effective dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsher, R. H.; Van Riper, K. A.

    2005-01-01

    In typical realistic scenarios, dose factors due to 60 Co contaminated steel, used in consumer products, cannot be approximated by standard exposure geometries. It is then necessary to calculate the effective dose using an appropriate anthropomorphic phantom. MCNP calculations were performed using a MIRD human model in two settings. In the first, a male office worker is sitting in a chair containing contaminated steel, surrounded by contaminated furniture. In the second, a male driver is seated inside an automobile, the steel of which is uniformly contaminated. To accurately calculate the dose to lower body organs, especially the gonads, it was essential to modify the MIRD model to simulate two sitting postures: chair and driving position. The phantom modifications are described, and the results of the calculations are presented. In the case of the automobile scenarios, results are compared to those obtained using an isotropic fluence-to-dose conversion function. (authors)

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of a mammographic test phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, R. A.; Dance, D. R.; Pachoud, M.; Carlsson, G. A.; Sandborg, M.; Ullman, G.

    2005-01-01

    A test phantom, including a wide range of mammographic tissue equivalent materials and test details, was imaged on a digital mammographic system. In order to quantify the effect of scatter on the contrast obtained for the test details, calculations of the scatter-to-primary ratio (S/P) have been made using a Monte Carlo simulation of the digital mammographic imaging chain, grid and test phantom. The results show that the S/P values corresponding to the imaging conditions used were in the range 0.084-0.126. Calculated and measured pixel values in different regions of the image were compared as a validation of the model and showed excellent agreement. The results indicate the potential of Monte Carlo methods in the image quality-patient dose process optimisation, especially in the assessment of imaging conditions not available on standard mammographic units. (authors)

  20. A dynamic phantom for radionuclide renography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkinen, J.O.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to develop and test a dynamic phantom simulating radionuclide renography. The phantom consisted of five partly lead covered plastic containers simulating kidneys, heart, bladder and background (soft tissues, liver and spleen). Dynamics were performed with multiple movable steel plates between containers and a gamma camera. Control of the plates is performed manually with a stopwatch following exact time schedules. The containers were filled with activities ( 99m Tc) which produce count rates close to clinical situations. Count rates produced by the phantom were compared with ten clinical renography cases: five 99m Tc MAG3 and five 99m Tc DTPA examinations. Two phantom simulations were repeated three times with separate fillings, acquisitions and analyses. Precision errors as a coefficient of variation (CV) of repeated measurements were calculated and theoretical values were compared with the corresponding measured ones. A multicentre comparison was made between 19 nuclear medicine laboratories and three clinical cases were simulated with the phantom. Correlations between count rates produced by the phantom and clinical studies were r=0.964 for 99m Tc MAG3 (p 99m Tc DTPA (p max was 4.0±1.6%. Images and curves of the scanned phantom were close to a real patient in all 19 laboratories but calculated parameters varied: the difference between theoretical and measured values for T max was 6.8±6.2%. The difference between laboratories is most probably due to variations in acquisition protocols and analysis programs: 19 laboratories with 18 different protocols and 8 different programs. The dynamics were found to be repeatable and suitable for calibration purposes for radionuclide renography programs and protocols as well as for multicentre comparisons. (author)

  1. SU-E-T-114: Analysis of MLC Errors On Gamma Pass Rates for Patient-Specific and Conventional Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterling, D; Ehler, E [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether a 3D patient-specific phantom is better able to detect known MLC errors in a clinically delivered treatment plan than conventional phantoms. 3D printing may make fabrication of such phantoms feasible. Methods: Two types of MLC errors were introduced into a clinically delivered, non-coplanar IMRT, partial brain treatment plan. First, uniformly distributed random errors of up to 3mm, 2mm, and 1mm were introduced into the MLC positions for each field. Second, systematic MLC-bank position errors of 5mm, 3.5mm, and 2mm due to simulated effects of gantry and MLC sag were introduced. The original plan was recalculated with these errors on the original CT dataset as well as cylindrical and planar IMRT QA phantoms. The original dataset was considered to be a perfect 3D patient-specific phantom. The phantoms were considered to be ideal 3D dosimetry systems with no resolution limitations. Results: Passing rates for Gamma Index (3%/3mm and no dose threshold) were calculated on the 3D phantom, cylindrical phantom, and both on a composite and field-by-field basis for the planar phantom. Pass rates for 5mm systematic and 3mm random error were 86.0%, 89.6%, 98% and 98.3% respectively. For 3.5mm systematic and 2mm random error the pass rates were 94.7%, 96.2%, 99.2% and 99.2% respectively. For 2mm systematic error with 1mm random error the pass rates were 99.9%, 100%, 100% and 100% respectively. Conclusion: A 3D phantom with the patient anatomy is able to discern errors, both severe and subtle, that are not seen using conventional phantoms. Therefore, 3D phantoms may be beneficial for commissioning new treatment machines and modalities, patient-specific QA and end-to-end testing.

  2. SU-E-T-114: Analysis of MLC Errors On Gamma Pass Rates for Patient-Specific and Conventional Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterling, D; Ehler, E

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether a 3D patient-specific phantom is better able to detect known MLC errors in a clinically delivered treatment plan than conventional phantoms. 3D printing may make fabrication of such phantoms feasible. Methods: Two types of MLC errors were introduced into a clinically delivered, non-coplanar IMRT, partial brain treatment plan. First, uniformly distributed random errors of up to 3mm, 2mm, and 1mm were introduced into the MLC positions for each field. Second, systematic MLC-bank position errors of 5mm, 3.5mm, and 2mm due to simulated effects of gantry and MLC sag were introduced. The original plan was recalculated with these errors on the original CT dataset as well as cylindrical and planar IMRT QA phantoms. The original dataset was considered to be a perfect 3D patient-specific phantom. The phantoms were considered to be ideal 3D dosimetry systems with no resolution limitations. Results: Passing rates for Gamma Index (3%/3mm and no dose threshold) were calculated on the 3D phantom, cylindrical phantom, and both on a composite and field-by-field basis for the planar phantom. Pass rates for 5mm systematic and 3mm random error were 86.0%, 89.6%, 98% and 98.3% respectively. For 3.5mm systematic and 2mm random error the pass rates were 94.7%, 96.2%, 99.2% and 99.2% respectively. For 2mm systematic error with 1mm random error the pass rates were 99.9%, 100%, 100% and 100% respectively. Conclusion: A 3D phantom with the patient anatomy is able to discern errors, both severe and subtle, that are not seen using conventional phantoms. Therefore, 3D phantoms may be beneficial for commissioning new treatment machines and modalities, patient-specific QA and end-to-end testing

  3. Asian Adolescents with Excess Weight are at Higher Risk for Insulin Resistance than Non-Asian Peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamadony, Ahmed; Yates, Kathy F; Sweat, Victoria; Yau, Po Lai; Mangone, Alex; Joseph, Adriana; Fierman, Arthur; Convit, Antonio

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether Asian American adolescents have higher metabolic risk from excess weight than non-Asians. Seven hundred thirty-three students, aged 14 to 19 years old, completed a school-based health screening. The 427 Asian and 306 non-Asian students were overall equivalent on age, sex, and family income. Height, weight, waist circumference, percent body fat, and blood pressure were measured. Fasting triglycerides, high- and low-density lipoproteins, glucose, and insulin levels were measured. Asian and non-Asians in lean or overweight/obesity groups were contrasted on the five factors that make up the metabolic syndrome. Asian adolescents carrying excess weight had significantly higher insulin resistance (IR), triglyceride levels, and waist-height ratios (W/H), despite a significantly lower overall BMI than corresponding non-Asians. Similarly, Asians had a stronger relationship between W/H and the degree of IR than non-Asian counterparts; 35% and 18% of the variances were explained (R 2  = 0.35, R 2  = 0.18) respectively, resulting in a significant W/H by racial group interaction (F change [1,236] = 11.56, P Asians have higher IR and triglyceride levels from excess weight than their non-Asian counterparts. One-size-fits-all public health policies targeting youth should be reconsidered and attention paid to Asian adolescents, including those with mild degrees of excess weight. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  4. SU-E-T-124: Anthropomorphic Phantoms for Confirmation of Linear Accelerator Based Small Animal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perks, J; Benedict, S [UC Davis Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lucero, S [UC Davis, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To document the support of radiobiological small animal research by a modern radiation oncology facility. This study confirms that a standard, human use linear accelerator can cover the range of experiments called for by researchers performing animal irradiation. A number of representative, anthropomorphic murine phantoms were made. The phantoms confirmed the small field photon and electron beams dosimetry validated the use of the linear accelerator for rodents. Methods: Laser scanning a model, CAD design and 3D printing produced the phantoms. The phantoms were weighed and CT scanned to judge their compatibility to real animals. Phantoms were produced to specifically mimic lung, gut, brain, and othotopic lesion irradiations. Each phantom was irradiated with the same protocol as prescribed to the live animals. Delivered dose was measured with small field ion chambers, MOS/FETs or TLDs. Results: The density of the phantom material compared to density range across the real mice showed that the printed material would yield sufficiently accurate measurements when irradiated. The whole body, lung and gut irradiations were measured within 2% of prescribed doses with A1SL ion chamber. MOSFET measurements of electron irradiations for the orthotopic lesions allowed refinement of the measured small field output factor to better than 2% and validated the immunology experiment of irradiating one lesion and sparing another. Conclusion: Linacs are still useful tools in small animal bio-radiation research. This work demonstrated a strong role for the clinical accelerator in small animal research, facilitating standard whole body dosing as well as conformal treatments down to 1cm field. The accuracy of measured dose, was always within 5%. The electron irradiations of the phantom brain and flank tumors needed adjustment; the anthropomorphic phantoms allowed refinement of the initial output factor measurements for these fields which were made in a large block of solid water.

  5. A heterogeneous human tissue mimicking phantom for RF heating and MRI thermal monitoring verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yu; Wyatt, Cory; Maccarini, Paolo; Stauffer, Paul; Craciunescu, Oana; Macfall, James; Dewhirst, Mark; Das, Shiva K

    2012-04-07

    This paper describes a heterogeneous phantom that mimics a human thigh with a deep-seated tumor, for the purpose of studying the performance of radiofrequency (RF) heating equipment and non-invasive temperature monitoring with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The heterogeneous cylindrical phantom was constructed with an outer fat layer surrounding an inner core of phantom material mimicking muscle, tumor and marrow-filled bone. The component materials were formulated to have dielectric and thermal properties similar to human tissues. The dielectric properties of the tissue mimicking phantom materials were measured with a microwave vector network analyzer and impedance probe over the frequency range of 80-500 MHz and at temperatures of 24, 37 and 45 °C. The specific heat values of the component materials were measured using a differential scanning calorimeter over the temperature range of 15-55 °C. The thermal conductivity value was obtained from fitting the curves obtained from one-dimensional heat transfer measurement. The phantom was used to verify the operation of a cylindrical four-antenna annular phased array extremity applicator (140 MHz) by examining the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) thermal imaging patterns for various magnitude/phase settings (including settings to focus heating in tumors). For muscle and tumor materials, MRI was also used to measure T1/T2* values (1.5 T) and to obtain the slope of the PRFS phase change versus temperature change curve. The dielectric and thermal properties of the phantom materials were in close agreement to well-accepted published results for human tissues. The phantom was able to successfully demonstrate satisfactory operation of the tested heating equipment. The MRI-measured thermal distributions matched the expected patterns for various magnitude/phase settings of the applicator, allowing the phantom to be used as a quality assurance tool. Importantly, the material formulations for the various tissue types

  6. Mammography dosimetry using an in-house developed polymethyl methacrylate phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.; Sharma, S. D.; Mayya, Y. S.; Chourasiya, G.

    2012-01-01

    Phantom-based measurements in mammography are well-established for quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) procedures involving equipment performance and comparisons of X-ray machines. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is among the best suitable materials for simulation of the breast. For carrying out QA/QC exercises in India, a mammographic PMMA phantom with engraved slots for keeping thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) has been developed. The radiation transmission property of the developed phantom was compared with the commercially available phantoms for verifying its suitability for mammography dosimetry. The breast entrance exposure (BEE), mean glandular dose (MGD), percentage depth dose (PDD), percentage surface dose distribution (PSDD), calibration testing of automatic exposure control (AEC) and density control function of a mammography machine were measured using this phantom. MGD was derived from the measured BEE following two different methodologies and the results were compared. The PDD and PSDD measurements were carried out using LiF: Mg, Cu, P chips. The in-house phantom was found comparable with the commercially available phantoms. The difference in the MGD values derived using two different methods were found in the range of 17.5-32.6 %. Measured depth ranges in the phantom lie between 0.32 and 0.40 cm for 75 % depth dose, 0.73 and 0.92 cm for 50 % depth dose, and 1.54 and 1.78 cm for 25 % depth dose. Higher PSDD value was observed towards chest wall edge side of the phantom, which is due to the orientation of cathode-anode axis along the chest wall to the nipple direction. Results obtained for AEC configuration testing shows that the observed mean optical density (O.D) of the phantom image was 1.59 and O.D difference for every successive increase in thickness of the phantom was within ±0.15 O.D. Under density control function testing, at -2 and -1 density settings, the variation in film image O.D was within ±0.15 O.D of the normal density

  7. The Asian petrochemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selwa, Christopher.

    1996-03-01

    The Asian Petrochemical Industry brings you up to date with the latest developments in this dynamic region and covers all the key issues, giving detailed analysis and comment on: the general economic outlook; demand and production trends for basic petrochemicals and specialities in individual countries; political stability and how with affects growth and investment opportunities; security of supply; the import of petrochemicals and the aim of the region to become a net exporter by 2000; capacity increases - the relative merits of new plant construction versus expanding existing plants; the financing of petrochemical projects; the use of appropriate projects; the use of appropriate technology and patent provision in the Gatt treaty; increasing environmental concerns and the 'responsible care' initiative. The Asian Petrochemical Industry presents an overview of each Asian player in the petrochemical and associated industries, comparing and contrasting the countries within the region. (Author)

  8. Cultural Patterns of South Asian and Southeast Asian Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Rachel

    2000-01-01

    An overview of South Asian and Southeast Asian Americans is discussed to aid teachers in understanding behaviors exhibited by Asian students. Culture influences in the following areas are explored: family relationships, respect for age, social interaction, communication style, family expectations, humility, school situations, decision making, and…

  9. Doses mammography: from phantom to the patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, P [Gammasonic Radiological Services, Pty., Ltd., Five Dock, NSW (Australia)

    1994-02-01

    While the use of a reference phantom is essential for dosimetry in acceptance testing and in regular quality control checks of a mammographic X-ray unit, it is also of importance to be able to estimate the patient dose in each individual investigation. Radiographic and physical data were analysed for a total of 212 women who were screened at three locations participating in a breast screening programme. The radiologists made estimates of the individual breast composition (%glandular/adipose ratio) at the film reporting sessions, and then the glandular doses were calculated by the auditor according to the NCRP 85 methodology. Arising from the data analysis of this dosimetry survey, a method is proposed to determine objectively patient breast composition from the photo-timed mAs for a given film optical density setting. This permits the NCRP calculations to be extended from breasts of 'average' (50/50) composition to breasts of individually determined composition. The diversity of the results between the three locations emphasises the need for regular audits of a mammographic X-ray unit's performance by an experienced radiological physicists, at least annually or after any major interventional service on the unit. 11 refs., 6 tabs., 4 figs.

  10. WE-F-16A-06: Using 3D Printers to Create Complex Phantoms for Dose Verification, Quality Assurance, and Treatment Planning System Commissioning in Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassaee, A; Ding, X; McDonough, J; Reiche, M; Witztum, A; Teo, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To use 3D printers to design and construct complex geometrical phantoms for commissioning treatment planning systems, dose calculation algorithms, quality assurance (QA), dose delivery, and patient dose verifications. Methods: In radiotherapy, complex geometrical phantoms are often required for dose verification, dose delivery and calculation algorithm validation. Presently, fabrication of customized phantoms is limited due to time, expense and challenges in machining of complex shapes. In this work, we designed and utilized 3D printers to fabricate two phantoms for QA purposes. One phantom includes hills and valleys (HV) for verification of intensity modulated radiotherapy for photons, and protons (IMRT and IMPT). The other phantom includes cylindrical cavities (CC) of various sizes for dose verification of inhomogeneities. We evaluated the HV phantoms for an IMPT beam, and the CC phantom to study various inhomogeneity configurations using photon, electron, and proton beams. Gafcromic ™ films were used to quantify the dose distributions delivered to the phantoms. Results: The HV phantom has dimensions of 12 cm × 12 cm and consists of one row and one column of five peaks with heights ranging from 2 to 5 cm. The CC phantom has a size 10 cm × 14 cm and includes 6 cylindrical cavities with length of 7.2 cm and diameters ranging from 0.6 to 1.2 cm. The IMPT evaluation using the HV phantom shows good agreement as compared to the dose distribution calculated with treatment planning system. The CC phantom also shows reasonable agreements for using different algorithms for each beam modalities. Conclusion: 3D printers with submillimiter resolutions are capable of printing complex phantoms for dose verification and QA in radiotherapy. As printing costs decrease and the technology becomes widely available, phantom design and construction will be readily available to any clinic for testing geometries that were not previously feasible

  11. Effect of phantom dimension variation on Monte Carlo simulation speed and precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Hui; Xu Yuanying; Xu Liangfeng; Li Guoli; Jiang Jia

    2007-01-01

    There is a correlation between Monte Carlo simulation speed and the phantom dimension. The effect of the phantom dimension on the Monte Carlo simulation speed and precision was studied based on a fast Monte Carlo code DPM. The results showed that when the thickness of the phantom was reduced, the efficiency would increase exponentially without compromise of its precision except for the position at the tailor. When the width of the phantom was reduced to outside the penumbra, the effect on the efficiency would be neglectable. However when it was reduced to within the penumbra, the efficiency would be increased at some extent without precision loss. This result was applied to a clinic head case, and the remarkable increased efficiency was acquired. (authors)

  12. Mental Health and Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American > Mental Health Mental Health and Asian Americans Suicide was the 9th leading ... Americans is half that of the White population. MENTAL HEALTH STATUS Serious psychological distress among adults 18 years ...

  13. Asian American Health - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Asian American Health URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Asian American Health - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features ...

  14. Verification of gamma knife based fractionated radiosurgery with newly developed head-thorax phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisht, Raj Kishor; Kale, Shashank Sharad; Natanasabapathi, Gopishankar; Singh, Manmohan Jit; Agarwal, Deepak; Garg, Ajay; Rath, Goura Kishore; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Kumar, Pratik; Thulkar, Sanjay; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Purpose of the study is to verify the Gamma Knife Extend™ system (ES) based fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery with newly developed head-thorax phantom. Methods: Phantoms are extensively used to measure radiation dose and verify treatment plan in radiotherapy. A human upper body shaped phantom with thorax was designed to simulate fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery using Extend™ system of Gamma Knife. The central component of the phantom aids in performing radiological precision test, dosimetric evaluation and treatment verification. A hollow right circular cylindrical space of diameter 7.0 cm was created at the centre of this component to place various dosimetric devices using suitable adaptors. The phantom is made of poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA), a transparent thermoplastic material. Two sets of disk assemblies were designed to place dosimetric films in (1) horizontal (xy) and (2) vertical (xz) planes. Specific cylindrical adaptors were designed to place thimble ionization chamber inside phantom for point dose recording along xz axis. EBT3 Gafchromic films were used to analyze and map radiation field. The focal precision test was performed using 4 mm collimator shot in phantom to check radiological accuracy of treatment. The phantom head position within the Extend™ frame was estimated using encoded aperture measurement of repositioning check tool (RCT). For treatment verification, the phantom with inserts for film and ion chamber was scanned in reference treatment position using X-ray computed tomography (CT) machine and acquired stereotactic images were transferred into Leksell Gammaplan (LGP). A patient treatment plan with hypo-fractionated regimen was delivered and identical fractions were compared using EBT3 films and in-house MATLAB codes. Results: RCT measurement showed an overall positional accuracy of 0.265 mm (range 0.223 mm–0.343 mm). Gamma index analysis across fractions exhibited close agreement between LGP and film

  15. Tissue Equivalent Phantom Design for Characterization of a Coherent Scatter X-ray Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Kathryn Elizabeth

    testing. Our imaging system has been able to define the location and composition of the various materials in the phantom. These phantoms were used to characterize the CACSSI system in terms of beam width and imaging technique. The result of this work showed accurate modeling and characterization of the phantoms through comparison of the tissue-equivalent form factors to those from literature. The physical construction of the phantoms, based on actual patient anatomy, was validated using mammography and computed tomography to visually compare the clinical images to those of actual patient anatomy.

  16. The development of a population of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms for imaging research and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segars, W. P., E-mail: paul.segars@duke.edu; Norris, Hannah; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Zhang, Yakun; Bond, Jason; Samei, E. [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Minhas, Anum; Frush, D. [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I. [Center for Imaging Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: We previously developed a set of highly detailed 4D reference pediatric extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 yr with organ and tissue masses matched to ICRP Publication 89 values. In this work, we extended this reference set to a series of 64 pediatric phantoms of varying age and height and body mass percentiles representative of the public at large. The models will provide a library of pediatric phantoms for optimizing pediatric imaging protocols. Methods: High resolution positron emission tomography-computed tomography data obtained from the Duke University database were reviewed by a practicing experienced radiologist for anatomic regularity. The CT portion of the data was then segmented with manual and semiautomatic methods to form a target model defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was used to calculate the transform from the best age matching pediatric XCAT reference phantom to the patient target. The transform was used to complete the target, filling in the nonsegmented structures and defining models for the cardiac and respiratory motions. The complete phantoms, consisting of thousands of structures, were then manually inspected for anatomical accuracy. The mass for each major tissue was calculated and compared to linearly interpolated ICRP values for different ages. Results: Sixty four new pediatric phantoms were created in this manner. Each model contains the same level of detail as the original XCAT reference phantoms and also includes parameterized models for the cardiac and respiratory motions. For the phantoms that were 10 yr old and younger, we included both sets of reproductive organs. This gave them the capability to simulate both male and female anatomy. With this, the population can be expanded to 92. Wide anatomical variation was clearly seen amongst the phantom models, both in organ shape and size, even for

  17. Computed tomography scan optimization using head phantom and radiochromic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Lorena C.; Santana, P.C.; Velasquez, Carlos E.; Mourao, Arnaldo P., E-mail: lorena.cfernandes@hotmail.com, E-mail: carlosvelcab@hotmail.com, E-mail: pridili@gmail.com, E-mail: apmourao@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Centro de Imagem Molecular do INCT-Medicina Molecular (CIMol/UFMG) Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Centro Federal de Educação Tecnológica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The research and development in technology applied to computed tomography has been improve in the image quality, resulting in the best identification of diseases, and therefore an increase in the number of exams, among them the head exams can be highlighted. In order to promote a radioprotection and reduction on the dose of the general public some international agencies have stipulated dose limits to be followed and the implementation of the principles of ALARA in all establishments that use ionizing radiation. One of these principles is the optimization that should be treated with substantial attention, because the reduction of radiation doses can be feasible as long as it does not compromise the tomographic images; such practice is difficult to perform due to the lack of proper guidance. In optimization of the CT exams, not only the lowest dose is evaluated to obtain diagnostic image, but also should be knowledge the dose distribution throughout the scanned area. In this work were used a cylindrical head phantom of PMMA, a GE Discovery CT scan with 64 channels, and radiochromic films. The films were positioned in the phantom in their central region for the dose evaluation using the automatic control for the voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kV. The images were acquired from the scan of the phantom and the film readings were obtained through digital images. The results show an evaluation of the longitudinal kerma profiles, dose delivered, and the image noise was also observed using the central slice images. (author)

  18. Computed tomography scan optimization using head phantom and radiochromic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Lorena C.; Santana, P.C.; Velasquez, Carlos E.; Mourao, Arnaldo P.

    2017-01-01

    The research and development in technology applied to computed tomography has been improve in the image quality, resulting in the best identification of diseases, and therefore an increase in the number of exams, among them the head exams can be highlighted. In order to promote a radioprotection and reduction on the dose of the general public some international agencies have stipulated dose limits to be followed and the implementation of the principles of ALARA in all establishments that use ionizing radiation. One of these principles is the optimization that should be treated with substantial attention, because the reduction of radiation doses can be feasible as long as it does not compromise the tomographic images; such practice is difficult to perform due to the lack of proper guidance. In optimization of the CT exams, not only the lowest dose is evaluated to obtain diagnostic image, but also should be knowledge the dose distribution throughout the scanned area. In this work were used a cylindrical head phantom of PMMA, a GE Discovery CT scan with 64 channels, and radiochromic films. The films were positioned in the phantom in their central region for the dose evaluation using the automatic control for the voltages of 80, 100 and 120 kV. The images were acquired from the scan of the phantom and the film readings were obtained through digital images. The results show an evaluation of the longitudinal kerma profiles, dose delivered, and the image noise was also observed using the central slice images. (author)

  19. Cosmological perturbations in transient phantom inflation scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richarte, Martin G. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica, Caixa Postal 19044, Curitiba (Brazil); Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria 1428, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kremer, Gilberto M. [Universidade Federal do Parana, Departamento de Fisica, Caixa Postal 19044, Curitiba (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    We present a model of inflation where the inflaton is accommodated as a phantom field which exhibits an initial transient pole behavior and then decays into a quintessence field which is responsible for a radiation era. We must stress that the present unified model only deals with a single field and that the transition between the two eras is achieved in a smooth way, so the model does not suffer from the eternal inflation issue. We explore the conditions for the crossing of the phantom divide line within the inflationary era along with the structural stability of several critical points. We study the behavior of the phantom field within the slow-climb approximation along with the necessary conditions to have sufficient inflation. We also examine the model at the level of classical perturbations within the Newtonian gauge and determine the behavior of the gravitational potential, contrast density and perturbed field near the inflation stage and the subsequent radiation era. (orig.)

  20. The effects of contact with Asians and Asian Americans on White American college students: attitudes, awareness of racial discrimination, and psychological adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Khanh T; Weinstein, Traci L; Nemon, Melissa; Rondeau, Sara

    2008-12-01

    On the basis of acculturation theory, explicating mutual influences between different cultural or ethnic groups coming into contact, this study focused "on the other side of acculturation" theory by examining the effects of intercultural contact with Asians and Asian Americans on the psychosocial experiences of White American college students. Participants (N = 315), undergraduates attending a public university located within the state of Massachusetts, completed a survey that assessed demographic and personal characteristics, acculturation (extent of intercultural contact with Asian people and Asian cultures), attitudes towards Asians and Asian Americans, awareness of institutional discrimination and blatant racial issues, and psychological distress. Results indicated that White American students' intercultural contact with Asians and Asian Americans contributed significant variance to the prediction of their attitudes towards this ethnic group and awareness of discrimination and racial issues, but not to psychological distress. This study provides implications for understanding mutual acculturative influences between different ethnic groups in the United States.

  1. Diffusion Capillary Phantom vs. Human Data: Outcomes for Reconstruction Methods Depend on Evaluation Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah D. Lichenstein

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Diffusion MRI provides a non-invasive way of estimating structural connectivity in the brain. Many studies have used diffusion phantoms as benchmarks to assess the performance of different tractography reconstruction algorithms and assumed that the results can be applied to in vivo studies. Here we examined whether quality metrics derived from a common, publically available, diffusion phantom can reliably predict tractography performance in human white matter tissue. Material and Methods: We compared estimates of fiber length and fiber crossing among a simple tensor model (diffusion tensor imaging, a more complicated model (ball-and-sticks and model-free (diffusion spectrum imaging, generalized q-sampling imaging reconstruction methods using a capillary phantom and in vivo human data (N=14. Results: Our analysis showed that evaluation outcomes differ depending on whether they were obtained from phantom or human data. Specifically, the diffusion phantom favored a more complicated model over a simple tensor model or model-free methods for resolving crossing fibers. On the other hand, the human studies showed the opposite pattern of results, with the model-free methods being more advantageous than model-based methods or simple tensor models. This performance difference was consistent across several metrics, including estimating fiber length and resolving fiber crossings in established white matter pathways. Conclusions: These findings indicate that the construction of current capillary diffusion phantoms tends to favor complicated reconstruction models over a simple tensor model or model-free methods, whereas the in vivo data tends to produce opposite results. This brings into question the previous phantom-based evaluation approaches and suggests that a more realistic phantom or simulation is necessary to accurately predict the relative performance of different tractography reconstruction methods. Acronyms: BSM: ball-and-sticks model; d

  2. Measurements and calculations of neutron spectra and neutron dose distribution in human phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palfalvi, J.

    1984-11-01

    The measurement and calculation of the radiation field around and in a phantom, with regard to the neutron component and the contaminating gamma radiation, are essential for radiation protection and radiotherapy purposes. The final report includes the development of the simple detector system, automized detector measuring facilities and a computerized evaluating system. The results of the depth dose and neutron spectra experiments and calculations in a human phantom are given

  3. Transport calculations for a 14.8 MeV neutron beam in a water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetsch, S.J.

    1981-01-01

    A coupled neutron/photon Monte Carlo radiation transport code (MORSE-CG) has been used to calculate neutron and photon doses in a water phantom irradiated by 14.8 MeV neutrons from the Gas Target Neutron Source. The source-collimator-phantom geometry was carefully simulated. Results of calculations utilizing two different statistical estimators (next-collision and track-length) are presented

  4. Development of an Anthropomorphic Breast Phantom for Combined PET, B-Mode Ultrasound and Elastographic Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Dang, J; Lecoq, P; Tavernier, S; Lasaygues, P; Mensah, S; Zhang, D C; Auffray, E; Frisch, B; Varela, J; Wan, M X; Felix, N

    2011-01-01

    International audience; Combining the advantages of different imaging modalities leads to improved clinical results. For example, ultrasound provides good real-time structural information without any radiation and PET provides sensitive functional information. For the ongoing ClearPEM-Sonic project combining ultrasound and PET for breast imaging, we developed a dual-modality PET/Ultrasound (US) phantom. The phantom reproduces the acoustic and elastic properties of human breast tissue and allo...

  5. Noncontact ultrasound imaging applied to cortical bone phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulman, J B; Ganezer, K S; Halcrow, P W; Neeson, Ian

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this paper was to take the first steps toward applying noncontact ultrasound (NCU) to the tasks of monitoring osteoporosis and quantitative ultrasound imaging (QUS) of cortical bone. The authors also focused on the advantages of NCU, such as its lack of reliance on a technologist to apply transducers and a layer of acoustical coupling gel, the ability of the transducers to operate autonomously as specified by preprogrammed software, and the likely reduction in statistical and systematic errors associated with the variability in the pressure applied by the clinician to the transmitting transducer that NCU might provide. The authors also undertook this study in order to find additional applications of NCU beyond its past limited usage in assessing the severity of third degree burns. A noncontact ultrasound imaging system using a pair of specially designed broadband, 1.5 MHz noncontact piezoelectric transducers and cortical bone phantoms, were used to determine bone mineral density (BMD), speed of sound (SOS), integrated response (IR), and ultrasonic transmittance. Air gaps of greater than 3 cm, two transmission and two reflection paths, and a digital signal processor were also used in the collection of data from phantoms of nominal mass densities that varied from 1.17 to 2.25 g/cm(3) and in bone mineral density from 0 to 1.7 g/cm(3). Good correlations between known BMD and measured SOS, IR, and transmittance were obtained for all 17 phantoms, and methods for quantifying and minimizing sources of systematic errors were outlined. The BMD of the phantom sets extended through most of the in vivo range found in cortical bone. A total of 16-20 repeated measurements of the SOS, thickness, and IR for the phantom set that were conducted over a period of several months showed a small variation in the range of measurements of ±1%-2%. These NCU data were shown to be in agreement with similar results using contact ultrasound to be within 1%-2%. Transmittance

  6. Scrolling and Strolling, Asian Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Joan

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a lesson on Asian cultures. Asian cultures demonstrate respect for nature through their art. Students learned how to use Asian brush techniques and designs to create scrolls. They also learned how to write Haiku, a three-line form of poetry that uses a pattern of syllables.

  7. New mechanism to cross the phantom divide

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Yunshuang; Zhang, Hongsheng; Li, Xin-Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Recently, type Ia supernovae data appear to support a dark energy whose equation of state $w$ crosses -1, which is a much more amazing problem than the acceleration of the universe. We show that it is possible for the equation of state to cross the phantom divide by a scalar field in the gravity with an additional inverse power-law term of Ricci scalar in the Lagrangian. The necessary and sufficient condition for a universe in which the dark energy can cross the phantom divide is obtained. So...

  8. FY 1999 report on the results of the research cooperative project on the research cooperation in promotion of reforming the structure of the Asian economy; 1999 nendo Asia keizai kozo kaikaku sokushin kenkyu kyoryoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-05-01

    This project aims at making the best possible of vitality of private companies in Asia, producing the technical results which directly connect to commercialization in a short term, and leading them to reinforcement of developmental ability of their own technologies in the country. In the first fiscal year, eight projects were carried out in five ASEAN countries, and the developmental results with high potential of commercialization were obtained. The names of project are as follows: 1) development of Thai material type seasoning (Thailand), 2) development of electronic ceramics sintering technology by the domestic production (Thailand), 3) study of small-/medium-scale activated coal production technology for depopulated areas in Indonesia (Indonesia), 4) development of a fiber material procurement supply chain management system connecting among Asian countries by Web, 5) development of large plastic formed products adopting gas injection blow molding method (The Philippines), 6) joint R and D on the increase in power transmission capacity using the existing overhead transmission line in Malaysia, 7) development of local site application type asbesto substituting construction materials (Vietnam), 8) low temperature storing technology for Japanese species rice produced in Vietnam (Vietnam). All the projects were proposed by Japanese companies. (NEDO)

  9. Image quality assessment using the CD-DISC phantom for vascular radiology and vascular surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struelens, Lara; Hambach, Lionel; Buls, Nico; Smans, Kristien; Malchair, Francoise; Hoornaert, Marie-Therese; Vanhavere, Filip; Bosmans, Hilde

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate image quality (IQ) associated with vascular radiology and vascular surgery procedures in Belgium and to determine reference values for future image quality assessment. IQ was evaluated with the CD-DISC contrast-detail phantom. This circular PMMA phantom contains 225 holes with different diameter and depth, to quantify resolution and contrast. Images of the phantom were acquired for both fluoroscopy and subtraction images on 21 systems. Three observers evaluated the images by determining the threshold contrast visible for every diameter. This results in contrast-detail curves and image quality figures. We observed a large difference in IQ between the centres. No straightforward correlation could be found with radiation dose or other exposure settings. A comparison was made with the image quality evaluation of the systems performed with the TOR[18FG] phantom for fluoroscopy. There is no clear correlation observed between the results of the CD-DISC phantom and the TOR phantom. However, systems with very poor or very good image quality could be detected by both phantoms. An important result is that a 75th percentile reference contrast-detail curve could be proposed to separate the best centres from these with poorer quality. Some centres had also a significantly better image quality than others. Therefore, we introduced also a 25th percentile. Centres with IQ above this value are recommended to lower the dose and work with acceptable rather than excellent image quality. The CD-DISC phantom thus allows to guide the image quality setting

  10. Characteristics of 3D gamma evaluation according to phantom rotation error and dose gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyeong Hyun; Kim, Dong Su; Kim, Tae Ho; Kang, Seong Hee; Shin, Dong Seok; Noh, Yu Yoon; Suh, Tae Seok [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, the Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Min Seok [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) quality assurance (QA) using dosimetric phantom, a spatial uncertainty induced from phantom set-up inevitably occurs and gamma index that is used to evaluate IMRT plan quality can be affected differently by a combination of the spatial uncertainty and magnitude of dose gradient. In this study, we investigated the impacts of dose gradient and the phantom set-up error on 3D gamma evaluation. In this study, we investigated the characteristics of gamma evaluation according to dose gradient and phantom rotation axis. As a result, 3D gamma had better performance than 2D gamma. Therefore, it can be useful for IMRT QA analysis at clinical field.

  11. Calibration of lung counter using a CT model of Torso phantom and Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Binquan; Ma Jizeng; Yang Duanjie; Liu Liye; Cheng Jianping

    2006-01-01

    Tomography image of a Torso phantom was obtained from CT-Scan. The Torso phantom represents the trunk of an adult man that is 170 cm high and weight of 65 kg. After these images were segmented, cropped, and resized, a 3-dimension voxel phantom was created. The voxel phantom includes more than 2 million voxels, which size was 2.73 mm x 2.73 mm x 3 mm. This model could be used for the calibration of lung counter with Monte Carlo method. On the assumption that radioactive material was homogeneously distributed throughout the lung, counting efficiencies of a HPGe detector in different positions were calculated as Adipose Mass fraction (AMF) was different in the soft tissue in chest. The results showed that counting efficiencies of the lung counter changed up to 67% for 17.5 keV γ ray and 20% for 25 keV γ ray when AMF changed from 0 to 40%. (authors)

  12. A new cubic phantom for PET/CT dosimetry: Experimental and Monte Carlo characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinato, Walmir; Silva, Rogerio M.V.; Souza, Divanizia N.; Santos, William S.; Caldas, Linda V.E.; Perini, Ana P.; Neves, Lucio P.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, positron emission tomography (PET) associated with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has become a diagnostic technique widely disseminated to evaluate various malignant tumors and other diseases. However, during PET/CT examinations, the doses of ionizing radiation experienced by the internal organs of patients may be substantial. To study the doses involved in PET/CT procedures, a new cubic phantom of overlapping acrylic plates was developed and characterized. This phantom has a deposit for the placement of the fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) solution. There are also small holes near the faces for the insertion of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD). The holes for OSLD are positioned at different distances from the 18 F-FDG deposit. The experimental results were obtained in two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. Differences in the absorbed doses were observed in OSLD measurements due to the non-orthogonal positioning of the detectors inside the phantom. This phantom was also evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations, with the MCNPX code. The phantom and the geometrical characteristics of the equipment were carefully modeled in the MCNPX code, in order to develop a new methodology form comparison of experimental and simulated results, as well as to allow the characterization of PET/CT equipments in Monte Carlo simulations. All results showed good agreement, proving that this new phantom may be applied for these experiments. (authors)

  13. A new cubic phantom for PET/CT dosimetry: Experimental and Monte Carlo characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belinato, Walmir [Departamento de Ensino, Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Bahia, Campus Vitoria da Conquista, Zabele, Av. Amazonas 3150, 45030-220 Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil); Silva, Rogerio M.V.; Souza, Divanizia N. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sergipe-UFS, Sao Cristovao, Sergipe (Brazil); Santos, William S.; Caldas, Linda V.E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo SP (Brazil); Perini, Ana P.; Neves, Lucio P. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo SP (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Uberlandia, Caixa Postal 593, 38400-902, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, positron emission tomography (PET) associated with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has become a diagnostic technique widely disseminated to evaluate various malignant tumors and other diseases. However, during PET/CT examinations, the doses of ionizing radiation experienced by the internal organs of patients may be substantial. To study the doses involved in PET/CT procedures, a new cubic phantom of overlapping acrylic plates was developed and characterized. This phantom has a deposit for the placement of the fluorine-18 fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) solution. There are also small holes near the faces for the insertion of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD). The holes for OSLD are positioned at different distances from the {sup 18}F-FDG deposit. The experimental results were obtained in two PET/CT devices operating with different parameters. Differences in the absorbed doses were observed in OSLD measurements due to the non-orthogonal positioning of the detectors inside the phantom. This phantom was also evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations, with the MCNPX code. The phantom and the geometrical characteristics of the equipment were carefully modeled in the MCNPX code, in order to develop a new methodology form comparison of experimental and simulated results, as well as to allow the characterization of PET/CT equipments in Monte Carlo simulations. All results showed good agreement, proving that this new phantom may be applied for these experiments. (authors)

  14. 3D dose distribution calculation in a voxelized human phantom by means of Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abella, V.; Miro, R.; Juste, B.; Verdu, G.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to provide the reconstruction of a real human voxelized phantom by means of a MatLab program and the simulation of the irradiation of such phantom with the photon beam generated in a Theratron 780 (MDS Nordion) 60 Co radiotherapy unit, by using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle), version 5. The project results in 3D dose mapping calculations inside the voxelized antropomorphic head phantom. The program provides the voxelization by first processing the CT slices; the process follows a two-dimensional pixel and material identification algorithm on each slice and three-dimensional interpolation in order to describe the phantom geometry via small cubic cells, resulting in an MCNP input deck format output. Dose rates are calculated by using the MCNP5 tool FMESH, superimposed mesh tally, which gives the track length estimation of the particle flux in units of particles/cm 2 . Furthermore, the particle flux is converted into dose by using the conversion coefficients extracted from the NIST Physical Reference Data. The voxelization using a three-dimensional interpolation technique in combination with the use of the FMESH tool of the MCNP Monte Carlo code offers an optimal simulation which results in 3D dose mapping calculations inside anthropomorphic phantoms. This tool is very useful in radiation treatment assessments, in which voxelized phantoms are widely utilized.

  15. Possible association between phantom vibration syndrome and occupational burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Pen; Wu, Chi-Cheng; Chang, Li-Ren; Lin, Yu-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Phantom vibration syndrome (PVS) and phantom ringing syndrome (PRS) occur in many cell phone users. Previous studies have indicated an association between PVS/PRS and job stress. The aim of this study was to determine if PVS/PRS were also associated with occupational burnout. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of 384 employees of a high-tech company in northern Taiwan. They all completed a phantom vibration and ringing questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Chinese version of the Occupational Burnout Inventory. Results Significantly more women and people with at least a college education were in the population with PRS and PVS, respectively. Anxiety and depression had no associations with PVS/PRS. Higher scores for personal fatigue, job fatigue, and service target fatigue had an independent impact on the presence of PVS, but only a higher score for service target fatigue had an independent impact on the presence of PRS. Conclusion The independent association between work-related burnout and PVS/PRS suggests that PVS/PRS may be a harbinger of mental stress or a component of the clinical burnout syndrome, and may even be a more convenient and accurate predictor of occupational burnout. PMID:25750984

  16. Membership function used to construction of a hand homogeneous phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavan, Ana Luiza Menegatti; Alvarez, Matheus; Alves, Allan Felipe Fattori; Rosa, Maria Eugenia Dela; Miranda, Jose Ricardo de Arruda

    2014-01-01

    Fractures and dislocations of the hand are some injuries most frequently encountered in trauma of the musculoskeletal system. In evaluating these lesions, in addition to physical examination, radiography, in at least two incidents, is the investigation of choice, and rarely is necessary the help of other images to establish the diagnosis and treatment. The image quality of X-ray examination is therefore essential. In this study, a homogeneous phantom hand was developed to be used in the optimization of images from hand using computed radiography system process. In this procedure were quantified thicknesses of different tissues that constitute an anthropomorphic phantom hand. To perform the classification and quantification of tissue was applied membership functions for histograms of CT scans. The same procedure was adopted for retrospective examinations of 30 patients of the Hospital das Clinicas, Botucatu Medicine School, UNESP (HCFMB-UNESP). The results showed agreement between the thicknesses of tissues that make up the anthropomorphic phantom and sampling of patients, presenting variations between 12.63% and 6.48% for soft tissue and bone, respectively. (author)

  17. A phantom study of tumor contouring on PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Song; Li Xuena; Li Yaming; Yin Yafu; Li Na; Han Chunqi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore an algorithm to define the threshold value for tumor contouring on 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET imaging. Methods: A National Electrical Manufacturing Association (NEMA)NU 2 1994 PET phantom with 5 spheres of different diameters were filled with 18 F-FDG. Seven different sphere-to-background ratios were obtained and the phantom was scanned by Discovery LS 4. For each sphere-to-background ratio, the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) of each sphere, the SUV of the border of each sphere (SUV border ), the mean SUV of a 1 cm region of background (SUV bg ) and the diameter (D) of each sphere were measured. SPSS 13.0 software was used for curve fitting and regression analysis to obtain the threshold algorithm. The calculated thresholds were applied to delineate 29 pathologically confirmed lung cancer lesions on PET images and the obtained volumes were compared with the volumes contoured on CT images in lung window. Results: The algorithm for defining contour threshold is TH% = 33.1% + 46.8% SUV bg /SUV max + 13.9%/D (r = 0.994) by phantom studies. For 29 lung cancer lesions, the average gross tumor volumes (GTV) delineated on PET and CT are (7.36±1.62) ml and (8.31±2.05) ml, respectively (t = -1.26, P>0.05). Conclusion: The proposed threshold algorithm for tumor contouring on PET image could provide comparable GTV with CT. (authors)

  18. Calibration of clinical dosemeters in the IAEA water phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, L.V.E.; Albuquerque, M.P.P.

    1994-01-01

    The procedures recommended by the IAEA Code of Practice were applied at the Calibration Laboratory of Sao Paulo in order to provide in the future the clinical dosemeters users with absorbed dose to water calibration factors for Cobalt 60 radiation beams. In this work the clinical dosemeters were calibrated free in air and in water, and the results were compared, using conversion factors. The several tested clinical dosemeters of different manufacturers and models belong to the laboratory and to hospitals. For the measurements in water the IAEA cubic water phantom was used. The dosemeters were all calibrated free in air in terms of air kerma, and the calibration factors in terms of absorbed dose to water were obtained through conversion factors. the same dosemeters were also calibrated into the water phantom. Good agreement was found between the two methods, the differences were always less than 0.5%. The data obtained during this work show that when the dosemeters are used only in Cobalt 60 radiation and the users apply in the hospital routine work the IAEA Code of Practice, the calibration can be performed directly in the water phantom. This procedure provides the useful calibration factors in terms of absorbed dose to water

  19. Masculine Norms, Avoidant Coping, Asian Values and Depression among Asian American Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Derek Kenji; Liao, Liang; Liu, William Ming

    2010-01-01

    Contrary to the "model minority" myth, growing research indicates that the rates of mental health problems among Asian Americans may be higher than initially assumed. This study seeks to add to the scant knowledge regarding the mental health of Asian American men by examining the role of masculine norms, coping and cultural values in predicting depression among this population (N=149). Results reveal that Asian American men who used avoidant coping strategies and endorsed the masculine norm Dominance reported higher levels of depressive symptoms. In contrast, endorsing Winning masculine norms was associated to lower levels of depressive symptoms. Findings suggest that adherence to masculine norms and avoidant coping strategies play a salient role in the mental health of Asian American men.

  20. Masculine Norms, Avoidant Coping, Asian Values and Depression among Asian American Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Derek Kenji; Liao, Liang; Liu, William Ming

    2010-01-01

    Contrary to the “model minority” myth, growing research indicates that the rates of mental health problems among Asian Americans may be higher than initially assumed. This study seeks to add to the scant knowledge regarding the mental health of Asian American men by examining the role of masculine norms, coping and cultural values in predicting depression among this population (N=149). Results reveal that Asian American men who used avoidant coping strategies and endorsed the masculine norm Dominance reported higher levels of depressive symptoms. In contrast, endorsing Winning masculine norms was associated to lower levels of depressive symptoms. Findings suggest that adherence to masculine norms and avoidant coping strategies play a salient role in the mental health of Asian American men. PMID:20657794

  1. East Asian welfare regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamson, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The paper asks if East Asian welfare regimes are still productivist and Confucian? And, have they developed public care policies? The literature is split on the first question but (mostly) confirmative on the second. Care has to a large, but insufficient extent, been rolled out in the region...

  2. Malaysian Cinema, Asian Film

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heide, van der William

    2002-01-01

    This title series departs from traditional studies of national cinema by accentuating the intercultural and intertextual links between Malaysian films and Asian (as well as European and American) film practices. Using cross-cultural analysis, the author characterizes Malaysia as a pluralist society

  3. Asian oil demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesharaki, F.

    2005-01-01

    This conference presentation examined global oil market development and the role of Asian demand. It discussed plateau change versus cyclical movement in the global oil market; supply and demand issues of OPEC and non-OPEC oil; if high oil prices reduce demand; and the Asian oil picture in the global context. Asian oil demand has accounted for about 50 per cent of the global incremental oil market growth. The presentation provided data charts in graphical format on global and Asia-Pacific incremental oil demand from 1990-2005; Asia oil demand growth for selected nations; real GDP growth in selected Asian countries; and, Asia-Pacific oil production and net import requirements. It also included charts in petroleum product demand for Asia-Pacific, China, India, Japan, and South Korea. Other data charts included key indicators for China's petroleum sector; China crude production and net oil import requirements; China's imports and the share of the Middle East; China's oil exports and imports; China's crude imports by source for 2004; China's imports of main oil products for 2004; India's refining capacity; India's product balance for net-imports and net-exports; and India's trade pattern of oil products. tabs., figs

  4. Asian Americans and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The communities that constitute the racialized category of Asian Americans consist of approximately 20 million people in the United States, or about 5% of the total population. About 20% or 4 million are of primary or secondary school age, and over 1.1 million are in higher education. Both in popular and academic discourse, "Asian…

  5. Asian fungal fermented food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nout, M.J.R.; Aidoo, K.E.

    2010-01-01

    In Asian countries, there is a long history of fermentation of foods and beverages. Diverse micro-organisms, including bacteria, yeasts and moulds, are used as starters, and a wide range of ingredients can be made into fermented foods. The main raw materials include cereals, leguminous seeds,

  6. Development of the voxel computational phantoms of pediatric patients and their application to organ dose assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonik

    A series of realistic voxel computational phantoms of pediatric patients were developed and then used for the radiation risk assessment for various exposure scenarios. The high-resolution computed tomographic images of live patients were utilized for the development of the five voxel phantoms of pediatric patients, 9-month male, 4-year female, 8-year female, 11-year male, and 14-year male. The phantoms were first developed as head and torso phantoms and then extended into whole body phantoms by utilizing computed tomographic images of a healthy adult volunteer. The whole body phantom series was modified to have the same anthropometrics with the most recent reference data reported by the international commission on radiological protection. The phantoms, named as the University of Florida series B, are the first complete set of the pediatric voxel phantoms having reference organ masses and total heights. As part of the dosimetry study, the investigation on skeletal tissue dosimetry methods was performed for better understanding of the radiation dose to the active bone marrow and bone endosteum. All of the currently available methodologies were inter-compared and benchmarked with the paired-image radiation transport model. The dosimetric characteristics of the phantoms were investigated by using Monte Carlo simulation of the broad parallel beams of external phantom in anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral, rotational, and isotropic angles. Organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated for extensive photon energies and compared with the conventional stylized pediatric phantoms of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The multi-slice helical computed tomography exams were simulated using Monte Carlo simulation code for various exams protocols, head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis studies. Results have found realistic estimates of the effective doses for frequently used protocols in pediatric radiology. The results were very

  7. Higher bone resorption excretion in South Asian women vs. White Caucasians and increased bone loss with higher seasonal cycling of vitamin D: Results from the D-FINES cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, A L; Hart, K H; Gossiel, F; Robertson, F; Hunt, J; Hill, T R; Johnsen, S; Berry, J L; Eastell, R; Vieth, R; Lanham-New, S A

    2017-05-01

    Few data exist on bone turnover in South Asian women and it is not well elucidated as to whether Western dwelling South Asian women have different bone resorption levels to that of women from European ethnic backgrounds. This study assessed bone resorption levels in UK dwelling South Asian and Caucasian women as well as evaluating whether seasonal variation in 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is associated with bone resorption in either ethnic group. Data for seasonal measures of urinary N-telopeptide of collagen (uNTX) and serum 25(OH)D were analysed from n=373 women (four groups; South Asian postmenopausal n=44, South Asian premenopausal n=50, Caucasian postmenopausal n=144, Caucasian premenopausal n=135) (mean (±SD) age 48 (14) years; age range 18-79years) who participated in the longitudinal D-FINES (Diet, Food Intake, Nutrition and Exposure to the Sun in Southern England) cohort study (2006-2007). A mixed between-within subjects ANOVA (n=192) showed a between subjects effect of the four groups (PAsian and premenopausal Asian groups. Season specific age-matched-pairs analyses showed that in winter (P=0.04) and spring (P=0.007), premenopausal Asian women had a 16 to 20nmolBCE/mmol Cr higher uNTX than premenopausal Caucasian women. The (amplitude/mesor) ratio (i.e. seasonal change) for 25(OH)D was predictive of uNTX, with estimate (SD)=0.213 (0.015) and 95% CI (0.182, 0.245; PAsian women than would be expected for their age, being greater than same-age Caucasian women, and similar to postmenopausal Asian women. This highlights potentially higher than expected bone resorption levels in premenopausal South Asian women which, if not offset by concurrent increased bone formation, may have future clinical and public health implications which warrant further investigation. Individuals with a larger seasonal change in 25(OH)D concentration showed an increased bone resorption, an association which was larger than that of the 25(OH)D yearly average, suggesting it may be as

  8. Articulating Asianness: Young Asian Dutch and non-homeland Asian popular media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kartosen, R.A.; Tan, E.S.H.

    2013-01-01

    This study explores Asian Dutch young people’s ethnic-cultural identification in relation to their media consumption, and specifically their consumption of popular media from Asian countries other than their country of origin. A survey was conducted among 486 Asian Dutch (18-35 years old). In

  9. Comparative imaging study in ultrasound, MRI, CT, and DSA using a multimodality renal artery phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Deirdre M.; Fagan, Andrew J.; Moran, Carmel M.; Browne, Jacinta E. [Medical Ultrasound Physics and Technology Group, School of Physics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Centre for Advanced Medical Imaging (CAMI), St James' s Hospital, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Department of Medical Physics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Medical Ultrasound Physics and Technology Group, School of Physics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: A range of anatomically realistic multimodality renal artery phantoms consisting of vessels with varying degrees of stenosis was developed and evaluated using four imaging techniques currently used to detect renal artery stenosis (RAS). The spatial resolution required to visualize vascular geometry and the velocity detection performance required to adequately characterize blood flow in patients suffering from RAS are currently ill-defined, with the result that no one imaging modality has emerged as a gold standard technique for screening for this disease. Methods: The phantoms, which contained a range of stenosis values (0%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 85%), were designed for use with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, and x-ray digital subtraction angiography. The construction materials used were optimized with respect to their ultrasonic speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, MR relaxometry (T{sub 1},T{sub 2}) properties, and Hounsfield number/x-ray attenuation coefficient, with a design capable of tolerating high-pressure pulsatile flow. Fiducial targets, incorporated into the phantoms to allow for registration of images among modalities, were chosen to minimize geometric distortions. Results: High quality distortion-free images of the phantoms with good contrast between vessel lumen, fiducial markers, and background tissue to visualize all stenoses were obtained with each modality. Quantitative assessments of the grade of stenosis revealed significant discrepancies between modalities, with each underestimating the stenosis severity for the higher-stenosed phantoms (70% and 85%) by up to 14%, with the greatest discrepancy attributable to DSA. Conclusions: The design and construction of a range of anatomically realistic renal artery phantoms containing varying degrees of stenosis is described. Images obtained using the main four diagnostic techniques used to detect RAS were free from artifacts and exhibited adequate contrast

  10. Analysis of biological tissues in infant chest for the development of an equivalent radiographic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pina, D. R.; Souza, Rafael T. F.; Duarte, Sergio B.; Alvarez, Matheus; Miranda, Jose R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The main purpose of the present study was to determine the amounts of different tissues in the chest of the newborn patient (age ≤1 year), with the aim of developing a homogeneous phantom chest equivalent. This type of phantom is indispensable in the development of optimization procedures for radiographic techniques, including dosimetric control, which is a crucial aspect of pediatric radiology. The authors present a systematic set of procedures, including a computational algorithm, to estimate the amounts of tissues and thicknesses of the corresponding simulator material plates used to construct the phantom. Methods: The Gaussian fit of computed tomographic (CT) analysis was applied to classify and quantify different biological tissues. The methodology is summarized with a computational algorithm, which was used to quantify tissues through automated CT analysis. The thicknesses of the equivalent homogeneous simulator material plates were determined to construct the phantom. Results: A total of 180 retrospective CT examinations with anterior-posterior diameter values ranging 8.5-13.0 cm were examined. The amounts of different tissues were evaluated. The results provided elements to construct a phantom to simulate the infant chest in the posterior-anterior or anterior-posterior (PA/AP) view. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this report represents the first demonstration of an infant chest phantom dedicated to the radiology of children younger than one year. This phantom is a key element in the development of clinical charts for optimizing radiographic technique in pediatric patients. Optimization procedures for nonstandard patients were reported previously [Pina et al., Phys. Med. Biol. 49, N215-N226 (2004) and Pina et al., Appl. Radiat. Isot. 67, 61-69 (2009)]. The constructed phantom represents a starting point to obtain radiologic protocols for the infant patient.

  11. Comparative imaging study in ultrasound, MRI, CT, and DSA using a multimodality renal artery phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Deirdre M.; Fagan, Andrew J.; Moran, Carmel M.; Browne, Jacinta E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A range of anatomically realistic multimodality renal artery phantoms consisting of vessels with varying degrees of stenosis was developed and evaluated using four imaging techniques currently used to detect renal artery stenosis (RAS). The spatial resolution required to visualize vascular geometry and the velocity detection performance required to adequately characterize blood flow in patients suffering from RAS are currently ill-defined, with the result that no one imaging modality has emerged as a gold standard technique for screening for this disease. Methods: The phantoms, which contained a range of stenosis values (0%, 30%, 50%, 70%, and 85%), were designed for use with ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, x-ray computed tomography, and x-ray digital subtraction angiography. The construction materials used were optimized with respect to their ultrasonic speed of sound and attenuation coefficient, MR relaxometry (T 1 ,T 2 ) properties, and Hounsfield number/x-ray attenuation coefficient, with a design capable of tolerating high-pressure pulsatile flow. Fiducial targets, incorporated into the phantoms to allow for registration of images among modalities, were chosen to minimize geometric distortions. Results: High quality distortion-free images of the phantoms with good contrast between vessel lumen, fiducial markers, and background tissue to visualize all stenoses were obtained with each modality. Quantitative assessments of the grade of stenosis revealed significant discrepancies between modalities, with each underestimating the stenosis severity for the higher-stenosed phantoms (70% and 85%) by up to 14%, with the greatest discrepancy attributable to DSA. Conclusions: The design and construction of a range of anatomically realistic renal artery phantoms containing varying degrees of stenosis is described. Images obtained using the main four diagnostic techniques used to detect RAS were free from artifacts and exhibited adequate contrast to allow

  12. MCNPX simulation of proton dose distribution in homogeneous and CT phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.C.; Lee, Y.J.; Tung, C.J.; Cheng, H.W.; Chao, T.C.

    2014-01-01

    A dose simulation system was constructed based on the MCNPX Monte Carlo package to simulate proton dose distribution in homogeneous and CT phantoms. Conversion from Hounsfield unit of a patient CT image set to material information necessary for Monte Carlo simulation is based on Schneider's approach. In order to validate this simulation system, inter-comparison of depth dose distributions among those obtained from the MCNPX, GEANT4 and FLUKA codes for a 160 MeV monoenergetic proton beam incident normally on the surface of a homogeneous water phantom was performed. For dose validation within the CT phantom, direct comparison with measurement is infeasible. Instead, this study took the approach to indirectly compare the 50% ranges (R 50% ) along the central axis by our system to the NIST CSDA ranges for beams with 160 and 115 MeV energies. Comparison result within the homogeneous phantom shows good agreement. Differences of simulated R 50% among the three codes are less than 1 mm. For results within the CT phantom, the MCNPX simulated water equivalent R eq,50% are compatible with the CSDA water equivalent ranges from the NIST database with differences of 0.7 and 4.1 mm for 160 and 115 MeV beams, respectively. - Highlights: ► Proton dose simulation based on the MCNPX 2.6.0 in homogeneous and CT phantoms. ► CT number (HU) conversion to electron density based on Schneider's approach. ► Good agreement among MCNPX, GEANT4 and FLUKA codes in a homogeneous water phantom. ► Water equivalent R 50 in CT phantoms are compatible to those of NIST database

  13. History of Asian American psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Frederick T L; Okazaki, Sumie

    2009-10-01

    An overview of the history of Asian American psychology is provided by reviewing the context for the development of the field as well as the early founding of the Asian American Psychological Association (AAPA). The presidents of AAPA as well as key events and conferences are noted. The involvement of AAPA leaders in national mental health policies and activities are reviewed. The substantive areas of Asian American psychology and the education and training of Asian American psychologists are also discussed. The article ends with some comments about the future of Asian American psychology. Copyright 2009 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. Critical thinking dispositions of nursing students in Asian and non-Asian countries: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsali, Mahvash; Tajvidi, Mansooreh; Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad

    2013-09-26

    Critical thinking disposition represents an inclination of a person to use possessed skills in relation to critical thinking. The trend of critical thinking has been described as inner motivation to solve problems and make decisions by thinking. In nursing as a practical profession, the concept of critical thinking dispositions is important component in helping to manage complex health situations and to deal with patient issues effectively. Willingness to think critically is a prerequisite for safe and subtly performance. The results of studies show critical thinking dispositions of nursing students in Asian countries are different from non-Asian countries. Aim of this literature review was to compare critical thinking dispositions of nursing students in Asian and non-Asian countries. Literature review was done in English and Persian databases. The results showed of the 795 articles published in English and Persian language that studied critical thinking, 73 ones studied critical thinking skills and dispositions in nursing education, and relationship between teaching methods and critical thinking skills and dispositions in nursing education of different countries. Fifteen of seventy three articles assessed critical thinking dispositions in nursing students. Limited studies showed that the Asian nursing students had mostly undermining score of the critical thinking dispositions, while non-Asian countries tend to positive scores. The reasons for these differences could be due to issues such as environmental, educational methods and cultural differences. However, future studies should measure critical thinking disposition by discipline-based tools.

  15. Critical Thinking Dispositions of Nursing Students in Asian and Non-Asian Countries: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsali, Mahvash; Tajvidi, Mansooreh; Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad

    2013-01-01

    Critical thinking disposition represents an inclination of a person to use possessed skills in relation to critical thinking. The trend of critical thinking has been described as inner motivation to solve problems and make decisions by thinking. In nursing as a practical profession, the concept of critical thinking dispositions is important component in helping to manage complex health situations and to deal with patient issues effectively. Willingness to think critically is a prerequisite for safe and subtly performance. The results of studies show critical thinking dispositions of nursing students in Asian countries are different from non-Asian countries. Aim of this literature review was to compare critical thinking dispositions of nursing students in Asian and non-Asian countries. Literature review was done in English and Persian databases. The results showed of the 795 articles published in English and Persian language that studied critical thinking, 73 ones studied critical thinking skills and dispositions in nursing education, and relationship between teaching methods and critical thinking skills and dispositions in nursing education of different countries. Fifteen of seventy three articles assessed critical thinking dispositions in nursing students. Limited studies showed that the Asian nursing students had mostly undermining score of the critical thinking dispositions, while non-Asian countries tend to positive scores. The reasons for these differences could be due to issues such as environmental, educational methods and cultural differences. However, future studies should measure critical thinking disposition by discipline-based tools. PMID:24171885

  16. Radiation dose evaluation of dental cone beam computed tomography using an anthropomorphic adult head phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jay; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Ho, Chang-hung; Liu, Yan-Lin; Chang, Yuan-Jen; Min Chao, Max; Hsu, Jui-Ting

    2014-11-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) provides high-resolution tomographic images and has been gradually used in clinical practice. Thus, it is important to examine the amount of radiation dose resulting from dental CBCT examinations. In this study, we developed an in-house anthropomorphic adult head phantom to evaluate the level of effective dose. The anthropomorphic phantom was made of acrylic and filled with plaster to replace the bony tissue. The contour of the head was extracted from a set of adult computed tomography (CT) images. Different combinations of the scanning parameters of CBCT were applied. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the absorbed doses at 19 locations in the head and neck regions. The effective doses measured using the proposed phantom at 65, 75, and 85 kVp in the D-mode were 72.23, 100.31, and 134.29 μSv, respectively. In the I-mode, the effective doses were 108.24, 190.99, and 246.48 μSv, respectively. The maximum percent error between the doses measured by the proposed phantom and the Rando phantom was l4.90%. Therefore, the proposed anthropomorphic adult head phantom is applicable for assessing the radiation dose resulting from clinical dental CBCT.

  17. A Chinese Visible Human-based computational female pelvic phantom for radiation dosimetry simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nan, H.; Jinlu, S.; Shaoxiang, Z.; Qing, H.; Li-wen, T.; Chengjun, G.; Tang, X.; Jiang, S. B.; Xiano-lin, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate voxel phantom is needed for dosimetric simulation in radiation therapy for malignant tumors in female pelvic region. However, most of the existing voxel phantoms are constructed on the basis of Caucasian or non-Chinese population. Materials and Methods: A computational framework for constructing female pelvic voxel phantom for radiation dosimetry was performed based on Chinese Visible Human datasets. First, several organs within pelvic region were segmented from Chinese Visible Human datasets. Then, polygonization and voxelization were performed based on the segmented organs and a 3D computational phantom is built in the form of a set of voxel arrays. Results: The generated phantom can be converted and loaded into treatment planning system for radiation dosimetry calculation. From the observed dosimetric results of those organs and structures, we can evaluate their absorbed dose and implement some simulation studies. Conclusion: A voxel female pelvic phantom was developed from Chinese Visible Human datasets. It can be utilized for dosimetry evaluation and planning simulation, which would be very helpful to improve the clinical performance and reduce the radiation toxicity on organ at risk.

  18. Ultrasonographic Quantification of Fat Content in Fatty Liver Phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Il Young; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Joo, Gyung Soo; Kim, Ho Jung; Kim, Young Beom; Lee, Byoung Ho

    1995-01-01

    Assuming that the fat content of certain tissue might be quantified by measurirrg the ultrasound echo level, we analyzed the ultrasound histograms obtained from the fatty liver phantoms that contained various amount of fat. Various amount of margarine(Mazola. Cliff wood. USA) was mixed with 2% of agarin solution state to produce fatty liver phantoms that contained 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40% of fat. We obtained ultrasound histogram from each fatty liver phantom in gel state. We used 2% agar gel as a control. The ultrasound histograms from the control phantom showed gradual increase in echo level as the depth from the surface increased. The echo level from the phantom that contained 5% of fat showed gradual increase and subsequent decrease with the peak echo level at the depth of 3cm. The echo levels from the phantoms that contained more in 5% of fat gradually decreased as the depth from the surface increased; the change becoming more pronounced as the fat content of the phantom increased. The echo levels measured at the depth of 1cm were 9.3(control), 29.6(5%phantom), 3l.3 (10% phantom), 26.3 (20% phantom), l8.8 (30% phantom), and l6dB (40% phantom). Fat content of fatty phantoms can not be quantified by measuring only echo level. Simultaneous measurement of attenuation of ultrasound, which is not easy to do and not done in this study, is prerequisite to quantify fat content

  19. Coping Strategies for Managing Acculturative Stress among Asian International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Young-An; Trusty, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the effects of specific coping strategies on managing acculturative stress and acculturation of Asian international students, based on a sample of 220 Asian international students in the U.S. The data were analyzed with hierarchical multiple regression using Baron and Kenny's (1986) mediation procedure. The results supported…

  20. Dimensions of Assertiveness in an Asian-American Student Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Mary A.; Greenfield, Tom K.

    1983-01-01

    Analyzed components of assertiveness, assessed by the College Self-Expression Scale, for Asian-American (N=105) and Caucasian (N=135) students. Results showed a significant difference in full-scale assertion scores indicating lower levels of overall assertion in Asian Americans, interpreted as consistent with value differences between…

  1. Education and Recreation Activities of Older Asian Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junhyoung; Dattilo, John; Heo, Jinmoo

    2011-01-01

    Older Asian immigrants experience a variety of challenges when attempting to adapt to life in a new society. Adjustment difficulties associated with cultural differences among older Asian immigrants and the host country may result in a certain levels of acculturative stress. This stress is negatively associated with health and quality of life. In…

  2. Tissue quantification for development of pediatric phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, A.F.F.; Miranda, J.R.A.; Pina, D.R.

    2013-01-01

    The optimization of the risk- benefit ratio is a major concern in the pediatric radiology, due to the greater vulnerability of children to the late somatic effects and genetic effects of exposure to radiation compared to adults. In Brazil, it is estimated that the causes of death from head trauma are 18 % for the age group between 1-5 years and the radiograph is the primary diagnostic test for the detection of skull fracture . Knowing that the image quality is essential to ensure the identification of structures anatomical and minimizing errors diagnostic interpretation, this paper proposed the development and construction of homogeneous phantoms skull, for the age group 1-5 years. The construction of the phantoms homogeneous was performed using the classification and quantification of tissue present in the skull of pediatric patients. In this procedure computational algorithms were used, using Matlab, to quantify distinct biological tissues present in the anatomical regions studied , using pictures retrospective CT scans. Preliminary data obtained from measurements show that between the ages of 1-5 years, assuming an average anteroposterior diameter of the pediatric skull region of the 145.73 ± 2.97 mm, can be represented by 92.34 mm ± 5.22 of lucite and 1.75 ± 0:21 mm of aluminum plates of a provision of PEP (Pacient equivalent phantom). After its construction, the phantoms will be used for image and dose optimization in pediatric protocols process to examinations of computerized radiography

  3. PHANTOM: Smoothed particle hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Daniel J.; Wurster, James; Nixon, Chris; Tricco, Terrence S.; Toupin, Stéven; Pettitt, Alex; Chan, Conrad; Laibe, Guillaume; Glover, Simon; Dobbs, Clare; Nealon, Rebecca; Liptai, David; Worpel, Hauke; Bonnerot, Clément; Dipierro, Giovanni; Ragusa, Enrico; Federrath, Christoph; Iaconi, Roberto; Reichardt, Thomas; Forgan, Duncan; Hutchison, Mark; Constantino, Thomas; Ayliffe, Ben; Mentiplay, Daniel; Hirsh, Kieran; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    Phantom is a smoothed particle hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics code focused on stellar, galactic, planetary, and high energy astrophysics. It is modular, and handles sink particles, self-gravity, two fluid and one fluid dust, ISM chemistry and cooling, physical viscosity, non-ideal MHD, and more. Its modular structure makes it easy to add new physics to the code.

  4. Homemade ultrasound phantom for simulation of hydronephrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Karine Brandao Novaes

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this article, we describe the development of a simple and inexpensive simulation phantom as a surrogate of human hydronephrosis for the identification of urinary tract obstruction at bedside to be used in undergraduate training of medical students.

  5. The "Phantom Costs" of Florida's Citrus Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Muraro, Ronald P.; Roka, Fritz M.; Spreen, Thomas H.

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory compliance, the "phantom costs of production," is an increasingly "fact-of-life" for U.S. agriculture. A survey was developed and implemented to enumerate regulatory compliance costs for Florida's 748,500 acres citrus industry. Complying with 61 production related regulations, 643,757 hours were expended at a total annual cost of over $24.3 million.

  6. Phantom breast sensations are frequent after mastectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dorthe Marie Helbo; Kehlet, Henrik; Gærtner, Rune

    2011-01-01

    Phantom breast sensation (PBS) following mastectomy has been recognized for many years. PBS is a feeling that the removed breast is still there. The reported prevalence and risk factors have not been established in large well-defined patient series. The purpose of this study was to examine...... the prevalence of PBS following mastectomy and associated risk factors....

  7. Glucose abnormalities in Asian patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Qingyan; Orsenigo, Roberto; Wang, Junyi; Griffel, Louis; Brass, Clifford

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated a potential association between type 2 diabetes (T2D) and hepatitis C virus infection in Western countries, while similar evidence is limited in Asia. We compared the prevalence of glucose abnormalities (impaired fasting glucose [IFG] and T2D) and their risk factors between Asian and non-Asian chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients, and evaluated whether glucose abnormalities impacted the viral responses to peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment (current standard of care in most Asian countries). This study retrospectively analyzed data of 1,887 CHC patients from three Phase II/III studies with alisporivir (DEB025) as treatment for CHC. The chi-square test was used to compare the prevalence of IFG/T2D between Asian and non-Asian CHC patients, and logistic regression was used to adjust for sex, age, and cirrhosis status. Risk factors for IFG/T2D were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analysis. Our results indicated that the prevalence of IFG/T2D was high in both Asian and non-Asian CHC patients (23.0% vs 20.9%), and no significant difference was found between these two populations (adjusted odds ratio: 1.3, 95% confidence interval: 0.97, 1.7; P=0.08). Age, sex, and cirrhosis status were risk factors for IFG/T2D in both populations, while body mass index was positively associated with IFG/T2D in non-Asian but not in Asian participants. No significant differences in sustained virological response rates were seen between patients with normal fasting glucose and patients with IFG/T2D for both populations. These results demonstrate that the prevalence of glucose abnormalities in Asian CHC patients was similar to that in non-Asians, and glucose abnormalities had no impact on viral response to peginterferon plus ribavirin.

  8. A polygon-surface reference Korean male phantom (PSRK-Man) and its direct implementation in Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Bolch, Wesley E [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Cho, Kun-Woo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sung Bae, E-mail: chkim@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Physical Therapy, Kyungbuk College, Hyucheon 2-dong, Yeongju-si, Gyeongbuk 750-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-21

    Even though the hybrid phantom embodies both the anatomic reality of voxel phantoms and the deformability of stylized phantoms, it must be voxelized to be used in a Monte Carlo code for dose calculation or some imaging simulation, which incurs the inherent limitations of voxel phantoms. In the present study, a voxel phantom named VKH-Man (Visible Korean Human-Man), was converted to a polygon-surface phantom (PSRK-Man, Polygon-Surface Reference Korean-Man), which was then adjusted to the Reference Korean data. Subsequently, the PSRK-Man polygon phantom was directly, without any voxelization process, implemented in the Geant4 Monte Carlo code for dose calculations. The calculated dose values and computation time were then compared with those of HDRK-Man (High Definition Reference Korean-Man), a corresponding voxel phantom adjusted to the same Reference Korean data from the same VKH-Man voxel phantom. Our results showed that the calculated dose values of the PSRK-Man surface phantom agreed well with those of the HDRK-Man voxel phantom. The calculation speed for the PSRK-Man polygon phantom though was 70-150 times slower than that of the HDRK-Man voxel phantom; that speed, however, could be acceptable in some applications, in that direct use of the surface phantom PSRK-Man in Geant4 does not require a separate voxelization process. Computing speed can be enhanced, in future, either by optimizing the Monte Carlo transport kernel for the polygon surfaces or by using modern computing technologies such as grid computing and general-purpose computing on graphics processing units programming.

  9. A polygon-surface reference Korean male phantom (PSRK-Man) and its direct implementation in Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Hyeong; Jeong, Jong Hwi; Bolch, Wesley E; Cho, Kun-Woo; Hwang, Sung Bae

    2011-01-01

    Even though the hybrid phantom embodies both the anatomic reality of voxel phantoms and the deformability of stylized phantoms, it must be voxelized to be used in a Monte Carlo code for dose calculation or some imaging simulation, which incurs the inherent limitations of voxel phantoms. In the present study, a voxel phantom named VKH-Man (Visible Korean Human-Man), was converted to a polygon-surface phantom (PSRK-Man, Polygon-Surface Reference Korean-Man), which was then adjusted to the Reference Korean data. Subsequently, the PSRK-Man polygon phantom was directly, without any voxelization process, implemented in the Geant4 Monte Carlo code for dose calculations. The calculated dose values and computation time were then compared with those of HDRK-Man (High Definition Reference Korean-Man), a corresponding voxel phantom adjusted to the same Reference Korean data from the same VKH-Man voxel phantom. Our results showed that the calculated dose values of the PSRK-Man surface phantom agreed well with those of the HDRK-Man voxel phantom. The calculation speed for the PSRK-Man polygon phantom though was 70-150 times slower than that of the HDRK-Man voxel phantom; that speed, however, could be acceptable in some applications, in that direct use of the surface phantom PSRK-Man in Geant4 does not require a separate voxelization process. Computing speed can be enhanced, in future, either by optimizing the Monte Carlo transport kernel for the polygon surfaces or by using modern computing technologies such as grid computing and general-purpose computing on graphics processing units programming.

  10. PID - 3D: a software to develop mathematical human phantoms for use in computational dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Filho, Jose de Melo; Vieira, Jose Wilson; Lima, Vanildo Junior de Melo; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade

    2009-01-01

    The PID-3D software, written in Visual C++, contains tools developed for building and editing of three-dimensional geometric figures formed of voxels (volume pixels). These tools were projected to be used, together with those already developed by the Grupo de Dosimetria Numerica (GDN/CNPq), such as the FANTOMAS and DIP software, in computational dosimetry of ionizing radiation. The main objective of this paper is to develop various voxel-based geometric solids to build voxel phantoms (meaning models), anthropomorphic or not. The domain of this technique of development of geometric solids is important for the GDN/CNPq, because it allows the use of just one Monte Carlo code to simulate the transportation, interaction and deposition of radiation in tomographic and mathematical phantoms. Building a particular geometric solid the user needs to inform to the PID-3D software, the location and the size of the parallelepiped that involves it. Each built solid can be saved in a binary file of the type SGI (file containing the size and the numeric values that constitutes the 3D matrix that represents the solid, commonly used by GDN/CNPq). The final mathematical phantom is built starting from these SGI files and the SGI file resulting constitutes a voxel phantom. With this approach the software's user does not have to manipulate the equations and inequalities of the solids that represent the organs and tissues of the phantom. The 3D-PID software, associated with the FANTOMAS and DIP software are tools produced by GDN/CNPq, providing a new technique for building of 3D scenes in dosimetric evaluations using voxel phantoms. To validate the PID-3D software one built, step by step, a phantom similar to the MIRD-5 stylized phantom. (author)

  11. Mathematical development of a 10 years old child phantom for use in internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deus, S.F.; Poston, J.W.; Watanabe, S.

    1989-08-01

    The main objectives of this work are: 1) to develop a project of a mathematical phantom representing as far as possible a child of 10 years old and 2)to use this phantom as a base for the specific absorbed fractions (SAF) calculations in the internal organs and skeleton due to the radioisotopes most used in nuclear medicine. This phantom was similar in shape to the Fisher and Snyder one, but several changes were introduced to make the phantom more realistic. Those changes included the addition of a neck region, puting the arms outside the trunk region, changes in the trunk, head and genitalia regions shapes. Several modifications were also done in the skeleton. For instance, the head bones, rib cage, pelvis, vertebral column, scapula, clavicles and the arms and legs bones were made very close to the real anatomic shapes. Some internal organs as the brain, lungs, liver, small and large intestines were also changed as a consenquence of the above modifications. In all those cases, the changes were made not only in the shapes but also in the organs and bones position in such a way to be more representative of the 10 years old anatomic age. Estimates of the SAF obtained by the use of this phantom, resulted, as expected, significantly different from those obtained by the use of a simpler model. In other words, the ratio between the SAF in the organs of the phantom developed in this project and the SAF in the organs of the phantom similar to the adult (obtained by reducing each region of the adult phantom by the use of appropriate factor) vary from 0.37 to 5. Those differences and their meaning are also discussed. (author) [pt

  12. 3D printed cardiac phantom for procedural planning of a transcatheter native mitral valve replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Richard L.; O'Hara, Ryan P.; Iyer, Vijay; Hansen, Rose; Meess, Karen M.; Nagesh, S. V. Setlur; Rudin, Stephen; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Springer, Michael; Ionita, Ciprian N.

    2016-03-01

    3D printing an anatomically accurate, functional flow loop phantom of a patient's cardiac vasculature was used to assist in the surgical planning of one of the first native transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) procedures. CTA scans were acquired from a patient about to undergo the first minimally-invasive native TMVR procedure at the Gates Vascular Institute in Buffalo, NY. A python scripting library, the Vascular Modeling Toolkit (VMTK), was used to segment the 3D geometry of the patient's cardiac chambers and mitral valve with severe stenosis, calcific in nature. A stereolithographic (STL) mesh was generated and AutoDesk Meshmixer was used to transform the vascular surface into a functioning closed flow loop. A Stratasys Objet 500 Connex3 multi-material printer was used to fabricate the phantom with distinguishable material features of the vasculature and calcified valve. The interventional team performed a mock procedure on the phantom, embedding valve cages in the model and imaging the phantom with a Toshiba Infinix INFX-8000V 5-axis Carm bi-Plane angiography system. Results: After performing the mock-procedure on the cardiac phantom, the cardiologists optimized their transapical surgical approach. The mitral valve stenosis and calcification were clearly visible. The phantom was used to inform the sizing of the valve to be implanted. Conclusion: With advances in image processing and 3D printing technology, it is possible to create realistic patientspecific phantoms which can act as a guide for the interventional team. Using 3D printed phantoms as a valve sizing method shows potential as a more informative technique than typical CTA reconstruction alone.

  13. Integral test phantom for dosimetric quality assurance of image guided and intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letourneau, Daniel; Keller, Harald; Sharpe, Michael B.; Jaffray, David A.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a dosimetric phantom quality assurance (QA) of linear accelerators capable of cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guided and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). This phantom is to be used in an integral test to quantify in real-time both the performance of the image guidance and the dose delivery systems in terms of dose localization. The prototype IG-IMRT QA phantom consisted of a cylindrical imaging phantom (CatPhan) combined with an array of 11 radiation diodes mounted on a 10 cm diameter disk, oriented perpendicular to the phantom axis. Basic diode response characterization was performed for 6 and 18 MV photons. The diode response was compared to planning system calculations in the open and penumbrae regions of simple and complex beam arrangements. The clinical use of the QA phantom was illustrated in an integral test of an IG-IMRT treatment designed for a clinical spinal radiosurgery case. The sensitivity of the phantom to multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and setup errors in the clinical setting was assessed by introducing errors in the IMRT plan or by displacing the phantom. The diodes offered good response linearity and long-term reproducibility for both 6 and 18 MV. Axial dosimetry of coplanar beams (in a plane containing the beam axes) was made possible with the nearly isoplanatic response of the diodes over 360 deg. of gantry (usually within ±1%). For single beam geometry, errors in phantom placement as small as 0.5 mm could be accurately detected (in gradient ≥1%/mm). In clinical setting, MLC systematic errors of 1 mm on a single MLC bank introduced in the IMRT plan were easily detectable with the QA phantom. The QA phantom demonstrated also sufficient sensitivity for the detection of setup errors as small as 1 mm for the IMRT delivery. These results demonstrated that the prototype can accurately and efficiently verify the entire IG-IMRT process. This tool, in conjunction with image guidance capabilities

  14. Integral test phantom for dosimetric quality assurance of image guided and intensity modulated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létourneau, Daniel; Keller, Harald; Sharpe, Michael B; Jaffray, David A

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a dosimetric phantom quality assurance (QA) of linear accelerators capable of cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guided and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT). This phantom is to be used in an integral test to quantify in real-time both the performance of the image guidance and the dose delivery systems in terms of dose localization. The prototype IG-IMRT QA phantom consisted of a cylindrical imaging phantom (CatPhan) combined with an array of 11 radiation diodes mounted on a 10 cm diameter disk, oriented perpendicular to the phantom axis. Basic diode response characterization was performed for 6 and 18 MV photons. The diode response was compared to planning system calculations in the open and penumbrae regions of simple and complex beam arrangements. The clinical use of the QA phantom was illustrated in an integral test of an IG-IMRT treatment designed for a clinical spinal radiosurgery case. The sensitivity of the phantom to multileaf collimator (MLC) calibration and setup errors in the clinical setting was assessed by introducing errors in the IMRT plan or by displacing the phantom. The diodes offered good response linearity and long-term reproducibility for both 6 and 18 MV. Axial dosimetry of coplanar beams (in a plane containing the beam axes) was made possible with the nearly isoplanatic response of the diodes over 360 degrees of gantry (usually within +/-1%). For single beam geometry, errors in phantom placement as small as 0.5 mm could be accurately detected (in gradient > or = 1% /mm). In clinical setting, MLC systematic errors of 1 mm on a single MLC bank introduced in the IMRT plan were easily detectable with the QA phantom. The QA phantom demonstrated also sufficient sensitivity for the detection of setup errors as small as 1 mm for the IMRT delivery. These results demonstrated that the prototype can accurately and efficiently verify the entire IG-IMRT process. This tool, in conjunction with image guidance

  15. Deep brain stimulation for phantom limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittar, Richard G; Otero, Sofia; Carter, Helen; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2005-05-01

    Phantom limb pain is an often severe and debilitating phenomenon that has been reported in up to 85% of amputees. Its pathophysiology is poorly understood. Peripheral and spinal mechanisms are thought to play a role in pain modulation in affected individuals; however central mechanisms are also likely to be of importance. The neuromatrix theory postulates a genetically determined representation of body image, which is modified by sensory input to create a neurosignature. Persistence of the neurosignature may be responsible for painless phantom limb sensations, whereas phantom limb pain may be due to abnormal reorganisation within the neuromatrix. This study assessed the clinical outcome of deep brain stimulation of the periventricular grey matter and somatosensory thalamus for the relief of chronic neuropathic pain associated with phantom limb in three patients. These patients were assessed preoperatively and at 3 month intervals postoperatively. Self-rated visual analogue scale pain scores assessed pain intensity, and the McGill Pain Questionnaire assessed the quality of the pain. Quality of life was assessed using the EUROQOL EQ-5D scale. Periventricular gray stimulation alone was optimal in two patients, whilst a combination of periventricular gray and thalamic stimulation produced the greatest degree of relief in one patient. At follow-up (mean 13.3 months) the intensity of pain was reduced by 62% (range 55-70%). In all three patients, the burning component of the pain was completely alleviated. Opiate intake was reduced in the two patients requiring morphine sulphate pre-operatively. Quality of life measures indicated a statistically significant improvement. This data supports the role for deep brain stimulation in patients with phantom limb pain. The medical literature relating to the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment of this clinical entity is reviewed in detail.

  16. Reconstruction of voxel phantoms for skin dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Paula Cristina Guimaraes

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a therapeutic modality that utilizes ionizing radiation for the destruction of neoplastic human cells. One of the requirements for this treatment methodology success lays on the appropriate use of planning systems, which performs, among other information, the patient's dose distribution estimate. Nowadays, transport codes have been providing huge subsidies to these planning systems, once it enables specific and accurate patient organ and tissue dosimetry. The model utilized by these codes to describe the human anatomy in a realistic way is known as voxel phantoms, which are represented by discrete volume elements (voxels) directly associated to tomographic data. Nowadays, voxel phantoms doable of being inserted and processed by the transport code MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) presents a 3-4 mm image resolution; however, such resolution limits some thin body structure discrimination, such as skin. In this context, this work proposes a calculus routine that discriminates this region with thickness and localization in the voxel phantoms similar to the real, leading to an accurate dosimetric skin dose assessment by the MCNP code. Moreover, this methodology consists in manipulating the voxel phantoms volume elements by segmenting and subdividing it in different skin thickness. In addition to validate the skin dose calculated data, a set of experimental evaluations with thermoluminescent dosimeters were performed in an anthropomorphic phantom. Due to significant differences observed on the dose distribution of several skin representations, it was found that is important to discriminate the skin thickness similar to the real. The presented methodology is useful to obtain an accurate skin dosimetric evaluation for several radiotherapy procedures, with particular interest on the electron beam radiotherapy, in which highlights the whole body irradiation therapy (TSET), a procedure under implementation at the Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da

  17. Phantom Sensations, Supernumerary Phantom Limbs and Apotemnophilia: Three Body Representation Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatu, Laurent; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2018-01-01

    Body representation disorders continue to be mysterious and involve the anatomical substrate that underlies the mental representation of the body. These disorders sit on the boundaries of neurological and psychiatric diseases. We present the main characteristics of 3 examples of body representation disorders: phantom sensations, supernumerary phantom limb, and apotemnophilia. The dysfunction of anatomical circuits that regulate body representation can sometimes have paradoxical features. In the case of phantom sensations, the patient feels the painful subjective sensation of the existence of the lost part of the body after amputation, surgery or trauma. In case of apotemnophilia, now named body integrity identity disorder, the subject wishes for the disappearance of the existing and normal limb, which can occasionally lead to self-amputation. More rarely, a brain-damaged patient with 4 existing limbs can report the existence of a supernumerary phantom limb. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Prevalence of overweight and obesity in Asian American students using Asian specific criteria to determine weight classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Individuals of Asian descent have been found to be at greater risk of developing conditions associated with obesity at lower BMI levels compared to other ethnic groups. As a result, new criteria have been developed to identify overweight and obesity in Asian populations. The purpose of the current s...

  19. Construction of voxel head phantom and application to BNCT dose calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choon Sik; Lee, Choon Ik; Lee, Jai Ki [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-15

    Voxel head phantom for overcoming the limitation of mathematical phantom in depicting anatomical details was constructed and example dose calculation for BNCT was performed. The repeated structure algorithm of the general purpose Monte Carlo code, MCNP4B was applied for voxel Monte Carlo calculation. Simple binary voxel phantom and combinatorial geometry phantom composed of two materials were constructed for validating the voxel Monte Carlo calculation system. The tomographic images of VHP man provided by NLM(National Library of Medicine) were segmented and indexed to construct voxel head phantom. Comparison od doses for broad parallel gamma and neutron beams in AP and PA directions showed decrease of brain dose due to the attenuation of neutron in eye balls in case of voxel head phantom. The spherical tumor volume with diameter, 5cm was defined in the center of brain for BNCT dose calculation in which accurate 3 dimensional dose calculation is essential. As a result of BNCT dose calculation for downward neutron beam of 10keV and 40keV, the tumor dose is about doubled when boron concentration ratio between the tumor to the normal tissue is 30{mu}g/g to 3 {mu}g/g. This study established the voxel Monte Carlo calculation system and suggested the feasibility of precise dose calculation in therapeutic radiology.

  20. Construction of boundary-surface-based Chinese female astronaut computational phantom and proton dose estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Wenjuan; Xie Tianwu; Liu Qian; Jia Xianghong; Xu Feng

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid development of China's space industry, the importance of radiation protection is increasingly prominent. To provide relevant dose data, we first developed the Visible Chinese Human adult Female (VCH-F) phantom, and performed further modifications to generate the VCH-F Astronaut (VCH-FA) phantom, incorporating statistical body characteristics data from the first batch of Chinese female astronauts as well as reference organ mass data from the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP; both within 1% relative error). Based on cryosection images, the original phantom was constructed via Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) boundary surfaces to strengthen the deformability for fitting the body parameters of Chinese female astronauts. The VCH-FA phantom was voxelized at a resolution of 2 x 2 x 4 mm 3 for radioactive particle transport simulations from isotropic protons with energies of 5000 - 10 000 MeV in Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. To investigate discrepancies caused by anatomical variations and other factors, the obtained doses were compared with corresponding values from other phantoms and sex-averaged doses. Dose differences were observed among phantom calculation results, especially for effective dose with low-energy protons. Local skin thickness shifts the breast dose curve toward high energy, but has little impact on inner organs. Under a shielding layer, organ dose reduction is greater for skin than for other organs. The calculated skin dose per day closely approximates measurement data obtained in low-Earth orbit (LEO). (author)

  1. Incorporation of detailed eye model into polygon-mesh versions of ICRP-110 reference phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thang Tat; Yeom, Yeon Soo; Kim, Han Sung; Wang, Zhao Jun; Han, Min Cheol; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Lee, Jai Ki; Zankl, Maria; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Bolch, Wesley E; Lee, Choonsik; Chung, Beom Sun

    2015-11-21

    The dose coefficients for the eye lens reported in ICRP 2010 Publication 116 were calculated using both a stylized model and the ICRP-110 reference phantoms, according to the type of radiation, energy, and irradiation geometry. To maintain consistency of lens dose assessment, in the present study we incorporated the ICRP-116 detailed eye model into the converted polygon-mesh (PM) version of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms. After the incorporation, the dose coefficients for the eye lens were calculated and compared with those of the ICRP-116 data. The results showed generally a good agreement between the newly calculated lens dose coefficients and the values of ICRP 2010 Publication 116. Significant differences were found for some irradiation cases due mainly to the use of different types of phantoms. Considering that the PM version of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms preserve the original topology of the ICRP-110 reference phantoms, it is believed that the PM version phantoms, along with the detailed eye model, provide more reliable and consistent dose coefficients for the eye lens.

  2. Monte Carlo simulations in CT for the study of the surface air kerma and energy imparted to phantoms of varying size and position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilés Lucas, P.; Dance, D. R.; Castellano, I. A.; Vañó, E.

    2004-04-01

    A Monte Carlo computational model of CT has been developed and used to investigate the effect of various physical factors on the surface air kerma length product, the peak surface air kerma, the air kerma length product within a phantom and the energy imparted. The factors investigated were the bow-tie filter and the size, shape and position of a phantom which simulates the patient. The calculations show that the surface air kerma length product and the maximum surface air kerma are mainly dependent on phantom position and decrease along the vertical axis of the CT plane as the phantom surface moves away from the isocentre along this axis. As a result, measurements using standard body dosimetry phantoms may underestimate the skin dose for real patients. This result is specially important for CT fluoroscopic procedures: for an adult patient the peak skin dose can be 37% higher than that estimated with a standard measurement on the body AAPM (American Association of Physicists in Medicine) phantom. The results also show that the energy imparted to a phantom is mainly influenced by phantom size and is nearly independent of phantom position (within 3%) and shape (up to 5% variation). However, variations of up to 30% were found for the air kerma to regions within the AAPM body phantom when it is moved vertically. This highlights the importance of calculating doses to organs taking into account their size and position within the gantry.

  3. Using appropriate body mass index cut points for overweight and obesity among Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jih, Jane; Mukherjea, Arnab; Vittinghoff, Eric; Nguyen, Tung T.; Tsoh, Janice Y.; Fukuoka, Yoshimi; Bender, Melinda S.; Tseng, Winston; Kanaya, Alka M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Asian Americans have low prevalence of overweight/obesity based on standard BMI cut points yet have higher rates of diabetes. We examined the prevalence of overweight/obesity, using lower BMI cut points recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for Asians, and diabetes in Asian American subgroups in California. Method Secondary analysis of the 2009 adult California Health Interview Survey (n = 45,946) of non-Hispanic Whites (NHW), African Americans, Hispanics and Asians (Vietnamese, Chinese, Korean, Filipino, South Asian and Japanese). WHO Asian BMI cut points (overweight = 23–27.5 kg/m2; obese ≥ 27.5 kg/m2) were used for Asian subgroups. Standard BMI cut points (overweight = 25–29.9 kg/m2; obese ≥ 30 kg/m2) were applied for other groups. Results Among Asian subgroups, overweight/obesity was highest among Filipinos (78.6%), which was higher than NHWs (p Asians with BMI = 23–24.9 kg/m2 and Koreans, Filipinos and Japanese with BMI = 27.5–29.9 kg/m2, the ranges WHO recommends as overweight or obese for Asians but not for other groups. Conclusions Filipinos should be a priority population for overweight/obesity screening. Filipinos, Vietnamese, Korean, South Asians and Japanese have higher diabetes prevalence at lower BMI cut points. WHO Asian BMI cut points may have clinical utility to identify at-risk Asian Americans. PMID:24736092

  4. Phantom energy accretion onto black holes in a cyclic universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Chengyi

    2008-01-01

    Black holes pose a serious problem in cyclic or oscillating cosmology. It is speculated that, in the cyclic universe with phantom turnarounds, black holes will be torn apart by phantom energy prior to turnaround before they can create any problems. In this paper, using the mechanism of phantom accretion onto black holes, we find that black holes do not disappear before phantom turnaround. But the remanent black holes will not cause any problems due to Hawking evaporation.

  5. Hybrid pregnant reference phantom series based on adult female ICRP reference phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafat-Motavalli, Laleh; Miri-Hakimabad, Hashem; Hoseinian-Azghadi, Elie

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents boundary representation (BREP) models of pregnant female and her fetus at the end of each trimester. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) female reference voxel phantom was used as a base template in development process of the pregnant hybrid phantom series. The differences in shape and location of the displaced maternal organs caused by enlarging uterus were also taken into account. The CT and MR images of fetus specimens and pregnant patients of various ages were used to replace the maternal abdominal pelvic organs of template phantom and insert the fetus inside the gravid uterus. Each fetal model contains 21 different organs and tissues. The skeletal model of the fetus also includes age-dependent cartilaginous and ossified skeletal components. The replaced maternal organ models were converted to NURBS surfaces and then modified to conform to reference values of ICRP Publication 89. The particular feature of current series compared to the previously developed pregnant phantoms is being constructed upon the basis of ICRP reference phantom. The maternal replaced organ models are NURBS surfaces. With this great potential, they might have the feasibility of being converted to high quality polygon mesh phantoms.

  6. Initial investigation of a novel light-scattering gel phantom for evaluation of optical CT scanners for radiotherapy gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosi, Stephen; Naseri, Pourandokht; Puran, Alicia; Davies, Justin; Baldock, Clive

    2007-01-01

    There is a need for stable gel materials for phantoms used to validate optical computerized tomography (CT) scanners used in conjunction with radiation-induced polymerizing gel dosimeters. Phantoms based on addition of light-absorbing dyes to gelatine to simulate gel dosimeters have been employed. However, to more accurately simulate polymerizing gels one requires phantoms that employ light-scattering colloidal suspensions added to the gel. In this paper, we present the initial results of using an optical CT scanner to evaluate a novel phantom in which radiation-exposed polymer gels are simulated by the addition of colloidal suspensions of varying turbidity. The phantom may be useful as a calibration transfer standard for polymer gel dosimeters. The tests reveal some phenomena peculiar to light-scattering gels that need to be taken into account when calibrating polymer gel dosimeters

  7. A comparison of methods to evaluate gray scale response of tomosynthesis systems using a software breast phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Maria A. Z.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Schiabel, Homero; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2017-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to be an effective imaging tool for breast cancer diagnosis as it provides three-dimensional images of the breast with minimal tissue overlap. The quality of the reconstructed image depends on many factors that can be assessed using uniform or realistic phantoms. In this paper, we created four models of phantoms using an anthropomorphic software breast phantom and compared four methods to evaluate the gray scale response in terms of the contrast, noise and detectability of adipose and glandular tissues binarized according to phantom ground truth. For each method, circular regions of interest (ROIs) were selected with various sizes, quantity and positions inside a square area in the phantom. We also estimated the percent density of the simulated breast and the capability of distinguishing both tissues by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results shows a sensitivity of the methods to the ROI size, placement and to the slices considered.

  8. Fabrication of a compliant phantom of the human aortic arch for use in Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hütter Larissa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Compliant phantoms of the human aortic arch can mimic patient specific cardiovascular dysfunctions in vitro. Hence, phantoms may enable elucidation of haemodynamic disturbances caused by aortic dysfunction. This paper describes the fabrication of a thin-walled silicone phantom of the human ascending aorta and brachiocephalic artery. The model geometry was determined via a meta-analysis and modelled in SolidWorks before 3D printing. The solid model surface was smoothed and scanned with a 3D scanner. An offset outer mould was milled from Ebalta S-Model board. The final phantom indicated that ABS was a suitable material for the internal model, the Ebalta S-Model board yielded a rough external surface. Co-location of the moulds during silicone pour was insufficient to enable consistent wall thickness. The resulting phantom was free of air bubbles but did not have the desired wall thickness consistency.

  9. A psychometric revision of the Asian values scale using the Rasch model

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Bryan S. K.; Hong, Sehee

    2004-01-01

    The 36-item Asian Values Scale (B. S. K. Kim, D. R. Atkinson, & P H. Yang, 1999) was revised on the basis of G. Rasch (1960) model and data from 618 Asian Americans. The results led to the establishment of a 25-item measure named the Asian Values Scale-Revised.

  10. Asian Media Productions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This work consists of 12 essays on different aspects of Asian media by Japanese, European, and American scholars, many of whom have themselves been involved in the production of media forms. Working in the fields of anthropology, media and cultural studies, and on the basis of hands-on research, ......, they have written a book on the social practices and cultural attitudes of people producing, reading, watching and listening to different kinds of media in Japan, China, Taiwan, Indonesia, Vietnam, Singapore and India....

  11. Asian American Adolescent Identity

    OpenAIRE

    Ohm, Julie Juhye

    1999-01-01

    The formation of ego identity in Asian American late adolescents attending Virginia Tech was examined within the frameworks of Erikson's psychosocial theory and Berry, Trimble, and Olmedo's model of acculturation. Ego identity was measured using the Achieved sub-scale of the Revised Version of the Extended Objective Measure of Ego Identity Status, an instrument based on the theoretical constructs of Erikson. Ethnic identity was measured using the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure and America...

  12. Dose conversion coefficients based on the Chinese mathematical phantom and MCNP code for external photon irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, R.; Li, J.; Zhang, Z.; Liu, L.; Bi, L.; Ren, L.

    2009-01-01

    A set of conversion coefficients from kerma free-in-air to the organ-absorbed dose are presented for external monoenergetic photon beams from 10 keV to 10 MeV based on the Chinese mathematical phantom, a whole-body mathematical phantom model. The model was developed based on the methods of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory mathematical phantom series and data from the Chinese Reference Man and the Reference Asian Man. This work is carried out to obtain the conversion coefficients based on this model, which represents the characteristics of the Chinese population, as the anatomical parameters of the Chinese are different from those of Caucasians. Monte Carlo simulation with MCNP code is carried out to calculate the organ dose conversion coefficients. Before the calculation, the effects from the physics model and tally type are investigated, considering both the calculation efficiency and precision. In the calculation irradiation conditions include anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, right lateral, left lateral, rotational and isotropic geometries. Conversion coefficients from this study are compared with those recommended in the Publication 74 of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP74) since both the sets of data are calculated with mathematical phantoms. Overall, consistency between the two sets of data is observed and the difference for more than 60% of the data is below 10%. However, significant deviations are also found, mainly for the superficial organs (up to 65.9%) and bone surface (up to 66%). The big difference of the dose conversion coefficients for the superficial organs at high photon energy could be ascribed to kerma approximation for the data in ICRP74. Both anatomical variations between races and the calculation method contribute to the difference of the data for bone surface. (authors)

  13. Dose conversion coefficients based on the Chinese mathematical phantom and MCNP code for external photon irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Rui; Li, Junli; Zhang, Zhan; Liu, Liye; Bi, Lei; Ren, Li

    2009-02-01

    A set of conversion coefficients from kerma free-in-air to the organ-absorbed dose are presented for external monoenergetic photon beams from 10 keV to 10 MeV based on the Chinese mathematical phantom, a whole-body mathematical phantom model. The model was developed based on the methods of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory mathematical phantom series and data from the Chinese Reference Man and the Reference Asian Man. This work is carried out to obtain the conversion coefficients based on this model, which represents the characteristics of the Chinese population, as the anatomical parameters of the Chinese are different from those of Caucasians. Monte Carlo simulation with MCNP code is carried out to calculate the organ dose conversion coefficients. Before the calculation, the effects from the physics model and tally type are investigated, considering both the calculation efficiency and precision. In the calculation irradiation conditions include anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, right lateral, left lateral, rotational and isotropic geometries. Conversion coefficients from this study are compared with those recommended in the Publication 74 of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP74) since both the sets of data are calculated with mathematical phantoms. Overall, consistency between the two sets of data is observed and the difference for more than 60% of the data is below 10%. However, significant deviations are also found, mainly for the superficial organs (up to 65.9%) and bone surface (up to 66%). The big difference of the dose conversion coefficients for the superficial organs at high photon energy could be ascribed to kerma approximation for the data in ICRP74. Both anatomical variations between races and the calculation method contribute to the difference of the data for bone surface.

  14. Influence of the PMMA and the ISO slab phantom for calibrating personal dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginjaume, M.; Ortega, X.; Barbosa, A.

    2000-01-01

    Wide agreement has been achieved among the main Bodies and Organisations involved in standardisation of radiation protection, related to the operational quantities for personal dosimetry. Since their definition in 1985, several reports have been published to clarify and define the experimental set up to be used for the calibration of dosemeters in terms of the above-mentioned quantities. Among these lines, ICRU 47 has listed five different phantoms that are used for calibration and whose results were accurate, within accepted uncertainties. However, to achieve uniformity in calibration procedures, the 30 cm x 30 cm x 15 cm PMMA slab phantom was recommended. The secondary calibration Laboratory from the Institut de Techniques Energetiques at the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) agreed with the Spanish Nacional Laboratory to adopt the recommended PMMA phantom but to improve the accuracy of the calibration procedure, by introducing a correction factor for backscatter differences in a PMMA and an ICRU slab phantom. Such corrections were of the order of 8% for the low-energy X-ray qualities. Recently, ISO in ISO 4037-3, has proposed the ISO water slab phantom which consists of a 30 cm x 30 cm x 15 cm water phantom with PMMA walls (front wall 2.5 mm thick). This new phantom could be substituted by the above mentioned PMMA phantom for radiation qualities with mean energy equal or above that of 137 Cs. The aim of this work is to compare the influence of both phantoms when calibrating personal dosemeters with photons. A set of four TL personal dosemeters that are used in the UPC personal dosimetry Service and an electronic personal dosemeter (SIEMENS EPD-2) were calibrated in terms of H p (10) and H p (0.07) using the two proposed phantoms. Calibration factors for ISO X-ray narrow spectra, 137 Cs and 60 Co were experimentally obtained for each phantom and compared. In the TL measurements, differences were found to be within TL statistical uncertainty, provided that a

  15. An externally and internally deformable, programmable lung motion phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Yam; Sawant, Amit, E-mail: amit.sawant@utsouthwestern.edu [UT Southwestern Medical Center, University of Texas, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Most clinically deployed strategies for respiratory motion management in lung radiotherapy (e.g., gating and tracking) use external markers that serve as surrogates for tumor motion. However, typical lung phantoms used to validate these strategies are based on a rigid exterior and a rigid or a deformable-interior. Such designs do not adequately represent respiration because the thoracic anatomy deforms internally as well as externally. In order to create a closer approximation of respiratory motion, the authors describe the construction and experimental testing of an externally as well as internally deformable, programmable lung phantom. Methods: The outer shell of a commercially available lung phantom (RS-1500, RSD, Inc.) was used. The shell consists of a chest cavity with a flexible anterior surface, and embedded vertebrae, rib-cage and sternum. A custom-made insert was designed using a piece of natural latex foam block. A motion platform was programmed with sinusoidal and ten patient-recorded lung tumor trajectories. The platform was used to drive a rigid foam “diaphragm” that compressed/decompressed the phantom interior. Experimental characterization comprised of determining the reproducibility and the external–internal correlation of external and internal marker trajectories extracted from kV x-ray fluoroscopy. Experiments were conducted to illustrate three example applications of the phantom—(i) validating the geometric accuracy of the VisionRT surface photogrammetry system; (ii) validating an image registration tool, NiftyReg; and (iii) quantifying the geometric error due to irregular motion in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Results: The phantom correctly reproduced sinusoidal and patient-derived motion, as well as realistic respiratory motion-related effects such as hysteresis. The reproducibility of marker trajectories over multiple runs for sinusoidal as well as patient traces, as characterized by fluoroscopy, was within 0

  16. A study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios for CT scanning without table translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob; Yang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: For CT scanning in the stationary-table modes, AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the midpoint dose on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long phantoms. Currently, a long cylindrical phantom is usually not available in many clinical facilities. The use of a long phantom is also challenging because of the heavy weight. In order to shed light on assessing the midpoint dose in CT scanning without table movement, the authors present a study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios, and perform a cross-comparison of CT dose ratios on different scanner models. Methods: The authors performed Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations with a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare), and modeled dosimetry measurements using a 0.6 cm 3 Farmer type chamber and a 10-cm long pencil ion chamber. The short (15 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were computed for two PMMA diameters (16 and 32 cm), two phantom axes (the center and the periphery), and a range of beam apertures (3–25 cm). The results were compared with the published data of previous studies with other multiple detector CT (MDCT) scanners and cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners. Results: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios changed with beam apertures but were insensitive to beam qualities (80–140 kV, the head and body bowtie filters) and MDCT and CBCT scanner models. Conclusions: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios enable medical physicists to make dosimetry measurements using the standard CT dosimetry phantoms and a Farmer chamber or a 10 cm long pencil chamber, and to assess the midpoint dose in long phantoms. This method provides an effective approach for the dosimetry of CBCT scanning in the stationary-table modes, and is useful for perfusion and interventional CT

  17. Technical Note: Development of a 3D printed subresolution sandwich phantom for validation of brain SPECT analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negus, Ian S.; Holmes, Robin B.; Thorne, Gareth C.; Saunders, Margaret; Jordan, Kirsty C.; Nash, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To make an adaptable, head shaped radionuclide phantom to simulate molecular imaging of the brain using clinical acquisition and reconstruction protocols. This will allow the characterization and correction of scanner characteristics, and improve the accuracy of clinical image analysis, including the application of databases of normal subjects. Methods: A fused deposition modeling 3D printer was used to create a head shaped phantom made up of transaxial slabs, derived from a simulated MRI dataset. The attenuation of the printed polylactide (PLA), measured by means of the Hounsfield unit on CT scanning, was set to match that of the brain by adjusting the proportion of plastic filament and air (fill ratio). Transmission measurements were made to verify the attenuation of the printed slabs. The radionuclide distribution within the phantom was created by adding 99m Tc pertechnetate to the ink cartridge of a paper printer and printing images of gray and white matter anatomy, segmented from the same MRI data. The complete subresolution sandwich phantom was assembled from alternate 3D printed slabs and radioactive paper sheets, and then imaged on a dual headed gamma camera to simulate an HMPAO SPECT scan. Results: Reconstructions of phantom scans successfully used automated ellipse fitting to apply attenuation correction. This removed the variability inherent in manual application of attenuation correction and registration inherent in existing cylindrical phantom designs. The resulting images were assessed visually and by count profiles and found to be similar to those from an existing elliptical PMMA phantom. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated the ability to create physically realistic HMPAO SPECT simulations using a novel head-shaped 3D printed subresolution sandwich method phantom. The phantom can be used to validate all neurological SPECT imaging applications. A simple modification of the phantom design to use thinner slabs would make it suitable for

  18. A study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios for CT scanning without table translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob, E-mail: bliu7@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Yang, Jie [Pinnacle Health - Fox Chase Regional Cancer Center, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17109 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: For CT scanning in the stationary-table modes, AAPM Task Group 111 proposed to measure the midpoint dose on the central and peripheral axes of sufficiently long phantoms. Currently, a long cylindrical phantom is usually not available in many clinical facilities. The use of a long phantom is also challenging because of the heavy weight. In order to shed light on assessing the midpoint dose in CT scanning without table movement, the authors present a study of the short- to long-phantom dose ratios, and perform a cross-comparison of CT dose ratios on different scanner models. Methods: The authors performed Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations with a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare), and modeled dosimetry measurements using a 0.6 cm{sup 3} Farmer type chamber and a 10-cm long pencil ion chamber. The short (15 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were computed for two PMMA diameters (16 and 32 cm), two phantom axes (the center and the periphery), and a range of beam apertures (3–25 cm). The results were compared with the published data of previous studies with other multiple detector CT (MDCT) scanners and cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners. Results: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios changed with beam apertures but were insensitive to beam qualities (80–140 kV, the head and body bowtie filters) and MDCT and CBCT scanner models. Conclusions: The short- to long-phantom dose ratios enable medical physicists to make dosimetry measurements using the standard CT dosimetry phantoms and a Farmer chamber or a 10 cm long pencil chamber, and to assess the midpoint dose in long phantoms. This method provides an effective approach for the dosimetry of CBCT scanning in the stationary-table modes, and is useful for perfusion and interventional CT.

  19. Technical Note: Development of a 3D printed subresolution sandwich phantom for validation of brain SPECT analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negus, Ian S.; Holmes, Robin B.; Thorne, Gareth C.; Saunders, Margaret [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol BS28HW (United Kingdom); Jordan, Kirsty C. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G11XQ (United Kingdom); Nash, David A. [Department of Medical Physics, Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Portsmouth PO63LY (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: To make an adaptable, head shaped radionuclide phantom to simulate molecular imaging of the brain using clinical acquisition and reconstruction protocols. This will allow the characterization and correction of scanner characteristics, and improve the accuracy of clinical image analysis, including the application of databases of normal subjects. Methods: A fused deposition modeling 3D printer was used to create a head shaped phantom made up of transaxial slabs, derived from a simulated MRI dataset. The attenuation of the printed polylactide (PLA), measured by means of the Hounsfield unit on CT scanning, was set to match that of the brain by adjusting the proportion of plastic filament and air (fill ratio). Transmission measurements were made to verify the attenuation of the printed slabs. The radionuclide distribution within the phantom was created by adding {sup 99m}Tc pertechnetate to the ink cartridge of a paper printer and printing images of gray and white matter anatomy, segmented from the same MRI data. The complete subresolution sandwich phantom was assembled from alternate 3D printed slabs and radioactive paper sheets, and then imaged on a dual headed gamma camera to simulate an HMPAO SPECT scan. Results: Reconstructions of phantom scans successfully used automated ellipse fitting to apply attenuation correction. This removed the variability inherent in manual application of attenuation correction and registration inherent in existing cylindrical phantom designs. The resulting images were assessed visually and by count profiles and found to be similar to those from an existing elliptical PMMA phantom. Conclusions: The authors have demonstrated the ability to create physically realistic HMPAO SPECT simulations using a novel head-shaped 3D printed subresolution sandwich method phantom. The phantom can be used to validate all neurological SPECT imaging applications. A simple modification of the phantom design to use thinner slabs would make it suitable

  20. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Ge, Chaoyong; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli; Gao, Linfeng; Zheng, Junzheng

    2014-01-01

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations. (paper)

  1. Thrombolysis for acute ischaemic stroke with alteplase in an Asian population: results of the multicenter, multinational Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke-Non-European Union World (SITS-NEW).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rha, Joung-Ho; Shrivastava, Vasantha Padma; Wang, Yongjun; Lee, Kim En; Ahmed, Niaz; Bluhmki, Erich; Hermansson, Karin; Wahlgren, Nils

    2014-10-01

    Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke-Non-European Union World was a multinational, prospective, open, monitored, observational study of intravenous alteplase as thrombolytic therapy in clinical practice. Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke-Non-European Union World was required to assess the safety of alteplase in an Asian population by comparison with results from the European Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke-Monitoring Study and pooled results from randomized controlled trials. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous alteplase (0·9 mg/kg) as thrombolytic therapy within three-hours of onset of acute ischaemic stroke in an Asian population. The 591 patients included were treated at 48 centers in four countries (South Korea, China, India, and Singapore) between 2006 and 2008. Primary outcomes were symptomatic (deterioration in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score ≥4 or death within the first 24 h) intracerebral haemorrhage type 2 22-36 h after the thrombolysis and mortality at three-month follow-up. The secondary outcome was functional independence (modified Rankin Scale score 0-2) at three-months. Results were compared with those from Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke-Monitoring Study (n = 6483) and pooled results of patients (n = 415) who received intravenous alteplase (0·9 mg/kg) zero- to three-hours from onset of stroke symptoms in four randomized controlled trials (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke A and B, Altephase Thrombolysis for Acute Noninterventional Therapy in Ischaemic Stroke, and European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study II). Results are presented as Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke-Non-European Union World vs. Safe Implementation of Thrombolysis in Stroke-Monitoring Study vs. pooled randomized controlled trials. Median age was 64 vs. 68 vs. 70 years, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score at baseline was 12 vs. 12 vs. 13

  2. An investigation into the accuracy of Acuros(TM) BV in heterogeneous phantoms for a (192)Ir HDR source using LiF TLDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Siobhan; Nyathi, Thulani

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the new Acuros(TM) BV algorithm using well characterized LiF:Mg,Ti TLD 100 in heterogeneous phantoms. TLDs were calibrated using an (192)Ir source and the AAPM TG-43 calculated dose. The Tölli and Johansson Large Cavity principle and Modified Bragg Gray principle methods confirm the dose calculated by TG-43 at a distance of 5 cm from the source to within 4 %. These calibrated TLDs were used to measure the dose in heterogeneous phantoms containing air, stainless steel, bone and titanium. The TLD results were compared with the AAPM TG-43 calculated dose and the Acuros calculated dose. Previous studies by other authors have shown a change in TLD response with depth when irradiated with an (192)Ir source. This TLD depth dependence was assessed by performing measurements at different depths in a water phantom with an (192)Ir source. The variation in the TLD response with depth in a water phantom was not found to be statistically significant for the distances investigated. The TLDs agreed with Acuros(TM) BV within 1.4 % in the air phantom, 3.2 % in the stainless steel phantom, 3 % in the bone phantom and 5.1 % in the titanium phantom. The TLDs showed a larger discrepancy when compared to TG-43 with a maximum deviation of 9.3 % in the air phantom, -11.1 % in the stainless steel phantom, -14.6 % in the bone phantom and -24.6 % in the titanium phantom. The results have shown that Acuros accounts for the heterogeneities investigated with a maximum deviation of -5.1 %. The uncertainty associated with the TLDs calibrated in the PMMA phantom is ±8.2 % (2SD).

  3. Comparison of the automated evaluation of phantom mama in digital and digitalized images; Comparacao da avaliacao automatizada do phantom mama em imagens digitais e digitalizadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, Priscila do Carmo, E-mail: pcs@cdtn.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares; Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Propedeutica Complementar; Gomes, Danielle Soares; Oliveira, Marcio Alves; Nogueira, Maria do Socorro, E-mail: mnogue@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Mammography is an essential tool for diagnosis and early detection of breast cancer if it is provided as a very good quality service. The process of evaluating the quality of radiographic images in general, and mammography in particular, can be much more accurate, practical and fast with the help of computer analysis tools. This work compare the automated methodology for the evaluation of scanned digital images the phantom mama. By applied the DIP method techniques was possible determine geometrical and radiometric images evaluated. The evaluated parameters include circular details of low contrast, contrast ratio, spatial resolution, tumor masses, optical density and background in Phantom Mama scanned and digitized images. The both results of images were evaluated. Through this comparison was possible to demonstrate that this automated methodology is presented as a promising alternative for the reduction or elimination of subjectivity in both types of images, but the Phantom Mama present insufficient parameters for spatial resolution evaluation. (author)

  4. Spectrum of breast cancer in Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Gaurav; Pradeep, P V; Aggarwal, Vivek; Yip, Cheng-Har; Cheung, Polly S Y

    2007-05-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in Asia, and in recent years is emerging as the commonest female malignancy in the developing Asian countries, overtaking cancer of the uterine cervix. There have been no studies objectively comparing data and facts relating to breast cancer in the developed, newly developed, and developing Asian countries thus far. This multi-national collaborative study retrospectively compared the demographic, clinical, pathological and outcomes data in breast cancer patients managed at participating breast cancer centers in India, Malaysia and Hong Kong. Data, including those on the availability of breast screening, treatment facilities and outcomes from other major cancer centers and cancer registries of these countries and from other Asian countries were also reviewed. Despite an increasing trend, the incidence of breast cancer is lower, yet the cause-specific mortality is significantly higher in developing Asian countries compared with developed countries in Asia and the rest of the world. Patients are about one decade younger in developing countries than their counterparts in developed nations. The proportions of young patients (women and the clinical picture are different from those of average patients managed elsewhere in the world. Owing to lack of awareness, lack of funding, lack of infrastructure, and low priority in public health schemes, breast cancer screening and early detection have not caught up in these under-privileged societies. The inadequacies of health care infrastructures and standards, sociocultural barriers, economic realities, illiteracy, and the differences in the clinical and pathological attributes of this disease in Asian women compared with the rest of the world together result in a different spectrum of the disease. Better socioeconomic conditions, health awareness, and availability of breast cancer screening in developed Asian countries seem to be the major causes of a favorable clinical

  5. Surgical Results of Laparoscopic Loop Duodenojejunal Bypass with Sleeve Gastrectomy (LDJB-SG in Obese Asians (BMI ≥ 27.5 kg/m2 with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM: A New Promising Bariatric and Metabolic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voraboot Taweerutchana, M.D. F.R.C.S.T.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To demonstrate surgical outcomes, safety and complications in obese Asians (BMI > 27.5 kg/m2 who underwent LDJB-SG in our center. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed ninety-one patients who underwent LDJB-SG from October 2011 to March 2014. One-year surgical outcomes regarding the efficacy of weight loss, safety as well as complications of this procedure were demonstrated. Remission of T2DM and co-morbidities resolution after one year were also analyzed. Results: The median duration of T2DM was 60 months and the median operative time was 140 min. Interestingly, the mean/median preoperative BMI, HbA1C and FPG levels dropped significantly from 30.7 kg/m2 , 8.9%, and 139.0 mg% to 23.7 kg/m2 , 6.2%, and 95.0 mg% respectively at 1 year after operation (p<0.001. Furthermore, 61.5% of patients who had completed 1 year follow-up showed complete diabetic remission and 92.3% experienced glycemic control (HbA1c<7% without any medication. The postoperative complications were intra-abdominal bleeding (4.4%, leakage (1.1%, stricture (3.3% and port site hernia (2.2%. Conclusion: LDJB-SG is a safe and feasible bariatric and metabolic surgery, which has demonstrated excellent outcomes in terms of weight reduction, co-morbidities resolution as well as glycemic control in short-term follow-up.

  6. Current Update in Asian Rhinoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clyde H. Ishii, MD, FACS

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: There has been a tremendous growth of cosmetic surgery among Asians worldwide. Rhinoplasty is second only to blepharoplasty in terms of popularity among Asians regarding cosmetic surgical procedures. Most Asians seek to improve their appearance while maintaining the essential features of their ethnicity. There are considerable ethnic nasal and facial variations in this population alone. Successful rhinoplasty in Asians must take into account underlying anatomic differences between Asians and whites. Due to ethnic variations, cultural differences, and occasional language barriers, careful preoperative counseling is necessary to align the patient’s expectations with the limitations of the procedure. This article will review the many facets of Asian rhinoplasty as it is practiced today.

  7. The threshold contrast thickness evaluated with different CDMAM phantoms and software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiszewska Ewa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The image quality in digital mammography is described by specifying the thickness and diameter of disks with threshold visibility. The European Commission recommends the CDMAM phantom as a tool to evaluate threshold contrast visibility in digital mammography [1, 2]. Inaccuracy of the manufacturing process of CDMAM 3.4 phantoms (Artinis Medical System BV, as well as differences between software used to analyze the images, may lead to discrepancies in the evaluation of threshold contrast visibility. The authors of this work used three CDMAM 3.4 phantoms with serial numbers 1669, 1840, and 1841 and two mammography systems of the same manufacturer with an identical types of detectors. The images were analyzed with EUREF software (version 1.5.5 with CDCOM 1.6. exe file and Artinis software (version 1.2 with CDCOM 1.6. exe file. The differences between the observed thicknesses of the threshold contrast structures, which were caused by differences between the CDMAM 3.4 phantoms, were not reproduced in the same way on two mammography units of the same type. The thickness reported by the Artinis software (version 1.2 with CDCOM 1.6. exe file was generally greater than the one determined by the EUREF software (version 1.5.5 with CDCOM 1.6. exe file, but the ratio of the results depended on the phantom and diameter of the structure. It was not possible to establish correction factors, which would allow correction of the differences between the results obtained for different CDMAM 3.4 phantoms, or to correct the differences between software. Great care must be taken when results of the tests performed with different CDMAM 3.4 phantoms and with different software application are interpreted.

  8. Finite-element modeling of compression and gravity on a population of breast phantoms for multimodality imaging simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Gregory M; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Lo, Joseph Y; Samei, E; Segars, W P

    2016-05-01

    The authors are developing a series of computational breast phantoms based on breast CT data for imaging research. In this work, the authors develop a program that will allow a user to alter the phantoms to simulate the effect of gravity and compression of the breast (craniocaudal or mediolateral oblique) making the phantoms applicable to multimodality imaging. This application utilizes a template finite-element (FE) breast model that can be applied to their presegmented voxelized breast phantoms. The FE model is automatically fit to the geometry of a given breast phantom, and the material properties of each element are set based on the segmented voxels contained within the element. The loading and boundary conditions, which include gravity, are then assigned based on a user-defined position and compression. The effect of applying these loads to the breast is computed using a multistage contact analysis in FEBio, a freely available and well-validated FE software package specifically designed for biomedical applications. The resulting deformation of the breast is then applied to a boundary mesh representation of the phantom that can be used for simulating medical images. An efficient script performs the above actions seamlessly. The user only needs to specify which voxelized breast phantom to use, the compressed thickness, and orientation of the breast. The authors utilized their FE application to simulate compressed states of the breast indicative of mammography and tomosynthesis. Gravity and compression were simulated on example phantoms and used to generate mammograms in the craniocaudal or mediolateral oblique views. The simulated mammograms show a high degree of realism illustrating the utility of the FE method in simulating imaging data of repositioned and compressed breasts. The breast phantoms and the compression software can become a useful resource to the breast imaging research community. These phantoms can then be used to evaluate and compare imaging

  9. Phantoms for Radiation Measurements of Mobile Phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of radiation efficiency for a handheld phone equipped with a patch and a helical antenna operated near the human user have been performed. Both measurements include a simple head plus hand phantom and live persons are considered. The position of the hand on the phone is found...... to be the main reason for the large variation in radiation efficiency among persons. The tilt angle of the phone and the distance between the head and phone only play a minor role...

  10. Composition of MRI phantom equivalent to human tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hirokazu; Kuroda, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Koichi; Yoshida, Atsushi; Hanamoto, Katsumi; Kawasaki, Shoji; Shibuya, Koichi; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2005-01-01

    We previously developed two new MRI phantoms (called the CAG phantom and the CAGN phantom), with T1 and T2 relaxation times equivalent to those of any human tissue at 1.5 T. The conductivity of the CAGN phantom is equivalent to that of most types of human tissue in the frequency range of 1 to 130 MHz. In this paper, the relaxation times of human tissues are summarized, and the composition of the corresponding phantoms are provided in table form. The ingredients of these phantoms are carrageenan as the gelling agent, GdCl 3 as a T1 modifier, agarose as a T2 modifier, NaCl (CAGN phantom only) as a conductivity modifier, NaN 3 as an antiseptic, and distilled water. The phantoms have T1 values of 202-1904 ms and T2 values of 38-423 ms when the concentrations of GdCl 3 and agarose are varied from 0-140 μmol/kg, and 0%-1.6%, respectively, and the CAGN phantom has a conductivity of 0.27-1.26 S/m when the NaCl concentration is varied from 0%-0.7%. These phantoms have sufficient strength to replicate a torso without the use of reinforcing agents, and can be cut by a knife into any shape. We anticipate the CAGN phantom to be highly useful and practical for MRI and hyperthermia-related research

  11. SU-E-J-07: IGRT Gently: Evaluating Imaging Dose in Phantoms of Different Sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, B; Duggar, W; Stanford, J; Yang, C [University of Mississippi Med. Center, Jackson, MS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: IGRT imaging procedures have emerged as a common method of patient position verification in radiotherapy, though imaging dose is generally neglected in the treatment plan. Consequently, evaluating and optimizing the dose from these procedures is worthwhile. This process is especially important for children, who are more radiosensitive than adults. The aim of this work was to gain some understanding of the relative doses involved with various XVI-preset parameters for an “adult” and “child” phantom set, with the hopes that imaging dose for a child can be reduced. Methods: 32 and 16cm CTDI-phantoms were used as surrogates for adult and child torsos, respectively. Dose was measured in the central and peripheral chamber positions of the phantoms. CBCT scans were made for both phantoms using Elekta’s Chest-preset to establish a dose baseline. The child-phantom was then scanned using the Elekta Head and Neck (HN) preset. A modified HN-preset (named Peds Abd-pelvis) was also created with a doubled mAs to maintain a reduction in dose to the child-phantom (relative to the baseline), while providing clinically-usable image quality. Results: The baseline dose to the child-phantom from the Chest-preset was 310% that of the adult-phantom for the center chamber position and 150% at the periphery. An average dose reduction of 97% was obtained in the childphantom by switching from the Chest-preset to the HN-preset, while the Peds Abd-pelvis-preset similarly reduced the dose by an average of 92%. Conclusion: XVI-preset parameters significantly affect dose, and should be optimized to reduce dose, while ensuring clinically-usable image quality. Using a modified imaging preset (Peds Abd-pelvis-preset) greatly reduced the dose to the child-phantom compared to the dose for the Chest-preset for both the child and adult-phantoms. This outcome provides support for the development of child-specific protocols for IGRT imaging in pediatric patients.

  12. Scatter correction method for x-ray CT using primary modulation: Phantom studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hewei; Fahrig, Rebecca; Bennett, N. Robert; Sun Mingshan; Star-Lack, Josh; Zhu Lei

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Scatter correction is a major challenge in x-ray imaging using large area detectors. Recently, the authors proposed a promising scatter correction method for x-ray computed tomography (CT) using primary modulation. Proof of concept was previously illustrated by Monte Carlo simulations and physical experiments on a small phantom with a simple geometry. In this work, the authors provide a quantitative evaluation of the primary modulation technique and demonstrate its performance in applications where scatter correction is more challenging. Methods: The authors first analyze the potential errors of the estimated scatter in the primary modulation method. On two tabletop CT systems, the method is investigated using three phantoms: A Catphan(c)600 phantom, an anthropomorphic chest phantom, and the Catphan(c)600 phantom with two annuli. Two different primary modulators are also designed to show the impact of the modulator parameters on the scatter correction efficiency. The first is an aluminum modulator with a weak modulation and a low modulation frequency, and the second is a copper modulator with a strong modulation and a high modulation frequency. Results: On the Catphan(c)600 phantom in the first study, the method reduces the error of the CT number in the selected regions of interest (ROIs) from 371.4 to 21.9 Hounsfield units (HU); the contrast to noise ratio also increases from 10.9 to 19.2. On the anthropomorphic chest phantom in the second study, which represents a more difficult case due to the high scatter signals and object heterogeneity, the method reduces the error of the CT number from 327 to 19 HU in the selected ROIs and from 31.4% to 5.7% on the overall average. The third study is to investigate the impact of object size on the efficiency of our method. The scatter-to-primary ratio estimation error on the Catphan(c)600 phantom without any annulus (20 cm in diameter) is at the level of 0.04, it rises to 0.07 and 0.1 on the phantom with an

  13. SU-E-J-07: IGRT Gently: Evaluating Imaging Dose in Phantoms of Different Sizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, B; Duggar, W; Stanford, J; Yang, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: IGRT imaging procedures have emerged as a common method of patient position verification in radiotherapy, though imaging dose is generally neglected in the treatment plan. Consequently, evaluating and optimizing the dose from these procedures is worthwhile. This process is especially important for children, who are more radiosensitive than adults. The aim of this work was to gain some understanding of the relative doses involved with various XVI-preset parameters for an “adult” and “child” phantom set, with the hopes that imaging dose for a child can be reduced. Methods: 32 and 16cm CTDI-phantoms were used as surrogates for adult and child torsos, respectively. Dose was measured in the central and peripheral chamber positions of the phantoms. CBCT scans were made for both phantoms using Elekta’s Chest-preset to establish a dose baseline. The child-phantom was then scanned using the Elekta Head and Neck (HN) preset. A modified HN-preset (named Peds Abd-pelvis) was also created with a doubled mAs to maintain a reduction in dose to the child-phantom (relative to the baseline), while providing clinically-usable image quality. Results: The baseline dose to the child-phantom from the Chest-preset was 310% that of the adult-phantom for the center chamber position and 150% at the periphery. An average dose reduction of 97% was obtained in the childphantom by switching from the Chest-preset to the HN-preset, while the Peds Abd-pelvis-preset similarly reduced the dose by an average of 92%. Conclusion: XVI-preset parameters significantly affect dose, and should be optimized to reduce dose, while ensuring clinically-usable image quality. Using a modified imaging preset (Peds Abd-pelvis-preset) greatly reduced the dose to the child-phantom compared to the dose for the Chest-preset for both the child and adult-phantoms. This outcome provides support for the development of child-specific protocols for IGRT imaging in pediatric patients

  14. Radiological response and dosimetry in physical phantom of head and neck for 3D conformational radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Larissa

    2013-01-01

    Phantoms are tools for simulation of organs and tissues of the human body in radiology and radiotherapy. This thesis describes the development, validation and, most importantly, the use of a physical head and neck phantom in radiology and radiotherapy, with the purpose of evaluating dose distribution using Gafchromic EBT2 film in 15 MV 3D conformal radiotherapy. The work was divided in two stages, (1) development of new equivalent tissues and improvement of the physical phantom, and (2) use of the physical phantom in experimental dosimetry studies. In phase (1) parameters such as mass density, chemical composition of tissues, anatomical and biometric measurements were considered, as well as aspects of imaging by computed tomography (CT) and radiological response representation in Hounsfield Units (HU), which were compared with human data. Radiological experiments of in-phantom simulated brain pathologies were also conducted. All those results matched human-sourced data, therefore the physical phantom is a suitable simulator that may be used to enhance radiological protocols and education in medical imaging. The main objective in phase (2) was to evaluate the spatial dose distribution in a brain tumor simulator inserted inside the head and neck phantom developed by the Ionizing Radiation Research Group (NRI), exposed to 15 MV 3D conformal radiotherapy, for internal dose assessment. Radiation planning was based on CT images of the physical phantom with a brain tumor simulator made with equivalent material. The treatment planning system (TPS), CAT3D software, used CT images and prescribed a dose of 200 cGy, distributed in three fields of radiation, in a T-shaped pattern. The TPS covered the planning treatment volume (PTV) with 97% of the prescribed dose. A solid water phantom and radiochromic Gafchromic EBT2 film were used for calibration procedures, generating a dose response curve as a function of optical density (OD). After calibration and irradiation, the film

  15. Geometrothermodynamics of phantom AdS black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quevedo, Hernando [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Mexico (Mexico); Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica ed ICRANet, Rome (Italy); Quevedo, Maria N. [Facultad de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Militar Nueva Granada, Departamento de Matematicas, Bogota (Colombia); Sanchez, Alberto [CIIDET, Departamento de Posgrado, Queretaro (Mexico)

    2016-03-15

    We show that to investigate the thermodynamic properties of charged phantom spherically symmetric anti-de Sitter black holes, it is necessary to consider the cosmological constant as a thermodynamic variable so that the corresponding fundamental equation is a homogeneous function defined on an extended equilibrium space. We explore all the thermodynamic properties of this class of black holes by using the classical physical approach, based upon the analysis of the fundamental equation, and the alternative mathematical approach as proposed in geometrothermodynamics. We show that both approaches are compatible and lead to equivalent results. (orig.)

  16. Optical response of the FXG solution to different phantom materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavinato, C.C.; Sakuraba, R.K.; Cruz, J.C.; Campos, L.L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the performance of the Fricke xylenol gel (FXG) solution developed at IPEN, prepared with 270 Bloom gelatine (made in Brazil), for clinical electron beams to the reference depth, using different phantom materials. The colour change, optical absorption spectra, intra and inter-batches reproducibility, dose-response, lower detection limit, energy and dose rate dependent response and response uniformity were studied. The excellent results obtained indicate the viability of employing this solution in 2D spectrophotometric dosimetry (could be extended to 3D MRI dosimetry) to be applied in quality assurance for clinical radiotherapy treatment planning of superficial tumours being treated with clinical electron beams.

  17. MRI quality assurance using the ACR phantom in a multi-unit imaging center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihalainen, Toni M.; Kuusela, Linda J.; Savolainen, Sauli E.; Loennroth, Nadja T.; Peltonen, Juha I.; Uusi-Simola, Jouni K.; Timonen, Marjut H.; Sipilae, Outi E.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) instrumentation is vulnerable to technical and image quality problems, and quality assurance is essential. In the studied regional imaging center the long-term quality assurance has been based on MagNET phantom measurements. American College of Radiology (ACR) has an accreditation program including a standardized image quality measurement protocol and phantom. The ACR protocol includes recommended acceptance criteria for clinical sequences and thus provides possibility to assess the clinical relevance of quality assurance. The purpose of this study was to test the ACR MRI phantom in quality assurance of a multi-unit imaging center. Material and methods. The imaging center operates 11 MRI systems of three major manufacturers with field strengths of 3.0 T, 1.5 T and 1.0 T. Images of the ACR phantom were acquired using a head coil following the ACR scanning instructions. Both ACR T1- and T2-weighted sequences as well as T1- and T2-weighted brain sequences in clinical use at each site were acquired. Measurements were performed twice. The images were analyzed and the results were compared with the ACR acceptance levels. Results. The acquisition procedure with the ACR phantom was faster than with the MagNET phantoms. On the first and second measurement rounds 91% and 73% of the systems passed the ACR test. Measured slice thickness accuracies were not within the acceptance limits in site T2 sequences. Differences in the high contrast spatial resolution between the ACR and the site sequences were observed. In 3.0 T systems the image intensity uniformity was slightly lower than the ACR acceptance limit. Conclusion. The ACR method was feasible in quality assurance of a multi-unit imaging center and the ACR protocol could replace the MagNET phantom tests. An automatic analysis of the images will further improve cost-effectiveness and objectiveness of the ACR protocol

  18. SU-E-T-89: Comprehensive Quality Assurance Phantom for the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jermoumi, M; Ngwa, W [University of Massachusetts Lowell, MA (United States); Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Korideck, H; Zygmanski, P; Berbeco, R; Makrigiorgos, G; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Use of Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) systems for conducting state-of-the-art image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) research on small animals has become more common over the past years. The purpose of this work is to develop and test the suitability and performance of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) phantom for the SARRP. Methods: A QA phantom was developed for carrying out daily, monthly and annual QA tasks including imaging, dosimetry and treatment planning system (TPS) performance evaluation of the SARRP. The QA phantom consists of nine (60×60×5 mm3) KV-energy tissue equivalent solid water slabs that can be employed for annual dosimetry QA with film. Three of the top slabs are replaceable with ones incorporating Mosfets or OSLDs arranged in a quincunx pattern, or a slab drilled to accommodate an ion chamber insert. These top slabs are designed to facilitate routine daily and monthly QA tasks such as output constancy, isocenter congruency test, treatment planning system (TPS) QA, etc. One slab is designed with inserts for image QA. A prototype of the phantom was applied to test the performance of the imaging, planning and treatment delivery systems. Results: Output constancy test results showed daily variations within 3%. For isocenter congruency test, the phantom could be used to detect 0.3 mm deviations of the CBCT isocenter from the radiation isocenter. Using the Mosfet in phantom as target, the difference between TPS calculations and measurements was within 5%. Image-quality parameters could also be assessed in terms of geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, linearity, noise and image uniformity, etc. Conclusion: The developed phantom can be employed as a simple tool for comprehensive performance evaluation of the SARRP. The study provides a reference for development of a comprehensive quality assurance program for the SARRP, with proposed tolerances and frequency of required tests.

  19. SU-E-T-89: Comprehensive Quality Assurance Phantom for the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jermoumi, M; Ngwa, W; Korideck, H; Zygmanski, P; Berbeco, R; Makrigiorgos, G; Cormack, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Use of Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) systems for conducting state-of-the-art image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) research on small animals has become more common over the past years. The purpose of this work is to develop and test the suitability and performance of a comprehensive quality assurance (QA) phantom for the SARRP. Methods: A QA phantom was developed for carrying out daily, monthly and annual QA tasks including imaging, dosimetry and treatment planning system (TPS) performance evaluation of the SARRP. The QA phantom consists of nine (60×60×5 mm3) KV-energy tissue equivalent solid water slabs that can be employed for annual dosimetry QA with film. Three of the top slabs are replaceable with ones incorporating Mosfets or OSLDs arranged in a quincunx pattern, or a slab drilled to accommodate an ion chamber insert. These top slabs are designed to facilitate routine daily and monthly QA tasks such as output constancy, isocenter congruency test, treatment planning system (TPS) QA, etc. One slab is designed with inserts for image QA. A prototype of the phantom was applied to test the performance of the imaging, planning and treatment delivery systems. Results: Output constancy test results showed daily variations within 3%. For isocenter congruency test, the phantom could be used to detect 0.3 mm deviations of the CBCT isocenter from the radiation isocenter. Using the Mosfet in phantom as target, the difference between TPS calculations and measurements was within 5%. Image-quality parameters could also be assessed in terms of geometric accuracy, CT number accuracy, linearity, noise and image uniformity, etc. Conclusion: The developed phantom can be employed as a simple tool for comprehensive performance evaluation of the SARRP. The study provides a reference for development of a comprehensive quality assurance program for the SARRP, with proposed tolerances and frequency of required tests

  20. Phantom taxes: The big payback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    This article is a discussion of Accumulated Deferred Federal Income Taxes (AFDITs) associated with the stranded investments in nuclear facilities. The amounts are in the tens of billions of dollars and may rival the sum of recoverable stranded costs. The example is given of LILCO's Shoreham Nuclear Power Plant. Prior to cancellation, LILCO had capitalized the cost of the project for rate purposes and had generated income for rate purposes. For tax purposes, however, their accounting system produced a substantial loss, resulting in the collection of more than $1B in federal tax-expense reimbursements over and above actual tax expenses. These additional monies were retained by LILCO. The author argues that these monies should be used to offset standed recoverable costs

  1. Maladaptive plasticity: imprinting of past experiences onto phantom limb schemata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giummarra, Melita Joy; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Nicholls, Michael E R; Gibson, Stephen J; Chou, Michael; Bradshaw, John L

    2011-10-01

    Phantom limb perception is common following amputation, and is sometimes characterised by pain that resembles the characteristics, intensity or location of past pain. We tested Flor's model that phantom pain results from memory for long-lasting znoxious input. We report a questionnaire study of 283 amputees, that explored the experience of painful, non-painful and postural somatosensory memories in the phantom. We explore the impact of pre-amputation pain and impairment duration, and complications in the limb (eg, infection, gangrene, surgery, and vascular disease). Differences in mood, coping and adjustment to amputation are also explored in those with somatosensory pain memories. Our findings support Flor's model, as amputation-related and non-amputation-related pain memories, and non-painful memories comprised pains or sensations that were either enduring/recurring pains or sensations (eg, ingrown toenail, corns, chilblains, arthritis-type pain in winter, night-cramps, or holding a tennis racquet), or resulted from a painful event with a "core-trauma" element (eg, fracture, crushing/penetration injury). Pain memories related to amputation were more common following functional impairment before amputation; infection or surgery prior to amputation; or having diabetic or vascular amputations-which are associated with multiple complications, including neuropathic changes, infection and prior surgery. Furthermore, participants with amputation-related pain memories exhibited higher sensory pain ratings, as well as poorer mood and adjustment to the limitations of amputation. We propose that somatosensory pain memories likely relate to the generation and maintenance of limb representations upon which intense or emotionally powerful past experiences have been imprinted.

  2. A computer-simulated liver phantom (virtual liver phantom) for multidetector computed tomography evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funama, Yoshinori [Kumamoto University, Department of Radiological Sciences, School of Health Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Awai, Kazuo; Nakayama, Yoshiharu; Liu, Da; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Miyazaki, Osamu; Goto, Taiga [Hitachi Medical Corporation, Tokyo (Japan); Hori, Shinichi [Gate Tower Institute of Image Guided Therapy, Osaka (Japan)

    2006-04-15

    The purpose of study was to develop a computer-simulated liver phantom for hepatic CT studies. A computer-simulated liver phantom was mathematically constructed on a computer workstation. The computer-simulated phantom was calibrated using real CT images acquired by an actual four-detector CT. We added an inhomogeneous texture to the simulated liver by referring to CT images of chronically damaged human livers. The mean CT number of the simulated liver was 60 HU and we added numerous 5-to 10-mm structures with 60{+-}10 HU/mm. To mimic liver tumors we added nodules measuring 8, 10, and 12 mm in diameter with CT numbers of 60{+-}10, 60{+-}15, and 60{+-}20 HU. Five radiologists visually evaluated similarity of the texture of the computer-simulated liver phantom and a real human liver to confirm the appropriateness of the virtual liver images using a five-point scale. The total score was 44 in two radiologists, and 42, 41, and 39 in one radiologist each. They evaluated that the textures of virtual liver were comparable to those of human liver. Our computer-simulated liver phantom is a promising tool for the evaluation of the image quality and diagnostic performance of hepatic CT imaging. (orig.)

  3. Construction of Korean adult voxel phantoms for radiation dosimetry and their applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choon Sik

    2002-08-15

    Although contribution of the MIRD-type mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms to computational radiation dosimetry, especially in determining the effective dose to the exposed personnel, is very significant, there remain some questions on possible deviation in the resulting dosimetric quantities from the true values. This is particularly the case for those organ or tissues having complicated geometry difficult to model with simple geometrical body elements. As an alternative approach to resolve the problem, there have been efforts to use voxel phantoms, which can very precisely describe both the external shape and the internal organs by virtue of fast advances in medical imaging technology as well as in computing power. In this study, Korean adult male and female voxel phantoms were constructed by processing whole-body MR images of healthy volunteers who belong to middle group of Korean in height and weight. Organs and tissues on tomographic images were manually segmented and indexed using the graphic software PL-400 . Due to limited resolution of the raw MR images, voxels of rather large size, 2 mmx2 mmx8 mm for the woman and 2mmx2mmx10mm for the man, were used. The resulting male and female voxel phantoms were named KRMAN and KRWOMAN, respectively. To assess utility of the voxel phatoms, calculations were carried out with the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B for two illustrative problems. A program VOXELMAKER1.0 was developed to convert the voxel phantom data into MCNP geometry input format. In the first example, organ equivalent doses and effective doses were evaluated for phantoms in broad parallel photon fields of different energies and directions and were compared to corresponding values given in ICRP 74 which were derived with the MIRD-type phantoms. No significant deviations between MIRD and voxel phantoms were found in the effective doses. Significant differences up to around factor of 2, however, were observed in organ equivalent doses for some organs including

  4. results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salabura Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HADES experiment at GSI is the only high precision experiment probing nuclear matter in the beam energy range of a few AGeV. Pion, proton and ion beams are used to study rare dielectron and strangeness probes to diagnose properties of strongly interacting matter in this energy regime. Selected results from p + A and A + A collisions are presented and discussed.

  5. Do Caucasian and Asian clocks tick differently?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Barbosa

    Full Text Available The Period 3 and Clock genes are important components of the mammalian molecular circadian system. Studies have shown association between polymorphisms in these clock genes and circadian phenotypes in different populations. Nevertheless, differences in the pattern of allele frequency and genotyping distribution are systematically observed in studies with different ethnic groups. To investigate and compare the pattern of distribution in a sample of Asian and Caucasian populations living in Brazil, we evaluated two well-studied polymorphisms in the clock genes: a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR in PER3 and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in CLOCK. The aim of this investigation was to search for clues about human evolutionary processes related to circadian rhythms. We selected 109 Asian and 135 Caucasian descendants. The frequencies of the shorter allele (4 repeats in the PER3 gene and the T allele in the CLOCK gene among Asians (0.86 and 0.84, respectively were significantly higher than among Caucasians (0.69 and 0.71, respectively. Our results directly confirmed the different distribution of these polymorphisms between the Asian and Caucasian ethnic groups. Given the genetic differences found between groups, two points became evident: first, ethnic variations may have implications for the interpretation of results in circadian rhythm association studies, and second, the question may be raised about which evolutionary conditions shaped these genetic clock variations.

  6. Patient-specific cardiac phantom for clinical training and preprocedure surgical planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, Justin; Moore, John; Vassallo, Reid; Bainbridge, Daniel; Drangova, Maria; Peters, Terry

    2018-04-01

    Minimally invasive mitral valve repair procedures including MitraClip ® are becoming increasingly common. For cases of complex or diseased anatomy, clinicians may benefit from using a patient-specific cardiac phantom for training, surgical planning, and the validation of devices or techniques. An imaging compatible cardiac phantom was developed to simulate a MitraClip ® procedure. The phantom contained a patient-specific cardiac model manufactured using tissue mimicking materials. To evaluate accuracy, the patient-specific model was imaged using computed tomography (CT), segmented, and the resulting point cloud dataset was compared using absolute distance to the original patient data. The result, when comparing the molded model point cloud to the original dataset, resulted in a maximum Euclidean distance error of 7.7 mm, an average error of 0.98 mm, and a standard deviation of 0.91 mm. The phantom was validated using a MitraClip ® device to ensure anatomical features and tools are identifiable under image guidance. Patient-specific cardiac phantoms may allow for surgical complications to be accounted for preoperative planning. The information gained by clinicians involved in planning and performing the procedure should lead to shorter procedural times and better outcomes for patients.

  7. Heart Disease and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American > Heart Disease Heart Disease and Asians and Pacific Islanders Overall, Asian American ... are less likely than white adults to have heart disease and they are less likely to die from ...

  8. Immunizations and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American > Immunizations Immunizations and Asians and Pacific Islanders Asian/Pacific Islander ... 35 months reached the Healthy People goal for immunizations for hepatitis B, MMR (measles-mumps-rubella), polio ...

  9. Development of a three-dimensionally movable phantom system for dosimetric verifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Mizowaki, Takashi; Narita, Yuichiro; Kawada, Noriyuki; Takahashi, Kunio; Mihara, Kazumasa; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    The authors developed a three-dimensionally movable phantom system (3D movable phantom system) which can reproduce three-dimensional movements to experimentally verify the impact of radiotherapy treatment-related movements on dose distribution. The phantom system consists of three integrated components: a three-dimensional driving mechanism (3D driving mechanism), computer control system, and phantoms for film dosimetry. The 3D driving mechanism is a quintessential part of this system. It is composed of three linear-motion tables (single-axis robots) which are joined orthogonally to each other. This mechanism has a motion range of 100 mm, with a maximum velocity of 200 mm/s in each dimension, and 3D motion ability of arbitrary patterns. These attributes are sufficient to reproduce almost all organ movements. The positional accuracy of this 3D movable phantom system in a state of geostationary is less than 0.1 mm. The maximum error in terms of the absolute position on movement was 0.56 mm. The positional reappearance error on movement was up to 0.23 mm. The observed fluctuation of time was 0.012 s in the cycle of 4.5 s of oscillation. These results suggested that the 3D movable phantom system exhibited a sufficient level of accuracy in terms of geometry and timing to reproduce interfractional organ movement or setup errors in order to assess the influence of these errors on high-precision radiotherapy such as stereotactic irradiation and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. In addition, the authors 3D movable phantom system will also be useful in evaluating the adequacy and efficacy of new treatment techniques such as gating or tracking radiotherapy

  10. Experimental study on representation of flow on the bifurcated carotid arterial phantoms using magnetic resonance angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Tae Sub; Rhim, Yoon Chul; Kim, Kyung Oh; Suh, Sang Ho; Jin, En Hao

    1995-01-01

    A common finding of carotid artery on magnetic resonance angiograms(MRAs) is a signal dropout along the posterior wall of carotid bulb due to reverse flow. The purpose of this study is to evaluate variable flow patterns on bifurcated carotid arterial phantoms using steady-state flow. We designed phantoms of a bifurcated carotid artery with acrylic materials. Flow patterns were evaluated with axial and coronal imaging of MRA(2D-TOF, 3D-TOF), color Doppler imaging, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) within the phantoms constructed of an automated closed-type circulatory system filled with 4% sugar solution. These findings were compared with findings obtained from normal volunteers. Axial 3D-TOF MRA images exhibited closer resemblance to the contour of the inner wall of phantoms when compared to coronal 2D-TOF MRA imaging. However, 2D-TOF MRA showed good contrast difference of signal intensities between forward flow area and reverse flow area. Dark zones with reduced signal intensities due to reversed flow were separated from the outer wall of the internal and external carotid arteries by a thin layer of forward flow along the wall on the source slice image of MRA. The general hemodynamics of the phantoms on MRA were identical to hemodynamics on color Doppler imaging and CFD. The results obtained with the phantoms matched the findings on normal volunteers. Although representations of bifurcated carotid arterial phantoms on axial 3D-TOF MRA were excellent if ideally designed, the zone of reversed flow could be a significant factor in creating distorted image when the zone of reversed flow contacted directly with curved or deformed arterial wall

  11. Customized three-dimensional printed optical phantoms with user defined absorption and scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannem, Sanjana; Sweer, Jordan; Diep, Phuong; Lo, Justine; Snyder, Michael; Stueber, Gabriella; Zhao, Yanyu; Tabassum, Syeda; Istfan, Raeef; Wu, Junjie; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Roblyer, Darren M.

    2016-03-01

    The use of reliable tissue-simulating phantoms spans multiple applications in spectroscopic imaging including device calibration and testing of new imaging procedures. Three-dimensional (3D) printing allows for the possibility of optical phantoms with arbitrary geometries and spatially varying optical properties. We recently demonstrated the ability to 3D print tissue-simulating phantoms with customized absorption (μa) and reduced scattering (μs`) by incorporating nigrosin, an absorbing dye, and titanium dioxide (TiO2), a scattering agent, to acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) during filament extrusion. A physiologically relevant range of μa and μs` was demonstrated with high repeatability. We expand our prior work here by evaluating the effect of two important 3D-printing parameters, percent infill and layer height, on both μa and μs`. 2 cm3 cubes were printed with percent infill ranging from 10% to 100% and layer height ranging from 0.15 to 0.40 mm. The range in μa and μs` was 27.3% and 19.5% respectively for different percent infills at 471 nm. For varying layer height, the range in μa and μs` was 27.8% and 15.4% respectively at 471 nm. These results indicate that percent infill and layer height substantially alter optical properties and should be carefully controlled during phantom fabrication. Through the use of inexpensive hobby-level printers, the fabrication of optical phantoms may advance the complexity and availability of fully customizable phantoms over multiple spatial scales. This technique exhibits a wider range of adaptability than other common methods of fabricating optical phantoms and may lead to improved instrument characterization and calibration.

  12. Development and application of a pediatric head phantom for dosimetry in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Elaine Wirney

    2016-01-01

    To determine the exposure levels and the absorbed dose in patients undergoing CT scans, is necessary to calculate the CT dose index in measurements with a PMMA or water phantom. The phantom must be enough to simulate the attenuation and scattering characteristics of a human body or parts in a radiation field. The CT specific quantities : CT air kerma index (Ca,100) , weighted CT air kerma index (CW ), a total volume CT air kerma index (Cvol) and the CT air kerma-length product (PKL) must be determined and compared to literature reference levels. In this work a head pediatric phantom was developed, considering that the Brazilian published Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRL) are based on adult phantom measurements. This developed phantom shows a construction innovation using materials to simulate the skullcap, cortical bone (aluminum) and cancellous bone (PVC), and it was filled with distilled water. The phantom dimension follows the recommendations of the World Health Organization and the International Commission on Radiation Units for children from 0 to 5 years old head size: diameter of 160 mm and height of 155 mm. The skullcap has 4 mm of thickness and 111.9 mm of internal diameter. In order to evaluate its behavior, tests were carried out in calibration laboratories and in clinical beams. The results showed attenuation up to 23% when different materials are used as skullcap, demonstrating that the DRLs adopted could be overestimating the dose received by pediatric patients. It is observed that the dose received by CT skull scans presents different distribution, due to the skullcap partially attenuation and/or backscattering which is not considered when the PMMA phantom is used.

  13. Realistic phantoms to characterize dosimetry in pediatric CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carver, Diana E.; Kost, Susan D.; Fraser, Nicholas D.; Pickens, David R.; Price, Ronald R.; Stabin, Michael G. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Nashville, TN (United States); Segars, W.P. [Duke University, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Durham, NC (United States)

    2017-05-15

    The estimation of organ doses and effective doses for children receiving CT examinations is of high interest. Newer, more realistic anthropomorphic body models can provide information on individual organ doses and improved estimates of effective dose. Previously developed body models representing 50th-percentile individuals at reference ages (newborn, 1, 5, 10 and 15 years) were modified to represent 10th, 25th, 75th and 90th height percentiles for both genders and an expanded range of ages (3, 8 and 13 years). We calculated doses for 80 pediatric reference phantoms from simulated chest-abdomen-pelvis exams on a model of a Philips Brilliance 64 CT scanner. Individual organ and effective doses were normalized to dose-length product (DLP) and fit as a function of body diameter. We calculated organ and effective doses for 80 reference phantoms and plotted them against body diameter. The data were well fit with an exponential function. We found DLP-normalized organ dose to correlate strongly with body diameter (R{sup 2}>0.95 for most organs). Similarly, we found a very strong correlation with body diameter for DLP-normalized effective dose (R{sup 2}>0.99). Our results were compared to other studies and we found average agreement of approximately 10%. We provide organ and effective doses for a total of 80 reference phantoms representing normal-stature children ranging in age and body size. This information will be valuable in replacing the types of vendor-reported doses available. These data will also permit the recording and tracking of individual patient doses. Moreover, this comprehensive dose database will facilitate patient matching and the ability to predict patient-individualized dose prior to examination. (orig.)

  14. Hybrid computational phantoms of the 15-year male and female adolescent: Applications to CT organ dosimetry for patients of variable morphometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Lodwick, Daniel; Williams, Jonathan L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2008-01-01

    Currently, two classes of the computational phantoms have been developed for dosimetry calculation: (1) stylized (or mathematical) and (2) voxel (or tomographic) phantoms describing human anatomy through mathematical surface equations and three-dimensional labeled voxel matrices, respectively. Mathematical surface equations in stylized phantoms provide flexibility in phantom design and alteration, but the resulting anatomical description is, in many cases, not very realistic. Voxel phantoms display far better anatomical realism, but they are limited in terms of their ability to alter organ shape, position, and depth, as well as body posture. A new class of computational phantoms - called hybrid phantoms - takes advantage of the best features of stylized and voxel phantoms - flexibility and anatomical realism, respectively. In the current study, hybrid computational phantoms representing reference 15-year male and female body anatomy and anthropometry are presented. For the male phantom, organ contours were extracted from the University of Florida (UF) 14-year series B male voxel phantom, while for the female phantom, original computed tomography (CT) data from two 14-year female patients were used. Polygon mesh models for the major organs and tissues were reconstructed for nonuniform rational B-spline (NURBS) surface modeling. The resulting NURBS/polygon mesh models representing body contour and internal anatomy were matched to anthropometric data and reference organ mass data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP), respectively. Finally, two hybrid 15-year male and female phantoms were completed where a total of eight anthropometric data categories were matched to standard values within 4% and organ masses matched to ICRP data within 1% with the exception of total skin. To highlight the flexibility of the hybrid phantoms, 10th and 90th weight percentile 15-year male and

  15. Application of a simple phantom in assessing the effects of dose reduction on image quality in chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbe, N.O.; Heaton, B.; Sharp, P.F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Firstly, to evaluate a commercial chest phantom incorporating a quasi anthropomorphic insert by comparing exposure measurements on the phantom with those of actual patients and, secondly, to assess the value of the phantom for image quality and dose optimisation. Methods: In the first part of the study entrance surface doses (ESD), Beam transmission (BT), and optical density (OD) were obtained for 77 chest radiography patients and compared with measurements made from exposures of the phantom using the respective patient exposure factors from chest examination. Differences were assessed with a student t-test, while the Pearson's linear correlation coefficient was used to test for any linear relationship. The second part assessed the applicability of the phantom to image quality studies by investigating the effect, on the clarity and detectability of lung lesions made from gelatine, of reducing patient dose below current dose levels. Clarity of linear objects of different dimensions was also studied. Lesion detectability and clarity was assessed by four observers. The possibility of extending dose reduction below current dose levels (D ref ) was assessed from comparison of doses that produced statistically significant differences in image quality from D ref . Results: Results show that, with the exception of entrance doses and beam transmission through the diaphragm (P > 0.05), differences in OD and beam transmission between patients and phantom were statistically significant (P ref produced significant changes in both clarity and detectability. Conclusion: Within limits posed by the observed differences, the phantom can be applied to image quality studies in diagnostic radiology.

  16. Development and application of anthropomorphic voxel phantom of the head for in vivo measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrba, T

    2007-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of the activity deposited in the skeleton is a very useful source of information on human internal contaminations with transuranic elements, e.g. americium 241, especially for long time periods after intake. Measurements are performed on the skull or the larger joints such as the knee or elbow. The paper deals with the construction of an anthropomorphic numerical phantom based on CT scans, its potential for calibration and the estimation of the uncertainties of the detection system. The density of bones, activity distribution and position of the detectors were changed in individual simulations in order to estimate their effects on the result of the measurement. The results from simulations with the numerical phantom were compared with the results of physical phantoms.

  17. Evaluation of non-linear adaptive smoothing filter by digital phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kazuhiro; Ishiya, Hiroki; Oshita, Ryosuke; Yanagawa, Isao; Goto, Mitsunori; Mori, Issei

    2008-01-01

    As a result of the development of multi-slice CT, diagnoses based on three-dimensional reconstruction images and multi-planar reconstruction have spread. For these applications, which require high z-resolution, thin slice imaging is essential. However, because z-resolution is always based on a trade-off with image noise, thin slice imaging is necessarily accompanied by an increase in noise level. To improve the quality of thin slice images, a non-linear adaptive smoothing filter has been developed, and is being widely applied to clinical use. We developed a digital bar pattern phantom for the purpose of evaluating the effect of this filter and attempted evaluation from an addition image of the bar pattern phantom and the image of the water phantom. The effect of this filter was changed in a complex manner by the contrast and spatial frequency of the original image. We have confirmed the reduced effect of image noise in the low frequency component of the image, but decreased contrast or increased quantity of noise in the image of the high frequency component. This result represents the effect of change in the adaptation of this filter. The digital phantom was useful for this evaluation, but to understand the total effect of filtering, much improvement of the shape of the digital phantom is required. (author)

  18. Evaluation of the water equivalence of solid phantoms using gamma ray transmission measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.F.; Brown, S.; Baldock, C.

    2008-01-01

    Gamma ray transmission measurements have been used to evaluate the water equivalence of solid phantoms. Technetium-99m was used in narrow beam geometry and the transmission of photons measured, using a gamma camera, through varying thickness of the solid phantom material and water. Measured transmission values were compared with Monte Carlo calculated transmission data using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to score fluence in a geometry similar to that of the measurements. The results indicate that the RMI457 Solid Water, CMNC Plastic Water and PTW RW3 solid phantoms had similar transmission values as compared to water to within ±1.5%. However, Perspex had a greater deviation in the transmission values up to ±4%. The agreement between the measured and EGSnrc calculated transmission values agreed to within ±1% over the range of phantom thickness studied. The linear attenuation coefficients at the gamma ray energy of 140.5 keV were determined from the measured and EGSnrc calculated transmission data and compared with predicted values derived from data provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) using the XCOM program. The coefficients derived from the measured data were up to 6% lower than those predicted by the XCOM program, while the coefficients determined from the Monte Carlo calculations were between measured and XCOM values. The results indicate that a similar process can be followed to determine the water equivalency of other solid phantoms and at other photon energies

  19. Perturbation correction for alanine dosimeters in different phantom materials in high-energy photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Voigts-Rhetz, P; Anton, M; Vorwerk, H; Zink, K

    2016-02-07

    In modern radiotherapy the verification of complex treatments plans is often performed in inhomogeneous or even anthropomorphic phantoms. For dose verification small detectors are necessary and therefore alanine detectors are most suitable. Though the response of alanine for a wide range of clinical photon energies in water is well know, the knowledge about the influence of the surrounding phantom material on the response of alanine is sparse. Therefore we investigated the influence of twenty different surrounding/phantom materials for alanine dosimeters in clinical photon fields via Monte Carlo simulations. The relative electron density of the used materials was in the range [Formula: see text] up to 1.69, covering almost all materials appearing in inhomogeneous or anthropomorphic phantoms used in radiotherapy. The investigations were performed for three different clinical photon spectra ranging from 6 to 25 MV-X and Co-60 and as a result a perturbation correction [Formula: see text] depending on the environmental material was established. The Monte Carlo simulation show, that there is only a small dependence of [Formula: see text] on the phantom material and the photon energy, which is below  ±0.6%. The results confirm the good suitability of alanine detectors for in-vivo dosimetry.

  20. Experimental phantom verification studies for simulations of light interactions with skin: liquid phantoms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Karsten, A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Karsten_2010_P.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 5080 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Karsten_2010_P.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Experimental phantom verification... studies for simulations of light interactions with skin: Solid Phantoms Aletta E Karsten, A Singh Presented by: J E Smit National Laser Center CSIR South Africa akarsten@csir.co.za Slide 2 © CSIR 2009 www.csir.co.za Where...

  1. Additional Resources on Asian Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Corinne Maekawa; Lee, Sunny; Liang, Christopher T. H.; Alvarez, Alvin N.; McEwen, Marylu K.

    2002-01-01

    The authors identify Asian American associations and organizations, academic journals, periodicals, and media resources. Selected annotated resources on Asian American activism and politics, counseling and psychology, educational issues, gender and sexual orientation, history, policy reports, and racial and ethnic identity are also included.…

  2. Reconsidering Asian American Student Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Corinne M.; Maramba, Dina C.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter addresses the applicability of student development theories in light of empirical research on Asian American college students through a twofold approach: (a) revisiting the relevance of Kodama, McEwen, Liang, and Lee's (2001, 2002) theoretical work on Asian American student development; and (b) using Jones' and Stewart's (2016)…

  3. The Asian Newspaper's Reluctant Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lent, John A., Ed.

    This book is composed of 19 articles written by both Asian and American scholars on the history and present conditions of newspapers in 15 Asian nations: China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Australia, Burma, Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore, the Philippines, Thailand, South Vietnam, Ceylon, India, and Pakistan. Two overviews of the Asian…

  4. Mathematical human phantoms and their application to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro

    1998-01-01

    This review described the characteristics of mathematical phantoms, their history over 30 years and their application. Mathematical phantoms are classified into two models of formula and voxel types. In the former, human body and organs are described by 2- and/or 3-D mathematical formula and can be seen as a combination of solid bodies like spheres, cubes and ovals. The phantom is composed from three tissue components (bone, lung and soft tissue) and made on data on Reference Man in ICRP Publ. 23. The latter voxel (volume pixel) phantom consists from a number of small cubes based on CT and MRI images of a certain man. For instance, the phantom CHILD, 1.54 x 1.54 x 8.00 mm 3 in size, is based on a 7-year old child, which consisting from about one million voxels. The mathematical phantom was first made in Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the middle of the nineteen-sixties, which have undergone various improvements to reach MIRD-5 phantom. Thereafter, many similitude phantoms have been made as a variation of MIRD-5, depending on age and sex (e.g., ADAM and EVA). Voxel phantom was made in the middle of nineteen-eighties and have undergone improvements which are continued even currently in Japan, U.S. etc. The mathematical phantoms are used for calculation of radiation transport program by Monte Carlo method in the field of radiation protection. Also in the field of medicine, the phantom is used for calculation of internal and external exposure doses, of correction constants of externally measuring instruments, of doses for neutron capture therapy and of A-bomb exposure doses in Hiroshima and Nagasaki for reevaluation. Recently, the development of phantom is in the current from formula phantom to voxel one due to the purpose of precision and standardization. (K.H.)

  5. Influence of Manufacturing Processes on the Performance of Phantom Lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traub, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Chest counting is an important tool for estimating the radiation dose to individuals who have inhaled radioactive materials. Chest counting systems are calibrated by counting the activity in the lungs of phantoms where the activity in the phantom lungs is known. In the United States a commonly used calibration phantom was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is referred to as the Livermore Torso Phantom. An important feature of this phantom is that the phantom lungs can be interchanged so that the counting system can be challenged by different combinations of radionuclides and activity. Phantom lungs are made from lung tissue substitutes whose constituents are foaming plastics and various adjuvants selected to make the lung tissue substitute similar to normal healthy lung tissue. Some of the properties of phantom lungs cannot be readily controlled by phantom lung manufacturers. Some, such as density, are a complex function of the manufacturing process, while others, such as elemental composition of the bulk plastic are controlled by the plastics manufacturer without input, or knowledge of the phantom manufacturer. Despite the fact that some of these items cannot be controlled, they can be measured and accounted for. This report describes how manufacturing processes can influence the performance of phantom lungs. It is proposed that a metric that describes the brightness of the lung be employed by the phantom lung manufacturer to determine how well the phantom lung approximates the characteristics of a human lung. For many purposes, the linear attenuation of the lung tissue substitute is an appropriate surrogate for the brightness

  6. TU-H-206-02: Novel Linearly-Filled Derenzo PET Phantom Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, S; Cox, B; Valdovinos, H; Jeffery, J; Eliceiri, K; Barnhart, T; Nickles, R; Farhoud, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To design a linearly-filled Derenzo positron emission tomography (PET) phantom, eliminating the extraneous radioisotope volumes in a conventional reservoir-type design. This activity reduction combined with the elimination of bubbles in smaller phantom channels would significantly reduce personnel dose, radioisotope cost, and would improve image quality by reducing out-of-slice activity scatter. Methods: A computer-aided design (CAD) was created of a modular Derenzo phantom consisting of three phantom layers with gaskets between the layers. The central piece contains the active pattern volume and channels connecting adjacent rods in a serpentine pattern. The two end-pieces contained an inlet and an outlet for filling purposes. Phantom prototypes were 3D printed on a Viper Si2 stereolithography machine. The two gaskets were fabricated from silicon sheets using a PLS 6.75 laser cutter. Phantoms were held together by pass-through glass-filled nylon bolts and nuts. Phantoms were filled with "5"2Mn, "6"4Cu, "7"4Br, and "1"2"4I for testing, and were imaged on a Siemens Inveon MicroPET scanner. Results: Four phantom prototypes were constructed using male Leur Lock fittings for inlet/outlet ports. 3D printed layers were sanded to ensure proper coupling to the silicon gaskets. The filling volume for each prototype was approximately 2.4 mL. The filling process was found to be rapid, leak-tight, and with minimal back-pressure. PET images were reconstructed by OSEM3D, and axial slices along the phantom pattern length were averaged to provide final images. Image distortion was isotope dependent with "5"2Mn and "6"4Cu having the least distortion and "1"2"4I having the most distortion. Conclusion: These results indicate that the linearlyfilled Derenzo design improves on conventional reservoir-type designs by eliminating potential bubbles in small channels and by reducing activity level, radioisotope volume, radioisotope cost, personnel dose, filling time, and out

  7. Comparison study of reconstruction algorithms for prototype digital breast tomosynthesis using various breast phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-suk; Lee, Haeng-Hwa; Choi, Young-Wook; Choi, Jae-Gu; Kim, Hak Hee; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a recently developed system for three-dimensional imaging that offers the potential to reduce the false positives of mammography by preventing tissue overlap. Many qualitative evaluations of digital breast tomosynthesis were previously performed by using a phantom with an unrealistic model and with heterogeneous background and noise, which is not representative of real breasts. The purpose of the present work was to compare reconstruction algorithms for DBT by using various breast phantoms; validation was also performed by using patient images. DBT was performed by using a prototype unit that was optimized for very low exposures and rapid readout. Three algorithms were compared: a back-projection (BP) algorithm, a filtered BP (FBP) algorithm, and an iterative expectation maximization (EM) algorithm. To compare the algorithms, three types of breast phantoms (homogeneous background phantom, heterogeneous background phantom, and anthropomorphic breast phantom) were evaluated, and clinical images were also reconstructed by using the different reconstruction algorithms. The in-plane image quality was evaluated based on the line profile and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and out-of-plane artifacts were evaluated by means of the artifact spread function (ASF). Parenchymal texture features of contrast and homogeneity were computed based on reconstructed images of an anthropomorphic breast phantom. The clinical images were studied to validate the effect of reconstruction algorithms. The results showed that the CNRs of masses reconstructed by using the EM algorithm were slightly higher than those obtained by using the BP algorithm, whereas the FBP algorithm yielded much lower CNR due to its high fluctuations of background noise. The FBP algorithm provides the best conspicuity for larger calcifications by enhancing their contrast and sharpness more than the other algorithms; however, in the case of small-size and low

  8. Understanding the Southeast Asian haze

    Science.gov (United States)

    G, Karthik K. R.; Baikie, T.; T, Mohan Dass E.; Huang, Y. Z.; Guet, C.

    2017-08-01

    The Southeast Asian region had been subjected to a drastic reduction in air quality from the biomass burnings that occurred in 2013 and 2015. The smoke from the biomass burnings covered the entire region including Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand, with haze particulate matter (PM) reducing the air quality to hazardous levels. Here we report a comprehensive size-composition-morphology characterization of the PM collected from an urban site in Singapore during the two haze events. The two haze events were a result of biomass burning and occurred in two different geographical source regions. We show the similarities and variations of particle size distribution during hazy and clear days during the two haze events. Sub-micron particles (method is used to determine the fractal dimensions of the PM, and the dimensionality varied for every classification from 1.79 to 1.88. We also report the complexities of particles and inconsistencies in the existing approaches to understand them.

  9. SU-E-T-234: Daily Quality Assurance for a Six Degrees of Freedom Couch Using a Novel Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, K; Woollard, J; Ayan, A; Sandu, A; Sommerfeld, J; Gupta, N; Laurel, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To test the accuracy and reproducibility of both translational and rotational movements for a couch with six degrees of freedom (6DoF) using a novel phantom design Methods: An end-to-end test was carried out using two different phantoms. A 6 cm3 cube with a central fiducial BB (WL-QA Sun Nuclear) and a custom fabricated rectangular prism (31 cm x 8 cm x 8 cm), placed on a baseplate with known angular offsets for pitch, roll and yaw with a central fiducial BB and unique surface structures for registration purposes, were used. The end-to-end test included an initial CT simulation for a reference study, setup to an offset mark on each phantom, registration of the reference CT to the acquired cone-beam CT, and final Winston-Lutz delivery at four cardinal gantry angles. Results for both translational and rotational movements were recorded and compared for both phantoms. Results: Translational and rotational measurements were performed with a PerfectPitch (Varian) couch for 10 trials for both phantoms. Distinct translational shifts were [−5.372±0.384mm, −10.183±0.137mm, 14.028±0.155mm] for the cube and [7.520±0.159mm, −9.117±0.101mm, 16.273±0.115mm] for the prototype phantom for lateral, longitudinal, and vertical shifts, respectively. Distinct rotational adjustments were [1.121±0.102o, −1.067±0.235o, −2.662±0.380o] for the cube and [2.534±0.059o, 1.994±0.025o, 2.094±0.076o] for the prototype for pitch, roll, and yaw, respectively. Winston-Lutz test results performed after 6DoF couch correction from each cardinal gantry angle ranged from 0.26–0.72mm for the cube and 0.55–0.86mm for the prototype. Conclusion: The prototype phantom is more precise for both translational and rotational adjustments compared to a commercial phantom. The design of the prototype phantom allows for a more discernible visual confirmation of correct translational and rotational adjustments with the prototype phantom. Winston-Lutz results are more accurate for the

  10. SU-E-T-234: Daily Quality Assurance for a Six Degrees of Freedom Couch Using a Novel Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, K; Woollard, J; Ayan, A; Sandu, A; Sommerfeld, J; Gupta, N [Ohio State Univ, Columbus, OH (United States); Laurel, A [Memorial Medical Center, Modesto, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To test the accuracy and reproducibility of both translational and rotational movements for a couch with six degrees of freedom (6DoF) using a novel phantom design Methods: An end-to-end test was carried out using two different phantoms. A 6 cm3 cube with a central fiducial BB (WL-QA Sun Nuclear) and a custom fabricated rectangular prism (31 cm x 8 cm x 8 cm), placed on a baseplate with known angular offsets for pitch, roll and yaw with a central fiducial BB and unique surface structures for registration purposes, were used. The end-to-end test included an initial CT simulation for a reference study, setup to an offset mark on each phantom, registration of the reference CT to the acquired cone-beam CT, and final Winston-Lutz delivery at four cardinal gantry angles. Results for both translational and rotational movements were recorded and compared for both phantoms. Results: Translational and rotational measurements were performed with a PerfectPitch (Varian) couch for 10 trials for both phantoms. Distinct translational shifts were [−5.372±0.384mm, −10.183±0.137mm, 14.028±0.155mm] for the cube and [7.520±0.159mm, −9.117±0.101mm, 16.273±0.115mm] for the prototype phantom for lateral, longitudinal, and vertical shifts, respectively. Distinct rotational adjustments were [1.121±0.102o, −1.067±0.235o, −2.662±0.380o] for the cube and [2.534±0.059o, 1.994±0.025o, 2.094±0.076o] for the prototype for pitch, roll, and yaw, respectively. Winston-Lutz test results performed after 6DoF couch correction from each cardinal gantry angle ranged from 0.26–0.72mm for the cube and 0.55–0.86mm for the prototype. Conclusion: The prototype phantom is more precise for both translational and rotational adjustments compared to a commercial phantom. The design of the prototype phantom allows for a more discernible visual confirmation of correct translational and rotational adjustments with the prototype phantom. Winston-Lutz results are more accurate for the

  11. CT dose profiles and MSAD calculation in a chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Bruno Beraldo; Silva, Teogenes Augusto da

    2011-01-01

    For optimizing patient doses in computed tomography (CT), the Brazilian legislation has only established diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) in terms of Multiple Scan Average Dose (MSAD) in a typical adult as a quality control parameter for CT scanners. Compliance with the DRLs can be verified by measuring the Computed Tomography Air Kerma Index with a calibrated pencil ionization chamber or by obtaining the dose distribution in CT scans. An analysis of the quality of five CT scanners in Belo Horizonte was done in terms of dose profile of chest scans and MSAD determinations. Measurements were done with rod shape lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) distributed in cylinders positioned in peripheral and central regions of a polymethylmethacrylate chest phantom. The peripheral regions presented higher dose values. The longitudinal dose variation can be observed and the maximum dose was recorded at the edges of the phantom at the midpoint of the longitudinal axis. The MSAD results were in according to the DRL of 25 mGy established by Brazilian legislation. The results contribute to disseminate to hospitals and radiologists the proper procedure to use the thermoluminescent dosimeters for the calculation of the MSAD from the CT dose profiles and to notice the compliance with the DRLs. (author)

  12. Simulation of computed tomography dose based on voxel phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunyu; Lv, Xiangbo; Li, Zhaojun

    2017-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the preferred and the most valuable imaging tool used in diagnostic radiology, which provides a high-quality cross-sectional image of the body. It still causes higher doses of radiation to patients comparing to the other radiological procedures. The Monte-Carlo method is appropriate for estimation of the radiation dose during the CT examinations. The simulation of the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) phantom was developed in this paper. Under a similar conditions used in physical measurements, dose profiles were calculated and compared against the measured values that were reported. The results demonstrate a good agreement between the calculated and the measured doses. From different CT exam simulations using the voxel phantom, the highest absorbed dose was recorded for the lung, the brain, the bone surface. A comparison between the different scan type shows that the effective dose for a chest scan is the highest one, whereas the effective dose values during abdomen and pelvis scan are very close, respectively. The lowest effective dose resulted from the head scan. Although, the dose in CT is related to various parameters, such as the tube current, exposure time, beam energy, slice thickness and patient size, this study demonstrates that the MC simulation is a useful tool to accurately estimate the dose delivered to any specific organs for patients undergoing the CT exams and can be also a valuable technique for the design and the optimization of the CT x-ray source.

  13. Determination of dose correction factor for energy and directional dependence of the MOSFET dosimeter in an anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sung Koo; Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Na, Seong Ho

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the MOSFET dosimeter has been widely used in various medical applications such as dose verification in radiation therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The MOSFET dosimeter is, however, mainly made of silicon and shows some energy dependence for low energy photons. Therefore, the MOSFET dosimeter tends to overestimate the dose for low energy scattered photons in a phantom. This study determines the correction factors to compensate these dependences of the MOSFET dosimeter in ATOM phantom. For this, we first constructed a computational model of the ATOM phantom based on the 3D CT image data of the phantom. The voxel phantom was then implemented in a Monte Carlo simulation code and used to calculate the energy spectrum of the photon field at each of the MOSFET dosimeter locations in the phantom. Finally, the correction factors were calculated based on the energy spectrum of the photon field at the dosimeter locations and the pre-determined energy and directional dependence of the MOSFET dosimeter. Our result for 60 Co and 137 Cs photon fields shows that the correction factors are distributed within the range of 0.89 and 0.97 considering all the MOSFET dosimeter locations in the phantom

  14. Electrical Impedance Spectroscopic Studies on Broiler Chicken Tissue Suitable for the Development of Practical Phantoms in Multifrequency EIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Kanti Bera

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Phantoms are essential for assessing the system performance in Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT. Saline phantoms with insulator inhomogeneity fail to mimic the physiological structure of real body tissue in several aspects. Saline or any other salt solutions are purely resistive and hence studying multifrequency EIT systems cannot be assessed with saline phantoms because the response of the purely resistive materials do not change over frequency. Animal tissues show a variable response over a wide band of signal frequency due to their complex physiological and physiochemical structures and hence they can suitably be used as bathing medium and inhomogeneity in the phantoms of multifrequency EIT system. An efficient assessment of a multifrequency EIT system with real tissue phantom needs a prior knowledge of the impedance profile of the bathing medium as well as the inhomogeneity. In this direction Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS of broiler chicken muscle tissue paste and broiler chicken fat tissue is conducted from 10 Hz to 2 MHz using an impedance analyzer and their impedance profiles are thoroughly studied. Results show that the broiler chicken muscle tissue paste is less resistive than the fat tissue and hence it can be successfully used as the bathing medium of the phantoms for resistivity imaging in multifrequency EIT. Fat tissue is found more resistive than the muscle tissue which makes it more suitable for the inhomogeneity in phantoms of resistivity imaging study. doi:10.5617/jeb.174 J Electr Bioimp, vol. 2, pp. 48-63, 2011

  15. Phantom construction by the lithography process for micro-radiographic system analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Henrique de Souza; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Macedo, Pedro Ivo M.T.

    2002-01-01

    In this work it was analyzed the viability of the use of a standard phantom, manufactured by the lithograph process, for obtaining the space resolution of a microradiographic system. The project predicted the construction of three types of phantoms, one for obtaining the function of modulation transfer in systems with resolutions between 10 and 60 μm and other two for the direct reading of the space resolution, in systems with resolution between 10 and 100 μm and between 100 and 400 μm. Despite of the results have been obtained from preliminary samples of the built phantoms, it was possible to find good results in relation to the space resolution. Using a reference system formed by a conventional microfocused X-rays tube with a CCD detector, was possible to match a space resolution of 15 μm in 20% of modulation in a system with a estimated resolution of 12,5 μm. (author)

  16. Performance of an automatic dose control system for CT. Specifications and basic phantom tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, H.D. [Wissenschaft und Technik fuer die Radiolgoe, Dr. HD Nagel, Buchholz (Germany); Stumpp, P.; Kahn, T.; Gosch, D. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To assess the performance and to provide more detailed insight into the characteristics and limitations of devices for automatic dose control (ADC) in CT. Materials and Methods: A comprehensive study on DoseRight 2.0, the ADC system provided by Philips for its Brilliance CT scanners, was conducted. Phantom tests were carried out on a 64-slice scanner (Brilliance 64) using assorted quality control (QC) phantoms that allowed verification of the basic specifications. If feasible, the findings were verified by model calculations based on known specifications. Results: For all tests, the dose reductions and modulation characteristics fully met the values expected from the specifications. Adverse effects due to increased image noise were only moderate as a result of the 'adequate noise system' design that employs comparatively gentle modulation, and the additional use of adaptive filtration. Conclusion: Simple tests with QC phantoms allow evaluation of the most relevant characteristics of devices for ADC in CT. (orig.)

  17. Phantom study of PET/CT guided delineation of radiation therapy volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Lin; Zheng Rong; Wang Yibin; Geng Jianhua; Wu Ning; Zhao Ping

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To propose a model-based method for calculating the threshold in GTV determination by 18 F-FDG PET in a phantom study. Methods: A phantom was constructed of a 9 L cylindrical tank.Glass spheres with volumes ranging from 0.5 to 16 ml (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 16 ml) were suspended within the tank. The six spheres were filled with an identical concentration of FDG (203.5 MBq/L) and suspended within 3 different background baths of FDG (6.179, 16.021, 0 MBq/L) solutions, creating 3 target-to-background ratios of 32.96 : 1, 12.69 : 1 and target to zero background. A linear regressive function was constructed which represented the relationship between the threshold and the average activity concentration of the target. A 40% of maximum intensity threshold and the linear regressive function method were applied to define the spheres filled with 18 F-FDG. The volume differences between the two methods and the true volumes of the spheres were compared with t-test. Results: The linear regressive function model was derived as:threshold =(mean target concentration + 2.6227)/1.9752. The results indicated that a smaller deviation occurred when the function was utilized to estimate the volumes of the phantoms as compared to the 40% of maximum intensity threshold method, but there were no significant differences between them (t=0.306, P>0.05). The effect of the linear regressive function on volume was such that when the phantom sphere volumes were ≥ 1 ml, the average deviation between the defined volumes and the true volumes of phantoms was 1.01%; but when the phantom sphere volume was 0.5 ml, the average deviation was 9.53%. When the 40% of maximum intensity threshold method was applied to define the phantom spheres of volume ≥2 ml, the average deviation between the defined volumes and the true volumes of phantoms was -4.62%; but, the average deviation of that was 19.9% when the volumes of spheres were 0.5 and 1 ml. When the linear regressive function was applied to

  18. An analytical phantom for the evaluation of medical flow imaging algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashaei, A; Fatouraee, N

    2009-01-01

    Blood flow characteristics (e.g. velocity, pressure, shear stress, streamline and volumetric flow rate) are effective tools in diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerotic plaque, aneurism and cardiac muscle failure. Noninvasive estimation of cardiovascular blood flow characteristics is mostly limited to the measurement of velocity components by medical imaging modalities. Once the velocity field is obtained from the images, other flow characteristics within the cardiovascular system can be determined using algorithms relating them to the velocity components. In this work, we propose an analytical flow phantom to evaluate these algorithms accurately. The Navier-Stokes equations are used to derive this flow phantom. The exact solution of these equations obtains analytical expression for the flow characteristics inside the domain. Features such as pulsatility, incompressibility and viscosity of flow are included in a three-dimensional domain. The velocity domain of the resulted system is presented as reference images. These images could be employed to evaluate the performance of different flow characteristic algorithms. In this study, we also present some applications of the obtained phantom. The calculation of pressure domain from velocity data, volumetric flow rate, wall shear stress and particle trace are the characteristics whose algorithms are evaluated here. We also present the application of this phantom in the analysis of noisy and low-resolution images. The presented phantom can be considered as a benchmark test to compare the accuracy of different flow characteristic algorithms.

  19. Experimental Determination of the Neutron Radiation-Dose Distribution in the Human Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stipcic, Neda [Institute Rudjer Bogkovic, Zagreb, Yugoslavia (Serbia)

    1967-01-15

    The quality of the radiation delivering the radiation dose to the human phantom is quite different from that of the incident neutron beam. This paper describes the experimental investigation of the variation of neutron dose related to the variation of neutron fluence with depth in the human phantom. The distribution of neutron radiation was determined in the human phantom - a cube of paraffin wax 25 cm x 25 cm x 50 cm with a density of 0.92 cm{sup -3}. Po-Be and Ra-Be point sources were used as neutron sources. Neutron fluences were measured using different types of detector: scintillation detector, BF{sub 3} counter, and nuclear-track emulsions. Since the fluence measurements with these three types of detectors were carried out under the same experimental conditions, it was possible to separate and analyse each part of the radiation dose in the paraffin. From the investigations, the distribution of the total radiation dose was obtained as a function of the paraffin depth. The maximum value of this dose distribution is constant with respect to the distance between the source and the paraffin phantom. From the results obtained, some conclusions may be drawn concerning the amount of absorbed radiation dose in the human phantom. (author)

  20. Quantitative analysis of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine myocardial scintigraphy by myocardial uptake using a phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momose, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Hideki; Kashikura, Kenichi; Kanaya, Shinichi; Maki, Masako; Hosoda, Saichi; Kusakabe, Kiyoko

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the quantitative analysis of 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy, total injected dose measured by first pass (FP) method (T FP ) was compared with that measured by phantom method using an acrylic phantom in 45 patients with cardiac disease. Heart per mediastinum ratio (H/M) was compared to myocardial uptake calculated with T FP . The total injected dose measured using the phantom in which the syringe was set in depth of 3.5 cm (T pham ) was correlated with T FP (r=0.73, p=0.0001). When T pham was corrected by body weight (c-T pham ), c-T pham showed better correlation with T FP . MU calculated by T FP (MU-FP) was well correlated with MU by c-T pham (MU-pham) (r=0.94, p=0.001). These results indicate that phantom method is sufficient to substitute for FP method. Though H/M was correlated with MU-FP (p<0.001), the interpatient variation was relatively large. Then the analysis by H/M is insufficient to substitute for the myocardial uptake. It is thought to be enough to use the phantom method on daily routine work, since this method is accurate and easy to quantitate the myocardial uptake of MIBG taking a short time. (author)

  1. A multileaf collimator phantom for the quality assurance of radiation therapy planning systems and CT simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNiven, Andrea; Kron, Tomas; Van Dyk, Jake

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The evolution of three-dimensional conformal radiation treatment has led to the use of multileaf collimators (MLCs) in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and other treatment techniques to increase the conformity of the dose distribution. A new quality assurance (QA) phantom has been designed to check the handling of MLC settings in treatment planning and delivery. Methods and materials: The phantom consists of a Perspex block with stepped edges that can be rotated in all planes. The design allows for the assessment of several MLC and micro-MLC types from various manufacturers, and is therefore applicable to most radiation therapy institutions employing MLCs. The phantom is computed tomography (CT) scanned as is a patient, and QA assessments can be made of field edge display for a variety of shapes and orientations on both radiation treatment planning systems (RTPS) and computed tomography simulators. Results: The dimensions of the phantom were verified to be physically correct within an uncertainty range of 0-0.7 mm. Errors in leaf position larger than 1 mm were easily identified by multiple observers. Conclusions: The MLC geometry phantom is a useful tool in the QA of radiation therapy with application to RTPS, CT simulators, and virtual simulation packages with MLC display capabilities

  2. Analysis of translational errors in frame-based and frameless cranial radiosurgery using an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Taynna Vernalha Rocha [Faculdades Pequeno Principe (FPP), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Cordova Junior, Arno Lotar; Almeida, Cristiane Maria; Piedade, Pedro Argolo; Silva, Cintia Mara da, E-mail: taynnavra@gmail.com [Centro de Radioterapia Sao Sebastiao, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Brincas, Gabriela R. Baseggio [Centro de Diagnostico Medico Imagem, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Marins, Priscila; Soboll, Danyel Scheidegger [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate three-dimensional translational setup errors and residual errors in image-guided radiosurgery, comparing frameless and frame-based techniques, using an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods: We initially used specific phantoms for the calibration and quality control of the image-guided system. For the hidden target test, we used an Alderson Radiation Therapy (ART)-210 anthropomorphic head phantom, into which we inserted four 5- mm metal balls to simulate target treatment volumes. Computed tomography images were the taken with the head phantom properly positioned for frameless and frame-based radiosurgery. Results: For the frameless technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.22 ± 0.04 mm for setup errors and 0.14 ± 0.02 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 0.28 mm and 0.16 mm, respectively. For the frame-based technique, the mean error magnitude was 0.73 ± 0.14 mm for setup errors and 0.31 ± 0.04 mm for residual errors, the combined uncertainty being 1.15 mm and 0.63 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The mean values, standard deviations, and combined uncertainties showed no evidence of a significant differences between the two techniques when the head phantom ART-210 was used. (author)

  3. OEDIPE: a new graphical user interface for fast construction of numerical phantoms and MCNP calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, D; de Carlan, L; Pierrat, N; Broggio, D; Lamart, S

    2007-01-01

    Although great efforts have been made to improve the physical phantoms used to calibrate in vivo measurement systems, these phantoms represent a single average counting geometry and usually contain a uniform distribution of the radionuclide over the tissue substitute. As a matter of fact, significant corrections must be made to phantom-based calibration factors in order to obtain absolute calibration efficiencies applicable to a given individual. The importance of these corrections is particularly crucial when considering in vivo measurements of low energy photons emitted by radionuclides deposited in the lung such as actinides. Thus, it was desirable to develop a method for calibrating in vivo measurement systems that is more sensitive to these types of variability. Previous works have demonstrated the possibility of such a calibration using the Monte Carlo technique. Our research programme extended such investigations to the reconstruction of numerical anthropomorphic phantoms based on personal physiological data obtained by computed tomography. New procedures based on a new graphical user interface (GUI) for development of computational phantoms for Monte Carlo calculations and data analysis are being developed to take advantage of recent progress in image-processing codes. This paper presents the principal features of this new GUI. Results of calculations and comparison with experimental data are also presented and discussed in this work.

  4. Preliminary Evidence for Training-Induced Changes of Morphology and Phantom Limb Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Preißler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether a special prosthetic training in phantom limb pain patients aimed at increasing the functional use of the prosthesis leads to neural morphological plasticity of brain structures and a reduction in phantom limb pain. For chronic pain disorders, it was shown that morphological alterations due to pain might become at least partially reversed by pain therapies. Phantom limb pain is a chronic pain disorder that is frequently followed by neural plasticity of anatomical brain structures. In our study, 10 patients with amputation of the upper limb participated in a two-week training with a myoelectric prosthesis with somatosensory feedback. Grip strength was fed back with electrocutaneous stimulus patterns applied to the stump. Phantom limb pain was assessed before and after the two-week training. Similarly, two T1 weighted MRI scans were conducted for longitudinal thickness analyses of cortical brain structures. As result of this treatment, patients experienced a reduction in phantom limb pain and a gain in prosthesis functionality. Furthermore, we found a change of cortical thickness in small brain areas in the visual stream and the post-central gyrus ipsilateral to the amputation indicating morphological alterations in brain areas involved in vision and pain processing.

  5. Specific developed phantoms and software to assess radiological equipment image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdu, G., E-mail: gverdu@iqn.upv.es [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear; Mayo, P., E-mail: p.mayo@titaniast.com [TITANIA Servicios Teconologicos, Valencia (Spain); Rodenas, F., E-mail: frodenas@mat.upv.es [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Matematica Aplicada; Campayo, J.M., E-mail: j.campayo@lainsa.com [Logistica y Acondicionamientos Industriales S.A.U (LAINSA), Valencia (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    The use of radiographic phantoms specifically designed to evaluate the operation of the radiographic equipment lets the study of the image quality obtained by this equipment in an objective way. In digital radiographic equipment, the analysis of the image quality can be automatized because the acquisition of the image is possible in different technologies that are, computerized radiography or phosphor plate and direct radiography or detector. In this work we have shown an application to assess automatically the constancy quality image in the image chain of the radiographic equipment. This application is integrated by designed radiographic phantoms which are adapted to conventional, dental equipment and specific developed software for the automatic evaluation of the phantom image quality. The software is based on digital image processing techniques that let the automatic detection of the different phantom tests by edge detector, morphological operators, threshold histogram techniques, etc. The utility developed is enough sensitive to the radiographic equipment of operating conditions of voltage (kV) and charge (mAs). It is a friendly user programme connected with a data base of the hospital or clinic where it has been used. After the phantom image processing the user can obtain an inform with a resume of the imaging system state with accepting and constancy results. (author)

  6. Specific developed phantoms and software to assess radiological equipment image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdu, G.; Rodenas, F.

    2011-01-01

    The use of radiographic phantoms specifically desig