WorldWideScience

Sample records for ashing dry

  1. FLY ASH RECYCLE IN DRY SCRUBBING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper describes the effects of fly ash recycle in dry scrubbing. (Previous workers have shown that the recycle of product solids improves the utilization of slaked lime--Ca(OH)2--for sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal by spray dryers with bag filters.) In laboratory-scale experimen...

  2. Influence of fly ash fineness on strength, drying shrinkage and sulfate resistance of blended cement mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Chindaprasirt; S. Homwuttiwong; V. Sirivivatnanon [Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen (Thailand). Department of Civil Engineering

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, the influence of fineness of fly ash on water demand and some of the properties of hardened mortar are examined. In addition to the original fly ash (OFA), five different fineness values of fly ash were obtained by sieving and by using an air separator. Two sieves, Nos. 200 and 325, were used to obtain two lots of graded fine fly ash. For the classification using air separator, the OFA was separated into fine, medium and coarse portions. The fly ash dosage of 40% by weight of binder was used throughout the experiment. From the tests, it was found that the compressive strength of mortar depended on the fineness of fly ash. The strength of mortar containing fine fly ash was better than that of OFA mortar at all ages with the very fine fly ash giving the highest strength. The use of all fly ashes resulted in significant improvement in drying shrinkage with the coarse fly ash showing the least improvement owing primarily to the high water to binder ratio (W/B) of the mix. Significant improvement of resistance to sulfate expansion was obtained for all fineness values except for the coarse fly ash where greater expansion was observed. The resistance to sulfuric acid attack was also improved with the incorporation of all fly ashes. In this case the coarse fly ash gave the best performance with the lowest rate of the weight loss owing probably to the better bonding of the coarse fly ash particles to the cement matrix and less hydration products. It is suggested that the fine fly ash is more reactive and its use resulted in a denser cement matrix and better mechanical properties of mortar.

  3. Rainfall and wet and dry cycle's impact on ash thickness. A laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Keestra, Saskia; Peters, Piet; Cerdà, Artemi

    2016-04-01

    Ash is the most important and effective soil protection in the immediate period after the fire (Cerda and Doerr, 2008; Pereira et al., 2015a). This protection can last for days or weeks depending on the fire severity, topography of the burned area and post-fire meteorological conditions. In the initial period after the fire, ash is easily transported by wind. However after the first rainfalls, ash is eroded, or bind in soil surface (Pereira et al., 2013, 2015a). Ash thickness has implications on soil protection. The soil protection against the erosion and the ash capacity to retain water increases with the ash thickness (Bodi et al., 2014). Ash cover is very important after fire because store water and releases into soil a large amount of nutrients, fundamental to vegetation recuperation (Pereira et al., 2014). Despite the importance of ash thickness in post fire environments, little information is available about the effects of rainfall and wet and dry cycle's effects on ash thickness. This work aims to fill this gap. The objective of this study is to investigate the impacts of rainfall and wet and dry cycles in the ash thickness of two different under laboratory conditions. Litter from Oak (Quercus robur) and Spruce (Picea abis) were collected to and exposed during 2 hours to produce ash at 200 and 400 C. Subsequently a layer of 15 mm ash was spread on soil surface in small boxes (24x32 cm) and then subjected to rainfall simulation. Boxes were placed at a 17% of inclination and a rainfall intensity of 55 mm/h during 40 minutes was applied. After the rainfall simulation the plots were stored in an Oven at the temperature of 25 C during four days, in order to identify the effects of wet and dry cycles (Bodi et al., 2013). Ash thickness was measured after the first rainfall (AFR), before the second rainfall (BSR) - after the dry period of 4 days - and after the second rainfall (ASR). In each box a grid with 57 points was designed in order to analyse ash thickness

  4. Amenability to dry processing of high ash thermal coal using a pneumatic table

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dey Shobhana; Gangadhar B.; Gopalkrishna S.J.

    2015-01-01

    High ash thermal coal from India was used to conduct the dry processing of fine coal using a pneumatic table to evolve a techno-economically novel technique. The fine as-received sample having 55.2%ash was subjected to washability studies at variant densities from 1.4 to 2.2 to assess the amenability to separa-tion. The experiments were conducted using a central composite design for assessing the interactive effects of the variable parameters of a pneumatic table on the product yield and ash content. The perfor-mance of the pneumatic table was analyzed in terms of clean coal yield, recovery of combustibles, separation efficiency (Esp) and useful heat value of clean coal. The combustibles of clean coal obtained through a single stage operation at 35% and 38.7% ash were 40% and 63% respectively. However, the two stage processing was more effective in reducing the ash content in the clean coal. The rougher con-centrate generated at higher ash level was subsequently processed in different conditions at 35% ash level, and 58%combustibles could be recovered. Hence, two stage processing increases the combustibles by 18 units and the useful heat value of clean coal increases from 1190 kcal/kg to 3750 kcal/kg.

  5. Dry Sliding Friction and Wear Studies of Fly Ash Reinforced AA-6351 Metal Matrix Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Uthayakumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash particles are potentially used in metal matrix composites due to their low cost, low density, and availability in large quantities as waste by-products in thermal power plants. This study describes multifactor-based experiments that were applied to research and investigation on dry sliding wear system of stir-cast aluminum alloy 6351 with 5, 10, and 15 wt.% fly ash reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs. The effects of parameters such as load, sliding speed, and percentage of fly ash on the sliding wear, specific wear rate, and friction coefficient were analyzed using Grey relational analysis on a pin-on-disc machine. Analysis of variance (ANOVA was also employed to investigate which design parameters significantly affect the wear behavior of the composite. The results showed that the applied load exerted the greatest effect on the dry sliding wear followed by the sliding velocity.

  6. Wet-dry cycles effect on ash water repellency. A laboratory experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerdà, Artemi; Oliva, Marc; Mataix, Jorge; Jordán, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    In the immediate period after the fire, the ash layer has a strong influence on soil hydrological processes, as runoff, infiltration and erosion. Ash is very dynamic in the space and time. Until the first rainfall periods, ash is (re)distributed by the wind. After it can cover the soil surface, infiltrate or transported to other areas by water transport (Pereira et al., 2013a, b). This will have strong implications on nutrient redistribution and vegetation recovery. Ash layer may affect soil water repellency in different ways, depending on fire severity, soil properties and vegetation. Ash produced at low temperatures after low-severity burning is usually hydrophobic (Bodi et al., 2011, 2012). Wet-dry cycles have implications on ash physical and chemical properties, changing their effects in space and time. The aim of this study is to analyse the effects of fire temperature and severity on ash water repellency. Pinus sylvestris needles were collected in a Lithuania forest in Dzukija National Park (53º 54' N and 24º 22' E), transported to laboratory and washed with deionized water to remove soil particles and other residues. Needle samples were dried during 24 hours and exposed to different temperatures: 200, 300, 400 and 500 ºC, during 2 hours. Ash colour was analysed according to the Munsell Soil Color charts. Ash was black (10 YR 2/1) at 200 ºC, very dark grey (10YR 3/1) at 300 ºC, gray (10YR 5/1) at 400 ºC and light gray (10YR 7/1) at 500 ºC. Ten samples of ash released after each treatment were placed in plastic dishes (50 mm in diameter) in an amount enough to form a 5 mm thick layer, and ash water repellency was measured according to the Water Drop Penetration Test. Later, ash was carefully wetted with 15 ml of deionized water and placed in an oven during 4 days (96 hours), as in Bodí et al. (2012). This procedure was repeated 5 times in order to observe the effects of wet-dry cycles in ash water repellency. The results showed significant differences

  7. Wet-dry cycles effect on ash water repellency. A laboratory experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerdà, Artemi; Oliva, Marc; Mataix, Jorge; Jordán, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    In the immediate period after the fire, the ash layer has a strong influence on soil hydrological processes, as runoff, infiltration and erosion. Ash is very dynamic in the space and time. Until the first rainfall periods, ash is (re)distributed by the wind. After it can cover the soil surface, infiltrate or transported to other areas by water transport (Pereira et al., 2013a, b). This will have strong implications on nutrient redistribution and vegetation recovery. Ash layer may affect soil water repellency in different ways, depending on fire severity, soil properties and vegetation. Ash produced at low temperatures after low-severity burning is usually hydrophobic (Bodi et al., 2011, 2012). Wet-dry cycles have implications on ash physical and chemical properties, changing their effects in space and time. The aim of this study is to analyse the effects of fire temperature and severity on ash water repellency. Pinus sylvestris needles were collected in a Lithuania forest in Dzukija National Park (53º 54' N and 24º 22' E), transported to laboratory and washed with deionized water to remove soil particles and other residues. Needle samples were dried during 24 hours and exposed to different temperatures: 200, 300, 400 and 500 ºC, during 2 hours. Ash colour was analysed according to the Munsell Soil Color charts. Ash was black (10 YR 2/1) at 200 ºC, very dark grey (10YR 3/1) at 300 ºC, gray (10YR 5/1) at 400 ºC and light gray (10YR 7/1) at 500 ºC. Ten samples of ash released after each treatment were placed in plastic dishes (50 mm in diameter) in an amount enough to form a 5 mm thick layer, and ash water repellency was measured according to the Water Drop Penetration Test. Later, ash was carefully wetted with 15 ml of deionized water and placed in an oven during 4 days (96 hours), as in Bodí et al. (2012). This procedure was repeated 5 times in order to observe the effects of wet-dry cycles in ash water repellency. The results showed significant differences

  8. Effect of bagasse ash reinforcement on dry sliding wear behaviour of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The influence of wear parameters on the wear rate of RLDPE were investigated. → The predicted wear rate of the RLDPE and it composites were found to lie close to that experimentally observed ones. → The results showed that the addition of bagasse ash as filler materials in RLDPE composites increase the wear resistance. -- Abstract: The tribological behaviour of recycled low density polyethylene (RLDPE) polymer composites with bagasse ash particles as a reinforcement was studied using a pin-on-disc wear rig under dry sliding conditions. The influence of wear parameters like, applied load, sliding speed, sliding distance and percentage of bagasse ash fillers, on the wear rate were investigated. A plan of experiments was performed to acquire data in a controlled way. Scanning electron microscope was used to analyse the worn surface of the samples. Linear regression equation and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were employed to investigate the influence of process parameters on the wear rate of the samples. The predicted wear rate of the RLDPE and it composites were found to lie close to that experimentally observed ones. The confirmation of the experiments conducted using ANOVA to verify the optimal testing parameters show that sliding speed and applied load had significant effect on the wear rate. The results showed that the addition of bagasse ash as filler materials in RLDPE composites increase the wear resistance of the composite greatly.

  9. Natural weathering in dry disposed ash dump: Insight from chemical, mineralogical and geochemical analysis of fresh and unsaturated drilled cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemi, S A; Akinlua, A; Gitari, W M; Khuse, N; Eze, P; Akinyeye, R O; Petrik, L F

    2012-07-15

    Some existing alternative applications of coal fly ash such as cement manufacturing; road construction; landfill; and concrete and waste stabilisation use fresh ash directly collected from coal-fired power generating stations. Thus, if the rate of usage continues, the demand for fresh ash for various applications will exceed supply and use of weathered dry disposed ash will become necessary alternative. As a result it's imperative to understand the chemistry and pH behaviour of some metals inherent in dry disposed fly ash. The bulk chemical composition as determined by XRF analysis showed that SiO2, Al2O3 and Fe2O3 were the major oxides in fresh ash and unsaturated weathered ashes. The unsaturated weathered ashes are relatively depleted in CaO, Fe2O3, TiO2, SiO2, Na2O and P2O5 due to dissolution and hydrolysis caused by chemical interaction with ingressing CO2 from the atmosphere and infiltrating rain water. Observed accumulations of Fe2O3, TiO2, CaO, K2O, Na2O and SO3 and Zn, Zr, Sr, Pb, Ni, Cr and Co in the lower layers indicate progressive downward movement through the ash dump though at a slow rate. The bulk mineralogy of unsaturated weathered dry disposed ash, as determined by XRD analysis, revealed quartz and mullite as the major crystalline phases; while anorthite, hematite, enstatite, lime, calcite, and mica were present as minor mineral phases. Pore water chemistry revealed a low concentration of readily soluble metals in unsaturated weathered ashes in comparison with fresh ash, which shows high leachability. This suggests that over time the precipitation of transient minor secondary mineral phases; such as calcite and mica might retard residual metal release from unsaturated weathered ash. Chloride and sulphate species of the water soluble extracts of weathered ash are at equilibrium with Na+ and K+; these demonstrate progressive leaching over time and become supersaturated at the base of unsaturated weathered ash. This suggests that the ash dump does not

  10. Properties of ceramics prepared using dry discharged waste to energy bottom ash dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourtsalas, Athanasios; Vandeperre, Luc; Grimes, Sue; Themelis, Nicolas; Koralewska, Ralf; Cheeseman, Chris

    2015-09-01

    The fine dust of incinerator bottom ash generated from dry discharge systems can be transformed into an inert material suitable for the production of hard, dense ceramics. Processing involves the addition of glass, ball milling and calcining to remove volatile components from the incinerator bottom ash. This transforms the major crystalline phases present in fine incinerator bottom ash dust from quartz (SiO(2)), calcite (CaCO(3)), gehlenite (Ca(2)Al(2)SiO(7)) and hematite (Fe(2)O(3)), to the pyroxene group minerals diopside (CaMgSi(2)O(6)), clinoenstatite (MgSi(2)O(6)), wollastonite (CaSiO(3)) together with some albite (NaAlSi(3)O(8)) and andradite (Ca(3)Fe(2)Si(3)O(12)). Processed powders show minimal leaching and can be pressed and sintered to form dense (>2.5 g cm(-3)), hard ceramics that exhibit low firing shrinkage (ceramic tiles that have potential for use in a range of industrial applications.

  11. Drying Shrinkage Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Concrete Incorporating Polyvinyl Alcohol Fibres and Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Noushini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study assesses the drying shrinkage behaviour of polyvinyl alcohol fibre reinforced concrete (PVA-FRC containing short-length (6 mm and long-length (12 mm uncoated monofilament PVA fibres at 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.375%, and 0.5% volumetric fractions. Fly ash is also used as a partial replacement of Portland cement in all mixes. PVA-FRC mixes have been compared to length change of control concrete (devoid of fibres at 3 storage intervals: early-age (0–7 days, short-term (0–28 days, and long-term (28–112 days intervals. The shrinkage results of FRC and control concrete up to 112 days indicated that all PVA-FRC mixes exhibited higher drying shrinkage than control. The shrinkage exhibited by PVA-FRC mixes ranged from 449 to 480 microstrain, where this value was only 427 microstrain in the case of control. In addition, the longer fibres exhibited higher mass loss, thus potentially contributing to higher shrinkage.

  12. Effect of Fly Ash and Carbon Reinforcement on Dry Sliding Wear Behaviour of Red Mud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harekrushna Sutar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explains the sliding wear performance of red mud, fly ash, and carbon composite coating on mild steel. The complex mixture of red mud, fly ash, and carbon is plasma sprayed at 9 kW operating power level. The coatings are examined to study the coating morphology, XRD phase transformation, wear rate, and wear morphology. Wear rate (in terms of cumulative mass loss with sliding time has been demonstrated in the study. At first pure red mud is plasma coated to observe the coating characteristics and then compounded with 20% carbon, 30% carbon, and 20% carbon + 30% fly ash, separately by weight and sliding wear test conducted using pin on disc wear tester. The trial was performed at fixed track diameter of 100 mm and at sliding speed of 100 rpm (0.523 m/s at a load of 30 N. The results are compared. Declined cumulative mass loss by inclusion of fly ash and carbon is seen. This might be due to augmented interfacial tension and dense film build-up at boundary layer.

  13. Blackberry wines mineral and heavy metal content determination after dry ashing: multivariate data analysis as a tool for fruit wine quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidžić Klarić, Daniela; Klarić, Ilija; Mornar, Ana; Velić, Darko; Velić, Natalija

    2015-08-01

    This study brings out the data on the content of 21 mineral and heavy metal in 15 blackberry wines made of conventionally and organically grown blackberries. The objective of this study was to classify the blackberry wine samples based on their mineral composition and the applied cultivation method of the starting raw material by using chemometric analysis. The metal content of Croatian blackberry wine samples was determined by AAS after dry ashing. The comparison between an organic and conventional group of investigated blackberry wines showed statistically significant difference in concentrations of Si and Li, where the organic group contained higher concentrations of these compounds. According to multivariate data analysis, the model based on the original metal content data set finally included seven original variables (K, Fe, Mn, Cu, Ba, Cd and Cr) and gave a satisfactory separation of two applied cultivation methods of the starting raw material.

  14. Total arsenic in foods after sequential wet digestion, dry ashing, coprecipitation with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, and graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A graphite-furnace atomic absorption (GFAAS) method is described for determining total arsenic (organic and inorganic compounds) in foods. Samples ranging from 1 to 40 g (depending on moisture content) were digested with HNO3 and dry-ashed at 500 degree C overnight after addition of MgO. After dissolution in HCl, the arsenic was reduced with iodide and ascorbic acid and precipitated with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) in the presence of nickel carrier. Precipitates were collected on 0.3μm cellulose acetate filters and dissolved in 10% HNO3 containing modifier. Ba(NO3)2 was added to remove a sulfate interference resulting from decomposition of APDC. Arsenic was determined using GFAAS. Accuracy of the method was good for 7 US National Bureau of Standards (NBS) Standard Reference Materials and 3 National Research Council of Canada (NRCC) round-robin samples. Recovery of arsenic(V) from foods averaged 99.2% for peak heights and 97.1% for peak areas, with relative standard deviations (RSD) of 2.2% for peak heights and 3.3% for peak areas for all NBS and NRCC materials. Detection limit of the method was ca 10 ng arsenic

  15. 粉煤灰对C50高性能混凝土干缩的影响%Effect of Fly ash on Dry Shrinkage of C50 High-Performance Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛艳军; 王文林

    2012-01-01

      研究了粉煤灰掺量对C50高性能混凝土HPC工作性、抗压强度以及干缩的影响。试验结果表明:粉煤灰掺量在10%~20%范围内,提高了混凝土的工作性能、后期抗压强度,降低了混凝土的干缩值。%  This paper studied the impact of fly ash on the workability, compressive strength and dry shrinkage of C50 high-performance concrete. The results showed that the performance of the concrete and its late compressive strength were improved, the drying shrinkage value reduced when fly ash was mixed with 10%-20%.

  16. Carbonation of lignite fly ash at ambient T and P in a semi-dry reaction system for CO{sub 2} sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Markus, E-mail: markus.bauer1@uni-bayreuth.de [Department of Hydrology, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Gassen, Niklas [Department of Hydrology, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Stanjek, Helge [Clay and Interface Mineralogy, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Peiffer, Stefan [Department of Hydrology, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > The carbonation of lignite fly ash was achieved under semi dry conditions at low temperature and pressure conditions. > Highest CO{sub 2}-uptake was reached for intermediate liquid-to-solid ratios of 0.12-0.18 L kg{sup -1}. > Increasing mixing intensity or pCO{sub 2} caused higher carbonation rates, suggesting limitation by CO{sub 2} supply. > Up to 4.8 mmol CO{sub 2} g{sup -1} were absorbed, corresponding to 53% of the theoretical CO{sub 2} binding capacity of the material. > Both Ca and Mg containing phases were converted into carbonate minerals. - Abstract: The global rise in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations calls for practicable solutions to capture CO{sub 2}. In this study, a mineral carbonation process was applied in which CO{sub 2} reacts with alkaline lignite ash and forms stable carbonate solids. In comparison to previous studies, the assays were conducted at low temperatures and pressures and under semi-dry reaction conditions in an 8 L laboratory mixing device. In order to find optimum process conditions the pCO{sub 2} (10-20%), stirring rate (500-3000 rpm) and the liquid to solid ratio (L/S = 0.03-0.36 L kg{sup -1}) were varied. In all experiments a considerable CO{sub 2} uptake from the gas phase was observed. Concurrently the solid phase contents of Ca and Mg (hydr)oxides decreased and CaCO{sub 3} and MgCO{sub 3} fractions increased throughout the experiments, showing that CO{sub 2} was stabilized as a solid carbonate. The carbonation reaction depends on three factors: Dissolution of CO{sub 2} in the liquid phase, mobilization of Ca and Mg from the mineral surface and precipitation of the carbonate solids. Those limitations were found to depend strongly on the variation of the process parameters. Optimum reaction conditions could be found for L/S ratios between 0.12 and 0.18, medium stirring velocities and pCO{sub 2} between 10% and 20%. Maximum CO{sub 2} uptake by the solid phase was 4.8 mmol g{sup -1} after 120 min

  17. 干式排渣在大型电站锅炉上的运行特性分析%Operating Characteristic Analysis of Dry Bottom Ash Handling System on Power Station Boiler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董信光; 李洪涛; 冷成岗; 李德功

    2012-01-01

    Comparing to the discharging slag by water, the dry bottom ash handling system has many advantages such as simple structure, water conserving, more useful. When the bottom ash system has been changed from water mode to dry mode, the operating characteristics of boiler will be varied, which is analyzed and optimized in detailed. Positive and negative impacts are found, which can be referred when the bottom ash system revised and boiler operating.%和水力除渣方式相比,干式排渣有结构简单、节水、干渣经济价值高等优点。将原水力除渣改为干式排渣后,锅炉的运行特性会发生变化,通过对干式排渣运行特性的全面分析和优化,找出积极因素和负面影响,为除渣系统的改造和运行提供参考。

  18. 白蜡木、黑胡桃木、橄榄木的干缩湿胀特性研究%Study on the Dry Shrinkage and Well Swelling Properties of White Ash, Black Walnut and Olive Wood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏路; 陈凤义; 孙照斌; 蔡家斌

    2015-01-01

    实木制品的干缩湿胀性直接影响其尺寸稳定性,对白蜡木、黑胡桃木和橄榄木的干缩湿胀特性研究结果表明:三种木材全干状态下的体积干缩率分别为13.88%、10.85%、9.89%,气干状态下的体积干缩率分别为4.89%、4.71%、4.14%,气干至饱水状态下的体积湿胀率分别为18.28%、12.82%、11.54%,全干至气干状态下的体积湿胀率分别为5.94%、4.20%、3.96%。三种木材中白蜡木的干缩湿胀性最强,黑胡桃木次之,橄榄木最小。研究结果对实木制品用材含水率的控制具有一定的指导意义。%The dry shrinkage and wet expansion rate of solid wood products directly affects the dimensional stability of solid wood products. In this paper,the results of study on the dry shrinkage and wet expansion properties of ash,black walnut and olive wood show that the dry shrinkage and wet expansion rates of white ash,black walnut and olive wood are respectively 13.88%,10.85% and 9.89%,respectively 4.89%,4.71% and 4.14% under the air dry state,and respectively 18.28%, 12.82% and 11.54% under the whole dry and air dry status. Of the three kinds of wood,white ash has the largest dry shrink-age and wet expansion rate,walnut coming second,olive wood coming bottom. The research results are of certain guidance on the control of water content of wood used for solid wood products.

  19. 干、湿式除渣系统对锅炉效率影响的研究%Study on the Impact of Dry and Wet Bottom Ash Handling Systems on Boiler Efficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许华; 张华伦; 王仕能; 党楠

    2013-01-01

    So far the impacts of air-cooling dry-type bottom ash handling system on boiler efficiency are still controversial and very few authoritative conclusions have been drawn.After three years' research on the system,the mathematical models including boiler efficiency and cooling air volume are established.Combining with the tests conducted in two 1 000-MW boilers of one power plant,it is concluded that the dry-type bottom ash handling system does have impacts on boiler combustion and lower the boiler efficiency under most circumstances.In addition,the impacts of the dry-type bottom ash handling system are greater than those of the wet-type system.The easy-cooking coal is not a suitable choice for the boilers with dry-type system.If the coal quality of the power plant fluctuates drastically,it is critical to choose the dry-type system meticulously.%风冷干式除渣系统对锅炉效率的影响目前尚存争议,缺少权威定论.通过为期3年的对干式除渣系统的研究,建立了锅炉效率、炉渣冷却风量等参数的数学模型,坐合对某电厂1000MW锅炉干式除渣系统的运行测试,得出干式除渣系统在多数情况下影响锅炉燃烧、降低锅炉效率;干式除渣系统比湿式除渣系统对锅炉燃烧及效率的影响更大;易结焦煤不宜采用干式除渣系统;当电厂燃煤煤质变化较大时,应慎重采用干式除渣系统等结论.

  20. 干熄焦除尘灰配入钒钛矿烧结的研究%RESEARCH ABOUT ADDING DEDUSTING ASH OF DRY QUENCHING OF COKE IN SINTERING OF VANADIUM-TITANIUM ORE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王英杰

    2015-01-01

    烧结固体燃料中配加一定量的干熄焦除尘灰,在保证烧结过程主要参数和烧结矿指标变化不大的前提下,可以适当降低烧结矿固体燃料消耗和生产成本。对干熄焦除尘灰配入钒钛矿烧结固体燃料的可行性及其合理配比进行了探讨,认为干熄焦除尘灰配入钒钛矿烧结是可行的,且配比在0.2%较为适宜。%To add a certain amount of dedusting ash of dry quenching of coke in solid fuel material of sintering can reduce solid fuel consumption to a certain extent and save production cost with main parameters of sinte-ring guaranteed and no large cha neg in indexes of sinter.It is discussed the feasibility to add dedusting ash of dry quenching of coke into solid fuel of vanadium-titanium ore sintering and suitable proportion, considered this method is feasible and the appropriate proportion as 0.2%.

  1. Research and the Application of Large-capacity Dry Ash Extractor and Its Key Equipment%大容量干式排渣机及其关键设备的研究与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王启杰; 李久锋

    2013-01-01

    结合山西大唐国际运城发电厂干式排渣机的应用,从如何提高锅炉底渣的冷却效果及设备的安全性两方面出发,阐述了大容量干式排渣机及其关键设备的研制情况,经现场测试该设备各项运行参数达到并超过了设计值,对火电厂燃煤煤质适应性较强。%Based on the operation situation of dry ash extractor in Shanxi Datang International Yuncheng Power Plant,this paper elaborates the development of large-capacity dry ash extractor and its key equipment proceeding from the aspects of how to improve the cooling effect of boiler bottom slag and improve the equipment security. Through test in actual operation,each operation parameter of the equipment is verified to be superior than the designed standard.

  2. 干式排渣系统网条生产设备的研制%Development of Steel Net Strip Producing Equipment in Dry Bottom Ash Handling System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张培林

    2015-01-01

    Stainless steel net strip is the key components of dry bottom ash handling system,usually be cold manufactured by the stainless steel wire of the greater tensile strength,the process is complex,the forming is difficult and in the same time,there is not the professional production equipment interiorly for manufacturing such products.We developed the net strip winding machine for the engineering demand of dry bottom ash handling system.The net strip product,manufactured through this equipment,has been well validated in engineering practice,this equipment fill a domestic gap in the field,with the great value of development and application.%网条是干式排渣系统的关键零部件,通常采用抗拉强度较大的不锈钢丝冷加工而成,其加工工艺复杂,成形难度大,而目前国内尚无此类产品的专业生产设备.针对干式排渣系统的工程需求,研制了网条绕制机.该设备绕制的网条产品在工程实践中得到了很好的验证,填补了该领域的国内空白,具有广泛的应用与开发价值.

  3. Zooplankton biomass (displacement volume, dry mass, ash-free dry mass) data collected in Eastern Central Atlantic during CIPREA project from 1978-07-25 to 1978-09-12 by France (NODC Accession 0070783)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton biomass (displacement volume, dry mass, and ashfree dry mass) data collected in Eastern Central Atlantic during CIPREA project in Jul - Sep 1978 by...

  4. Magnetic mapping of fly-ash pollution and heavy metals from soil samples around a point source in a dry tropical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Atul Prakash; Tripathi, B D

    2008-03-01

    The Singrauli region in the southeastern part of Uttar Pradesh, India is one of the most polluted industrial sites of Asia. It encompasses 11 open cast coal mines and six thermal power stations that generate about 7,500 MW (about 10% of India's installed generation capacity) electricity. Thermal power plants represent the main source of pollution in this region, emitting six million tonnes of fly-ash per annum. Fly-ash is deposited on soils over a large area surrounding thermal power plants. Fly-ashes have high surface concentrations of several toxic elements (heavy metals) and high atmospheric mobility. Fly ash is produced through high-temperature combustion of fossil fuel rich in ferromagnetic minerals. These contaminants can be identified using rock-magnetic methods. Magnetic susceptibility is directly linked to the concentration of ferromagnetic minerals, primarily high values of magnetite. In this study, magnetic susceptibility of top soil samples collected from surrounding areas of a bituminous-coal-fired power plant were measured to identify areas of high emission levels and to chart the spatial distribution of airborne solid particles. Sites close to the power plant have shown higher values of susceptibility that decreases with increasing distance from the source. A significant correlation between magnetic susceptibility and heavy metal content in soils is found. A comparison of the spatial distribution of magnetic susceptibility with heavy-metal concentrations in soil samples suggests that magnetic measurements can be used as a rapid and inexpensive method for proxy mapping of air borne pollution due to industrial activity.

  5. Electrodialytic removal of Cd from biomass combustion fly ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Simonsen, Peter;

    2004-01-01

    Due to a high concentration of Cd, biomass combustion fly ash often fails to meet the Danish legislative requirements for recycling on agricultural fields. In this work the potential of using the method Electrodialytic Remediation to reduce the concentration of Cd in different biomass combustion...... fly ashes was studied. Four fly ashes were investigated, originating from combustion of straw (two ashes), wood chips, and co-firing of wood pellets and fuel oil, respectively. One of the straw ashes had been pre-washed and was obtained suspended in water, the other ashes were obtained naturally dry....... The initial Cd concentration in the ashes varied between 8.8 mg Cd/kg DM (co-firing ash) and 64 mg Cd/kg DM (pre-washed straw ash), and pH varied from 3.7 to 13.3. In spite of large differences in ash characteristics, the electrodialytic remediation experiments indicated a good remediation potential for all...

  6. Radioactivity of wood ash; Puun tuhkan radioaktiivisuus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rantavaara, A.; Moring, M

    2000-01-01

    STUK (Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority) has investigated natural and artificial radioactivity in wood ash and radiation exposure from radionuclides in ash since 1996. The aim was to consider both handling of ash and different ways of using ash. In all 87 ash samples were collected from 22 plants using entirely or partially wood for their energy production in 1996-1997. The sites studied represented mostly chemical forest industry, sawmills or district heat production. Most plants used fluidised bed combustion technique. Samples of both fly ash and bottom ash were studied. The activity concentrations of radionuclides in samples of, e.g., dried fly ash from fuel containing more than 80% wood were determined. The means ranged from 2000 to less than 50 Bq kg{sup -1}, in decreasing order: {sup 137}Cs, {sup 40}K, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 210}Pb,{sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 235}U. In bott radionuclide contents decreased in the same order as in fly ash, but were smaller, and {sup 210}Pb was hardly detectable. The NH{sub 4}Ac extractable fractions of activities for isotopes of alkaline elements (K, Cs) in bottom ash were lower than in fly ash, whereas solubility of heavier isotopes was low. Safety requirements defined by STUK in ST-guide 12.2 for handling of peat ash were fulfilled at each of the sites. Use of ash for land-filling and construction of streets was minimal during the sampling period. Increasing this type of ash use had often needed further investigations, as description of the use of additional materials that attenuate radiation. Fertilisation of forests with wood ash adds slightly to the external irradiation in forests, but will mostly decrease doses received through use of timber, berries, mushrooms and game meat. (orig.)

  7. EDU 626 ASH

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 40 course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com     Product Description EDU 626 Week 1 Research Topic (Ash) EDU 626 Week 2 Annotated Bibliography (Ash) EDU 626 Week 2 Critical Thinking Questions (Ash) EDU 626 Week 3 Procedures or Methods (Ash) EDU 626 Week 4 Critical Thinking Questions (Ash) EDU 626 Week 5 Critical Thinking Questions (Ash) EDU 626 Week 6 Final Paper (Ash)  

  8. Determination of Total Solids and Ash in Algal Biomass: Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Wychen, S.; Laurens, L. M. L.

    2013-12-01

    This procedure describes the methods used to determine the amount of moisture or total solids present in a freeze-dried algal biomass sample, as well as the ash content. A traditional convection oven drying procedure is covered for total solids content, and a dry oxidation method at 575?C is covered for ash content.

  9. Transformations in oil shale ash at wet deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estonian oil shale ash contains chemically active compounds which would undergo different spontaneous transformations in the atmosphere of air. For explaining these processes the system ash-water-air was studied storing moisture samples of ash in laboratory in open-air as well as hermetic conditions. The samples of dry ash formed at pulverized combustion of oil shale at the Baltic Power Plant, and samples obtained from ash storing plateau from different depth of different boreholes were under investigation. Storing conditions as well as the properties of initial samples have a great influence upon the processes taking place at storing of ashes. The results obtained could be used to explain and control the processes taking place at storing of ashes under atmospheric (wet) conditions

  10. Triple oxygen and sulfur isotope analyses of sulfate extracted from voluminous volcanic ashes in the Oligocene John Day Formation: insight into dry climate conditions and ozone contribution to supereruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, J.; Bindeman, I. N.; Martin, E.; Retallack, G.; Palandri, J. L.; Weldon, N.

    2014-12-01

    Large volume pyroclastic silicic eruptions emit hundreds of megatons of SO2 into the troposphere and stratosphere that is oxidized into sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by a variety of reactions with mass independent oxygen signatures (MIF), Δ17O>0. Sulfuric acid is then preserved as gypsum in parental volcanic deposits. Diagenic effects are mass dependent and can dilute, but otherwise do not affect MIF ratios. Pleistocene Yellowstone and Bishop tuffs and modern volcanic eruptions preserved under arid climate conditions in North American playa lakes, preserve small amounts of volcanic sulfate as gypsum. This gypsum's Δ17O>0, in combination with isotopic variations of δ18O, δ33S and δ34S is distinct from sedimentary sulfate and reveals its original MIF sulfate isotopic signal and the effect of super eruptions on the atmosphere, and ozone consumption in particular. We use linear algebraic equations to resolve volcanic versus sedimentary (MIF=0) sources. We have found that many large volume ignimbrites have very high initial Δ17O in volcanic sulfate that can only be acquired from reaction with stratospheric ozone. We here investigate nine thick (>2 m) ash beds ranging in age from ~33-23 Ma in the John Day Formation of central Oregon, including massive 28.6 Ma Picture Gorge tuff of newly identified Crooked River supercaldera. The 28.6 Ma Picture Gorge tuff (PGT) has the highest measured Δ17O of 3.5‰, and other tuffs (Tin Roof, Biotite, Deep Creek) have +1.3 to 3.4‰ Δ17O excesses. Sulfate from modern smaller tropospheric eruptions studied for comparison have a resolvable 0.4‰ range consistent with liquid-phase based H2O2 oxidation. The PGT is coeval with the ignimbrite flare-up in western N. America, the 28-29 Ma eruption of the 5000 km3 Fish Canyon tuff and the 28 Ma Never Summer Field eruption in Nebraska-Colorado that have the highest measured Δ17O of 6‰ (Bao et al. 2003). We speculate on the climatic/atmospheric effects of these multiple ~28 Ma supereruptions

  11. Heavy metals in MSW incineration fly ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Celia; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2003-01-01

    related to the combustion of MSW and the formation of fly ash, especially in what concerns heavy metals. Treatment of the flue gas in air pollution control equipment plays an important role and the basic processes to accomplish this are explained. Fly ash from a semi-dry flue gas treatment system......Incineration is a common solution for dealing with the increasing amount of municipal solid waste (MSW). During the process, the heavy metals initially present in the waste go through several transformations, ending up in combustion products, such as fly ash. This article deals with some issues...... is characterized regarding its physical-chemical properties: pH, solubility, chemical composition, and leaching, amongst others. Results indicate a high alkalinity and the presence of large amounts of calcium, chlorides, sulfates, carbonates, sodium and potassium. Metal concentrations in fly ash are: 6,2 g...

  12. [Ash Meadows Purchase Proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A proposal sent to the Richard King Mellon Foundation for a loan to fund the purchase of Ash Meadows by the Nature Conservancy. Ash Meadows, set outside of Las...

  13. Expansion control for cementation of incinerated ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method, in which incinerated ash is solidified with a cement material, has been developed to dispose of radioactive incinerated ash waste. A small amount of metallic Al, which was not oxidized in the incineration, existed in the ash. When such ash was mixed with a cement material and water, alkaline components in the ash and the cement were dissolved in the mixing water and then metallic Al reaction with the alkaline compounds resulted in generation of H2. Because the H2 generation began immediately just after the mixing, H2 bubbles pushed up the mixed grout material and an expanded solidified form was obtained. The expansion leads to lowering the strength of the solidified form and making harmful void. In this study, we tried to control H2 generation from the reaction of metallic Al in the cementation by means of following two methods, one was a method to let metallic Al react prior to the cementation and the other was a method to add an expansion inhibitor that made an oxide film on the surface of metallic Al. In the pre-treatment, the ash was soaked in water in order to let metallic Al react with it, and then the ash with the immersion solution was dried at 105 Celsius degrees. The pre-treated ash was mixed with an ordinary portland cement and water. The inhibitor of lithium nitrite, sodium nitrite, phosphoric acid, or potassium dihydrogen phosphate was added at the mixing process. The solidified forms prepared using the pre-treated ash and lithium nitrite were not expanded. Phosphoric acid and sodium nitrite were effective for expansion control, but potassium dihydrogen phosphate did not work. (authors)

  14. Electrodialytic removal of cadmium from straw combustion fly ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik K.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2004-01-01

    Fly ash from straw combustion contains valuable nutrients when returned to agricultural soils. In many instances, however, this fly ash may contain heavy metals, such as cadmium, at levels which often exceed the limits given by the Danish legislation. Thus before utilizing the nutrients, cadmium...... must be removed from these ashes. The use of an electrodialytic remediation method to remove cadmium from fly ash arising from straw combustion and containing 11.2 mg Cd kg$+-1$/ DM (dry matter) was accessed. After 36 days of remediation at a constant current density of 5.6 mA cm$+-2$/ more than 97......% of the cadmium had been removed from around 150 g ash on a dry basis. $CPY 2004 Society of Chemical Industry....

  15. Effect of refractory agent on ash fusibility temperatures of briquette

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-xing CUI; Kui HUANG; Ming-sui LIN

    2013-01-01

    To solve the problem of the low ash fusion point of briquette,this paper reported that the ash fusibility temperatures can be elevated by changing ash ingredients through blending refractory agents in briquette ash,which will create favorable conditions for moving bed continuous gasification of briquette with oxygen-rich air.The effects of Al2O3,SiO2,kaolin,dry powder and bentonite on ash fusibility temperatures were studied,based upon the relationship between briquette ash components and ash fusibility.The results show that the increasing of ash fusibility temperatures by adding the same amount (11%,w)of refractory agents follows the sequence of SiO2,bentonite,dry powder,kaolin,Al2O3,with the softening temperatures beingelevated by 37.2,57.6,60.4,82.6 and 104.4 ℃.With the same ratio of SiO2/Al2O3 in briquette,adding the Al2O3 component is more effective than SiO2 for raising ash fusibility temperatures.In this paper,inexpensive kaolin and bentonite rich in Al2O3 are found to be better refractory agents,and the suitable adding quantities are 9% and 11%,respectively.

  16. Experimental Study on Durability Improvement of Fly Ash Concrete with Durability Improving Admixture

    OpenAIRE

    Quan, Hong-zhu; Kasami, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the durability of fly ash concrete, a series of experimental studies are carried out, where durability improving admixture is used to reduce drying shrinkage and improve freezing-thawing resistance. The effects of durability improving admixture, air content, water-binder ratio, and fly ash replacement ratio on the performance of fly ash concrete are discussed in this paper. The results show that by using durability improving admixture in nonair-entraining fly ash concrete,...

  17. Effect of Fly Ash on Durability of High Performance Concrete Composites

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Zhang; Qingfu Li

    2013-01-01

    A parametric experimental study has been conducted to investigate the effect of fly ash on the durability of the concrete composites. Four different fly ash contents (10, 15, 20 and 25% respectively) were used. The durability of concrete composites includes water impermeability, dry shrinkage property, the carbonation resistance and the freeze-thaw resistance. The results indicate that the addition of fly ash has greatly improved the water impermeability and restricted the dry shrinkage of co...

  18. ASH MELTING TEMPERATURE PREDICTION FROM CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF BIOMASS ASH

    OpenAIRE

    Holubcik, Michal; Jandacka, Jozef; Malcho, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Solid fuels, including biomass, consist of combustible, ash and water. Ash in fuel is result of reaction of minerals presented in the biomass. Minerals and other different substances which form ash got into biomass during growth. Ash is solid residue resulted from the perfect laboratory combustion of fuel. It is composed of minerals that are present in the fuel. Some species of biomass ash have low ash melting temperature and can cause various problems in combustion boilers. Ash slags and sin...

  19. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum and fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cumberland Fossil Plant (CUF) is located in Stewart County, Tennessee, and began commercial operation in 1972. This is the Tennessee Valley Authority's newest fossil (coal-burning) steam electric generating plant. Under current operating conditions, the plant burns approximately seven million tons of coal annually. By-products from the combustion of coal are fly ash, approximately 428,000 tons annually, and bottom ash, approximately 115,000 tons annually. Based on historical load and projected ash production rates, a study was initially undertaken to identify feasible alternatives for marketing, utilization and disposal of ash by-products. The preferred alternative to ensure that facilities are planned for all by-products which will potentially be generated at CUF is to plan facilities to handle wet FGD gypsum and dry fly ash. A number of different sites were evaluated for their suitability for development as FGD gypsum and ash storage facilities. LAW Engineering was contracted to conduct onsite explorations of sites to develop information on the general mature of subsurface soil, rock and groundwater conditions in the site areas. Surveys were also conducted on each site to assess the presence of endangered and threatened species, wetlands and floodplains, archaeological and cultural resources, prime farmland and other site characteristics which must be considered from an environmental perspective

  20. Fly ash carbon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  1. Shedding of ash deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zbogar, Ana; Frandsen, Flemming; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    2009-01-01

    Ash deposits formed during fuel thermal conversion and located on furnace walls and on convective pass tubes, may seriously inhibit the transfer of heat to the working fluid and hence reduce the overall process efficiency. Combustion of biomass causes formation of large quantities of troublesome....... Low melting temperatures make straw ashes especially troublesome, since their stickiness is higher at lower temperatures, compared to coal ashes. Increased stickiness will eventually lead to a higher collection efficiency of incoming ash particles, meaning that the deposit may grow even faster...

  2. Potential fly-ash utilization in agriculture: A global review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manisha Basu; Manish Pande; P.B.S. Bhadoria; S.C. Mahapatra

    2009-01-01

    Though in last four decades various alternate energy sources have come into the limelight, the hyperbolic use of coal as a prime energy source cannot be counterbalanced. Disposal of high amount of fly-ash from thermal power plants absorbs huge amount of water, energy and land area by ash ponds. In order to meet the growing energy demand, various environmental, economic and social problems associated with the disposal of fly-ash would continue to increase. Therefore, fly-ash management would remain a great concern of the century. Fly-ash has great potentiality in agriculture due to its efficacy in modification of soil health and crop performance. The high concentration of elements (K, Na, Zn, Ca, Mg and Fe) in fly-ash increases the yield of many agricultural crops. But compared to other sectors, the use of fly-ash in agriculture is limited. An exhaustive review of numerous studies of last four decades took place in this paper, which systematically covers the importance, scope and apprehension regarding utilization of fly-ash in agriculture. The authors concluded that though studies have established some solutions to handle the problems of radioactivity and heavy metal content in flyash, long-term confirmatory research and demonstration are necessary. This paper also identified some areas, like proper handling of dry ash in plants as well as in fields, ash pond management (i.e., faster decantation, recycling of water, vertical expansion rather than horizontal), monitoring of soil health, crop quality, and fate of fly-ash in time domain, where research thrust is required. Agricultural lime application contributes to global warming as Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assumes that all the carbon in agricultural lime is finally released as CO2to the atmosphere. It is expected that use of fly-ash instead of lime in agriculture can reduce net CO2emission, thus reduce global warming also.

  3. Research on Existing Pattern of Carbon and Its Removal from Fly Ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨玉芬; 章新喜; 陈清如

    2002-01-01

    Flyash is a fine and dispersed powder discharged from power station a fter the coal being burned. With the deepening of people's recognition about the pollution problem of fly ash, the ways of utilizing fly ash are gradually incre asing. Utilizing value of fly ash is closely related to the unburned carbon cont ent.On the basis of analysis of modern testing method,a fundamental thinking I stheoretically posed for decreasing unburned carbon content from fly ash by a d ry removing carbon technology. The triboelectric separation method shown that the above-mentioned thinking of dry removing carbon from fly ash is practical.

  4. Experimental study on thermal conductivity of fly ash autoclaved aerated concrete block drying in natural environment%自然干燥状态下粉煤灰蒸压加气混凝土砌块导热系数实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄建恩; 闫加贺; 吕恒林; 冯伟; 张丙利; 周泰

    2012-01-01

    Moisture content of fly ash autoclaved concrete blocks (ACB) affects not only the thermal conductivity seriously but also the building operational energy consumption and indoor thermal or humid environment. The moisture content of ACB changes with time in natural drying environment. The thermal conductivity and moisture content of ACB are tested by stages in experiment natural environment. Then we get variation laws of thermal conductivity and moisture with time in the natural environment. The function of fly ash autoclaved concrete block's thermal conductivity to moisture content is fitted based on nonlinear least square method. The research results will provide basis and reference for studying on building energy consumption and indoor thermal or humid environment affected by fly ash autoclaved concrete blocks' thermal conductivity and moisture content in natural environment.%粉煤灰蒸压加气混凝土砌块的含水率对导热系数有较大的影响,从而影响到建筑运行能耗和室内热湿环境.自然干燥状态下砌块的含水率随时间不断变化,通过对实验室自然干燥状态下不同时间段的粉煤灰蒸压加气混凝土砌块含水率和导热系数的实验测试,得出了导热系数、含水率随静置时间的变化规律,并运用非线性最小二乘法拟合得出了导热系数-含水率函数,为进一步研究粉煤灰蒸压加气混凝土砌块自然干燥状态对建筑能耗和室内热湿环境的影响提供参考依据.

  5. Self-healing ability of fly ash-cement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipat Termkhajornkit; Toyoharu Nawa; Yoichi Yamashiro; Toshiki Saito [Lafarge Research Centre, Quentin Fallavier (France). Reactive Components Department

    2009-03-15

    Concrete is susceptible to cracking due to both autogenous and drying shrinkage. Nevertheless, most of these types of cracks occur before 28 days. Because fly ash continues to hydrate after 28 days, it is likely that hydrated products from fly ash may modify microstructure, seal these cracks, and prolong the service life. This research investigates the self-healing ability of fly ash-cement paste. Compressive strength, porosity, chloride diffusion coefficients, hydration reactions and hydrated products were studied. The research focuses on behavior after 28 days. According to the experimental results, the fly ash-cement system has the self-healing ability for cracks that occur from shrinkage. The self-healing ability increased when the fraction of fly ash increased.

  6. Stabilization of Expansive Soil by Lime and Fly Ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ji-ru; CAO Xing

    2002-01-01

    An experimental program was undertaken to study the individual and admixed effects of lime and fly ash on the geotechnical characteristics of expansive soil. Lime and fly ash were added to the expansive soil at 4% -6% and 40% - 50% by dry weight of soil, respectively. Testing specimens were determined and examined in chemical composition, grain size distribution, consistency limits, compaction, CBR ,free swell and swell capacity. The effect of lime and fly ash addition on reducing the swelling potential of an expansive soil is presented.It is revealed that a change of expansive soil texture takes place when lime and fly ash are mixed with expansive soil. Plastic limit increases by mixing lime and liquid limit decreases by mixing fly ash, which decreases plasticity index. As the amount of lime and fly ash is increased, there are an apparent reduction in maximum dry density,free swell and swelling capacity under 50 kPa pressure, and a corresponding increase in the percentage of coarse particles, optimum moisture content and CBR value. Based on the results, it can be concluded that the expansive soil can be successfully stabilized by lime and fly ash.

  7. Forest fuel, ashes and ecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-scale use of bioenergy is an essential measure if several of the major environmental problems are to be solved. However, it is important to utilize the possibilities available to produce biofuel without creating new environmental problems. Whole-tree removal gives a considerable reduction in the nitrogen lead which, in combination with the return of ashes, counteracts the nutrient imbalance and acidification in southern Sweden. Forestry of that kind should lead to lower total leaching of nitrogen in comparison with conventional forestry. In situations where there is high deposition of atmospheric sulphur and nitrogen, fuel removal with return of a moderate dose of slowly dissolvable ashes should be a good soil management measure. The humus status and flora/fauna always require some kind of consideration. With compensation measures and retained nutrient status there should be no problems with the humus status on most soils. However, on poor and dry soils, it is suitable to avoid whole-tree removal on account of the humus status. Consideration to nature includes, for example, increasing the number of broad-leaf trees, old trees and dead wood (preferably the trunks). These measures concern all types of forestry and are not linked directly with fuel removal. Removal of felling residues and return of ashes are of minor importance in comparison with this and fit well into forestry adapted to natural values. With correct planning and accomplishment of the removal of forest fuel the natural values of the forest can be retained or even improved. Forestry where fuel is also produced can be designed whereby negative effects are avoided at the same time as positive environmental effects are obtained. 68 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  8. Fly ash: Perspective resource for geo-polymer materials production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargin, Aleksey; Baev, Vladimir; Mashkin, Nikolay; Uglyanica, Andrey

    2016-01-01

    The present paper presents the information about the chemical and mineralogical composition of the ash and slag and their amounts at the dumps of the thermoelectric plants located in the city of Kemerovo. It is known that about 85% of ash and slag from the thermoelectric plants in Russia are removed by means of the hydraulic sluicing systems and only about 15% - by the systems of pneumatic ash handling. Currently, however, the transition from the "wet" ash removal systems to the "dry" ones is outlined. This process is quite logical since the fly ash has the higher reactivity compared with the hydraulic sluicing ash and therefore it is of the great interest for recycling and use. On the other hand, the recent trend is the increased use of fly ash in the production of geo-polymers due to their availability, workability and the increased life of the final product. The analysis is carried out to check the possibility of using the fly ash from various Kemerovo thermoelectric plants as a raw material for the production of the alkali-activated binder.

  9. ACC 305 ASH

    OpenAIRE

    admn

    2015-01-01

    ACC 305 ASH Check this A+ tutorial guideline at   http://www.assignmentcloud.com/ACC-305-ASH/ACC-305-ASH-Complete-Class ACC 305 Week 1 Assignments E 3-18, E 3-20, J Case 3-5 ACC 305 Week 1 DQ 1 FASB and Ethics ACC 305 Week 1 DQ 2 Cash versus Accrual & Financial Disclosures ACC 305 Week 2 DQ 1 Earnings Management Case 4-3 ACC 305 Week 2 DQ 2 Revenue Recognition Case 5-2 ACC 305 Week 2 Problem E4-16 Bluebonnet Bakers ACC 305 Week 2 Problem E4-19 ...

  10. HIS 204 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    JOHN

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   HIS 204 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 1 DQ 2 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) HIS 204 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) HIS 204 Week 3 Assignment Women Right, Sacrifices & Independence (Ash) HIS 204 Week 3 DQ 1 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 3 DQ 2 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 4 DQ 1 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 4 DQ 2 (Ash) HIS 204 Week 4 Quiz (Ash) HIS 204 Week 5 DQ 1 (Ash) ...

  11. Influence of fly ash fineness on water requirement and shrinkage of blended cement mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanissorn Vimonsatit

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the influence of fly ash fineness on water requirement and shrinkage of blended cement mortar was studied. The results indicate that the water requirement and shrinkage characteristic of the blended cement mortar are dependent on fly ash fineness and replacement level. The use of coarse fly ash slightly reduces the water requirement but greatly reduced the drying and the autogenous shrinkage of the blended cement mortars and the reduction is more with an increase in the fly ash replacement level. The finer fly ashes further reduce the water requirement, but increase the drying and the autogenous shrinkages as compared with coarser fly ash. The incorporation of superplasticizer drastically reduces the water requirement, but the effect on the drying and autogenous shrinkages of the normal Portland cement mortar is small. However, for the fly ash mortar, the use of superplasticizer results in a decrease in drying shrinkage and in a substantial increase in the autogenous shrinkage particularly for the fine fly ash at a high replacement level.

  12. Fusion characterization of biomass ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Teng; Fan, Chuigang; Hao, Lifang;

    2016-01-01

    The ash fusion characteristics are important parameters for thermochemical utilization of biomass. In this research, a method for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash by Thermo-mechanical Analyzer, TMA, is described. The typical TMA shrinking ratio curve can be divided into two...... stages, which are closely related to ash melting behaviors. Several characteristics temperatures based on the TMA curves are used to assess the ash fusion characteristics. A new characteristics temperature, Tm, is proposed to represent the severe melting temperature of biomass ash. The fusion...... characteristics of six types of biomass ash have been measured by TMA. Compared with standard ash fusibility temperatures (AFT) test, TMA is more suitable for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash. The glassy molten areas of the ash samples are sticky and mainly consist of K-Ca-silicates....

  13. To fractionate municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash: Key for utilisation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sormunen, Laura Annika; Rantsi, Riina

    2015-11-01

    For the past decade, the Finnish waste sector has increasingly moved from the landfilling of municipal solid waste towards waste incineration. New challenges are faced with the growing amounts of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash, which are mainly landfilled at the moment. Since this is not a sustainable or a profitable solution, finding different utilisation applications for the municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash is crucial. This study reports a comprehensive analysis of bottom ash properties from one waste incineration plant in Finland, which was first treated with a Dutch bottom ash recovery technique called advanced dry recovery. This novel process separates non-ferrous and ferrous metals from bottom ash, generating mineral fractions of different grain sizes (0-2 mm, 2-5 mm, 5-12 mm and 12-50 mm). The main aim of the study was to assess, whether the advanced bottom ash treatment technique, producing mineral fractions of different grain sizes and therefore properties, facilitates the utilisation of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash in Finland. The results were encouraging; the bottom ash mineral fractions have favourable behaviour against the frost action, which is especially useful in the Finnish conditions. In addition, the leaching of most hazardous substances did not restrict the utilisation of bottom ash, especially for the larger fractions (>5 mm). Overall, this study has shown that the advanced bottom ash recovering technique can be one solution to increase the utilisation of bottom ash and furthermore decrease its landfilling in Finland.

  14. Potential of phosphorus recovery from sewage sludge and manure ash by thermochemical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havukainen, Jouni; Nguyen, Mai Thanh; Hermann, Ludwig; Horttanainen, Mika; Mikkilä, Mirja; Deviatkin, Ivan; Linnanen, Lassi

    2016-03-01

    All life forms require phosphorus (P), which has no substitute in food production. The risk of phosphorus loss from soil and limited P rock reserves has led to the development of recycling P from industrial residues. This study investigates the potential of phosphorus recovery from sewage sludge and manure ash by thermochemical treatment (ASH DEC) in Finland. An ASH DEC plant could receive 46-76 kt/a of sewage sludge ash to produce 51-85 kt/a of a P-rich product with a P2O5 content of 13-18%, while 320-750 kt/a of manure ash could be supplied to produce 350-830 kt/a of a P-rich product with a P content of 4-5%. The P2O5 potential in the total P-rich product from the ASH DEC process using sewage sludge and manure ash is estimated to be 25-47 kt/a, which is significantly more than the P fertilizer demand in Finland's agricultural industries. The energy efficiency of integrated incineration and the ASH DEC process is more dependent on the total solid content and the subsequent need for mechanical dewatering and thermal drying than on the energy required by the ASH DEC process. According to the results of this study, the treated sewage sludge and manure ash using the ASH DEC process represent significant potential phosphorus sources for P fertilizer production. PMID:26810030

  15. To fractionate municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash: Key for utilisation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sormunen, Laura Annika; Rantsi, Riina

    2015-11-01

    For the past decade, the Finnish waste sector has increasingly moved from the landfilling of municipal solid waste towards waste incineration. New challenges are faced with the growing amounts of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash, which are mainly landfilled at the moment. Since this is not a sustainable or a profitable solution, finding different utilisation applications for the municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash is crucial. This study reports a comprehensive analysis of bottom ash properties from one waste incineration plant in Finland, which was first treated with a Dutch bottom ash recovery technique called advanced dry recovery. This novel process separates non-ferrous and ferrous metals from bottom ash, generating mineral fractions of different grain sizes (0-2 mm, 2-5 mm, 5-12 mm and 12-50 mm). The main aim of the study was to assess, whether the advanced bottom ash treatment technique, producing mineral fractions of different grain sizes and therefore properties, facilitates the utilisation of municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash in Finland. The results were encouraging; the bottom ash mineral fractions have favourable behaviour against the frost action, which is especially useful in the Finnish conditions. In addition, the leaching of most hazardous substances did not restrict the utilisation of bottom ash, especially for the larger fractions (>5 mm). Overall, this study has shown that the advanced bottom ash recovering technique can be one solution to increase the utilisation of bottom ash and furthermore decrease its landfilling in Finland. PMID:26330401

  16. MAT 126 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    stylia

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MAT 126 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126 Week 1 Written Assignment (Arithmetic and geometric sequence) (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 Assignment Is It Fat Free (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 DQ 2 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 Assignment Quadratic Equations (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126...

  17. Electrodialytic treatment of fly ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie;

    Heavy metals are removed from the fly ashes by an electrodialytic treatment with the aim of up-grading the ashes for reuse in stead of disposal in landfill.A great potential for upgrading of bio- and waste incineration ashes by electrodialytic treatment exists. In the future, the applicability...

  18. ASH and NASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglioni, F; Ciccia, S; Marino, M; Bedogni, G; Bellentani, S

    2011-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) have a similar pathogenesis and histopathology but a different etiology and epidemiology. NASH and ASH are advanced stages of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD). NAFLD is characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver (steatosis), without any other evident causes of chronic liver diseases (viral, autoimmune, genetic, etc.), and with an alcohol consumption ≤20-30 g/day. On the contrary, AFLD is defined as the presence of steatosis and alcohol consumption >20-30 g/day. The most common phenotypic manifestations of primary NAFLD/NASH are overweight/obesity, visceral adiposity, type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia and hypertension. The prevalence of NAFLD in the general population in Western countries is estimated to be 25-30%. The prevalence and incidence of NASH and ASH are not known because of the impossibility of performing liver biopsy in the general population. Up to 90% of alcoholics have fatty liver, and 5-15% of these subjects will develop cirrhosis over 20 years. The risk of cirrhosis increases to 30-40% in those who continue to drink alcohol. About 10-35% of alcoholics exhibit changes on liver biopsy consistent with alcoholic hepatitis. Natural histories of NASH and ASH are not completely defined, even if patients with NASH have a reduced life expectancy due to liver-related death and cardiovascular diseases. The best treatment of AFLD/ASH is to stop drinking, and the most effective first-line therapeutic option for NAFLD/NASH is non-pharmacologic lifestyle interventions through a multidisciplinary approach including weight loss, dietary changes, physical exercise, and cognitive-behavior therapy. PMID:21734385

  19. Effect of wood ash application on the morphological, physiological and biochemical parameters of Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeela, Farhat; Murad, Waheed; Khan, Imran; Mian, Ishaq Ahmad; Rehman, Hazir; Adnan, Muhammad; Azizullah, Azizullah

    2015-10-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect of wood ash application on different parameters of Brassica napus L. including seed germination, seedling growth, fresh and dry biomass, water content in seedlings, photosynthetic pigments, soluble sugars, total protein and cell viability. In addition, the effect of wood ash on soil microflora and accumulation of trace elements in seedlings were determined. The seeds of B. napus were grown at different doses of wood ash (0, 1, 10, 25, 50 and 100 g (wood ash)/kg (soil)) and the effect on various parameters was determined. Wood ash significantly inhibited seed germination at doses above 25 g/kg and there was no germination at 100 g/kg of wood ash. At lower concentrations of wood ash, most of the growth parameters of seedlings were stimulated, but at higher concentrations of wood ash most of the studied parameters were adversely affected. Wood ash was found to be very detrimental to B. napus when applied above 25 g/kg. Wood ash application resulted in an increased bioaccumulation of trace elements in seedlings of B. napus. Almost all trace elements were significantly higher in seedlings grown in wood ash above 10 g/kg as compared to the control. An increase in total microbial count was observed with wood ash treatment which was statistically significant at 1 and 10 g/kg of wood ash. It is concluded that at very high concentration, wood ash can be detrimental to plants; however, its application at lower application rate can be recommended. PMID:26163419

  20. MGT 330 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    alfoniz

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MGT 330 Week 1 Individual Assignment Functions of Management Paper (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 3 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 Summary (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Team Assignment External Internal Factors Paper (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Individual Assignment Delegation (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Summary (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 330 W...

  1. Dry release of suspended nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsén, Esko Sebastian; Davis, Zachary James; Dong, M.;

    2004-01-01

    A dry release method for fabrication of suspended nanostructures is presented. The technique has been combined with an anti-stiction treatment for fabrication of nanocantilever based nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). The process combines a dry release method, using a supporting layer...... of photoresist which is removed using oxygen ashing in a reactive ion etcher (RIE), with CHF3 plasma induced deposition of an fluorocarbon (FC) film acting as an antistiction coating. All in a single RIE sequence. The dry release process is contamination free and batch process compatible. Furthermore......, the technique enables long time storage and transportation of produced devices without the risk of stiction. By combining the dry release method with a plasma deposited anti-stiction coating both fabrication induced stiction, which is mainly caused by capillary forces originating from the dehydration...

  2. MAT 221 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    mirat

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MAT 221 Week 1 Assignment 1 Simplifying Expressions (Ash) MAT 221 Week 1 DQ 1 Evaluating Algebraic Expressions (Ash) MAT 221 Week 2 Assignment 2 Inequalities (Ash) MAT 221 Week 2 DQ 1 Formulas (Ash) MAT 221 Week 3 Assignment 3 Two-Variable Inequality (Ash) MAT 221 Week 3 DQ 1 Parallel and Perpendicular (Ash) MAT 221 Week 4 Assignment 4 Financial Polynomials (Ash) MAT 221 Week 4 DQ 1 Initial Investme...

  3. Dry Mouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dry mouth is the feeling that there is not enough saliva in your mouth. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while - if they are nervous, ... under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can ...

  4. Ash dust co-centration in the vicinity of the ash disposal site depending on the size of the pond (“Water Mirror”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Gršić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal power plants Nikola Tesla “A” and “B” are large sources of ash from their ashes/slag deposit sites. Total sizes of ashes/slag depots are 600ha and 382ha, with active cassettes having dimensions ∼200 ha and ∼130 ha. The active cassettes of the disposal sites are covered by rather large waste ponds, the sizes of vary depending on the working condition of a sluice system and on meteorological conditions. Modeling of ash lifting was attempted using results from the dust lifting research. The relation between sizes of ponds and air dust concentration in the vicinity of ash disposal sites was analyzed. As expected, greater sizes of dried disposal site surfaces in combination with stronger winds gave greater dust emission and greater air dust concentration.

  5. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-03-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines.

  6. Fly ash effects. II. The active effect of fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiqin Wang; Chengzhi Zhang; Wei Suna [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Department of Materials Science and Engineering

    2004-11-01

    This paper examines the method for determining the hydration degree of cement clinker and the pozzolanic reaction degree of fly ash in the system of cement and fly ash. In the base, the active effect of fly ash is studied. The studied results show that the active effect includes two aspects: (1) Fly ash has stronger pozzolanic activity and can react with Ca(OH)2, and (2) it can promote the hydration of cement. When the content of fly ash is less, its pozzolanic activity can exert well, but its promoting role to the hydration of cement is weaker. When the content of fly ash is more, it is less than its pozzolanic activity can be used, but its promoting role to the hydration of cement is stronger.

  7. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B

    2016-03-02

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines.

  8. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines. PMID:26931824

  9. Ashes for organic farming

    OpenAIRE

    Kousa, T.; Heinonen, M; Suoniitty, T.; Peltonen, K

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays only eight percent of the cultivated field area is used for organic farming. The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry has published the guidelines for the program of organic farming to diversify the supply and the consumption of organic food. The aim is to increase organically arable land to 20% by the year 2020.The demand of organic fertilizer products is strongly increasing. Interest in forestry by-products (ash, bark, zero fiber, etc.) for use in organic production has recently be...

  10. Ash Management Review—Applications of Biomass Bottom Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpuneet S. Ghuman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In industrialized countries, it is expected that the future generation of bioenergy will be from the direct combustion of residues and wastes obtained from biomass. Bioenergy production using woody biomass is a fast developing application since this fuel source is considered to be carbon neutral. The harnessing of bioenergy from these sources produces residue in the form of ash. As the demand for bioenergy production increases, ash and residue volumes will increase. Major challenges will arise relating to the efficient management of these byproducts. The primary concerns for ash are its storage, disposal, use and the presence of unburned carbon. The continual increase in ash volume will result in decreased ash storage facilities (in cases of limited room for landfill expansion, as well as increased handling, transporting and spreading costs. The utilization of ash has been the focus of many studies, hence this review investigates the likely environmental and technological challenges that increased ash generation may cause. The presence of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, chlorine, sulphur and silicon influences the reactivity and leaching to the inorganic phases which may have significant impacts on soils and the recycling of soil nutrient. Discussed are some of the existing technologies for the processing of ash. Unburned carbon present in ash allows for the exploration of using ash as a fuel. The paper proposes sieve fractionation as a suitable method for the separation of unburnt carbon present in bottom ash obtained from a fixed-bed combustion system, followed by the application of the gasification technology to particle sizes of energy importance. It is hoped that this process will significantly reduce the volume of ash disposed at landfills.

  11. Melting Behavior of Volcanic Ash relevant to Aviation Ash Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Hess, K.; Lavallee, Y.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash is one of the major hazards caused by volcanic eruptions. In particular, the threat to aviation from airborne volcanic ash has been widely recognized and documented. In the past 12 years, more than 60 modern jet airplanes, mostly jumbo jets, have been damaged by drifting clouds of volcanic ash that have contaminated air routes and airport facilities. Seven of these encounters are known to have caused in-flight loss of engine power to jumbo jets carrying a total of more than 2000 passengers. The primary cause of engine thrust loss is that the glass in volcanic ash particles is generated at temperatures far lower than the temperatures in the combustion chamber of a jet engine ( i.e. > 1600 oC) and when the molten volcanic ash particles leave this hottest section of the engine, the resolidified molten volcanic ash particles will be accumulated on the turbine nozzle guide vanes, which reduced the effective flow of air through the engine ultimately causing failure. Thus, it is essential to investigate the melting process and subsequent deposition behavior of volcanic ash under gas turbine conditions. Although few research studies that investigated the deposition behavior of volcanic ash at the high temperature are to be found in public domain, to the best our knowledge, no work addresses the formation of molten volcanic ash. In this work, volcanic ash produced by Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala in November 8, 2012 was selected for study because of their recent activity and potential hazard to aircraft safety. We used the method of accessing the behavior of deposit-forming impurities in high temperature boiler plants on the basis of observations of the change in shape and size of a cylindrical coal ash to study the sintering and fusion phenomena as well as determine the volcanic ash melting behavior by using characteristic temperatures by means of hot stage microscope (HSM), different thermal analysis (DTA) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) to

  12. Evaluation of Changes in Index Properties of Lateritic Soil Stabilized with Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agapitus AMADI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available For soils to be suitable in civil engineering projects, they must meet existing local requirements for index properties in addition to certain strength criteria. Typically, specifications limit these properties to some threshold values which in most cases are project specific. Some lateritic soils in their natural state need some treatment/modification to meet these specification requirements. The objective of this study was to evaluate changes in the index properties (i.e., particle size distribution, Atterberg limits and compaction characteristics of a residually derived lateritic soil following fly ash application. Lateritic soil – fly ash mixtures with up to 20% fly ash by dry weight of soil were tested and specimens for compaction characteristics were prepared at different compaction states (optimum, dry and wet of optimum moisture content and compacted using British Standard Light (BSL compactive effort. While soil – fly ash mixtures containing up to 15% fly ash classify as CL according to USCS classification system and plotted above A-line in the plasticity chart, it was observed that changes in the gradation characteristics of soil sample treated with 20% fly ash resulted in the alteration of its classification to ML as well as the crossing of the A- line to the silty region. The liquid limit (LL varied from 42.2 to 29.53% representing 70% reduction while the plasticity index (PI of specimen treated with 20% fly ash was 16% lower than that of natural soil. The optimum moisture content (OMC ranged from 17.36% for the natural soil to 18.34% for soil mixtures containing 20% fly ash which yielded dry unit weight of 17.2kN/m3 for the natural soil and 16.1kN/m3 for samples treated with 20% fly ash. From the study, useful data were obtained showing substantial and desirable changes in the properties of lateritic soil as a civil engineering material on application of fly ash.

  13. What Controls the Sizes and Shapes of Volcanic Ash? Integrating Morphological, Textural and Geochemical Ash Properties to Decipher Eruptive Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, E. J.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash particles encompass a diverse spectrum of shapes as a consequence of differences in the magma properties and the magma ascent and eruption conditions. We show how the quantitative analysis of ash particle shapes can be a valuable tool for deciphering magma fragmentation and transport processes. Importantly, integrating morphological data with ash texture (e.g. bubble and crystal sizes) and dissolved volatile data provides valuable insights into the physical and chemical controls on the resulting ash deposit. To explore the influence of magma-water interaction (MWI) on fine ash generation, we apply this multi-component characterisation to tephra from the 2500BC Hverfjall Fires, Iceland. Here, coeval fissure vents spanned sub-aerial to shallow lacustrine environments. Differences in the size and morphology of pyroclasts thus reflect fragmentation mechanisms under different near-surface conditions. Using shape parameters sensitive to both particle roughness and internal vesicularity, we quantify the relative proportions of dense fragments, bubble shards, and vesicular grains from 2-D SEM images. We show that componentry (and particle morphology) varies as a function of grain size, and that this variation can be related back to the bubble size distribution. Although both magmatic and hydromagmatic deposits exhibit similar component assemblages, they differ in how these assemblages change with grain size. These results highlight the benefits of characterising ash deposits over a wide range of grain sizes, and caution against inferring fragmentation mechanism from a narrow grain size range. Elevated matrix glass S concentrations in hydromagmatic ash (600-1500 ppm) compared to those in magmatic ash and scoria lapilli (200-500 ppm) indicate interrupted vesiculation. In contrast to the subaerial 'dry' deposits, fragmentation during MWI likely occurred over a greater range of depths with quench rates sufficient to prevent post-fragmentation degassing. High

  14. INF 325 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    SINDHU

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com INF 325 Week 1 DQ 1 Network Management (Ash) INF 325 Week 1 DQ 2 Ethernet Network (Ash) INF 325 Week 1 Commercial Internet Expansion (Ash) INF 325 Week 2 DQ 1 UTP Cord Problem (Ash) INF 325 Week 2 DQ 2 Managed Switches (Ash) INF 325 Week 2 Leased Lines (Ash) INF 325 Week 3 DQ 1 WPA (Ash) INF 325 Week 3 DQ 2 Remote Access Management (Ash) INF 325 Week 3 Mobile Service (Ash) INF 325 Week 4 DQ 1 Ro...

  15. INF 336 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    MADURA

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com INF 336 Week 1 DQ 1 Risk Management (Ash) INF 336 Week 1 DQ 2 Organizational Structure (Ash) INF 336 Week 2 DQ 1 Supply Process Improvements (Ash) INF 336 Week 2 DQ 2 Outsourcing (Ash) INF 336 Week 2 Assignment Article Review (Ash) INF 336 Week 3 DQ 1 Capital Goods (Ash) INF 336 Week 3 DQ 2 Quality (Ash) INF 336 Week 3 Assignment Need Definition (Ash) INF 336 Week 4 DQ 1 Procuring Services (Ash) ...

  16. MGT 401 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    kennith

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MGT 401 Week 1 Individual Assignment Strategic Management Process Paper (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 Class Activity Week 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 Learning Team Business Model Comparison Example (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 Class Activity (Ash) MGT 401 Week 3 Individual Assignment Business Plan Evaluation (Ash) ...

  17. INF 410 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    MADHURA

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com     INF 410 Week 1 DQ 1 Project Life Cycle (Ash) INF 410 Week 1 DQ 2 The Importance of Project Management (Ash) INF 410 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) INF 410 Week 2 DQ 1 Project Charter (Ash) INF 410 Week 2 DQ 2 Project Management Plan (Ash) INF 410 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) INF 410 Week 3 DQ 1 Risk Identification (Ash) INF 410 Week 3 DQ 2 Triple Constraint (Ash) INF 410 Week 3 Quiz (Ash) INF 410 Week 4 DQ...

  18. Ash in the Soil System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, P.

    2012-04-01

    Ash is the organic and inorganic residue produced by combustion, under laboratory and field conditions. This definition is far away to be accepted. Some researchers consider ash only as the inorganic part, others include also the material not completely combusted as charcoal or biochar. There is a need to have a convergence about this question and define clear "what means ash". After the fire and after spread ash onto soil surface, soil properties can be substantially changed depending on ash properties, that can be different according to the burned residue (e.g wood, coal, solid waste, peppermill, animal residues), material treatment before burning, time of exposition and storage conditions. Ash produced in boilers is different from the produced in fires because of the material diferent propertie and burning conditions. In addition, the ash produced in boilers is frequently treated (e.g pelletization, granulation, self curing) previously to application, to reduce the negative effects on soil (e.g rapid increase of pH, mycorrhiza, fine roots of trees and microfauna). These treatments normally reduce the rate of nutrients dissolution. In fires this does not happen. Thus the implications on soil properties are logically different. Depending on the combustion temperature and/or severity, ash could have different physical (e.g texture, wettability) and chemical properties (e.g amount and type of total and leached nutrients) and this will have implications on soil. Ash can increase and decrease soil aggregation, wettablity and water retention, bulk density, runoff and water infiltration. Normally, ash increases soil pH, Electrical Conductivity, and the amount of some basic nutrients as calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium. However it is also a potential source of heavy metals, especially if ash pH is low. However the effect of ash on soil in space and time depends especially of the ash amount and characteristics, fire temperature, severity, topography, aspect

  19. Dielectric properties of fly ash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Raghavendra; R L Raibagkar; A B Kulkarni

    2002-02-01

    This paper reports the dielectric properties of fly ash. The dielectric measurements were performed as a function of frequency and temperature. The sample of fly ash shows almost similar behaviour in the frequency and temperature range studied. The large value of dielectric constant in the typical frequency range is because of orientation polarization and tight binding force between the ions or atoms in the fly ash. The sample of fly ash is of great scientific and technological interest because of its high value of dielectric constant (104).

  20. The reuse of bio ash for the production of concrete : a Danish case study[Held jointly with the 4. Canadian organic residuals and biosolids managment conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjersgaard, D.; Jacobsen, B.N. [Avedoere Wastewater Services, Hvidovre (Denmark); Rindel, K. [Lynettefaellesskabet, Copenhagen K (Denmark); Andreasen, L.; Larsen, F. [Unicon Ltd., Copenhagen S (Denmark); Nyegaard, P.; Pade, C.; Bodker, J. [Danish Technological Inst., Taastrup (Denmark)

    2007-07-01

    Urban wastewater treatment plants are continuously modifying and optimizing the handling and disposal of produced solid waste. In Europe, an increasing part of the produced solid waste or sludge is incinerated. One option for the reuse of sludge ash is to use the dry sludge ash as an ingredient for the production of concrete since fly ash has been used for several years as a valuable constituent in concrete production recipes. This paper presented information on biocrete, a project that is being undertaken in order facilitate and increase the reuse of bio ash or sludge ash for the production of concrete. The paper discussed the project partners; installation of full scale equipment; and analytical characterization of bio ash. Convenient equipment for the handling of dry bio ash was installed at two Danish wastewater treatment plants and at 3 ready-mixed concrete production plants. In 2006, 1100 tons of bio ash was reused for the production of concrete. The paper also discussed the technical and environmental properties of bio ash concrete. It was concluded that it is feasible to use bio ash for concrete production. In addition, bio ash has less pozzolanic properties than fly ash, providing good function as a filler in concrete. 4 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. Modeling the formation of the quench product in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkaew, Kanawut; Saffarzadeh, Amirhomayoun; Shimaoka, Takayuki

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated changes in bottom ash morphology and mineralogy under lab-scale quenching conditions. The main purpose was to clarify the mechanisms behind the formation of the quench product/layer around bottom ash particles. In the experiments, the unquenched bottom ashes were heated to 300°C for 1h, and were quenched by warm water (65°C) with different simulated conditions. After having filtered and dried, the ashes were analyzed by a combination of methodologies namely, particle size distribution analysis, intact particle and thin-section observation, X-ray diffractometry, and scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results indicated that after quenching, the morphology and mineralogy of the bottom ash changed significantly. The freshly quenched bottom ash was dominated by a quench product that was characterized by amorphous and microcrystalline calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) phases. This product also enclosed tiny minerals, glasses, ceramics, metals, and organic materials. The dominant mineral phases produced by quenching process and detected by XRD were calcite, Friedel's salt, hydrocalumite and portlandite. The formation of quench product was controlled by the fine fraction of the bottom ash (particle size conceptual model of the ash-water reactions and formation of the quench product in the bottom ash was proposed. PMID:27079853

  2. Influence of Bed Ash and Fly Ash Replacement in Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Summoogum-Utchanah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluates the influence of fly ash and bottom ash as partial cement substitutes in mortars by studying the particle size distribution, consistency, flow, fresh density, air content, compressive strength and flexural strength characteristics. The results revealed that fly ash and cement had relatively the same particle size distribution unlike bottom ash. In the fresh state, as the amount of pozzolans increased in the mixtures, the mortars showed an enhancement in workability, were susceptible to water loss by bleeding, and exhibited a decline in fresh density. The early strength gains of the fly ash samples were low but reached higher than the control after 28 days of curing. The flexural strength increased as the fly ash content rose to reach a maximum at 20 % replacement. However, the 2-day compressive strength of bottom ash samples was higher than the control but decreased after 28 days of curing while the flexural strength declined with addition of bottom ash except at 5 % substitution.

  3. Can ash clog soil pores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoof, Cathelijne; Stoof, Cathelijne; Gevaert, Anouk; Gevaert, Anouk; Baver, Christine; Baver, Christine; Hassanpour, Bahareh; Hassanpour, Bahareh; Morales, Veronica; Morales, Veronica; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Martin, Deborah; Martin, Deborah; Steenhuis, Tammo; Steenhuis, Tammo

    2015-04-01

    Wildfire can greatly increase a landscape's vulnerability to flooding and erosion events, and ash is thought to play a large role in controlling runoff and erosion processes after wildfire. Although ash can store rainfall and thereby reduce runoff and erosion for a limited period after wildfires, it has also been hypothesized to clog soil pores and reduce infiltration. Several researchers have attributed the commonly observed increase in runoff and erosion after fire to the potential pore-clogging effect of ash. Evidence is however incomplete, as to date, research has solely focused on identifying the presence of ash in the soil, with the actual flow processes associated with the infiltration and pore-clogging of ash remaining a major unknown. In several laboratory experiments, we tested the hypothesis that ash causes pore clogging to the point that infiltration is hampered and ponding occurs. We first visualized and quantified pore-scale infiltration of water and ash in sand of a range of textures and at various infiltration rates, using a digital bright field microscope capturing both photo and video. While these visualization experiments confirm field and lab observation of ash washing into soil pores, we did not observe any clogging of pores, and have not been able to create conditions for which this does occur. Additional electrochemical analysis and measurement of saturated hydraulic conductivity indicate that pore clogging by ash is not plausible. Electrochemical analysis showed that ash and sand are both negatively charged, showing that attachment of ash to sand and any resulting clogging is unlikely. Ash also had quite high saturated conductivity, and systems where ash was mixed in or lying on top of sand had similarly high hydraulic conductivity. Based on these various experiments, we cannot confirm the hypothesis that pore clogging by ash contributes to the frequently observed increase in post-fire runoff, at least for the medium to coarse sands

  4. Exploration of using stripped ammonia and ash from poultry litter for the cultivation of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis and the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markou, Giorgos; Iconomou, Dimitris; Sotiroudis, Theodore; Israilides, Cleanthes; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2015-11-01

    Herein a new approach of exploiting poultry litter (PL) is demonstrated. The suggested method includes drying of PL with simultaneously striping and recovery of ammonia, followed by the direct combustion of dried PL. The generated ash after the combustion, and the striped ammonia consequently, could be used as nutrient source for the cultivation of microalgae or cyanobacteria to produce feed additives. The present study explored the application of PL ash and recovered ammonia for the cultivation of Arthrospira platensis and Chlorella vulgaris. For a simultaneously 90% dissolution of ash potassium and phosphorus, a ratio of acid to ash of 0.02mol-H(+)/g was required. The optimum mass of ash required was 0.07-0.08g/g dry biomass, while the addition of ammoniac nitrogen of 8-9mgN per g of dry biomass per day was adequate for a satisfactory production of A. platensis and C. vulgaris. PMID:26280098

  5. Fly ash quality and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, L.E.; Lachner, L.; Wenzel, G.B. [Inst. for Energy, Budapest (Hungary); Beer, M.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The quality of fly ash is of considerable importance to fly ash utilizers. The fly ash puzzolanic activity is one of the most important properties that determines the role of fly ash as a binding agent in the cementing process. The puzzolanic activity, however is a function of fly ash particle size and chemical composition. These parameters are closely related to the process of fly ash formation in pulverized coal fired furnaces. In turn, it is essential to understand the transformation of mineral matter during coal combustion. Due to the particle-to-particle variation of coal properties and the random coalescence of mineral particles, the properties of fly ash particles e.g. size, SiO{sub 2} content, viscosity can change considerably from particle to particle. These variations can be described by the use of the probability theory. Since the mean values of these randomly changing parameters are not sufficient to describe the behavior of individual fly ash particles during the formation of concrete, therefore it is necessary to investigate the distribution of these variables. Examples of these variations were examined by the Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) for particle size and chemical composition for Texas lignite and Eagel Butte mineral matter and fly ash. The effect of combustion on the variations of these properties for both the fly ash and mineral matter were studied by using a laminar flow reactor. It is shown in our paper, that there are significant variations (about 40-50% around the mean values) of the above-listed properties for both coal samples. By comparing the particle size and chemical composition distributions of the mineral matter and fly ash, it was possible to conclude that for the Texas lignite mineral matter, the combustion did not effect significantly the distribution of these properties, however, for the Eagel Butte coal the combustion had a major impact on these mineral matter parameters.

  6. Reducing carbon-in-ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigel S. Dong [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15

    High levels of carbon-in-ash lead to reduced power plant efficiency and higher fuel costs, degrade the performance of electrostatic precipitators and increase emissions of particulates. Increased carbon levels in the fly ash can lead to problems with ash use in cement/concrete production. This report reviews current measures and technologies that can be used to prevent excessive carbon-in-ash in pulverised coal combustion (PCC) power plants. These include coal cleaning, coal fineness improvement, reduction of distribution imbalance of coal among burners, increasing coal-air mixing rates at both burner and OFA levels and optimising excess air ratios. A plasma-assisted combustion enhancement technology can help achieve better ignition and more stable flame for coals that are normally difficult to burn. Computer-based combustion optimisation using expert systems, neural network systems and coal combustion simulation is becoming an invaluable means to tackle the carbon-in-ash issue. This report also reviews the regulations in nine major coal-consuming countries, which stipulate the maximum unburnt carbon levels permitted for fly ash for use in concrete/cement production. The Loss on Ignition (LOI) parameter is used in all national standards, although it is considered inadequate and may exclude some usable fly ash from being utilised. Performance-based regulations are more appropriate and have been adopted by Canada and USA. The EU and Canada now permit the use of fly ash produced from co-combustion of coal and biomass. China and Russia allow very high LOI levels for certain fly ash but the other countries require similar LOI limits for fly ash for use in concrete. Finally, this report discusses measures and technologies for reduction of carbon-in-ash, including classification, froth flotation, triboelectrostatic separators, thermal processes and carbon surface modification. 146 refs., 19 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. BUS 611 Ash course tutorial / uophelp

    OpenAIRE

    uophelp

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.uophelp.com   BUS 611 Week 1 Assignment Article Review (Ash Course) BUS 611 Week 2 Assignment Project Risk (Ash Course) BUS 611 Week 3 Assignment WBS (Ash Course) BUS 611 Week 4 Assignment Integrated Project Management Tools (Ash Course) BUS 611 Week 5 Assignment Monthly Status Reports (Ash Course) BUS 611 Week 6 Final Research Paper (Ash Course)  

  8. Measurement of natural activity in peat ashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High proportions of radioactive materials in peat ashes may involve radiation hazards during handling and deposition of these waste materials. Measurements have been performed to determine the content of radioactive materials in ashes from peat burning. The activities in fly ash and ''solid'' ash in seven peat-fired power plants in Sweden are presented. The methods of analysing and measuring peat ashes for activity from different radionuclides are described. The activity levels in ash samples are given

  9. Do phytotoxic allelochemicals remain in ashes after burning Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera (boneseed)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harun, Md Abdullah Yousuf Al; Johnson, Joshua; Robinson, Randall W

    2016-06-01

    Australia is facing challenges in controlling Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera (boneseed). However, burning has achieved some success in this regard. We aimed to investigate the comparative phytotoxicity of boneseed dried powder and ashes (burnt at 450°C and 250°C). Phenolic compounds in powder and ashes were measured using Folin-Ciocalteu assay and HPLC. The phytotoxicity of boneseed powder and ash extracts was assessed through germination bioassay on Lactuca sativa and the phytotoxicity of litter and ashes was evaluated using field soil, both in growth chamber. Burning of boneseed reduced total phenolics in ashes of boneseed organs by 99% and 100% both at high and low temperatures. The four phenolic compounds that were detected in boneseed were either absent or at negligible levels in the ashes, with inversely related to temperature. Both boneseed ash extracts and litter ash-mediated soil significantly reduced phytotoxicity displaying increased germination, biometric and biochemical parameters of test species compared with unburnt powder extracts and litter powder-mediated soil respectively, with greater reduction of phytotoxicity found for ashes produced at the lower temperature. Interestingly, the ash extracts and litter ash-mediated soil were found to stimulate some of those parameters of the test species compared to control. There was no excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in test species exposed to ash extracts compared with unburnt powder extracts. These findings suggest that burning of boneseed is an appropriate method of weed control and that this approach will reduce phytotoxicity of this species on native plants. PMID:27266307

  10. Effect of blanching and drying methods on the nutritional and sensory quality of leafy vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onayemi, O; Badifu, G I

    1987-01-01

    The nutrient retention and sensory quality factors of vegetables blanched by two methods and solar-dried or dried in the cabinet dryer were evaluated. The type and conditions of the blanching treatment prior to drying affect the retention of ascorbic acid, carotene, and ash in the dried vegetables. The sun-dried vegetables had inferior colour, texture and acceptibility compared to the vegetables dried in the cabinet dryer. There were significant differences in the rehydration and drying ratio of the dried vegetables. The implications of the blanching and drying processes for an effective preservation technique are discussed. PMID:3507002

  11. ECO 316(ASH) course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    naresh 1

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   ECO 316 Week 1 DQ 1 Should You Invest Short Term (Ash) ECO 316 Week 1 DQ 2 Treasury Inflation Protection Bonds (Ash) ECO 316 Week 1 Quiz (Chapter 1-6) (Ash) ECO 316 Week 2 DQ 1 New Product, Will I Be Rich (Ash) ECO 316 Week 2 DQ 2 Mutual Fund Regulation (Ash) ECO 316 Week 2 Quiz (Chapter 7-12) (Ash) ECO 316 Week 3 DQ 1 Exchange Rate Risk (Ash) ECO 316 Week 3 DQ 2 Should I Expect a Bail Out (Ash) ...

  12. CRJ 303 ASH course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    naresh 1

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   Product Description CRJ 303 Week 1 DQ 1 Goals of Sentencing (Ash) CRJ 303 Week 1 DQ 2 Sentencing Techniques (Ash) CRJ 303 Week 2 DQ 1 Punishment (Ash) CRJ 303 Week 2 DQ 2 Privatizing Prisons (Ash) CRJ 303 Week 2 Assignment Jails vs. Prisons (Ash) CRJ 303 Wee 3 DQ 1 Probation and Parole (Ash) CRJ 303 Week 3 DQ 2 Civil Commitments (Ash) CRJ 303 Week 3 Assignment Juvenile Detainees (Ash) CRJ 303...

  13. PSY 496 ASH Tutorial Course / Uoptutorial

    OpenAIRE

    John Allen

    2015-01-01

    PSY 496 Week 1 Assignment Foundations for the Final Paper (Ash) PSY 496 Week 2 Assignment Finalized Resources and Revisions for the Final Paper (Ash) PSY 496 Week 1 DQ 1 Approaches to Research (Ash) PSY 496 Week 1 DQ 2 Measuring Change (Ash) PSY 496 Week 2 DQ 1 Protecting Participants from Harm (Ash) PSY 496 Week 2 DQ 2 Areas of Competence (Ash) PSY 496 Week 2 Journal Ethics in Research and Practice (Ash) PSY 496 Week 3 Assignment Final Paper Draft (Ash) PSY 49...

  14. MGT 415 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    kennith archi

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MGT 415 Week 1 DQ 1 Organizational Design (Ash) MGT 415 Week 1 DQ 2 The Research Project (Ash) MGT 415 Week 2 DQ 1 Group Development Process (Ash) MGT 415 Week 2 DQ 2 Influence of Informal Groups (Ash)  MGT 415 Week 3 DQ 1 Group Cohesion and Productivity (Ash) MGT 415 Week 3 DQ 2 Norms and Conformity (Ash) MGT 415 Week 3 Assignment Best Workplace (Ash) MGT 415 Week 4 DQ 1 Group Decisions (Ash) ...

  15. HIS 103 ASH course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 34

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   HIS 103 Week 1 DQ 1 (Transition to Agriculture) (Ash) HIS 103 Week 1 DQ 2 (Early Complex Societies) (Ash) HIS 103 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) HIS 103 Week 1 Assignment (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 Assignment Greco Roman Influence Paper (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 DQ 1 Chinese Social and Political Order Systems (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 DQ 2 Caste System (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) HIS 103 Week 3 Assignment Black Death Dra...

  16. MAT 222 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    mirat

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MAT 222 Week 1 Solving Proportions (Ash) MAT 222 Week 1 DQ 1 Can't Cancel Terms (Ash) MAT 222 Week 2 DQ 1 One-Variable Compound Inequalities (Ash) MAT 222 Week 2 Two-Variable Inequalities (Ash) MAT 222 Week 3 DQ 1 Simplifying Radicals (Ash) MAT 222 Week 3 Real World Radical Formulas (Ash) MAT 222 Week 4 DQ 1 Solving Quadratic Equations (Ash) MAT 222 Week 4 Real World Quadratic Functions (Ash) ...

  17. BUS 642 Ash course tutorial / uophelp

    OpenAIRE

    uophelp

    2015-01-01

    www.uophelp.com     BUS 642 Week 1 DQ 1 Scientific Thinking (Ash Course) BUS 642 Week 1 DQ 2 Making Research Decisions (Ash Course) BUS 642 Week 1 Exercises (Ash Course) BUS 642 Week 2 DQ 1 Ethics in Business Research (Ash Course) BUS 642 Week 2 DQ 2 Design of Research (Ash Course) BUS 642 Week 2 Exercises (Ash Course) BUS 642 Week 3 DQ 1 Measurement Scales (Ash Course) BUS 642 Week 3 DQ 2 Clarifying the Research Questions (Ash Course) BUS...

  18. An efficient and not polluting bottom ash extraction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that boiler waste water effluent must meet more and more tighter requirements to comply with environmental regulations; sluice water resulting from bottom ash handling is one of the main problems in this context, and many utilities are under effort to maximize the reuse of the sluice water, and, if possible, to meet the aim of zero water discharge from bottom ash handling system. At the same time ash reuse efforts gain strength in order to minimize waste production. One solution to these problems can be found in an innovative Bottom Ash Extraction System (MAC System), marked by the peculiarity to be a continuous dry ash removal; the system has been developed in the last four years by MAGALDI INDUSTRIE SRL in collaboration with ANSALDO Ricerche, the R and D department of ANSALDO, the main Italian Boiler Manufacturer, and is now installed in six ENEL Boilers. The elimination of the water as separation element between the bottom part of the furnace and the outside atmosphere gives advantages mainly from the environmental view point, but a certain improvement in the boiler efficiency has also been demonstrated by the application of the system

  19. Uncertainty in volcanic ash cloud forecasting: sources and quantification (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folch, A.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash clouds formed during explosive volcanic eruptions can disperse in the atmosphere over larger distances jeopardizing aerial navigation. The trajectories and extent of ash clouds are forecasted operationally coupling atmospheric transport and numerical weather prediction models. The major uncertainties in simulations come from wind fields, eruption source parameters (eruption rate, vertical distribution of ash in the atmosphere and particle granulometry) and removal processes (ash aggregation, wet and dry deposition mechanisms). The global air traffic disruptions following the 2010 and 2011 eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull and Cordón Caulle forced a revision of the modelling approaches in order to provide a more robust and reliable response to the social needs. Strategies to reduce and quantify uncertainties are being introduced at both research and operational levels, including data assimilation, ensemble modelling and probabilistic forecasts. This requires collaboration amongst volcanological and meteorological communities. Initiatives such as the 2nd IUGG-WMO workshop on ash dispersal forecast and civil aviation (Geneva, 18-20 November 2013) help to develop strategies for a closer working relationship and further collaboration amongst scientific communities and between scientists and aviation industry and other stakeholders.

  20. Volcanic ash - Terrestrial versus extraterrestrial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeefe, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A principal difference between terrestrial and extraterrestrial lavas may consist in the greater ability of terrestrial lavas to form thin films (like those of soap bubbles) and hence foams. It would follow that, in place of the pumice and spiny shards found in terrestrial volcanic ash, an extraterrestrial ash should contain minute spherules. This hypothesis may help to explain lunar microspherules.

  1. Leaching from biomass combustion ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2014-01-01

    in water. The content of the selected heavy metals (i.e. Cr, Ni, Pb and Cd) complied with the Danish Statutory Order on the use of bio-ash for agricultural purposes; however, critical releases of Cr were detected in the leachate extracts, especially in the fly ash. High alkaline pHs were measured in all...

  2. Melting and Sintering of Ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug

    1997-01-01

    in the ashes lead to increased melt fractions in the temperature range 600-750°C.b) Bottom ashes from straw combustion consist purely of silicates, with varying ratios of the quite refractory Al-silicates and quartz to the less refractory K- and Ca-silicates. Bottom ashes melt in the temperature range 800......-1300°C, and a trend of higher fusion temperatures with increasing contents of Al-silicates and quartz was found.c) Fly ashes, bottom ashes and deposits from coal/straw co-firing were all found to consist mainly of metal-alumina and alumina-silicates. These ashes all melt in the temperature range 1000......The thesis contains an experimental study of the fusion and sintering of ashes collected during straw and coal/straw co-firing.A laboratory technique for quantitative determination of ash fusion has been developed based on Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA). By means of this method the fraction...

  3. Ash Properties of Alternative Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capablo, Joaquin; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Pedersen, Kim Hougaard;

    2009-01-01

    The ash behavior during suspension firing of 12 alternative solid biofuels, such as pectin waste, mash from a beer brewery, or waste from cigarette production have been studied and compared to wood and straw ash behavior. Laboratory suspension firing tests were performed on an entrained flow...

  4. Using fly ash for construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenti, M.

    1995-05-01

    Each year electrical utilities generate 80 million tons of fly ash, primarily from coal combustion. Typically, utilities dispose of fly ash by hauling it to landfills, but that is changing because of the increasing cost of landfilling, as well as environmental regulations. Now, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in Palo Alto, Calif., its member utilities, and manufacturers of building materials are finding ways of turning this energy byproduct into the building blocks of roads and structures by converting fly ash into construction materials. Some of these materials include concrete and autoclaved cellular concrete (ACC, also known as aerated concrete), flowable fill, and light-weight aggregate. EPRI is also exploring uses for fly ash other than in construction materials. One of the more high-end uses for the material is in metal matrix composites. In this application, fly ash is mixed with softer metals, such as aluminum and magnesium, to strengthen them, while retaining their lighter weight.

  5. The Effects of Eggshell Ash on Strength Properties of Cement-stabilized Lateritic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okonkwo U. N

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Eggshell ash obtained by incinerating Fowls’ eggshells to ash has been established to be a good accelerator for cement-bound materials and this would be useful for road construction work at the peak of rainy seasons for reducing setting time of stabilized road pavements. However this should be achieved not at the expense of other vital properties of the stabilized matrix. This is part of the effort in adding value to agricultural materials which probably cause disposal problems. Thus this study aimed at determining the effect of eggshell ash on the strength properties of cement-stabilized lateritic soil. The lateritic soil was classified to be A-6(2 in AASHTO rating system and reddish-brown clayey sand (SC in the Unified Classification System. Constant cement contents of 6% and 8% were added to the lateritic soil with variations in eggshell ash content of 0% to 10% at 2% intervals. All proportions of cement and eggshell ash contents were measured in percentages by weight of the dry soil. The Compaction test, California Bearing Ratio test, Unconfined Compressive Strength test and Durability test were carried out on the soil-cement eggshell ash mixtures. The increase in eggshell ash content increased the Optimum Moisture Content but reduced the Maximum Dry Density of the soil-cement eggshell ash mixtures. Also the increase in eggshell ash content considerably increased the strength properties of the soil-cement eggshell ash mixtures up to 35% in the average but fell short of the strength requirements except the durability requirement was satisfied.

  6. Wood ash treatment, a cost-effective way to deactivate tannins in Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. foliage and to improve digestion by Barbarine sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three in vitro experiments and one in vivo experiment were carried out to study the effect of wood ash sources (6 L wood ash solution/kg fresh plant leaves) and levels and treatment duration on the nutritive value of acacia leaves. In Experiment 1, samples of fresh (F), dried (D), or dried and ground (DG) acacia were soaked for 6 h in water or acacia wood ash solution (120 g of wood ash dry matter/L of water). Soaking acacia in water decreased total extractable phenols (TP), total extractable tannins (TT) and extractable condensed tannins (CT). Wood ash treatment led to a further decrease of these phenolic compounds and was highest with DG acacia. Experiment 2 investigated different levels of acacia wood ash (0, 120, 180 and 240 g wood ash dry matter/L of water) and treatment duration (1, 2 and 3 days). The higher the level of wood ash, the lower proportion of TP and CT in acacia was noted. In Experiment 3, two sources of wood ash (i.e., acacia and Aleppo pine) and the same solution of each source of wood ash were used eight times. The two sources of wood ash had similar deactivating effect on TP and CT. The rate of decrease of TP and CT was highest when the same wood ash solution was used four consecutive times and decreased progressively thereafter. In these three experiments, water and wood ash treatment reduced organic matter and crude protein content but substantially increased the neutral detergent fibre (NDFom) content of treated acacia. In the fourth experiment, we treated acacia with acacia wood ash (180 g/L of water for 2 days) and the same solution was used five times. Treated and untreated acacia were air-dried and fed ad libitum to two groups, each of four Barbarine rams together with 300 g of concentrate. Wood ash treatment did not affect intake and OM digestibility of the diet but increased crude protein and NDFom digestibility (P < 0.05). Feeding untreated acacia resulted in negative N balances but with wood ash treatment, N balance was positive

  7. Wood ash treatment, a cost-effective way to deactivate tannins in Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. foliage and to improve digestion by Barbarine sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Salem, H. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie (INRAT), Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia)]. E-mail: bensalem.hichem@iresa.agrinet.tn; Abidi, S. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie (INRAT), Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia); Ecole Superieure d' Agriculture de Mateur, Mateur (Tunisia); Makkar, H.P.S. [Animal Production and Health Section, Joint FAO/IAEA Division, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Nefzaoui, A. [Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique de Tunisie (INRAT), Laboratoire des Productions Animales et Fourrageres, Ariana (Tunisia)

    2005-08-19

    Three in vitro experiments and one in vivo experiment were carried out to study the effect of wood ash sources (6 L wood ash solution/kg fresh plant leaves) and levels and treatment duration on the nutritive value of acacia leaves. In Experiment 1, samples of fresh (F), dried (D), or dried and ground (DG) acacia were soaked for 6 h in water or acacia wood ash solution (120 g of wood ash dry matter/L of water). Soaking acacia in water decreased total extractable phenols (TP), total extractable tannins (TT) and extractable condensed tannins (CT). Wood ash treatment led to a further decrease of these phenolic compounds and was highest with DG acacia. Experiment 2 investigated different levels of acacia wood ash (0, 120, 180 and 240 g wood ash dry matter/L of water) and treatment duration (1, 2 and 3 days). The higher the level of wood ash, the lower proportion of TP and CT in acacia was noted. In Experiment 3, two sources of wood ash (i.e., acacia and Aleppo pine) and the same solution of each source of wood ash were used eight times. The two sources of wood ash had similar deactivating effect on TP and CT. The rate of decrease of TP and CT was highest when the same wood ash solution was used four consecutive times and decreased progressively thereafter. In these three experiments, water and wood ash treatment reduced organic matter and crude protein content but substantially increased the neutral detergent fibre (NDFom) content of treated acacia. In the fourth experiment, we treated acacia with acacia wood ash (180 g/L of water for 2 days) and the same solution was used five times. Treated and untreated acacia were air-dried and fed ad libitum to two groups, each of four Barbarine rams together with 300 g of concentrate. Wood ash treatment did not affect intake and OM digestibility of the diet but increased crude protein and NDFom digestibility (P < 0.05). Feeding untreated acacia resulted in negative N balances but with wood ash treatment, N balance was positive

  8. DETERMINATION OF METAL CONTENT AND AN ASSESSMENT OF THE POTENTIAL USE OF WASTE CASHEW NUT ASH (CNSA AS SOURCE FOR POTASH PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Bosede Ogundiran

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The potential use of waste cashew nut shell (CNS ash as a source for potash production was investigated in this study. Managing waste ash generated from cashew nut processing is a major challenge, as land filling and open dumping of the waste ashes have been the main options in management of the ash in Nigeria. Economically viable ways of using waste ash rather than having to dispose of it have to be investigated. The CNS was air-dried for 4 weeks and combusted to ashes; the resulting ash was extracted with water for its potash content. Some parameters of the CNS, including moisture, dry matter, and ash content, were determined. Potash yield obtained was 33.4% of 150 g CNS ash used; analysis of the potash gave it a percentage purity of 78%, while purity on recrystalization increased to 86%. Potash yield from CNS ash was comparable to those reported for wood ash, plantain peels, and other agro-wastes. Also, the results showed that the CNS shared similar lignocellulosic properties and characteristics with hardwood biomass.

  9. Dry Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in thyroid disease when the eye protrudes forward; cosmetic surgery, if the eyelids are opened too widely. Frequently ... disease when the eye protrudes forward or after cosmetic surgery if the eyelids are opened too widely, dry ...

  10. Morphological and Strength Properties of Tanjung Bin Coal Ash Mixtures for applied in Geotechnical Engineering Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd. Rahim Awang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Malaysia, coal has been used as a raw material to generate electricity since 1988. In the past, most of the wastage of coal burning especially the bottom ash was not managed properly as it was dumped in the waste pond and accumulated drastically.This paper focuses on some properties of coal ash mixtures (fly  ash and bottom ash mixtures from Tanjung Bin power plant. The characteristics studied were morphological properties, compaction behaviour and strength properties. Strength properties of coal ash mixtures are carried out by conducting direct shear test and unconfined compression test. Besides, morphology and mineralogy of coal ash mixtures are studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM and x-ray diffraction (XRD. The coal ash mixtures were compacted at 95% of maximum dry density, sealed and cured for 0, 14, and 28 days before they were analysed for shear strength, morphological and mineralogical analyses. The shear strength of coal ash mixtures varied depending on the fly ash compositions. The maximum shear strength was obtained at mixture with 50%FA: 50%BA and the value increased with curing periods. The friction angle obtained ranged from 27° to 37°. Morphological analysis showed that the number of irregular shaped particles increased confirming change in material type with curing period. From mineralogical analysis, the crystalline compounds present in Tanjung Bin coal ash were Mullite, Quartz, Calcium Phosphide, Calcite, Cristobalite and Hematite. It can be concluded that the coal ash mixtures can advantageously be applied in the construction of embankments, roads, reclamation and fill behind retaining structures.

  11. Trophic structure and metal bioaccumulation differences in multiple fish species exposed to coal ash-associated metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otter, Ryan [Middle Tennessee State University; Bailey, Frank [Middle Tennessee State University; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    On December 22, 2008 a dike containing coal fly ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant near Kingston Tennessee USA failed and resulted in the largest coal ash spill in U.S. history. Coal ash, the by-product of coal combustion, is known to contain multiple contaminants of concern, including arsenic and selenium. The purpose of this study was to investigate the bioaccumulation of arsenic and selenium and to identify possible differences in trophic dynamics in feral fish at various sites in the vicinity of the Kingston coal ash spill. Elevated levels of arsenic and selenium were observed in various tissues of largemouth bass, white crappie, bluegill and redear sunfish from sites associated with the Kingston coal ash spill. Highest concentrations of selenium were found in redear sunfish with liver concentrations as high as 24.83 mg/kg dry weight and ovary concentrations up to 10.40 mg/kg dry weight at coal ash-associated sites. To help explain the elevated selenium levels observed in redear sunfish, investigations into the gut pH and trophic dynamics of redear sunfish and bluegill were conducted which demonstrated a large difference in the gut physiology between these two species. Redear sunfish stomach and intestinal pH was found to be 1.1 and 0.16 pH units higher than in bluegill, respectively. In addition, fish from coal ash-associated sites showed enrichment of 15N & 13C compared to no ash sites, indicating differences in food web dynamics between sites. These results imply the incorporation of coal ash-associated compounds into local food webs and/or a shift in diet at ash sites compared to the no ash reference sites. Based on these results, further investigation into a broader food web at ash-associated sites is warranted.

  12. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans § 230.69 Ash pans. Ash pans shall be securely supported from mud-rings or frames with no part less than...

  13. Ash removal plants in large power stations designed for higher ash contents in brown coal and the utilization of waste products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, G.; Nicko, K.H.; Weidlich, H.G.

    1984-12-01

    More than 80% of the electric power generated in the GDR is produced on the basis of raw brown coal. Mean ash concentrations of 18 to 20% in raw brown coal and calorific values of 7000 kJ/kg are quite common. This means a higher amount of combustion residues, e.g. slag, fly ash and fly dust. In consequence, ash removal technologies for coal-fired power plants are getting increasingly important. Most of the present systems are combinations of suction and pressure-pneumatic systems. The most widely used system consists of a conveying trough, a pressure vessel conveyor, and a dry ash bunker. This combination is economically efficient, easy to operate, and requires little maintenance.

  14. Determination of K,Ca and Mg in Black Fungus Certiifed Reference Material by Dry Ashing-ion Chromatography%干灰化-离子色谱法测定木耳标准物质中的钾、钙、镁

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    巢静波; 史乃捷; 吴冰

    2014-01-01

    采用离子色谱法对木耳标准物质中的K,Ca,Mg进行测定,对样品消解以及离子色谱分离条件进行了优化。在优化实验条件下,该法对木耳中K,Ca,Mg 3种元素测定结果的相对标准偏差小于1.0%(n=7)。采用该方法对NIST西红柿叶标准物质(SRM1573a)进行测定,测定结果与标准值相符,同时与ICP–OES方法比较验证,两者测定结果一致。对该方法测定结果的不确定度进行了评定,K,Ca,Mg测定结果的相对扩展不确定度(k=2)分别为2.3%,3.3%,1.9%。该方法准确可靠,能够满足标准物质定值的要求。%The contents of potassium,calcium and magnesium in black fungus certified reference material were determined by ion chromatography after dry ashing digestion. Sample digestion and ion chromatography conditions were optimized. Under optimal conditions, the relative standard deviation of detection results of K,Ca and Mg in black fungus was less than 1.0%(n=7). The method was used to determine tomato leaves reference material (NIST SRM1573a), and the results were consistent with standard value. The results detected by the method were compared with those detected by ICP–OES, and they were coincided with each other. The relative expanded uncertainties (k=2) of the results were evaluated, which were 2.3%,3.3%and 1.9%for K,Ca and Mg,respectively. The method is accurate and reliable,and it can meet the requirements of certification of reference material.

  15. BUS 620 Ash course tutorial / uophelp

    OpenAIRE

    uophelp

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.uophelp.com   BUS 620 Week 1 DQ 1 What is Marketing (Ash Course) BUS 620 Week 1 DQ 2 Marketing Strategies (Ash Course) BUS 620 Week 1 The Future of the New York Times (Ash Course) BUS 620 Week 2 DQ 1 Buyer Behavior (Ash Course) BUS 620 Week 2 DQ 2 Customer Needs (Ash Course) BUS 620 Week 2 Industry Forecasting (Ash Course) BUS 620 Week 3 DQ 1 Braining Nordstrom (Ash Course) BUS 620 Week 3 DQ 2 Marketing Segmentat...

  16. GEN 499 ASH course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 34

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com       GEN 499 Week 1 DQ 1 Final Research Paper Topic and Plan (Ash) GEN 499 Week 1 DQ 2 Social Media (Ash) GEN 499 Week 2 DQ 1 Professional Resume and Cover Letter (Ash) GEN 499 Week 2 Assignment Critiquing Internet Sources (Ash) GEN 499 Week 3 DQ 1 Social Capital (Ash) GEN 499 Week 3 DQ 2 Federal Policy (Ash) GEN 499 Week 3 Assignment Annotated Bibliography (Ash) GEN 499 Week 4 DQ 1...

  17. BUS 372 ASH Material - bus372dotcom

    OpenAIRE

    lucky108

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.bus372.com       BUS 372 Week 1 DQ 1 The Role of Unionization (Ash Course) BUS 372 Week 1 DQ 2 Meeting Member Needs (Ash Course) BUS 372 Week 2 DQ 1 Profit Interest and Employee Interest (Ash Course) BUS 372 Week 2 DQ 2 Union Requirements (Ash Course) BUS 372 Week 2 Assignment Changing Landscape of Unions (Ash Course) BUS 372 Week 2 Quiz (Ash Course) BUS 372 Week 3 DQ 1 Strikes (Ash Course) BUS ...

  18. EDU 623 ASH COURSE Tutorial/UOPHELP

    OpenAIRE

    dgfvbhn

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.uophelp.com   EDU 623 Week 1 No Child Left Behind (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 1 DQ 1 Skills Needed for Master of Education (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 1 DQ 2 Effective Teachers (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 Writing and Researching Skills Self-Assessment (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 DQ 1 Evaluating Research (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 DQ 2 Diversity in Schools (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 3 Lesson Plan Critique (Ash Course) ...

  19. HCA 375 (ASH) course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 34

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com     HCA 375 Week 1 DQ 1 Management versus Leadership (Ash) HCA 375 Week 1 DQ 2 Implementation and Barriers (Ash) HCA 375 Week 2 DQ 1 Measurement (Ash) HCA 375 Week 2 DQ 2 Quality and Outcomes (Ash) HCA 375 Week 2 Assignment Customer Satisfaction and Quality Care (Ash) HCA 375 Week 3 DQ 1 Teamwork in Health Care (Ash) HCA 375 Week 3 DQ 2 The Impact of Nursing (Ash) HCA 375 Week 3 Ass...

  20. HCA 430(ASH) course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 34

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   HCA 430 Week 1 DQ 1 Perspective (Ash) HCA 430 Week 1 DQ 2 Trends in Vulnerable Populations (Ash) HCA 430 Week 2 DQ 1 Vulnerable Populations (Ash) HCA 430 Week 2 DQ 2 Resource Availability (Ash) HCA 430 Week 2 DQ 3 Race, Ethnicity, and Healthcare (Ash) HCA 430 Week 2 Assignment Critical Thinking Paper (Ash) HCA 430 Week 3 DQ 1 Continuum of Care (Ash) HCA 430 Week 3 DQ 2 Paying for Healthcar...

  1. ENG 328 ASH course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 34

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com     ENG 328 Week 1 DQ 1 What is Technical Writing (Ash) ENG 328 Week 1 DQ 2 Target Audience (Ash) ENG 328 Week 2 DQ 1 Collaborative Writing Process (Ash) ENG 328 Week 2 DQ 2 Design and Graphics (Ash) ENG 328 Week 3 DQ 1 Web Design and Readability (Ash) ENG 328 Week 3 DQ 2 Online Technical Documents (Ash) ENG 328 Week 4 DQ 1 Writing Instructions (Ash) ENG 328 Week 4 DQ 2 Writing Proposa...

  2. EDU 623 ASH COURSES TUTORIAL/UOPHELP

    OpenAIRE

    ROOSER12

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.uophelp.com   EDU 623 Week 1 No Child Left Behind (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 1 DQ 1 Skills Needed for Master of Education (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 1 DQ 2 Effective Teachers (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 Writing and Researching Skills Self-Assessment (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 DQ 1 Evaluating Research (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 DQ 2 Diversity in Schools (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 3 Lesson Plan Critique (Ash Course) ...

  3. Washing of fly ash from combustion of municipal solid waste using water as leachant; Vattentvaett av flygaska fraan avfallsfoerbraenning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steenari, Britt-Marie; Zhao, Dongmei

    2010-03-15

    Ashes from combustion of municipal solid waste contain a large amount of minerals, salts and other metal compounds that are more or less soluble in water. The metal salts are often enriched in the fly ash which leads to a classification of the ash as hazardous waste. This makes ash management complicated and costly. Many stabilisation methods for Municipal Solid Waste Incineration (MSWI) fly ash have been developed and most of them are based on a removal of chloride and sulfate in addition to a binding of metals in less soluble forms. The aim is to avoid the common situation that the ash does not comply to leaching limit values due to release of harmless salts. The aim of this project was to investigate if a simple washing with water can remove enough of the fly ash content of chloride and sulphate so that the ash can be landfilled in a simpler and less costly way than today. The project was focused on fly ashes from the MSWI units owned by Boraas Energi och Miljoe AB and Renova AB Goeteborg, i.e. a electro filter ash from grate fired boilers at Renova and a cyclone ash from a fluid bed boiler at Boraas. The results show that the main part of the chloride content of the ashes can be removed easily, but the washing with water is less effective in the removal of sulphate. A water-to-ash ratio of 1-2 l/kg removes about 100% of chloride but only 8-16% of the sulphate content. In many cases, the leachability of sulphate increases after the washing step. This is due to the rather complex sulphate chemistry with several possible reactions taking place in the ash-water system. For both the tested ashes the high level of chloride leaching is an important factor that prevents admittance on a landfill for hazardous waste without treatment.. The leaching of certain metals, such as Pb, is also high from both ashes but in the case of the Renova fly ash this is dealt with by treatment of the ash according to the Bamberg method. After a water washing with L/S 1-2 (L/kg dry ash

  4. AshMeadowsNaucorid_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Ash Meadows Naucorid (Ambrysus amargosus) occur. "Nevada, Nye County. Point of Rocks Springs and...

  5. Dry cell battery poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  6. Fly ash. Quality recycling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomster, D.; Leisio, C.

    1996-11-01

    Imatran Voima`s coal-fired power plants not only generate power and heat but also produce fly ash which is suitable raw material for recycling. This material for recycling is produced in the flue gas cleaning process. It is economical and, thanks to close quality control, is suitable for use as a raw material in the building materials industry, in asphalt production, and in earthworks. Structures made from fly ash are also safe from an environmental point of view. (orig.)

  7. Effect of Oven Drying On Proximate Composition of Ginger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S Agu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ginger root (ZingiberOfficinale was analyzed to identify its proximate composition. The effects of drying as a processing technique on ginger were investigated with respect to the proximate composition of the produce. Ginger rhizomes were collected, sorted, sliced and dried using the oven at 500C for five (5 hours. Fresh ginger slices were successfully dried from initial moisture content of 70% to 18 %. Ginger composition before drying were 1.81% ash, 7.85% fat, 3.06% protein, 9% fiber, and 8.18% carbohydrate. The analysis of the results of proximate composition showed that the moisture content of ginger reduced after oven drying while the ash, protein, crude fiber increased after drying. On the other hand, the ash content, crude fiber, protein, fat and carbohydrates were 2.35%, 11%, 13.13%, 8.20% and47.32% respectively. The oven-drying technique however was a better option for the drying process as it was more effective in removing sufficient moisture and more so enhanced some nutritional parameter of the produce.

  8. DETERMINATION OF POTASH ALKALI AND METAL CONTENTS OF ASHES OBTAINED FROM PEELS OF SOME VARIETIES OF NIGERIA GROWN MUSA SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Olajiire Babayemi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Potash alkali and metal contents of ashes obtained from peels of six varieties of Nigeria Musa species were investigated. The varieties of Musa species – Musa paradisiaca (plantain, Musa ‘Gross Michel’ (Igbo banana, M.sapientum L. (paranta, Musa ‘Wild Banana’ (omini, Musa ‘Red’ (sweet banana, and Musa ‘Fugamo’ (somupeke, were investigated. The moisture, dry matter, ash and alkali contents; concentration of metals in the ashes and in the contents extracted with water from the ashes; and the ratio of potassium to other metals in the ashes and in the corresponding extracts were determined. Moisture contents ranged from 80.9 to 86.7%; dry matter content, 13.3 to 19.1%; ash content, 6.3 to 12.0%; alkali content, 69.0 to 81.9% of ash and 4.7 to 9.6% of dry sample. Samples ranged between 2.60 and 720mg/kg and in the corresponding extracts, BDL to 500.49mg/kg; ratio of concentration of potassium to other metals in the samples, 0.6 to 395; and in the extracts, 0.5 to 313. Gross michel showed the highest concentration of K (750mg/kg while omini banana gave the lowest average value (112.70mg/kg.

  9. Utilization of ash fractions from alternative biofuels used in power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaisen, L.; Hinge, J.; Christensen, I. (Danish Technological Inst., Aarhus (Denmark)); Dahl, J. (Force Technology, Broendby (Denmark)); Arendt Jensen, P. (DTU-CHEC, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Soendergaard Birkmose, T. (Dansk Landbrugsraadgivning, Landscentret, Aarhus (Denmark)); Sander, B. (DONG Energy, Fredericia (Denmark)); Kristensen, O. (Kommunekemi A/S, Nyborg (Denmark))

    2008-07-15

    It is expected, that demand for the traditional biomass resources wood and straw will increase over the next years. In other projects a number of agro industrial waste products has been tested and characterized as fuels for power plants. The annual production in Denmark of these fuels is estimated at roughly 400.000 tons of Dry Matter per year, so the potential is substantial. The agro industrial biomass products include: Grain screening waste, pea shells, soy waste, cocoa waste, sugar beet waste, sunflower waste, shea waste, coffee waste, olive waste, rice shell waste, potato waste, pectin waste, carrageen waste, tobacco waste, rape seed waste and mash from breweries. In the PSO project 5075, 5 different types of fuel pellets was produced, which were rendered suitable for combustion in power plants. In this project, ash is produced from the above mentioned 5 mixtures together with another 2 mixtures produced especially for this project. From the 5 mixtures from PSO 5075, ash is produced at Danish Technological Institute's slag analyzer. These ash products are rendered comparable to ash from grate fired boilers at power plants. The ash/slag from the combustion in the slag analyzer was then grinded - thus resulting in a total of 5 ash products. At DTU CHEC's Entrained Flow Reactor, ash products from the 5+2 mixtures were produced. These ash products are rendered comparable to ash produced form suspension fired boilers at power plants. For each of the 7 mixtures, bottom-, cyclone and filter ash was taken out separately resulting in a total of 21 ash samples. The produced ashes have been evaluated for their properties as directly applied fertilizer. Furthermore, scenarios have been set up to assess the feasibility in producing artificial fertilizer from the ash products, based on known processes. In the main components the content of Na, S, Cl and K is significantly higher in filter ashes, whereas the content of Mg, Al, Si and Ca is significantly lower. The

  10. Dry Cleaning

    OpenAIRE

    Shirley, Lindsey; Weller, Chanae

    2010-01-01

    Despite its name, commercial dry cleaning is not actually a “dry” process. Clothes are immersed in a solvent, most commonly perchlorethylene (perc), instead of in water. Perc or other similar solvents are effective in the removal of oil and grease-based stains without damaging or shrinking sensitive fabrics, unlike a regular detergents and fabric softeners.

  11. Characterization of ashes from biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frandsen, F.J.; Hansen, L.A. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. Dept. of Chemical Engineering (Denmark); Soerensen, H.S. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (Denmark); Hjuler, K. [dk-TEKNIK. Energy and Environment (Denmark)

    1998-02-01

    One motivation for initiating the present project was that the international standard method of estimating the deposit propensity of solid fuels, of which a number of variants exist (e.g. ISO, ASTM, SD, DIN), has shown to be unsuitable for biomass ashes. This goal was addressed by the development of two new methods for the detection of ash fusibility behaviour based on Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA) and High Temperature Light Microscopy (HTLM), respectively. The methods were developed specifically for ashes from biofuels, but are suitable for coal ashes as well. They have been tested using simple salt mixtures, geological standards and samples from straw CHP and coal-straw PF combustion plants. All samples were run in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C/min. In comparison with the standard method, the new methods are objective and have superior repeatability and sensitivity. Furthermore, the two methods enable the melting behavior to be characterized by a continuous measurement of melt fraction versus temperature. Due to this two-dimensional resolution of the results, the STA and HTLM methods provide more information than the standard method. The study of bottom ash and fly ash as well as deposit samples from straw test firings at the Haslev and Slagelse Combined Heat and Power plants resulted in a better understanding of mineral behaviour during straw grate firing. In these tests a number of straws were fired which had been carefully selected for having different qualities with respect to sort and potassium and chlorine contents. By studying bottom ashes from Slagelse it was found that the melting behaviour correlated with the deposition rate on a probe situated at the outlet part of the combustion zone. (EG)

  12. Drying Characteristics and Physical and Nutritional Properties of Shrimp Meat as Affected by Different Traditional Drying Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, H.; Dziedzoave, N. T.; Kortei, N. K.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of different drying methods on physical and nutritional properties of shrimp meat was investigated in this study. Peeled shrimps were dried separately using an air-oven dryer and a tunnel solar dryer. The drying profile of shrimp meat was determined in the two drying systems by monitoring moisture loss over the drying period. Changes in color, proximate composition, and rehydration capacity were assessed. The rate of moisture removal during solar drying was faster than the air-oven drying. The development of red color during drying was comparable among the two methods, but solar-dried shrimps appeared darker (L⁎ = 47.4) than the air-oven-dried (L⁎ = 49.0). Chemical analysis indicated that protein and fat made up nearly 20% and 2% (wb) of the shrimp meat, respectively. Protein and ash content of shrimp meat dried under the two dryer types were comparable but fat was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in oven-dried meat (2.1%), compared to solar-dried meat (1.5%). Although rehydration behavior of shrimp from the two drying systems followed a similar pattern, solar-dried shrimp absorbed moisture more rapidly. The results have demonstrated that different approaches to drying may affect the physical and nutritional quality of shrimp meat differently. PMID:27034924

  13. Drying Characteristics and Physical and Nutritional Properties of Shrimp Meat as Affected by Different Traditional Drying Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. T. Akonor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different drying methods on physical and nutritional properties of shrimp meat was investigated in this study. Peeled shrimps were dried separately using an air-oven dryer and a tunnel solar dryer. The drying profile of shrimp meat was determined in the two drying systems by monitoring moisture loss over the drying period. Changes in color, proximate composition, and rehydration capacity were assessed. The rate of moisture removal during solar drying was faster than the air-oven drying. The development of red color during drying was comparable among the two methods, but solar-dried shrimps appeared darker (L⁎=47.4 than the air-oven-dried (L⁎=49.0. Chemical analysis indicated that protein and fat made up nearly 20% and 2% (wb of the shrimp meat, respectively. Protein and ash content of shrimp meat dried under the two dryer types were comparable but fat was significantly (p<0.05 higher in oven-dried meat (2.1%, compared to solar-dried meat (1.5%. Although rehydration behavior of shrimp from the two drying systems followed a similar pattern, solar-dried shrimp absorbed moisture more rapidly. The results have demonstrated that different approaches to drying may affect the physical and nutritional quality of shrimp meat differently.

  14. EDU 623 ASH course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 34

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com     EDU 623 Week 1 No Child Left Behind (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 1 DQ 1 Skills Needed for Master of Education (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 1 DQ 2 Effective Teachers (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 Writing and Researching Skills Self-Assessment (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 DQ 1 Evaluating Research (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 2 DQ 2 Diversity in Schools (Ash Course) EDU 623 Week 3 Lesson Plan Critiqu...

  15. HCA 421(ASH) course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 34

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   HCA 421 Week 1 DQ 1 (Basic Strategy) (Ash) HCA 421 Week 1 DQ 2 (Internal Audit of Strategic Assets) (Ash) HCA 421 Week 2 Assignment Competition in Healthcare (Ash) HCA 421 Week 2 DQ 1 (Strategic External Assessment Industry and Competition) (Ash) HCA 421 Week 2 DQ 2 (Market Segments) (Ash) HCA 421 Week 3 Assignment The Future Direction of Health Care (Five challenges) (Ash) HCA 421 Week 3 DQ 1 (Pr...

  16. HCA 415(ASH) course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 34

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   HCA 415 Week 1 DQ 1 Historical Contributions of Public Health (Ash) HCA 415 Week 1 DQ 2 Poverty and Health (Ash) HCA 415 Week 2 DQ 1 U.S. Health Care System Critical Issues (Ash) HCA 415 Week 2 DQ 2 Role of Prevention in Health Status (Ash) HCA 415 Week 2 Assignment Public Health and the Law (Ash) HCA 415 Week 3 DQ 1 Tools for Assessing Community Health (Ash) HCA 415 Week 3 DQ 2 Essential Ser...

  17. Controlling formaldehyde emissions with boiler ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Jennifer; Abu-Daabes, Malyuba; Banerjee, Sujit

    2005-07-01

    Fluidized wood ash reduces formaldehyde in air from about 20 to formaldehyde reduction increases with increasing moisture content of the ash. Sorption of formaldehyde to ash can be substantially accounted for by partitioning to the water contained in the ash followed by rate-controlling binding to the ash solids. Adsorption occurs at temperatures of up to 165 degrees C; oxidation predominates thereafter. It is proposed that formaldehyde could be stripped from an air stream in a fluidized bed containing ash, which could then be returned to a boiler to incinerate the formaldehyde.

  18. Investigation on the fly ash thermal treatment on the performance of Lithium Ferriphosphate (LiFePO{sub 4}) battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Febiolita, Bella; Khoirunnissak, Dewi; Purwanto, Agus, E-mail: aguspurw@gmail.com [Research Group of Battery & Advanced Material, Department of Chemical Engineering, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A Kentingan, Surakarta Indonesia 57126 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    Addition of the fly ash can be used to improve the capacity of LiFePO{sub 4} battery. Fly ash was added in Acethylene Black (AB) as 2% of the total weight of Acetylene Black (AB). The effects of temperature variation and fly ash characteristics were analyzed. Fly ash was prepared by heating at 50, 100, 150, and 250°C in muffle furnace for 5 hours and passed in 200 mesh screen prior to mixing it with other compounds. Lithium Ferriphospat (LiFePO{sub 4}), fly ash, Acethylene Black (AB), Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) as a binder and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent were mixed to be slurry. The slurry were coated, dried and hot pressed to make a cathode film. The performance of battery lithium was examined by eight channel battery analyzer. The composition of the fly ash was examined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and Fourier Tansform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The excellent performance was shown in the fly ash addition which were treated by heating at 150°C. The capacity of fly ash added LiFePO{sub 4} battery is 94.373 mAh/g, which is higher than that of without fly ash addition, i.e. 67.998 mAh/g.

  19. Investigation on the fly ash thermal treatment on the performance of Lithium Ferriphosphate (LiFePO4) battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addition of the fly ash can be used to improve the capacity of LiFePO4 battery. Fly ash was added in Acethylene Black (AB) as 2% of the total weight of Acetylene Black (AB). The effects of temperature variation and fly ash characteristics were analyzed. Fly ash was prepared by heating at 50, 100, 150, and 250°C in muffle furnace for 5 hours and passed in 200 mesh screen prior to mixing it with other compounds. Lithium Ferriphospat (LiFePO4), fly ash, Acethylene Black (AB), Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) as a binder and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent were mixed to be slurry. The slurry were coated, dried and hot pressed to make a cathode film. The performance of battery lithium was examined by eight channel battery analyzer. The composition of the fly ash was examined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and Fourier Tansform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The excellent performance was shown in the fly ash addition which were treated by heating at 150°C. The capacity of fly ash added LiFePO4 battery is 94.373 mAh/g, which is higher than that of without fly ash addition, i.e. 67.998 mAh/g

  20. Investigation on the fly ash thermal treatment on the performance of Lithium Ferriphosphate (LiFePO4) battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febiolita, Bella; Khoirunnissak, Dewi; Purwanto, Agus

    2016-02-01

    Addition of the fly ash can be used to improve the capacity of LiFePO4 battery. Fly ash was added in Acethylene Black (AB) as 2% of the total weight of Acetylene Black (AB). The effects of temperature variation and fly ash characteristics were analyzed. Fly ash was prepared by heating at 50, 100, 150, and 250°C in muffle furnace for 5 hours and passed in 200 mesh screen prior to mixing it with other compounds. Lithium Ferriphospat (LiFePO4), fly ash, Acethylene Black (AB), Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) as a binder and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent were mixed to be slurry. The slurry were coated, dried and hot pressed to make a cathode film. The performance of battery lithium was examined by eight channel battery analyzer. The composition of the fly ash was examined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) and Fourier Tansform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The excellent performance was shown in the fly ash addition which were treated by heating at 150°C. The capacity of fly ash added LiFePO4 battery is 94.373 mAh/g, which is higher than that of without fly ash addition, i.e. 67.998 mAh/g.

  1. Effects of coal fly ash-amended composts on the yield and elemental uptake by plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of coal fly ash-amended composts for use as an alternate manure for agricultural crops. Home-made organic composts was mixed in various proportions with fine fly ash collected from Savannah River Site, and allowed to decompose for two weeks while the mixture was kept wet. Water extracts from the amended composts were analyzed for selected major and trace elements. These amended composts were mixed with sifted sandy loam soil in a predetermined optimum ratio of 1:3 and used to grow corn and sorghum plants. It was shown that fly ash additions to home-made compost facilitated efficient plant utilization of nutrients when 20-40% fly ash in compost was applied to the soil. The maximum dry shoot yields correlated with the higher concentrations of K, Ca and N and lower concentrations of B in the amended compost treatment

  2. Studies on Carbon-Fly Ash Composites with Chopped PANOX Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh V. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical analysis and morphological studies of fly ash reveals the complex chemical constituents present as spherical particles with diameter of less than 25 μm. The constituents of fly ash are silica, alumina, iron oxide, titanium dioxide, calcium and magnesium oxide, and other trace elements. The use of thermosetting as well thermoplastic polymer matrix has been made by several workers to develop polymer matrix fly ash particulate composites by using the hard and abrasive properties of fly ash and lightweight of polymers. Such composites have poor mechanical strength, fracture toughness, and thermal stability. To overcome these shortcomings, in carbonaceous matrix, the carbon fibers were added as additional reinforcement along with the fly ash. The composites were developed with two different methods known as Dry method and Wet method. The processing parameters such as temperature and pressure were optimized in establishing the carbon matrix. Physical, thermal, and mechanical characteristics were studied. The microstructures of composites show good compatibility between fly ash and fibers with the carbon matrix. These composites have higher strength, thermal stability, and toughness as compared to polymer matrix fly ash particulate composites.

  3. Ash in fire affected ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Jordan, Antonio; Cerda, Artemi; Martin, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    Ash in fire affected ecosystems Ash lefts an important footprint in the ecosystems and has a key role in the immediate period after the fire (Bodi et al., 2014; Pereira et al., 2015). It is an important source of nutrients for plant recover (Pereira et al., 2014a), protects soil from erosion and controls soil hydrological process as runoff, infiltration and water repellency (Cerda and Doerr, 2008; Bodi et al., 2012, Pereira et al., 2014b). Despite the recognition of ash impact and contribution to ecosystems recuperation, it is assumed that we still have little knowledge about the implications of ash in fire affected areas. Regarding this situation we wanted to improve our knowledge in this field and understand the state of the research about fire ash around world. The special issue about "The role of ash in fire affected ecosystems" currently in publication in CATENA born from the necessity of joint efforts, identify research gaps, and discuss future cooperation in this interdisciplinary field. This is the first special issue about fire ash in the international literature. In total it will be published 10 papers focused in different aspects of the impacts of ash in fire affected ecosystems from several parts of the world: • Fire reconstruction using charcoal particles (Burjachs and Espositio, in press) • Ash slurries impact on rheological properties of Runoff (Burns and Gabet, in press) • Methods to analyse ash conductivity and sorbtivity in the laboratory and in the field (Balfour et al., in press) • Termogravimetric and hydrological properties of ash (Dlapa et al. in press) • Effects of ash cover in water infiltration (Leon et al., in press) • Impact of ash in volcanic soils (Dorta Almenar et al., in press; Escuday et al., in press) • Ash PAH and Chemical extracts (Silva et al., in press) • Microbiology (Barreiro et al., in press; Lombao et al., in press) We believe that this special issue will contribute importantly to the better understanding of

  4. ETVS - a process for decentral processing of liquid, pasty and solid organic residues into electrical energy and ash, optionally with hydrosoft high-pressure dewatering, fluidized-bed drying, fluidized-bed gasification and heat-and-power cogeneration using product gas; ETVS - Ein Verfahren zur dezentralen Verwertung von fluessigen, pastoesen und festen biologischen Reststoffen in elektrische Energie und Asche, bedarfsweise mit Hydrosoft-Hochdruckentwaesserung, Wirbelschicht-Trockner, Wirbelschicht-Vergaser und Produktgas-Kraft-Waerme-Kopplung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eder, C.; Eder, G. [Christian Eder Technology, Neunkirchen (Germany); Wied, E. [Bisanz GmbH, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    By means of the ETVS process, predominantly liquid organic residues can be converted into electrical energy and mineral ash decentrally, i.e. where they accrue. The process is exemplified with reference to sewage sludge. Sludge containing at least about 4 % dry residue is dewatered to the highest dry substance content possible. The obtained filter cakes are indirectly dried in a fluidized-bed drier using internal process waste heat. Then the organic sewage sludge constituents are gasified in an atmospheric fluidized bed system. The cleaned product gas is used to generate power in a cogeneration power plant, meeting the sewage treatment plant's in-house power demand. The ETVS process is self-sufficient in terms of thermal energy requirement from an initial dry substance content of the filter cake > 40 %. Incineration is a means of disposing of sewage sludge in accordance with the boundary conditions for sewage sludge disposal from 2005, laid down in the technical code on municipal waste. Combining the ETVS process with modern biological treatment stages makes for a substantial cut in the construction and operating cost of sewage treatment plants. (orig.) [German] Mit dem ETVS-Verfahren koennen ueberwiegend fluessige biologische Reststoffe dezentral, d.h. an der Anfallstelle in eigennutzbare elektrische Energie und mineralische Asche umgewandelt werden. Das Verfahren wird am Klaerschlamm beispielhaft dargestellt. Der Klaerschlamm wird ab einem Trockensubstanzgehalt von ca. 4%TR auf moeglichst hohe Trockensubstanzgehalte entwaessert und die dabei erzeugten Filterkuchen mit internen Prozessabwaermen in einem Wirbelschichttrockner indirekt getrocknet. Die organischen Bestandteile des Klaerschlammes werden anschliessend in einer ebenfalls atmosphaerischen Wirbelschichtanlage vergast. Der mit dem gereinigten Produktgas in einer KWK-Anlage erzeugte Strom wird zur Deckung des Eigenbedarfs der Klaeranlage verwandt. Durch die Veraschung liefert das ab einem

  5. Properties of high fly ash content cellular concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufeld, R.D.; Vallejo, L.E.; Hu, W.; Latona, M.; Carson, C.; Kelly, C. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    High fly ash content autoclaved cellular concrete is produced by adding calibrated quantities of aluminum powder to a mixture of fly ash (60% wt/wt), cement, and water. The foamed product is hardened in an autoclave with pressurized steam at about 180 C. Block material for samples tested originated from a mobile pilot plant that toured sites of United States-based electric utilities. Compressive strengths of the foamed product were controlled to the range of 300--600 psi, with dry weight densities on the order of 32--37 lb/cu ft. Heavy metal concentrations in TCLP, ASTM, and synthetic acid rain leachates were on the order one to 10 times that found in Pittsburgh tap water, and never approached 100 times drinking water standards. Organic contents of leachates were not detectable. Controlling pore distributions appears to influence density, moisture accumulation rates, and mechanical/physical properties that are significant for construction.

  6. Phosphorus Treated Coal Combustion Products (CCP-bottom ash) as an Agricultural Source of Phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junfeng, Shen; Powell, M. A.; Hayden, D. B.

    Coal combustion products (CCP or "ash") have been seen to be beneficial for improving soil quality and increasing vegetative yields. Owing to their structure with more holes, they are also potential carriers of plant nutrients. The bottom ash from the Lambton Generating Station, Sarnia, Ontario, Canada was treated for 66 hours in 0.10 mol/L P solutions prepared from NaH 2PO 4, which resulted in the ash adsorbing 784 µg/g of phosphorus. The ash was mixed with quartz sand and/or non P-loaded ash from the same source to provide a set of growth media that contained 10%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of the recommended dose of P (50 µg/g) for maize. Biomass yields at 26, 34, and 46 days after planting were compared with control (non-doped ash) and fertilized with 0-20-0 fertilizer. In general, growth media containing between 25% and 100% of the recommended P dose performed as well or better than the fertilized trials. 46 days after planting, the shoot fresh weight for the 50%, 75%, and 100% doped media were 39.46%, 42.73%, and 46.13%, respectively, greater compared to fertilized trials. The shoot dry weight increased by 29.71%, 13.39%, and 28.87%, respectively. Also, root fresh and dry weight increased averagely by 16.62% and 14.03%. These results implied that coal ashes are a better carrier for P uptaking, and P-loaded ash can be a good additive for sand soil improvement.

  7. Drying Characteristics and Physical and Nutritional Properties of Shrimp Meat as Affected by Different Traditional Drying Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akonor, P T; Ofori, H; Dziedzoave, N T; Kortei, N K

    2016-01-01

    The influence of different drying methods on physical and nutritional properties of shrimp meat was investigated in this study. Peeled shrimps were dried separately using an air-oven dryer and a tunnel solar dryer. The drying profile of shrimp meat was determined in the two drying systems by monitoring moisture loss over the drying period. Changes in color, proximate composition, and rehydration capacity were assessed. The rate of moisture removal during solar drying was faster than the air-oven drying. The development of red color during drying was comparable among the two methods, but solar-dried shrimps appeared darker (L (⁎) = 47.4) than the air-oven-dried (L (⁎) = 49.0). Chemical analysis indicated that protein and fat made up nearly 20% and 2% (wb) of the shrimp meat, respectively. Protein and ash content of shrimp meat dried under the two dryer types were comparable but fat was significantly (p solar-dried meat (1.5%). Although rehydration behavior of shrimp from the two drying systems followed a similar pattern, solar-dried shrimp absorbed moisture more rapidly. The results have demonstrated that different approaches to drying may affect the physical and nutritional quality of shrimp meat differently. PMID:27034924

  8. De-ashing treatment of corn stover improves the efficiencies of enzymatic hydrolysis and consequent ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yanqing; Fang, Zhenhong; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xinliang; Bao, Jie

    2014-10-01

    In this study, corn stover with different ash content was pretreated using dry dilute acid pretreatment method at high solids loading of 67% (w/w). The results indicate that the hydrolysis yield of corn stover is increased from 43.30% to 70.99%, and ethanol yield is increased from 51.74% to 73.52% when ash is removed from 9.60% to 4.98%. The pH measurement of corn stover slurry indicates that the decrease of pretreatment efficiency is due to the neutralization of sulfuric acid by alkaline compounds in the ash. The elemental analysis reveals that the ash has the similar composition with the farmland soil. This study demonstrates the importance of ash removal from lignocellulose feedstock under high solids content pretreatment.

  9. Effect of coconut fibre ash on strength properties of concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Chandak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is the construction material which is obtained by mixing of cement, water and aggregate in required proportions. The day by day the cost of cement is increasing, yet the need for building and other construction requiring this material keep growing with an increase in the population, thus the need to find alternative binding materials that can be used solely or in partial replacement of cement. Agricultural waste material, In this case coconut fibre ash, which is an environmental pollutant. Coconut fibres are collected and the fibre are properly dried and burnt in the open air with a temperature range of 6000 c to 7000 c. when the fibres turned into ash. The ash was collected and made to pass through 150 micron sieve. This work presents the results of laboratory test carried out using coconut fibre ash (CFA as a partial replacement for cement in concrete production. Concrete cubes are cast and tested at curing aging of 7, 28, 60, & 90 days using 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, & 25 percent replacement levels. The slump test results show that the workability of the concrete decreased as the CFA content increased & the compressive strength of CFA concrete increased with curing aging but decrease with increasing the percentage of coconut fibre ash. The percentage strength gained at 90 days for 5% and 10% for the control of 0% is 96.22% & 86.12% respectively. The optimum compressive strength of 59.25N/mm2 was obtained at 5% replacement at 90 days of ages. The percentage strength at this optimum point of the control is 96.22%.

  10. Strength of Ternary Blended Cement Sandcrete Containing Afikpo Rice Husk Ash and Saw Dust Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. O. Ettu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigated the compressive strength of ternary blended cement sandcrete containing Afikpo rice husk ash (RHA and sawdust ash (SDA. 105 sandcrete cubes of 150mm x 150mm x 150mm were produced with OPC-RHA binary blended cement, 105 with OPC-SDA binary blended cement, and 105 with OPC-RHA-SDA ternary blended cement, each at percentage OPC replacement with pozzolan of 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25%. Three cubes for each percentage replacement of OPC with pozzolan and the control were tested for saturated surface dry bulk density and crushed to obtain their compressive strengths at 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 50, and 90 days of curing. The 90-day strengths obtained from ternary blending of OPC with equal proportions of RHA and SDA were 11.80N/mm2for 5% replacement, 11.20N/mm2for 10% replacement, 10.60N/mm2for 15% replacement, 10.00N/mm2for 20% replacement, and 9.10N/mm2for 25% replacement, while that of the control was 10.90N/mm2. This suggests that very high sandcrete strength values could be obtained with OPCRHA-SDA ternary blended cement with richer mixes, high quality control, and longer days of hydration. Thus, OPC-RHA-SDA ternary blended cement sandcrete could be used for various civil engineering and building works, especially where early strength is not a major requirement.

  11. Temporal evolution of wildfire ash and its implications for water pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin, Cristina; Doerr, Stefan H.; Otero, Xose L.; Chafer, Chris J.

    2015-04-01

    Ash, the burnt residue generated from combustion of vegetation, litter and surface soil, covers the ground after every wildfire. The effects of wildfire ash on the post-fire landscape are many and very diverse. It is a source of nutrients and can, therefore, help the recovery of vegetation after fire. Furthermore, in its initial state, the ash layer on the ground can protect the bare soil from rain splash erosion and can act as an adsorbent layer, preventing or delaying post-fire water erosion by runoff. However, when the adsorbent capability of the ash layer is exceeded, this highly erodible material can be transported into the hydrological network and be a major contributor to water contamination. Most previous studies on post-fire erosion and water contamination have focused on soil erosion and associated sediment transfer and overlooked the ash component or, when considered, ash has been included as an unidentified part of the eroded sediment. One of the reasons for overlooking this key post-fire component is the difficulty of ash sampling before it is lost by wind or water erosion or altered by aging on-site. Here we compare the water contamination potential of ash obtained from two fires in the dry eucalyptus forest environment of the Sydney tablelands, Australia: i) 'aged ash' produced during the severe Balmoral wildfire and sampled two months after the event (Jan. 2014) and ii) 'fresh ash' sampled immediately after a high-intensity experimental fire in the same region (Sept. 2014). At the time of sampling, neither of the ash types had been affected by water erosion, however, the aged ash had been subjected to rainfall events and, potentially, to wind erosion during the two months of exposure. Vegetation type, fuel loads and fire severity, determined using remote sensing and on-site observations, were comparable between both areas sampled. Ash physicochemical properties differed, with 'fresh ash' having higher pH and EC values and higher concentration of

  12. Rising from the ashes: Coal ash in recycling and construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naquin, D.

    1998-02-01

    Beneficial Ash Management (BAM, Clearfield, Pa.) has won an environmental award for its use of ash and other waste to fight acid mine drainage. The company`s workers take various waste materials, mainly fly ash from coal-burning plants, to make a cement-like material or grouting, says Ernest Roselli, BAM president. The grouting covers the soil, which helps prevent water from contacting materials. This, in turn, helps control chemical reactions, reducing or eliminating formation of acid mine drainage. The company is restoring the 1,400-acre Bark Camp coal mine site near Penfield in Clearfield County, Pa. Under a no-cost contract with the state of Pennsylvania, BAM is using boiler slag, causticizing byproducts (lime) and nonreclaimable clarifier sludge from International Paper Co. (Erie, Pa.). The mine reclamation techniques developed and monitored at the site include using man-made wetlands to treat acid mine drainage and testing anhydrous ammonia as a similar treatment agent. BAM researches and tests fly ash mixed with lime-based activators as fill material for land reclamation, and develops and uses artificial soil material from paper mill and tannery biosolids.

  13. Gasification of high ash, high ash fusion temperature bituminous coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Peng, WanWang

    2015-11-13

    This invention relates to gasification of high ash bituminous coals that have high ash fusion temperatures. The ash content can be in 15 to 45 weight percent range and ash fusion temperatures can be in 1150.degree. C. to 1500.degree. C. range as well as in excess of 1500.degree. C. In a preferred embodiment, such coals are dealt with a two stage gasification process--a relatively low temperature primary gasification step in a circulating fluidized bed transport gasifier followed by a high temperature partial oxidation step of residual char carbon and small quantities of tar. The system to process such coals further includes an internally circulating fluidized bed to effectively cool the high temperature syngas with the aid of an inert media and without the syngas contacting the heat transfer surfaces. A cyclone downstream of the syngas cooler, operating at relatively low temperatures, effectively reduces loading to a dust filtration unit. Nearly dust- and tar-free syngas for chemicals production or power generation and with over 90%, and preferably over about 98%, overall carbon conversion can be achieved with the preferred process, apparatus and methods outlined in this invention.

  14. Transcriptomic signatures of ash (Fraxinus spp. phloem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Bai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ash (Fraxinus spp. is a dominant tree species throughout urban and forested landscapes of North America (NA. The rapid invasion of NA by emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis, a wood-boring beetle endemic to Eastern Asia, has resulted in the death of millions of ash trees and threatens billions more. Larvae feed primarily on phloem tissue, which girdles and kills the tree. While NA ash species including black (F. nigra, green (F. pennsylvannica and white (F. americana are highly susceptible, the Asian species Manchurian ash (F. mandshurica is resistant to A. planipennis perhaps due to their co-evolutionary history. Little is known about the molecular genetics of ash. Hence, we undertook a functional genomics approach to identify the repertoire of genes expressed in ash phloem. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using 454 pyrosequencing we obtained 58,673 high quality ash sequences from pooled phloem samples of green, white, black, blue and Manchurian ash. Intriguingly, 45% of the deduced proteins were not significantly similar to any sequences in the GenBank non-redundant database. KEGG analysis of the ash sequences revealed a high occurrence of defense related genes. Expression analysis of early regulators potentially involved in plant defense (i.e. transcription factors, calcium dependent protein kinases and a lipoxygenase 3 revealed higher mRNA levels in resistant ash compared to susceptible ash species. Lastly, we predicted a total of 1,272 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 980 microsatellite loci, among which seven microsatellite loci showed polymorphism between different ash species. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The current transcriptomic data provide an invaluable resource for understanding the genetic make-up of ash phloem, the target tissue of A. planipennis. These data along with future functional studies could lead to the identification/characterization of defense genes involved in resistance of ash to A. planipennis

  15. Settling characteristics of some Indian fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, M.K.; Sastry, B.S. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharapur (India). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2003-07-01

    The paper examines the aspects of the solid liquid separation (settling characteristics) of some of the fly ash obtained from coal-fired power plants in India. The application of a coagulating or flocculating agent (polymer) to improve the two properties as indicated is a typical industrial practice. The sources for this study comprise of fly ash, pond ash, and bottom ash and the settling characteristics are studied in conjunction with the flocculating agent polyacrylamide. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Use of Incineration MSW Ash: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Charles H. K. Lam; Alvin W. M. Ip; John Patrick Barford; Gordon McKay

    2010-01-01

    This study reviews the characteristics of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) ashes, with a main focus on the chemical properties of the ashes. Furthermore, the possible treatment methods for the utilization of ash, namely, separation processes, solidification/stabilization and thermal processes, are also discussed. Seven types of MSWI ash utilization are reviewed, namely, cement and concrete production, road pavement, glasses and ceramics, agriculture, stabilizing agent, adsorbents and...

  17. Ash characteristics and plant nutrients in some aquatic biomasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masto, Reginald; Pandit, Ankita; George, Joshy; Mukhopadhyay, Sangeeta; Selvi, Vetrivel; Ram, Lal

    2016-04-01

    Aquatic biomasses are explored as potential fuel source for direct combustion because of their faster growth and no land requirement. The energy density and the ash characteristics of the aquatic biomasses are to be evaluated for their suitability for energy extraction. In the study, four aquatic plant samples namely Eichornia crassipes, Hydrilla verticilleta, Lemna minor, Spirogyra spp were collected from a pond in Digwadih Campus of Central Institute of Mining and Fuel Research, Dhanbad. The biomasses were air dried, powdered and ashed at different temperatures. Volatile C was relatively lower in Spirogyra and Hydrilla (53 %) than Eichornia (62.6 %) or Lemna (59.7 %), whereas fixed C was higher for Eichornia and Lemna (about 10 %) and lower for Hydrilla (1 %). Ultimate analysis showed that the carbon content was in the order Eichornia > Lemna > Spirogyra > Hydrilla. The IR spectra of each raw biomass is compared to their respective ashes obtained at different temperatures (500-900°C). With increase in ashing temperature from 500-900°C there is gradual breakdown of the cellulosic structure hence, peaks around 2900-2800cm-1 caused by aliphatic C-H vibration tends to disappear slowly in ash. More number of peaks appears at lower wavenumbers in ashes of all the biomass samples indicating towards increased percentage of inorganic ion species. Considerable enrichment of SiO2 is validated with prominent peaks at 1100-900 cm-1 in all the ashes. Lemna and Spirogyra has a similar ash composition (Si > Al > Ca > K), whereas, Ca was higher in Hydrilla (Si > Ca > K > Al). Eichornia (Si > K > Ca > Al) has higher K and Ca than Al. SiO2 and Al2O3 were higher in Spirogyra, while SiO2 and CaO in Eichornia and Hydrilla. K first increased from 500-700/800⁰C, and then decreased from 800-900⁰C. Cl is lost slowly in ash from 500-700/800⁰C and then by a drastic reduction from 800-900⁰C. S is enhanced in ash at all temperatures although the change is quite small. Most of the Cl

  18. Interspecific Proteomic Comparisons Reveal Ash Phloem Genes Potentially Involved in Constitutive Resistance to the Emerald Ash Borer

    OpenAIRE

    Justin G A Whitehill; Alexandra Popova-Butler; Green-Church, Kari B.; Koch, Jennifer L; Herms, Daniel A.; Pierluigi Bonello

    2011-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an invasive wood-boring beetle that has killed millions of ash trees since its accidental introduction to North America. All North American ash species (Fraxinus spp.) that emerald ash borer has encountered so far are susceptible, while an Asian species, Manchurian ash (F. mandshurica), which shares an evolutionary history with emerald ash borer, is resistant. Phylogenetic evidence places North American black ash (F. nigra) and Manchurian ash in ...

  19. Use of ashes and ash-and-slad wastes in construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lahtinen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of ash waste saves expenses on main materials without compromising the quality of the product, while solving the problem of disposal of ash materials. The aim of this work is classification of ashes and evaluation its use in construction.Classification of ash-and-slad wastes based on type of burned coal, way of incineration, flame temperature, way of ash disposal is made. The chemical composition and behavior of shale ash, its main deposits, its advantages as a mineral concrete admixture are analysed. Fly ashes are divided into siliceous ashes and basic ashes.Various application areas of ash-and-slad wastes in construction are considered, the examples of its use are given.

  20. DURABILITY OF HARDENED FLY ASH PASTE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The mechanical properties and durability ( mainly frost-resistance and carbonation resistance ) of fly ash-CaO-CaSO4 .2H2O hardened paste are studied. The relationship among durability of harden ed fly ash paste, the quantity and distribution of hydrates and the initial p aste texture of hardened fly ash paste is presented.

  1. A method for treating bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rem, P.C.; Van Craaikamp, H.; Berkhout, S.P.M.; Sierhuis, W.; Van Kooy, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    A method for treating bottom ash from a waste incineration plant. The invention relates in particular to a method for treating bottom ash from a domestic waste incineration plant. In accordance with the invention bottom ash having a size ranging up to 2 mm is treated by removing a previously determi

  2. Drying Thermoplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    In searching for an improved method of removing water from polyester type resins without damaging the materials, Conair Inc. turned to the NASA Center at the University of Pittsburgh for assistance. Taking an organized, thorough look at existing technology before beginning research has helped many companies save significant time and money. They searched the NASA and other computerized files for microwave drying of thermoplastics. About 300 relevant citations were retrieved - eight of which were identified as directly applicable to the problem. Company estimates it saved a minimum of a full year in compiling research results assembled by the information center.

  3. Selenium speciation and cycling in fly ash ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallschlager, D. [Frontier Geosciences, Seattle, WA (United States); Carlton, R.B. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Selenium (Se) is becoming a major element of concern in many aquatic ecosystems because of its ecotoxicity for fish and waterfowl. Elevated Se concentrations in impacted water bodies may be due to both geogenic and anthropogenic sources. Several coal-fired power plants face Se problems since they burn certain types of coal which are geologically-enriched in selenium. The Se pool is volatilized during combustion and ends up in one or two waste streams, fly ash and scrubber water. Both waste streams usually end up in man-made or natural aquatic ecosystems and may create an ecotoxicological risk due to the Se content. Only a few coal-fired power plants currently use wet scrubber technology to remove sulfur from their flue gas, which also results in a selenium bearing waste water stream. Most power plants have electrostatic precipitators to remove particulates from the flue gas stream. Fly ash is the solid residue from this process. It is often enriched in Se, arsenic and chromium. Fly ash is typically stored under water in fly ash ponds. Efforts are being made to manage the biochemistry of selenium in fly ash ponds in a way that promotes fixation in the pond sediments, reducing the mobilization into water and minimizing the risk to wildlife. This paper reported the results of a pilot study in which Se contaminated water of a settling pond was draining a dry fly ash disposal site. The authors examined Se speciation in the fly ash pond waters and sediments to comprehend the biogeochemical Se cycling in the system. Total and dissolved Se in the waters and sediment pore waters were determined by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). Ion chromatography coupled with HG-AFS was used to determine dissolved Se speciation in waters and pore waters. Se associated with iron and manganese hydroxide was also determined by comparing extractions with two different reductants, hydroxyl ammonium hydro chloride and sodium dithionite. Results indicated that

  4. Drying Characteristics and Physical and Nutritional Properties of Shrimp Meat as Affected by Different Traditional Drying Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akonor, P T; Ofori, H; Dziedzoave, N T; Kortei, N K

    2016-01-01

    The influence of different drying methods on physical and nutritional properties of shrimp meat was investigated in this study. Peeled shrimps were dried separately using an air-oven dryer and a tunnel solar dryer. The drying profile of shrimp meat was determined in the two drying systems by monitoring moisture loss over the drying period. Changes in color, proximate composition, and rehydration capacity were assessed. The rate of moisture removal during solar drying was faster than the air-oven drying. The development of red color during drying was comparable among the two methods, but solar-dried shrimps appeared darker (L (⁎) = 47.4) than the air-oven-dried (L (⁎) = 49.0). Chemical analysis indicated that protein and fat made up nearly 20% and 2% (wb) of the shrimp meat, respectively. Protein and ash content of shrimp meat dried under the two dryer types were comparable but fat was significantly (p shrimp from the two drying systems followed a similar pattern, solar-dried shrimp absorbed moisture more rapidly. The results have demonstrated that different approaches to drying may affect the physical and nutritional quality of shrimp meat differently.

  5. A comparison between sludge ash and fly ash on the improvement in soft soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Deng-Fong; Lin, Kae-Long; Luo, Huan-Lin

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the strength of soft cohesive subgrade soil was improved by applying sewage sludge ash as a soil stabilizer. Test results obtained were compared with earlier tests conducted on soil samples treated with fly ash. Five different proportions of sludge ash and fly ash were mixed with soft cohesive soil, and tests such as pH value, compaction, California bearing ratio, unconfined compressive strength (UCS), and triaxial compression were performed to understand soil strength improvement because of the addition of both ashes. Results indicate that pH values increase with extending curing age for soil with sludge ash added. The UCS of sludge ash/soil were 1.4-2 times better than untreated soil. However, compressive strength of sludge ash/soil was 20-30 kPa less than fly ash/soil. The bearing capacities for both fly ash/soil and sludge ash/soil were five to six times and four times, respectively, higher than the original capacity. Moreover, the cohesive parameter of shear strength rose with increased amounts of either ash added. Friction angle, however, decreased with increased amounts of either ash. Consequently, results show that sewage sludge ash can potentially replace fly ash in the improvement of the soft cohesive soil. PMID:17269231

  6. Use of Incineration MSW Ash: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles H. K. Lam

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the characteristics of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI ashes, with a main focus on the chemical properties of the ashes. Furthermore, the possible treatment methods for the utilization of ash, namely, separation processes, solidification/stabilization and thermal processes, are also discussed. Seven types of MSWI ash utilization are reviewed, namely, cement and concrete production, road pavement, glasses and ceramics, agriculture, stabilizing agent, adsorbents and zeolite production. The practical use of MSWI ash shows a great contribution to waste minimization as well as resources conservation.

  7. Thermo-mechanical properties and microfabric of fly ash-stabilized gold tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon Kyu; Shang, Julie Q; Jeong, Sangseom

    2014-07-15

    This paper studies the changes in thermal conductivity, temperature, and unconfined compressive strength of gold tailings and fly ash mixtures during the curing period of 5 days. The microfabric of the cured mixtures was investigated with mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). The mixture samples were prepared at their maximum dry unit weight and optimum moisture content. Effect of adding fly ash to gold tailings (i.e., 0, 20, and 40% of the dry weight of tailings) was examined, and a comparison was made on samples prepared at the same fly ash content by replacing gold tailings with humic acid (i.e., gold tailings and humic acid ratios of 100:0, 90:10, and 80:20 by weight) or by varying pore fluid chemistry (i.e., water and salt solutions of 1M NaCl and CaCl2). The results show that the initial thermal conductivity of the samples is sensitive to the mixture proportion and a declination in the thermal conductivity is observed due to hydration of fly ash and evaporation. Inclusion of fly ash and salts into gold tailings improves the unconfined compressive strength but the presence of humic acid in samples leads to the decrease of the strength. MIP results reveal the pore structure changes associated with the packing states of the samples that reflect the influential factors considered. PMID:24910909

  8. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aughenbaugh, Katherine; Stutzman, Paul; Juenger, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS), calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS), a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  9. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eAughenbaugh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS, calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS, a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  10. Dry Mouth or Xerostomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or Xerostomia Request Permissions Print to PDF Dry Mouth or Xerostomia Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... a dry mouth. Signs and symptoms of dry mouth The signs and symptoms of dry mouth include ...

  11. Investigations of ash fouling with cattle wastes as reburn fuel in a small-scale boiler burner under transient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyukjin; Annamalai, Kalyan; Sweeten, John M

    2008-04-01

    Fouling behavior under reburn conditions was investigated with cattle wastes (termed as feedlot biomass [FB]) and coal as reburn fuels under a transient condition and short-time operation. A small-scale (30 kW or 100,000 Btu/hr) boiler burner research facility was used for the reburn experiments. The fuels considered for these experiments were natural gas (NG) for the ashless case, pure coal, pure FB, and blends of coal and FB. Two parameters that were used to characterize the ash "fouling" were (1) the overall heat-transfer coefficient (OHTC) when burning NG and solid fuels as reburn fuels, and (2) the combustible loss through ash deposited on the surfaces of heat exchanger tubes and the bottom ash in the ash port. A new methodology is presented for determining ash-fouling behavior under transient conditions. Results on the OHTCs for solid reburn fuels are compared with the OHTCs for NG. It was found that the growth of the layer of ash depositions over longer periods typically lowers OHTC, and the increased concentration of ash in gas phase promotes radiation in high-temperature zones during initial periods while decreasing the heat transfer in low-temperature zones. The ash analyses indicated that the bottom ash in the ash port contained a smaller percentage of combustibles with a higher FB percentage in the fuels, indicating better performance compared with coal because small particles in FB burn faster and the FB has higher volatile matter on a dry ash-free basis promoting more burn out.

  12. ACAA fly ash basics: quick reference card

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    Fly ash is a fine powdery material created when coal is burned to generate electricity. Before escaping into the environment via the utility stacks, the ash is collected and may be stored for beneficial uses or disposed of, if necessary. The use of fly ash provides environmental benefits, such as the conservation of natural resources, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and eliminating the needed for ash disposal in landfills. It is also a valuable mineral resource that is used in construction and manufacturing. Fly ash is used in the production of Portland cement, concrete, mortars and stuccos, manufactured aggregates along with various agricultural applications. As mineral filler, fly ash can be used for paints, shingles, carpet backing, plastics, metal castings and other purposes. This quick reference card is intended to provide the reader basic source, identification and composition, information specifically related to fly ash.

  13. Restoration of Ecosystems Destroyed by the Fly Ash Dump Using Different Plant Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florica Morariu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The leguminous plants was studied at experimental variants on fly ash dump: sown species of Onobrichys viciifolia and invasive colonies of Bird's-foot Trefoil (Lotus corniculatus, and yellow sweet (Melilotus officinalis. Six experimental variants were studied in three replicates each: untreated fly ash, fly ash amended with unmodified/modified volcanic rock and fly ash treated with unmodified/modified volcanic rock (indigenous volcanic tuff mixed with organic fertilizer, anaerobically stabilized municipal sludge type. The characteristics of topsoil was assessed in toxic metals Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni content and the characteristics of plants was assessed in terms: height, shoot and roots dry weight, root and shoot ratio, root length density, the aspect plant and competitive ability of this species to dominate in sown habitat. Invasive plants (Lotus corniculatus and Melilotus officinalis have colonized up to 38 - 43 % and max 5 % respectively, treated experimental variants fly ash with organic fertilizer mixed with unmodified/modified volcanic tuff. The proposed strategy with sown leguminous species led to improved conditions for installation of more and resistant invasive species. Furthermore ecological restoration is increasing with effective fly ash dump stabilization.

  14. Physical, chemical and mineralogical characterisation of hydraulically disposed fine coal ash from SASOL Synfuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabulani S. Mahlaba; Elsabe P. Kearsley; Richard A. Kruger [University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa). Civil Engineering

    2011-07-15

    Coal serves as the primary energy source in most parts of the world. It is a fact that coal combustion yields enormous quantities of fly ash some of which are either hydraulically placed or dry dumped. The current study attempts to provide a comprehensive characterisation of a disused alkaline fine coal ash dam (FCAD) towards assessing environmental impact, rehabilitation and utilisation potential. Fine coal ash refers to a combination of approximately 83% power station fly ash and 17% gasification and bottom ash fines (particles {lt}250 {mu}m) at SASOL Synfuels. The hydration products found in Weathered Fine Coal Ash (WFCA) using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) are analcime, calcite, C-S-H gel, ettringite, hydrated gehlenite (Strtlingite), magnetite, periclase, pyrrhotite and sillimanite. High resolution Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) results provide additional proof that hydration products are present in WFCA. No indication of appreciable leaching was given by X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) results except calcium and silicon. Thus evidence exists that pollutants from saline brines are immobilised in WFCA and an insight of reaction kinetics was obtained. High content of amorphous phase and lack of alteration in some geotechnical properties suggest that WFCA can be reutilised with lime addition to increase alkalinity and activate pozzolanic reactions. 48 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Acidification - neutralization processes in a lignite mine spoil amended with fly ash or limestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seoane, S.; Leiros, M.C. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. de Edafologia y Quimica Agricola

    2001-08-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the long-term effects of amending sulfide-rich lignite mine spoil with fly ash (originating from a coal-fired power station and largely comprised of aluminosilicates) and/or agricultural limestone. The experiment was carried out with soil moisture maintained at field capacity or alternate cycles of wetting and drying. Results obtained suggest that the principal acidification processes were oxidation of sulfide and formation of hydroxysulfate (FeOHSO{sub 4}), whereas the main neutralization processes were weathering of aluminosilicates in fly ash-treated samples. The highest dose of limestone rapidly raised the pH of the spoil, but this increase was not maintained throughout the one-year experiment. In contrast, fly ash-treated samples showed a more sustained increase in pH, attributable to the gradual weathering of aluminosilicates. The best results (i.e., good short- and long-term neutralization) were obtained in samples treated with both fly ash and limestone. The low liming capacity of the fly ash (47.85 cmol kg{sup -1}) means that it must be used in large quantities, an advantage in achieving the further aim of disposing of the fly ash. 33 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. Unburned Carbon Loss in Fly Ash of CFB Boilers Burning Hard Coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Junfu(吕俊复); WANG Qimin(王启民); LI Yong(黎永); YUE Guangxi(岳光溪); Yam Y.Lee; Baldur Eliasson; SHEN Jiezhong(沈解忠); YU Long(于龙)

    2003-01-01

    The unburned carbon loss in fly ash of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers, most of which are burning active fuels such as lignite or peat, is normally very low. However, most CFB boilers in China usually burn hard coals such as anthracite and bituminous coal and coal wastes, so the carbon content in the fly ash from these boilers is higher than expected. This paper investigates the source of unburned carbon in the fly ash of CFB boilers burning hard coal through a series of field tests and laboratory investigations. The char behavior during combustion, including fragmentation and deactivation, which is related to the parent coal, has an important impact on the carbon burnout in CFB boilers. The research shows that char deactivation occurs during char burnout in fluidized bed combustion, especially for large particles of low rank coal. The uneven mixing of solids and air in the core region of the furnace also causes poor burnout of carbon in CFB fly ash. An index describing the volatile content (as dry ash free basis) over the heating value is proposed to present the coal rank. The coal combustion efficiency is shown to be strongly connected with this coal index. Several changes in the CFB boiler design are suggested to reduce the unburned carbon loss in the fly ash.

  17. Electroosmotic dewatering of chalk sludge, iron hydroxide sludge, wet fly ash and biomass sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H.K.; Christensen, Iben Vernegren; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.;

    2003-01-01

    Electroosmotic dewatering has been tested in laboratory cells on four different porous materials: chalk sludge, iron hydroxide sludge, wet fly ash and biomass sludge from enzyme production. In all cases it was possible to remove water when passing electric DC current through the material....... Casagrande's coefficients were determined for the four materials at different water contents. The experiments in this work showed that chalk could be dewatered from 40% to 79% DM (dry matter), fly ash from 75 to 82% DM, iron hydroxide sludge from 2.7 to 19% DM and biomass from 3 to 33% DM by electroosmosis...

  18. Ultrasonic ash/pyrite liberation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yungman, B.A.; Buban, K.S.; Stotts, W.F.

    1990-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a coal preparation concept which employed ultrasonics to precondition coal prior to conventional or advanced physical beneficiation processes such that ash and pyrite separation were enhanced with improved combustible recovery. Research activities involved a series of experiments that subjected three different test coals, Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Upper Freeport, ground to three different size fractions (28 mesh [times] 0, 200 mesh [times] 0, and 325 mesh [times] 0), to a fixed (20 kHz) frequency ultrasonic signal prior to processing by conventional and microbubble flotation. The samples were also processed by conventional and microbubble flotation without ultrasonic pretreatment to establish baseline conditions. Product ash, sulfur and combustible recovery data were determined for both beneficiation processes.

  19. Utilization Of Rice Husk Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Nagrale

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available India is a major rice producing country, and the husk generated during milling is mostly used as a fuel in the boilers for processing paddy, producing energy through direct combustion and / or by gasification. About 20 million tones of Rice Husk Ash (RHA is produced annually. This RHA is a great environment threat causing damage to the land and the surrounding area in which it is dumped. Lots of ways are being thought of for disposing them by making commercial use of this RHA. RHA can be used as a replacement for concrete (15 to 25%.This paper evaluates how different contents of Rice Husk Ash added to concrete may influence its physical and mechanical properties. Sample Cubes were tested with different percentage of RHA and different w/c ratio, replacing in mass the cement. Properties like Compressive strength, Water absorption and Slump retention were evaluated.

  20. The Ashes of Marci Shore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Kopeć

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses Marci Shore’s social and historical thought, as presented in her books: Caviar and Ashes: A Warsaw Generation’s Life and Death in Marxism, 1918-1968 (2006, The Taste of Ashes (2013, and her essays recently published in Polish translation. The author follows the American historian, presenting her concept of modernity, but focuses on the main theme of her research: the contribution of Jewish writers, poets, artists, and intellectuals to the creation of Marxism. The author acknowledges the great value of Marci Shore’s writings, but argues that her panorama of the 20th century would be fuller if her discussion included a reflection on the religious attitude of many Jewish thinkers to Marxism and the USSR. This topic was discussed by Nikolai Berdyaev and Polish thinkers who published in pre-war social journals.

  1. Quality Improvement of Pork Loin by Dry Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Cheorun; Lee, Kyung Haeng; You, Insin

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of dry aging on the quality of pork loin. Longissimus lumborum muscles were dissected from the right half of five pork carcasses and were used as the control samples. The left halves of the carcasses were aged at 2±1℃ and a relative humidity of 80% for 40 d. The total aerobic bacteria count was similar between the control and dry-aged pork loin (p>0.05). Lactic-acid bacteria was absent in both the control and dry-aged pork loins. Dry-aged pork loin contained low moisture and high protein and ash compared to the controls (p0.05). Dry-aged pork loin had lower hardness and shear force and received higher core in sensory evaluation than the control (p<0.05). According to the results, dry aging improved textural and sensorial quality of pork loin.

  2. Removal of uranium from simulated fly ash by chloride volatilization method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fly ash is generated from LWR nuclear power plant as a low-level waste, which is contaminated with a small amount of radioactive materials, composed mainly of uranium oxide. The constituents of the fly ash are similar to those of the ore; the major components of the ash are oxides of silicon, aluminum, sodium, magnesium, zinc, iron sodium and uranium. In this study, removal of uranium from the simulated fly ash, of which composition was U3O8: 10, CaO:25, SiO2: 25, Al2O3: 20, MgO: 10, ZnO:5, Fe2O3: 3 and Na2CO3: 2 wt%, by chloride volatilization method was examined. The simulated fly ash was chlorinated by the same manner as the dry way processing for the ore; namely, the ash was heated in a flow of chlorine in the presence of carbon at high temperatures. In the case of volatilization of uranium from U3O8 and a simulated fly ash by chlorination using chlorine and carbon, it was seen that uranium of both samples showed similar volatilization behaviour: The volatilization ratio of uranium (VU) increased with increasing temperature from 800 to 1100 C. The VU value attained 99.9% at 1100 C. Iron, silicon and zinc showed similar behaviour to uranium, namely, they vaporized completely. The volatilization ratio of aluminum, magnesium and sodium were still high in a range 80-90%. The volatilization ratio of calcium was ∼40% under the same chlorination condition, though it changed to chloride. For recovery of uranium from fly ash by chlorination using chlorine in the presence of carbon, high volatilization ratio of uranium can be achieved at high temperatures. Volatilization ratio of other components also increases, which decreases the amount of decontaminated residue resulting in the reducing of decontamination effect. Selection of heating condition is important. (author)

  3. Rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xu; Rong, Le; Ng, Wei Cheng; Ong, Cynthia; Baeg, Gyeong Hun; Zhang, Wenlin; Lee, Si Ni; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Dai, Yanjun; Tong, Yen Wah; Neoh, Koon Gee; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    The solid residues including bottom ashes and fly ashes produced by waste gasification technology could be reused as secondary raw materials. However, the applications and utilizations of these ashes are very often restricted by their toxicity. Therefore, toxicity screening of ash is the primary condition for reusing the ash. In this manuscript, we establish a standard for rapid screening of gasification ashes on the basis of in vitro and in vivo testing, and henceforth guide the proper disposal of the ashes. We used three different test models comprising human cell lines (liver and lung cells), Drosophila melanogaster and Daphnia magna to examine the toxicity of six different types of ashes. For each ash, different leachate concentrations were used to examine the toxicity, with C0 being the original extracted leachate concentration, while C/C0 being subsequent diluted concentrations. The IC50 for each leachate was also quantified for use as an index to classify toxicity levels. The results demonstrated that the toxicity evaluation of different types of ashes using different models is consistent with each other. As the different models show consistent qualitative results, we chose one or two of the models (liver cells or lung cells models) as the standard for rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes. We may classify the gasification ashes into three categories according to the IC50, 24h value on liver cells or lung cells models, namely "toxic level I" (IC50, 24h>C/C0=0.5), "toxic level II" (C/C0=0.05types of ashes generated in gasification plants every day. Subsequently, appropriate disposal methods can be recommended for each toxicity category. PMID:26923299

  4. Vitrification of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash using biomass ash as additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadj-Mallah, Moussa-Mallaye; Huang, Qunxing; Cai, Xu; Chi, Yong; Yan, JianHua

    2015-01-01

    Thermal melting is an energy-costing solution for stabilizing toxic fly ash discharged from the air pollution control system in the municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plant. In this paper, two different types of biomass ashes are used as additives to co-melt with the MSWI fly ash for reducing the melting temperature and energy cost. The effects of biomass ashes on the MSWI fly ash melting characteristics are investigated. A new mathematical model has been proposed to estimate the melting heat reduction based on the mass ratios of major ash components and measured melting temperature. Experimental and calculation results show that the melting temperatures for samples mixed with biomass ash are lower than those of the original MSWI fly ash and when the mass ratio of wood ash reaches 50%, the deformation temperature (DT), the softening, hemisphere temperature (HT) and fluid temperature (FT) are, respectively, reduced by 189°C, 207°C, 229°C, and 247°C. The melting heat of mixed ash samples ranges between 1650 and 2650 kJ/kg. When 50% wood ash is mixed, the melting heat is reduced by more than 700 kJ/kg for the samples studied in this paper. Therefore, for the vitrification treatment of the fly ash from MSW or other waste incineration plants, wood ash is a potential fluxing assistant.

  5. Volcanic ash infrared signature: porous non-spherical ash particle shapes compared to homogeneous spherical ash particles

    OpenAIRE

    A. Kylling; M. Kahnert; Lindqvist, H; Nousiainen, T.

    2014-01-01

    The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic ash clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements effective particle radius and mass loading may be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculated thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compared these with mass- and volume-equivalent sp...

  6. Characterization of fly ash from low-sulfur and high-sulfur coal sources: Partitioning of carbon and trace elements with particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hower, J.C.; Trimble, A.S.; Eble, C.F.; Palmer, C.A.; Kolker, A.

    1999-01-01

    Fly ash samples were collected in November and December of 1994, from generating units at a Kentucky power station using high- and low-sulfur feed coals. The samples are part of a two-year study of the coal and coal combustion byproducts from the power station. The ashes were wet screened at 100, 200, 325, and 500 mesh (150, 75, 42, and 25 ??m, respectively). The size fractions were then dried, weighed, split for petrographic and chemical analysis, and analyzed for ash yield and carbon content. The low-sulfur "heavy side" and "light side" ashes each have a similar size distribution in the November samples. In contrast, the December fly ashes showed the trend observed in later months, the light-side ash being finer (over 20 % more ash in the -500 mesh [-25 ??m] fraction) than the heavy-side ash. Carbon tended to be concentrated in the coarse fractions in the December samples. The dominance of the -325 mesh (-42 ??m) fractions in the overall size analysis implies, though, that carbon in the fine sizes may be an important consideration in the utilization of the fly ash. Element partitioning follows several patterns. Volatile elements, such as Zn and As, are enriched in the finer sizes, particularly in fly ashes collected at cooler, light-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) temperatures. The latter trend is a function of precipitation at the cooler-ESP temperatures and of increasing concentration with the increased surface area of the finest fraction. Mercury concentrations are higher in high-carbon fly ashes, suggesting Hg adsorption on the fly ash carbon. Ni and Cr are associated, in part, with the spinel minerals in the fly ash. Copyright ?? 1999 Taylor & Francis.

  7. Comparison of CO2 capture by ex-situ accelerated carbonation and in in-situ naturally weathered coal fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muriithi, Grace N; Petrik, Leslie F; Fatoba, Olanrewaju; Gitari, Wilson M; Doucet, Frédéric J; Nel, Jaco; Nyale, Sammy M; Chuks, Paul E

    2013-09-30

    Natural weathering at coal power plants ash dams occurs via processes such as carbonation, dissolution, co-precipitation and fluid transport mechanisms which are responsible for the long-term chemical, physical and geochemical changes in the ash. Very little information is available on the natural carbon capture potential of wet or dry ash dams. This study investigated the extent of carbon capture in a wet-dumped ash dam and the mineralogical changes promoting CO2 capture, comparing this natural phenomenon with accelerated ex-situ mineral carbonation of fresh fly ash (FA). Significant levels of trace elements of Sr, Ba and Zr were present in both fresh and weathered ash. However Nb, Y, Sr, Th and Ba were found to be enriched in weathered ash compared to fresh ash. Mineralogically, fresh ash is made up of quartz, mullite, hematite, magnetite and lime while weathered and carbonated ashes contained additional phases such as calcite and aragonite. Up to 6.5 wt % CO2 was captured by the fresh FA with a 60% conversion of calcium to CaCO3 via accelerated carbonation (carried out at 2 h, 4Mpa, 90 °C, bulk ash and a S/L ratio of 1). On the other hand 6.8 wt % CO2 was found to have been captured by natural carbonation over a period of 20 years of wet disposed ash. Thus natural carbonation in the ash dumps is significant and may be effective in capturing CO2.

  8. Can vegetative ash be water repellent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodí, M. B.; Cerdà, A.; Mataix-Solera, J.; Doerr, S. H.

    2012-04-01

    In most of the literature, ash is referred to as a highly wettable material (e.g. Cerdà and Doerr, 2008; Etiegni and Campbell, 1991; Woods and Balfour 2010). However, the contrary was suggested in few articles, albeit with no further quantification (Gabet and Sternberg, 2008; Khanna et al., 1996; Stark, 1977). To clarify this question, water repellency measurements on ash using the Water Drop Penetration Times (WDPT) method were performed on ash from Mediterranean ecosystems and it was found to be water repellent (Bodí et al. 2011). Water repellency on ash from different wildfires ranged from 40 to 10 % occurrence with samples being extreme repellent (lasting more than 3600 s to penetrate). Part of the ash produced in the laboratory was also water repellent. After that, other ash samples had been found water repellent in wildfires in Colorado (unpublished results), Portugal (Gonzalez-Pelayo, 2009), or in prescribed fires in Australia (Bodí et al. 2011b; Petter Nyman, personnal communication). All the samples exhibiting water repellent properties had in common that were combusted at low temperatures, yielding in general ash with dark colour and contents of organic carbon of more than 18 % (Bodí et al. 2011a), although these properties were not exactly proportional to its water repellency occurrence or persistence. In addition, the species studied in Bodí et al. (2011) had been found to produce different levels of WR repellency, being ash from Pinus halepensis more repellent than that from Quercus coccifera and Rosmarins officinalis. Ash from Eucaliptus radiata had been found also very water repellent, as Pinus halepensis (unpublished data). The reasons of the existance of water repellent ash are that the charred residue produced by fire (an also contained in the ash) can contain aromatic compounds that have a lower free energy than water and therefore behave as hydrophobic materials with reduced solubility (Almendros et al., 1992 and Knicker, 2007

  9. Effect of fly ash on autogenous shrinkage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipat Termkhajornkit; Toyoharu Nawa; Masashi Nakai; Toshiki Saito [Hokkaido University, Hokkaido (Japan). Division of Structural and Geotechnical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering

    2005-03-01

    The correlation between autogenous shrinkage and degree of hydration of fly ash was determined with the selective dissolution method. Then, the relationship between the degree of hydration of fly ash and autogenous shrinkage was examined. The results showed that the degree of hydration of fly ash increased as its Blaine surface area increased. The degree of hydration of fly ash increased with time, and autogenous shrinkage increased corresponding to the increase in the degree of hydration of fly ash. Moreover, it was found that the total quantity of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in cement-fly ash samples affected autogenous shrinkage at early ages, but the long-term influence was very small.

  10. COAL ASH RESOURCES RESEARCH CONSORTIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium (CARRC, pronounced �cars�) is the core coal combustion by-product (CCB) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCBs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. CARRC continued the partnership of industry partners, university researchers, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) addressing needs in the CCB industry through technical research and development projects. Technology transfer also continued through distribution and presentation of the results of research activities to appropriate audiences, with emphasis on reaching government agency representatives and end users of CCBs. CARRC partners have evolved technically and have jointly developed an understanding of the layers of social, regulatory, legal, and competition issues that impact the success of CCB utilization as applies to the CCB industry in general and to individual companies. Many CARRC tasks are designed to provide information on CCB performance including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC activities from 1993�1998 included a variety of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. The tasks summarized in this report are 1) The Demonstration of CCB Use in Small Construction Projects, 2) Application of CCSEM (computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy) for Coal Combustion By-Product Characterization, 3) Development of a Procedure to Determine Heat of Hydration for Coal Combustion By-Products, 4) Investigation of the Behavior of High

  11. Atmospheric distribution and removal of volcanic ash after the eruption of Kasatochi volcano: A regional model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmann, Baerbel; ZakšEk, Klemen; Hort, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    In August 2008, Kasatochi volcano on the Aleutian Islands erupted without much advance warning. Volcanic ash released during this eruption quickly settled out of the atmosphere, mainly into the NE Pacific Ocean. The amount of volcanic ash, as well as the ash fall area and volume into the NE Pacific Ocean, remains speculative, as only a limited number of measurements is available. We used a three-dimensional atmosphere/chemistry-aerosol model to determine the atmospheric distribution of SO2 and volcanic ash and its fallout after the eruption of Kasatochi volcano. In a first step, modeled atmospheric SO2 distributions are compared with satellite data, thereby evaluating the model capabilities to reasonably reproduce atmospheric transport patterns. For modeled volcanic ash mass a considerable reduction of the atmospheric content already occurred by 10 August, the second day after the eruption in accordance with satellite observations. Gravitational settling is the most efficient removal process for volcanic ash mass, exceeding dry and wet deposition by far. Assuming an ash volume of 0.3 km3 released during the eruption of Kasatochi volcano and a median ash particle diameter of 4 μm, the mass of volcanic ash removed at ground within the 0.1 mm isopach covers an area of 7.6 × 105 km2 over the NE Pacific Ocean and makes up 49% of the removed material out of the atmosphere. The amount of ash and that of iron attached to it is sufficient to explain measured seawater CO2 decrease at the ocean station Papa in August 2008 induced by iron fertilization and subsequent phytoplankton production.

  12. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao; Bøjer, M.; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Glarborg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Ash deposition on boiler surfaces is a major problem encountered during biomass combustion. Ash deposition adversely influences the boiler efficiency, may corrode heat transfer surfaces, and may even completely block flue gas channels in severe cases, causing expensive unscheduled boiler shutdowns. Therefore, timely removal of ash deposits is essential for optimal boiler operation. In order to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of deposit shedding in boilers, this study in...

  13. The Ash-1, Ash-2 and Trithorax Genes of Drosophila Melanogaster Are Functionally Related

    OpenAIRE

    Shearn, A.

    1989-01-01

    Mutations in the ash-1 and ash-2 genes of Drosophila melanogaster cause a wide variety of homeotic transformations that are similar to the transformations caused by mutations in the trithorax gene. Based on this similar variety of transformations, it was hypothesized that these genes are members of a functionally related set. Three genetic tests were employed here to evaluate that hypothesis. The first test was to examine interactions of ash-1, ash-2 and trithorax mutations with each other. D...

  14. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye Sections What Is Dry Eye? Causes of Dry ... Eye Diagnosis Dry Eye Treatment What Is Dry Eye? Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Devin A ...

  15. Hazards Associated With Recent Popocatepetl Ash Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, A.; Martin, A.; Espinasa-Pereña, R.; Ferres, D.

    2013-05-01

    Popocatepetl has been producing ash from small eruptions since 1994. Until 2012 about 650 small ash emissions have been recorded at the monitoring system of Popocatépetl Volcano. Ash consists mainly of glassy lithic clasts from the recent crater domes, plagioclase and pyroxene crystals, and in major eruptions, olivine and/or hornblende. Dome forming eruptions produced a fine white ash which covers the coarser ash. This fine ash consists of plagioclase, glass and cristobalite particles mostly under15 microns. During the recent crisis at Popocatépetl, April and May2012 ash fell on villages to the east and west of the volcano, reaching Mexico City (more than 20 million people) and Puebla (2 million people). In 14 cases the plumes had heights over 2 km, the largest on May 2 and 11 (3 and 4 km in height, respectively). Heavier ash fall occurred on April 13, 14, 20, and 23 and May 2, 3, 5, 11, 14, 23, 24 and 25. A database for ash fall was constructed from April 13 with field observations, reports emitted by the Centro Nacional de Comunicaciones (CENACOM), ash fall advisories received at CENAPRED and alerts from the Servicios a la Navegación en el Espacio Aéreo Mexicano (SENEAM). This aim of this database is to calculate areas affected by the ash and estimate the ash fall volume emitted by Popocatépetl in each of these events. Heavy ash fall from the May 8 to May 11 combined with reduced visibility due to fog forced to closure of the Puebla airport during various periods of time, for up to 13 hours. Domestic and international flights were cancelled. Ash eruptions have caused respiratory conditions in the state of Puebla, to the east of the volcano, since 1994 (Rojas et al, 2001), but because of the changing wind conditions in the summer mainly, some of these ash plumes go westward to towns in the State of Mexico and even Mexico City. Preliminary analyses of these eruptions indicate that some ash emissions produced increased respiratory noninfectious problems

  16. Characteristics of Wood ASH/OPC Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullahi, M

    2006-01-01

    The study presents the behaviour of wood ash / OPC concrete. Chemical analysis of wood ash, bulk density, sieve analysis and specific gravity of wood ash and aggregates, consistency, setting time and slump test of the fresh paste were conducted to determine the suitability of the materials for concrete making. Mix ratio of 1:2:4 and percentage replacement level of 0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 percents of cement by wood ash were used. 150mm´150mm cubes were cast, cured and crushed at 28 and 60 days to...

  17. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao;

    2016-01-01

    . Therefore, timely removal of ash deposits is essential for optimal boiler operation. In order to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of deposit shedding in boilers, this study investigates the shear adhesion strength of biomass ash deposits on superheater tubes. Artificial biomass ash...... deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000 °C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off by an electrically controlled arm, and the corresponding adhesion strength was measured. The results reveal the effect of temperature, ash/deposit composition......, sintering duration, and steel type on the adhesion strength....

  18. Properties of cement-fly ash grout admixed with bentonite, silica fume, or organic fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed laboratory study was conducted to investigate the properties of cement-fly ash grout mixtures as barriers for isolation of hazardous and low-level radioactive wastes. In the grout studied, fly ash was used to replace 30 percent by mass of cement. Three additives including bentonite, silica fume, and polypropylene fiber were used individually in the grout mixes to improve the properties of the grouts in different aspects. The flowability, bleeding, and setting time of freshly mixed grouts were determined; and the unconfined compressive strength, pore size distribution, and water permeability were determined for hardened grouts at various curing durations up to 120 days. Finally, the durability of cement-fly ash grouts was carefully examined in terms of the changes in their physical properties after different levels of exposure to sulfate attack and wet-dry cycles

  19. Bactericidal and virucidal mechanisms in the alkaline disinfection of compost using calcium lime and ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijikata, Nowaki; Tezuka, Rui; Kazama, Shinobu; Otaki, Masahiro; Ushijima, Ken; Ito, Ryusei; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke; Funamizu, Naoyuki

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, the bactericidal and virucidal mechanisms in the alkaline disinfection of compost with calcium lime and ash were investigated. Two indicator microorganisms, Escherichia coli and MS2 coliphage, were used as surrogates for enteric pathogens. The alkaline-treated compost with calcium oxide (CaO) or ash resulted primarily in damage to the outer membrane and enzyme activities of E. coli. The alkaline treatment of compost also led to the infectivity loss of the coliphage because of the partial capsid damage and RNA exteriorization due to a raised pH, which is proportional to the amount of alkaline agents added. These results indicate that the alkaline treatment of compost using calcium oxide and ash is effective and can contribute to the safe usage of compost from a mixing type dry toilet. PMID:27562698

  20. Dry Purification by Natural Adsorbents of Ethyl Biodiesels Derived from Nonedible Oils

    OpenAIRE

    Nitiema-Yefanova, Svitlana; Richard, Romain; Thiebaud-Roux, Sophie; Bouyssiere, Brice; Bonzi-Coulibaly, Yvonne L.; Nébié, Roger H. C.; Mozet, Kevin; Coniglio, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    International audience The purpose of this work is to analyze the efficiency of natural adsorbents (rice husk ash (RHA) versus corn husk ash (CHA)) for the dry purification of ethyl biodiesels obtained by transesterification via homogeneous catalysis of nonedible oils (Balagnites aegyptiaca, Azadirachta indica, and Jatropha curcas). The characterization of RHA and CHA was achieved by N2 adsorption/Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis and by scanning electron spectroscopy with microanalysis by e...

  1. A Study on the Evaluation of Field Application of High-Fluidity Concrete Containing High Volume Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Wang Choi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent concrete industry, high-fluidity concrete is being widely used for the pouring of dense reinforced concrete. Normally, in the case of high-fluidity concrete, it includes high binder contents, so it is necessary to replace part of the cement through admixtures such as fly ash to procure economic feasibility and durability. This study shows the mechanical properties and field applicability of high-fluidity concrete using mass of fly ash as alternative materials of cement. The high-fluidity concrete mixed with 50% fly ash was measured to manufacture concrete that applies low water/binder ratio to measure the mechanical characteristics as compressive strength and elastic modulus. Also, in order to evaluate the field applicability, high-fluidity concrete containing high volume fly ash was evaluated for fluidity, compressive strength, heat of hydration, and drying shrinkage of concrete.

  2. Ash Content and Calorific Energy of Corn Stover Components in Eastern Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Luc Lizotte

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Corn stover is an abundant agricultural residue that could be used on the farm for heating and crop drying. Ash content and calorific energy of corn grain and six stover components were measured from standing plants during the grain maturing period, between mid-September and mid-November. Ash of stover in standing corn averaged 4.8% in a cool crop heat unit zone (2300–2500 crop heat units (CHU and 7.3% in a warmer zone (2900–3100 CHU. The corn cob had the lowest ash content (average of 2.2% while leaves had the highest content (from 7.7% to 12.6%. In the fall, ash content of mowed and raked stover varied between 5.5% and 11.7%. In the following spring, ash content of stover mowed, raked and baled in May averaged 3.6%. The cob and stalk located below the first ear contained the highest calorific energy with 17.72 MJ·kg−1. Leaves and grain had the lowest energy with an average of 16.99 MJ·kg−1. The stover heat of combustion was estimated at 17.47 MJ·kg−1 in the cool zone and 17.26 MJ·kg−1 in the warm zone. Based on presented results, a partial “cob and husk” harvest system would collect less energy per unit area than total stover harvest (44 vs. 156 GJ·ha−1 and less biomass (2.51 vs. 9.13 t·dry matter (DM·ha−1 but the fuel quality would be considerably higher with a low ash-to-energy ratio (1.45 vs. 4.27 g·MJ−1.

  3. Heavy metal leaching from coal fly ash amended container substrates during Syngonium production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiansheng; Chen, Jianjun; Li, Yuncong

    2008-02-01

    Coal fly ash has been proposed to be an alternative to lime amendment and a nutrient source of container substrates for ornamental plant production. A great concern over this proposed beneficial use, however, is the potential contamination of surface and ground water by heavy metals. In this study, three fly ashes collected from Florida, Michigan, and North Carolina and a commercial dolomite were amended in a basal substrate. The formulated substrates were used to produce Syngonium podophyllum Schott 'Berry Allusion' in 15-cm diameter containers in a shaded greenhouse. Leachates from the containers were collected during the entire six months of plant production and analyzed for heavy metal concentrations. There were no detectable As, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se in the leachates; Cd and Mo were only detected in few leachate samples. The metals constantly detected were Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn. The total amounts of Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn leached during the six-month production period were 95, 210, 44, and 337 microg per container, indicating that such amounts in leachates may contribute little to contamination of surface and ground water. In addition, plant growth indices and fresh and dry weights of S. podophyllum 'Berry Allusion' produced from fly ash and dolomite-amended substrates were comparable except for the plants produced from the substrate amended with fly ash collected from Michigan which had reduced growth indices and fresh and dry weights. Thus, selected fly ashes can be alternatives to commercial dolomites as amendments to container substrates for ornamental plant production. The use of fly ashes as container substrate amendments should represent a new market for the beneficial use of this coal combustion byproduct.

  4. Heavy metal leaching from coal fly ash amended container substrates during Syngonium production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Q.S.; Chen, J.J.; Li, Y.C. [University of Florida, Apopka, FL (United States)

    2008-02-15

    Coal fly ash has been proposed to be an alternative to lime amendment and a nutrient source of container substrates for ornamental plant production. A great concern over this proposed beneficial use, however, is the potential contamination of surface and ground water by heavy metals. In this study, three fly ashes collected from Florida, Michigan, and North Carolina and a commercial dolomite were amended in a basal substrate. The formulated substrates were used to produce Syngonium podophyllum Schott 'Berry Allusion' in 15-cm diameter containers in a shaded greenhouse. Leachates from the containers were collected during the entire six months of plant production and analyzed for heavy metal concentrations. There were no detectable As, Cr, Hg, Pb, and Se in the leachates; Cd and Mo were only detected in few leachate samples. The metals constantly detected were Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn. The total amounts of Cu, Mn, Ni, and Zn leached during the six-month production period were 95, 210, 44, and 337 {mu} g per container, indicating that such amounts in leachates may contribute little to contamination of surface and ground water. In addition, plant growth indices and fresh and dry weights of S. podophyllum 'Berry Allusion' produced from fly ash and dolomite-amended substrates were comparable except for the plants produced from the substrate amended with fly ash collected from Michigan which had reduced growth indices and fresh and dry weights. Thus, selected fly ashes can be alternatives to commercial dolomites as amendments to container substrates for ornamental plant production. The use of fly ashes as container substrate amendments should represent a new market for the beneficial use of this coal combustion byproduct.

  5. Characterization of fly ash from bio and municipal waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima, Ana T.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pedersen, Anne Juul;

    2008-01-01

    Four different fly ashes are characterized in the present paper. The ashes differ in the original fuel type and were sampled at distinct plants. The investigation includes two different ashes from municipal solid waste incineration (with and without sorbents addition), a straw ash and an ash from...... on leaching characteristics, Cd is found mainly associated with carbonates in MSW fly ash and is associated with oxides in straw and co-combustion of wood and oil ash, while Cr is mainly associated with oxides in all studied fly ashes or with carbonates in straw ash. Among the studied parameters, crystalline...... minerals present in fly ash are discussed, measured by an XRD apparatus. Fuel is of main importance to determine Cd and Cr final concentration on fly ash, while flue gas temperature plays an important role as well. The goal of the present work is to underline the main parameters that determine fly ash...

  6. Emergency protection approved for two Ash Meadows fishes

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A large residential and agricultural development near Ash Meadows, Nevada poses an imminent threat to the survival of the Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish and the Ash...

  7. 10 Risk to Ash from Emerald Ash Borer: Can Biological Control Prevent the Loss of Ash Stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash trees were once relatively free of serious, major diseases and insect pests in North America until the arrival of EAB, which was first detected in North America in Michigan in 2002. As of February 2014, EAB had been detected in 22 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces, killing millions of ash ...

  8. Changes of the ash structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Václav; Friedel, Pavel; Janša, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the article is to appraisal of the changes in the structure of the ash due to the addition of compounds capable of the eutectics composition change. For the transformation were used limestone and dolomite dosed in amounts of 2, 5 and 10 wt.% with pellets of spruce wood, willow wood and refused derived fuel. Combustion temperatures of the mixtures were adjusted according to the temperatures reached during the using of fuels in power plants, i.e. 900, 1000, 1100 and 1200 °C.

  9. Statistical Analysis of the Effects of Drying Temperature and Pretreatment on the Proximate Composition of Dried Matured Green Plantain (Musa Paradisiaca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.A. Yusuf

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Drying has been identified as the efficient means of ensuring continuous food supply to the growing population of any country and to enable the farmers produce more high quality marketable products. In this study, the effects of drying temperature and pretreatment on the quality of dried mature green plantain (Musa paradisiaca were studied using an electrically-powered cabinet dryer. The product was dried from an initial moisture content of 62% (w.b to a moisture content of 11.9% (w.b. A factorial experiment in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD involving three levels of temperature (50, 60 and 70 0C; three levels of pretreatment (blanching, boiling and control and three replications were used. The quality analysis of the dried samples at different level of drying temperatures and pre-treatments was carried out for protein, fat, ash and fibre content and the data obtained were statistically analyzed using SPSS 16.0 software to determine the level of significance among the treatment factors on the dried samples. The protein, fat and fibre content decreased with increase in temperature but the ash content increased with increase in temperature. In pretreatments, control had the highest protein content of 4.27% at 60 0C, lowest fat content of 2.26% at 70 0 C and moderate fibre and ash contents of 0.68% and 1.82% respectively at 60 0C. Boiled sample also had the highest fat content of 4.27% at 50 0C, lowest fat content 2.26% at 70 0C and moderate fibre and ash contents of 0.88% and 1.73% respectively at 60 0C. lastly, blanched sample had the highest fat content of 4.11% at 50 0 C, lowest fat content 2.54% at 70 0C and moderate fibre and ash contents of 0.83% and 1.45% respectively at 60 0C.

  10. Improving lithium-ion battery performances by adding fly ash from coal combustion on cathode film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyartanti, Endah Retno; Jumari, Arif, E-mail: arifjumari@yahoo.com; Nur, Adrian; Purwanto, Agus [Research Group of Battery & Advanced Material, Department of Chemical Engineering, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A Kentingan, Surakarta Indonesia 57126 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    A lithium battery is composed of anode, cathode and a separator. The performance of lithium battery is also influenced by the conductive material of cathode film. In this research, the use of fly ash from coal combustion as conductive enhancer for increasing the performances of lithium battery was investigated. Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO{sub 4}) was used as the active material of cathode. The dry fly ash passed through 200 mesh screen, LiFePO{sub 4} and acethylene black (AB), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a binder and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent were mixed to form slurry. The slurry was then coated, dried and hot pressed to obtain the cathode film. The ratio of fly ash and AB were varied at the values of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5% while the other components were at constant. The anode film was casted with certain thickness and composition. The performance of battery lithium was examined by Eight Channel Battery Analyzer, the composition of the cathode film was examined by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), and the structure and morphology of the anode film was analyzed by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). The composition, structure and morphology of cathode film was only different when fly ash added was 4% of AB or more. The addition of 2% of AB on cathode film gave the best performance of 81.712 mAh/g on charging and 79.412 mAh/g on discharging.

  11. Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodoo, J.N.D.; Okoh, J.M.; Diaz, A.

    1998-08-01

    Oxidation studies of coal fly ash have been carried out at partial pressures in the range 1 atmosphere down to 400 torr. The studies have also been carried out at 1 atmosphere for different temperatures in the range 500 to 750 C. The equipment used was a state-of-the-art Cann Thermogravimetric analyzer having sensitive microbalance that permitted measurements to .1 {micro}g. The analyzer is part of a GC/MS/TG setup in this laboratory. The fly ash was supplied by Delmarva Power Indian River Plant, DE. The samples were dried and stored in a desiccator to ensure that they remained dry prior to combustion. The combustion process inside the TGA is continuous and the heat released can be related to the percent of carbon consumed. The setup provided easy identification of the elements in the fly ash. The elemental analysis was also augmented by use of an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. In the X-ray analysis the carbon in the fly ash was compared with that in a dolomite (CaMg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}) standard obtained from the US Bureau of Mines (USBOM). Preliminary data show encouraging results in the rate of reduction of the residual carbon. Both analyses show reduction of carbon after burning.

  12. Effects of Characteristics of Fly Ash on the Properties of Geopolymer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜海燕; 杨立娜; 高婉琪; 刘家臣

    2016-01-01

    The properties of two types of fly ash geopolymers made from class F fly ashes produced in wet bottom and dry bottom boilers were investigated in the present study. The source material used in the geopolymer concrete was activated with sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate solution. The results revealed that the geopolymer pro-duced with wet bottom boiler fly ash(CZ-FA)hardened quickly, and had higher early-age strength and lower shrinkage than the geopolymer produced with dry bottom boiler fly ash(SX-FA). The compressive strength of the two geopolymers made from CZ-FA and SX-FA was 45 MPa and 15 MPa respectively when cured at 60℃ and delayed for 14 d. However, after 90 days’ delay, the compressive strength of both the samples is almost the same, up to 80 MPa. Nearly 20% volume shrinkage of the samples made from SX-FA was much higher than that made from CZ-FA, which was almost zero. XRD, SEM/EDS and FT-IR were used to analyze the main reason of the dif-ferences.

  13. Improving lithium-ion battery performances by adding fly ash from coal combustion on cathode film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lithium battery is composed of anode, cathode and a separator. The performance of lithium battery is also influenced by the conductive material of cathode film. In this research, the use of fly ash from coal combustion as conductive enhancer for increasing the performances of lithium battery was investigated. Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) was used as the active material of cathode. The dry fly ash passed through 200 mesh screen, LiFePO4 and acethylene black (AB), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a binder and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent were mixed to form slurry. The slurry was then coated, dried and hot pressed to obtain the cathode film. The ratio of fly ash and AB were varied at the values of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5% while the other components were at constant. The anode film was casted with certain thickness and composition. The performance of battery lithium was examined by Eight Channel Battery Analyzer, the composition of the cathode film was examined by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), and the structure and morphology of the anode film was analyzed by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). The composition, structure and morphology of cathode film was only different when fly ash added was 4% of AB or more. The addition of 2% of AB on cathode film gave the best performance of 81.712 mAh/g on charging and 79.412 mAh/g on discharging

  14. Possibility of using waste tire rubber and fly ash with Portland cement as construction materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Arin; Degirmenci, Nurhayat

    2009-05-01

    The growing amount of waste rubber produced from used tires has resulted in an environmental problem. Recycling waste tires has been widely studied for the last 20 years in applications such as asphalt pavement, waterproofing systems and membrane liners. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing fly ash and rubber waste with Portland cement as a composite material for masonry applications. Class C fly ash and waste automobile tires in three different sizes were used with Portland cement. Compressive and flexural strength, dry unit weight and water absorption tests were performed on the composite specimens containing waste tire rubber. The compressive strength decreased by increasing the rubber content while increased by increasing the fly ash content for all curing periods. This trend is slightly influenced by particle size. For flexural strength, the specimens with waste tire rubber showed higher values than the control mix probably due to the effect of rubber fibers. The dry unit weight of all specimens decreased with increasing rubber content, which can be explained by the low specific gravity of rubber particles. Water absorption decreased slightly with the increase in rubber particles size. These composite materials containing 10% Portland cement, 70% and 60% fly ash and 20% and 30% tire rubber particles have sufficient strength for masonry applications. PMID:19110410

  15. Improving lithium-ion battery performances by adding fly ash from coal combustion on cathode film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyartanti, Endah Retno; Jumari, Arif; Nur, Adrian; Purwanto, Agus

    2016-02-01

    A lithium battery is composed of anode, cathode and a separator. The performance of lithium battery is also influenced by the conductive material of cathode film. In this research, the use of fly ash from coal combustion as conductive enhancer for increasing the performances of lithium battery was investigated. Lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) was used as the active material of cathode. The dry fly ash passed through 200 mesh screen, LiFePO4 and acethylene black (AB), polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a binder and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) as a solvent were mixed to form slurry. The slurry was then coated, dried and hot pressed to obtain the cathode film. The ratio of fly ash and AB were varied at the values of 1%, 2%, 3%, 4% and 5% while the other components were at constant. The anode film was casted with certain thickness and composition. The performance of battery lithium was examined by Eight Channel Battery Analyzer, the composition of the cathode film was examined by XRD (X-Ray Diffraction), and the structure and morphology of the anode film was analyzed by SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope). The composition, structure and morphology of cathode film was only different when fly ash added was 4% of AB or more. The addition of 2% of AB on cathode film gave the best performance of 81.712 mAh/g on charging and 79.412 mAh/g on discharging.

  16. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from fly ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the Ph.D. work was to develop the electrodialytic remediation method for removal of heavy metals from fly ashes. The work was focused on two types of fly ashes: fly ashes from wood combustion and fly ashes from municipal solid waste incineration.......The aim of the Ph.D. work was to develop the electrodialytic remediation method for removal of heavy metals from fly ashes. The work was focused on two types of fly ashes: fly ashes from wood combustion and fly ashes from municipal solid waste incineration....

  17. Surface Modification of Fly Ash for Active Catalysis

    OpenAIRE

    Deepti Jain; Renu Hada; Ashu Rani

    2013-01-01

    Fly ash based effective solid base catalyst (KF/Al2O3/fly ash473, KF/Al2O3/fly ash673, and KF/Al2O3/fly ash873) was synthesized by loading KF over chemically and thermally activated fly ash. The chemical activation was done by treating fly ash with aluminum nitrate via precipitation method followed by thermal activation at 650°C to increase the alumina content in fly ash. The increased alumina content was confirmed by SEM-EDX analysis. The alumina enriched fly ash was then loaded with KF (10...

  18. ENG 328 ASH Course Tutorial / eng328dotcom

    OpenAIRE

    anil3

    2015-01-01

    ENG 328 Entire Course (Ash) For more course tutorials visit www.eng328.com ENG 328 Week 1 DQ 1 What is Technical Writing (Ash) ENG 328 Week 1 DQ 2 Target Audience (Ash) ENG 328 Week 2 DQ 1 Collaborative Writing Process (Ash) ENG 328 Week 2 DQ 2 Design and Graphics (Ash) ENG 328 Week 3 DQ 1 Web Design and Readability (Ash) ENG 328 Week 3 DQ 2 Online Technical Documents (Ash) ENG 328 Week 4 DQ 1 Writing Instructions (Ash) ENG 328 Week 4 DQ 2 Writing Propo...

  19. ENG 328 ASH Material-eng328dotcom

    OpenAIRE

    Sandywilliam

    2015-01-01

    ENG 328 Entire Course (Ash) For more course tutorials visit www.eng328.com ENG 328 Week 1 DQ 1 What is Technical Writing (Ash) ENG 328 Week 1 DQ 2 Target Audience (Ash) ENG 328 Week 2 DQ 1 Collaborative Writing Process (Ash) ENG 328 Week 2 DQ 2 Design and Graphics (Ash) ENG 328 Week 3 DQ 1 Web Design and Readability (Ash) ENG 328 Week 3 DQ 2 Online Technical Documents (Ash) ENG 328 Week 4 DQ 1 Writing Instructions (Ash) ENG 328 Week 4 DQ 2 Writing Propo...

  20. CHARACTERIZATION AND COMPARISON OF TREATED AND UNTREATED RICH HUSH ASH & FLY ASH FOR METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Pal Singh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Rice Husk ash and fly ash are agricultural and coal wastes respectively. These are produced in abundance globally and poses risk to health as well as environment. Thus their effective, conducive and eco-friendly utilization has always been a challenge for scientific community. The fly ash has been used as reinforcement for improved mechanical properties of composites (1,3-5,9. Rice husk ash can also be used for similar applications as its composition is almost similar to that of fly ash. This paper mainly deals with identification ofcharacteristics of both the fly ash and rice husk ash using spectroscopic and microscopic analysis. SEM, XRD,XRF and FTIR spectroscopic methods were used for the characterization of treated and untreated ashes. The results were compared and it was observed that both ashes possesses nearly same chemical phases and otherfunctional groups thus proposing the use of rice husk ash as reinforcement like fly ash in Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs specifically for wear resistance applications.

  1. Ash basin reclamation with forest trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, J.H.; McMinn, J.W.

    1977-09-01

    An ash basin at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina is growing trees as well as, and with some species better than, a local soil. The basin contains ashes from a stoker-fed boiler and was last used about 12 years before the trees were planted. The concentrations of 24 chemical elements were measured in ashes, soil and trees. The concentrations of most of the chemical elements were higher in ashes than in soil; however, with a few exceptions, these elements were less available to the trees on ashes than to the trees on soil. The trees do not show any toxicity or deficiency symptoms, but the concentration of manganese in sycamore growing on ashes indicates a possible deficiency. No concentration of an element in trees appears to be high enough to be toxic to the trees. A longer period of study will be required to determine whether the ashes can produce commercial timber, but trees can be used to stabilize ash basins and improve their appearance.

  2. Wet physical separation of MSWI bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muchova, L.

    2010-01-01

    Bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) has high potential for the recovery of valuable secondary materials. For example, the MSWI bottom ash produced by the incinerator at Amsterdam contains materials such as non-ferrous metals (2.3%), ferrous metals (8-13%), gold (0.4 ppm),

  3. Construction procedures using self hardening fly ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, S. I.; Parker, D. G.

    1980-07-01

    Fly ash produced in Arkansas from burning Wyoming low sulfur coal is self-hardening and can be effective as a soil stabilizing agent for clays and sands. The strength of soil-self hardening fly ash develops rapidly when compacted immediately after mixing. Seven day unconfined compressive strengths up to 1800 psi were obtained from 20% fly ash and 80% sand mixtures. A time delay between mixing the fly ash with the soil and compaction of the mixture reduced the strength. With two hours delay, over a third of the strength was lost and with four hours delay, the loss was over half. Gypsum and some commercial concrete retarders were effective in reducing the detrimental effect of delayed compaction. Adequate mixing of the soil and fly ash and rapid compaction of the mixtures were found to be important parameters in field construction of stabilized bases.

  4. FLEXURAL BEHAVIOUR OF ACTIVATED FLY ASH CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUNILAA GEORGE

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cement concrete is the most widely used construction material in many infrastructure projects. The development and use of mineral admixture for cement replacement is growing in construction industry mainly due to the consideration of cost saving, energy saving, environmental production and conservation of resources. Present study is aimed at replacing cement in concrete with activated fly ash. The paper highlights the chemical activation of low calcium fly ash using CaO and Na2SiO3 in the ratio 1:8 for improving the pozzolanic properties of fly ash .The investigation deals with the flexural behavior of beams using chemically activated fly ash at various cement replacement levels of 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, and 60% with water cement ratio 0.45.The results are compared with OPC and Activated Fly ash at the same replacement levels.

  5. The effect of using different sources of dry materials on waste-form grout properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reference grout formulation had been developed for a liquid low-level radioactive waste using the following dry materials: ground limestone, ground granulated blast furnace slag, fly ash, and cement. The effect of varying the sources of these dry materials was tested. Two limestones, two fly ashes, two cements, and eight slags were tested. Varying the source of dry materials significantly affected the grout properties, but only the 28-d free-standing liquid varied outside of the preferred range. A statistical technique, Tukey's paired comparison, can be used to ascertain whether a given combination of dry materials resulted in grout properties significantly different from those of other combinations of dry materials. (author)

  6. Properties and Leachability of Self-Compacting Concrete Incorporated with Fly Ash and Bottom Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Ikhmal Haqeem Hassan, Mohd; Jamaluddin, Norwati; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    The process of combustion in coal-fired power plant generates ashes, namely fly ash and bottom ash. Besides, coal ash produced from coal combustion contains heavy metals within their compositions. These metals are toxic to the environment as well as to human health. Fortunately, treatment methods are available for these ashes, and the use of fly ash and bottom ash in the concrete mix is one of the few. Therefore, an experimental program was carried out to study the properties and determine the leachability of selfcompacting concrete incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash. For experimental study, self-compacting concrete was produced with fly ash as a replacement for Ordinary Portland Cement and bottom ash as a replacement for sand with the ratios of 10%, 20%, and 30% respectively. The fresh properties tests conducted were slump flow, t500, sieve segregation and J-ring. Meanwhile for the hardened properties, density, compressive strength and water absorption test were performed. The samples were then crushed to be extracted using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and heavy metals content within the samples were identified accordingly using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The results demonstrated that both fresh and hardened properties were qualified to categorize as self-compacting concrete. Improvements in compressive strength were observed, and densities for all the samples were identified as a normal weight concrete with ranges between 2000 kg/m3 to 2600 kg/m3. Other than that, it was found that incorporation up to 30% of the ashes was safe as the leached heavy metals concentration did not exceed the regulatory levels, except for arsenic. In conclusion, this study will serve as a reference which suggests that fly ash and bottom ash are widely applicable in concrete technology, and its incorporation in self-compacting concrete constitutes a potential means of adding value to appropriate mix and design.

  7. Investigation on Leaching Behaviour of Fly Ash and Bottom Ash Replacement in Self-Compacting Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Ikhmal Haqeem Hassan, Mohd; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    Fly ash and bottom ash are some of the waste generated by coal-fired power plants, which contains large quantities of toxic and heavy metals. In recent years, many researchers have been interested in studying on the properties of self-compacting concrete incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash but there was very limited research from the combination of fly ash and bottom ash towards the environmental needs. Therefore, this research was focused on investigating the leachability of heavy metals of SCC incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash by using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure, Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure and Static Leaching Test. The samples obtained from the coal-fired power plant located at Peninsula, Malaysia. In this study, the potential heavy metals leached out from SCC that is produced with fly ash as a replacement for Ordinary Portland Cement and bottom ash as a substitute for sand with the ratios from 10% to 30% respectively were designated and cast. There are eight heavy metals of concern such as As, Cr, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Mn and Fe. The results indicated that most of the heavy metals leached below the permissible limits from the United States Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization limit for drinking water. As a conclusion, the minimum leaching of the heavy metals from the incorporation of fly ash and bottom ash in self-compacting concrete was found in 20% of fly ash and 20% of bottom ash replacement. The results also indicate that this incorporation could minimize the potential of environmental problems.

  8. Ash and heavy metals in fluidized-bed combustion of wood wastes; Tuhka ja raskasmetallit puuperaeisen jaetteen kerrosleijupoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaessi, T.; Aittoniemi, P. [IVO Power Engineering, Vantaa (Finland); Kauppinen, E.; Latva-Somppi, J.; Kurkela, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Partanen, J. [IVO Technology Centre, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Ash formation and deposition mechanisms during co-combustion of pulp mill sludge and bark in industrial bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) combustor have been studied. Similar fuels were used in a bench-scale BFB for co-combustion of sludge and bark pellets and comparative studies with separate combustion of these fuels. Results indicated that in industrial scale unit significant fraction of ash had vaporization. About 14 mass-% of the total fly ash was found in the particle size below 0.2 {mu}m. The vaporized species consisted of potassium (K), sulfur (S), chlorine (Cl) and also of minor quantities of sodium (Na). In the benchscale similar vaporization fractions during co-combustion were measured, about 11 mass-%. During the combustion of bark this ratio, about 20 mass-%, was higher than during sludge combustion. The vaporized ash fraction was in the case of dried sludge combustion about 7 mass-%, but with wet sludge the vaporization rate was remarkably lower, about 1-2 mass-%. An increase in the bed temperature increased also ash vaporization. Test run period without combustion at elevated temperatures produced very low quantities of vaporized ash. The vaporized species in bench-scale test during bark pellet combustion were K, S and Cl, for sludge combustion also Na was clearly detected. No condensation of the vaporized species in bed area or furnace walls was observed. Bed defluidization was studied in the bench-scale unit. During bark pellet combustion the bed-agglomeration proceeded via small ash particle, below 2 {mu}m, coating on sand particle surface and consequent bonding between the ash layers. In the case of sludge combustion the accumulation of large ash particles and sintering of these porous agglomerates was observed to cause bed coarsening and defluidization. (orig.)

  9. Laboratory Studies of Ice Nucleation on Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, M. A.; Schill, G. P.; Genareau, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Ice nucleation on volcanic ash controls both ash aggregation and cloud glaciation, which affect human respiratory health, atmospheric transport, and global climate. We have performed laboratory studies of the depositional and immersion freezing efficiency of three distinct samples of volcanic ash using Raman Microscopy coupled to an environmental cell. Ash from the Fuego (Basaltic Ash, Guatemala), Soufriere Hills (Andesetic Ash, Montserrat), and Taupo (Rhyolitic Ash, New Zealand) volcanoes were chosen to represent different geographical locations and silica content. All ash samples were quantitatively analyzed for both percent crystallinity and mineralogy using X-ray diffraction. We find that all three samples of volcanic ash are excellent depositional ice nuclei, nucleating ice at ice saturation ratios of 1.05 ± 0.1. For immersion freezing, however, only the Taupo ash exhibited efficient heterogeneous ice nucleation activity. Similar to recent studies on mineral dust, we suggest that the mineralogy of volcanic ash may dictate its ice nucleation activity in the immersion mode.

  10. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2012-05-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  11. Long term effects of ash fertilization of reed canary grass; Laangtidseffekter av askgoedsling vid roerflensodling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmborg, Cecilia; Lindvall, Eva

    2011-03-15

    Reed canary grass (RCG) is a bio-energy crop with large potential. It is a 1.5 . 2.5 m tall grass that is harvested in spring when it is grown as a fuel. At spring harvest it yields 3 . 10 ton field dried material per ha and year. One disadvantage when reed canary grass is used as a fuel is the high ash content, 5-10 %. This means that large quantities of ash have to be deposited which is expensive, about 1000 SEK/ton. However, since reed canary grass ash contains reasonable amounts of plant nutrients like phosphorous (P), potassium (K) and magnesium (Mg) it could be recycled as fertilizer in agriculture. The ash can be used without any pretreatment since, in agriculture, plant availability is desirable. The aim of this project, was to evaluate a field experiment, where ash was used as a fertilizer in reed canary grass. The experiment was established at the SLU research station in Umea, Sweden in the spring 2002. Three different fertilizer treatments were applied: Treatment A was fertilized with an ash produced by combustion of RCG together with municipal wastes (paper, plastic, leather), treatment B, an ash from combustion of RCG, and for treatment C commercial fertilizers were used. In total, 100 kg ha-1 of nitrogen (N), 15 kg ha-1 of phosphorous (P) and 80 kg ha-1 of potassium (K), were applied each year in all treatments. The amount of ash in treatment A and B was calculated from the chemical analysis of the ashes to be equal to the required amount of P, while K and N were supplied also by commercial fertilizers. [Table 1. Composition of the ashes] Literature study: There is a lack of knowledge about fertilization with reed canary grass ash, since few experiments have been conducted. The composition of reed canary grass is dependent of harvest date and the soil substrate. The amount of ash and the amount of harmful substances such as potassium and chloride generally decreases over winter, giving an increased fuel quality from spring harvest compared to autumn

  12. Fly Ash in Civil Engineering Stage 1: Inventory/Application; Flygaska i geotekniska anlaeggningar Etapp 1: Inventering/Tillaemplighet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macsik, Josef; Svedberg, Bo; Lenstroemer, Stina; Nilsson, Thomas [Scandiaconsult, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-01-01

    The project presented below is the first phase of a broader project named FACE 'Fly Ash in Civil Engineering'. The objective of the project is to identify environmentally friendly products based on fly ash to be used in geotechnical applications such as road bases etc. In this phase of the project, named 'Inventory/Applicability', different fly ashes have been grouped according to their technical properties and potential applications. The objective of grouping fly ashes is to identify key-properties in order to make future investigations less extensive and also to make it easier to assess potential applications in the future. A total of nine different fly ashes from incineration of bio fuels (Heating Plants and Forest Industry Boilers) were investigated. The investigated fly ashes were all fresh and dry apart from two which originated from landfill. Properties such as grain-size distribution, water content, void-ratio, loss on ignition, compaction properties, increase of shear strength, have been investigated. Analyses of the results indicate that fly ashes can be divided into three main groups A, B and C, where: Group A fly ashes have poor curing properties and need stabilisation agents such as other fly ashes with higher curing capacity or cement (Portland cement, Merit 5000 etc.). Fly ash which has been stored in landfill and has a low content of quick lime is also part of this group. These fly ashes are not appropriate for use without addition of stabilising agent if they are to be used in applications where percolating water and frost-thaw cycles occur. After stabilisation with fresh fly ash and cement, fly ashes from this group can be used in sub-base in roads. Group B fly ashes have medium-high to high content of quick lime and good development of shear strength. These fly ashes can be used without being stabilised with cement. In fact, adding cement can reduce properties of compaction thus reducing the strength of a construction. The

  13. Selective catalytic reduction of NO by ammonia over oil shale ash and fly ash catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changtao Yue; Shuyuan Li [University of Petroleum, Beijing (China). State Key Lab of Heavy Oil Processing

    2003-07-01

    Acid rain and urban air pollution, produced mainly by pollutants such as SOX and NOX and other volatile organic compounds, has become the most serious environmental problem. The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH{sub 3} in the presence of oxygen is a wellproven method to limit the NOX emissions. The work in this field has been the subject of much research in recent years. In this paper, NO reduction with NH{sub 3} over oil shale ash or fly ash catalysts was studied. Fe, Cu, V or Ni as active elements was loaded by adding aqueous solutions of the metal nitrate over the oil shale ash or fly ash support. The activities of the catalysts for NO removal were measured in a fixed-bed reactor. According to the results, oil shale ash or fly ash, after pre-treatment, can be reasonably used as the SCR catalyst support to remove NO from flue gas. Cu gave the highest catalytic activity and NO conversion for fly ash while V for oil shale ash. As the support, fly ash is more feasible than oil shale ash. Because of their low cost and high efficiency, the catalysts should be used in the SCR process. Further research on this subject is necessary in the future to understand more details of the SCR system and issue of pollution control. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) drying: an optimization approach using microwave-vacuum drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirun, Sathira; Utama-Ang, Niramon; Roach, Paul D

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of microwave power (2,400-4,000 W) and drying times (10-30 min) on the quality of dried turmeric in terms of colour (L, a*, b*), moisture content, water activity (aw), ash, antioxidant activity (2,2-dipheneyl-1-picrylhydrazyl; DPPH), total phenolic and curcuminoids content. In addition, Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was implemented to optimize the drying conditions for turmeric. A range of quality parameters, microwave power (W) and time (min) were fitted to quadratic models using a central composite design. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) statistic results suggested that the optimal qualities (i.e., aw, value, moisture content, phenolic content, curcuminoid content and EC50 and L value) of dried turmeric were achieved at high vacuum-microwave power (3,500-4,000 W) and long duration (27-30 min). The improvement in the quality of dried turmeric microwave-vacuum drying in these conditions was illustrated through the enzymatic browning reaction via inhibition of polyphenol oxidase which suppressed the formation of the brown pigments and increased the phenol substrates.

  15. Gasification reactivity and ash sintering behaviour of biomass feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moilanen, A.; Nasrullah, M.

    2011-12-15

    Char gasification reactivity and ash sintering properties of forestry biomass feedstocks selected for large-scale gasification process was characterised. The study was divided into two parts: (1) Internal variation of the reactivity and the ash sintering of feedstocks. (2) Measurement of kinetic parameters of char gasification reactions to be used in the modelling of a gasifier. The tests were carried out in gases relevant to pressurized oxygen gasification, i.e. steam and carbon dioxide, as well as their mixtures with the product gases H{sub 2} and CO. The work was based on experimental measurements using pressurized thermobalance. In the tests, the temperatures were below 1000 deg C, and the pressure range was between 1 and 20 bar. In the first part, it was tested the effect of growing location, storage, plant parts and debarking method. The following biomass types were tested: spruce bark, pine bark, aspen bark, birch bark, forestry residue, bark feedstock mixture, stump chips and hemp. Thick pine bark had the lowest reactivity (instantaneous reaction rate 14%/min) and hemp the highest (250%/min); all other biomasses laid between these values. There was practically no difference in the reactivities among the spruce barks collected from the different locations. For pine bark, the differences were greater, but they were probably due to the thickness of the bark rather than to the growth location. For the spruce barks, the instantaneous reaction rate measured at 90% fuel conversion was 100%/min, for pine barks it varied between 14 and 75%/min. During storage, quite large local differences in reactivity seem to develop. Stump had significantly lower reactivity compared with the others. No clear difference in the reactivity was observed between barks obtained with the wet and dry debarking, but, the sintering of the ash was more enhanced for the bark from dry debarking. Char gasification rate could not be modelled in the gas mixture of H{sub 2}O + CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2

  16. Kohonen's feature maps for fly ash categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraja, M C; Jayaram, M A; Ravikumar, C N

    2006-12-01

    Fly ash is a common admixture used in concrete and may constitute up to 50% by weight of the total binder material. Incorporation of fly ash in Portland-cement concrete is highly desirable due to technological, economic, and environmental benefits. This article demonstrates the use of artificial intelligence neural networks for the classification of fly ashes in to different groups. Kohonen's Self Organizing Feature Maps is used for the purpose. As chemical composition of fly ash is crucial in the performance of concrete, eight chemical attributes of fly ashes have been considered. The application of simple Kohonen's one-dimensional feature maps permitted to differentiate three main groups of fly ashes. Three one-dimensional feature maps of topology 8-16, 8-24 and 8-32 were explored. The overall classification result of 8-16 topology was found to be significant and encouraging. The data pertaining to 80 fly ash samples were collected from standard published works. The categorization was found to be excellent and compares well with Canadian Standard Association's [CSA A 3000] classification scheme. PMID:17285691

  17. Pozzolanic Reaction Kinetics of Coal Ashes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Hongwei; WANG Zhijuan; QIAN Jueshi; SONG Yuanming; WANG Zhi

    2009-01-01

    The pozzolanic reactivity was determined by the hydration kinetics of pozzolanic reaction based on the fact that the hydration products of active SiO_2 and Al_2O_3 with lime were soluble in dilute hydrochloric acid.The results show that the pozzolanic reaction of active SiO_2 and Al2O3 of coal ashes follows apparent first-order kinetics.The reaction rate constant of FBC ashes is greater than that of PC ashes,while the activation energy of the former is lower than that of the latter.It is confirmed that the pozzolanic activity of fluidized bed combustion(FBC)ashes is significantly higher than that of PC ashes,and the reaction barrier of the former is lower than that of the latter,because the microstructures of FBC ashes,such as mineralogical composition,morphology and polymerization degree of [SiO_4]and[AlO_6]are more favorable to the pozzolanic activity development than those of PC ashes.

  18. Air pollution dry deposition: radioisotopes as particles and volatiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on determining volcanic ash and ambient airborne solids concentrations at various sampling sites subsequent to the Mt. St. Helens' eruption in order to develop an experimental basis for models predicting removal of airborne particles and gases by dry deposition onto outdoor surfaces. In addition, deposition rates were determined using dual tracer techniques in the field and in a wind tunnel in the laboratory

  19. Utilization of Meat and Bone Meal Bottom Ash in Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginija VALANČIENĖ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available During utilization of animal waste meat and bone meal (MBM is received, realization and use of which has been stopped due to risk for the transmission of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy infection. The MBM must be safely stored or treated. Most often meat and bone meal undergoes thermal treatment. During combustion large quantities of residues (ashes are received, the recycled use of which has been given a lot of attention lately. In this work it was investigated the impact of the additive of the bottom ash (BA formed during combustion of the MBM on the properties of forming mass and ceramic body of hydromica clay, and also it was evaluated a possibility to use the MBM BA in manufacturing of building ceramics. After replacing the sand in porous ceramics by this additive the plasticity of the forming mass, drying and firing shrinkage as well as density of ceramic body changed insignificantly whereas the compressive strength increased by 8 % - 22 %. So the MBM BA can be utilized in production of porous ceramics.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.1.256

  20. Adhesion Strength of Biomass Ash Deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laxminarayan, Yashasvi; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao;

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the shear adhesion strength of biomass ash deposits on superheater tubes. Artificial biomass ash deposits were prepared on superheater tubes and sintered in an oven at temperatures up to 1000°C. Subsequently, the deposits were sheared off with the help of an electrically...... controlled arm. Higher sintering temperatures resulted in greater adhesion strengths, with a sharp increase observed near the melting point of the ash. Repetition of experiments with fixed operation conditions revealed considerable variation in the obtained adhesion strengths, portraying the stochastic...

  1. Volcanic Ash Transport and Dispersion Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servranckx, R.; Stunder, B.

    2006-12-01

    Volcanic ash transport and dispersion models (VATDM) have been used operationally since the mid 1990's by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) designated Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC) to provide ash forecast guidance. Over the years, significant improvements in the detection and prediction of airborne volcanic ash have been realized thanks to improved models, increases in computing power, 24-hr real time monitoring by VAACs / Meteorological Watch Offices and close coordination with Volcano Observatories around the world. Yet, predicting accurately the spatial and temporal structures of airborne volcanic ash and the deposition at the earth's surface remains a difficult and challenging problem. The forecasting problem is influenced by 3 main components. The first one (ERUPTION SOURCE PARAMETERS) comprises all non-meteorological parameters that characterize a specific eruption or volcanic ash cloud. For example, the volume / mass of ash released in the atmosphere, the duration of the eruption, the altitude and distribution of the ash cloud, the particle size distribution, etc. The second component (METEOROLOGY) includes all meteorological parameters (wind, moisture, stability, etc.) that are calculated by Numerical Weather Prediction models and that serve as input to the VATDM. The third component (TRANSPORT AND DISPERSION) combines input from the other 2 components through the use of VATDM to transport and disperse airborne volcanic ash in the atmosphere as well as depositing it at the surface though various removal mechanisms. Any weakness in one of the components may adversely affect the accuracy of the forecast. In a real-time, operational response context such as exists at the VAACs, the rapid delivery of the modeling results puts some constraints on model resolution and computing time. Efforts are ongoing to evaluate the reliability of VATDM forecasts though the use of various methods, including ensemble techniques. Remote sensing data

  2. Column leaching from biomass combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    this study, a fly ash sample from an operating Danish power plant based on wood biomass was collected, chemically characterized and investigated for its leaching release of nutrients and heavy metals. A column leaching test was employed. The strongly alkaline pH of all the collected eluates suggested...... the potential suitability of the ash as a liming material. Although high contents of nutrients were detected, differences in their leaching release were found. Heavy metals were detected within typical literature contents for Nordic countries ashes....

  3. Characterizing the Hydrological Properties of Wildfire Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, S.; Balfour, V.

    2010-12-01

    Wildfires are extreme disturbance events that can increase runoff and erosion rates by 2-3 orders of magnitude. Fire related sediment presents a significant geomorphic hazard in terms of debris flows and other catastrophic erosion events, but ultimately plays a key role in landscape evolution in fire prone regions. The hyper-dessicated ash and soil layers making up the near surface profile in recently burned areas respond very differently to rainfall than the litter and unburned soil that existed prior to the fire. Limited knowledge regarding the hydrological properties of the ash-soil profile, and the ash layer in particular, currently limits efforts to model the infiltration process in burned areas and hence predict the location and magnitude of post fire runoff and erosion events. In our ongoing research we are investigating and quantifying the hydrologic properties of wildfire ash. Wherever possible we use conventional laboratory techniques from soil hydrology but in some cases we have had to adapt these techniques to account for the distinct physical and chemical properties of ash, such as the variability in particle density and the partial solubility of many of the mineral components. Some of the hydrologic properties of ash, such as the hydraulic conductivity, are similar to those of a mineral soil with a comparable particle size distribution. For example, ash from Spain with a silty loam texture had a hydraulic conductivity of 7 x 10-4 cm s-1, which is within the range reported for mineral soils with the same texture. However, other properties such as the porosity are considerably different; an undisturbed ash sample with a sandy loam texture had a porosity of 93 percent compared to the typical range of 30 to 50 percent for mineral soils with this texture. Scanning electron microscopy analysis indicates that the contrasting hydrologic properties of ash and soil are due to differences in the particle shape, particle packing and pore structure. Using examples

  4. Chemical composition of coal and coke ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluzhnikov, A.I.; Tsymbal, G.L.

    1983-05-01

    Karaganda Metals uses low sulphur coal from Karaganda and Kuzbass coalfields and is seeking ways of improving coke in terms of ash and its effect on blast furnace operations, chiefly coke rate reduction. Ash in coke has a critical effect on iron quality, slag composition and desulphurisation. The index used to demonstrate the change in coke consistency during incineration in the blast furnace is that of pyrolytic change: this closely reflects changes in coal charge composition. Control of coke ash content by suitably selecting the charge can be used to influence slag basicity and iron quality.

  5. Electrodialytic removal of Cd from biomass combustion fly ash suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor M; Damoe, Anne J; Ottosen, Lisbeth M

    2013-04-15

    Due to relatively high concentrations of Cd, biomass combustion fly ashes often fail to meet Danish legislative requirements for recycling as fertilizer. In this study, the potential of using electrodialytic remediation for removal of Cd from four different biomass combustion fly ashes was investigated with the aim of enabling reuse of the ashes. The ashes originated from combustion of straw (two ashes), wood chips, and co-firing of wood pellets and fuel oil, respectively. A series of laboratory scale electrodialytic remediation experiments were conducted with each ash. The initial Cd concentration in the ashes varied between 8.8 mg Cd/kg (co-firing ash) and 64 mg Cd/kg (pre-washed straw ash), and pH varied from 3.7 (co-firing ash) to 13.3 (wood ash). In spite of such large variations between the ashes, the electrodialytic method showed to be sufficiently robust to treat the ashes so the final Cd concentration was below 2.0mg Cd/kg DM in at least one experiment done with each ash. This was obtained within 2 weeks of remediation and at liquid to solid (L/S) ratios of L/S 16 for the pre-washed straw ash and L/S 8 for the straw, co-firing and wood ash. PMID:23454460

  6. Fly Ash Disposal in Ash Ponds: A Threat to Ground Water Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R. K.; Gupta, N. C.; Guha, B. K.

    2016-07-01

    Ground water contamination due to deposition of fly ash in ash ponds was assessed by simulating the disposal site conditions using batch leaching test with fly ash samples from three thermal power plants. The periodic analysis of leachates was performed for selected elements, Fe, Cu, Ni, Cr, Pb and Cd in three different extraction solutions to determine the maximum amount that can be leached from fly ash. It was observed that at low pH value, maximum metals are released from the surface of the ash into leachate. The average concentration of these elements found in ground water samples from the nearby area of ash ponds shows that almost all the metals except `Cr' are crossing the prescribed limits of drinking water. The concentration of these elements at this level can endanger public health and environment.

  7. Fly Ash Disposal in Ash Ponds: A Threat to Ground Water Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R. K.; Gupta, N. C.; Guha, B. K.

    2016-09-01

    Ground water contamination due to deposition of fly ash in ash ponds was assessed by simulating the disposal site conditions using batch leaching test with fly ash samples from three thermal power plants. The periodic analysis of leachates was performed for selected elements, Fe, Cu, Ni, Cr, Pb and Cd in three different extraction solutions to determine the maximum amount that can be leached from fly ash. It was observed that at low pH value, maximum metals are released from the surface of the ash into leachate. The average concentration of these elements found in ground water samples from the nearby area of ash ponds shows that almost all the metals except `Cr' are crossing the prescribed limits of drinking water. The concentration of these elements at this level can endanger public health and environment.

  8. Gaseous fuels production from dried sewage sludge via air gasification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, Sebastian; Dudziak, Mariusz

    2014-07-01

    Gasification is a perspective alternative method of dried sewage sludge thermal treatment. For the purpose of experimental investigations, a laboratory fixed-bed gasifier installation was designed and built. Two sewage sludge (SS) feedstocks, taken from two typical Polish wastewater treatment systems, were analysed: SS1, from a mechanical-biological wastewater treatment system with anaerobic stabilization (fermentation) and high temperature drying; and (SS2) from a mechanical-biological-chemical wastewater treatment system with fermentation and low temperature drying. The gasification results show that greater oxygen content in sewage sludge has a strong influence on the properties of the produced gas. Increasing the air flow caused a decrease in the heating value of the produced gas. Higher hydrogen content in the sewage sludge (from SS1) affected the produced gas composition, which was characterized by high concentrations of combustible components. In the case of the SS1 gasification, ash, charcoal, and tar were produced as byproducts. In the case of SS2 gasification, only ash and tar were produced. SS1 and solid byproducts from its gasification (ash and charcoal) were characterized by lower toxicity in comparison to SS2. However, in all analysed cases, tar samples were toxic.

  9. Gaseous fuels production from dried sewage sludge via air gasification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, Sebastian; Dudziak, Mariusz

    2014-06-17

    Gasification is a perspective alternative method of dried sewage sludge thermal treatment. For the purpose of experimental investigations, a laboratory fixed-bed gasifier installation was designed and built. Two sewage sludge (SS) feedstocks, taken from two typical Polish wastewater treatment systems, were analysed: SS1, from a mechanical-biological wastewater treatment system with anaerobic stabilization (fermentation) and high temperature drying; and (SS2) from a mechanical-biological-chemical wastewater treatment system with fermentation and low temperature drying. The gasification results show that greater oxygen content in sewage sludge has a strong influence on the properties of the produced gas. Increasing the air flow caused a decrease in the heating value of the produced gas. Higher hydrogen content in the sewage sludge (from SS1) affected the produced gas composition, which was characterized by high concentrations of combustible components. In the case of the SS1 gasification, ash, charcoal, and tar were produced as byproducts. In the case of SS2 gasification, only ash and tar were produced. SS1 and solid byproducts from its gasification (ash and charcoal) were characterized by lower toxicity in comparison to SS2. However, in all analysed cases, tar samples were toxic. PMID:24938297

  10. Environmentally-mediated ash aggregate formation: example from Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueppers, Ulrich; Ayris, Paul M.; Bernard, Benjamin; Delmelle, Pierre; Douillet, Guilhem A.; Lavallée, Yan; Mueller, Sebastian B.; Dingwell, Donald B.; Dobson, Kate J.

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic ash is generated during explosive eruptions through an array of different processes; it can be produced in large quantities and can, in some circumstances, have the potential for far-reaching impacts beyond the flanks of the volcano. Aggregation of ash particles can significantly impact the dispersal within the atmosphere, and its subsequent deposition into terrestrial or aquatic environments. However, our understanding of the complex interplay of the boundary conditions which permit aggregation to occur remain incomplete. Tungurahua volcano, Ecuador, has been intermittently active since 1999. In August 2006, a series of pyroclastic density currents (PDC) were generated during a series of dry, Vulcanian explosions and travelled down the western and northern flanks of the volcano. In some locations, the related PDC deposits temporarily dammed the Chambo river, and the residual heat within those deposits produced vigorous steam plumes. During several field campaigns (2009-2015), we mapped, sampled, and analysed the related deposits. At the base of the Rea ravine, a large delta fan of PDC deposits had dammed the river over a length of several hundred metres. In several outcrops adjacent to the river and in small erosional gullies we found a peculiar stratigraphic layer (up to ten centimetres thick) at the top of the PDC deposits. As this layer is capped by a thin fall unit of coarse ash that we also find elsewhere at the top of the August 2006 deposits, the primary nature is without doubt. In this unit, we observed abundant ash aggregates up to eight millimetres in diameter within a poorly sorted, ash-depleted lapilli tuff, primarily comprised of rounded pumiceous and scoriaceous clasts of similar size. Leaching experiments have shown that these aggregates contain several hundred ppm of soluble sulphate and chloride salts. Recent laboratory experiments (Mueller et al. 2015) have suggested that in order for accretionary lapilli to be preserved within ash

  11. Effect of Compaction Energy on Engineering Properties of Fly Ash –Granite Dust Stabilized Expansive Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshaya Kumar Sabat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of compaction energy on engineering properties of an expansive soil stabilized with optimum percentage of fly ash-granite dust have been discussed in this paper. Expansive soil stabilized with optimum percentage of fly ash-granite dust was compacted with five compaction energy levels. Maximum dry density and optimum moisture content corresponding to each energy level were determined. Based on these maximum dry density and optimum moisture content, samples were prepared for unconfined compressive strength, soaked California bearing ratio, hydraulic conductivity and swelling pressure tests. From the test results it is found that increase in compaction energy increased the maximum dry density, unconfined compressive strength, soaked California bearing ratio and swelling pressure, and decreased the optimum moisture content and hydraulic conductivity.

  12. Effect of Fly Ash on the Electrical Conductivity of Concretes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The fly ash occasionally has high content of iron oxide and carbon that are good electrical conducting components. This paper investigates the effect of the fly ash used as mineral admixtures on the electrical conductivity of concretes. The electrical properties of concretes using 3 kinds of fly ash with different iron oxide contents have been studied. Experimental results show that at the same fly ash dosage the resistivity of concrete using fly ash with high content of iron oxide is slightly lower than that with low content of iron oxide. However, the concrete resistivity after 14d increases as fly ash dosage increases regardless of iron oxide content in fly ash.

  13. Properties of Concrete Incorporating Bed Ash from Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion and Ground Granulates Blast-furnace Slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG An; HSU Hui-Mi; CHAO Sao-Jeng

    2011-01-01

    The properties of concrete incorporating circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) bed ash and ground granulates blast-furnace slag (GGBS) were studied. Compressive strength,drying shrinkage, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) of concrete samples containing CFBC bed ash and GGBS were used. This work used initial surface absorption test (ISAT) and rapid chloride penetration test (RCPT) on concrete to measure the absorption and the ability of concrete to resist chloride ion characteristics for different concrete samples containing CFBC bed ash and GGBS. Open circuit potential (OCP), direct current polarization resistance were obtained to evaluate rebar corrosion. The CFBC bed ash was X-ray amorphous and consist of SiO2, A12O3 and CaO compounds. As the replacement of CFBC for sand increases, the rate of initial surface absorption (ISA) increases but compressive strength decreases.When the content of CFBC bed ash replacement for sand maintains constant, the replacement of GGBS for cement increases, compressive strength increases but the rate of ISA decreases. Chloride and corrosion resistance of rebar significantly improve by utilizing a proper amount of CFBC bed ash and GGBS in concrete.

  14. Ash wettability conditions splash erosion in the postfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo-Rivero, Ángel J.; de Celis, Reyes; García-Moreno, Jorge; Jiménez-Compán, Elizabeth; Alanís, Nancy; Cerdà, Artemi; Pereira, Paulo; Zavala, Lorena M.; Jordán, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    at each point of study were collected monthly and determined gravimetrically after oven drying between November 2012 and May 2013. 3. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Depending on the intensity of the water repellency, the ash layer fluctuated between wettable and very strongly water repellent. The ash has a high permeability and water storage. However, its hydrophilic character has been emphasized rarely (Cerdà and Doerr, 2008). Different authors have described hydrophobic behaviors depending on the burned vegetation such as oak (Gabet and Sternberg, 2008) or pine forest (Stark, 1977) in the United States, eucalyptus forest in Australia (Khanna et al., 1996 ) or Mediterranean tree and shrub species in Spain (Bodí et al., 2011). In the latter case, Bodí et al. (2011) observed that ash has different properties depending on the combustion conditions, organic carbon content and color. This variability of behavior agrees with the results obtained in the present work. Significant differences between splash erosion from wettable and water-repellent ash zones were found (p soil from the direct impact of raindrops and thus reduce sediment dispersion by splash (Cerdà and Doerr, 2008, Larsen et al, 2009; Woods and Balfour, 2008, Zavala et al, 2009). However, there is very little information about the effect of hydrophobicity on splash erosion. In a rainfall simulation experiment under laboratory conditions, Bodí et al. (2012) observed that splash erosion was at least two times higher in samples of water repellent soil than in hydrophilic soil, but no differences in ash loss or thickness of ash layer were observed. 4. CONCLUSIONS Our results highlight the role played by ash water repellency and the influence of burn severity on the development of a pattern of splash erosion intensities. Splash erosion was reduced in one order of magnitude on wettable ash zones. In contrast, the presence of a water-repellent ash layer increases the mobilization of sediments at plot scale. Further

  15. Nutritional composition of ginger powder prepared using various drying methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwan, A; Kawatra, A; Sehgal, S

    2014-09-01

    A study was undertaken to prepare ginger powder using various drying methods and their nutritional evaluation was carried out. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) was dried using shade, solar, oven and microwave drying methods. All the samples were ground in grinder to make fine powder. Sensory analysis indicated that acceptability of all types of ginger powders were in the range of 'liked very much' to 'liked moderately' by the panelists. The mean score obtained for colour was higher in shade dried ginger powder i.e., 8.20 as compared to oven dried (7.60), solar dried (7.70) and microwave dried ginger powder (7.80). Moisture content ranged from 3.55 % in solar dried ginger powder to 3.78 % in shade dried ginger powder. Slightly higher moisture content was found in shade dried ginger powder. Protein, crude fiber, fat and ash contents ranged from 5.02 to 5.82, 4.97 to 5.61, 0.76 to 0.90 and 3.38 to 3.66 %, respectively. β-carotene and ascorbic acid content was found maximum in shade dried ginger powder i.e., 0.81 mg/100 g and 3.83 mg/100 g, respectively. Polyphenol content was almost similar in all the samples whereas calcium was slightly higher in the shade dried ginger powder i.e., 69.21 mg/100 g. Results have shown that ginger powder prepared from various drying methods had good sensory and nutritional profile.

  16. Ash Decline Assessment in Emerald Ash Borer Infested Natural Forests Using High Spatial Resolution Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Murfitt

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The invasive emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire infects and eventually kills endemic ash trees and is currently spreading across the Great Lakes region of North America. The need for early detection of EAB infestation is critical to managing the spread of this pest. Using WorldView-2 (WV2 imagery, the goal of this study was to establish a remote sensing-based method for mapping ash trees undergoing various infestation stages. Based on field data collected in Southeastern Ontario, Canada, an ash health score with an interval scale ranging from 0 to 10 was established and further related to multiple spectral indices. The WV2 image was segmented using multi-band watershed and multiresolution algorithms to identify individual tree crowns, with watershed achieving higher segmentation accuracy. Ash trees were classified using the random forest classifier, resulting in a user’s accuracy of 67.6% and a producer’s accuracy of 71.4% when watershed segmentation was utilized. The best ash health score-spectral index model was then applied to the ash tree crowns to map the ash health for the entire area. The ash health prediction map, with an overall accuracy of 70%, suggests that remote sensing has potential to provide a semi-automated and large-scale monitoring of EAB infestation.

  17. Municipal solid waste ash as a cement raw material substitute

    OpenAIRE

    Somnuk Tangtermsirikul; Pichaya Rachdawong; Kritsada Sisomphon

    2000-01-01

    An investigation of using municipal solid waste (MSW) ash as a cement raw material substitute was performed to evaluate the potential use of ash in construction. The use of incineratior ash in cement production would not only get rid of the ash, but also alleviate many environmental problems, for example, reducing raw materials required for cement production, reducing CO2 emission into the atmosphere, and reducing landfill space requirement for the residue ash disposal. The metallic oxide con...

  18. Assessing fly ash treatment: Remediation and stabilization of heavy metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima, A.T.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Ribeiro, Alexandra B.

    2012-01-01

    consider application to the soil. ST ash is the only residue that gets concentrations low enough to be reused, but its fertilizing value might be questioned. An alternative reuse for the three ashes is here preliminary tested, the combination of fly ash with mortar. Fly ashes have been substituted...... by cement fraction or aggregate fraction. Surprisingly, better compressive strengths were obtained by replacing the aggregate fraction. CW ashes presented promising results for the substitution of aggregate in mortar and possibly in concrete....

  19. Electrodialytic removal of Cd from biomass combustion fly ash suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkelund, Gunvor M.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Damoe, Anne J.

    2013-01-01

    Due to relatively high concentrations of Cd, biomass combustion fly ashes often fail to meet Danish legislative requirements for recycling as fertilizer. In this study, the potential of using electrodialytic remediation for removal of Cd from four different biomass combustion fly ashes was investigated with the aim of enabling reuse of the ashes. The ashes originated from combustion of straw (two ashes), wood chips, and co-firing of wood pellets and fuel oil, respectively. A series of laborat...

  20. Integrated use of boiler ash as organic fertilizer and soil conditioner with NPK in calcareous soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Jamil Khan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available characteristics and provide a reasonable economic means to recycle these wastes in an environmentally friendly manner. To achieve this objective, sugar industry boiler ash was applied to wheat crop in pots having 20 kg soil @ 3, 12, 25,50, 125 and 250 t ha-1 respectively, compared to the control. Same doses of boiler ash were also applied to wheat crop in the field experiment. A basal dose of NPK, 120, 90, and 60 kg ha-1 respectively, was also applied with boiler ash before sowingof wheat crop in both experiments. The soil under investigation was calcareous in nature, having a high pH (8.2, low in organic matter (8200 mg kg-1, and deficient in N (300 mg kg-1, P (7.5 mg kg-1 and Zn (6.2 mg kg-1. Boiler ash was rich inmicronutrients like Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu and also contained sufficient amount of Ca, Mg, Na, S, K and P. Consequently, total porosity of soil, available P, S and K, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu content in soil, increased with the levels of boiler ash application.On the other hand, dry bulk density declined which is a positive effect. ECe and pH of the soil was minutely increased. Yields and most of the yield components of wheat crop in pots, as well as in the field experiment, also increased due to boiler ashapplication. It is recommended that application of boiler ash @ 50 t ha-1 will result in enhanced yield of wheat in calcareous soil.

  1. AshMeadowsSpeckledDace_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis mionectes) occur. "Nevada, Nye County: Each...

  2. NICKEL SPECIATION OF RESIDUAL OIL ASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA GRANT NUMBER: R827649C002Title: Nickel Speciation Of Residual Oil AshInvestigators: Kevin C. Galbreath, John Won, Frank E. Huggins, Gerald P. Huffman, Christopher J. Zygarlicke, Donald L. TomanInstitution: University of North Dakota<...

  3. Volcanic Ash Advisory Database, 1983-2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Volcanic ash is a significant hazard to aviation and can also affect global climate patterns. To ensure safe navigation and monitor possible climatic impact, the...

  4. AshMeadowsAmargosaPupfish_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis mionectes) occur. "Nevada, Nye County: Each...

  5. ASH External Web Portal (External Portal)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The ASH External Web Portal is a web-based portal that provides single sign-on functionality, making the web portal a single location from which to be authenticated...

  6. Composites based on fly ash and clay

    OpenAIRE

    Fidancevska, Emilija; Jovanov, Vojo; Angusheva, Biljana; Srebrenkoska, Vineta

    2014-01-01

    Fly ash is a waste generated from the coal combustion during the production of electricity in the thermal power plants. It presents industrial by-product containing Technologically Enhanced Natural Occurring Radioactive Materials (TENORM) with the great potential for valorisation (1). Fly ash is successfully utilized in cement and concrete industry (2), also in ceramics industry (3) as component for manufacturing bricks and tiles, and recently there are many investigations for production of g...

  7. Biologic effects of oil fly ash.

    OpenAIRE

    Ghio, Andrew J.; Silbajoris, Robert; Carson, Johnny L.; Samet, James M.

    2002-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated increased human morbidity and mortality with elevations in the concentration of ambient air particulate matter (PM). Fugitive fly ash from the combustion of oil and residual fuel oil significantly contributes to the ambient air particle burden. Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) is remarkable in the capacity to provoke injury in experimental systems. The unique composition of this emission source particle makes it particularly useful as a surrogate for ambient...

  8. Soil chemical properties as affected by plant derived ash to replace potassium fertilizer and its conversion value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Bako Baon

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Potassium chloride (KCl presently used as main source of K, tends to become more expensive, therefore, there is a need for a breakthrough in finding alternative materials to replace KCl. The aim of this paper is to present recent research on the use of plant derived ash to replace KCl fertilizer, especially in relation with soil chemical characteristics and its conversion value. Plant derived ash coming from palm sugar processing unit which use farm waste as main fuel was used in this experiment. Treatments investigated were no K2O application (control, applied with K2O in forms of both KCl and plant derived ash in dosages of 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 mg kg-1 air dry soil. The mixture of soil with those treatments were then incubated for one year. After incubation period, the soil in pots were divided into two parts, first part was added with 2g urea, while other part was added with 2 g SP 36. Both parts were incubated for two months. Results of this experiment showed that plant derived ash can be used to replaced KCl. To obtain similar soil K content, the amount of K2O in form of plant derived ash needed to be added or its conversion value is 1.44 times the amount of K2O in form of KCl. Use of plant derived ash also increased the content of soil Ca, available P, ratio of Ca/Mg and pH. Plant derived ash did not caused nitrogen loss. Key words: Potassium, fertilizer, plant derived ash, pH, soil.

  9. Leachability of trace metal elements from fly ashes, and from concrete incorporating fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, M.H. [National University of Singapore (Singapore); Blanchette, M.C. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Energy Technology Centre; Malhotra, V.M. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    Manufacturing portland cement is not environmentally desirable because for every tonne of cement produced, about one tonne of carbon dioxide is released into the atmosphere. This problem can be solved by replacing a portion of portland cement with fly ash, a mineral by-product of burning coal at power generation facilities. A study was conducted to examine the leachability of trace metal elements from a variety of fly ashes from various sources in Canada and the United States along with the concrete incorporating the fly ash. Gold, arsenic, boron, barium cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, lead and selenium are the regulated elements in leachates. In this study, each of these elements were tested from 9 fly ashes within the limits of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Canadian regulations for the Transportation of Dangerous Goods. It was shown that in general, but with some exceptions, the leaching of arsenic, boron, nickel and selenium increased with an increase in their content in the fly ash. Arsenic concentration from fly ash obtained from bituminous coal was found to be much higher than that from lignite or from sub-bituminous coal. However, the study also showed that none of the trace metals in the leachates from the fly ash concrete samples exceeded the regulated concentration limits, regardless of the type and percentage of fly ash used. It was concluded that concrete which incorporates fly ash is environmentally stable. It was also concluded that waste product utilization, in terms of using fly ash from power generating facilities, can significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions when manufacturing portland cement. Typical replacement levels of fly ash in portland cement concrete is about 20 per cent by mass of the total cementitious materials. 10 refs., 14 tabs., 4 figs.

  10. Comparison of methods for determination of nutrient digestibility of a dry kibble diet for ocelots

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson L. de Carvalho; Vladimir de Oliveira; Wanderlei Moraes; Zalmir S. Cubas; Alcides R. Rinaldi; Oliveira, Marcos J.; Rosana. P. de Almeida; Leonardo A.F. Bordignon

    2013-01-01

    In this experiment, methods of total fecal collection (TFC) and internal markers (acid-insoluble ash - AIA, crude fiber - CF, and acid-detergent fiber - ADF) were compared for determination of the coefficients of apparent digestibility (CAD) for dry matter (DM), crude protein (CP), ether extract (EE), nitrogen-free extracts (NFE), and gross energy (GE) of commercial feline dry kibble for ocelots (Leopardus pardalis). Six adult animals, weighing 12.45±1.37 kg, gradually received experimental k...

  11. Sulphation characteristics of paper sludge ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, S.A. [Environmental Systems Research Center, Korea Inst. of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.D. [Environmental Systems Research Center, Korea Inst. of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

    2007-04-15

    Landfills are no longer a viable solution for the disposal of sludge produced from waste water treatment plants because of the decrease in available space, rising fees and growing environmental concerns. However, thermal utilization of this waste may be an economic and sustainable disposal solution. Co-combustion of low heating value sludge with fossil fuels has a positive effect for sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions due to the low sulphur content of biomass fuels and increased sulphur retention in the ash. The sulphur retention is attributed to the formation of sulphates, such as CaSO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The amount of fuel-ash-related sulphur sorption increases during co-combustion. Therefore, sorbents for sulphur reduction may not be required if proper control of the biomass feed is maintained. This paper presented a study in which the sulphation characteristics of calcium-rich paper sludge ash were determined for the use of co-combustion of biomass and coal. The calcium in the paper sludge ash came from the limestone filler used in the manufacturing process to increase the density and whiteness of the paper at 2 paper mills in Korea. A thermobalance reactor along with XRD and SEM-EDX were used for the analysis of sulphated ash to determine the effects of sulphation temperature, particle size and SO{sub 2} concentration on sulphation conversion. The activation energy and pre-exponential factor of sulphation reaction of sludge ash were determined based on the uniform-reaction model. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that most of the sulphation compounds were CaSO{sub 4}. The sulphation occurred uniformly throughout the ash and the CaSO{sub 4} did not block the outer pore of the sludge ash. The uniform distributions of CaO and other inert minerals in the ash resulted in uniform sulphation with good penetration of SO{sub 2} into pores of the sludge ash without pore blocking during sulphation of CaO. 13 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  12. Thermal treatment and utilization of Al-rich waste in high calcium fly ash geopolymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Rattanasak, Ubolluk; Vongvoradit, Pimdao; Jenjirapanya, Supichart

    2012-09-01

    The Al-rich waste with aluminium and hydrocarbon as the major contaminant is generated at the wastewater treatment unit of a polymer processing plant. In this research, the heat treatment of this Al-rich waste and its use to adjust the silica/alumina ratio of the high calcium fly ash geopolymer were studied. To recycle the raw Al-rich waste, the waste was dried at 110°C and calcined at 400 to 1000°C. Mineralogical analyses were conducted using X-ray diffraction (XRD) to study the phase change. The increase in calcination temperature to 600, 800, and 1000°C resulted in the phase transformation. The more active alumina phase of active γ-Al2O3 was obtained with the increase in calcination temperature. The calcined Al-rich waste was then used as an additive to the fly ash geopolymer by mixing with high calcium fly ash, water glass, 10 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and sand. Test results indicated that the calcined Al-rich waste could be used as an aluminium source to adjust the silica/alumina ratio and the strength of geopolymeric materials. The fly ash geopolymer mortar with 2.5wt% of the Al-rich waste calcined at 1000°C possessed the 7-d compressive strength of 34.2 MPa.

  13. Modelling wet deposition in simulations of volcanic ash dispersion from hypothetical eruptions of Merapi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Richard A.; Potts, Rodney J.; Wain, Alan G.

    2016-10-01

    The statistical impact of including the process of wet deposition in dispersion model predictions of the movement of volcanic ash is assessed. Based on hypothetical eruptions of Merapi, Indonesia, sets of dispersion model simulations were generated, each containing four simulations per day over a period of three years, to provide results based on a wide range of atmospheric conditions. While on average dry sedimentation removes approximately 10% of the volcanic ash from the atmosphere during the first 24 h, wet deposition removes an additional 30% during seasons with highest rainfall (December and January) but only an additional 1% during August and September. The majority of the wet removal is due to in-cloud rather than below-cloud collection of volcanic ash particles. The largest uncertainties in the amount of volcanic ash removed by the process of wet deposition result from the choice of user-defined parameters used to compute the scavenging coefficient, and from the definition of the cloud top height. Errors in the precipitation field provided by the numerical weather prediction model utilised here have relatively less impact.

  14. Study of radiation stability of new poly-phase ash-ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of physico-mechanical and thermophysical properties of ash-ceramics after repeated irradiation by accelerated electrons beams under different regimes is carried out. Ash of Almaty Thermal Power Plant (Almatinskaya GREhS) and clay of Ajnabulak deposit serve as objects of testing . Samples after preliminary drying have been burnt in electric crucible furnace at maximum temperature 1100 deg C. Samples with different densities (1100-1400 kg/m3) were got with help method of different rate of treatment and compressing of forming ash-clay mixture. Pressure strength for burnt samples made up 12.5-17.5 MPa. Examined samples irradiated a few times with following doses: 9.45·106; 27·106; 81·106 Gy. Thermophysical and physico-technical features of samples have been studied after each irradiation. Comparison of received results with data of non-irradiated samples shows, that evident changes in structure and properties of testing materials have been not observed. It is concluded, that new ash-ceramic materials have sufficient radiation stability

  15. Environmental adaptability of Canavalia virosa and Flemingia congesta to sandy ash soil of Merapi Volcano, Java

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Wardoyo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies on volcanic ash of Mount Merapi erupted in 2010 are limited to only characterization of mineralogical, physical, chemical, and biological properties of the volcanic ash. In order to speed up rehabilitation of soils affected by the volcanic ash, it is necessary to study the application of suitable plant species, which is called bio-mechanic conservation. The purpose of this study was to test the environmental adaptability of Canavalia virosa and Flemingia congesta in sandy soil covered by volcanic ash of Mount Merapi. This study was carried out using 2x4 Split-plot randomized block design with three replicates. The main plot of the design was plant species (Canavalia virosa and Flemingia congesta, while the sub plot was the dose of organic matter application (0, 20, 40, and 60 t / ha. Soil parameters measured were N-total, P-total, available P, available K, and organic matter contents. Plant parameters measured were plant dry weight and plant height. The results showed no significant differences in soil N, P and K contents of all treatments tested in this study after 9 weeks, except C organic content. Canavalia virosa grew well until 9 weeks, whereas Flemingia congesta started to die a 9 weeks after planting.

  16. Comparative study on the characteristics of fly ash and bottom ash geopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Chalee, Wichian; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2009-02-01

    This research was conducted to compare geopolymers made from fly ash and ground bottom ash. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and sodium silicate (Na(2)SiO(3)) solutions were used as activators. A mass ratio of 1.5 Na(2)SiO(3)/NaOH and three concentrations of NaOH (5, 10, and 15M) were used; the geopolymers were cured at 65 degrees C for 48 h. A Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used on the geopolymer pastes. Geopolymer mortars were also prepared in order to investigate compressive strength. The results show that both fly ash and bottom ash can be utilized as source materials for the production of geopolymers. The properties of the geopolymers are dependent on source materials and the NaOH concentration. Fly ash is more reactive and produces a higher degree of geopolymerization in comparison with bottom ash. The moderate NaOH concentration of 10 M is found to be suitable and gives fly ash and bottom ash geopolymer mortars with compressive strengths of 35 and 18 MPa.

  17. Effect of ash components on the ignition and burnout of high ash coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, B.; Yan, R.; Zheng, C.G. [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). National Laboratory of Coal Combustion

    1998-11-01

    The effect of the ash components on the ignition and burnout of four Chinese high ash coals were studied by thermogravimetric analysis. To investigate the influence of the ash components, comparative experiments were carried out with original, deashed and impregnated coals. Eleven types of ash components, such as SiO{sub 2}, CaCO{sub 3}, MgO, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, FeS{sub 2}, NH{sub 4}Fe(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}12H{sub 2}O and FeSO{sub 4},(NH{sub 4}){center_dot}6H{sub 2}O were used in the present study. It was found that most of the ash components have negative effects. The strong influence of some ash components suggests that the combustion characteristics of high ash coal may be determined by the ash composition. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Influence of Fly Ash, Bottom Ash, and Light Expanded Clay Aggregate on Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sivakumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Invention of new methods in strengthening concrete is under work for decades. Developing countries like India use the extensive reinforced construction works materials such as fly ash and bottom ash and other ingredients in RCC construction. In the construction industry, major attention has been devoted to the use of fly ash and bottom ash as cement and fine aggregate replacements. In addition, light expanded clay aggregate has been introduced instead of coarse aggregate to make concrete have light weight. This paper presents the results of a real-time work carried out to form light weight concrete made with fly ash, bottom ash, and light expanded clay aggregate as mineral admixtures. Experimental investigation on concrete mix M20 is done by replacement of cement with fly ash, fine aggregate with bottom ash, and coarse aggregate with light expanded clay aggregate at the rates of 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, 30%, and 35% in each mix and their compressive strength and split tensile strength of concrete were discussed for 7, 28, and 56 days and flexural strength has been discussed for 7, 28, and 56 days depending on the optimum dosage of replacement in compressive strength and split tensile strength of concrete.

  19. Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Afonso; R. Hurt; I. Kulaots

    2006-03-01

    The disposal of fly ash from the combustion of coal has become increasingly important. When the fly ash does not meet the required specification for the product or market intended, it is necessary to beneficiate it to achieve the desired quality. This project, conducted at PPL's Montour SES, is the first near full-scale ({approx}10 ton/day), demonstration of ash ozonation technology. Bituminous and sub bituminous ashes, including two ash samples that contained activated carbon, were treated during the project. Results from the tests were very promising. The ashes were successfully treated with ozone, yielding concrete-suitable ash quality. Preliminary process cost estimates indicate that capital and operating costs to treat unburned carbon are competitive with other commercial ash beneficiation technologies at a fraction of the cost of lost sales and/or ash disposal costs. This is the final technical report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730.

  20. Apparent digestibility coefficient of duckweed (Lemna minor), fresh and dry for Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Shafai, S.A.A.M.; El-Gohary, F.; Verreth, J.A.J.; Schrama, J.W.; Gijzen, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    Dry matter (DMD), protein (PD), ash (AD), fat (FD), gross energy (ED) and phosphorus (PhD) digestibility coefficients were determined for five different iso-N fish diets fed to Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The control diet contained fishmeal (35%), corn (29%), wheat (20%), wheat bran (10%),

  1. International Database of Volcanic Ash Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, K.; Cameron, C.; Wilson, T. M.; Jenkins, S.; Brown, S.; Leonard, G.; Deligne, N.; Stewart, C.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic ash creates extensive impacts to people and property, yet we lack a global ash impacts catalog to organize, distribute, and archive this important information. Critical impact information is often stored in ephemeral news articles or other isolated resources, which cannot be queried or located easily. A global ash impacts database would improve 1) warning messages, 2) public and lifeline emergency preparation, and 3) eruption response and recovery. Ashfall can have varying consequences, such as disabling critical lifeline infrastructure (e.g. electrical generation and transmission, water supplies, telecommunications, aircraft and airports) or merely creating limited and expensive inconvenience to local communities. Impacts to the aviation sector can be a far-reaching global issue. The international volcanic ash impacts community formed a committee to develop a database to catalog the impacts of volcanic ash. We identify three user populations for this database: 1) research teams, who would use the database to assist in systematic collection, recording, and storage of ash impact data, and to prioritize impact assessment trips and lab experiments 2) volcanic risk assessment scientists who rely on impact data for assessments (especially vulnerability/fragility assessments); a complete dataset would have utility for global, regional, national and local scale risk assessments, and 3) citizen science volcanic hazard reporting. Publication of an international ash impacts database will encourage standardization and development of best practices for collecting and reporting impact information. Data entered will be highly categorized, searchable, and open source. Systematic cataloging of impact data will allow users to query the data and extract valuable information to aid in the development of improved emergency preparedness, response and recovery measures.

  2. USABILITY OF FLY ASH AND PHOSPHOGYPSUM IN MANUFACTURING OF BUILDING PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhayat DEĞİRMENCİ

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the class-C fly ash, lime and phosphogypsum were used with water to produce fly ash-limephosphogypsum (FaL-G based binders. The dry unit weight, water absorption, compressive and flexural strength of the specimens was determined after 28 days of their preparation. On the basis of the test results, it was concluded that phosphogypsum decreased the compressive and flexural strength while fly ash increased. It was also concluded that the curing conditions have an important influence on the strengths of FaL-G specimens. These binders gain furthers strength after 28 days. For the strength requirements, phosphogypsum content should be constant as 20%. The water absorption and thermal conductivity of the specimens increases with the increase in phosphogypsum content. Also the increase in the amount of phosphogypsum addition caused a reduction in the dry unit weight of the specimens. The test results show that these binders may be utilized in production of construction elements such as blocks, masonry mortars and controlled low-strength materials.

  3. Effect of incineration temperature on phosphorus availability in bio-ash from manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thygesen, A M; Wernberg, O; Skou, E; Sommer, S G

    2011-04-01

    In the near future phosphorus (P) will be a limited resource in high demand. This will increase the incentives for recycling P in animal manure. In this study the dry-matter-rich fraction from slurry separation was incinerated and the P availability of the ash fraction examined. The aim was to adjust incineration temperature to support a high plant-availability of P in ash. The plant-availability of P was approximately halved when the incineration temperature was increased from 400 to 700 degrees C. This decrease in plant-availability was probably due to the formation of hydroxyapatite. Incineration temperatures should therefore be kept below 700 degrees C to ensure a high fertilizer efficiency of P in ash. This may conflict with the energy production, which is optimal at temperatures above 800 degrees C. An alternative to incineration may therefore be thermal gasification of the dry-matter-rich fraction, which can be carried out efficiently at lower temperatures. PMID:21877544

  4. Utilization of ashes as construction materials in landfills; Askanvaendning i deponier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tham, Gustav [Telge AB, Soedertaelje (Sweden); Ifwer, Karin [AaF-Process AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    Large amounts of material will be needed to cover landfill sites in Sweden and other EU states over the next ten years. It is estimated that more than one hundred million tons of material will be required in Sweden alone in order to comply with the EU Landfill Directive (1999/31/EC). Suitable natural materials to be used in landfill cover constructions are not available on site. This report summarises the present use of secondary construction material in waste management with a focus on incineration ash. Information from eleven landfill sites has been compiled and includes the practical experience of using ash as the primary material in landfill cover. Other applications of using ash on landfill sites are also discussed. According to Swedish law, a complete cover of a landfill site consists of five different layers, each having its own specific function. The permeability of the total cover should then satisfy the permeability requirements of 50 litres per square meter and year for non-hazardous waste landfill sites and 5 litres per square meter and year for those with hazardous waste. The main purpose of this report is to describe how ash is used in the different layers and discuss the advantages or disadvantages of the techniques applied. Various landfill sites have submitted information ranging from small test areas on a pilot scale to full scale application of techniques on several hectares. Each project is part of the general Vaermeforsk research program for 2003-2005, Environmentally proper use of ash. The overall results show that incineration ash is a suitable material for use in liner constructions, either alone, or mixed with sewage sludge. Data from water percolating below the liner has indicated that the liners can meet permeability requirements. Special techniques for applying the various layers have been described. It is important to have materials readily available for an area, in order to avoid long period of exposure to dry or wet weather. Some

  5. Experimental volcanic ash aggregation: Internal structuring of accretionary lapilli and the role of liquid bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sebastian B.; Kueppers, Ulrich; Ayris, Paul M.; Jacob, Michael; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    pellets, suggesting them to be the result of a particular granulometry and fast-acting selective aggregation processes. For such aggregates to survive deposition and be preserved in the deposits of eruption plumes and pyroclastic density currents likely requires a significant pre-existing salt load on ash surfaces, and rapid aggregate drying prior to deposition or interaction with a more energetic environment. Our results carry clear benefits for future efforts to parameterize models of ash transport and deposition in the field.

  6. Speciation of Zinc in ash investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy; Zinks foerekomstformer i aska studerade med en roentgenabsorptionsspektrometrisk metod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steenari, Britt-Marie; Noren, Katarina

    2008-06-15

    Direct identification of trace metal compounds in solid materials is difficult to achieve due to the detection limits of available analytical methods. Although zinc is the most abundant trace metal in combustion residues, the number of publications dealing with its direct speciation is small. Struis and co-workers have published an investigation where they used Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements to identify zinc compounds in municipal solid waste incineration fly ash. The EXAFS technique has been used more often for speciation of Zn in contaminated soil. EXAFS data for farm soil samples showed that zinc was most commonly sequestered in layer silicates, but soil particles containing zinc sulphide, zinc chromite and zinc phosphate were also found. Generally, published results show that zinc after being mobilised in a soil, has a clear tendency to be sequestered in silicates, as sulphides or, if there is phosphate available, as phosphate. The aim of the work presented in this work was to use the EXAFS method to show how zinc in chemically bound in ash from woody fuels and from municipal solid waste (MSW). The results can be used for evaluations of the possible toxicity of ash and in predictions of the leaching of zinc from ash. The investigation comprised dry ashes from two fluidised bed combustors fired with forestry litter, bark and other wood fuels, moistened and aged wood ashes and dry ashes from three MSW incinerators: one fluidised bed combustor and two stoker fired combustors. The spectroscopic measurements were carried out at the beam line I811 in the Swedish national synchrotron facility Maxlab at Lund University. The results showed that the lowest concentration of Zn in ash for which it is possible to get any information about the nearest neighbour atoms around zinc is about 500 mg Zn per kg dry ash. If the concentration is higher than 1000 mg/ kg it is possible to obtain information, not only about the nearest

  7. The effect of polyethylene glycol and wood ash on the detannification of sorghum evaluated by an in vitro gas production profile and organic matter degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG, MW 4000) and wood ash on the detannification of sorghum grains. In the first experiment, different sorghum genotypes (14) were evaluated using tannin bioassay based on incubation of feeds with and without PEG in a semi-automatic in vitro gas production technique. From this study, genotype 9929030 was selected for detannification because it contained the maximum level of biological active tannins. The results from this experiment indicated the effect of PEG on the reduction of tannin effects; a consequent increase in the volume of gas produced with PEG during the fermentation (Figure 1) indicated reduction of tannin effect by PEG. In addition, the results of the parallelism test demonstrated that the curves were different and not parallel. Organic matter degradability was also higher in presence of PEG (33.4% vs. 24.3%). agent. The wood ash was obtained from the burning of the stems of Eucalyptus sp (T1) and Bauhinia spp (T2), and milled (1 mm). In addition, two methods of adding ash to the substrate (sorghum grain 9929030) were tested. In method one (M1), wood ash was added to milled sorghum grains and placed inside a gas bottle used for the in vitro fermentation. In method two (M2), wood ash was mixed with water and whole grains for 3 h, dried and milled (1 mm). In both methods, three concentrations of wood ash/grain were tested, 0 (C1), 100 (C2) and 200 (C3) mg of wood ash/g of substrate. Fermentation was conducted in a semi-automatic in vitro gas production technique for up to 96 h. The results demonstrated that wood ash increased gas production volume and organic matter degradation and the effect was concentration dependent. Gas production volume and organic matter degradation were also higher when using wood ash obtained from Bauhinia tree. However, these effects were not observed when method 2 was applied. Therefore, the results of this study showed that the use of wood ash

  8. Ash melting behavior by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Han-xu; QIU Xiao-sheng; TANG Yong-xin

    2008-01-01

    A Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic (FTIR) method involving a Fe2O3 flux was used to learn how China's coal ash melts. The relationship between ash fusion temperature and chemical composition, as well as the effects of Fe2O3 flux on the ash fusion temperature were studied. The relationship between ash fusion temperature and chemical composition, mineralogical phases and functional groups was analyzed with the FTIR method. The results show that the ash fusion temperature is related to the location and transmittance of certain absorption peaks, which is of great significance for the study of ash behavior.

  9. Analysis list: ash-2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ash-2 Adult,Embryo + ce10 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/target/ash...-2.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/target/ash-2.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc....jp/kyushu-u/ce10/target/ash-2.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/colo/ash-2.Adult.tsv,ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/ce10/colo/ash-2.Embryo.tsv http://dbarch

  10. An analysis of impact on the environmental pollution under accident conditions due to the disposal of ashes from the Nikola Tesla B thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ash disposal area of Nikola Tesla B TPP is presenting considerable potential source of environmental pollution. Due to its vast area, that is for an effective plot of about 400 ha, under unfavorable meteorological conditions the emerging of ash cloud spreading over the surrounding area at distances of over 15 km could be produced. This paper deals with accident conditions at ash disposal area which, after stopping of sprinkling operation or in case of an inadequate sequence of ash tapping, when larger portions of disposal area are dried, turn into area of air polluting sources. Computations of particle dispersions under such conditions have been performed for different meteorological conditions and the results are represented as space distribution of particle deposition on the soil and their concentration in the air. (author). 5 figs., 4 refs

  11. Characteristics of MSWI fly ash during vitrification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Shu-lei; WANG Qi; WANG Qun-hui; MA Hong-zhi

    2009-01-01

    The vitrification characteristics of municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ash were investigated. Effects of temperature on the binding efficiency of heavy metals, the change of chemical compositions and the weight loss of fly ash in the range of 800 - 1350 ℃ were studied. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) of the United States was used to analyze the leaching characteristics of heavy metals in fly ash and molten slag. Results indicate that chemical compositions, the weight loss of fly ash and the binding efficiency of heavy metals in fly ash have a tremendous change in the range of 1150 - 1260 ℃. The percentage of CaO, SiO2and AI203 increases with the increasing temperature, whereas it is contrary for SO3 , K2O, Na20 and CI; especially when the temperature is 1260 ℃, the percentage of these four elements decreases sharply from 43.72%to 0. 71%. The weight loss occurs obviously in the range of 1150 - 1260 ℃. Heavy metals of Pb and Cd are almost vaporized above 1000 ℃. Cr is not volatile and its binding efficiency can reach 100% below 1000 ℃. Resuits of TCLP indicate that the heavy metal content of molten slag is beyond stipulated limit values.

  12. National volcanic ash operations plan for aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; ,

    2007-01-01

    The National Aviation Weather Program Strategic Plan (1997) and the National Aviation Weather Initiatives (1999) both identified volcanic ash as a high-priority informational need to aviation services. The risk to aviation from airborne volcanic ash is known and includes degraded engine performance (including flameout), loss of visibility, failure of critical navigational and operational instruments, and, in the worse case, loss of life. The immediate costs for aircraft encountering a dense plume are potentially major—damages up to $80 million have occurred to a single aircraft. Aircraft encountering less dense volcanic ash clouds can incur longer-term costs due to increased maintenance of engines and external surfaces. The overall goal, as stated in the Initiatives, is to eliminate encounters with ash that could degrade the in-flight safety of aircrews and passengers and cause damage to the aircraft. This goal can be accomplished by improving the ability to detect, track, and forecast hazardous ash clouds and to provide adequate warnings to the aviation community on the present and future location of the cloud. To reach this goal, the National Aviation Weather Program established three objectives: (1) prevention of accidental encounters with hazardous clouds; (2) reduction of air traffic delays, diversions, or evasive actions when hazardous clouds are present; and (3) the development of a single, worldwide standard for exchange of information on airborne hazardous materials. To that end, over the last several years, based on numerous documents (including an OFCMsponsored comprehensive study on aviation training and an update of Aviation Weather Programs/Projects), user forums, and two International Conferences on Volcanic Ash and Aviation Safety (1992 and 2004), the Working Group for Volcanic Ash (WG/VA), under the OFCM-sponsored Committee for Aviation Services and Research, developed the National Volcanic Ash Operations Plan for Aviation and Support of the

  13. Effects of the addition of oil shale ash and coal ash on physic-chemical properties of CPJ45 cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabih K.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We focused our research on recycling industrial wastes, fly ash (F.A, bottom ash (B.A and oil shale ash (S.A in cement production. The study concerns physico-chemical characterization of these products and the influence of their addition on the mechanical proprieties of the CPJ45 cement. XRF allowed us to rank the three additives used according to their contents on major oxides. Coal ashes belong to the class F, and thus possess poozzolanic properties and oil shale ash belongs to the class C and possesses hydraulic and poozolanic properties. The crystalline phases constituting each ash were analysed by XRD. We observe in bottom ash the presence of quartz and mullite. The same crystals are found in fly ash with hematite and magnetite. Oil shale ash is composed of quartz, anhydrite, gehlenite, wollastonite and periclase. The microstructures of fly ash and bottom ash were studied using SEM. The bottom ash was composed respectively of fine particles that are generally irregularly shaped, their dimensions are between 5 and 28μm and of big particles(300 μm. The EDX analysis coupled with an electronic microscope provided some information about the major elements that constitute our samples. The dehydrations of anhydrous and three days hydrated cement were examined by DSC. For hydrated cements we noticed endothermic peaks related to the dehydration of CSH, CH and decomposition of carbonates. The study of the mechanical properties of CPJ45 cement by adding different proportions of fly ash, bottom ash and oil shale ash helped clarifying the percentage of ash that leaded to improve the 28 days mechanical strength. The results show that the cements studied have their maximum mechanical resistance with the addition at 7% of fly ash or 10% of oil shale ash.

  14. Interspecific proteomic comparisons reveal ash phloem genes potentially involved in constitutive resistance to the emerald ash borer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin G A Whitehill

    Full Text Available The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis is an invasive wood-boring beetle that has killed millions of ash trees since its accidental introduction to North America. All North American ash species (Fraxinus spp. that emerald ash borer has encountered so far are susceptible, while an Asian species, Manchurian ash (F. mandshurica, which shares an evolutionary history with emerald ash borer, is resistant. Phylogenetic evidence places North American black ash (F. nigra and Manchurian ash in the same clade and section, yet black ash is highly susceptible to the emerald ash borer. This contrast provides an opportunity to compare the genetic traits of the two species and identify those with a potential role in defense/resistance. We used Difference Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE to compare the phloem proteomes of resistant Manchurian to susceptible black, green, and white ash. Differentially expressed proteins associated with the resistant Manchurian ash when compared to the susceptible ash species were identified using nano-LC-MS/MS and putative identities assigned. Proteomic differences were strongly associated with the phylogenetic relationships among the four species. Proteins identified in Manchurian ash potentially associated with its resistance to emerald ash borer include a PR-10 protein, an aspartic protease, a phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER, and a thylakoid-bound ascorbate peroxidase. Discovery of resistance-related proteins in Asian species will inform approaches in which resistance genes can be introgressed into North American ash species. The generation of resistant North American ash genotypes can be used in forest ecosystem restoration and urban plantings following the wake of the emerald ash borer invasion.

  15. Thermal treatment of ashes[Fly Ash from Municipal Waste Incineration]; Termisk rening av askor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, Karin; Berg, Magnus; Bjurstroem, Henrik [AaF-Energi och Miljoe AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordin, Anders [Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Applied Physics and Electronics

    2003-04-01

    In this project descriptions of different processes for thermal treatment of ashes have been compiled. A technical and economic evaluation of the processes has been done to identify possibilities and problems. The focus in the project lays on treatment of fly ash from municipal waste incineration but the processes can also be used to treat other ashes. When the ash is heated in the thermal treatment reactor, with or without additives, the material is sintered or vitrified and at the same time volatile substances (Zn, Pb, Cd, Hg etc.) are separated. In general the separation is more effective in processes with reducing conditions compared to oxidizing conditions. Oxidizing processes have both worse separation capacity and require more energy. The oxidizing processes are mainly used to stabilize the ash through vitrification and they are in some cases developed for management of municipal sewage sludge and bottom ash. However, these processes are often not as complex as for example an electric arc melting furnace with reducing conditions. The research today aim to develop more effective electrical melting systems with reducing conditions such as plasma melting furnaces, electric resistance melting furnaces and low frequency induction furnaces. A central question in the evaluation of different thermal treatment processes for ash is how the residues from the treatment can be used. It is not certain that the vitrified material is stable enough to get a high economic value, but it can probably be used as construction material. How the remaining metals in the ash are bound is very important in a long-time perspective. Further studies with leaching tests are necessary to clarify this issue. The heavy metal concentrate from the processes contains impurities, such as chlorine, which makes it unprofitable to obtain the metals. Instead the heavy metal concentrate has to be land filled. However, the amount of material for land filling will be much smaller if only the heavy

  16. Regular Recycling of Wood Ash to Prevent Waste Production (RecAsh). Technical Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Lars E-mail: lars.t.andersson@skogsstyreslen.se

    2007-03-15

    At present, the extraction of harvest residues is predicted to increase in Sweden and Finland. As an effect of the intensified harvesting, the export of nutrients and acid buffering substances from the growth site is also increased. Wood ash could be used to compensate forest soils for such losses. Most wood fuel ash is today often deposited in landfills. If the wood ash is recycled, wood energy is produced without any significant waste production. Ash recycling would therefore contribute to decreasing the production of waste, and to maintaining the chemical quality of forest waters and biological productivity of forest soils in the long term. The project has developed, analysed and demonstrated two regular ash-recycling systems. It has also distributed knowledge gathered about motives for ash recycling as well as technical and administrative solutions through a range of media (handbooks, workshops, field demonstrations, reports, web page and information videos). Hopefully, the project will contribute to decreasing waste problems related to bio-energy production in the EU at large. The project has been organised as a separate structure at the beneficiary and divided in four geographically defined subprojects, one in Finland and three in Sweden (Central Sweden, Northern Sweden, and South-western Sweden). The work in each subproject has been lead by a subproject leader. Each subproject has organised a regional reference group. A project steering committee has been established consisting of senior officials from all concerned partners. The project had nine main tasks with the following main expected deliverables and output: 1. Development of two complete full-scale ash-recycling systems; 2. Production of handbooks of the ash recycling system; 3. Ash classification study to support national actions for recommendations; 4. Organise regional demonstrations of various technical options for ash treatment and spreading; 5. Organise national seminars and demonstrations of

  17. Drying Characteristics of Sweet Potato

    OpenAIRE

    Koide, Shoji; Murata, Satoshi; Uchino, Toshitaka; Amaratunga, K.S.P.

    1996-01-01

    The drying test of sweet potato has been done at the air conditions of 40,50,60, and 75 ℃, in order to investigate the drying characteristics. In this study, three types of drying periods, the constant rate drying period, the first falling rate drying period, and the second falling rate drying period, was found during drying. With regards to this, three drying equations, the modified constant rate drying equation, the first falling rate drying equation, and the second falling rate drying equa...

  18. Synthesis and characterization of zeolite material from coal ashes modified by surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal ash was used as starting material for zeolite synthesis by means of hydrothermal treatment. The surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) was prepared by adsorbing the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA-Br) on the external surface of the zeolite from coal ash. The zeolite structure stability was monitored during the characterization of the materials by FTIR, XDR and SEM. The structural parameters of surfactant-modified zeolite are very close to that of corresponding non-modified zeolite which indicates that the crystalline nature of the zeolite remained intact after required chemical treatment with HDTMA-Br molecules and heating treatment for drying. The most intense peaks in the FTIR spectrum of HDTMA-Br were observed in SMZ spectrum confirming adsorption of surfactant on zeolites. (author)

  19. Strength properties of autoclaved cellular concrete with high volume fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, W.; Neufeld, R.D.; Vallejo, L.E.; Kelly, C.; Latona, M. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1997-08-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation on the strength properties of autoclaved cellular concrete (ACC) blocks, a building material that can contain up to 70% w/w of electric utility fly ash. The scope of this investigation covers three phases: (1) a brief literature review; (2) a selection of optimum strength testing methods suitable for ACC materials; and (3) a determination of physical properties of ACC made with US electric utility fly ash, and comparison of such properties to European ACC materials made with sand as the silica source. Optimum laboratory testing methods were selected based on a comprehensive literature search that included American, European, and Chinese standards. The properties examined were compressive, tensile, and flexural strengths. Results showed that block recipe and density influence the compressive, tensile, and flexural strength values. The investigation indicated that the compressive strength of the blocks increases with dry weight density, and decreases as their moisture content increases.

  20. Evaluation of solar dried thyme (Thymus vulgaris Linne) herbs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balladin, Derrick A.; Headley, Oliver [University of the West Indies, Center for Resource Management and Environmental Studies, St Michael (Barbados)

    1999-07-01

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris Linne) herbs can be dried at about 50degC reached an equilibrium moisture content after 12 h and 9.5 h using the wire basket solar dryer and oven drying method respectively. The initial moisture content (wet wt. basis), (final moisture content, dry wt. basis (dwb)) determined by the Dean-Stark toluene method, oven and microwave were 75.15% (10.0%), 75.12% (11.85%) and 72.31% (12.50%) respectively. Paired t-test ({alpha} = 0.05, 10 degrees of freedom) showed no significant difference between the Dean-Stark toluene and the oven methods, but a significant difference between these two methods and the microwaves method. The % essential oils extracted after drying by the oven and the wire basket solar methods were 0.5 and 0.6% (per 100 g dwb) respectively. The % oleoresin and ash content were 27% for both drying methods and 1.60, 2.03 and 2.25% for the fresh, oven dried and the wire basket solar dried herb respectively. (Author)

  1. Quality Improvement of Pork Loin by Dry Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheol Woo; Lee, Ju Ri; Kim, Min Kyu; Jo, Cheorun; Lee, Kyung Haeng; You, Insin; Jung, Samooel

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of dry aging on the quality of pork loin. Longissimus lumborum muscles were dissected from the right half of five pork carcasses and were used as the control samples. The left halves of the carcasses were aged at 2±1℃ and a relative humidity of 80% for 40 d. The total aerobic bacteria count was similar between the control and dry-aged pork loin (p>0.05). Lactic-acid bacteria was absent in both the control and dry-aged pork loins. Dry-aged pork loin contained low moisture and high protein and ash compared to the controls (pcarnosine and anserine content between dry-aged pork loin and the control (p>0.05). Dry-aged pork loin had lower hardness and shear force and received higher core in sensory evaluation than the control (p<0.05). According to the results, dry aging improved textural and sensorial quality of pork loin. PMID:27433108

  2. Role of fly ash in heavy metal removal from flue gas. Final report, September 1, 1994--February 29, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavarian, F.; Mahuli, S.; Ghosh-Dastidar, A.; Agnihotri, R.; Fan, Liang-Shih

    1996-10-01

    The work is mainly focused towards investigating the sorption phenomena of a representative chalcophile, arsenic (As) species, on fly ashes at temperatures representative of the upper-furnace region (850 -1200{degrees}C) and the economizer section (375-600{degrees}C). Arsenic is chosen because it is a highly toxic chalcophile and shows some affinity for fly ash but is also emitted from the stack as vapor and aerosol particles. Based on the preliminary thermodynamic analyses it was determined that under the temperature ranges of interest (400- 600{degrees}C and 800-1000{degrees}C) arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) is the main arsenic species in the flue gas environment. The two temperature zones have been chosen because most of the dry-sorbent injection technologies are being developed for application in these two regions. Also various fly ash samples from different sources are being studied because their chemical composition and subsequently their chemical sorption characteristics would show a great deal of variation depending on their source. Studies were also conducted with calcium hydroxide as the chosen representative dry sorbent. This served as comparative studies between fly ash and dry sorbents. This will enable us to predict the behavior of arsenic when exposed to both fly ash and sorbent which is the case under actual boiler conditions. Experimental results show that Ca(OH){sub 2} captures significant amounts of arsenic species. To gain further insight into the capturing mechanism of calcium hydroxide experiments were performed at various temperatures and exposure times.

  3. Drying and energy technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, A

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of essential topics related to conventional and advanced drying and energy technologies, especially motivated by increased industry and academic interest. The main topics discussed are: theory and applications of drying, emerging topics in drying technology, innovations and trends in drying, thermo-hydro-chemical-mechanical behaviors of porous materials in drying, and drying equipment and energy. Since the topics covered are inter- and multi-disciplinary, the book offers an excellent source of information for engineers, energy specialists, scientists, researchers, graduate students, and leaders of industrial companies. This book is divided into several chapters focusing on the engineering, science and technology applied in essential industrial processes used for raw materials and products.

  4. Laboratory study of volcanic ash electrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alois, Stefano; Merrison, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Electrostatic forces play an important role in the dynamics of volcanic plumes, for example in ash dispersion and aggregation phenomena. Field measurements of ash electrification are often technically challenging due to poor access and there lacks an accepted physical theory to describe the electrical charge exchange which occurs during particle contact. The goal of the study is to investigate single particle electrification under controlled conditions using advanced laboratory facilities. A novel technique is presented, based on the use of a laser based velocimeter. Here an electric field is applied and the field-induced drift velocity of (micron-sized) ash grains is measured as well as the particles fall velocity. This allows the simultaneous determination of a suspended grains size and electrical charge. The experiments are performed in a unique environmental wind tunnel facility under controlled low-pressure conditions. Preliminary results of particle electrification will be presented.

  5. Characteristic of elements in coal bottom ash and fly ash by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal-fired power plant and industrial stacks that using coal produce solid waste such as bottom ash and fly ash. Determination of elements in these wastes qualitatively and quantitatively is usually the first step taken for subsequent evaluation of the associated environmental and biological risks. In this study, the determination of trace elements in bottom ash and fly ash by instrumental neutron activation analysis was carried out. The samples were irradiated at rabbit facility in G.A. Siwabessy reactor with neutron flux ~ 1013 n.cm-2.s-1, and then counted by HPGe spectrometer gamma detector. The validation of method was performed by characterization of standard reference material (SRM) 1633b coal fly ash from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Some elements such as Al, As, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, La, Mn, Na, Sc, Sm, Ti and V were detected in both samples. The concentration of environmentally toxic elements, As and Cr in bottom ash were 6.24 and 137.4 mg/kg, whereas in fly ash were 6.37 and 39.0 mg/kg respectively. Arsenic concentrations had been over the standard value based on PP no.85/1999. (author)

  6. Correlation between the critical viscosity and ash fusion temperatures of coal gasifier ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Peter Y. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Kwong, Kyei-Sing [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Bennett, James [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)

    2015-09-27

    Coal gasification yields synthesis gas, an important intermediate in chemical manufacturing. It is also vital to the production of liquid fuels through the Fischer-Tropsch process and electricity in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle power generation. Minerals naturally present in coal become molten in entrained-flow slagging gasifiers. Molten coal ash slag penetrates and dissolves refractory bricks, leading to costly plant shutdowns. The extent of coal ash slag penetration and refractory brick dissolution depends on the slag viscosity, the gasification temperature, and the composition of slag and bricks. Here, we measured the viscosity of several synthetic coal ash slags with a high-temperature rotary viscometer and their ash fusion temperatures through optical image analysis. We made all measurements in a carbon monoxide-carbon dioxide reducing atmosphere that approximates coal gasification conditions. Empirical correlation models based on ash fusion temperatures were used to calculate critical viscosity temperatures based on the coal ash compositions. These values were then compared with those obtained from thermodynamic phase-transition models. Finally, an understanding of slag viscosity as a function of ash composition is important to reducing refractory wear in slagging coal gasifiers, which would help to reduce the cost and environmental impact of coal for chemical and electricity production.

  7. Correlation between the critical viscosity and ash fusion temperatures of coal gasifier ashes*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Peter

    2015-07-02

    Coal gasification yields synthesis gas, an important intermediate in chemical manufacturing. It is also vital to the production of liquid fuels through the Fischer-Tropsch process and electricity in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle power generation. Minerals naturally present in coal become molten in entrained-flow slagging gasifiers. Molten coal ash slag penetrates and dissolves refractory bricks, leading to costly plant shutdowns. The extent of coal ash slag penetration and refractory brick dissolution depends on the slag viscosity, the gasification temperature, and the composition of slag and bricks. We measured the viscosity of several synthetic coal ash slags with a high-temperature rotary viscometer and their ash fusion temperatures through optical image analysis. All measurements were made in a carbon monoxide-carbon dioxide reducing atmosphere that approximates coal gasification conditions. Empirical correlation models based on ash fusion temperatures were used to calculate critical viscosity temperatures based on the coal ash compositions. These values were then compared with those obtained from thermodynamic phase-transition models. An understanding of slag viscosity as a function of ash composition is important to reducing refractory wear in slagging coal gasifiers, which would help to reduce the cost and environmental impact of coal for chemical and electricity production.

  8. Ambient Dried Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Steven M.; Paik, Jong-Ah

    2013-01-01

    A method has been developed for creating aerogel using normal pressure and ambient temperatures. All spacecraft, satellites, and landers require the use of thermal insulation due to the extreme environments encountered in space and on extraterrestrial bodies. Ambient dried aerogels introduce the possibility of using aerogel as thermal insulation in a wide variety of instances where supercritically dried aerogels cannot be used. More specifically, thermoelectric devices can use ambient dried aerogel, where the advantages are in situ production using the cast-in ability of an aerogel. Previously, aerogels required supercritical conditions (high temperature and high pressure) to be dried. Ambient dried aerogels can be dried at room temperature and pressure. This allows many materials, such as plastics and certain metal alloys that cannot survive supercritical conditions, to be directly immersed in liquid aerogel precursor and then encapsulated in the final, dried aerogel. Additionally, the metalized Mylar films that could not survive the previous methods of making aerogels can survive the ambient drying technique, thus making multilayer insulation (MLI) materials possible. This results in lighter insulation material as well. Because this innovation does not require high-temperature or high-pressure drying, ambient dried aerogels are much less expensive to produce. The equipment needed to conduct supercritical drying costs many tens of thousands of dollars, and has associated running expenses for power, pressurized gasses, and maintenance. The ambient drying process also expands the size of the pieces of aerogel that can be made because a high-temperature, high-pressure system typically has internal dimensions of up to 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in height. In the case of this innovation, the only limitation on the size of the aerogels produced would be in the ability of the solvent in the wet gel to escape from the gel network.

  9. Effect of Azolla Based - Organic Fertilizer, Rock Phosphate and Rice Hull Ash on Rice Yield and Chemical Properties of Alfisols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The application of chemical fertilizer for long time may adverse soil environment. Organic agriculture, for example combination use of azolla based-organic fertilizer, phosphate rock and rice hull ash, was one of ways that able to recover it. Research was conducted in Sukosari, Jumantono, Karanganyar while soi chemical properties analysis was analysed in Soil Chemistry and Fertility Laboratory, Fac. of Agriculture, Sebelas Maret University April to November 2013. Research design used was RAKL with 5 treatments, each repeated 5 times. The treatments applied were P0 (control, P1 ( azola inoculum dosage 250 g/m2 + phosphate rock + rice hull ash equal to 150 kg/ha KCl, P2 (azola inoculum dosage 500 g/m2 + phosphate rock equal to 150kg/ha, SP-36 + rice hull ash equal to 100 kg/ha KCl, P3 (manure dosage of 5 ton/ha,P4 (Urea 250 kg/ha + SP-36 150 kg/ha + KCl 100 kg/ha. Data analysed statistically by F test (Fisher test with level of confident 95% followed by DMRT (Duncan Multiple Range Test if any significant differences. The result showed that the treatment combination of azolla, phosphate rock and rice hull ash increase soil organic matter content, cation exchange capacity, available-P and exchangeable-K as well as rice yield ( (at harvest-dry grain weight and milled-dry grain weight.

  10. Soluble iron inputs to the Southern Ocean through recent andesitic to rhyolitic volcanic ash eruptions from the Patagonian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonella, L. E.; Palomeque, M. E.; Croot, P. L.; Stein, A.; Kupczewski, M.; Rosales, A.; Montes, M. L.; Colombo, F.; García, M. G.; Villarosa, G.; Gaiero, D. M.

    2015-08-01

    Patagonia, due to its geographic position and the dominance of westerly winds, is a key area that contributes to the supply of nutrients to the Southern Ocean, both through mineral dust and through the periodic deposits of volcanic ash. Here we evaluate the characteristics of Fe dissolved (into soluble and colloidal species) from volcanic ash for three recent southern Andes volcanic eruptions having contrasting features and chemical compositions. Contact between cloud waters (wet deposition) and end-members of andesitic (Hudson volcano) and rhyolitic (Chaitén volcano) materials was simulated. Results indicate higher Fe release and faster liberation rates in the andesitic material. Fe release during particle-seawater interaction (dry deposition) has higher rates in rhyolitic-type ashes. Rhyolitic ashes under acidic conditions release Fe in higher amounts and at a slower rate, while in those samples containing mostly glass shards, Fe release was lower and faster. The 2011 Puyehue eruption was observed by a dust monitoring station. Puyehue-type eruptions can contribute soluble Fe to the ocean via dry or wet deposition, nearly reaching the limit required for phytoplankton growth. In contrast, the input of Fe after processing by an acidic eruption plume could raise the amount of dissolved Fe in surface ocean waters several times, above the threshold required to initiate phytoplankton blooms. A single eruption like the Puyehue one represents more than half of the yearly Fe flux contributed by dust.

  11. Effects of a layer of vegetative ash layer on wettable and water repellent soil hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodí, Merche B.; Doerr, Stefan H.; Cerdà, Artemi; Mataix-Solera, Jorge

    2010-05-01

    Following a wildfire, a layer of vegetative ash often covers the ground until it is dissolved or redistributed by wind and water erosion. Much of the existing literature suggests that the ash layer temporally reduces infiltration by clogging soil pores or by forming a surface crust (Mallik et al., 1984; Onda et al., 2008). However, an increasing number of field-based studies have found that, at least in the short term, ash increases infiltration by storing rainfall and protecting the underlying soil from sealing (Cerdà and Doerr, 2008; Woods and Balfour, 2008). On the other hand, after a fire the soil may have produced, enhanced or reduced its water repellency (Doerr et al., 2000). Very few studies have been taken into account the interaction of the ash and the repellent soil. The layer of ash may have similar role as a litter layer in delaying runoff and reducing erosion by storing water. In order to examine this interaction, it was been made a series of experiments using a laboratory rainfall simulation. It has been assessed the effects of an ash layer i) on a wettable and water repellent soil (WDPT > 7200s), ii) with different ash thicknesses (bare soil and 5 mm, 15 mm and 30 mm of ash), iii) preceding and following the first rain after a fire when the ground is still wetted and after being partially dried. Three replicates were done, being a total of 40 simulations. The ash used was collected from a Wildfire in Teruel (Spain) during summer of 2009. The simulations were conducted in metal boxes of 30x30 cm and filled with 3 cm of soil. The slope of the box was set at 10° (17%) and the intensity applied was 78-84 mm h-1during 40 minutes. The splash detachment was determined also using four splash cups. Overland flow and subsurface drainage was collected at 1-minute intervals and the former stored every 5 min to allow determination of sediment concentrations, yield and erosion rates. Each sample was examined at the end in terms of water repellency, infiltration

  12. Dry etching for microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, RA

    1984-01-01

    This volume collects together for the first time a series of in-depth, critical reviews of important topics in dry etching, such as dry processing of III-V compound semiconductors, dry etching of refractory metal silicides and dry etching aluminium and aluminium alloys. This topical format provides the reader with more specialised information and references than found in a general review article. In addition, it presents a broad perspective which would otherwise have to be gained by reading a large number of individual research papers. An additional important and unique feature of this book

  13. Effect of municipal solid waste incinerator types on characteristics of ashes from different air pollution control devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chien-Hsing; Chuang, Kui-Hao

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the characteristics of fly and bottom ashes sampled from both fluidized bed (FB) and mass-burning (MB) municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs), respectively. Fly ashes from different locations at FB and MB MSWIs equipped with a cyclone, a semi-dry scrubber, and a bag filter as air pollution control devices were examined to provide the baseline information between physicochemical properties and leaching ability. Experimental results of leachability indicated that the bag filter fly ash (FB-FA(B)) from the FB incinerator meets Taiwan regulatory standards set through the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure. X-ray diffraction results revealed the presence of Cr5O12 and Pb2O3 in the cyclone fly ash (MB-FA(C)) and bag filter fly ash (MB-FA(B)), respectively, from the MB incinerator. To observe lead incorporation mechanism, mixture of simulate lead-laden waste with bed material were fired between 600 °C and 900 °C in a laboratory scale FB reactor. The results clearly demonstrate a substantial decrease in lead leaching ratio for products with an appropriate temperature. The concentration of Pb in the MB-FA(B) was 250 times that in the FB-FA(B), suggesting that incineration of MSW in FB is a good strategy for stabilizing hazardous metals.

  14. Thermochemical treatment of sewage sludge ash with sodium salt additives for phosphorus fertilizer production--Analysis of underlying chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemann, Jan; Peplinski, Burkhard; Adam, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Stocks of high grade phosphate rock are becoming scarce, and there is growing concern about potentially harmful impurities in conventional phosphorus fertilizers. Sewage sludge ash is a promising secondary phosphorus source. However, to remove heavy metals and convert the phosphorus contained in sewage sludge ash into mineral phases available to plants, an after-treatment is required. Laboratory-scale calcination experiments of sewage sludge ash blended with sodium salts using dried sewage sludge as a reducing agent were carried out at 1000°C. Thus, the Ca3(PO4)2 or whitlockite component of raw sewage sludge ash, which is not readily plant available, was converted to CaNaPO4 (buchwaldite). Consequently, nearly complete phosphorus solubility in ammonium citrate (a well-established indicator for plant availability) was achieved. Moreover, it was shown that Na2CO3 may be replaced by moderately priced Na2SO4. However, molar ratios of Na/P>2 were required to achieve >80% phosphorus solubility. Such over-stoichiometric Na consumption is largely caused by side reactions with the SiO2 component of the sewage sludge ash - an explanation for which clear evidence is provided for the first time. PMID:26219587

  15. High performance of treated and washed MSWI bottom ash granulates as natural aggregate replacement within earth-moist concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keulen, A; van Zomeren, A; Harpe, P; Aarnink, W; Simons, H A E; Brouwers, H J H

    2016-03-01

    Municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash was treated with specially designed dry and wet treatment processes, obtaining high quality bottom ash granulate fractions (BGF) suitable for up to 100% replacement of natural gravel in concrete. The wet treatment (using only water for separating and washing) significantly lowers the leaching of e.g. chloride and sulfate, heavy metals (antimony, molybdenum and copper) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Two potential bottom ash granulate fractions, both in compliance with the standard EN 12620 (aggregates for concrete), were added into earth-moist concrete mixtures. The fresh and hardened concrete physical performances (e.g. workability, strength and freeze-thaw) of high strength concrete mixtures were maintained or improved compared with the reference mixtures, even after replacing up to 100% of the initial natural gravel. Final element leaching of monolithic and crushed granular state BGF containing concretes, showed no differences with the gravel references. Leaching of all mixtures did not exceed the limit values set by the Dutch Soil Quality Degree. In addition, multiple-life-phase emission (pH static test) for the critical elements of input bottom ash, bottom ash granulate (BGF) and crushed BGF containing concrete were assessed. Simulation pH lowering or potential carbonation processes indicated that metal (antimony, barium, chrome and copper) and sulfate element leaching behavior are mainly pH dominated and controlled, although differ in mechanism and related mineral abundance.

  16. Effect of municipal solid waste incinerator types on characteristics of ashes from different air pollution control devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chien-Hsing; Chuang, Kui-Hao

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the characteristics of fly and bottom ashes sampled from both fluidized bed (FB) and mass-burning (MB) municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs), respectively. Fly ashes from different locations at FB and MB MSWIs equipped with a cyclone, a semi-dry scrubber, and a bag filter as air pollution control devices were examined to provide the baseline information between physicochemical properties and leaching ability. Experimental results of leachability indicated that the bag filter fly ash (FB-FA(B)) from the FB incinerator meets Taiwan regulatory standards set through the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure. X-ray diffraction results revealed the presence of Cr5O12 and Pb2O3 in the cyclone fly ash (MB-FA(C)) and bag filter fly ash (MB-FA(B)), respectively, from the MB incinerator. To observe lead incorporation mechanism, mixture of simulate lead-laden waste with bed material were fired between 600 °C and 900 °C in a laboratory scale FB reactor. The results clearly demonstrate a substantial decrease in lead leaching ratio for products with an appropriate temperature. The concentration of Pb in the MB-FA(B) was 250 times that in the FB-FA(B), suggesting that incineration of MSW in FB is a good strategy for stabilizing hazardous metals. PMID:26226945

  17. High performance of treated and washed MSWI bottom ash granulates as natural aggregate replacement within earth-moist concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keulen, A; van Zomeren, A; Harpe, P; Aarnink, W; Simons, H A E; Brouwers, H J H

    2016-03-01

    Municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash was treated with specially designed dry and wet treatment processes, obtaining high quality bottom ash granulate fractions (BGF) suitable for up to 100% replacement of natural gravel in concrete. The wet treatment (using only water for separating and washing) significantly lowers the leaching of e.g. chloride and sulfate, heavy metals (antimony, molybdenum and copper) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Two potential bottom ash granulate fractions, both in compliance with the standard EN 12620 (aggregates for concrete), were added into earth-moist concrete mixtures. The fresh and hardened concrete physical performances (e.g. workability, strength and freeze-thaw) of high strength concrete mixtures were maintained or improved compared with the reference mixtures, even after replacing up to 100% of the initial natural gravel. Final element leaching of monolithic and crushed granular state BGF containing concretes, showed no differences with the gravel references. Leaching of all mixtures did not exceed the limit values set by the Dutch Soil Quality Degree. In addition, multiple-life-phase emission (pH static test) for the critical elements of input bottom ash, bottom ash granulate (BGF) and crushed BGF containing concrete were assessed. Simulation pH lowering or potential carbonation processes indicated that metal (antimony, barium, chrome and copper) and sulfate element leaching behavior are mainly pH dominated and controlled, although differ in mechanism and related mineral abundance. PMID:26856445

  18. Geotechnical Properties of Saw Dust Ash Stabilized Southwestern Nigeria Lateritic Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson Henry Tolulope Ogunribido

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out with an intention to evaluate the effects of saw dust ash on the geotechnical properties of soil from three locations in Southwestern Nigeria. Tests that were performed on three samples, A, B and C, dealt with consistency limits, specific gravity, compaction, California bearing ratio, unconfined compressive strength and shear strength. These tests were conducted at both non-stabilized and stabilized states by adding 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10% of saw dust ash. The results show that saw dust ash has improved geotechnical properties of the soil samples: maximum dry density increases from 1403 to1456 Kg/m3 and 1730 to 1785kg/m3, optimum moisture content increases from 23.6 to 28.2% and  26.2 to 29.2%, unconfined compressive strength  - from 101.4  to 142.14 and 154.97 , shear strength  - from  50.92  to  71.07kN/m2 and 77.49 to 105.99kN/m2 for samples A and B, respectively. Saw dust ash is therefore found to be an effective stabilizer for lateritic soils. Preface. Road failure is a common problem in Nigeria which is due to low materials application quality in road building. This article has a mission of providing some information to the road building industry that geotechnical properties of the materials they use can be improved by adding a stabilizer such as saw dust ash.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.60.2.986

  19. Market assessment and technical feasibility study of PFBC ash use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, V.E.; Bland, A.E.; Brown, T.H. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States); Georgiou, D.N. [Jacques, Whitford and Associates Ltd., Dartmouth, NS (Canada); Wheeldon, J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The overall objectives of this study are to determine the market potential and the technical feasibility of using PFBC ash in high volume ash use applications. The information will be of direct use to the utility industry in assessing the economics of PFBC power generation in light of ash disposal avoidance through ash marketing. In addition, the research is expected to result in the generation of generic data on the use of PFBC ash that could lead to novel processing options and procedures. The specific objectives of the proposed research and demonstration effort are: Define resent and future market potential of PFBC ash for a range of applications (Phase I); assess the technical feasibility of PFBC ash use in construction, civil engineering and agricultural applications (Phase II); and demonstrate the most promising of the market and ash use options in full-scale field demonstrations (Phase III).

  20. About the mineralogical composition of Estonian oil shale ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of previous research about the mineralogical composition of Estonian oil shale ash focused on using X-ray diffractometry, problems related to oil shale combustion, and utilization of oil shale ashes were analysed. (author)

  1. Environmental risks of biomass ashes application in soils [Resumo

    OpenAIRE

    Freire, M; Lopes, M. Helena; Tarelho, L.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the potential environmental risks of biomass ashes application in forest soils. The ashes were collected in five industrial biomass thermal plants using different technologies: bubbling fluidized bed combustor and grate furnace.

  2. Utilization of blended fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash in geopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, synthesis of geopolymer from fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash was studied in order to effectively utilize both ashes. FBC-fly ash and bottom ash were inter-ground to three different finenesses. The ashes were mixed with as-received PCC-fly ash in various proportions and used as source material for synthesis of geopolymer. Sodium silicate (Na(2)SiO(3)) and 10M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions at mass ratio of Na(2)SiO(3)/NaOH of 1.5 and curing temperature of 65 degrees C for 48h were used for making geopolymer. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), degree of reaction, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed on the geopolymer pastes. Compressive strength was also tested on geopolymer mortars. The results show that high strength geopolymer mortars of 35.0-44.0MPa can be produced using mixture of ground FBC ash and as-received PCC-fly ash. Fine FBC ash is more reactive and results in higher degree of reaction and higher strength geopolymer as compared to the use of coarser FBC ash. Grinding increases reactivity of ash by means of increasing surface area and the amount of reactive phase of the ash. In addition, the packing effect due to fine particles also contributed to increase in strength of geopolymers.

  3. Changeing of fly ash leachability after grinding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, J.; Szabo, R.; Racz, A.; Banhidi, O.; Mucsi, G.

    2016-04-01

    Effect of grinding on the reactivity of fly ash used for geopolymer production was tested. Extraction technique using different alkaline and acidic solutions were used for detect the change of the solubility of elements due to the physical and mechano-chemical transformation of minerals in function of grinding time. Both the extraction with alkaline and acidic solution have detected improvement in solubility in function of grinding time. The enhancement in alkaline solution was approx. 100% in case of Si and Al. The acidic medium able to dissolve the fly ash higher manner than the alkaline, therefore the effect of grinding was found less pronounced.

  4. Physical cleaning of high carbon fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, McMahan L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Soong, Yee; Killmeyer, Richard P. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, US Department of Energy, P.O. Box 10940, Cochran Mills Roads, 15236 Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Maroto-Valer, M. Mercedes; Andresen, John M. [The Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, 405 Academic Activities Building, 16802-2308 University Park, PA (United States); Ciocco, Michael V.; Zandhuis, Paul H. [Parson Project Services Inc, National Energy Technology Laboratory, P.O. Box 618, 15129 Library, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2002-04-20

    An industrial fly ash sample was cleaned by three different processes, which were triboelectrostatic separation, ultrasonic column agglomeration, and column flotation. The unburned carbon concentrates were collected at purities ranging up to 62% at recoveries of 62%. In addition, optical microscopy studies were conducted on the final carbon concentrates to determine the carbon forms (inertinite, isotropic coke and anisotropic coke) collected from these various physical-cleaning processes. The effects of the various cleaning processes on the production of different carbon forms from high carbon fly ashes will be discussed.

  5. Utilization options for fly ash, bottom ash, and slag in Eastern Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manz, O.E.

    1995-12-01

    Since 1967, at least six ash utilization symposiums have been held in the United States, with papers presented by several European authors on the utilization of coal by-products in Eastern Europe. There is currently over 80,000 megawatts of installed coal-fired capacity available in that region. Unfortunately, of the 117,778,000 tonnes of fly ash, bottom ash, and slag produced in Eastern Europe in 1989, only 13% was utilized. This paper outlines the research and levels and kinds of coal by-product utilization taking place in Eastern Europe since the late 1960s.

  6. Cleaner phosphogypsum, coal combustion ashes and waste incineration ashes for application in building materials: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. Reijnders [University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-02-15

    Application of phosphogypsum, coal combustion ashes and waste incineration ashes in building materials has been limited by the presence of minor components that are hazardous, such as radioactive substances, chlorinated dioxins and heavy metals, or have a negative impact on product quality or production economics, such as phosphate, fluoride, carbon and chloride. Source reduction, destruction of persistent organics and separation techniques may reduce the concentrations of such components. With a few exceptions, separation techniques currently lead to significantly higher (private) costs. Higher waste disposal costs, tighter regulations and higher prices for competing virgin minerals could make the use of the purified phosphogypsum and ashes in building materials more attractive.

  7. Associative properties of 137Cs in biofuel ashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study aims to reveal how radiocesium is associated to the ash particles derived from biofuel combustion. A sequential extraction procedure was carried out for the characterisation of radiocesium speciation in ash generated by different fuels and burner types. The ash types considered were fly ash and bottom ash collected from Swedish district heating plants using bark wood or peat as fuel. A fraction of the radiocesium in biofuel ash can easily become solubilised and mobilised by water and also, a significant fraction of the radionuclides can be bound to the ash particles in cation-exchangeable forms. Therefore, at using the ash derived from biofuels to recycle mineral nutrients for forestry or short rotation coppicing, radiocesium solubilised and leached from the ash by rains has a potential to rather quickly enter the rooting zone of forest vegetation or energy crops. On the other hand, radiocesium strongly bound to the ash will migrate slowly into the soil column with the successive accumulation of litter and in the process act to maintain the external dose rate at an elevated level for a long time. The results of the sequential extraction procedure and activity determination of the different extracted fractions implies that the bioavailable fraction of radiocesium in ash from bark, wood or peat is in the range between 20-85% of the total ash contents. Peat ash collected from a powder burner strongly retained a large fraction (70-90%) of its radiocesium content while the peat ash from a continuos fluidized bed type burner retained nearly 100% of the radiocesium in the bottom ash and only about 15% in the fly ash

  8. Application of Fly Ash from Solid Fuel Combustion in Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Kim Hougaard; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2008-01-01

    Application of Fly Ash from Solid Fuel Combustion in Concrete Kim H. Pedersen Abstract Industrial utilization of fly ash from pulverized coal combustion plays an important role in environmentally clean and cost effective power generation. Today, the primary market for fly ash utilization is as pozzolanic additive in the production of concrete. However, the residual carbon in fly ash can adsorb the air entraining admixtures (AEAs) added to enhance air entrainment in concrete in order to increa...

  9. Granulated wood ash to forest soil - Ecological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes research concerning ecological effects of wood ash recycling to forest soils. The main part of the minerals in the wood fuels are retained in the ashes after combustion. By returning the ashes back to the cleared forest areas, the mineral losses can be reduced. Adding ashes and limestone is a method to vitalize acidified forest soils and restore the production capacity. 48 refs, 26 figs, 8 tabs

  10. Optimizing and Characterizing Geopolymers from Ternary Blend of Philippine Coal Fly Ash, Coal Bottom Ash and Rice Hull Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ernesto Kalaw

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Geopolymers are inorganic polymers formed from the alkaline activation of amorphous alumino-silicate materials resulting in a three-dimensional polymeric network. As a class of materials, it is seen to have the potential of replacing ordinary Portland cement (OPC, which for more than a hundred years has been the binder of choice for structural and building applications. Geopolymers have emerged as a sustainable option vis-à-vis OPC for three reasons: (1 their technical properties are comparable if not better; (2 they can be produced from industrial wastes; and (3 within reasonable constraints, their production requires less energy and emits significantly less CO2. In the Philippines, the use of coal ash, as the alumina- and silica- rich geopolymer precursor, is being considered as one of the options for sustainable management of coal ash generation from coal-fired power plants. However, most geopolymer mixes (and the prevalent blended OPC use only coal fly ash. The coal bottom ash, having very few applications, remains relegated to dumpsites. Rice hull ash, from biomass-fired plants, is another silica-rich geopolymer precursor material from another significantly produced waste in the country with only minimal utilization. In this study, geopolymer samples were formed from the mixture of coal ash, using both coal fly ash (CFA and coal bottom ash (CBA, and rice hull ash (RHA. The raw materials used for the geopolymerization process were characterized using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF for elemental and X-ray diffraction (XRD for mineralogical composition. The raw materials’ thermal stability and loss on ignition (LOI were determined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and reactivity via dissolution tests and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP analysis. The mechanical, thermal and microstructural properties of the geopolymers formed were analyzed using compression tests, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR

  11. Standardization of spray-dried powder of Piper betle hot water extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyanage Dona Ashanthi Menuka Arawwawala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The leaves of Piper betle Linn. (Family: Piperaceae possess several bioactivities and are used in the Traditional Medical systems of Sri Lanka. The present investigation was carried out to standardize the spray-dried powder of P. betle by (a determination of physicochemical parameters, presence or absence of heavy metals, and microbial contamination; (b screening for phytochemicals; and (c development of High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC fingerprint and densitogram. The percentages of moisture content, total ash, acid insoluble ash, water-soluble ash, and ethanol extractable matter of spray-dried powder of P. betle were 2.2-2.5, 6.8-7.0, 0.003-0.005, 4.1-4.3, and 15.8-16.2, respectively. The concentrations of all the tested heavy metals were below the WHO acceptable limits and bacterial species, such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeroginosa were not present in the P. betle spray-dried powder. Phenolic compounds, tannins, flavonoids steroids, and alkaloids were found to be present in the spray-dried powder of P. betle and HPLC fingerprint and densitogram clearly demonstrated the proportional differences of these chemical constituents. In conclusion, the results obtained from this study can be used to standardize the spray-dried powder of P. betle.

  12. Standardization of spray-dried powder of Piper betle hot water extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arawwawala, Liyanage Dona Ashanthi Menuka; Hewageegana, Horadugoda Gamage Sujatha Pushpakanthi; Arambewela, Lakshmi Sriyani Rajapaksha; Ariyawansa, Hettiarachchige Sami

    2011-04-01

    The leaves of Piper betle Linn. (Family: Piperaceae) possess several bioactivities and are used in the Traditional Medical systems of Sri Lanka. The present investigation was carried out to standardize the spray-dried powder of P. betle by (a) determination of physicochemical parameters, presence or absence of heavy metals, and microbial contamination; (b) screening for phytochemicals; and (c) development of High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) fingerprint and densitogram. The percentages of moisture content, total ash, acid insoluble ash, water-soluble ash, and ethanol extractable matter of spray-dried powder of P. betle were 2.2-2.5, 6.8-7.0, 0.003-0.005, 4.1-4.3, and 15.8-16.2, respectively. The concentrations of all the tested heavy metals were below the WHO acceptable limits and bacterial species, such as Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeroginosa were not present in the P. betle spray-dried powder. Phenolic compounds, tannins, flavonoids steroids, and alkaloids were found to be present in the spray-dried powder of P. betle and HPLC fingerprint and densitogram clearly demonstrated the proportional differences of these chemical constituents. In conclusion, the results obtained from this study can be used to standardize the spray-dried powder of P. betle. PMID:21716924

  13. 77 FR 55895 - Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Permanent Closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of permanent closure of Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport (ISZ). SUMMARY: The... Cincinnati advising that on August 29, 2012, it was permanently closing Cincinnati Blue Ash Airport...

  14. Ash transformation during co-firing coal and straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn;

    2007-01-01

    Co-firing straw with coal in pulverized fuel boilers can cause problems related to fly ash utilization, deposit formation, corrosion and SCR catalyst deactivation due to the high contents of Cl and K in the ash. To investigate the interaction between coal and straw ash and the effect of coal qual...

  15. Quantification of fusion in ashes from solid fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug; Frandsen, Flemming; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    1999-01-01

    The fusion of ashes produced during solid fuel combustion greatly affects the tendency of these ashes to cause operational problems in utility boilers. In this paper, a new and quantitative laboratory method for assessing the fusion of ashes based on simultaneous thermal analysis, STA, is described...

  16. Evaluation of Pollutant Leaching Potential of Coal Ashes for Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, D.; Woo, N. C.; Kim, H.; Yoon, H.; Chung, D.

    2011-12-01

    By 2009, coal ashes produced from coal-based power plants in Korea have been reused as cement supplement materials; however, the rest is mostly disposed in landfills inside the plant properties. Continuous production of coal ashes and limited landfill sites require more recycles of coal ashes as base materials, specifically in constructions of roads and of huge industrial complex. Previous researches showed that coal ashes could contain various metals such as arsenic(As), chromium(Cr), lead(Pb), nickel(Ni), selenium(Se), etc. In this study, we collected four types of bottom ashes and two of fly ashes from four coal-based power plants. These ash samples were tested with distilled water through the column leaching process in oxidized conditions. The column test results were compared with those of total digestion, sequential extraction processes and TCLP. Concentrations of metals in outflows from columns are generally greater in fly ashes than in bottom ashes, specifically for As, Se, B, Sr and SO4. Only one fly ash (J2-F) shows high concentrations of arsenic and selenium in leachate. Sequential extraction results indicate that these metals are in readily soluble forms, such as adsorbed, carbonated, and reducible forms. Results of TCLP analysis indicate no potential contaminants leached from the ashes. In conclusion, recycling of coal combustion ashes could be encouraged with proper tests such as sequential and leaching experiments.

  17. Mathematical Modeling and Effect of Various Hot-Air Drying on Mushroom (Lentinus edodes)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xiao-hui; XIA Chun-yan; TAN Yu-rong; CHEN Long; MING Jian

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to determine the characteristics and drying process of mushroom (Lentinus edodes) by 6 different hot-air drying methods namely isothermal drying, uniform raise drying, non-uniform raise drying, uniform intermittent drying, non-uniform intermittent drying and combined drying. The chemical composition (dry matter, ash, crude protein, crude fat, total sugars, dietary ifber, and energy), color parameters (L, a*, b*, c*, and h0) and rehydration capacities were determined. Among all the experiments, non-uniform intermittent drying reached a better comprehensive results due to the higher chemical composition, better color quality associated with high bright (26.381±5.842), high color tone (73.670±2.975), low chroma (13.349±3.456) as well as the highest rehydration (453.76%weigh of dried body). Nine kinds of classical mathematical model were used to obtained moisture data and the Midili-kucuk model can be described by the drying process with the coefifcient (R2 ranged from 0.99790 to 0.99967), chi-square (χ2 ranged from 0.00003 to 0.00019) and root mean square error (RMSE ranged from 0.000486 to 0.0012367).

  18. Use of Slag/Sugar Cane Bagasse Ash (SCBA) Blends in the Production of Alkali-Activated Materials

    OpenAIRE

    María V. Borrachero; Jordi Payá; José Monzó; Lourdes Soriano; Mauro M. Tashima; José L.P. Melges; Jorge L. Akasaki; Vinícius N. Castaldelli

    2013-01-01

    Blast furnace slag (BFS)/sugar cane bagasse ash (SCBA) blends were assessed for the production of alkali-activated pastes and mortars. SCBA was collected from a lagoon in which wastes from a sugar cane industry were poured. After previous dry and grinding processes, SCBA was chemically characterized: it had a large percentage of organic matter (ca. 25%). Solutions of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate were used as activating reagents. Different BFS/SCBA mixtures were studied, replacing part...

  19. Adhesive carrier particles for rapidly hydrated sorbent for moderate-temperature dry flue gas desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; You, Changfu; Song, Chenxing

    2010-06-15

    A rapidly hydrated sorbent for moderate-temperature dry flue gas desulfurization was prepared by rapidly hydrating adhesive carrier particles and lime. The circulation ash from a circulating fluidized bed boiler and chain boiler ash, both of which have rough surfaces with large specific surface areas and specific pore volumes, can improve the adhesion, abrasion resistance, and desulfurization characteristics of rapidly hydrated sorbent when used as the adhesive carrier particles. The adhesion ability of sorbent made from circulation ash is 67.4% higher than that of the existing rapidly hydrated sorbent made from fly ash, the abrasion ratio is 76.2% lower, and desulfurization ability is 14.1% higher. For sorbent made from chain boiler ash, the adhesion ability is increased by 74.7%, the desulfurization ability is increased by 30.3%, and abrasion ratio is decreased by 52.4%. The abrasion ratios of the sorbent made from circulation ash having various average diameters were all about 9%, and their desulfurization abilities were similar (approximately 150 mg/g). PMID:20481549

  20. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Find an Ophthalmologist Academy Store Eye Health A-Z Symptoms Glasses & Contacts Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye Sections What Is Dry Eye? Causes ...

  1. Tray Drying of Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afacan, Artin; Masliyah, Jacob

    1984-01-01

    Describes a drying experiment useful in presenting the concept of simultaneous heat and mass transfer. Background information, equipment requirements, experimental procedures, and results are provided. The reasonably good agreement in the calculated rate of drying and that observed experimentally makes students feel confident in applying…

  2. Manipulation of the ash flow temperature and viscosity of a carbonaceous Sasol waste stream

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.C. van Dyk; M.J. Keyser; F.B. Waanders; M. Conradie [Syngas and Coal Technologies, Sasolburg (South Africa). Sasol Technology, R& amp; D Division

    2010-01-15

    In 2001 Sasol investigated selected the Lurgi Multi Purpose Gasification (MPG) process for converting a Sasol-Lurgi MK III fixed bed dry bottom coal gasifier at the former Sasolburg coal-to-liquids plant to a slagging gasification process. The MPG process was considered anoption suitable for the gasification of feedstocks which are difficult to manage. The most obvious differences between the feedstocks previously gasified, compared to the Sasol dusty tar, were found to be the viscosity and melting point of the dusty tar. The viscosity of the Sasol dusty tar mixture was higher than a factor of 10 ofpreviously used feedstocks. Another important feedstock property is the ash melting point of the feed within the gasifier. Ash particles fed with the tar melt in the high temperature zone of the flame. Molten ash particles which hit the gasifier wall will solidify and stick to the wall if the wall temperature is below the melting point of the ash. The melting point of the dusty tar ash is 1380{sup o}C and a fluxing agent has to be added to reduce the melting temperature below 1250{sup o}C to limit excessive wear of the refractory lining. It was concluded that the viscosity of dusty tar can be decreased with the addition of specific waste solvent streams. The ash fusion temperatures of dusty tar can be lowered by adding a fluxing agent. The addition of spent Fe-catalyst as fluxing agent was found to be less effective than limestone. The addition of Fe can cause the acid/base ratio to change so that the ash fusion temperature increases. The results show in both oxidizing and reducing atmospheres the Fe-catalyst was transformed into the slag melt as either Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} under oxidizing conditions and FeO under reducing conditions. The slag showed no sign of metallic Fe and was very homogeneous under oxidizing and reducing conditions. 17 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

  3. Effect of microwave and air drying of parboiled rice on stabilization of rice bran oil

    OpenAIRE

    Rizk, Laila F.; Basyony, A. E.; Doss, Hanaa A.

    1995-01-01

    Two rice varieties, Giza 175 (short grain) and Giza 181 (long grain) were partDoiled by soaking the grains at room temperature for 20 hours and steaming for 15 min then dried either at room temperature or by microwave. The results indicated that air and microwave drying significantly increased oil extraction in both rice bran varieties. Parboiling followed by air or microwave drying produced a slight change on protein, fiber and ash content of rice bran and reduced the development of free fat...

  4. Ash wettability conditions splash erosion in the postfire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo-Rivero, Ángel J.; de Celis, Reyes; García-Moreno, Jorge; Jiménez-Compán, Elizabeth; Alanís, Nancy; Cerdà, Artemi; Pereira, Paulo; Zavala, Lorena M.; Jordán, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    at each point of study were collected monthly and determined gravimetrically after oven drying between November 2012 and May 2013. 3. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Depending on the intensity of the water repellency, the ash layer fluctuated between wettable and very strongly water repellent. The ash has a high permeability and water storage. However, its hydrophilic character has been emphasized rarely (Cerdà and Doerr, 2008). Different authors have described hydrophobic behaviors depending on the burned vegetation such as oak (Gabet and Sternberg, 2008) or pine forest (Stark, 1977) in the United States, eucalyptus forest in Australia (Khanna et al., 1996 ) or Mediterranean tree and shrub species in Spain (Bodí et al., 2011). In the latter case, Bodí et al. (2011) observed that ash has different properties depending on the combustion conditions, organic carbon content and color. This variability of behavior agrees with the results obtained in the present work. Significant differences between splash erosion from wettable and water-repellent ash zones were found (p suelo. In: Bento-Gonçalves A, Vieira A (Eds.), Grandes incêndios florestais, erosão, degradação e medidas de recuperação dos solos. Núcleo de Investigação en Geografia e Planeamento (NIGP), Universidade do Minho. Guimaraes. Pp.: 145-160. DeBano LF. 1991. The effect of fire on soil. In: Harvey AE; Neuenschwander LF.(Eds.), Management and productivity of western-montane forest soils. General Technical Report INT-280. Intermountain Forest and Range Experimental Station, United States Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. Ogden, UT. DeBano LF. 2000. Water repellency in soils: a historical overview. Journal of Hydrology 231-232, 4-32. Doerr SH, Shakesby RA, Walsh RPD. 2000. Soil water repellency: its causes, characteristics and hydro-geomorphological significance. Earth-Science Reviews 51, 33-65. Larsen I, MacDonald LH, Brown E, Rough D, Welsh MJ, Pietraszek JH, Libohava Z, Benavides-Solorio JD

  5. Eliminating cracking during drying

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Qiu; Schofield, Andrew B; Xu, Lei; 10.1140/epje/i2013-13028-9

    2013-01-01

    When colloidal suspensions dry, stresses build up and cracks often occur - a phenomenon undesirable for important industries such as paint and ceramics. We demonstrate an effective method which can completely eliminate cracking during drying: by adding emulsion droplets into colloidal suspensions, we can systematically decrease the amount of cracking, and eliminate it completely above a critical droplet concentration. Since the emulsion droplets eventually also evaporate, our technique achieves an effective function while making little changes to the component of final product, and may therefore serve as a promising approach for cracking elimination. Furthermore, adding droplets also varies the speed of air invasion and provides a powerful method to adjust drying rate. With the effective control over cracking and drying rate, our study may find important applications in many drying and cracking related industrial processes.

  6. Dry imaging cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I K Indrajit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dry imaging cameras are important hard copy devices in radiology. Using dry imaging camera, multiformat images of digital modalities in radiology are created from a sealed unit of unexposed films. The functioning of a modern dry camera, involves a blend of concurrent processes, in areas of diverse sciences like computers, mechanics, thermal, optics, electricity and radiography. Broadly, hard copy devices are classified as laser and non laser based technology. When compared with the working knowledge and technical awareness of different modalities in radiology, the understanding of a dry imaging camera is often superficial and neglected. To fill this void, this article outlines the key features of a modern dry camera and its important issues that impact radiology workflow.

  7. Processing of Sugarcane Bagasse ash and Reactivity of Ash-blended Cement Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajay, Goyal; Hattori, Kunio; Ogata, Hidehiko; Ashraf, Muhammad

    Sugarcane bagasse ash (SCBA), a sugar-mill waste, has the potential of a partial cement replacement material if processed and obtained under controlled conditions. This paper discusses the reactivity of SCBA obtained by control burning of sugarcane bagasse procured from Punjab province of India. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques were employed to ascertain the amorphousness and morphology of the minerals ash particles. Destructive and non-destructive tests were conducted on SCBA-blended mortar specimens. Ash-blended cement paste specimens were analyzed by XRD, thermal analysis, and SEM methods to evaluate the hydration reaction of SCBA with cement. Results showed that the SCBA processed at 600°C for 5 hours was reactive as ash-blended mortar specimens with up to 15% substitution of cement gave better strength than control specimens.

  8. Root secretion stimulating ash growth in larch-ash mixed forest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴俊民; 刘广平; 王晓水; 吴保国

    2000-01-01

    Allelopathic effect of larch (Larix gmelini ) on the ash growth (Fraximus mandshurica) was studied in artificial cultivation tests. The results revealed that the larch root secretion obviously stimulated the ash growth. In order to determine the main stimulation allelochemicals, the chemical composition was analyzed. By contrasting the contents of carbohydrate and aminoacid in root secretion of larch and ash, it was concluded that the carbohydrate and aminoacid were not important stimulation allelochemicals. The organic acid and other components in root secretion of larch and ash were analyzed by GC and GC-MS analysis. The sand culture tests were carried out with selected model compounds. The results showed that benzeneacetic acid, benzenepropionic acid and phenolic acids in root secretion of larch were the main stimulation allelochemicals.

  9. Mössbauer characterization of feed coal, ash and fly ash from a thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was apply 57Fe Transmission Mössbauer Spectroscopy at room temperature in order to study the occurrence of iron-containing mineral phases in: 1) feed coal; 2) coal ash, obtained in different stages of the ASTM D3174 standard method; and 3) fly ash, produced when coal is burned in the TERMOPAIPA IV thermal power plant localized in Boyacá, Colombia. According to obtained results, we can conclude the occurrence of pyrite and jarosite in the feed coal; Fe2+ and Fe3+ crystalline paramagnetic phases, superparamagnetic hematite and hematite in coal ash; Fe2+ and Fe3+ noncrystalline and crystalline phases, magnetite and hematite in fly ash. Precisely, for a basic understanding, this work discusses some the possible transformations that take place during coal combustion

  10. Climate change and the ash dieback crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goberville, Eric; Hautekèete, Nina-Coralie; Kirby, Richard R.; Piquot, Yves; Luczak, Christophe; Beaugrand, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Beyond the direct influence of climate change on species distribution and phenology, indirect effects may also arise from perturbations in species interactions. Infectious diseases are strong biotic forces that can precipitate population declines and lead to biodiversity loss. It has been shown in forest ecosystems worldwide that at least 10% of trees are vulnerable to extinction and pathogens are increasingly implicated. In Europe, the emerging ash dieback disease caused by the fungus Hymenoscyphus fraxineus, commonly called Chalara fraxinea, is causing a severe mortality of common ash trees (Fraxinus excelsior); this is raising concerns for the persistence of this widespread tree, which is both a key component of forest ecosystems and economically important for timber production. Here, we show how the pathogen and climate change may interact to affect the future spatial distribution of the common ash. Using two presence-only models, seven General Circulation Models and four emission scenarios, we show that climate change, by affecting the host and the pathogen separately, may uncouple their spatial distribution to create a mismatch in species interaction and so a lowering of disease transmission. Consequently, as climate change expands the ranges of both species polewards it may alleviate the ash dieback crisis in southern and occidental regions at the same time. PMID:27739483

  11. 1997 Arthur Ashe Jr. Sport Scholars Awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    Winners of the "Black Issues in Higher Education" Arthur Ashe Jr. 1997 athletes of the year, one male and one female, are profiled and Sport Scholars are listed for baseball, softball, basketball, fencing, archery, football, handball, soccer, field hockey, crew, swimming, gymnastics, tennis, squash, golf, volleyball, lacrosse, wrestling, water…

  12. Hydrothermal processing of new fly ash cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, W.; Roy, D.M. (Materials Research Lab., Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States))

    1992-04-01

    The recent Mount Pinatubo volcanic eruption in the Philippines, in which at least 268 people died, shows that volcanic eruptions can be highly destructive. The eruption shot ash and debris over the countryside; six towns near the volcano faced a high risk of devastating mudslides, and nearly 2000 U.S. service members and their families were evacuated from two nearby military bases. However, this paper reports that not all the consequences of volcanic eruptions are bad. Under hydrothermal conditions, volcanic ash can be transformed into zeolitic tuff and, eventually, into clay minerals that constitute agricultural soils. The Materials Research Laboratory (MRL) has recently used some artificial pozzolanas (fly ash) that when mixed with lime, under hydrothermal conditions, also produced a new type of cementitious material. This was categorized as a new fly ash cement. The formation of a new hydrothermally treated wood-fiber-reinforced composite has also been demonstrated. It is apparent, however, that with respect to concerns about detailed knowledge of the reactivity of calcium silicate-based materials under hydrothermal conditions, the application of the technology far outweighs the understanding of the underlying principles of reactivity. It would seem that an understanding of reactions on the molecular level is just beginning, and that work on hydrothermal reactions is still a potentially lucrative area of research.

  13. Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars Awards 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfman, Lois; Walker, Marlon A.

    2011-01-01

    "Diverse: Issues In Higher Education" established the Sports Scholars Awards to honor undergraduate students of color who have made achieving both academically and athletically a winning combination. Inspired by tennis legend Arthur Ashe Jr.'s commitment to education as well as his love for the game of tennis, "Diverse" invites every college and…

  14. Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholars Awards 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfman, Lois; Ford, William J.

    2010-01-01

    "Diverse: Issues In Higher Education" established the Sports Scholars Awards to honor undergraduate students of color who have made achieving both academically and athletically a winning combination. Inspired by tennis legend Arthur Ashe Jr.'s commitment to education as well as his love for the game of tennis, they invite every college and…

  15. Lignite and conditioned ash handling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibolini, P.; Di Giacomo, L.; Ruga, A.M. [Techint (Italy)

    2001-10-01

    This article discusses Techint's latest contract for the engineering and supply of a lignite and conditioned ash handling system. Techint Italimpianti, the materials handling unit of Techint Technologies has served the market for over 40 years as a leading supplier of a range of systems for the handling of iron ore, pellets, coal, cement, bauxite, and aluminium. 6 figs.

  16. Phosphorus recovery from sewage sludge char ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atienza-Martinez, M.; Gea, G.; Arauzo, J.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Kootstra, A.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorus was recovered from the ash obtained after combustion at different temperatures (600 °C, 750 °C and 900 °C) and after gasification (at 820 °C using a mixture of air and steam as fluidising agent) of char from sewage sludge fast pyrolysis carried out at 530 °C. Depending on the leaching con

  17. Characterizing uncertainty in the motion, future location and ash concentrations of volcanic plumes and ash clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webley, P.; Patra, A. K.; Bursik, M. I.; Pitman, E. B.; Dehn, J.; Singh, T.; Singla, P.; Stefanescu, E. R.; Madankan, R.; Pouget, S.; Jones, M.; Morton, D.; Pavolonis, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Forecasting the location and airborne concentrations of volcanic ash plumes and their dispersing clouds is complex and knowledge of the uncertainty in these forecasts is critical to assess and mitigate the hazards that could exist. We show the results from an interdisciplinary project that brings together scientists drawn from the atmospheric sciences, computer science, engineering, mathematics, and geology. The project provides a novel integration of computational and statistical modeling with a widely-used volcanic particle dispersion code, to provide quantitative measures of confidence in predictions of the motion of ash clouds caused by volcanic eruptions. We combine high performance computing and stochastic analysis, resulting in real time predictions of ash cloud motion that account for varying wind conditions and a range of model variables. We show how coupling a real-time model for ash dispersal, PUFF, with a volcanic eruption model, BENT, allows for the definition of the variability in the dispersal model inputs and hence classify the uncertainty that can then propagate for the ash cloud location and downwind concentrations. We additionally analyze the uncertainty in the numerical weather prediction forecast data used by the dispersal model by using ensemble forecasts and assess how this affects the downwind concentrations. These are all coupled together and by combining polynomical chaos quadrature with stochastic integration techniques, we provide a quantitative measure of the reliability (i.e. error) of those predictions. We show comparisons of the downwind height calculations and mass loadings with observations of ash clouds available from satellite remote sensing data. The aim is to provide a probabilistic forecast of location and ash concentration that can be generated in real-time and used by those end users in the operational ash cloud hazard assessment environment.

  18. A study on fiy ash: ballistic separation of a fly ash

    OpenAIRE

    Peris Mora, Eduardo; Payá, Jordi; Monzó, José

    1991-01-01

    The object of this study is the characterization of several sized fractions from a "spanish fly ash" originating in the thermoelectric power plant in Andorra (Teruel). Physical (size distributions, densities) chemical (chemical composition) and mineralogical characteristics (X-ray diffractograms and infrared spectra) for those sized fractions have been analyzed. Initial fly ash was ballistically separated (horizontal draft) into four fractions using an aerodynamic tunnel with hori...

  19. Effect of various sugar solution concentrations on characteristics of dried candy tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDWI MAHAJOENO

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Buntaran W, Astirin PA, Mahajoeno M. 2009. Effect of various sugar solution concentrations on characteristics of dried candy tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum. Nusantara Bioscience 2: 55-61. The aims of the research were to study the effects of sugar syrup concentration on dried candy tomato characteristics and to determine the proper sugar solution concentration that gives the best characteristics of dry candy tomatoes. The research used Randomized Block Design Method with four treatments and six times repetitions. The treatment that be used was immersing the tomato in sugar solution, with concentration of A (40%, B (50%, C (60%, and D (70% group in 18 hours. The variables measured were water content, ash, vitamin C and organoleptic tests include flavor, color, flavor and texture test. Data were analyzed using ANOVA test (Analysis of Variance followed by DMRT (Duncan Multiple Range Test. The result showed that sugar solution concentration had different effect on water content, ash content, vitamin C content, texture, and organoleptic test for colour, taste, and flavor of the dry candy tomato. The best characteristics of dry tomato candy was obtained on A (40% group, with water content of 24.20%, ash content of 0.62%, and vitamin C content of 31.15 mg/100 g. Standar quality of water content for dry fruit candy was maximal 25% (SII No.0718-2003 and maximal allowed ash content for food materials was 1.0% (SII 0272.90. Vitamin C content was not much decreased compared with ripe tomato i.e. 30-40 mg/100. Organoleptic tets result indicated that A (40% group get the highest score, i.e. 3,98 for taste, 3,89 for flavor, and 3,98 for colour.

  20. Application of polymeric flocculant for enhancing settling of the pond ash particles and water drainage from hydraulically stowed pond ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mishra Devi Prasad; Das Samir Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Delayed settling of the ash particles and poor drainage of water from the pond ash are the major problems faced during the hydraulic stowing of pond ash.In this study the effect of polymeric flocculant on settling of the ash particles and drainage of water during pond ash stowing are investigated.In addition,the parameters,viz.drainage and absorption of water during pond ash stowing are quantified by stowing a mine goaf model with pond ash slurries of five different concentrations added with and without flocculant.The study revealed that addition of only 5 × 10-6 of Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose (Na-CMC)flocculant with the pond ash slurries during stowing offers best result in terms of quicker settling of the ash particles and enhanced water drainage from the hydraulically stowed pond ash.Besides,it resulted in drainage of more than 85% of the total water used in the initial 45 min of stowing.The improvement in drainage is caused due to coagulation and flocculation of the pond ash particles because of charge neutralization and particle-particle bridging.This study may provide a basis for estimating the drainage and absorption of water during the real pond ash stowing operation in underground mines.

  1. The adsorption of HCl on volcanic ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Xochilt; Schiavi, Federica; Keppler, Hans

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the interaction between volcanic gases and ash is important to derive gas compositions from ash leachates and to constrain the environmental impact of eruptions. Volcanic HCl could potentially damage the ozone layer, but it is unclear what fraction of HCl actually reaches the stratosphere. The adsorption of HCl on volcanic ash was therefore studied from -76 to +150 °C to simulate the behavior of HCl in the dilute parts of a volcanic plume. Finely ground synthetic glasses of andesitic, dacitic, and rhyolitic composition as well as a natural obsidian from Vulcano (Italy) served as proxies for fresh natural ash. HCl adsorption is an irreversible process and appears to increase with the total alkali content of the glass. Adsorption kinetics follow a first order law with rate constants of 2.13 ṡ10-6 s-1 to 1.80 ṡ10-4 s-1 in the temperature range investigated. For dacitic composition, the temperature and pressure dependence of adsorption can be described by the equation ln ⁡ c = 1.26 + 0.27 ln ⁡ p - 715.3 / T, where c is the surface concentration of adsorbed HCl in mg/m2, T is temperature in Kelvin, and p is the partial pressure of HCl in mbar. A comparison of this model with a large data set for the composition of volcanic ash suggests that adsorption of HCl from the gas phase at relatively low temperatures can quantitatively account for the majority of the observed Cl concentrations. The model implies that adsorption of HCl on ash increases with temperature, probably because of the increasing number of accessible adsorption sites. This temperature dependence is opposite to that observed for SO2, so that HCl and SO2 are fractionated by the adsorption process and the fractionation factor changes by four orders of magnitude over a temperature range of 250 K. The assumption of equal adsorption of different species is therefore not appropriate for deriving volcanic gas compositions from analyses of adsorbates on ash. However, with the experimental

  2. Ash3d: A finite-volume, conservative numerical model for ash transport and tephra deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaiger, Hans F.; Denlinger, Roger P.; Mastin, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    We develop a transient, 3-D Eulerian model (Ash3d) to predict airborne volcanic ash concentration and tephra deposition during volcanic eruptions. This model simulates downwind advection, turbulent diffusion, and settling of ash injected into the atmosphere by a volcanic eruption column. Ash advection is calculated using time-varying pre-existing wind data and a robust, high-order, finite-volume method. Our routine is mass-conservative and uses the coordinate system of the wind data, either a Cartesian system local to the volcano or a global spherical system for the Earth. Volcanic ash is specified with an arbitrary number of grain sizes, which affects the fall velocity, distribution and duration of transport. Above the source volcano, the vertical mass distribution with elevation is calculated using a Suzuki distribution for a given plume height, eruptive volume, and eruption duration. Multiple eruptions separated in time may be included in a single simulation. We test the model using analytical solutions for transport. Comparisons of the predicted and observed ash distributions for the 18 August 1992 eruption of Mt. Spurr in Alaska demonstrate to the efficacy and efficiency of the routine.

  3. Hot-Gas Filter Ash Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dockter, B.A.; Hurley, J.P.; Watne, T.A.; Katrinak, K.A.; O`Keefe, C.A. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Minerals Research Center

    1996-12-31

    Large-scale hot-gas testing over the past several years has revealed numerous cases of cake buildup on filter elements that have been difficult, if not impossible to remove. At times, the cake can bridge between candle filters, leading to high filter failure rates. Physical factors, including particle-size distribution, particle shape, the aerodynamics of deposition, and system temperature contribute to difficulty in removing the cake. It is speculated that chemical as well as physical effects are playing a role in leading the ash to bond to the filter or to itself. The Energy and Environmental research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota is working with Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and a consortium of companies in partnership with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform the research necessary to determine the factors that cause hot-gas cleanup filters to be blinded by ash or to develop deposits that can bridge the filters and cause them to fail. The objectives of this overall project are threefold: first, to determine the mechanisms by which difficult-to-clean ash is formed; second, to develop a method to determine the rate of blinding/bridging based on fuel and sorbent properties and operating conditions; finally, to provide suggestions fro ways to prevent filter blinding by the troublesome ash. The projects consists of four tasks: field sampling and archive sample analyses, laboratory-scale testing, bench-scale testing, and model and database development testing. This paper present preliminary data from Task 2 on determining the tensile strengths of coal ash particles at elevated temperatures and simulated combustor gas conditions.

  4. Plutonium dissolution from Rocky Flats Plant incinerator ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) soon will commence recovery of plutonium from Rocky Flats Plant incinerator ash. In preparation for this processing, Rockwell undertook literature and laboratory studies to identify, select and optimize plutonium dissolution methods for treating the ash. Ash reburning, followed by dissolution in nitric acid containing calcium fluoride, was selected as the processing method for the ash. Recommended values of process parameters were identified. Using the selected process, 99.5% plutonium recovery was achieved, leaving about 12.7 wt % heel residue for an equal weight composite of the three ashes tested. 15 refs., 26 figs

  5. Analysis list: ash2 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ash2 Larvae + dm3 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/ash2.1.tsv ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/ash2.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/ash...2.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/ash2.Larvae.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Larvae.gml ...

  6. Analysis list: ash1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ash1 Cell line + dm3 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/ash1.1.t...sv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/ash1.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/target/ash...1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/ash1.Cell_line.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/colo/Cell_line.gml ...

  7. Analysis list: Ash2l [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Ash2l Blood + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Ash2l.1.tsv... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Ash2l.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Ash...2l.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Ash2l.Blood.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Blood.gml ...

  8. Drying grain using a hydrothermally treated liquid lignite fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bukurov, Z.; Cvijanovic, P.; Bukurov, M. [Univ. of Novi Sad (Yugoslavia); Ljubicic, B.R. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1995-12-01

    A shortage of domestic oil and natural gas resources in Yugoslavia, particularly for agricultural and industrial purposes, has motivated the authors to explore the possibility of using liquid lignite as an alternate fuel for drying grain. This paper presents a technical and economic assessment of the possibility of retrofitting grain-drying plants currently fueled by oil or natural gas to liquid lignite fuel. All estimates are based on lignite taken from the Kovin deposit. Proposed technology includes underwater mining techniques, aqueous ash removal, hydrothermal processing, solids concentration, pipeline transport up to 120 km, and liquid lignite direct combustion. For the characterization of Kovin lignite, standard ASTM procedures were used: proximate, ultimate, ash, heating value, and Theological analyses were performed. Results from an extensive economic analysis indicate a delivered cost of US$20/ton for the liquid lignite. For the 70 of the grain-drying plants in the province of Vojvodina, this would mean a total yearly saving of about US $2,500,000. The advantages of this concept are obvious: easy to transport and store, nonflammable, nonexplosive, nontoxic, 30%-40% cheaper than imported oil and gas, domestic fuel is at hand. The authors believe that liquid lignite, rather than an alternative, is becoming more and more an imperative.

  9. The Effect of Fly Ash Qualify on the Properties of Concrete%粉煤灰品质对混凝土性能影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晖; 孙伟; 高波; 刘冠国

    2012-01-01

    The effect of high and low lime fly ash on the fluidity,compressive strength and long-term properties(carbonation,chloride ion diffusion coefficient,drying-wetting cycles)of concrete was studied. The test results showed that concrete with high and low lime fly ash have same slump of concrete, concrete with high lime fly ash has a higher compressive strength than that of low lime fly ash at the same curing period, the high and low lime fly ash have also effect on the carbonation depths, chloride ion diffusion coefficient and the damage under drying-wetting cycles of concrete, concrete with low lime fly ash has a higher carbonation depth than that of high lime fly ash, the high and low lime fly ash have not effect on chloride ion diffusion coefficient of concrete, the effect of high and low lime fly ash on deteriorate properties of concrete under drying-wetting cycles was studied, the parameter was the weight lost, the relative compressive strength and the relative dynamic of elasticity, the result indicates that concrete with low lime fly ash has a larger the relative compressive strength, relative dynamic of elasticity than concrete with high lime fly ash at the initial stage of drying-wetting cycle, the deteriorate degree of concrete with high lime fly ash is less than concrete with low lime fly ash after 30 days of dry-wet cycle.%研究掺低钙、高钙粉煤灰对结构混凝土坍落度、抗压强度、混凝土碳化、氯离子扩散系数、干湿循环破坏等性能的影响.研究表明低钙、高钙粉煤灰对混凝土坍落度没有影响,在相同的养护龄期里掺高钙粉煤灰的混凝土抗压强度大于低钙粉煤灰混凝土.掺加低钙、高钙粉煤灰对混凝土碳化、氯离子扩散系数、干湿循环破坏有影响,掺加低钙粉煤灰混凝土具有比掺高钙粉煤灰混凝土更大碳化深度,掺低钙、高钙粉煤灰对混凝土氯离子扩散系数影响不明显,在于湿循环初始阶段掺低钙粉煤灰混凝

  10. Life cycle adaption of biofuel ashes. Evaluation of new techniques for pelletizing of biofuel ashes, especially regarding operational properties and environmental effects in the forest after ash recycling. Stage 1; Kretsloppsanpassning av bioaskor. Utvaerdering av ny teknik foer pelletering av bioaska med avseende paa dels driftsegenskaper, dels miljoeeffekter i skogen av askaaterfoering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevgren, Linnea [Stora Enso Environment, Falun (Sweden); Lundmark, Jan-Erik; Jansson, Charlotta [AssiDomaen AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2000-11-01

    whole, a greater acid neutralisation capacity. Wood ash differs from lime in that it contains a substantial amount of nutrient elements essential for the forest. The acid neutralisation capacity of the roll pelleted ash was still the same after 100 days of laboratory leaching. The acid neutralisation capacity of self-hardened and crushed ashes usually ceases already after 30 days. It is likely that a well-hardened roll pelleted ash product can, without any great risk of serious damage to ground vegetation, be recycled to the forest during the clearcut stage as a compensation fertiliser following biofuel harvesting. Neither increased nitrification nor leaching of nitrate from soil water is likely to occur. Potassium is considered to be an element that is easily leached from ash. In our laboratory leaching study, on the other hand, as much as 61 % of the original potassium content was still present in the roll pelleted ash after 100 days. The roll pelleting machine has been running a little more than six months at the two mills. In total 1500 tonnes of pellets have been produced. The main part is pellets solely from ash, however, mixtures of ash and lime sludge and ash and green liquor sludge, respectively, have also been pelleted. Our experiences of the roll pelleting machine are very good. The ash products seem well suited to recycling back to the forest. The machine has a production capacity of five tonnes per hour, indicating a production capacity of 10,000 tonnes per year. The running costs, including costs for personnel, spare parts and internal transports, amounted to 87 SEK per tonne of dry ash (i.e. 61 SEK per tonne of ash with 30 % water content) during the long term test. These are low costs compared to other agglomeration techniques. The roll pelleting technique has worked very well on a large scale without any further technical development. As this machine was the first of its kind some adjustments and minor changes were made in the machine and container

  11. Reducing the environmental impact of Baltic Power Plant ash fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ash fields of Estonian oil-shale-fired power plants, especially ash hydrotransport system with its large amounts of high-alkaline waters, may cause great damage to the environment. The situation is particularly bad at the Baltic Power Plant whose ash fields and sediment ponds occupy more than ten square kilometers. The samples taken from the 2nd ash field were studied to determine their structure, pressure resistance and water filtration ability. Ash field material has a stratified structure, all layers contain Ca(OH)2 which, contacting with water, makes the latter highly alkaline. According to preliminary calculations, the ash field material binds only 10-20 % of CO2 emitted at oil shale burning. Disconnection of the 2nd ash field from the ash field water-sluicing system would be the first and most practical way to reduce the amount of water to be added to the water system of ash fields. Ca(OH)2 content of ash field material must be considered when making the projects for the 2nd ash field recultivation. (author)

  12. Experimental study on fly ash capture mercury in flue gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mercedes; DíAZ-SOMOANO; Patricia; ABAD-VALLE; M.Rosa; MARTíNEZ-TARAZONA

    2010-01-01

    Systematic experiments were conducted on a fixed-bed reactor to investigate the interaction between fly ash and mercury,the results implied that fly ash can capture mercury effectively.Among different fly ashes,the unburned carbon in the FA2 and FA3 fly ashes has the highest mercury capture capacity,up to 10.3 and 9.36 μg/g,respectively,which is close to that of commercial activated carbon.There is no obvious relationship between mercury content and carbon content or BET surface area of fly ash.Petrography classification standard was applied to distinguish fly ash carbon particles.Carbon content is not the only variable that controls mercury capture on fly ash,there are likely significant differences in the mercury capture capacities of the various carbon forms.Mercury capture capacity mainly depends on the content of anisotropy carbon particles with porous network structure.

  13. Chemical composition in relation with biomass ash structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubcik, Michal; Jandacka, Jozef

    2014-08-01

    Biomass combustion can be more complicated like combustion of fossil fuels because it is necessary to solve problems with lower ash melting temperature. It can cause a lot of problems during combustion process. Chemical composition of biomass ash has great impact on sinters and slags creation in ash because it affects structure of heated ash. In this paper was solved relation between chemical composition and structure of heated ash from three types of biomass (spruce wood, miscanthus giganteus and wheat straw). Amount of SiO2, CaO, MgO, Al2O3 and K2O was determined. Structure of heated ash was optically determined after heating to 1000 °C or 1200 °C. Results demonstrated that chemical composition has strong effect on structure and color of heated ash.

  14. Possibilities of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash utilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Silvie; Koval, Lukáš; Škrobánková, Hana; Matýsek, Dalibor; Winter, Franz; Purgar, Amon

    2015-08-01

    Properties of the waste treatment residual fly ash generated from municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash were investigated in this study. Six different mortar blends with the addition of the municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash were evaluated. The Portland cement replacement levels of the municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash used were 25%, 30% and 50%. Both, raw and washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash samples were examined. According to the mineralogical composition measurements, a 22.6% increase in the pozzolanic/hydraulic properties was observed for the washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash sample. The maximum replacement level of 25% for the washed municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash in mortar blends was established in order to preserve the compressive strength properties. Moreover, the leaching characteristics of the crushed mortar blend was analysed in order to examine the immobilisation of its hazardous contents. PMID:26060198

  15. Growth of Larval Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and Fitness of Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in Blue Ash (Fraxinus quadrangulata) and Green Ash (F. pennsylvanica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Donnie L; Duan, Jian J; Yaninek, J S; Ginzel, Matthew D; Sadof, Clifford S

    2015-12-01

    Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is an invasive primary pest of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. Blue ash (F. quadrangulata) is less susceptible to emerald ash borer infestations in the forest than other species of North American ash. Whereas other studies have examined adult host preferences, we compared the capacity of emerald ash borer larvae reared from emerald ash borer eggs in the field and in the laboratory to survive and grow in blue ash and the more susceptible green ash (F. pennsylvanica). Emerald ash borer larval survivorship was the same on both ash species. Mortality due to wound periderm formation was only observed in living field grown trees, but was low (emerald ash borer. Larvae reared from eggs on blue ash were smaller than on green ash growing in the field and also in bolts that were infested under laboratory conditions. In a laboratory study, parasitism rates of confined Tetrastichus planipennisi were similar on emerald ash borer larvae reared in blue and green ash bolts, as were fitness measures of the parasitoid including brood size, sex ratio, and adult female size. Thus, we postulate that emerald ash borer larvae infesting blue ash could support populations of T. planipennisi and serve as a potential reservoir for this introduced natural enemy after most of the other native ash trees have been killed. PMID:26314024

  16. Properties of pears dried with different drying processes.

    OpenAIRE

    Guiné, Raquel; Barroca, Maria João; Lopes, Paulo; Silva, Vitor; Lima, Maria João; Ferreira, Dulcineia

    2010-01-01

    Pears of S. Bartolomeu variety have been used over the years in Portugal to produce a traditional dried pear using the cheapest practice with environmental friendly characteristics: open-sun drying. However, the obvious disadvantages concerning the drying efficiency and safety of the dried product have been an incentive to design or improve solar drying methods as an alternative to the traditional one. The present work has tested three types of drying processes...

  17. Sorption of aqueous phosphorus onto bituminous and lignitous coal ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Jinying; Kirk, Donald W. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada); Jia, Charles Q. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada)], E-mail: cqjia@chem-eng.toronto.edu; Liu Xinan [College of Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing (China)

    2007-09-05

    Aiming at the development of a phosphorus removal technology for waste water, phosphate (PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}) retention behavior of bituminous and lignitous coal ashes was investigated using a batch reactor. Ash samples, including fresh and weathered fly and bottom ashes, were studied for their sorption isotherms and reversibility. Fly ashes had a much higher phosphate retention capacity (4000-30,000 mg P/kg) than bottom ashes (15-600 mg P/kg). Lignitous coal ashes were more capable of retaining phosphate than bituminous coal ashes. The retention process was largely irreversible, and the irreversibility increased with the increase in the retention capacity. Weathering enlarged the retention capacity of the bituminous bottom ash, but substantially lowered that of the fly ash, likely due to the difference in the weather-induced changes between the fly and bottom ashes. Sorption isotherms of fly ashes were found to be adequately represented by the Langmuir model while those of bottom ashes fitted better to the Freundlich model. Concentrations of Ca{sup 2+} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} in the aqueous phase were measured at the end of sorption and desorption experiments, and were compared with solubilities of three calcium phosphate minerals. The aqueous solutions were saturated or super-saturated with respect to tricalcium phosphate (Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}) and hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}OH), and slightly under-saturated with respect to amorphous calcium phosphate. It is concluded that precipitation of calcium phosphate is the predominant mechanism for phosphate retention by coal ash under the conditions studied. There is a strong and positive correlation between alkalinity and phosphate sorption capacity. Consequently, acid neutralization capacity (ANC) can be used as an indicator of phosphate sorption capacity of coal ashes.

  18. Application of paste technology to mitigate the dust emissions from handling of fly and bottom ash at coal fired power plant : CGTEE in Candiota, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Marques, M.E. [Golder Associates Peru, Lima (Peru); Lima, H. [Golder Associates Brazil, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Mandl, B.; Francoeur, R.; Palkovits, F. [Golder Paste Technology Ltd., Mississauga, ON (Canada); Blois, R. [Companhia de Geracao Termica de Energia Electrica, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed a method developed to reduce dust emissions generated in a fly ash handling procedure used at a thermal power plant located in the south of Brazil. The fly ash is collected in dry form at several locations in the plant and pneumatically conveyed to storage silos, where it is moistened with water in a mixer, loaded into dump trucks and deposited in a disposal area near a surface coal mine. The new solution created low density fly ash slurry in localized mixing tanks within the power plant. The low density slurry is pumped to an ash conditioning plant where the slurry is then mixed with the bottom ash, dewatered, and densified. The densified slurry is then pumped to an adjacent coal mine disposal site in order to be used as backfill in mined areas. The proposed method will significantly reduce dust emissions both inside and outside the plant, and will substantially reduce truck traffic at the mine. The method will reduce the environmental impacts associated with fly ash dust emissions in the region. 8 figs.

  19. Degradation rate of sludge/fly ash mixture used as landfill liner; Nedbrytningshastigheten foer taetskikt uppbyggda av slam och aska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, Karin; Berg, Magnus [AaF-Process AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Svensson, Malin; Ecke, Holger [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    In order to be able to use mixtures of ash and sludge as landfill liner an important aspect is to demonstrate that the degradation of organic matter is slow enough. Therefore, the goal of this project has been to find out for how long a landfill liner material of sludge and ash will be stable and keep its function. The degradation of organic material in two different mixtures of sludge and ash has been studied in laboratory experiments. The rate of degradation was then estimated for barriers of sludge and ash, taking into account construction techniques (mixture, compaction, water content), climate conditions (freezing, drying) and biological processes (NaN{sub 3} additive). The effect of the degradation on the permeability has also been quantified. Organic material may disappear for the landfill liner material through 1) initial leaching of soluble organic material, 2) leaching of organic material after chemical reactions or 3) evaporation during biological degradation. Bacterial activity was not found in the sludge/ash mixtures during the experiments. Therefore, the organic material is probably reduced mainly though leaching according to 1) and 2). The leached amount of TOC (total organic carbon) was measured for all samples of sludge/ash in several experimental cycles. The leached amount of TOC was compared to the initial amount of TOC in the material. The results show a small initial reduction of organic material through leaching but the TOC content in the material is then stabilized. In relation to the total weight of the material the leaching of TOC was similar for the mixtures with 80 % ash and 20 % ash. However, this means that a larger amount of TOC was leached out from the mixtures with a high ash content since the initial amount of organic material was smaller. General conclusions about which ash-sludge ratio that is suitable for a landfill liner material could not be drawn from the experiments from a degradation point of view. If the initial

  20. Dry electrodes for electrocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patient biopotentials are usually measured with conventional disposable Ag/AgCl electrodes. These electrodes provide excellent signal quality but are irritating for long-term use. Skin preparation is usually required prior to the application of electrodes such as shaving and cleansing with alcohol. To overcome these difficulties, researchers and caregivers seek alternative electrodes that would be acceptable in clinical and research environments. Dry electrodes that operate without gel, adhesive or even skin preparation have been studied for many decades. They are used in research applications, but they have yet to achieve acceptance for medical use. So far, a complete comparison and evaluation of dry electrodes is not well described in the literature. This work compares dry electrodes for biomedical use and physiological research, and reviews some novel systems developed for cardiac monitoring. Lastly, the paper provides suggestions to develop a dry-electrode-based system for mobile and long-term cardiac monitoring applications. (topical review)

  1. Dry eye syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... workplace (wind, air conditioning) Sun exposure Smoking or second-hand smoke exposure Cold or allergy medicines Dry eye ... helpful steps include: DO NOT smoke and avoid second-hand smoke, direct wind, and air conditioning. Use a ...

  2. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy Policy Related The link between seasonal allergens and dry ... Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media Ophthalmology ...

  3. Dry Skin Relief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases Cosmetic treatments Dry / sweaty skin Eczema / dermatitis Hair and scalp ...

  4. Dry Mouth (Xerostomia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... teeth from decay It prevents infection by controlling bacteria and fungi in the mouth It makes it ... drinks often. Avoid drinks with caffeine, such as coffee, tea, and some sodas. Caffeine can dry out ...

  5. Freeze drying apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppa, Nicholas V.; Stewart, Paul; Renzi, Ernesto

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  6. Freeze drying method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppa, Nicholas V.; Stewart, Paul; Renzi, Ernesto

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  7. Effects of nano-SiO(2) and different ash particle sizes on sludge ash-cement mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, K L; Chang, W C; Lin, D F; Luo, H L; Tsai, M C

    2008-09-01

    The effects of nano-SiO(2) on three ash particle sizes in mortar were studied by replacing a portion of the cement with incinerated sewage sludge ash. Results indicate that the amount of water needed at standard consistency increased as more nano-SiO(2) was added. Moreover, a reduction in setting time became noticeable for smaller ash particle sizes. The compressive strength of the ash-cement mortar increased as more nano-SiO(2) was added. Additionally, with 2% nano-SiO(2) added and a cure length of 7 days, the compressive strength of the ash-cement mortar with 1 microm ash particle size was about 1.5 times better that of 75microm particle size. Further, nano-SiO(2) functioned to fill pores for ash-cement mortar with different ash particle sizes. However, the effects of this pore-filling varied with ash particle size. Higher amounts of nano-SiO(2) better influenced the ash-cement mortar with larger ash particle sizes.

  8. On the impact of additional spectral bands usage on RST-ASH performance in volcanic ash plume detected from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconieri, Alfredo; Filizzola, Carolina; Marchese, Francesco; Pergola, Nicola; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    RST-ASH is an algorithm developed for detecting and tracking volcanic ash clouds from space based on the Robust Satellite Technique (RST) multi-temporal approach. For the identification of ash affected areas RST-ASH uses two local variation indexes in combination. They analyse the Brightness Temperature Differences (BTD) of the signal measured at 11 μm and 12 μm and at around 3.5 and 11 μm wavelengths to detect ash in both nighttime and daytime conditions. RST-ASH was tested on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and on Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) records and was then implemented on Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) for studying and monitoring eruptions of different volcanoes. In this study, some experimental configurations of RST-ASH, analyzing signal also in other spectral bands (e.g. VIS, SO2) will be tested and assessed, studying recent ash plumes (e.g. Etna, Eyjafjallajökull, Grímsvötn) affecting different geographic areas. Results achieved using both polar and geostationary satellite data will be evaluated even for comparison with other state of the art methods. The work shows that when the extended spectral capabilities offered by high temporal resolution satellites are exploited an improvement of RST-ASH performance in some observational and plume conditions is achievable, making RST-ASH still more suited for identifying and monitoring ash clouds in the framework of possible operational scenarios.

  9. Norm in coal, fly ash and cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal is technologically important materials being used for power generation and its cinder (fly ash) is used in manufacturing of bricks, sheets, cement, land filling etc. 222Rn (radon) and its daughters are the most important radioactive and potentially hazardous elements, which are released in the environment from the naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) present in coal, fly ash and cement. Thus it is very important to carry out radioactivity measurements in coal, fly ash and cement from the health and hygiene point of view. Samples of coal and fly ash from different thermal power stations in northern India and various fly ash using establishments and commercially available cement samples (O.P.C. and P.P.C.) were collected and analyzed for radon concentration and exhalation rates. For the measurements, alpha sensitive LR-115 type II plastic track detectors were used. The radon concentration varied from 147 Bq/m3 to 443 Bq/m3, the radium concentration varied from 1.5 to 4.5 Bq/kg and radon exhalation rate varied from 11.8 mBq.kg-1.h-1 to 35.7 mBq.kg-1.h-1 for mass exhalation rate and from 104.5 mBq.m-2.h-1 to 314.8 mBq.m-2.h-1 for surface exhalation rate in coal samples. The radon concentration varied from 214 Bq/m3 to 590 Bq/m3, the radium concentration varied from 1.0 to 2.7 Bq/kg and radon exhalation rate varied from 7.8 mBq.kg-1.h-1 to 21.6 mBq.kg-1.h-1 for mass exhalation rate and from 138 mBq m-2h-1 to 380.6 mBq.m-2.h-1 for surface exhalation rate in fly ash samples. The radon concentration varied from 157.62 Bq/m3 to 1810.48 Bq/m3, the radium concentration varied from 0.76 Bq/kg to 8.73 Bq/kg and radon exhalation rate varied from 6.07 mBq.kg-1.hr-1 to 69.81 mBq.kg-1.hr-1 for mass exhalation rate and from 107.10 mBq.m-2.hr-1 to 1230.21 mBq.m-2.hr-1 for surface exhalation rate in different cement samples. The values were found higher in P.P.C. samples than in O.P.C. samples. (authors)

  10. Drying of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Geiker, Mette Rica; Nygaard, Peter Vagn;

    2002-01-01

    Estimated and measured relative humidity (RH) change during drying are compared for two concretes, 1: w/c=0.46 and 2: w/(c+0.5fa+2sf)=0.50. The estimations were undertaken by means of the Swedish program TorkaS 1.0. Measurements were performed by RH-sensors type Humi-Guard. Drying of 150 mm thick...

  11. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from different fly ashes. Influence of heavy metal speciation in the ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne

    2003-01-01

    Electrodialytic Remediation has recently been suggested as a potential method for removal of heavy metals from fly ashes. In this work electrodialytic remediation of three different fly ashes, i.e. two municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) fly ashes and one wood combustion fly ash was studied...... in lab scale, and the results were discussed in relation to the expected heavy metal speciation in the ashes. In initial leaching experiments the pH-dependent desorption characteristics of the heavy metals Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu were analogous in the two MSWI ashes, and thus it was expected...... that the speciation of these metals was similar in the two ashes. On the other hand, the leaching behaviour (and concentration) of Cr was diverse. The apparent similar speciation of Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu was only partly confirmed in the following electrodialytic remediation experiments. Significant differences in re-moval...

  12. Using cement, lignite fly ash and baghouse filter waste for solidification of chromium electroplating treatment sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wantawin, C.

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to use baghouse filter waste as a binder mixed with cement and lignite fly ash to solidify sludge from chromium electroplating wastewater treatment. To save cost of solidification, reducing cement in binder and increasing sludge in the cube were focused on. Minimum percent cement in binder of 20 for solidification of chromium sludge was found when controlling lignite fly ash to baghouse filter waste at the ratio of 30:70, sludge to binder ratio of 0.5, water to mixer ratio of 0.3 and curing time of 7 days. Increase of sludge to binder ratio from 0.5 to 0.75 and 1 resulted in increase in the minimum percent cement in binder up to 30 percent in both ratios. With the minimum percent cement in binder, the calculated cement to sludge ratios for samples with sludge to binder ratios of 0.5, 0.75 and 1 were 0.4, 0.4 and 0.3 respectively. Leaching chromium and compressive strength of the samples with these ratios could achieve the solidified waste standard by the Ministry of Industry. For solidification of chromium sludge at sludge to binder ratio of 1, the lowest cost binder ratio of cement to lignite fly ash and baghouse filter waste in this study was 30:21:49. The cost of binder in this ratio was 718 baht per ton dry sludge.

  13. Phosphorus leaching from soils amended with thermally gasified piggery waste ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuligowski, Ksawery; Poulsen, Tjalfe

    2009-01-01

    In regions with intensive livestock farming, thermal treatment for local energy extraction from the manure and export of the P rich ash as a fertilizer has gained interest. One of the main risks associated with P fertilizers is eutrophication of water bodies. In this study P and K mobility in ash...... from anaerobically digested, thermally gasified (GA) and incinerated (IA) piggery waste has been tested using water loads ranging from 0.1 to 200 ml g−1. Leaching of P from soil columns amended with GA was investigated for one P application rate (205 kg P ha−1 corresponding to 91 mg P kg−1 soil dry...... matter) as a function of precipitation rate (9.5 and 2.5 mm h−1), soil type (Jyndevad agricultural soil and sand), amount of time elapsed between ash amendment and onset of precipitation (0 and 5 weeks) and compared to leaching from soils amended with a commercial fertilizer (Na2HPO4). Water soluble P...

  14. Electro-dry-adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahn, Jeffrey; Menon, Carlo

    2012-03-27

    This work presents novel conductive bioinspired dry adhesives with mushroom caps that enable the use of a synergistic combination of electrostatic and van der Waals forces (electro-dry-adhesion). An increase in shear adhesion bond strength of up to 2046% on a wide range of materials is measured when a maximum electrical field of 36.4 V μm(-1) is applied. A suction effect, due to the shape of the dry adhesive fibers, on overall adhesion was not noted for electro-dry-adhesives when testing was performed at both atmospheric and reduced pressure. Utilization of electrostatics to apply a preloading force to dry adhesive fiber arrays allows increased adhesion even after electrostatic force generation has been halted by ensuring the close contact necessary for van der Waals forces to be effective. A comparison is made between self-preloading of the electro-dry-adhesives and the direct application of a normal preloading pressure resulting in nearly the same shear bond strength with an applied voltage of 3.33 kV on the same sample.

  15. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and metals in ashes released from a forest fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, I.; Abrantes, N.; Pereira, P.; Vale, C.; Ferreira, A.; Keizer, J. J.

    2012-04-01

    Wildfires have become a permanent source of environmental and societal concerns. Whilst the impacts of wildfire on hydrological and erosion processes are well documented, the stocks and export of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals have received considerably less research attention. The ashes produced by wildfires, which include polluting substances such as PAHs and metals, are subject to transport processes by wind and especially by overland flow and water infiltrating into the soil and possibly reaching ground water bodies. In the framework of the FIRECNUTS project, we are studying the stocks of PAHs and selected metals in recently burnt forest stands in north-central Portugal, and their subsequent export by overland flow. The present work, however, will focus on the stocks in the ashes, both immediately after wildfire and three months later. These ashes were collected at two burnt slopes with contrasting forest types, i.e. a eucalypt and a maritime pine stand, the two pre-dominant forest types in the study region. The sixteen PAHs identified by US EPA as priority contaminants were analysed by gas chromatograph, after extraction and column clean up. The contents of vanadium (V), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) were analysed by inductively coupled plasma- mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), after an acid digestion, while mercury (Hg) was analysed by pyrolysis atomic absorption spectrometry with gold amalgamation. The total concentration of PAHs immediately after the wildfire ranged from 314 ng/g dry weight in the maritime pine stand to 597 ng/g dry weight in the eucalypt stand. Three months later, the total concentration has decreased with 33% in the pine stand but only half (16%) in the eucalypt stand. The composition the PAHs by ring size was dominated by three-rings PAHs. This was true for all samples. The concentrations of various metals differed for the two sampling

  16. Fabrication of Test Tubes for Coal Ash Corrosion Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.; Judkins, R.R.; Sikka, V.K.; Swindeman, R.W.; Wright, I.G.

    1999-05-11

    This paper deals with the fabrication of tube sections of four alloys for incorporating into test sections to be assembled by Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) for installation at Ohio Edison Power, Niles Plant. The primary purpose of the installation was to determine the corrosion behavior of ten different alloys for flue gas corrosion. Ohio Edison Power, Niles Plant is burning an Ohio coal containing approximately 3.4% S (dry basis) and approximately 0.4% alkali which causes chronic coal ash corrosion of the unit�s superheater tubing. The 2.5-in.-OD x 0.4in.-wall x 6-in-long sections of four alloys {type 304H coated with Fe3Al alloy FAS [developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)], 310 + Ta, modified 800H, and Thermie alloy} were fabricated at ORNL. Each alloy tubing was characterized in terms of chemical analysis and microstructure. The machined tubes of each of the alloys were inspected and shipped on time for incorporation into the test loop fabricated at B&W. Among the alloys fabricated, Thermie was the hardest to extrude and machine.

  17. Production of ceramics from coal fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angjusheva Biljana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dense ceramics are produced from fly ash from REK Bitola, Republic of Macedonia. Four types of fly ash from electro filters and one from the collected zone with particles < 0.063 mm were the subject of this research. Consolidation was achieved by pressing (P= 133 MPa and sintering (950, 1000, 1050 and 11000C and heating rates of 3 and 100/min. Densification was realized by liquid phase sintering and solid state reaction where diopside [Ca(Mg,Al(Si,Al2O6] was formed. Ceramics with optimal properties (porosity 2.96±0.5%, bending strength - 47.01±2 MPa, compressive strength - 170 ±5 MPa was produced at 1100ºC using the heating rate of 10ºC/min.

  18. Impact of Wood Species, Dimensions and Drying Temperature on Sorption Behaviour of Wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darius Albrektas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This research paper examines the interdependence between wood sorption properties and its dimensions, species and drying temperature. The research was carried out on specimens of six species of wood (oak, ash, aspen, birch, spruce and pine which had different dimensions and were dried at temperatures ranging between 30 and 90 °C. Subsequently specimens underwent the moistening and air drying process, and the following parameters were recorded: moistening and drying rate, moisture content distribution, steady moisture content and sorption hysteresis. It was established that sorption hysteresis was most affected by the cross section dimensions of the specimen. It was determined that, when the thickness of wood specimens increases from 7 to 30 mm, sorption hysteresis grows up to 8 times. The steady moisture content depends on the density, measurements and drying temperature of the specimen.

  19. Application of solid ash based catalysts in heterogeneous catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaobin

    2008-10-01

    Solid wastes, fly ash, and bottom ash are generated from coal and biomass combustion. Fly ash is mainly composed of various metal oxides and possesses higher thermal stability. Utilization of fly ash for other industrial applications provides a cost-effective and environmentally friendly way of recycling this solid waste, significantly reducing its environmental effects. On the one hand, due to the higher stability of its major component, aluminosilicates, fly ash could be employed as catalyst support by impregnation of other active components for various reactions. On the other hand, other chemical compounds in fly ash such as Fe2O3 could also provide an active component making fly ash a catalyst for some reactions. In this paper, physicochemical properties of fly ash and its applications for heterogeneous catalysis as a catalyst support or catalyst in a variety of catalytic reactions were reviewed. Fly-ash-supported catalysts have shown good catalytic activities for H2 production, deSO(x), deNO(x), hydrocarbon oxidation,and hydrocracking, which are comparable to commercially used catalysts. As a catalyst itself, fly ash can also be effective for gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, aqueous-phase oxidation of organics, solid plastic pyrolysis, and solvent-free organic synthesis. PMID:18939526

  20. Fundamental study of low-NOx combustion fly ash utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over fifty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives

  1. Chemical composition of ash in coal and coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluzhnikov, A.I.; Tsymbal, G.L.

    1983-05-01

    Ash content in coke influences coke consumption rate by blast furnaces. In the Karaganda steelworks a 1% ash content decrease in coke reduces coke consumption by a blast furnace by 1 to 1.6%. Ash content in coke depends on ash content in a coal mixture and ash content in a coal mixture depends on ash content and washability of coal components. Not all ash components are of identical importance for blast furnace coke production. Investigations show that silica and aluminium oxides are only slightly influenced by thermal degradation and reduction reactions which take place during coking. Coal pyrolysis decisively influences content of sodium oxides, potassium oxides or iron oxides. Sodium and potassium carbonates are also unstable and undergo degradation. Taking into consideration that silica and aluminium oxides are not influenced by thermal degradation during coking an increase in the two oxides in a coal mixture used for coking causes an ash content increase in coke. Examples of coal from the Kuzbass and the Vorkuta mines are given. Replacing 5% of the KZh and K coal from Karaganda with G6 coal from the Kuzbass characterized by the identical ash content but by higher content of silica and aluminium oxides causes an increase in ash content in coke ranging from 1.6 to 1.8%. (8 refs.)

  2. Optical properties of volcanic ash: improving remote sensing observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelley, Patrick; Colarco, Peter; Aquila, Valentina; Krotkov, Nickolay; Bleacher, Jake; Garry, Brent; Young, Kelsey; Rocha Lima, Adriana; Martins, Vanderlei; Carn, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Many times each year explosive volcanic eruptions loft ash into the atmosphere. Global travel and trade rely on aircraft vulnerable to encounters with airborne ash. Volcanic ash advisory centers (VAACs) rely on dispersion forecasts and satellite data to issue timely warnings. To improve ash forecasts model developers and satellite data providers need realistic information about volcanic ash microphysical and optical properties. In anticipation of future large eruptions we can study smaller events to improve our remote sensing and modeling skills so when the next Pinatubo 1991 or larger eruption occurs, ash can confidently be tracked in a quantitative way. At distances >100km from their sources, drifting ash plumes, often above meteorological clouds, are not easily detected from conventional remote sensing platforms, save deriving their quantitative characteristics, such as mass density. Quantitative interpretation of these observations depends on a priori knowledge of the spectral optical properties of the ash in UV (>0.3μm) and TIR wavelengths (>10μm). Incorrect assumptions about the optical properties result in large errors in inferred column mass loading and size distribution, which misguide operational ash forecasts. Similarly, simulating ash properties in global climate models also requires some knowledge of optical properties to improve aerosol speciation.

  3. Investigation of the Strength Properties of Palm Kernel Shell Ash Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Olutoge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many researchers have studied the use of agro-waste ashes as constituents in concrete. These agro-waste ashes are siliceous or aluminosiliceous materials that, in finely divided form and in the presence of moisture, chemically react with the calcium hydroxide released by the hydration of Portland cement to form calcium silicate hydrate and other cementitious compounds. Palm kernel shell ash (PKSA is a by-product in palm oil mills. This ash has pozzolanic properties that enables it as a partial replacement for cement but also plays an important role in the strength and durability of concrete. The use of palm kernel shell ash (PKSA as a partial replacement for cement in concrete is investigated. The objective of this paper is to alleviate the increasing challenges of scarcity and high cost of construction materials used by the construction industry in Nigeria and Africa in general, by reducing the volume of cement usage in concrete works. Collected PKSA was dried and sieved through a 45um sieve. The fineness of the PKSA was checked by sieving through 45um sieve. The chemical properties of the ash are examined whereas physical and mechanical properties of varying percentage of PKSA cement concrete and 100% cement concrete of mix 1:2:4 and 0.5 water-cement ratios are examined and compared. A total of 72 concrete cubes of size 150 × 150 × 150 mm³ with different volume percentages of PKSA to Portland cement in the order 0:100, 10:90 and 30:70 and mix ratio of 1:2:4 were cast and their physical and mechanical properties were tested at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days time. Although the compressive strength of PKSA concrete did not exceed that of OPC, compressive strength tests showed that 10% of the PKSA in replacement for cement was 22.8 N/mm2 at 28 days; which was quite satisfactory with no compromise in compressive strength requirements for concrete mix ratios 1:2:4. This research showed that the use of PKSA as a partial replacement for cement in concrete

  4. Aerodynamic characteristics of popcorn ash particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkaduvasala, V.; Murphy, D.W.; Ban, H.; Harrison, K.E.; Monroe, L.S. [University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Popcorn ash particles are fragments of sintered coal fly ash masses that resemble popcorn in low apparent density. They can travel with the flow in the furnace and settle on key places such as catalyst surfaces. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are often used in the design process to prevent the carryover and settling of these particles on catalysts. Particle size, density, and drag coefficient are the most important aerodynamic parameters needed in CFD modeling of particle flow. The objective of this study was to experimentally determine particle size, shape, apparent density, and drag characteristics for popcorn ash particles from a coal-fired power plant. Particle size and shape were characterized by digital photography in three orthogonal directions and by computer image analysis. Particle apparent density was determined by volume and mass measurements. Particle terminal velocities in three directions were measured in water and each particle was also weighed in air and in water. The experimental data were analyzed and models were developed for equivalent sphere and equivalent ellipsoid with apparent density and drag coefficient distributions. The method developed in this study can be used to characterize the aerodynamic properties of popcorn-like particles.

  5. Market assessment of PFBC ash use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, A. E.; Brown, T. H., Western Research Institute

    1998-01-01

    Pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) of coal is undergoing demonstration in the United States, as well as throughout the world. American Electric Power`s (AEP`s) bubbling PFBC 70 MWe Tidd demonstration program in Ohio and pilot-scale development at Foster Wheeler Energia Oy 10 MWth circulating PFBC at Karhula, Finland, have demonstrated the advantages of PFBC technology. Further technology development in the US is planned with the deployment of the technology at the MacIntosh Clean Coal project in Lakeland, Florida. Development of uses for solid wastes from PFBC coal-fired power systems is being actively pursued as part of the demonstration of PFBC technologies. Ashes collected from Foster Wheeler Energia Oy pilot circulating PFBC tests in Karhula, Finland, operating on (1) low sulfur subbituminous and (2) high sulfur bituminous coal; and ash from the AEP`s high-sulfur bituminous coal-fired bubbling PFBC in Brilliant, Ohio, were evaluated in laboratory and pilot-scale ash use testing at Western Research Institute (WRI).

  6. Gaseous mercury from curing concretes that contain fly ash: laboratory measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Danold W; Sun, Ping; Cheng, Chin-Min; Taerakul, Panuwat; Walker, Harold W; Weavers, Linda K; Golden, Dean M

    2005-08-01

    Total gaseous mercury in headspace air was measured for enclosed concretes dry curing at 40 degrees C for intervals of 2, 28, and 56 days. Release of mercury was confirmed for ordinary Portland cement concrete (OPC) and three concretes in which class F fly ash substituted for a fraction of the cement: (a) 33% fly ash (FA33), (b) 55% fly ash (FA55), and (c) 33% fly ash plus 0.5% mercury-loaded powdered activated carbon (HgPAC). Mean rates of mercury release (0.10-0.43 ng/day per kg of concrete) over the standard first 28 days of curing followed the order OPC mercury flux from exposed surfaces of these concretes ranged from 1.9 +/- 0.5 to 8.1 +/-2.0 ng/m(2)/h, values similar to the average flux for multiple natural substrates in Nevada, 4.2 +/- 1.4 ng/m(2)/h, recently published by others. Air sampling extending for 28 days beyond the initial 28-day maturation for OPC, FA55, and HgPAC suggested that the average Hg release rate by OPC is constant over 56 days and that mercury release rates for FA55 and HgPAC may ultimately diminish to levels exhibited by OPC concrete. The release of mercury from all samples was less than 0.1% of total mercury content over the initial curing period, implying that nearly all of the mercury was retained in the concrete. PMID:16124303

  7. Sensor-based control in eddy current separation of incinerator bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Abdur; Bakker, M C M

    2013-06-01

    A sensor unit was placed online in the particle stream produced by an eddy current separator (ECS) to investigate its functionality in non-ferrous metals recovery. The targeted feed was the 1-6mm size fraction bottom ash from a municipal waste incinerator. The sensor unit was attached to the ECS splitter, where it counted in real-time metal and mineral particles and accurately measured the grade of the stream in the metals product. Influence of segregation (e.g. due to particle size or density) on the metals concentrate were detected and studied using the sensor data collected at different splitter distances. Tests were performed in the laboratory and in a bottom ash processing plant with two different types of ECS and two sources of bottom ash with different moisture content. The measured metal grades matched the manual analyses with errors 0%, 1.5% and 3.1% for moist, dry and very wet feed, respectively. For very wet feed the ECS metals recovery dropped, which was observed from the strongly reduced particle counts and the large changes in cumulative particle properties. The measured sample proved representative for the whole metals concentrate if it is collected at a representative position within the metals particle trajectory fan produced by the ECS. ECS-performance proved sensitively dependent on splitter distance, since a 10mm shift may result in 10% change in metal recovery and 18% change in grade. The main functionalities of the sensor unit are determined as online quality control and facilitation of automatic control over the ECS splitter distance. These functionalities translate in significant improvements in ECS metals recovery which in turn is linked to economic benefits, increased recycling rate of scrap metals and a further reduction of the ecological drawbacks of incinerator bottom ash. PMID:23490354

  8. Chemical composition and properties of spray-dried sugar beet concentrate obtained after ultrafiltration of diffusion juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regiec Piotr

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafiltration of diffusion juice is a method that can reduce environmental pollution during the production of sugar. A by-product (concentrate of ultrafiltration contains a large amount of sucrose, but due to its properties, it is difficult to manage. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of the temperature used during drying of diffusion juice concentrates on the content of certain components and characteristics of resultant preparations. Diffusion juice obtained from one of the Polish sugar plants was subjected to ultrafiltration and the obtained concentrates were dried in a spray dryer. In the dried samples, the following parameters were analyzed: dry mass, sucrose, total ash, protein, crude fiber and color. It has been declared that the degree of concentration and drying temperature influenced the chemical composition and the properties of the dehydrated diffusion juice concentrates. An increase in drying temperature was accompanied by the increased content of dry mass, protein, ash and fiber content in the preparations. The greater the degree of juice concentration, the greater was the content of dry mass, ash, and fiber. Inversely, the greater the degree of juice concentration, the lower the content of sucrose. The brightest color of the dehydrated product was observed at the drying temperature of 200°C. Spray-drying may be used for waste management after the diffusion juice membrane filtration, and the resultant preparations might be used in the production of feedstuff or food industry in general e.g. as sucrose source, in fermentation processes or in microorganisms propagation.

  9. Autochthonous "Bjelovars dried cheese"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Kirin

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available «Dried cheese» is in autochthonous group of Bjelovar region cheeses which is still produced in rural domestic scale. The name of cheese originates from production procedure - drying for longer or shorter period in airy place after which the cheese is smoked, or is smoked only without drying. This type of cheese is produced in whole central region of Croatia which includes Međimurje, Podravina, Bilogora; Moslavina, Posavina and region around the capital. The aim of this paper is to describe and determine sensory, chemical and microbiological composition to determine its characteristics and production standards. As standards for sensory properties following characteristics can be used: a Outer shape: dimensions: diameter: 140-145 mm, height: 58-61 mm, mass: 700-750 g, equal, rounded shape, smooth skin, equal colour; b Consistency: easily cut, elastic, soft; c Cut: nicely combined white body, few improper holes of equal size; d Odour: pleasant milky acid odour, fairly smoky; e Taste: Fairly milky acidic taste, medium salty, fairly smoky taste. Depending on fat in dry matter content and water content in non fat dry matter, analyzed samples can be characterized as quarter fat, soft and semidry cheese. Higher acidity and saltiness was determined in some samples, microbiological analyses has shown that the most common contaminants are yeasts and moulds.

  10. Crowdsourcing genomic analyses of ash and ash dieback – power to the people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacLean Dan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ash dieback is a devastating fungal disease of ash trees that has swept across Europe and recently reached the UK. This emergent pathogen has received little study in the past and its effect threatens to overwhelm the ash population. In response to this we have produced some initial genomics datasets and taken the unusual step of releasing them to the scientific community for analysis without first performing our own. In this manner we hope to ‘crowdsource’ analyses and bring the expertise of the community to bear on this problem as quickly as possible. Our data has been released through our website at oadb.tsl.ac.uk and a public GitHub repository.

  11. Drying Shrinkage of Cement-Based Materials Under Conditions of Constant Temperature and Varying Humidity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Bao-guo; WEN Xiao-dong; WANG Ming-yuan; YAN Jia-jia; Gao Xiao-jian

    2007-01-01

    Currently,deformations along the central axis of specimens were usually measured under fixed environmental conditions. Seldom were the effects of environmental factors on the drying-shrinkage deformation of cement-based material considered. For this paper, the drying-shrinkage deformation at different w/b ratios and different additions to mortars was investigated under different environments at a temperature of 20 ℃ and humidity ranging from 100% to 50%. The specimens were cured in water for 28 days before measurement. The results illustrate that mortar shows much less shrinkage under various drying conditions when a lower w/b ratio is adopted. With a decrease in relative humidity the speed of drying-shrinkage becomes gradually lower. The addition of silica fume reduces the drying-shrinkage of mortar under higher relative humidity, because the pore structure of mortar with silica fume becomes more refined. The addition of fly ash increases the total porosity and the volume of coarse pores in the mortar. The drying-shrinkage of mortar under different conditions increases with the addition of more of fly ash.

  12. Changes of the soil environment affected by fly ash dumping site of the electric power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jerzy; Gwizdz, Marta; Jamroz, Elzbieta; Debicka, Magdalena; Kocowicz, Andrzej

    2014-05-01

    In this study the effect of fly ash dumping site of the electric power plant on the surrounding soil environment was investigated. The fly ash dumping site collect wastes form brown coal combustion of Belchatow electric power station, central Poland. The dumping site is surrounding by forest, where pine trees overgrow Podzols derived from loose quartz sands. The soil profiles under study were located at a distance of 50, 100, 400 and 500 m from the dumping site, while control profiles were located 8 km away from the landfill. In all horizons of soil profiles the mpain hysico-chemical and chemical properties were determined. The humic substances were extracted from ectohumus horizons by Shnitzer's method, purified using XAD resin and freeze-dried. The fulvic acids were passed through a cation exchange column and freeze-dried. Optical density, elemental composition and atomic ratios were determined in the humic and fulvic acids. Organic carbon by KMnO4 oxidation was also determined in the organic soil horizons. The fly ash from the landfill characterized by high salinity and strong alkaline reaction (pH=10), which contributed significantly to the changes of the pH values in soils horizons. The alkalization of soils adjacent to the landfill was found, which manifested in increasing of pH values in the upper soil horizons. The impact of the landfill was also noted in the changes of the soil morphology of Podzols analysed. As a result of the alkalization, Bhs horizons have been converted into a Bs horizons. Leaching of low molecular humus fraction - typical for podzolization - has been minimized as a result of pH changes caused by the impact of the landfill, and originally occurring humic substances in the Bhs horizon (present in the control profiles) have been probably transported out of the soil profile and then into the groundwater.

  13. Role of fly ash in heavy metal removal from flue gas. Final report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavarian, F.; Mahuli, S.; Ghosh-Dastidar, A.; Agnihotri, R.; Fan, L.S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The primary objective of this work is to study the fundamental phenomena involved in the sorption of trace chalcophilic elements by fly ash at high and medium temperatures. Chalcophiles are the low-boiling trace elements that are volatilized during pulverized coal combustion and are transferred to the gas phase, e.g., As, Pb, Cd and Se. The main focus of this work is investigating the sorption phenomena of a representative chalcophile, arsenic (As) on fly ashes at temperatures representative of the upper-furnace region (850--1200{degree}C) and the economizer section (375--600{degree}C). Arsenic is chosen because it is a highly toxic chalcophile and shows some affinity for fly ash but is also emitted from the stack as vapor and aerosol particles. The two temperature zones have been chosen because most of the dry-sorbent injection technologies are being developed for application in these two regions. Also, various fly ash samples from different sources are being studied because their chemical composition and subsequently their chemical sorption characteristics would show a great deal of variation depending on their source. In the first year of this project, it was proposed to conduct isothermal sorption experiments in a differential reactor system. The first year`s work was divided into two phases; namely (1) design, construction, testing and trouble-shooting of the differential reactor assembly and the analytical instrumentation, and, (2) designing experiments and conducting sorption studies in the differential reactor system.

  14. Chemical changes in different types of coal ash during prolonged, large scale, contact with seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoham-Frider, E.; Shelef, G.; Kress, N. [Nationall Institute of Oceanography, Haifa (Israel)

    2003-07-01

    The chemical changes occurring in coal ash exposed to prolonged (300 days), large scale, contact with running seawater were followed. Four major components (Al, Ca, Mg, Fe) and seven minor and trace elements (Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Zn, Pb, Hg) were measured in four coal ash types: fly and bottom ash freshly obtained from coal-fired power plant, and old ash (crushed and blocks) recovered from the sea after 3-5 years contact with seawater. Changes occurred in the chemical composition of the coal ash along the experiment: Fe increased in fresh ash, Al increased in old ash and Ca increased in all ash types except old ash blocks. Cu and Hg decreased in fresh fly ash while Cr increased, Cd decreased in all ash types except bottom ash, and Mn decreased in bottom ash. Most of the changes occurred in the fresh fly ash, and not in the old ash, indicating equilibrium after prior exposure to seawater. In addition, more changes occurred in fresh fly ash than in bottom ash, emphasizing the differences between the two ash types. While the changes in the concentrations of the major elements may be an indication of the integrity of the ash matrix, the only elements of environmental significance released to the environment were Hg and Cd. However, calculated seawater concentrations were much lower than seawater quality criteria and therefore the coal ash was considered suitable for marine applications concerning seawater quality.

  15. Environmental impact of using fly ash in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-09-01

    An attempt was made to estimate the chemical composition of fly ash using the known chemical composition of coals from numerous regions of the country and the known behavior of elements in a limited number of coal and fly-ash samples. This technique assumes that each element in every piece of coal in the United States partitions itself into fly ash to the same extent and leaches from fly ash at the same rate. Using these limited data, enrichment factors were then calculated by dividing the composition in the fly ash by the composition in the corresponding coal samples. These enrichment factors were then applied to all of the coal samples for which chemical compositions were available to estimate the chemical composition of the fly ash.

  16. Biofuel Combustion Fly Ash Influence on the Properties of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelijus Daugėla

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cement as the binding agent in the production of concrete can be replaced with active mineral admixtures. Biofuel combustion fly ash is one of such admixtures. Materials used for the study: Portland cement CEM I 42.5 R, sand of 0/4 fraction, gravel of 4/16 fraction, biofuel fly ash, superplasticizer, water. Six compositions of concrete were designed by replacing 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% 20%, and 25% of cement with biofuel fly ash. The article analyses the effect of biofuel fly ash content on the properties of concrete. The tests revealed that the increase of biofuel fly ash content up to 20% increases concrete density and compressive strength after 7 and 28 days of curing and decreases water absorption, with corrected water content by using plasticizing admixture. It was found that concrete where 20% of cement is replaced by biofuel ash has higher frost resistance.

  17. Magnetically responsive dry fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Filipa L; Bustamante, Rodney; Millán, Angel; Palacio, Fernando; Trindade, Tito; Silva, Nuno J O

    2013-08-21

    Ferrofluids and dry magnetic particles are two separate classes of magnetic materials with specific niche applications, mainly due to their distinct viscosity and interparticle distances. For practical applications, the stability of these two properties is highly desirable but hard to achieve. Conceptually, a possible solution to this problem would be encapsulating the magnetic particles but keeping them free to rotate inside a capsule with constant interparticle distances and thus shielded from changes in the viscosity of the surrounding media. Here we present an example of such materials by the encapsulation of magnetic ferrofluids into highly hydrophobic silica, leading to the formation of dry ferrofluids, i.e., a material behaving macroscopically as a dry powder but locally as a ferrofluid where magnetic nanoparticles are free to rotate in the liquid. PMID:23831769

  18. Ash accumulation effects using bench marked 0-D model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ash accumulation is a key issue relative to our ability to achieve D-3He ARIES III burn conditions. 1-1/2-d transport simulations using the BALDUR code have been used to examine the correlation between the global ash particle confinement time and the edge exhaust (or recycling) efficiency. This provides a way to benchmark the widely used 0-D model. The burn conditions for an ARIES-III plasma with various ash edge recycling coefficients are examined

  19. Geoenvironmental aspects of coal refuse-fly ash blends

    OpenAIRE

    Albuquerque, Allwyn J.

    1994-01-01

    The separate land disposal of coal refuse and fly ash presents difficulties throughout the Appalachian region, both in terms of disposal costs per acre and in terms of its potential environmental impacts on soil, ground water, revegetation, and slope stability. The purpose of this study was to determine how fly ash addition to coal refuse would impact on certain geotechnical properties of the refuse disposal piles, and whether the refuse-fly ash blends would be suitable as co-d...

  20. Recovering germanium from coal ash by chlorination with ammonium chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new process of enriching germanium from coal ash was developed. The process involves in mixing the coal ash and ammonium chloride and then roasting the mixture to produce germanium chloride that is then absorbed by dilute hydrochloric acid and hydrolyzed to germanium oxide. The germanium recovery reached to 80.2% at the optimum condition: mass ratio of NH4Cl/coal ash is 0.15, roasting temperature 400℃ and roasting time 90 min.

  1. Satellite data assimilation to improve forecasts of volcanic ash concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Guangliang; Lin, Hai-Xiang; Heemink, Arnold; SEGERS Arjo; Prata, Fred; Lu, Sha

    2016-01-01

    Data assimilation is a powerful tool that requires available observations to improve model forecast accuracy. Infrared satellite measurements of volcanic ash mass loadings are often used as input observations into the assimilation scheme. However, these satellite-retrieved data are often two-dimensional (2D), and cannot be easily combined with a three-dimensional (3D) volcanic ash model to continuously improve the volcanic ash state in a data assimilation system. By integrating available data...

  2. Corrosion of Modified Concrete with Sugar Cane Bagasse Ash

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez-Jaquez, R. E.; J. E. Buelna-Rodríguez; C. P. Barrios-Durstewitz; Gaona-Tiburcio, C.; Almeraya-Calderón, F.

    2012-01-01

    Concrete is a porous material and the ingress of water, oxygen, and aggressive ions, such as chlorides, can cause the passive layer on reinforced steel to break down. Additives, such as fly ash, microsilica, rice husk ash, and cane sugar bagasse ash, have a size breakdown that allows the reduction of concrete pore size and, consequently, may reduce the corrosion process. The objective of this work is to determine the corrosion rate of steel in reinforced concrete by the addition of 20% sugar ...

  3. Ash chemistry and sintering, verification of the mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M.; Skrifvars, B.J. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    In this project four sintering mechanisms have been studied, i.e., partial melting with a viscous liquid, partial melting with a non-viscous liquid, chemical reaction sintering and solid state sintering. The work has aimed at improving the understanding of ash sintering mechanisms and quantifying their role in combustion and gasification. The work has been oriented in particular on the understanding of biomass ash behavior. The work has not directly focused on any specific technical application. However, results can also be applied on other fuels such as brown coal, petroleum coke, black liquor and different types of wastes (PDF, RDF, MSW). In one part of study the melting behavior was calculated for ten biomass ashes and compared with lab measurements of sintering tendencies. The comparison showed that the T{sub 15} temperatures, i.e. those temperatures at which the ashes contained 15 % molten phase, correlated fairly well with the temperature at which the sintering measurements detected sintering. This suggests that partial melting can be predicted fairly accurate for some ashes already with the today existing thermodynamic calculation routines. In some cases, however the melting calculations did not correlate with the detected sintering temperatures. In a second part detailed measurements on ash behavior was conducted both in a semi full scale CFB and a lab scale FBC. Ashes and deposits were collected and analyzed in several different ways. These analyses show that the ash chemistry shifts radically when the fuel is shifted. Fuels with silicate based ashes behaved totally different than those with an oxide or salt based ash. The chemistry was also affected by fuel blending. The ultimate goal has been to be able to predict the ash thermal behavior during biomass thermal conversion, using the fuel and ash elemental analyses and a few operational key parameters as the only input data. This goal has not yet today been achieved. (author)

  4. The Cement Solidification of Municipal Solid Waste Incineration Fly Ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Haobo; HE Xinghua; ZHU Shujing; ZHANG Dajie

    2006-01-01

    The chemical composition, the content and the leachability of heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration ( MSWI) fly ash were tested and analyzed. It is shown that the leachability of Pb and Cr exceeds the leaching toxicity standard, and so the MSWI fly ash is considered as hazardous waste and must be solidifled. The effect of solidifying the MSWI fly ash by cement was studied, and it is indicated that the heavy metals can be well immobilized if the mass fraction of the fly ash is appropriate. The heavy metals were immobilized within cement hydration products through either physical fixation, substitution, deposition or adsorption mechanisms.

  5. Experimental Study on Volume for Fly Ash of Building Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash is a waste substance from thermal power plants, steel mills, etc. That is found in abundance in the world. It has polluted the environment, wasting the cultivated land. This study introduces an experimental research on fly ash being reused effectively, the study introduces raw materials of fly ash brick, production process and product inspection, fly ash content could be amounted to 40%~75%. High doping fly ash bricks are manufactured, which selects wet fly ash from the power plants, adding aggregate with reasonable ratio and additives with reasonable dosage and do the experimental research on manufacture products for properties, production technology and selection about technology parameter of production equipment. Index of strength grade and freezing-thawing resisting etc and the high doping fly ash brick building which we are working on can achieve the national standard on building materials industry. Based on the tests, this achievement of research has a very wide practical prospect in using fly ash, industrial waste residue, environmental protection and reducing the cost of enterprises. The efficient reuse of fly ash from coal boiler and power plants has very vital significance of protecting the environment, benefiting descendants and developing of circular economy.

  6. Electrodialytic removal of Cd from biomass combustion fly ash suspensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor M.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Damoe, Anne J.

    2013-01-01

    was investigated with the aim of enabling reuse of the ashes. The ashes originated from combustion of straw (two ashes), wood chips, and co-firing of wood pellets and fuel oil, respectively. A series of laboratory scale electrodialytic remediation experiments were conducted with each ash. The initial Cd......Due to relatively high concentrations of Cd, biomass combustion fly ashes often fail to meet Danish legislative requirements for recycling as fertilizer. In this study, the potential of using electrodialytic remediation for removal of Cd from four different biomass combustion fly ashes...... the final Cd concentration was below 2.0. mg Cd/kg DM in at least one experiment done with each ash. This was obtained within 2 weeks of remediation and at liquid to solid (L/S) ratios of L/S 16 for the pre-washed straw ash and L/S 8 for the straw, co-firing and wood ash. © 2013 Elsevier B.V....

  7. Geological behavior of wet outflow deposition fly ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周德泉; 赵明华; 刘宏利; 周毅; 严聪

    2008-01-01

    The geological behaviors of wet outflow deposition fly ash were investigated, including the feature of in-situ single and even bridge cone penetration test (CPT) curves, the change of the penetration parameters and vane strength with the increase of depth and the difference of the penetration resistance on and down the water level. Drilling, CPT and vane shear test were carried out in silty clay, fine sand, and fly ash of the ash-dam. The CPT curves of the fly ash do not show a critical depth. The cone resistance (qc) of the fly ash is smaller than that of silty clay or sand; the friction resistance is smaller than that of filling silty clay, similar to that of deposition silty clay or more than that of fine sand; the friction ratio is smaller than that of filling silty clay, or more than that of deposition silty clay or much more than that of fine sand. The specific penetration resistance (ps) is similar to that of filling silty clay, or more than that of deposition silty clay. There is a clear interface effect between the deposition fly ash and the clay. Interface effect of ps-h curve at the groundwater table is clear, and ps of the fly ash reduces significantly under the table. The vane strength of the fly ash increases as the depth increases. The deposition fly ash with wet outflow is similar to silt in the geological behavior.

  8. Assessing fly ash treatment: Remediation and stabilization of heavy metals

    KAUST Repository

    Lima, A.T.

    2010-12-17

    Fly ashes from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), straw (ST) and co-combustion of wood (CW) are here analyzed with the intent of reusing them. Two techniques are assessed, a remediation technique and a solidification/stabilization one. The removal of heavy metals from fly ashes through the electrodialytic process (EDR) has been tried out before. The goal of removing heavy metals has always been the reuse of fly ash, for instance in agricultural fields (BEK). The best removal rates are here summarized and some new results have been added. MSW fly ashes are still too hazardous after treatment to even consider application to the soil. ST ash is the only residue that gets concentrations low enough to be reused, but its fertilizing value might be questioned. An alternative reuse for the three ashes is here preliminary tested, the combination of fly ash with mortar. Fly ashes have been substituted by cement fraction or aggregate fraction. Surprisingly, better compressive strengths were obtained by replacing the aggregate fraction. CW ashes presented promising results for the substitution of aggregate in mortar and possibly in concrete. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Multitechnique multielemental analysis of coal and fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coal sample is first ashed with high temperature ashing or with RF plasma low temperature ashing. The coal ash or fly ash can be analyzed for major ash elements by fusing with lithium tetraborate in an automatic fusion device, the Claisse Fluxer. The ash samples are also dissolved in a Parr bomb in a mixture of aqua regia and HF. Subsequently, the solutions are analyzed for eight major (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Si, and Ti) and 20 trace elements (As, B, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sr, U, V, and Zn) by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. Mercury in coal and fly ash is determined on a separate aliquot by the cold vapor atomic absorption technique. Fluorine and chlorine in the samples are determined by fusing with Na2CO3 and Eschka mixture, respectively, and then measuring the two ions in solution with specific ion electrodes. Oxygen in the samples can be determined rapidly and nondestructively by 14-MeV neutron activation analysis. These methods have been tested by analyzing several NBS coal and fly ash standards with good accuracy and reproducibility. 10 tables

  10. Wildfire Ash: Chemical Composition, Ash-Soil Interactions and Environmental Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Anna; Hamzi, Seham; Wittenberg, Lea

    2015-04-01

    Of the five classical factors of soil formation, climate, parent material, topography, time, organisms, and recently recognized human activity, it is the latter factor which discretely includes fire and post-burn impact. However, it is considered that soil undergoing fire just experience a temporary removal of the top organic horizon, thus slightly modified and often labeled as 'temporarily disturbed' soil or soil 'under restoration/rehabilitation'. In fact the suggested seventh factor, post-burned produced ash, can act both dependently and independently of the other soil forming factors (Levin et al., 2013; Certini 2013). They are interdependent in cases where ash influences occur on time scales similar to 'natural' soil formation (Keesstra et ai., 2014) such as changes in vegetation. On the other hand, in post-fire areas a strong dependency is expected between soil-water retention mechanism, climate and topography. Wild-land fires exert many changes on the physical, chemical, mineralogical, biological, and morphological properties of soil that, in turn, affect the soil's hydrology and nutrient flux, modifying its ability to support vegetation and resist erosion. The ash produced by forest fires is a complex mixture composed of organic and inorganic particles characterized by vary physical-chemical and morphological properties. The importance of this study is straightforwardly related to the frequency and large-scales wildfires in Mediterranean region. In fact, wildfires are major environmental and land management concern in the world, where the number and severity of wildfires has increased during the past decades (Bodi, 2013). Certini (2013) assumed that cumulatively all of the vegetated land is burned in about 31 years annually affecting 330-430 Mha (over 3% of the Earth's surface) and wide range of land cover types worldwide including forests, peatlands, shrublands and grasslands. Whereas, the fire is identified as an important factor in soil formation, the

  11. Elemental characterization of coal, fly ash, and bottom ash using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total of 18 elements viz. Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, K, Na, Sr, V, Zn, Mn, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, Co, As and Cd were analyzed in coal, fly ash and bottom ash samples collected across India using an EDXRF technique. Various indices such as element enrichment ratio, enrichment factor (with respect to crustal average) and mineral composition were calculated. Around 95% of mass was reconstructed using the concentration of elements in this study for fly and bottom ash. - Highlights: • Concentrations of 18 elements were determined in coal and ash samples using EDXRF. • Mineral quantification up to 95% was carried out for fly and bottom ash samples. • Enrichment ratios of elements were calculated in combustion residue with respect to coal. • Enrichment factor with respect to crustal average was estimated for ash samples

  12. Natural rain - induced element leaching from coal ASH; La pluie naturelle - lixiviation d'element de la cendre de charbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovic, A.; Djordjevic, D.; Polic, P. [Belgrade Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, IChTM, Chemistry Center, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    2000-07-01

    Six composite samples of coal ash from power plants 'Nikola Tesla' A and B, located in the vicinity of Obrenovac, near Belgrade (Yugoslavia), were subjected to extraction with 1 M acetate solution, pH 5.5, in order to imitate possible leaching of the ash by natural acidic rain. Seven trace and five major elements have been examined, and the obtained amounts were in the range from 0.003 {+-} 0.001 ppm (Cd), to 117 {+-} 27 ppm (Ca), dry ash basis. Though some of the concentrations were higher than allowed by domestic and international regulations it can be concluded that neither of the examined elements represents a serious threat for the environment (at least for the conditions applied in this experiment). Also, both magnesium and iron are carriers of copper, chromium and arsenic, while cadmium is associated with magnesium and manganese. Calcium and manganese are beside magnesium and iron, scavengers of arsenic. (authors)

  13. Effect of the drying cycle on dried tile mechanical strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoros, J.L.; Sanchez, E.; Cantavella, V.; Monzo, M.; Jarque, J.C. [Universitat Jaume I, Castellon (Spain). Inst. de Tecnologia Ceramica; Timellini, G. [Centro Ceramico, Bologna (Italy); Leak, N. [British Ceramic Research Association, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom)

    2002-07-01

    The study shows that the industrial ceramic tile drying rate enormously affects dried tile mechanical strength. Tiles dried in an industrial facility were used to determine the variation of dried tile mechanical strength with storage time in a moisture-free container. Dried tile mechanical strength rose with storage time under these conditions. Under the most favourable conditions, dry mechanical strength increased by up to 60% of the starting value. The reason for the rise in mechanical strength is attributed to the relaxation of stresses that develop during fast industrial drying. The effect of the drying cycle on mechanical strength is interpreted on the basis of tile dimensional changes with temperature and moisture content during drying. This assumption was confirmed by laboratory experiments in a dilatometer. (orig.)

  14. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)); Haefner, R. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.)

    1993-04-01

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  15. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips & Prevention News Ask an Ophthalmologist Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Dry Eye ... Cause Nighttime Glare? Sep 12, 2014 Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es el Ojo Seco? Find an Ophthalmologist ...

  16. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get ophthalmologist-reviewed tips and information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy Policy Related The link between seasonal allergens and dry eye Apr 27, 2015 Choosing Wisely When It Comes to Eye Care, Part 5 Mar 19, 2013 Eye Makeup Safety ...

  17. Dry Skin (Xerosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... resources Meet our partners Español Donate Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ... Dry skin public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases ...

  18. What Is Dry Eye?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... large volume of tears, overwhelming the tear drainage system. These excess tears then overflow from your eye. Next   Causes of Dry ... Newsletter Get ophthalmologist-reviewed tips and information about eye health and preserving your vision. Privacy ...

  19. Drying drops of blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutin, David; Sobac, Benjamin; Loquet, Boris; Sampol, José.

    2010-11-01

    The drying of a drop of human blood is fascinating by the complexity of the physical mechanisms that occur as well as the beauty of the phenomenon which has never been previously evidenced in the literature. The final stage of full blood evaporation reveals for a healthy person the same regular pattern with a good reproducibility. Other tests on anemia and hyperlipidemic persons were performed and presented different patterns. By means of digital camera, the influence of the motion of red blood cells (RBCs) which represent about 50% of the blood volume, is revealed as well as its consequences on the final stages of drying. The mechanisms which lead to the final pattern of dried blood drops are presented and explained on the basis of fluid and solid mechanics in conjunction with the principles of hematology. Our group is the first to evidence that the specific regular patterns characteristic of a healthy individual do not appear in a dried drop of blood from a person with blood disease. Blood is a complex colloidal suspension for which the flow motion is clearly non-Newtonian. When drops of blood evaporate, all the colloids are carried by the flow motion inside the drop and interact.

  20. Strength and shrinkage properties of mortar containing a nonstandard high-calcium fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cengiz Duran Atis; Alaettin Kilic; Umur Korkut Sevim [Cukurova University, Balcali-Adana (Turkey). Engineering and Architecture Faculty

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory study was undertaken to assess the compressive and flexural tensile strength and drying shrinkage properties of mortar mixtures containing high-calcium nonstandard Afsin-Elbistan fly ash (FA). Possibility of using Afsin-Elbistan FA in cement-based materials as shrinkage-reducing or compensation agent was also discussed. Five mortar mixtures including control Portland cement (PC) and FA mortar mixtures were prepared. FA replaced the cement on mass basis at the replacement ratios of 10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. Water-cementitious materials ratio was 0.4 for all mixtures. The mixtures were cured at 65% relative humidity and 20{+-}2{sup o}C. The compressive and flexural tensile strength and drying shrinkage values of the mortar mixtures were measured. The results show that Afsin-Elbistan FA reduced drying shrinkage of the mortar by 40%. Therefore, it was concluded that Afsin-Elbistan FA can be used as a shrinkage-reducing agent. The mortar containing 40% FA expanded. This indicates that Afsin-Elbistan FA may be utilized to compensate drying shrinkage of cement-based materials.

  1. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2003-08-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a reasonably high alkali content, thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was well within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that the aggressive alkali-iron-trisulfate constituent was present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section C, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. The analysis of Test Section C followed much the same protocol that was employed in the assessment of Test Section A. Again, the focus was on determining and documenting the relative corrosion rates of the candidate materials. The detailed results of the investigation are included in this report as a series of twelve appendices. Each appendix is devoted to the performance of one of the candidate alloys. The table below summarizes metal loss rate for the worst case sample of each of the candidate materials for both Test Sections A and C

  2. Effect of Drying Temperature on the Chemical Properties and Diffusivity of belimbi (averrhoa belimbi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahari, N.; Jamil, N.; Rasmani, K. A.; Nursabrina

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, many dried fruit products have been developed in response to a strong demand by the customer. This type of fruit has a different composition and hence different moisture diffusivity (D). During drying, Fick's Law of diffusion, which describes the movement of liquid water was used to calculate this diffusivity. However diffusivity has strong effects on the material drying characteristics and these must be determined. In this paper, Fick's Law of diffusion with different kinds of boundary conditions was solve using separation of variable (SOV). In order to get the value of D, results obtained using SOV will be compared with the results from the drying of belimbi at temperature of 40°C, 50°C and 60°C. Although the results show that variation in the values of diffusivity for different temperatures is relatively small, but the variation in the total time required for drying is significantly bigger: between 3-7 hours. Its shown that diffusivity is an important measurement and should be considered in the modeling of the drying process. The chemical properties of belimbi slices in terms of vitamin C, total ash and antioxidant activity with different air temperatures and pretreatment were also investigated. Higher drying temperatures gives less drying time, a lower vitamin C and antioxidant activity but a greater total of ash, whilst pre-treatment can increased vitamin C and antioxidant activity. The results show that pre-treatment and the drying temperature are important variables to improve mass and heat transfer, as well as the belimbi chemical properties.

  3. Growth of larval agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and fitness of tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) in blue ash (Fraxinus quadrangulata) and green ash (F. pennsylvanica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis) is a primary pest of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees. Blue ash (F. quadrangulata) is more resistant than other North American ash and able to survive EAB infestation. This tree may affect EAB larvae and T. planipennisi. We compared the capacity ...

  4. Drying shrinkage of mortars with limestone filler and blast-furnace slag

    OpenAIRE

    Carrasco, M. F.; Bonavetti, V. L.; Irassar, E. F.

    2003-01-01

    During the 1990's the use of cements made with port land clinker and two mineral admixtures, called ternary or blended cements, has grown considerably. Nowadays, cements containing several combinations of fly ash and silica fume, blast-furnace slag and silica fume or blast-furnace slag and limestone filler are commonly used. There are numerous works on the influence of blended cements on the fresh state and mechanical properties of mortar and concrete, but the their deformations due to drying...

  5. Nutritional potential of green banana flour obtained by drying in spouted bed

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Vieira Bezerra; Antonio Manoel da Cruz Rodrigues; Edna Regina Amante; Luiza Helena Meller da Silva

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the chemical composition of peeled and unpeeled green banana Cavendish (AAA) flour obtained by drying in spouted bed, aiming at adding nutritional value to food products. The bananas were sliced and crushed to obtain a paste and fed to the spouted bed dryer (12 cm height and T = 80 ºC) in order to obtain flour. The flours obtained were subjected to analysis of moisture, protein, ash, carbohydrates, total starch, resistant starch, fiber. The green banana flours, mainly unp...

  6. Gas generation in incinerator ash; Gasbildning i aska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arm, Maria; Lindeberg, Johanna; Rodin, Aasa; Oehrstroem, Anna; Backman, Rainer; Oehman, Marcus; Bostroem, Dan

    2006-02-15

    In recent years, explosions have occurred in certain phases of ash handling in Sweden. Investigations have revealed that hydrogen may have been present in all cases. The hydrogen is believed to be generated by chemical reactions of aluminium and other metals within the ash in the presence of water. The purpose with this study is to increase the knowledge of gas generation of incinerator ash. Thereby, guides for appropriate ash management can be introduced and the risk for further explosions prevented. The study has comprised analyses of the ash properties, such as chemical and physical composition and the pH, of ash from 14 incineration plants (mostly waste incineration plants). Different fractions of ash materials representing different parts of the process in each plant have been analysed. Furthermore, the fuel and the technical differences between the plants have been analysed. A tool for measuring the gas generation in the laboratory has been developed and the gas generation of the different ash materials at natural and increased pH was measured. Gas analyses and thermodynamic calculations have also been performed. The results showed that: bottom ash from fluidised bed boilers generated small amounts of gas at increased pH, much smaller amounts than the idle pass, cyclone and filter ash did, bottom ash from grate fired boilers generated more gas at increased pH than their cyclone ash and filter ash, with exception of the Linkoeping plant, all bio waste incineration plants generated ash with low gas generation potential, all fly ash materials with a gas generation potential of more than 10 l/kg originated from municipal waste incineration plants, filter ash that had been stored in oxygen rich environment generated significant less gas than fresh filter ash of the same origin, hardly any other gases were generated apart from hydrogen (very small amounts of acetone, furane, benzene and most likely methane were detected in some of the ash materials), there were no

  7. Effects of water availability on emerald ash borer larval performance and phloem phenolics of Manchurian and black ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sourav; Whitehill, Justin G A; Hill, Amy L; Opiyo, Stephen O; Cipollini, Don; Herms, Daniel A; Bonello, Pierluigi

    2014-04-01

    The invasive emerald ash borer (EAB) beetle is a significant threat to the survival of North American ash. In previous work, we identified putative biochemical and molecular markers of constitutive EAB resistance in Manchurian ash, an Asian species co-evolved with EAB. Here, we employed high-throughput high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection and mass spectrometry (HPLC-PDA-MS) to characterize the induced response of soluble phloem phenolics to EAB attack in resistant Manchurian and susceptible black ash under conditions of either normal or low water availability, and the effects of water availability on larval performance. Total larval mass per tree was lower in Manchurian than in black ash. Low water increased larval numbers and mean larval mass overall, but more so in Manchurian ash. Low water did not affect levels of phenolics in either host species, but six phenolics decreased in response to EAB. In both ashes, pinoresinol A was induced by EAB, especially in Manchurian ash. Pinoresinol A and pinoresinol B were negatively correlated with each other in both species. The higher accumulation of pinoresinol A in Manchurian ash after attack may help explain the resistance of this species to EAB, but none of the responses measured here could explain increased larval performance in trees subjected to low water availability.

  8. Effects of water availability on emerald ash borer larval performance and phloem phenolics of Manchurian and black ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sourav; Whitehill, Justin G A; Hill, Amy L; Opiyo, Stephen O; Cipollini, Don; Herms, Daniel A; Bonello, Pierluigi

    2014-04-01

    The invasive emerald ash borer (EAB) beetle is a significant threat to the survival of North American ash. In previous work, we identified putative biochemical and molecular markers of constitutive EAB resistance in Manchurian ash, an Asian species co-evolved with EAB. Here, we employed high-throughput high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection and mass spectrometry (HPLC-PDA-MS) to characterize the induced response of soluble phloem phenolics to EAB attack in resistant Manchurian and susceptible black ash under conditions of either normal or low water availability, and the effects of water availability on larval performance. Total larval mass per tree was lower in Manchurian than in black ash. Low water increased larval numbers and mean larval mass overall, but more so in Manchurian ash. Low water did not affect levels of phenolics in either host species, but six phenolics decreased in response to EAB. In both ashes, pinoresinol A was induced by EAB, especially in Manchurian ash. Pinoresinol A and pinoresinol B were negatively correlated with each other in both species. The higher accumulation of pinoresinol A in Manchurian ash after attack may help explain the resistance of this species to EAB, but none of the responses measured here could explain increased larval performance in trees subjected to low water availability. PMID:24125060

  9. Spectral analysis of white ash response to emerald ash borer infestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandra, Laura

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is an invasive insect that has killed over 50 million ash trees in the US. The goal of this research was to establish a method to identify ash trees infested with EAB using remote sensing techniques at the leaf-level and tree crown level. First, a field-based study at the leaf-level used the range of spectral bands from the WorldView-2 sensor to determine if there was a significant difference between EAB-infested white ash (Fraxinus americana) and healthy leaves. Binary logistic regression models were developed using individual and combinations of wavelengths; the most successful model included 545 and 950 nm bands. The second half of this research employed imagery to identify healthy and EAB-infested trees, comparing pixel- and object-based methods by applying an unsupervised classification approach and a tree crown delineation algorithm, respectively. The pixel-based models attained the highest overall accuracies.

  10. Synergic Effect of Wheat Straw Ash and Rice-Husk Ash on Strength Properties of Mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Ajay; Kunio, Hattori; Ogata, Hidehiko; Garg, Monika; Anwar, A. M.; Ashraf, M.; Mandula

    Pozzolan materials obtained from various sources; when used as partial replacement for Portland cement in cement based applications play an important role not only towards sustainable development but in reducing the construction costs as well. Present study was conducted to investigate the synergic effect of Rice-Husk Ash (RHA) and Wheat Straw Ash (WSA) on the strength properties of ash substituted mortar. Ash materials were obtained after burning the wastes at 600°C for 5 h at a control rate of 2°C min. Two binary blends of mortar substituting 15% cement with WSA and RHA and three combinations of ternary blend with (10+5)%, (5+10)% and (7.5+7.5)% mix ratios of WSA and RHA, together with a control specimen were subjected to destructive (compressive and flexural strength) as well as non-destructive (ultrasonic pulse velocity) tests till 180 days of curing. Ternary blend with (7.5 + 7.5)% combination of WSA and RHA showed better strength results than control and other blends and proved to be the optimum combination for achieving maximum synergic effect.

  11. Illinois basin coal fly ashes. 2. Equilibria relationships and qualitative modeling of ash-water reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, W.R.; Griffin, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    Alkaline and acidic Illinois Basin coal fly ash samples were each mixed with deionized water and equilibrated for about 140 days to simulate ash ponding environments. Common to both equilibrated solutions, anhydrite solubility dominated Ca2+ activities, and Al3+ activities were in equilibrium with both matrix mullite and insoluble aluminum hydroxide phases. Aqueous silica activities were controlled by both mullite and matrix silicates. The pH of the extract of the acidic fly ash was 4.1 after 24 h but increased to a pH value of 6.4 as the H2SO4, assumed to be adsorbed to the particle surfaces, was exhausted by the dissolution of matrix iron oxides and aluminosilicates. The activities of aqueous Al3+ and iron, initially at high levels during the early stages of equilibration, decreased to below analytical detection limits as the result of the formation of insoluble Fe and Al hydroxide phases. The pH of the extract of the alkaline fly ash remained above a pH value of 10 during the entire equilibration interval as a result of the hydrolysis of matrix oxides. As with the acidic system, Al3+ activities were controlled by amorphous aluminum hydroxide phases that began to form after about 7 days of equilibration. The proposed mechanisms and their interrelations are discussed in addition to the solubility diagrams used to deduce these relationships. ?? 1984 American Chemical Society.

  12. ASH ENG 125 / Assignmentcloud.com

    OpenAIRE

    admin

    2015-01-01

    ENG 125 Complete Class   Check this A+ Guidelines at   http://www.assignmentcloud.com/ENG-125-ASH/ENG-125-Complete-Class-Guide     For more classes visit www.assignmentcloud.com ENG 125 Complete Class ENG 125 Week 1 DQ 1 ENG 125 Week 1 DQ 2 ENG 125 Week 1 Reading Assignment ENG 125 Week 2 DQ 1 ENG 125 Week 2 DQ 2 ENG 125 Week 2 Important Elements of Narratives Assignment ENG 125 Week 3 DQ 1 ENG 125 Week 3 DQ ...

  13. ACC 305 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialrank

    OpenAIRE

    charles

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visits www.tutorialrank.com ASHFORD ACC 305 Week 1 Assignments E 3-18, E 3-20, J Case 3-5 ASHFORD ACC 305 Week 1 DQ 1 FASB and Ethics ASHFORD ACC 305 Week 1 DQ 2 Cash versus Accrual & Financial Disclosures ASHFORD ACC 305 Week 2 DQ 1 Earnings Management Case 4-3 ASHFORD ACC 305 Week 2 DQ 2 Revenue Recognition Case 5-2 ASHFORD ACC 305 Week 2 Problem E4-19 Wainwright Corporation ASHFORD ACC 305 Week 2 Problem E4-22 Tiger Enterprises ASH...

  14. Electrochemical removal of Cd from bioashes in pilot scale and evaluation of possibilities for utilizing treated ashes in concrete; Elektrokemisk fjernelse af Cd fra bioasker i pilotskala og vurdering af mulighederne for nyttiggoerelse af behandlet aske i beton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juul Pedersen, A.; Ottosen, L.M. [BYG-DTU, Copenhagen (Denmark); Simonsen, P. [Energi E2 A/S, Copenhagen (Denmark); Aune, J. [MT Hoejgaard A/S, Soeborg (Denmark)

    2006-07-01

    Electrochemical removal of cadmium from bio ashes has been demonstrated in pilot scale, and the remediated ashes have been evaluated for possible reuse as either fertilizers, or in concrete products. 5 remediation experiments have been completed, using straw combustion fly ash or fly ash from cocombustion of wood and fuel oil. During these emediation experiments the process has been upscaled stepwise, from an initial distance between the electrodes of 35 cm and a tank volume of 300 L ash suspension, to a final electrode distance of 245 cm, a total tank volume of 2.1 m3, and inclusion of up to 6 'concentration-units'. The ash volumes to be remediated made up to between 8.4 and 82.5 kg dry matter, prior to eventual pre-wash. The first four remediation experiments were made with straw combustion fly ash, the fifth contained both straw combustion fly ash and cocombustion fly ash, in separate compartments. The demonstration experiments have in many ways confirmed the results obtained in smaller scale in the previous project PSO FU 3206. It is demonstrated that electrochemical removal of cadmium from bioashes is possible also in larger scale than laboratory scale and benchscale, as final concentrations of cadmium below the regulatory limits for recycling of straw ashes have been reached. Furthermore, new findings such as the importance of choosing more acid resistant materials for the plant have showed up. The use of concentration units contributed positively to the separation of cadmium from the ash suspension, but when using concentration units the 'natural' acidification of the ash during the remediation process is delayed, and thus it is recommended to add acid to the ash before and eventually during the remediation process to decrease pH more rapidly. The ashes were analyzed before and after remediation for evaluation of the potential of reusing the ashes in concrete products, or recycle them as fertilizers. It was found that the fertilizing

  15. A brief on high-volume Class F fly ash as cement replacement – A guide for Civil Engineer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa M. Rashad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Disposal of fly ash (FA resulting from the combustion of coal-fired electric power stations is one of the major environmental challenges. This challenge continues to increase with increasing the amount of FA and decreasing the capacity of landfill space. Therefore, studies have been carried out to re-use high-volumes of fly ash (HVFA as cement replacement in building materials. This paper presents an overview of the previous studies carried out on the use of high volume Class F FA as a partial replacement of cement in traditional paste/mortar/concrete mixtures based on Portland cement (PC. Fresh properties, mechanical properties, abrasion resistance, thermal properties, drying shrinkage, porosity, water absorption, sorptivity, chemical resistance, carbonation resistance and electrical resistivity of paste/mortar/concrete mixtures containing HVFA (⩾45% as cement replacement have been reviewed. Furthermore, additives used to improve some properties of HVFA system have been reviewed.

  16. Utilisation of fly ash for the management of heavy metal containing primary chemical sludge generated in a leather manufacturing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekaran, G.; Rao, B.P.; Ghanamani, A.; Rajamani, S. [Central Leather Research Institute, Chennai (India). Dept. of Environmental Technology

    2003-07-01

    The present study aims at disposal of primary chemical sludge generated in the tanning industry by solidification and stabilization process using flyash generated from thermal power plant along with binders and also on evaluating the leachability of heavy metal from the solidified product. The primary chemical sludge containing heavy metals iron and chromium were obtained from a garment leather manufacturing company at Chennai in India. The sludge was dried in open environment and it was powdered to fine size in a grinder. Binding increases stabilization of heavy metal in calcined sludge with refractory binders such as clay, fly ash, lime and ordinary Portland cement. Fly ash can be considered as the additional binder for producing stronger bricks, with high metal fixation efficiency, and minimum rate of removal of heavy metal and minimum diffusion co-efficient. 15 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. 利用油页岩灰制备蒸压砖的试验研究%Study on preparation of autoclaved brick with oil shale ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高子栋; 潘红

    2015-01-01

    The autoclaved brick is prepared with the oil shale ash, the fly ash, the calcium carbide residue, the gyp⁃sum and the stone chips. The effect on properties of autoclaved brick is studied by changing the ratio of oil shale ash and fly ash. When the ratio of oil shale ash increases, the compressive strength and the flexural strength of au⁃toclaved brick increase first, and then decrease, and the drying shrinkage value keep increasing. When the ratio of oil shale ash is 30%, the strength grade of autoclaved brick could achieves MU15. When the ratio of oil shale ash is 50%, the strength grade of autoclaved brick could also achieve MU10.%采用油页岩灰、粉煤灰、电石渣、石膏、石屑等作为原材料,制备了一种蒸压砖,研究了油页岩灰替代粉煤灰的比例对产品性能的影响。试验结果表明,随油页岩灰比例不断增大,蒸压砖的抗压强度、抗折强度均呈先提高后降低的变化趋势,干燥收缩值不断提高。当油页岩灰替代粉煤灰的比例为30%时,蒸压砖强度等级可达到标准JC239—2001《粉煤灰砖》中的MU15;当油页岩灰替代粉煤灰的比例为50%时,蒸压砖强度等级仍可达到MU10。

  18. Study on drying rate in contact drying with flexible screen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟宏; 陆仁书; 张显权

    2000-01-01

    The moisture contents (MC) of popular veneers were tested in Composition Board Laboratory of Northeast Forestry University by contact drying with flexible screen. The influence factors considered included temperature, initial moisture contents (IMC), and veneer thickness. Veneer-drying laws under different hot press conditions were analyzed. The results showed that the drying rate increased with temperature rising. 160℃ was considered to be more efficient than 140℃ and 180℃ because excessive high temperature has no significant contribution to drying rate. IMC had significant effect on drying rate. The veneer with high IMC had a higher drying rate at above fiber saturation point (FSP) and a lower drying rate at below FSP, compared to the veneer with low IMC. Average drying rate also varied with thickness in power law.

  19. Why and how to make a REACH registration of combustion ash; Moejligheter vid REACH-registrering av energiaskor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loevgren, Linnea; Wik, Ola

    2009-10-15

    substances from construction products were initiated in 2006 on the EU level. The proposed method s are similar to leaching methods used today in characterization of waste properties for landfill. The report describes pros and cons with REACH registration of ashes. It is believed that uses of ashes will more easily be available if the ashes are registered according to REACH. The reason is that a REACH registration generates extensive information about properties and emissions during uses and that safety instructions will be available to guarantee that emissions will not be higher than what man and nature can sustain. The fee for a joint submission of a REACH registration is 23,250 Euro per legal entity if the company put more than 1,000 tonnes of the dry substance on the market per year.

  20. Relationship between selenium body burdens and tissue concentrations in fish exposed to coal ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston spill site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Carriker, Neil [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Morris, Jesse G [ORNL; Gable, Jennifer [Environmental Standards, Inc.

    2014-01-01

    In December 2008, 4.1 million m3 of coal ash were released into the Emory and Clinch Rivers by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant. Coal ash contains several contaminants, including the bioaccumulative metalloid selenium (Se). Because Se is predominantly accumulated in aquatic organisms through dietary, rather than aqueous exposure, tissue-based toxicity thresholds for Se are currently being considered. The proposed threshold concentrations range between 4-9 g/g Se (dry wt.) in whole body fish, with a proposed fillet threshold of 11.8 g/g. In the present study we examined the spatial and temporal trends in Se bioaccumulation and examined the relationship between the Se content in fillets and in whole bodies of fish collected around the Kingston spill site to determine whether Se bioaccumulation was a significant concern at the ash spill site. While Se concentrations in fish (whole bodies and fillets) were elevated at sampling locations affected by the Kingston ash spill relative to reference locations, concentrations do not appear to be above risk thresholds and have not been increasing over the five year period since the spill. Our results are not only relevant to guiding the human health and ecological risk assessments at the Kingston ash spill site, but because of current national discussions on appropriate guidelines for Se in fish as well for the disposal of coal combustion wastes, our results are also relevant to the general understanding of Se bioaccumulation in contaminated water bodies.

  1. Vegetation type and the presence of ash as factors in the evolution of soil water repellency after a forest fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jiménez-Pinilla

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available After wildfires, burning may induce the occurrence of soil water repellency. Soil water repellency may vary in space and time in function of vegetation, the presence of ash and soil moisture. This study analyzes the evolution of fire-induced soil water repellency in function of these factors, and proposes measures to promote the restoration of fire-affected soils. Burnt and unburnt (control soil plots under pine and shrub from a recently burned area (Gorga, Alicante, SE Spain were established. Three treatments were applied: in some of the plots, the original ash layer was kept on the ground; in a second group, the ash layer was removed for simulating the effects of erosion; finally, in a third group, percolating irrigation was conducted to simulate a possible good input of water into the soil profile after burning, that could occur if the first rains were with high quantity but low intensity. During the dry season, soil moisture content was significantly lower in burned plots due to fire-induced water repellency and reduced vegetation cover. During the wet season, soil moisture decreased in the control unburnt plots due to direct evaporation of water intercepted by vegetation and consumption by roots. Fire increased soil water repellency only in plots under pine. Water repellency decreased during the wet season, disappearing in January and reappearing after declining rainfalls. This baseline recovery of soil water repellency was lower where ash removal was simulated. In unburned plots, seasonal fluctuations were less important. In general, ash removal promotes a rapid reduction of water repellency, since it can induce washing of hydrophobic compounds. Irrigation performed immediately after the fire also contributed to decreased water repellency.

  2. Effects of wood ash fertilization on forest floor greenhouse gas emissions and tree growth in nutrient poor drained peatland forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernfors, M; Sikström, U; Nilsson, M; Klemedtsson, L

    2010-09-15

    Wood ash (3.1, 3.3 or 6.6 tonnes dry weight ha(-1)) was used to fertilize two drained and forested peatland sites in southern Sweden. The sites were chosen to represent the Swedish peatlands that are most suitable for ash fertilization, with respect to stand growth response. The fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO(2)), methane (CH(4)) and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) from the forest floor, measured using opaque static chambers, were monitored at both sites during 2004 and 2005 and at one of the sites during the period 1 October 2007-1 October 2008. No significant (p>0.05) changes in forest floor greenhouse gas exchange were detected. The annual emissions of CO(2) from the sites varied between 6.4 and 15.4 tonnes ha(-1), while the CH(4) fluxes varied between 1.9 and 12.5 kg ha(-1). The emissions of N(2)O were negligible. Ash fertilization increased soil pH at a depth of 0-0.05 m by up to 0.9 units (pfertilization, the mean annual tree stand basal area increment was significantly larger (pash dose plots compared with control plots (0.64 m(2) ha(-1) year(-1) and 0.52 m(2) ha(-1) year(-1), respectively). The stand biomass, which was calculated using tree biomass functions, was not significantly affected by the ash treatment. The groundwater levels during the 2008 growing season were lower in the high ash dose plots than in the corresponding control plots (pash dose plots suggest that fertilization promoted tree growth, while not affecting greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:20667583

  3. Effects of chemical composition of fly ash on efficiency of metal separation in ash-melting of municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Separation of Pb and Zn from Fe and Cu in ash-melting of municipal solid waste. ► Molar ratio of Cl to Na and K in fly ash affected the metal-separation efficiency. ► The low molar ratio and a non-oxidative atmosphere were better for the separation. - Abstract: In the process of metal separation by ash-melting, Fe and Cu in the incineration residue remain in the melting furnace as molten metal, whereas Pb and Zn in the residue are volatilized. This study investigated the effects of the chemical composition of incineration fly ash on the metal-separation efficiency of the ash-melting process. Incineration fly ash with different chemical compositions was melted with bottom ash in a lab-scale reactor, and the efficiency with which Pb and Zn were volatilized preventing the volatilization of Fe and Cu was evaluated. In addition, the behavior of these metals was simulated by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Depending on the exhaust gas treatment system used in the incinerator, the relationships among Na, K, and Cl concentrations in the incineration fly ash differed, which affected the efficiency of the metal separation. The amounts of Fe and Cu volatilized decreased by the decrease in the molar ratio of Cl to Na and K in the ash, promoting metal separation. The thermodynamic simulation predicted that the chlorination volatilization of Fe and Cu was prevented by the decrease in the molar ratio, as mentioned before. By melting incineration fly ash with the low molar ratio in a non-oxidative atmosphere, most of the Pb and Zn in the ash were volatilized leaving behind Fe and Cu

  4. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Ya Liang; Tyler Moore; Douglas P. Harrison

    2003-08-01

    This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2003 and June 30, 2003 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for concentration of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Grade 1 sodium bicarbonate performed similarly to grade 5 sodium bicarbonate in fixed bed testing in that activity improved after the first carbonation cycle and did not decline over the course of 5 cycles. Thermogravimetric analysis indicated that sodium bicarbonate sorbents produced by calcination of sodium bicarbonate are superior to either soda ash or calcined trona. Energy requirements for regeneration of carbon dioxide sorbents (either wet or dry) is of primary importance in establishing the economic feasibility of carbon dioxide capture processes. Recent studies of liquid amine sorption processes were reviewed and found to incorporate conflicting assumptions of energy requirements. Dry sodium based processes have the potential to be less energy intensive and thus less expensive than oxygen inhibited amine based systems. For dry supported sorbents, maximizing the active fraction of the sorbent is of primary importance in developing an economically feasible process.

  5. A fly ash and shale fired brick production line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuYali

    2005-01-01

    The article describes the fly ash and shale fired brick production line with annual output of 1250 million bricks, designed by Xi'an Research and Design Institute of Wall and Roof Material, commissioned by QinDian Building Material Subcompany, and set an example for using fly ash and shale in China.

  6. Washing of granulated solidification fly ash containing radioactive contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incineration fly ash produced from city garbage, water-and-sewage sludge, and wastes generated by radioactive decontamination activities tends to have a high concentration of radioactive materials, and radioactive cesium in fly ash has high solubility in water. In order to advance the safe processing of incineration fly ash, it is necessary to have a technology for reducing the cesium in the fly ash. Washing the fly ash with water is an effective way of reducing the amount of radioactive cesium. Then, this study developed a new method for washing fly ash after granulated solidification. Laboratory tests showed that 70% or more of the radioactive cesium was removed by washing of the granulated solidification fly ash adjusted into 1-9.5 mm diameter particles under the following conditions: flow rate (SV) ≦ 10h-1 and flow volume ≧ 10 times of fly ash volume. Demonstration tests also confirmed the effectiveness of washing and the reduction of the volume of radioactive wastes. (author)

  7. Fly ash in landfill top covers - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brännvall, E; Kumpiene, J

    2016-01-01

    Increase of energy recovery from municipal solid waste by incineration results in the increased amounts of incineration residues, such as fly ash, that have to be taken care of. Material properties should define whether fly ash is a waste or a viable resource to be used for various applications. Here, two areas of potential fly ash application are reviewed: the use of fly ash in a landfill top cover either as a liner material or as a soil amendment in vegetation layer. Fly ashes from incineration of three types of fuel are considered: refuse derived fuel (RDF), municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) and biofuel. Based on the observations, RDF and MSWI fly ash is considered as suitable materials to be used in a landfill top cover liner. Whereas MSWI and biofuel fly ashes based on element availability for plant studies, could be considered suitable for the vegetation layer of the top cover. Responsible application of MSWI ashes is, however, warranted in order to avoid element accumulation in soil and elevation of background values over time. PMID:26701627

  8. Multinuclear NMR approach to coal fly ash characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netzel, D.A.

    1991-09-01

    This report describes the application of various nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to study the hydration kinetics and mechanisms, the structural properties, and the adsorption characteristics of coal fly ash. Coal fly ash samples were obtained from the Dave Johnston and Laramie River electric power generating plants in Wyoming. Hydrogen NMR relaxation times were measured as a function of time to observe the kinetics of hydration for the two coal fly ashes at different temperatures and water-to-cement ration. The kinetic data for the hydrated coal fly ashes were compared to the hydration of portland cement. The mechanism used to describe the kinetic data for the hydration of portland cement was applied, with reservation, to describe the hydration of the coal fly ashes. The results showed that the coal fly ashes differ kinetically from that of portland cement and from each other. Consequently, both coal fly ashes were judged to be poorer cementitious materials than portland cement. Carbon-13 NMR CP/MAS spectra were obtained for the anhydrous coal fly ashes in an effort to determine the type of organic species that may be present, either adsorbed on the surface or entrained.

  9. A study of fly ash-lime granule unfired brick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Chindaprasirt; K. Pimraksa [Khon Kaen University (Thailand). Department of Civil Engineering

    2008-02-15

    In this paper, the properties of fly ash-lime granule unfired bricks are studied. Granules were prepared from mixtures of fly ash and lime at fly ash to hydrated lime ratios of 100:0 (Ca/Si = 0.2), 95:5 (Ca/Si = 0.35) and 90:10 (Ca/Si = 0.5). After a period of moist curing, the microstructure and mineralogy of the granules were studied. Microstructure examination reveals that new phases in the form of needle-like particles are formed at the surface of granule. The granules were used to make unfired bricks using hydrothermal treatment at temperature of 130 {+-} 5{sup o}C and pressure of 0.14 MPa. The microstructures, mineralogical compositions, mechanical properties and environmental impact of bricks were determined. The results reveal that the strengths of unfired bricks are dependent on the fineness of fly ash. The strength is higher with an increase in fly ash fineness. The strengths of the fly ash-lime granule unfired brick are excellent at 47.0-62.5 MPa. The high strength is due to the formation of new products consisting mainly of hibschite and Al-substituted 11 {angstrom} tobermorite. The main advantage of utilization of granule is the ability to increase the pozzolanic reaction of fly ash through moisture retained in the granule. In addition, the heavy elements, in particular Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn are efficiently retained in the fly ash-lime granule unfired brick.

  10. Mineralogy and phase transition of oil sands coke ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heemun Jang; Thomas H. Etsell [University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2006-08-15

    Coke obtained from Syncrude and Suncor was investigated to characterize the metals and minerals by ashing it at various temperatures. Samples were collected by high temperature ashing at 100{sup o}C intervals from 400 to 1200{sup o}C. Samples were also obtained from low temperature ashing (LTA) which gives little effect on the mineral assemblage compared to HTA samples. X-ray diffraction patterns of Suncor and Syncrude coke ash were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively to characterize the mineral phases in the sample and their thermal transition behavior. In Suncor ash, kaolinite, illite, gypsum, anhydrite, microcline, anorthite, hematite, sillimanite and quartz were dominant phases in ash from the LTA temperature up to 700{sup o}C, and mullite, cristobalite, hercynite, albite, anorthite, pseudobrookite and other iron-titanium oxides were dominant mineral phases from 700 to 1200{sup o}C. In Syncrude ash, illite, anhydrite, quartz, anorthite, microcline, sillimanite and hematite were dominant up to 700{sup o}C, and hercynite, anorthite, albite, pseudobrookite and other iron-titanium oxides were dominant up to 1200{sup o}C. The higher quantities of Ca, K and Na, and the lower quantities of V, Fe and Ni in Syncrude ash resulted in higher amorphocity and the different mineral phases. 32 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Speciation of arsenic and selenium during leaching of fly ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, E.E. van der

    1995-01-01

    The leaching (release) of large amounts of oxyanions, such as those of arsenic and selenium, is an major environmental problem when it comes to the disposal or use of coal fly ash. To predict environmentally safe conditions for the disposal or use of fly ash in, for example, construction materials,

  12. Screening coal combustion fly ashes for application in geopolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valcke, S.L.A.; Pipilikaki, P.; Sarabér, A.J.; Fischer, H.R.; Nugteren, H.W.

    2013-01-01

    Driven by cost and sustainability, secondary resource materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, and bottom ash are increasingly used for alternative types of concrete binders, such as geopolymers. Because secondary resources may be highly variable from the perspective of geopolymers, it is ofte

  13. Stabilization of Fly Ash Deposits through Selected Cereal Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florica Morariu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash, a waste product from burning coal in power plants, occupies important spaces and is a major harm forenvironment: water, air, soil and associated ecosystems. New deposits do not have available nutrients for plantgrowth. The study presents a process of stimulating growth of oats in deposits of fly ash, which eliminates listed.Phytostabilization of new deposit is fast after fertilization with sewage sludge-based compost in the presence/absence of native or modified volcanic tuff with grain species, Avena sativa L., and variety Lovrin 1. Experimentalstudies have shown the species adaptability to climatic conditions and a growth rate until the maturity correlated withtype of treatment of upper layers of fly ash deposit. Fly ash with sewage sludge compost treatment 50 t/hadetermined the growth with 75% of the amount of grains vs. the amount of grains harvested from untreated fly ash.Fly ash with sewage sludge compost mixed with modified indigenous volcanic tuff 2.5 t/ha treatment determined thegrowth with 80% vs. the amount of grains harvested from untreated fly ash. If oat straw harvested from fertilizedvariant without modified indigenous volcanic tuff increases in weight are 30% and for fertilized variant in thepresence of tuff increases in weight are 39.8% vs. quantities harvested from untreated fly ash.

  14. Sintering of MSWI fly ash by microwave energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Sun-Yu; Lo, Shang-Lien; Hsieh, Ching-Hong; Chen, Ching-Lung

    2009-04-15

    This study presents the sintering of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash assisted by microwave energy. The composition of fly ash was investigated by chemical sequential extraction and modified microwave digestion method. Effects of process time, container materials, aging time and salt contents were also discussed. The major elements of fly ash are Ca, Cl, Na, Si, K, Al, Mg, and Zn, and the metal species, Zn, Cr, Pb, Ca, and Cu, are mainly in the oxide phase. Under microwave processing, the fly ash was sintered into a glass-ceramics and the leaching concentrations of heavy metals were restrained. The stabilization efficiency increased with an increase in processing time in most of the cases. Better stabilization efficiency of fly ash was discovered by using the SiO(2) or Al(2)O(3) container than by using the graphite plate/SiC plate. The presence of salt in the fly ash could enhance the sintering and stabilization of fly ash. During the aging time of 0-30 days, negligible Pb in the sintered fly ash was leached out, and the leaching concentration was lower than the criterion. PMID:18692957

  15. An unusually dry story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Rajagopala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a middle-aged woman with a prior history of central nervous system (CNS demyelinating disorder who presented with an acute onset quadriparesis and respiratory failure. The evaluation revealed distal renal tubular acidosis with hypokalemia and medullary nephrocalcinosis. Weakness persisted despite potassium correction, and ongoing evaluation confirmed recurrent CNS and long-segment spinal cord demyelination with anti-aquaporin-4 antibodies. There was no history of dry eyes or dry mouth. Anti-Sjogren′s syndrome A antigen antibodies were elevated, and there was reduced salivary flow on scintigraphy. Coexistent antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with inferior vena cava thrombosis was also found on evaluation. The index patient highlights several rare manifestations of primary Sjogren′s syndrome (pSS as the presenting features and highlights the differential diagnosis of the clinical syndromes in which pSS should be considered in the Intensive Care Unit.

  16. Dry alcohol production plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Mirjana S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for dry alcohol production plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects a production plant with a capacity of 40 m3/y was manufactured, at "Zorka Pharma", Šabac in 1995-1996. The product meets all quality demands, as well as environmental regulations. The dry alcohol production process is fully automatized. There is no waste in the process, neither gaseous, nor liquid. The chosen process provides safe operation according to temperature regime and resistance in the pipes, air purification columns and filters. Working at increased pressure is suitable for evaporation and condensation at increased temperatures. The production process can be controlled manually, which is necessary during start-up, and repairs.

  17. Cadmium in insects after ash fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin Lodenius; Jussi Josefsson; Kari Heli(o)vaara; Esa Tulisalo; Matti Nummelin

    2009-01-01

    Ash fertilization of forests returns nutrients to forest ecosystems and has a positive effect on soil pH.but it also may elevate Cd concentrations of forest biota.Cadmium concentrations of some forest insects(Formica ants.carabids and Coleopteran larvac from decaying wood)were investigated in southern Finland where two plots were fertilized with wood ash,while two other plots represented anfertilized control plots.In ants,mean Cd concentration was 3.6±1.4 mg/kg.with nest workers having significantly higher concen-trations than workers trapped in pitfall traps.Concentrations at fertilized and unfertilized plots were similar.In carabid beetles,the average Cd concentration of Carabus glabratus was 0.44±0.36 mg/kg.with no significant difference between control plots and fertilized plots.In another carabid beetle,Pterostichus niger,mean Cd concentration was higher at fertilized plots compared to control plots.We conclude that the variation of Cd concentra-tions in the insects studied is more efficiently controlled by species-specific differences than fertilization history of the forest floor.

  18. Recovery potential of German sewage sludge ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Oliver; Adam, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Incineration of sewage sludge is expected to increase in the future due to growing concerns about the direct use of sludge in agriculture. Sewage sludge is the pollutant sink of wastewater treatment and thus loaded with contaminants that might pose environmental hazards. Incineration degrades organic pollutants efficiently, but since the ash is currently mostly disposed of, all valuable component like phosphorus (P) and technologically relevant metals present in the sewage sludge ash (SSA) are removed from the economic cycle entirely. We conducted a complete survey of SSA from German mono-incineration facilities and determined the theoretical recovery potential of 57 elements. German SSA contains up to 19,000 t/a P which equals approximately 13% of phosphorus applied in the German agriculture in form of phosphate rock based mineral fertilizers. Thus, SSA is an important secondary resource of P. However, its P-solubility in ammonium citrate solution, an indicator for the bioavailability, is only about 26%. Treatment of SSA is recommended to enhance P bioavailability and remove heavy metals before it is applied as fertilizer. The recovery potential for technologically relevant metals is generally low, but some of these elements might be recovered efficiently in the course of P recovery exploiting synergies. PMID:25697389

  19. Radioactive wastes dispersed in stabilized ash cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most widely-used methods for the solidification/stabilization of low-level radwaste is by incorporation into Type-I/II ordinary portland cement (OPC). Treating of OPC with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO2) has been shown to significantly increase the density, while simultaneously decreasing porosity. In addition, the process significantly reduces the hydrogenous content, reducing the likelihood of radiolytic decomposition reactions. This, in turn, permits increased actinide loadings with a concomitant reduction in disposable waste volume. In this article, the authors discuss the combined use of fly-ash-modified OPC and its treatment with SCCO2 to further enhance immobilization properties. They begin with a brief summary of current cement immobilization technology in order to delineate the areas of concern. Next, supercritical fluids are described, as they relate to these areas of concern. In the subsequent section, they present an outline of results on the application of SCCO2 to OPC, and its effectiveness in addressing these problem areas. Lastly, in the final section, they proffer their thoughts on why they believe, based on the OPC results, that the incorporation of fly ash into OPC, followed by supercritical fluid treatment, can produce highly efficient wasteforms

  20. Radioactive wastes dispersed in stabilized ash cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, J.B.; Taylor, C.M.V.; Sivils, L.D.; Carey, J.W.

    1997-12-31

    One of the most widely-used methods for the solidification/stabilization of low-level radwaste is by incorporation into Type-I/II ordinary portland cement (OPC). Treating of OPC with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SCCO{sub 2}) has been shown to significantly increase the density, while simultaneously decreasing porosity. In addition, the process significantly reduces the hydrogenous content, reducing the likelihood of radiolytic decomposition reactions. This, in turn, permits increased actinide loadings with a concomitant reduction in disposable waste volume. In this article, the authors discuss the combined use of fly-ash-modified OPC and its treatment with SCCO{sub 2} to further enhance immobilization properties. They begin with a brief summary of current cement immobilization technology in order to delineate the areas of concern. Next, supercritical fluids are described, as they relate to these areas of concern. In the subsequent section, they present an outline of results on the application of SCCO{sub 2} to OPC, and its effectiveness in addressing these problem areas. Lastly, in the final section, they proffer their thoughts on why they believe, based on the OPC results, that the incorporation of fly ash into OPC, followed by supercritical fluid treatment, can produce highly efficient wasteforms.

  1. Desaster, destruction, creation: from nothing to ashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Terenzi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to briefly discuss about certain notions as nothing, fire, ashes and the creative power that derives from them. To reach this aim, first of all we chose some philosophical concepts extracted from Heidegger's philosophy. Then, we are going to discuss the book De l’esprit: Heidegger et la question from Jacques Derrida, in which he pays attention to the use of the word Geist (mind/spirit. Derrida will investigate the use of this word and its variants in Heidegger’s philosophical work, identifying potential readings that could be hidden, uncovering a huge heideggerian theatrical scenery around this word. The philosopher of deconstruction’s reading makes important contributions and allows the reader new approaches to Heidegger’s philosophy. This two axes will aid our own reading in order to show the relation between those notions: nothing, fire, ashes, related to creative act. In this article other names will also appear, as Heraclitus, Habermas, Wittgenstein and Beckett.

  2. Phosphorus Recovery from Ashes of Sewage Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornel, Peter; Schaum, Peter

    2003-07-01

    About 90% of the incoming phosphorus load of waste water is eliminated by waste water treatment and transferred into the sewage sludge. Considerable amounts of sewage sludge can not be used agriculturally but are incinerated. Thus the ash from mono sludge incineration plants contains significant amounts of phosphorus (up to 25% P{sub 2}O{sub 5}) and could be used as raw material in fertilizer industry. The ash is hygienically harmless and free of organic substances. The ratio of phosphorus to heavy metals is basically the same as in the sewage sludge. The first step in separating phosphorus from heavy metals is to dissolve phosphorus by extraction. The most promising way seems to be the release of phosphorus with acids or bases. With 1 m sulphuric acid it is possible to release phosphorus completely. By use of acid most of the heavy metals dissolve, too. With caustic soda as solvent, only 30-40% of the phosphorus can be dissolved but the eluate is almost free of heavy metals. The amount of phosphorus which can be released with caustic soda, depends on the applied precipitant (Al or Fe salts) for phosphorus elimination at the waste water treatment. (author)

  3. Mesoporous Silica from Rice Husk Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.R. Shelke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesoporous silica is used as a raw material in several areas: in preparation of catalysts, in inks, as a concrete hardening accelerator, as a component of detergents and soaps, as a refractory constituent etc. Sodium silicate is produced by reacting rice hull ash (RHA with aqueous NaOH and silica is precipitated from the sodium silicate by acidification. In the present work, conversion of about 90% of silica contained in RHA into sodium silicate was achieved in an open system at temperatures of about 100 °C. The results showed that silica obtained from RHA is mesoporous, has a large surface area and small particle size. Rice Husk is usually mixed with coal and this mixture is used for firing boilers. The RHA therefore, usually contains carbon particles. Activated carbon embedded on silica has been prepared using the carbon already present in RHA. This carbon shows good adsorption capacity. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 25th April 2010, Revised: 17th June 2010, Accepted: 24th June 2010[How to Cite: V.R. Shelke, S.S. Bhagade, S.A. Mandavgane. (2010. Mesoporous Silica from Rice Husk Ash. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 5 (2: 63-67. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.2.793.63-67][DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.2.793.63-67

  4. Hot-Gas Filter Ash Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, M.L.; Hurley, J.P.; Dockter, B.A.; O`Keefe, C.A.

    1997-07-01

    Large-scale hot-gas filter testing over the past 10 years has revealed numerous cases of cake buildup on filter elements that has been difficult, if not impossible, to remove. At times, the cake can blind or bridge between candle filters, leading to filter failure. Physical factors, including particle-size distribution, particle shape, the aerodynamics of deposition, and system temperature, contribute to the difficulty in removing the cake, but chemical factors such as surface composition and gas-solid reactions also play roles in helping to bond the ash to the filters or to itself. This project is designed to perform the research necessary to determine the fuel-, sorbent-, and operations-related conditions that lead to blinding or bridging of hot-gas particle filters. The objectives of the project are threefold: (1) Determine the mechanisms by which a difficult-to-clean ash is formed and how it bridges hot-gas filters (2) Develop a method to determine the rate of bridging based on analyses of the feed coal and sorbent, filter properties, and system operating conditions and (3) Suggest and test ways to prevent filter bridging.

  5. ASH position paper: hypertension in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindheimer, Marshall D; Taler, Sandra J; Cunningham, F Gary

    2009-04-01

    The American Society of Hypertension is publishing a series of Position Papers in their official journals throughout the 2008-2009 years. The following Position Paper originally appeared: JASH. 2008;2(6):484-494. Hypertension complicates 5% to 7% of all pregnancies. A subset of preeclampsia, characterized by new-onset hypertension, proteinuria, and multisystem involvement, is responsible for substantial maternal and fetal morbidity and is a marker for future cardiac and metabolic disease. This American Society of Hypertension, Inc (ASH) position paper summarizes the clinical spectrum of hypertension in pregnancy, focusing on preeclampsia. Recent research breakthroughs relating to etiology are briefly reviewed. Topics include classification of the different forms of hypertension during pregnancy, status of the tests available to predict preeclampsia, and strategies to prevent preeclampsia and to manage this serious disease. The use of antihypertensive drugs in pregnancy, and the prevention and treatment of the convulsive phase of preeclampsia, eclampsia, with intravenous magnesium sulfate is also highlighted. Of special note, this guideline article, specifically requested, reviewed, and accepted by ASH, includes solicited review advice from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

  6. Cleaning of South African coal using a compound dry cleaning apparatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Haibin; Luo Zhenfu; Zhao Yuemin; Wu Wanchang; Zhang Cuiyu; Dai Ningning

    2011-01-01

    The compound dry cleaning principle is briefly described. A beneficiation test on South African coal was conducted using a model compound dry cleaning apparatus. Excellent results were obtained and the optimum operating parameters were determined. They are: an amplitude of 3.0 ram, a motor frequency of 47.5 Hz, an air volume of 50%, a transverse angle of 7°, and a longitudinal angle of -2°. These conditions yield a clean coal containing 11% ash and a coal production of 75%. The organic efficiency, η, is 95.86%. These results show that the South African coal can be separated effectively by compound dry cleaning, which will popularize the compound dry cleaning method.

  7. The potential of two Salix genotypes for radionuclide/heavy metal accumulation. A case study of Rovinari ash pit (Gorj District, Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernea, Cornelia; Neţoiu, Constantin; Corneanu, Gabriel; Crăciun, Constantin; Corneanu, Mihaela; Cojocaru, Luminiţa; Rovena Lăcătuşu, Anca; Popescu, Ion

    2014-05-01

    Thermo Electric Power Plants (TEPP) produce a high amount of ash, that contains heavy metals and radionuclides. Ash is usually stored in ash-pits, in mixture with water and contains U235, Th 234 and their decay products, that are released from the coal matrix, during combustion, as well as heavy metals. Warm weather dried the ash and it can be spread by the wind in surrounded area. This paper presents the results of an experiment with two Salix genotypes, cultivated on an old closed ash-pit, nearby the Rovinari TEPP, in the middle Jiu valley (Gorj District, Romania), in order to evaluate its tolerance to heavy metals and radionuclides. Ash analysis revealed the presence of natural radionuclides, beloging from ash and coal dust, as well as of Cs 137, of Chernobil provenance. Radionuclides content over the normal limits for Romania were registered for Th 234, Pb210, U235 and Ra226. The heavy metals level in ash was over the normal limits, but under the alerts limits. In order to establish the woody plants tolerance to heavy metals and radionuclides, it is important to study the seedlings behavior. In this respect Salix alba and Salix viminalis whips and cuttings culture have been establish on Rovinari ash-pit. The observations made on survival and growth rate pointed out the superiority of Salix viminalis behaviour. After a period of three years Salix viminalis registered a 96% survival rate, while in Salix alba annual decreases, reaching to 14%. These results are supported by the radionuclides content in leaves and by the electron microscopy studies. In Salix alba the leaves parenchimatic cells present a low sinthesis activity. The exogenous particles are accumulated in parenchima cells vacuola, the chloroplasts are usually agranal, with few starch grains and mitocondria presents slightly dillated crista. The ultrastructural features of the mature leaf cells, evidenced the natural adaptation of Salix viminalins for development in an environment with a big amount of

  8. Aerosol properties and meteorological conditions in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina, during the resuspension of volcanic ash from the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graciela Ulke, Ana; Torres Brizuela, Marcela M.; Raga, Graciela B.; Baumgardner, Darrel

    2016-09-01

    The eruption in June 2011 of the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle Volcanic Complex in Chile impacted air traffic around the Southern Hemisphere for several months after the initial ash emissions. The ash deposited in vast areas of the Patagonian Steppe was subjected to the strong wind conditions prevalent during the austral winter and spring experiencing resuspension over various regions of Argentina. In this study we analyze the meteorological conditions that led to the episode of volcanic ash resuspension which impacted the city of Buenos Aires and resulted in the closure of the two main airports in Buenos Aires area (Ezeiza and Aeroparque) on 16 October 2011. A relevant result is that resuspended material (volcanic ash plus dust) imprints a distinguishable feature within the atmospheric thermodynamic vertical profiles. The thermodynamic soundings show the signature of "pulses of drying" in layers associated with the presence of hygroscopic ash in the atmosphere that has already been reported in similar episodes after volcanic eruptions in other parts of the world. This particular footprint can be used to detect the probable existence of volcanic ash layers. This study also illustrates the utility of ceilometers to detect not only cloud base at airports but also volcanic ash plumes at the boundary layer and up to 7 km altitude. Aerosol properties measured in the city during the resuspension episode indicate the presence of enhanced concentrations of aerosol particles in the boundary layer along with spectral signatures in the measurements at the Buenos Aires AERONET site typical of ash plus dust advected towards the city. The mandatory aviation reports from the National Weather Service about airborne and deposited volcanic ash at the airport near the measurement site (Aeroparque) correlate in time with the enhanced concentrations. The presence of the resuspended material was detected by the CALIOP lidar overpassing the region. Since the dynamics of ash resuspension and

  9. PECULIARITIES OF DRY FRICTION

    OpenAIRE

    Каgаn Mikhail Lazarevich; Antonov Viktor Ivanovich; Belov Viktor Anatolevich

    2012-01-01

    Some peculiarities of dry friction that represent the outcomes of several well-known physical phenomena but that are insufficiently accurately and simply explained in the scientific literature, are analyzed in this paper. The authors research into the reasons for the oscillation of strings of bowed string instruments in furtherance of the laws of mechanics; they also explain differences in the sound produced by strings of bowed and plucked instruments; they study the reasons for t...

  10. Dried Yoghurts: Kurut and Kashk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Say

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The removal of water from the foods by the drying process is a known method since ancient times. Among drying methods, drying under sun is a method that cheap, quite easily implemented, needing less labour and equipment. Drying yoghurt (Kurut is a form of dried yoghurt or buttermilk. Kurut is made with plenty of milk in summer seasons and consumed in winter in eastern and southeastern region of our country. Dried yoghurt is consumed with pasting after softened thoroughly by into hot water or granulating. Drying yoghurt (Kashk is manufactured traditionally in dried form and produced industrially in liquid form in Iran and it is used flavoring agents as a food ingredient in the preparation of various food. According to Institute of Standard and Industrial Researches of Iran, dried kashk is obtained by heating of homemade yoghurt, yoghurt drink or the remaining buttermilk. Traditional liquid kashk is produced by milling of dried kashk and industrial liquid kashk is also produced by industrially produced yoghurt. Kurut and dried kashk as dried milk products are high in protein and mineral contents, but their fat and water content are low level. With this study it was summarized some characteristics of these products with the production methods of dried yoghurt produced in Turkey and Iran.

  11. Drying of fiber webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, David W.

    1997-01-01

    A process and an apparatus for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquified eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciately stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers.

  12. Application of Fly Ash from Solid Fuel Combustion in Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Hougaard

    2008-01-01

    Nordjyllandsværket, unit 3; 3) post treatment of fly ash to lower its AEA adsorptivity. The foam index test is the method usually employed to determine the degree of fly ash interference with AEAs in concrete. The test involves the use of commercial AEAs and visual observation of foam stability. These facts reduce...... with implementation of low-NOx combustion technologies. The present thesis concerns three areas of importance within this field: 1) testing of fly ash adsorption behavior; 2) the influence of fuel type and combustion conditions on the ash adsorption behaviour including full-scale experiments at the power plant...... has a low sensitivity toward small variations in AEA adsorption between different fly ashes and it requires further work before a finished procedure is accomplished. Finally, it was shown that changes in temperature affect both test methods. Pulverized fuel has been combusted in an entrained flow...

  13. Electrical charging of ash in Icelandic volcanic plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Aplin, Karen L; Nicoll, Keri A

    2014-01-01

    The existence of volcanic lightning and alteration of the atmospheric potential gradient in the vicinity of near-vent volcanic plumes provides strong evidence for the charging of volcanic ash. More subtle electrical effects are also visible in balloon soundings of distal volcanic plumes. Near the vent, some proposed charging mechanisms are fractoemission, triboelectrification, and the so-called "dirty thunderstorm" mechanism, which is where ash and convective clouds interact electrically to enhance charging. Distant from the vent, a self-charging mechanism, probably triboelectrification, has been suggested to explain the sustained low levels of charge observed on a distal plume. Recent research by Houghton et al. (2013) linked the self-charging of volcanic ash to the properties of the particle size distribution, observing that a highly polydisperse ash distribution would charge more effectively than a monodisperse one. Natural radioactivity in some volcanic ash could also contribute to self-charging of volcan...

  14. Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Self, S.A.

    1994-12-01

    Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal. Volume 1 contains the dissertation of Ghosal which covers the characterization of fly ash and the measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of fly ash-zinc oxide nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Yeole

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash, generated in thermal power plants, is recognized as an environmental pollutant. Thus, measures are required to be undertaken to dispose it in an environmentally friendly method. In this paper an attempt is made to coat zinc oxide nano-particles on the surface of fly ash by a simple and environmentally friendly facile chemical method, at room temperature. Zinc oxide may serve as effective corrosion inhibitor by providing sacrificial protection. Concentration of fly ash was varied as 5, 10 and 15 (w/w % of zinc oxide. It was found that crystallinity increased, whereas particle size, specific gravity and oil absorption value decreased with increased concentration of fly ash in zinc oxide, which is attributed to the uniform distribution of zinc oxide on the surface of fly ash. These nanocomposites can potentially be used in commercial applications as additive for anticorrosion coatings.

  16. Pretreatment and utilization of waste incineration bottom ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Within recent years, researchers and authorities have had increasing focus on leaching properties from waste incineration bottom ashes. Researchers have investigated processes such as those related to carbonation, weathering, metal complexation, and leaching control. Most of these investigations......, however, have had a strong emphasis on lab experiments with little focus on full scale bottom ash upgrading methods. The introduction of regulatory limit values restricting leaching from utilized bottom ashes, has created a need for a better understanding of how lab scale experiences can be utilized...... in full scale bottom ash upgrading facilities, and the possibilities for complying with the regulatory limit values. A range of Danish research and development projects have within 1997-2005 investigated important techniques for bottom ash upgrading. The primary focus has been placed on curing...

  17. Ash Deposition Trials at Three Power Stations in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karin; Frandsen, Flemming; Larsen, Ole Hede

    1998-01-01

    Six full-scale trials were conducted at three power stations in Denmark: Ensted, Funen, and Vendsyssel power stations. During these trials, pulverized coal, bottom ash, fly ash, and deposits from cooled probes were sampled and analyzed with various techniques. On the basis of SEM analyses......, the deposits can be grouped into five textural types, which all possess distinct textural and chemical characteristics. Likewise, the deposition mechanisms for these five types are characteristic and they may be used for constructing a model for the buildup and maturation of an ash deposit. The deposits...... collected on the probes were thin (maximum 2 mm after 9 h) and the influence of operational parameters and probe temperatures on the magnitude of the deposits were minor. The probe temperatures had no influence on the composition of the ash deposits for coals with low ash deposition propensities, whereas...

  18. Leaching of nutrient salts from fly ash from biomass combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kaj; Vu, Duc Thuong; Stenby, Mette;

    2005-01-01

    Methods to selectively leach nutrient salts from fly ash, while leaving cadmium un-dissolved were studied. Temperature, pH, water to fly ash ratio are all expected to influence the kinetics and the equilibrium boundaries for this process. Three different leaching methods were investigated. The...... moving bed process with agitation/centrifugation. It was found that a satisfactory leaching of the nutrient salts could be achieved with the third method using only two or three stages, depending on the water to fly ash ratio. It is an advantage to perform the process at temperatures above 50°C as the...... first method was a counter current moving bed process in four stages. The ash was kept in filter bags and leached with water that was introduced into the bags at 40-50°C. In the second method, fly ash and water was brought into contact in a partially fluidized bed. The third method was a counter current...

  19. Improved mechanical properties of concretes by fly ash grading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, L.; Lu, Z.; Yan, Y.; Qiao, H.; An, J. [Southeast University of Science and Technology, Mianyang (China)

    2008-08-15

    The influence of the dosage of class II fly ash of different fineness on the mechanical properties of concrete was researched. The result shows that activity in the early phase elevated as the amount of submicron particles increased by grinding the fly ash. Over-grinding resulted in slump decreasing sharply. SEM analysis shows that hydrated products of glass micron-beads in class II fly ash were not found. The synergistic effect between fly ash of different fineness was researched by the Andersen equation. The micro-aggregate effect is the most important factor affecting the strength of concrete. A fourth-order mixture with a 50% replacement of cement by fly ash was studied under conditions of practical production and application. A regression equation which uses slump and compressive strength at 28 d as a function was deduced.

  20. STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen

    2003-05-20

    The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. During this fourth project period we completed the characterization of ozone-treated carbon surfaces and wrote a comprehensive report on the mechanism through which ozone suppresses the adsorption of concrete surfactants.