WorldWideScience

Sample records for artificially created pneumothorax

  1. CT staging of lung cancer: the role of artificial pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Seong; Im, Jung Gi; Han, Man Chung

    1991-01-01

    To determine the role of artificially induced pneumothorax in the evaluation of the chest wall and mediastinal invasion in patients with peripheral bronchogenic carcinoma. CT scans of 22 patients obtained after induced pneumothorax were evaluated. All patients had peripheral lung mass abutting the pleura on a routine CT scan. Room air of 200-400ml was introduced through intrathoracic negative pressure initially, followed by pressure injection through the 18 gauge long bevelled needle under fluoroscopic control. Conclusively, CT with artificial pneumothorax added more information than conventional CT in the evaluation of the chest wall or mediastinal invasion by lung cancer without notable risk

  2. Pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumothorax Overview A pneumothorax (noo-moe-THOR-aks) is a collapsed lung. A pneumothorax occurs when air leaks into the space between your ... only a portion of the lung collapses. A pneumothorax can be caused by a blunt or penetrating ...

  3. Pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramek, B.A.; Caywood, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the classification, etiopathogenesis, and treatment for the various forms of pneumothorax. Traumatic and nontraumatic pneumothoraces are discussed. New theories on the etiology and treatment of primary spontaneous and secondary pneumothorax are mentioned

  4. A prospective survey on the incidence of chest malignancies after repeated fluoroscopy during artificial pneumothorax therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitabatake, Takashi; Kurokawa, Shigeki; Yamasaki, Michio; Sato, Toshiro; Kurokawa, Hisae

    1975-01-01

    Patients with pulmonary tuberculosis treated in 4 sanatoria in Niigata Prefecture between 1941 and 1961 were followed up by a mail questionnaire. Of 2756 patients, 1193 responded and sent back effective information, letters to 1224 were returned because of uncertain or unknown new address, 326 did not respond, and 13 were excluded because of incomplete answers. Out of the 1193 effective responders, 568 had been treated by artificial pneumothorax (the pneumothorax group), and 552 had not been treated by pneumothorax (the control group). There were 65 deaths in the pneumothorax group, but none of them were from chest malignancies; and 40 deaths in the control group with 4 from chest malignancies. In this survey, there was no evidence of an increased number of chest malignancies (including leukemia) after pneumothorax fluoroscopy. (auth.)

  5. Prospective survey on the incidence of chest malignancies after repeated fluoroscopy during artificial pneumothorax therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitabatake, T; Kurokawa, S; Yamasaki, M; Sato, T; Kurokawa, H [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-10-01

    Patients with pulmonary tuberculosis treated in 4 sanatoria in Niigata Prefecture between 1941 and 1961 were followed up by a mail questionnaire. Of 2756 patients, 1193 responded and sent back effective information, letters to 1224 were returned because of uncertain or unknown new address, 326 did not respond, and 13 were excluded because of incomplete answers. Out of the 1193 effective responders, 568 had been treated by artificial pneumothorax (the pneumothorax group), and 552 had not been treated by pneumothorax (the control group). There were 65 deaths in the pneumothorax group, but none of them were from chest malignancies; and 40 deaths in the control group with 4 from chest malignancies. In this survey, there was no evidence of an increased number of chest malignancies (including leukemia) after pneumothorax fluoroscopy.

  6. Transthoracic Adrenal Biopsy Procedure Using Artificial Carbon Dioxide Pneumothorax as Outpatient Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favelier, Sylvain [CHU (University Hospital), Department of Radiology (France); Guiu, Severine [Georges-Francois Leclerc Cancer Center, Department of Oncology (France); Cherblanc, Violaine; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre; Krause, Denis; Guiu, Boris, E-mail: boris.guiu@chu-dijon.fr [CHU (University Hospital), Department of Radiology (France)

    2013-08-01

    Many routes have been described for percutaneous adrenal gland biopsy. They require either a complex non-axial path or a long hydrodissection or even pass through an organ thereby increasing complications. We describe here an approach using an artificially-induced carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) pneumothorax, performed as an outpatient procedure in a 57-year-old woman. Under local anaesthesia, 200 ml of CO{sub 2} was injected in the pleural space through a Veress needle under computed tomography fluoroscopy, to clear the lung parenchyma from the biopsy route. Using this technique, transthoracic adrenal biopsy can be performed under simple local anaesthesia as an safely outpatient procedure.

  7. Open Pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Paull

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 27-year-old male was transported to the emergency department by emergency medical services after crashing his motorcycle into a guardrail. Upon presentation he was alert, normotensive, and tachypneic. Significant findings: A large chest wound was clinically obvious. A chest radiograph performed after intubation showed subcutaneous emphysema, an anterior rib fracture, and a right-sided pneumothorax. He was then taken to the operating room for further management. Discussion: Thoracic injuries are responsible for one-quarter of all trauma-related deaths. Following rib fracture, pneumothorax is the second most common thoracic injury, occurring in 30% of patients with thoracic trauma. An open pneumothorax occurs when a chest wall injury results in direct communication between the atmosphere and pleura.1-2 It is estimated that open pneumothorax occurs in 80% of all penetrating chest wounds, with stab wounds being more common than gunshot wounds or impalement. Open pneumothoraces can lead to ventilatory insufficiency and rapid respiratory decompensation.2 Advanced Trauma Life Support recommends that the initial management of an open pneumothorax is placement of an occlusive dressing taped on three sides to create a ‘flutter-valve’ mechanism. This should then be followed by tube thoracostomy and repair of the chest wall defect.3 The placement of an occlusive dressing or initial wound closure without subsequent tube thoracostomy may result in the development of a tension pneumothorax.2 The patient was intubated and mechanical ventilation was initiated without complication. Due to the large size of the wound, an occlusive dressing was not placed in the emergency department and the patient was rapidly transported to the operating room for further management. In the operating room two chest tubes were placed. Operative findings included a right hemopneumothorax, multiple rib fractures, and a manubrial fracture. After

  8. [Lymphadenectomy performed along the left recurrent laryngeal nerve after anterior detachment of the esophagus via thoracoscopic esophagectomy in the prone position under artificial pneumothorax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shinichi; Ohshima, Hisami; Katsumori, Takashi; Hamaguchi, Hiromitsu; Tsukamoto, Yukika; Iwanaga, Tomohiro

    2014-11-01

    Thoracoscopic esophagectomy was performed in the prone position under artificial pneumothorax and did not affect the surgical area during lung ventilation; tracheal mobility was also improved. Lymphadenectomy around the left recurrent laryngeal nerve was performed by separating the left main bronchus and trachea between the esophagus and pericardium before detaching the dorsal side of the esophagus.

  9. EU copyright protection of works created by artificial intelligence systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bøhler, Helene Margrethe

    2017-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with copyright regulation of works created by artificial intelligence systems. The rapid advances in artificial intelligence are calling into question some of the fundamental assumptions upon which intellectual property law rests. Currently, the European framework of copyright law does not take non-human innovation into account. Meanwhile, advances in artificial intelligence are quickly making machine-generation of creative works a reality. Institutions of the Europea...

  10. Pneumothorax (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pleura and the lungs is usually very thin. Pneumothorax is the collection of air or gas in ... a lung collapse. The most common cause of pneumothorax is a breathing machine (mechanical ventilator).

  11. PNEUMOTHORAX- DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Milisavljević Slobodan; Spasić Marko; Milošević Bojan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pneumothorax is defined as the presence of air in the pleural cavity, ie, the space between the chest wall and the lung itself. Pneumothorax is classified ethiologically into spontaneous pneumothorax and traumatic pneumothorax. Spontaneous pneumothorax is further classified into primary and secondary. Traumatic pneumothorax may result from either blunt trauma or penetrating injury to the chest wall. It can also be caused by iatrogenic injuries. Spontaneous pneumothorax is a sign...

  12. Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Costumbrado

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 16-year-old male with asthma was brought to the emergency department by his parents for increasing right-sided chest pain associated with cough and mild dyspnea over the past week. Albuterol inhaler did not provide relief. He denied recent trauma, fever, sweats, and chills. The patient’s vitals and oxygen saturations were stable. Physical exam revealed a tall, slender body habitus with no signs of chest wall injuries. Bilateral breath sounds were present, but slightly diminished on the right. A chest radiograph was ordered to determine the etiology of the patient’s symptoms. Significant findings: Initial chest radiograph showed a 50% right-sided pneumothorax with no mediastinal shift, which can be identified by the sharp line representing the pleural lung edge (see arrows and lack of peripheral lung markings extending to the chest wall. While difficult to accurately estimate volume from a two-dimensional image, a 2 cm pneumothorax seen on chest radiograph correlates to approximately 50% volume.1 The patient underwent insertion of a pigtail pleural drain on the right and repeat chest radiograph showed resolution of previously seen pneumothorax. Ultimately the pigtail drain was removed and chest radiograph showed clear lung fields without evidence of residual pneumothorax or pleural effusion. Discussion: Pneumothorax is characterized by air between the lungs and the chest wall.2 Spontaneous pneumothorax (SP occurs when the pneumothorax is not due to trauma or any discernable etiology. 3 SP is multifactorial and may be associated with subpleural blebs, bullae, and other connective tissue changes that predispose the lungs to leak air into the pleural space.4 SP can be further subdivided into primary (no history of underlying lung disease or secondary (history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, tuberculosis, cystic fibrosis, lung malignancy, etc..2 It is estimated that the incidence of SP among US pediatric

  13. Prevalence of artificially created maxillary midline diastema and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the 21-30 years age group comprising 30.5%(19 natural and 24 artificial diastemas); in .... Fifty-two point one percent (25/48) of the respond- ents with artificially .... cause it was the fashion trend and due to peer pres- sure (figure 1). Of the 48 ...

  14. Rapid Gorge Formation in an Artificially Created Waterfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, L.; Mather, A. E.; Stokes, M.; Munoz Martin, A.

    2014-12-01

    A number of studies have examined rates of gorge formation, nick point retreat, and the controls on those rates via bedrock erodibility, the effectiveness of bedrock erosion mechanisms and the role of hillslope processes. Most findings are based on conceptual / empirical models or long term landscape analysis; but studies of recent quantifiable events are scarce yet highly valuable. Here we present expert eye witness account and quantitative survey of large and rapid fluvial erosion events that occurred over an artificially created waterfall at a spillway mouth. In 6 years a ~270 m long, ~100 m deep and ~100 to 160 m wide canyon was carved, and ~1.58 x106 m3 of granite bedrock was removed from the spillway site. Available flow data indicates that the erosion took place under unremarkable flood discharge conditions. The analysis of historic topographic maps enables the reconstruction of the former topography and successive erosion events, enabling the quantification of bedrock erosion amounts, and rates. Analysis of bedrock erodibility and discontinuity patterns demonstrates that the bedrock is mechanically strong, and that similar rock strength and fracture patterns are found throughout the region. It is apparent that structural pre-conditioning through fracture density and orientation in relation to flow and slope direction is of paramount importance in the gorge development. The presented example provides an exceptional opportunity for studying the evolution process of a bedrock canyon and to precisely measure the rate of bedrock channel erosion over a six year period. Results illustrate the highly episodic nature of the erosion and highlight several key observations for the adjustability of bedrock rivers. The observations have implications for the efficiency of bedrock erosion and raise important questions about incision rates, driving mechanisms and timescale assumptions' in models of landscape change.

  15. Creating and maintaining chemical artificial life by robotic symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanczyc, Martin M.; Parrilla, Juan M.; Nicholson, Arwen

    2015-01-01

    We present a robotic platform based on the open source RepRap 3D printer that can print and maintain chemical artificial life in the form of a dynamic, chemical droplet. The robot uses computer vision, a self-organizing map, and a learning program to automatically categorize the behavior of the d......We present a robotic platform based on the open source RepRap 3D printer that can print and maintain chemical artificial life in the form of a dynamic, chemical droplet. The robot uses computer vision, a self-organizing map, and a learning program to automatically categorize the behavior...... confluence of chemical, artificial intelligence, and robotic approaches to artificial life....

  16. Creating and Maintaining Chemical Artificial Life by Robotic Symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanczyc, Martin; Parrilla, Juan M.; Nicholson, Arwen

    2015-01-01

    We present a robotic platform based on the open source RepRap 3D printer that can print and maintain chemical artificial life in the form of a dynamic, chemical droplet. The robot uses computer vision, a self-organizing map, and a learning program to automatically categorize the behavior of the d......We present a robotic platform based on the open source RepRap 3D printer that can print and maintain chemical artificial life in the form of a dynamic, chemical droplet. The robot uses computer vision, a self-organizing map, and a learning program to automatically categorize the behavior...... confluence of chemical, artificial intelligence, and robotic approaches to artificial life....

  17. Catamenial pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visouli, Aikaterini N.; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Porpodis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Catamenial pneumothorax (CP) is the most common form of thoracic endometriosis syndrome, which also includes catamenial hemothorax, catamenial hemoptysis, catamenial hemopneumothorax and endometriosis lung nodules, as well as some exceptional presentations. Usually onset of lung collapse is less than 72 hours after menstruation. Most commonly occurs in women aged 30-40 years, but has been diagnosed in young girls as early as 10 years of age and post menopausal women (exclusively in women of menstrual age) most with a history of pelvic endometriosis. Diagnosis can be hinted by high recurrence rates of lung collapse in a woman of reproductive age with endometriosis. Moreover; CA-125 is elevated. Video-assisted thoracoscopy or medical thoracoscopy is used for confirmation. In our current work we will present all aspects of CP from diagnosis to treatment. PMID:25337402

  18. Artificial-life researchers try to create social reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flam, F

    1994-08-12

    Some scientists, among them cosmologist Stephen Hawking, argue that computer viruses are alive. A better case might be made for many of the self-replicating silicon-based creatures featured at the fourth Conference on Artificial Life, held on 5 to 8 July in Boston. Researchers from computer science, biology, and other disciplines presented computer programs that, among other things, evolved cooperative strategies in a selfish world and recreated themselves in ever more complex forms.

  19. Meaning of cognitive processes for creating artificial intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Pangrác, Vojtěch

    2011-01-01

    This diploma thesis brings an integral view at cognitive processes connected with artificial intelligence systems, and makes a comparison with the processes observed in nature, including human being. A historical background helps us to look at the whole issue from a certain point of view. The main axis of interest comes after the historical overview and includes the following: environment -- stimulations -- processing -- reflection in the cognitive system -- reaction to stimulation; I balance...

  20. Radiation-induced pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, D.M.; Littman, P.; Gefter, W.B.; Miller, W.T.; Raney, R.B. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an uncommon complication of radiation therapy to the chest. The proposed pathogenesis is radiation-induced fibrosis promoting subpleural bleb formation that ruptures resulting in pneumothorax. We report on two young patients with primary sarcomas without pulmonary metastases who developed spontaneous pneumothorax after irradiation. Neither patient had antecedent radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis

  1. Unusual causes of pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, Daniel R.; Parrish, Scott; Browning, Robert F.; Turner, J. Francis; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsiouda, Theodora; Madesis, Athanasios; Karaiskos, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is divided to primary and secondary. It is a situation that requires immediate treatment, otherwise it could have severe health consequences. Pneumothorax can be treated either by thoracic surgeons, or pulmonary physicians. In our current work, we will focus on unusual cases of pneumothorax. We will provide the etiology and treatment for each case, also a discussion will be made for each situation. PMID:25337394

  2. Catamenial pneumothorax - case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasara, R.; Kudelkova, J.; Pestal, A.; Jedlicka, V.; Capov, I.; Reismullerova, L.

    2014-01-01

    Catamenial pneumothorax is a rare type of spontaneous pneumothorax, developed in women in reproductive age due to the presence of thoracic endometriosis. Medical history is the key to the correct diagnosis. Treatment combines methods of thoracic surgery, together with hormonal substitution therapy and, in rare cases, also gynecological operation. We present the case report of young woman with spontaneous pneumothorax due to thoracic endometriosis. (author)

  3. Occult pneumothorax, revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Mangar Devanand; Abdelmalak Hany; Omar Hesham R; Rashad Rania; Helal Engy; Camporesi Enrico M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Pneumothorax is a recognized cause of preventable death following chest wall trauma where a simple intervention can be life saving. In cases of trauma patients where cervical spine immobilization is mandatory, supine AP chest radiograph is the most practical initial study. It is however not as sensitive as CT chest for early detection of a pneumothorax. "Occult" pneumothorax is an accepted definition of an existing but usually a clinically and radiologically silent disturbance that i...

  4. Silicosis with bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotedar Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentation with simultaneous bilateral pneumothorax is uncommon and usually in the context of secondary spontaneous pneumothorax.The association of pneumothorax and silicosis is infrequent and most cases are unilateral. Bilateral pneumothorax in silicosis is very rare with just a few reports in medical literature.

  5. PHILOSOPHICAL AND ANTHROPOLOGICAL IMPORTANCE OF DEVELOPMENT OF ARTIFICIALLY CREATED INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. D. Gensitskiy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Understanding the philosophical and anthropological importance of the development the artificial intelligence systems requires the analysis of the socio and anthropological content of intercomputer problems of interaction in the context of media philosophical praxis, anthropological maintenance of intellect nature, considering the specifics of the concept of artificial intelligence systems in the environment of M2M development of socio-cognitive practices of intercomputer interaction of social and humanitarian potential. Methodology. The implementation target is seen in the use of scientific and theoretical basis of the media philosophical, philosophical anthropology, the media philosophical approach to understanding society, science and technology, the use of publications on selected topics of research. Scientific novelty. The concept of artificial intelligence systems in the aspect of social and humanitarian potential of their formation and development in the environment of M2M was considered. The problems of machine learning as technology transformation M2M were analysed. The anthropological threats to the development of artificially created intelligent systems were defined. Conclusions. From the global risks point of view, one of the most critical circumstances due to the artificial intelligent system can strengthen its intelligence very quickly. The obvious reason for suspecting such an opportunity – a recursive self-improvement. Such system becomes smarter, including the intelligent writing of internal cognitive function, that the ability to rewrite their existing cognitive function to make it work better. This will make such systems more intelligent, and smarter in terms of the processing itself. The success of artificial intelligence may be the beginning of the end of the human race. Almost any technology falling into malicious hands reveals the potential for harm, but when it comes to artificial intelligent system, there is a

  6. Acoustic detection of pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansy, Hansen A.; Royston, Thomas J.; Balk, Robert A.; Sandler, Richard H.

    2003-04-01

    This study aims at investigating the feasibility of using low-frequency (pneumothorax detection were tested in dogs. In the first approach, broadband acoustic signals were introduced into the trachea during end-expiration and transmitted waves were measured at the chest surface. Pneumothorax was found to consistently decrease pulmonary acoustic transmission in the 200-1200-Hz frequency band, while less change was observed at lower frequencies (ppneumothorax states (pPneumothorax was found to be associated with a preferential reduction of sound amplitude in the 200- to 700-Hz range, and a decrease of sound amplitude variation (in the 300 to 600-Hz band) during the respiration cycle (pPneumothorax changed the frequency and decay rate of percussive sounds. These results imply that certain medical conditions may be reliably detected using appropriate acoustic measurements and analysis. [Work supported by NIH/NHLBI #R44HL61108.

  7. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Hesham R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a true occult pneumothorax where an initial AP chest X-ray revealed no evidence of pneumothorax and a CT chest immediately performed revealed evidence of pneumothorax. The second case represents an example of a missed rather than a truly occult pneumothorax where the initial chest radiograph revealed clues suggesting the presence of pneumothorax which were missed by the reading radiologist. The third case emphasizes the fact that "occult pneumothorax is predictable". The presence of subcutaneous emphesema and pulmonary contusion should call for further imaging with CT chest to rule out pneumothorax. Thoracic CT scan is therefore the "gold standard" for early detection of a pneumothorax in trauma patients. This report aims to sensitize readers to the entity of occult pneumothorax and create awareness among intensivists and ER physicians regarding the proper diagnosis and management.

  8. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hesham R; Mangar, Devanand; Khetarpal, Suneel; Shapiro, David H; Kolla, Jaya; Rashad, Rania; Helal, Engy; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-09-27

    Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP) chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a true occult pneumothorax where an initial AP chest X-ray revealed no evidence of pneumothorax and a CT chest immediately performed revealed evidence of pneumothorax. The second case represents an example of a missed rather than a truly occult pneumothorax where the initial chest radiograph revealed clues suggesting the presence of pneumothorax which were missed by the reading radiologist. The third case emphasizes the fact that "occult pneumothorax is predictable". The presence of subcutaneous emphesema and pulmonary contusion should call for further imaging with CT chest to rule out pneumothorax. Thoracic CT scan is therefore the "gold standard" for early detection of a pneumothorax in trauma patients. This report aims to sensitize readers to the entity of occult pneumothorax and create awareness among intensivists and ER physicians regarding the proper diagnosis and management.

  9. Sonographic diagnosis of pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna F Husain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung sonography has rapidly emerged as a reliable technique in the evaluation of various thoracic diseases. One important, well-established application is the diagnosis of a pneumothorax. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of a pneumothorax in the management of a critical patient can prevent the progression into a life-threatening situation. Sonographic signs, including ′lung sliding′, ′B-lines′ or ′comet tail artifacts′, ′A-lines′, and ′the lung point sign′ can help in the diagnosis of a pneumothorax. Ultrasound has a higher sensitivity than the traditional upright anteroposterior chest radiography (CXR for the detection of a pneumothorax. Small occult pneumothoraces may be missed on CXR during a busy trauma scenario, and CXR may not always be feasible in critically ill patients. Computed tomography, the gold standard for the detection of pneumothorax, requires patients to be transported out of the clinical area, compromising their hemodynamic stability and delaying the diagnosis. As ultrasound machines have become more portable and easier to use, lung sonography now allows a rapid evaluation of an unstable patient, at the bedside. These advantages combined with the low cost and ease of use, have allowed thoracic sonography to become a useful modality in many clinical settings.

  10. [Diagnostic ultrasound in pneumothorax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, É; Pichereau, C; Bourcier, S; Galbois, A; Lejour, G; Baudel, J-L; Ait-Oufella, H; Guidet, B

    2016-10-01

    For a long time the lung has been regarded as inaccessible to ultrasound. However, recent clinical studies have shown that this organ can be examined by this technique, which appears, in some situations, to be superior to thoracic radiography. The examination does not require special equipment and is possible using a combination of simple qualitative signs: lung sliding, the presence of B lines and the demonstration of the lung point. The lung sliding corresponds to the artefact produced by the movement of the two pleural layers, one against the other. The B lines indicate the presence of an interstitial syndrome. The presence of lung sliding and/or B lines has a negative predictive value of 100% and formally excludes a pneumothorax in the area where the probe has been applied. The presence of the lung point is pathognomonic of pneumothorax but the sensitivity is no more than 60%. Ultrasound is therefore a rapid and simple means of excluding a pneumothorax (lung sliding or B lines) and of confirming a pneumothorax when the lung point is visible. The question that remains is whether ultrasound can totally replace radiography in the management of this disorder. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Pneumothorax and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasawa, Tae; Ogura, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Asakura, Akira; Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Yazawa, Takuya; Inoue, Tomio

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the relation between the severity of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and the incidence of pneumothorax on computed tomography (CT) images. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the presence of pneumothorax in 56 consecutive patients who died of IPF from the initial CT to death. We quantitatively analyzed a total of 207 CT images and measured the volume of the normal pattern (N-pattern) and each lesion pattern on the initial CT and their serial changes. The effects of pneumothorax and clinical and CT features on survival were evaluated using Cox regression analysis. Pneumothorax occurred in 17 of 56 patients. Comparison of the pneumothorax (+) and (-) groups showed the initial vital capacity (VC) was lower (P=0.005) and the follow-up period was shorter (P=0.03) in the former group. The decrease in the N-pattern volume in the pneumothorax (+) group was significantly faster than in the pneumothorax (-) group (P=0.013). Cox regression analyses identified a rapid decrease in N-pattern volume (P=0.008) and a rapid decrease in VC (P=0.002), but not pneumothorax, as significant predictors of poor survival. Pneumothorax in IPF patients is associated with lower VC and rapid deterioration of CT findings. The findings suggest that pneumothorax is a complication of advanced IPF. (author)

  12. Electronic microscopy study of miofilaments created artificially at low ionic power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corredor R, C.

    1995-07-01

    Artificial miofilaments created at low ionic power from miosin extracted from muscles tissues of Lepus cuniculus and of Homarus americanus showed morphological differences depending from the ionic power, pH and polymerization time. The dorsal muscle miosin of L Cuniculus created at low ionic power of 0,2 M KCl-PO 4 , polymerized into miofilaments of indefine length at a pH of 6,4. At a pH of 6,1 these miofilaments were shorter. The miosin of H americanus polymerized into miofilaments of sizeable length following a Gaussian distribution with a modal value dependant on the time of polymerization. The miosin from the abdominal flexor muscle had a greater modal length than the miofilaments drawn from the miosin of the 'tenaza' muscle (Fig. 1). Two types of electrodensity 'coloration' are observed: the positive coloration is characterized by a quasi homogeneous or continuous distribution of Uranilo acetate on the miofibrilla and its surroundings showing few muscular details of the miofibrillas. The negative coloration, characterized by a distribution around the miofibrillas enabled a better observation of morphological details (Fig. 2). These two types of coloration or electrodensity reveal hydrophobic or

  13. Genetics Home Reference: primary spontaneous pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Primary spontaneous pneumothorax Primary spontaneous pneumothorax Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Primary spontaneous pneumothorax is an abnormal accumulation of air in the ...

  14. Pneumothorax in cardiac pacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To identify risk factors for pneumothorax treated with a chest tube after cardiac pacing device implantation in a population-based cohort.METHODS AND RESULTS: A nationwide cohort study was performed based on data on 28 860 patients from the Danish Pacemaker Register, which included all Danish...... age was 77 years (25th and 75th percentile: 69-84) and 55% were male (n = 15 785). A total of 190 patients (0.66%) were treated for pneumothorax, which was more often in women [aOR 1.9 (1.4-2.6)], and in patients with age >80 years [aOR 1.4 (1.0-1.9)], a prior history of chronic obstructive pulmonary...

  15. Clinical and pathological analysis of 10 cases of secondary pneumothorax due to angiosarcoma of the scalp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Hideto; Watanuki, Yuji; Miyazawa, Naoki; Kudo, Makoto; Inoue, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Kaneko, Takeshi; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki

    2008-01-01

    Angiosarcoma of the scalp is a very rare disease. Secondary pneumothorax is known as a characteristic complication in this disease due to lung metastasis. In this study, 17 patients of angiosarcoma of the scalp, diagnosed at our hospital between 1996 and 2006, were analyzed. Secondary pneumothorax was observed in 10 of these patients, among which bilateral pneumothorax occurred in 5 relapse of pneumothorax occurred in 6 and pneumothorax with bloody pleural fluid occurred in 7 patients. Characteristic findings on chest CT were multiple thin-wall cavities and ground-glass attenuation around the cavity, located in bilateral subpleural lung fields. It is suggested that the subpleural thin-wall cavities cause pneumothorax. Although pleurosclerosis were performed in 5 patients and one of them bad a subsequent partial resection of the lung, pneumothorax reocurred within a short period of time in all patients. The average survival time from the first pneumothorax episode was only 4.1 months. Secondary pneumothorax caused by this disease was intractable, resulting in an unfavorable outcome. It is necessary to develop a proper treatment strategy for secondary pneumothorax to create a favorable prognosis in this disease. (author)

  16. Vented chest seals for prevention of tension pneumothorax in a communicating pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotora, Joseph G; Henao, Jose; Littlejohn, Lanny F; Kircher, Sara

    2013-11-01

    Tension pneumothorax accounts for 3%-4% of combat casualties and 10% of civilian chest trauma. Air entering a wound via a communicating pneumothorax rather than by the trachea can result in respiratory arrest and death. In such cases, the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care advocates the use of unvented chest seals to prevent respiratory compromise. A comparison of three commercially available vented chest seals was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of tension pneumothorax prevention after seal application. A surgical thoracostomy was created and sealed by placing a shortened 10-mL syringe barrel (with plunger in place) into the wound. Tension pneumothorax was achieved via air introduction through a Cordis to a maximum volume of 50 mL/kg. A 20% drop in mean arterial pressure or a 20% increase in heart rate confirmed hemodynamic compromise. After evacuation, one of three vented chest seals (HyFin(®), n = 8; Sentinel(®), n = 8, SAM(®), n = 8) was applied. Air was injected to a maximum of 50 mL/kg twice, followed by a 10% autologous blood infusion, and finally, a third 50 mL/kg air bolus. Survivors completed all three interventions, and a 15-min recovery period. The introduction of 29.0 (±11.5) mL/kg of air resulted in tension physiology. All three seals effectively evacuated air and blood. Hemodynamic compromise failed to develop with a chest seal in place. HyFin(®), SAM(®), and Sentinel(®) vented chest seals are equally effective in evacuating blood and air in a communicating pneumothorax model. All three prevented tension pneumothorax formation after penetrating thoracic trauma. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Pneumothorax in severe thoracic traumas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camassa, N.W.; Boccuzzi, F.; Diettorre, E.; Troilo, A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors reviewed CT scans and supine chest X-ray of 47 patients affected by severe thoracic trauma, examined in 1985-86. The sensibility of the two methodologies in the assessment of pneumothorax was compared. CT detected 25 pneumothorax, whereas supine chest X-ray allowed a diagnosis in 18 cases only. In 8 of the latter (44.4%) the diagnosis was made possible by the presence of indirect signs of pneumothorax only - the most frequent being the deep sulcus sign. The characterization of pneumothorax is important especially in the patients who need to be treated with mechanical ventilation therapy, or who are to undergo surgery in total anaesthesia

  18. Effectiveness of digital subtraction radiography in detecting artificially created osteophytes and erosions in the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocasarac, Husniye Demirturk [Dept. of Comprehensive Dentistry, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio (United States); Celenk, Peruze [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ondokuz Mayis University, Samsun (Turkmenistan)

    2017-06-15

    Erosions and osteophytes are radiographic characteristics that are found in different stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. This study assessed the effectiveness of digital subtraction radiography (DSR) in diagnosing simulated osteophytes and erosions in the TMJ. Five intact, dry human skulls were used to assess the effectiveness of DSR in detecting osteophytes. Four cortical bone chips of varying thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm, and 2.0 mm) were placed at the medial, central, and lateral aspects of the condyle anterior surface. Two defects of varying depth (1.0 mm and 1.5 mm) were created on the lateral, central, and medial poles of the condyles of 2 skulls to simulate erosions. Panoramic images of the condyles were acquired before and after artificially creating the changes. Digital subtraction was performed with Emago dental image archiving software. Five observers familiar with the interpretation of TMJ radiographs evaluated the images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the imaging methods. The area under the ROC curve (Az) value for the overall diagnostic accuracy of DSR in detecting osteophytic changes was 0.931. The Az value for the overall diagnostic accuracy of panoramic imaging was 0.695. The accuracy of DSR in detecting erosive changes was 0.854 and 0.696 for panoramic imaging. DSR was remarkably more accurate than panoramic imaging in detecting simulated osteophytic and erosive changes. The accuracy of panoramic imaging in detecting degenerative changes was significantly lower than the accuracy of DSR (P<.05). DSR improved the accuracy of detection using panoramic images.

  19. Effectiveness of digital subtraction radiography in detecting artificially created osteophytes and erosions in the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocasarac, Husniye Demirturk; Celenk, Peruze

    2017-01-01

    Erosions and osteophytes are radiographic characteristics that are found in different stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. This study assessed the effectiveness of digital subtraction radiography (DSR) in diagnosing simulated osteophytes and erosions in the TMJ. Five intact, dry human skulls were used to assess the effectiveness of DSR in detecting osteophytes. Four cortical bone chips of varying thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm, and 2.0 mm) were placed at the medial, central, and lateral aspects of the condyle anterior surface. Two defects of varying depth (1.0 mm and 1.5 mm) were created on the lateral, central, and medial poles of the condyles of 2 skulls to simulate erosions. Panoramic images of the condyles were acquired before and after artificially creating the changes. Digital subtraction was performed with Emago dental image archiving software. Five observers familiar with the interpretation of TMJ radiographs evaluated the images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the imaging methods. The area under the ROC curve (Az) value for the overall diagnostic accuracy of DSR in detecting osteophytic changes was 0.931. The Az value for the overall diagnostic accuracy of panoramic imaging was 0.695. The accuracy of DSR in detecting erosive changes was 0.854 and 0.696 for panoramic imaging. DSR was remarkably more accurate than panoramic imaging in detecting simulated osteophytic and erosive changes. The accuracy of panoramic imaging in detecting degenerative changes was significantly lower than the accuracy of DSR (P<.05). DSR improved the accuracy of detection using panoramic images

  20. Pneumothorax associated with nontuberculous mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueyama, M; Asakura, Takanori; Morimoto, Kozo; Namkoong, Ho; Matsuda, Shuichi; Osawa, Takeshi; Ishii, Makoto; Hasegawa, Naoki; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Goto, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The incidence of nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease (NTMPD) is increasing worldwide. Secondary spontaneous pneumothorax occurs as a complication of underlying lung disease and is associated with higher morbidity, mortality, and recurrence than primary spontaneous pneumothorax. We here investigated the clinical features and long-term outcomes of pneumothorax associated with NTMPD. We conducted a retrospective study on consecutive adult patients with pneumothorax associated with NTMPD at Fukujuji Hospital and Keio University Hospital from January 1992 to December 2013. We reviewed the medical records of 69 such patients to obtain clinical characteristics, radiological findings, and long-term outcomes, including pneumothorax recurrence and mortality. The median age of the patients was 68 years; 34 patients were women. The median body mass index was 16.8 kg/m2. Underlying pulmonary diseases mainly included chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary tuberculosis. On computed tomography, nodules and bronchiectasis were observed in 46 (98%) and 45 (96%) patients, respectively. Consolidation, pleural thickening, interlobular septal thickening, and cavities were most common, and observed in 40 (85%), 40 (85%), 37 (79%), and 36 (77%) patients, respectively. Regarding pneumothorax treatment outcomes, complete and incomplete lung expansion were observed in 49 patients (71%) and 15 patients (22%), respectively. The survival rate after pneumothorax was 48% at 5 years. By the end of the follow-up, 33 patients had died, and the median survival was 4.4 years with a median follow-up period of 1.7 years. The rate of absence of recurrence after the first pneumothorax was 59% at 3 years. By the end of the follow-up, 18 patients had experienced pneumothorax recurrence. Furthermore, 12/18 patients (66%) with recurrent pneumothorax died during the study period. Twenty-three patients (70%) died because of NTMPD progression. Low body mass index (BMI) was a

  1. Metal-conjugated affinity labels: A new concept to create enantioselective artificial metalloenzymes

    KAUST Repository

    Reiner, Thomas

    2013-02-20

    How to train a protein: Metal-conjugated affinity labels were used to selectively position catalytically active metal centers in the binding pocket of proteases. The resulting artificial metalloenzymes achieve up to 82% e.r. in the hydrogenation of ketones. The modular setup enables a rapid generation of artificial metalloenzyme libraries, which can be adapted to a broad range of catalytic conditions. 2013 The Authors.

  2. Metal-conjugated affinity labels: A new concept to create enantioselective artificial metalloenzymes

    KAUST Repository

    Reiner, Thomas; Jantke, Dominik; Marziale, Alexander N.; Raba, Andreas; Eppinger, Jö rg

    2013-01-01

    How to train a protein: Metal-conjugated affinity labels were used to selectively position catalytically active metal centers in the binding pocket of proteases. The resulting artificial metalloenzymes achieve up to 82% e.r. in the hydrogenation of ketones. The modular setup enables a rapid generation of artificial metalloenzyme libraries, which can be adapted to a broad range of catalytic conditions. 2013 The Authors.

  3. Pneumothorax: from definition to diagnosis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Lampaki, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Secen, Nevena; Dryllis, Georgios; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Rapti, Aggeliki; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an urgent situation that has to be treated immediately upon diagnosis. Pneumothorax is divided to primary and secondary. A primary pneumothorax is considered the one that occurs without an apparent cause and in the absence of significant lung disease. On the other hand secondary pneumothorax occurs in the presence of existing lung pathology. There is the case where an amount of air in the chest increases markedly and a one-way valve is formed leading to a tension pneumothorax....

  4. Simulation on change of generic satellite radar cross section via artificially created plasma sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Shen Shou Max; Chuang, Yu-Chou

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancements in antisatellite missile technologies have proven the effectiveness of such attacks, and the vulnerability of satellites in such exercises inspires a new paradigm in RF Stealth techniques suitable for satellites. In this paper we examine the possibility of using artificially created plasma sprays on the surface of the satellite’s main body to alter its radar cross section (RCS). First, we briefly review past research related to RF Stealth using plasma. Next, we discuss the physics between electromagnetic waves and plasma, and the RCS number game in RF Stealth design. A comparison of RCS in a generic satellite and a more complicated model is made to illustrate the effect of the RCS number game, and its meaning for a simulation model. We also run a comparison between finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) and multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM) codes, and find the RCS results are very close. We then compare the RCS of the generic satellite and the plasma-covered satellite. The incident radar wave is a differentiated Gaussian monopulse, with 3 dB bandwidth between 1.2 GHz and 4 GHz, and we simulate three kinds of plasma density, with a characteristic plasma frequency ω P   =  0.1, 1, and 10 GHz. The electron-neutral collision frequency ν en is set at 0.01 GHz. We found the RCS of plasma-covered satellite is not necessarily smaller than the originally satellite. When ω P is 0.1 GHz, the plasma spray behaves like a dielectric, and there is minor reduction in the RCS. When ω P is 1 GHz, the X–Y cut RCS increases. When ω P is 10 GHz, the plasma behaves more like a metal to the radar wave, and stronger RCS dependency to frequency appears. Therefore, to use plasma as an RCS adjustment tool requires careful fine-tuning of plasma density and shape, in order to achieve the so-called plasma stealth effect. (paper)

  5. Delayed Tension Pneumothorax During Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Lun Chen

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Tension pneumothorax is a life-threatening emergency that rapidly results in cardiopulmonary arrest. It requires prompt diagnosis and treatment. We present 2 cases from our practice, 1 caused by blunt chest trauma and the other resulting from laparoscopic surgery. Both were successfully treated by insertion of a chest tube. The diagnosis and treatment of intraoperative pneumothorax is discussed together with a review of the literature.

  6. Project O.R.B (Operation Reef Ball): Creating Artificial Reefs, Educating the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Project O.R.B. (Operation Reef Ball) team at South Plantation High School's Everglades Restoration & Environmental Science Magnet Program is trying to help our ailing south Florida coral reefs by constructing, deploying, and monitoring designed artificial reefs. Students partnered with the Reef Ball Foundation, local concrete companies, state parks, Girl Scouts, Sea Scouts, local universities and environmental agencies to construct concrete reef balls, each weighing approximately 500 lbs (227 kg). Students then deployed two artificial reefs consisting of over 30 concrete reef balls in two sites previously permitted for artificial reef deployment. One artificial reef was placed approximately 1.5 miles (2.4 km) offshore of Golden Beach in Miami-Dade County with the assistance of Florida Atlantic University and their research vessel. A twin reef was deployed at the mouth of the river in Oleta River State Park in Miami. Monitoring and maintenance of the sites is ongoing with semi-annual reports due to the Reef Ball Foundation and DERM (Department of Environmental Resource Management) of Miami-Dade County. A second goal of Project O.R.B. is aligned with the Florida Local Action Strategy, the Southeast Florida Coral Reef Initiative, and the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force, all of which point out the importance of awareness and education as key components to the health of our coral reefs. Project O.R.B. team members developed and published an activity book targeting elementary school students. Outreach events incorporate cascade learning where high school students teach elementary and middle school students about various aspects of coral reefs through interactive "edu-tainment" modules. Attendees learn about water sampling, salinity, beach erosion, surface runoff, water cycle, ocean zones, anatomy of coral, human impact on corals, and characteristics of a well-designed artificial reef. Middle school students snorkel on the artificial reef to witness first-hand the success

  7. Creating a two-layered augmented artificial immune system for application to computer network intrusion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Matthew G.; Lamont, Gary B.

    2009-05-01

    Computer network security has become a very serious concern of commercial, industrial, and military organizations due to the increasing number of network threats such as outsider intrusions and insider covert activities. An important security element of course is network intrusion detection which is a difficult real world problem that has been addressed through many different solution attempts. Using an artificial immune system has been shown to be one of the most promising results. By enhancing jREMISA, a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm inspired artificial immune system, with a secondary defense layer; we produce improved accuracy of intrusion classification and a flexibility in responsiveness. This responsiveness can be leveraged to provide a much more powerful and accurate system, through the use of increased processing time and dedicated hardware which has the flexibility of being located out of band.

  8. Characteristics of the patients undergoing surgical treatment for pneumothorax: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Muharrem; Yuksel, Melih; Kandemir, Mehmet Nail

    2016-05-01

    To identify the characteristic features of pneumothorax patients treated surgically. The retrospective study was conducted at Gazi Yasargil Education and Research Hospital Thoracic Surgery Clinic, Diyarbakir, Turkey and comprised records of pneumothorax patients from January 2004 to December 2014. They were divided into two groups as spontaneous and traumatic. Patients who had not undergone any surgical intervention were excluded. Mean age, gender distribution, location of the disease, type of pneumothorax, and treatment method were noted. Among patients with spontaneous pneumothorax, age and months distribution, smoking habits, pneumothorax size, and treatment method were assessed. The effect of gender, location, comorbid disease, smoking, subgroup of disease, and pneumothorax size on surgical procedures were also investigated. The mean age of the 672 patients in the study was 34.5±6.17 years. There were 611(91%) men and 61(9%) women. Disease was on the right side in 360(53.6%) patients, on the left side in 308(45.8%), and bilateral in 4(0.59%). Besides, 523(77.8%) patients had spontaneous, and 149(22.7%) had traumatic pneumothorax. Overall, 561(83.5%) patients had been treated with tube thoracostomy, whereas 111(16.5%) were treated with thoracotomy/thoracoscopic surgery. The presence of comorbid diseases, being primary, and being total or subtotal according to partial were found to create predisposition to thoracotomy/ thoracoscopic surgery (ppneumothorax being total, the presence of comorbid diseases, and the increase in pneumothorax size, thoracotomy or thoracoscopic surgery is preferred.

  9. Feasibility of gas-discharge and optical methods of creating artificial ozone layers of the earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batanov, G.M.; Kossyi, I.A.; Matveev, A.A.; Silakov, V.P.

    1996-01-01

    Gas-discharge (microwave) and optical (laser) methods of generating large-scale artificial ozone layers in the stratosphere are analyzed. A kinetic model is developed to calculate the plasma-chemical consequences of discharges localized in the stratosphere. Computations and simple estimates indicate that, in order to implement gas-discharge and optical methods, the operating power of ozone-producing sources should be comparable to or even much higher than the present-day power production throughout the world. Consequently, from the engineering and economic standpoints, microwave and laser methods cannot be used to repair large-scale ozone 'holes'

  10. The risk of iatrogenic pneumothorax after electromyography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassardjian, Charles D; O'gorman, Cullen M; Sorenson, Eric J

    2016-04-01

    Pneumothorax is a potentially serious complication of electromyography (EMG). Data on the frequency of pneumothorax after EMG are lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency, timing, and risk factors for iatrogenic pneumothorax after EMG. Cases of pneumothorax after EMG were reviewed for clinical, electrophysiological, and radiological data. Of 64,490 EMG studies, 7 patients had an association between the EMG and pneumothorax. All patients were symptomatic and presented within 24 hours of EMG. Sampling of serratus anterior and diaphragm was causative in 1 patient each. In 5 patients, multiple high-risk muscles were sampled. The highest frequency of pneumothorax was observed with examination of serratus anterior (0.445%) and diaphragm (0.149%). The frequency of symptomatic iatrogenic pneumothorax after EMG appears to be low, and examinations of serratus anterior and diaphragm carry the highest risk. Electromyographers should be aware of the risk of pneumothorax and should counsel patients accordingly. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. [Emergency Surgery and Treatments for Pneumothorax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Masatoshi

    2015-07-01

    The primary care in terms of emergency for pneumothorax is chest drainage in almost cases. The following cases of pneumothorax and the complications need something of surgery and treatments. Pneumothorax with subcutaneous emphysema often needs small skin incisions around the drainage tube. Tension pneumothorax often needs urgent chest drainage. Pneumothorax with intractable air leakage often needs interventional treatments like endobroncheal occlusion (EBO) or thoracographic fibrin glue sealing method (TGF) as well as urgent thoracoscopic surgery. Pneumothorax with acute empyema also often needs urgent thoracoscopic surgery within 2 weeks if chest drainage or drug therapy are unsuccessful. It will probably become chronic empyema of thorax after then. Pneumothorax with bleeding needs urgent thoracoscopic surgery in case of continuous bleeding over 200 ml/2 hours. In any cases of emergency for pneumothorax, respiratory physicians should collaborate with respiratory surgeons at the 1st stage because it is important to timely judge conversion of surgical treatments from medical treatments.

  12. Exclusion of pneumothorax by radionuclide lung scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    A case is reported in which ventilation lung imaging was useful in excluding a large pneumothorax. This technique may be helpful in patients with emphysema in whom exclusion of pneumothorax by radiographic criteria might be difficult

  13. The Effect of Creating an Artificial Night On Physiological Changes in Preterm Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Reyhani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Preterm infants are exposed to irregular light for several weeks or months in the Neonatal intensive-care unit (NICU. This lack of maternal entrainment, the exposure to irregular extrauterine lighting and care in the nursery may contribute to the disturbances in body temperature, sleep and physiological changes that are commonly experienced by preterm infants. Materials and Methods This is a randomized clinical trial dual group study, 38 preterm infants (gestational age of 30-34 weeks due to prematurity hospitalized at NICU of Ghaem Hospital, Iran, were evaluated within 10 days. Infants were divided into two groups of 1200-1700 and 1701-2200g based on the weight and the weight of each group were randomized into artificial night (dark period was from 19 to 7 during incubator was covered with linen cloth & light period was from 7 to 19 removed the cover and control groups (continuous lighting. Mothers & infants through questionnaires, interviews, observation & document completion, changes in physiologic & weight before entering the study & then physiologic changes twice a day, weight & feeding tolerance were collected daily. Data were analyzed using SPSS version16 software. Results The two groups were matched in terms of other variables. Mean gestational age was (31.39+1.39 weeks in both groups, mean weight at study entry in period light of the (1415.8+ 263.46 and (1471.6 + 244.47 was in continuous lighting. The difference in oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, respectively, higher and lower in the intervention group than the control group. Result of the statistical analysis of repeated measures suggests that the difference between the two groups was significant (P

  14. Iatrogenic pneumothorax related to mechanical ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chien-Wei; Sun, Shu-Fen

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a potentially lethal complication associated with mechanical ventilation. Most of the patients with pneumothorax from mechanical ventilation have underlying lung diseases; pneumothorax is rare in intubated patients with normal lungs. Tension pneumothorax is more common in ventilated patients with prompt recognition and treatment of pneumothorax being important to minimize morbidity and mortality. Underlying lung diseases are associated with ventilator-related pneumothorax with pneumothoraces occurring most commonly during the early phase of mechanical ventilation. The diagnosis of pneumothorax in critical illness is established from the patients’ history, physical examination and radiological investigation, although the appearances of a pneumothorax on a supine radiograph may be different from the classic appearance on an erect radiograph. For this reason, ultrasonography is beneficial for excluding the diagnosis of pneumothorax. Respiration-dependent movement of the visceral pleura and lung surface with respect to the parietal pleura and chest wall can be easily visualized with transthoracic sonography given that the presence of air in the pleural space prevents sonographic visualization of visceral pleura movements. Mechanically ventilated patients with a pneumothorax require tube thoracostomy placement because of the high risk of tension pneumothorax. Small-bore catheters are now preferred in the majority of ventilated patients. Furthermore, if there are clinical signs of a tension pneumothorax, emergency needle decompression followed by tube thoracostomy is widely advocated. Patients with pneumothorax related to mechanical ventilation who have tension pneumothorax, a higher acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score or PaO2/FiO2 < 200 mmHg were found to have higher mortality. PMID:24834397

  15. Effectiveness of Alveolar Opening in Patients with Acute Lung Injury and Concomitant Pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Marchenkov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the efficiency of a lung opening maneuver in patients with acute lung injury (ALI and concomitant pneumothorax, who were on biphasic positive airway pressure ventilation (BIPAP and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation. Subject and methods. Seventy-three patients with acute lung injury and concomitant pneumoth-orax resulting from blunt chest trauma were examined. Their condition was an APACHE II of 18—24 scores. After elimination of pneumothorax, an open lung maneuver was made using different modes of lung support 3—5 times daily. Results. The study has shown that BIPAP used in patients with ALI and concomitant pneumothorax reduces the time of pleural cavity drainage, which allows the lung opening maneuver to be applied earlier. The employment of the latter in patients with ALI and pneumothorax permits a prompter recovery of lung function during different types of respiratory support, which is attended by reductions in the number of complications, artificial ventilation, and mortality. When the lung opening maneuver is combined with BIPAP, its efficiency considerably increases. Key words: acute lung injury, pneumothorax, BIPAP, lung opening maneuver.

  16. Spontaneous pneumothorax in silicotuberculosis of lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolenic, J.; Jurgova, T.; Zimacek, J.; Vajo, J.; Krchnavy, M.

    1995-01-01

    The authors describe the case of 62 years old man with the appearance of spontaneous pneumothorax, in whom the basic pulmonary disease was silicotuberculosis of the lung. At clinic of occupational diseases in Kosice have been evidence 965 cases of silicosis and silicotuberculosis. From 1971 they have now the first case of spontaneous pneumothorax. The authors make discussion about possible mechanical and biochemical factors, which cause relatively low incidence of spontaneous pneumothorax in silicosis of the lung. (authors)

  17. Post biopsy pneumothorax: Risk factors and course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, J.A.; Retamar, J.A.; Blazquez, J.; Castano, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    The was to study the natural course of pneumothorax produced after aspiration biopsy in the attempt to differentiate those cases that will resolve spontaneously from those that will require drainage, and to assess the possible risk factors associated with the development of this entity. Eighty-nine CT-guided aspiration biopsies were performed in 80 patients. Control CT was done immediately after the procedure and 24 hours later. When pneumothorax persisted, CT was repeated at 48 h, 72 h, day 5 and day 7 or until a drainage tube was introduced. The cases of pneumothorax were classified as minimal, anterior or anterolateral. Seven variables were assessed as possible risk factors for its occurrence. Pneumothorax developed on 29 occasions (32.5%), requiring drainage in 12 cases (13.5%). In 20 patients (22%), pneumothorax occurred immediately, while in the remaining 9 (10%) it was detected in the 24 h CT scan. When studied according to type, drainage was required in 3 of the 19 cases of minimal or anterior pneumothorax (15%) and in 9 or the 10 cases of anterolateral location (90%) (p<0.0005). The mean thickness of the parenchyma punctured was 3.4 cm +- 2.2. cm when pneumothorax developed and 1.3 cm+- 2 cm when it did not (p<0.0001). There is a statistically significant association between the development of anterolateral pneumothorax and the need for chest drainage. The thickness of the punctured parenchyma is associated with the production of pneumothorax. 16 refs

  18. Chest Tube Management after Surgery for Pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompili, Cecilia; Salati, Michele; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2017-02-01

    There is scant evidence on the management of chest tubes after surgery for pneumothorax. Most of the current knowledge is extrapolated from studies performed on subjects with lung cancer. This article reviews the existing literature with particular focus on the effect of suction and no suction on the duration of air leak after lung resection and surgery for pneumothorax. Moreover, the role of regulated suction, which seems to provide some benefit in reducing pneumothorax recurrence after bullectomy and pleurodesis, is discussed. Finally, a personal view on the management of chest tubes after surgery for pneumothorax is provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Diagnostic performance of cone-beam computed tomography on detection of mechanically-created artificial secondary caries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charuakkra, Arnon; Prapayasatok, Sangsom; Janhom, Apirum; Pongsirwet, Surawut; Verochana, Karune; Mahasantipiya, Phattaranant [Faculty of Dentistry, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand)

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images and bitewing images in detection of secondary caries. One hundred and twenty proximal slots of Class II cavities were randomly prepared on human premolar and molar teeth, and restored with amalgam (n=60) and composite resin (n=60). Then, artificial secondary caries lesions were randomly created using round steel No. 4 bur. The teeth were radiographed with a conventional bitewing technique and two CBCT systems; Pax-500ECT and Promax 3D. All images were evaluated by five observers. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (Az) was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy. Significant difference was tested using the Friedman test (p value<0.05). The mean Az values for bitewing, Pax-500ECT, and Promax 3D imaging systems were 0.882, 0.995, and 0.978, respectively. Significant differences were found between the two CBCT systems and film (p=0.007). For CBCT systems, the axial plane showed the greatest Az value. Based on the design of this study, CBCT images were better than bitewing radiographs in detection of secondary caries.

  20. Diagnostic performance of cone-beam computed tomography on detection of mechanically-created artificial secondary caries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charuakkra, Arnon; Prapayasatok, Sangsom; Janhom, Apirum; Pongsirwet, Surawut; Verochana, Karune; Mahasantipiya, Phattaranant

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images and bitewing images in detection of secondary caries. One hundred and twenty proximal slots of Class II cavities were randomly prepared on human premolar and molar teeth, and restored with amalgam (n=60) and composite resin (n=60). Then, artificial secondary caries lesions were randomly created using round steel No. 4 bur. The teeth were radiographed with a conventional bitewing technique and two CBCT systems; Pax-500ECT and Promax 3D. All images were evaluated by five observers. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (Az) was used to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy. Significant difference was tested using the Friedman test (p value<0.05). The mean Az values for bitewing, Pax-500ECT, and Promax 3D imaging systems were 0.882, 0.995, and 0.978, respectively. Significant differences were found between the two CBCT systems and film (p=0.007). For CBCT systems, the axial plane showed the greatest Az value. Based on the design of this study, CBCT images were better than bitewing radiographs in detection of secondary caries.

  1. Pneumothorax: from definition to diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Lampaki, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Secen, Nevena; Dryllis, Georgios; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Rapti, Aggeliki; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-10-01

    Pneumothorax is an urgent situation that has to be treated immediately upon diagnosis. Pneumothorax is divided to primary and secondary. A primary pneumothorax is considered the one that occurs without an apparent cause and in the absence of significant lung disease. On the other hand secondary pneumothorax occurs in the presence of existing lung pathology. There is the case where an amount of air in the chest increases markedly and a one-way valve is formed leading to a tension pneumothorax. Unless reversed by effective treatment, this situation can progress and cause death. Pneumothorax can be caused by physical trauma to the chest or as a complication of medical or surgical intervention (biopsy). Symptoms typically include chest pain and shortness of breath. Diagnosis of a pneumothorax requires a chest X-ray or computed tomography (CT) scan. Small spontaneous pneumothoraces typically resolve without treatment and require only monitoring. In our current special issue we will present the definition, diagnosis and treatment of pneumothorax from different experts in the field, different countries and present different methods of treatment.

  2. MESOTHELIOMA PRESENTING WITH PNEUMOTHORAX AND INTERLOBAR TUMOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MANNES, GPM; GOUW, ASH; BERENDSEN, HH; VERHOEFF, AJ; POSTMUS, PE

    A patient presented with a pneumothorax, a parahilar mass and a pleural effusion on the left side. Histology proved that this was caused by a malignant mesothelioma, epithelial type. The pneumothorax persisted, even after chest drainage and pleurodesis with talc powder and tetracycline.

  3. Tension Pneumothorax following an Accidental Kerosene Poisoning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tension pneumothorax is a rare complication following an accidental kerosene poisoning. In such situation, a bed-side needle thoracocentesis is performed because of its potential of becoming fatal; hence its clinical importance. A case of 15 month old boy with tension pneumothorax following accidental kerosene ...

  4. Bilateral tension pneumothorax after acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Nurashikin

    2018-04-19

    Acupuncture is an ancient complementary medicine which is currently used worldwide. Many serious adverse events have been reported which include a spectrum of mild-to-fatal complications. However, the level of awareness with regard to complications is still low both to physicians and patients. We report a 63-year-old who presented with acute shortness of breath 2 hours after having had acupuncture. On examination, there was absent breath sound heard on the left lung and slightly reduced breath sound on the right lung. She had type 1 respiratory failure. Urgent chest radiograph confirmed bilateral pneumothorax which was more severe on the left with tension pneumothorax and mediastinal shift. Chest tubes were inserted bilaterally after failed needle aspiration attempts. Subsequently, the pneumothoraces resolved, and she was discharged well. The bilateral pneumothoraces caused by acupuncture were curable but could have been potentially fatal if diagnosis was delayed. This case report adds to the limited current literature on the complications of acupuncture leading to bilateral pneumothoraces. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum and pneumopericardium: a pictorial review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Kyung Nyeo; Bae, Kyung Soo; Yoo, Jin Jong; Jung, Sung Hoon; Kang, Duk Sik

    2004-01-01

    Pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum and pneumopericardium usually develop during emergency situations and these conditions may result in cardiopulmonary compromise, so an early and accurate diagnosis is seen as crucial for proper treatment. For diagnosis of pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum and pneumopericardium, chest radiography is a primary modality and CT can help for diagnosing them earlier and detecting associated abnormalities. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to describe the pathophysiology, various radiographic signs and diagnostic pitfalls of pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum and peumopericardium on chest radiographs that are correlated with CTs, and to aid the physician in the radiographic diagnosis

  6. Protective pneumothorax in CT monitored mediastinal puncture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wein, B.B.; Dickgreber, N.J.; Guenther, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To achieve an extrapulmonary pathway for biopsy of mediastinal masses. Methods: In 6 patients a protective, temporary pneumothorax was established before performing large-bore needle biopsies of mediastinal masses using a Verres-needle. Results: Transpleural, extrapulmonary access was easy to achieve. One patient developed a tension pneumothorax after biopsy which was drained by percutaneous small chest tube. Another patient showed mediastinal tumour bleeding through the biopsy needle. As a prophylactic measure the bleeding was stopped by injection of tissue glue through the biopsy needle. Conclusion: The use of protective pneumothorax allows cutting needle biopsies of mediastinal masses where aspiration cytology yields no secure specific diagnosis. (orig.) [de

  7. Pneumothorax in human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibes Kumar Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumothorax occurs more frequently in people with Human immunodeficiency virus infection in comparison with the general population. In most cases it is secondary the underlying pulmonary disorder, especially pulmonary infections. Though Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia is most common pulmonary infection associated with pneumothorax, other infections, non-infective etiology and iatrogenic causes are also encountered. Pneumothorax in these patients are associated with persistent bronchopleural fistula, prolonged hospital stay, poor success with intercostal tube drain, frequent requirement of surgical intervention and increased mortality. Optimal therapeutic approach in these patients is still not well-defined.

  8. Spontaneous pneumothorax associated with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Dong Wook; Jung, Seung Hyae; Yoon, Yup; Lim, Jae Hoon; Cho, Kyu Soek; Yang, Moon Ho

    1991-01-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is a rare manifestation of lung cancer. Eight cases of pneumothorax found in 1648 patients with lung cancer from 1979-1990 are reported. Histopathologic types of cancer were adenocarcinoma in three cases, squamous cell carcinoma in two cases, bronchioloalveolar carcinoma in two cases, and metastatic renal cell carcinoma in one case. The primary tumor mass was not found even after thoracotomy in two cases. Spontaneous pneumothorax occurred on the ipsilateral side of the cancer. All the patients were more than 40 years old with a history of smoking 1-2 packs a day for 20 to 50 years, and had chronic lung diseases. The authors emphasize that bronchogenic carcinoma may be one of the causes of spontaneous pneumothorax in appropriate clinical settings

  9. [Tuberculous pneumothorax: Diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Saad, S; Melki, B; Douik El Gharbi, L; Soraya, F; Chaouch, N; Aouina, H; Cherif, J; Hamzaoui, A; Merghli, A; Daghfous, H; Tritar, F

    2018-04-01

    Pneumothorax is a serious complication of cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to describe clinical futures, to highlight challenges of its management. A retrospective multicentric and descriptive study including 65 patients treated for PT (1999-2015) was conducted to figure out clinical futures and its work-up. The mean age was 37.8 years. The sex ratio was 3.6. Smoking history and incarceration were noted respectively in 67.6 and 15.3% of cases. Acute respiratory failure and cachexia were reported in 26.1 and 10.7% of cases. The PT was inaugural in 41.5% of cases. Pyo-pneumothorax was noted in 69.2% of cases. The duration of antituberculous treatment ranged from 6 to 15 months for susceptible TB and was at least 12 months for resistant TB (4 cases). Thoracic drainage was performed in 90.7% patients. Its average length was 47 days. The drain drop was noted in 20% of cases. Bronchopleural fistula was diagnosed in 6 cases and pleural infection in 5 of cases. Surgery treatment was necessary in 6 cases. Mean time to surgery was 171 days. Six patients had pleural decortication associated with pulmonary resection in 4 cases. Persistent chronic PT was noted in 12.6% and chronic respiratory failure in 3% of cases and death in 15.3% of cases. The diagnosis of the PT is often easy. Its treatment encounters multiples difficulties. Duration of thoracic drainage and anti-TB treatment are usually long. Surgery is proposed lately. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Bilateral tension pneumothorax related to acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Rumi; Moriya, Takashi; Kinoshita, Kosaku; Tanjoh, Katsuhisa

    2013-06-01

    We report on a patient with a rare case of bilateral tension pneumothorax that occurred after acupuncture. A 69-year-old large-bodied man, who otherwise had no risk factors for spontaneous pneumothorax, presented with chest pressure, cold sweats and shortness of breath. Immediately after bilateral pneumothorax had been identified on a chest radiograph in the emergency room, his blood pressure and percutaneous oxygen saturation suddenly decreased to 78 mm Hg and 86%, respectively. We confirmed deterioration in his cardiopulmonary status and diagnosed bilateral tension pneumothorax. We punctured his chest bilaterally and inserted chest tubes for drainage. His vital signs promptly recovered. After the bilateral puncture and drainage, we learnt that he had been treated with acupuncture on his upper back. We finally diagnosed a bilateral tension pneumothorax based on the symptoms that appeared 8 h after the acupuncture. Because the patient had no risk factors for spontaneous pneumothorax, no alternative diagnosis was proposed. We recommend that patients receiving acupuncture around the chest wall must be adequately informed of the possibility of complications and expected symptoms, as a definitive diagnosis can be difficult without complete information.

  11. Bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax with pulmonary metastases of synovial sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matushita, J.P.K.; Azevedo, C.M. de

    1989-01-01

    The association of bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax with pulmonary tumor is uncommon and with pulmonary metastases is rare. The clinical and radiological features of bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax from a synovial sarcoma in a 14 years old boy are described. (author) [pt

  12. Sonography of iatrogenic pneumothorax in pediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Pneumothorax is defined as the presence of air in the pleural cavity. The incidence of iatrogenic pneumothorax in the pediatric population is 0.3–0.48 in 1000 patients. A conventional chest X-ray, in some cases supplemented with chest computed tomography, is a typical imaging examination used to confirm the diagnosis of pneumothorax. Within the last years, the relevance of transthoracic lung ultrasound in the diagnostic process of this disease entity has greatly increased. This is confirmed by the opinion of a group of experts in ultrasound lung imaging in patients in a life-threatening condition, who strongly recommend a transthoracic ultrasound examination for the diagnosis of pneumothorax in such patients. These data constituted the basis for initiating the prospective studies on the application of this method in pneumothorax diagnosis in patients of pediatric hematology and oncology wards. Aim The aim of the study was to present the possibility of using the transthoracic lung ultrasound in the diagnostic process of pneumothorax in pediatric patients, with particular attention paid to its iatrogenic form. The article discusses sonographic criteria for pneumothorax diagnosis in pediatric patients, including the sensitivity and specificity of the method, in relation to conventional chest X-ray. Material and methods The prospective studies included a group of patients treated in the Clinic of Pediatrics, Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Endocrinology of the Academic Clinical Centre (Medical University of Gdańsk, Poland) in whom a central venous catheter was placed in the subclavian veins. The studies lasted for one year – from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012. The examined group comprised 63 patients – 25 girls (39.7%) and 38 boys (60.3%) aged from 1 to 17. The analysis included the results of 115 ultrasound examinations conducted in this group. Results In t he examined group with suspected or diagnosed neoplasm, iatrogenic pneumothorax was identified in 4 out

  13. Lung ultrasonography to diagnose pneumothorax of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Chi, Jing-Han; Ren, Xiao-Ling; Li, Jie; Chen, Ya-Juan; Lu, Zu-Lin; Liu, Ying; Fu, Wei; Xia, Rong-Ming

    2017-09-01

    To explore the reliability and accuracy of lung ultrasound for diagnosing neonatal pneumothorax. This study was divided into two phases. (1) In the first phase, from January 2013 to June 2015, 40 patients with confirmed pneumothorax had lung ultrasound examinations performed to identify the sonographic characteristics of neonatal pneumothorax. (2) In the second phase, from July 2015 to August 2016, lung ultrasound was undertaken on 50 newborn infants with severe lung disease who were suspected of having pneumothorax, to evaluate the sonographic accuracy and reliability to diagnose pneumothorax. (1) The main ultrasonic manifestations of pneumothorax are as follows: ① lung sliding disappearance, which was observed in all patients (100%); ② the existence of the pleural line and the A-line, which was also observed in all patients (100%); ③ the lung point, which was found in 75% of the infants with mild-moderate pneumothorax but not found to exist in 25% of the severe pneumothorax patients; ④ the absence of B-lines in the area of the pneumothorax (100% of the pneumothorax patients); and ⑤ no lung consolidation existed in the area of the pneumothorax (100% of the pneumothorax patients). (2) The accuracy and reliability of the lung sonographic signs of lung sliding disappearance as well as the existence of the pleural line and the A-line in diagnosing pneumothorax were as follows: 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% positive predictive value, and 100% negative predictive value. When the lung point exists, the diagnosis is mild-moderate pneumothorax, whereas if no lung point exists, the diagnosis is severe pneumothorax. Lung ultrasound is accurate and reliable in diagnosing and ruling out neonatal pneumothorax and, in our study, was found to be as accurate as chest X-ray. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Spontaneous pneumothorax in diffuse cystic lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Joseph; Lee, Yun Chor Gary; Gupta, Nishant

    2017-07-01

    Diffuse cystic lung diseases (DCLDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders with varying pathophysiologic mechanisms that are characterized by the presence of air-filled lung cysts. These cysts are prone to rupture, leading to the development of recurrent spontaneous pneumothoraces. In this article, we review the epidemiology, clinical features, and management DCLD-associated spontaneous pneumothorax, with a focus on lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. DCLDs are responsible for approximately 10% of apparent primary spontaneous pneumothoraces. Computed tomography screening for DCLDs (Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, lymphangioleiomyomatosis, and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis) following the first spontaneous pneumothorax has recently been shown to be cost-effective and can help facilitate early diagnosis of the underlying disorders. Patients with DCLD-associated spontaneous pneumothorax have a very high rate of recurrence, and thus pleurodesis should be considered following the first episode of spontaneous pneumothorax in these patients, rather than waiting for a recurrent episode. Prior pleurodesis is not a contraindication to future lung transplant. Although DCLDs are uncommon, spontaneous pneumothorax is often the sentinel event that provides an opportunity for diagnosis. By understanding the burden and implications of pneumothoraces in DCLDs, clinicians can facilitate early diagnosis and appropriate management of the underlying disorders.

  15. Radar observations of the overdense ionospheric ionization created by the artificial electron beam in the 'Zarnitza-2' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhulin, I.A.; Kustov, A.V.; Uspensky, M.V.; Miroshnikova, T.V.

    1980-01-01

    This work contains an analysis of experimental radar data obtained in the 'Zarnitza-2' experiment when the artificial electron beam was injected into the ionosphere below 100 km. The signals observed just after switching off the electron gun are interpreted as radio echoes of overdense secondary ionization produced by the beam. The size of the secondary ionization torch is estimated and distributions of ionization over the cross-section of the torch are calculated and represented at different time moments, taking into account the motion of the rocket. The azimuth dependence of the echo amplitudes is discussed. The obtained Doppler velocity distribution can be interpreted as a height profile of ionospheric winds

  16. Creating artificial reefs from decommissioned platforms in the North Sea: review of knowledge and proposed programme of research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aabel, J.P.; Cripps, S.J.; Jensen, A.C.; Picken, G.

    1997-12-31

    This report relates to the case for research and development work on North Sea artificial reefs. There are potentially many benefits that can be derived from platform reefs, for example as an aid to increased fishing yield for commercial fishermen, a means of enhancing fish stocks and protecting habitat for physical damage. In addition there may be a reduction in decommissioning costs for the oil industry and in negative environmental impacts inherent with land-based decommissioning techniques. Negative impacts could be loss of fishing area and changes in the ecosystem. The report will be focused towards practically applicable results that will aid the decision making process. 129 refs., 13 figs., 18 tabs.

  17. Creating Spin-One Fermions in the Presence of Artificial Spin-Orbit Fields: Emergent Spinor Physics and Spectroscopic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkcuoglu, Doga Murat; de Melo, C. A. R. Sá

    2018-05-01

    We propose the creation and investigation of a system of spin-one fermions in the presence of artificial spin-orbit coupling, via the interaction of three hyperfine states of fermionic atoms to Raman laser fields. We explore the emergence of spinor physics in the Hamiltonian described by the interaction between light and atoms, and analyze spectroscopic properties such as dispersion relation, Fermi surfaces, spectral functions, spin-dependent momentum distributions and density of states. Connections to spin-one bosons and SU(3) systems is made, as well relations to the Lifshitz transition and Pomeranchuk instability are presented.

  18. Creating artificial reefs from decommissioned platforms in the North Sea: review of knowledge and proposed programme of research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aabel, J P; Cripps, S J; Jensen, A C; Picken, G

    1998-12-31

    This report relates to the case for research and development work on North Sea artificial reefs. There are potentially many benefits that can be derived from platform reefs, for example as an aid to increased fishing yield for commercial fishermen, a means of enhancing fish stocks and protecting habitat for physical damage. In addition there may be a reduction in decommissioning costs for the oil industry and in negative environmental impacts inherent with land-based decommissioning techniques. Negative impacts could be loss of fishing area and changes in the ecosystem. The report will be focused towards practically applicable results that will aid the decision making process. 129 refs., 13 figs., 18 tabs.

  19. Diagnostic accuracy of a novel software technology for detecting pneumothorax in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Shane M; Chin, Eric J; April, Michael D; Grisell, Ronald D; Lospinoso, Joshua A; Kheirabadi, Bijan S; Salinas, Jose; Blackbourne, Lorne H

    2017-09-01

    Our objective was to measure the diagnostic accuracy of a novel software technology to detect pneumothorax on Brightness (B) mode and Motion (M) mode ultrasonography. Ultrasonography fellowship-trained emergency physicians performed thoracic ultrasonography at baseline and after surgically creating a pneumothorax in eight intubated, spontaneously breathing porcine subjects. Prior to pneumothorax induction, we captured sagittal M-mode still images and B-mode videos of each intercostal space with a linear array transducer at 4cm of depth. After collection of baseline images, we placed a chest tube, injected air into the pleural space in 250mL increments, and repeated the ultrasonography for pneumothorax volumes of 250mL, 500mL, 750mL, and 1000mL. We confirmed pneumothorax with intrapleural digital manometry and ultrasound by expert sonographers. We exported collected images for interpretation by the software. We treated each individual scan as a single test for interpretation by the software. Excluding indeterminate results, we collected 338M-mode images for which the software demonstrated a sensitivity of 98% (95% confidence interval [CI] 92-99%), specificity of 95% (95% CI 86-99), positive likelihood ratio (LR+) of 21.6 (95% CI 7.1-65), and negative likelihood ratio (LR-) of 0.02 (95% CI 0.008-0.046). Among 364 B-mode videos, the software demonstrated a sensitivity of 86% (95% CI 81-90%), specificity of 85% (81-91%), LR+ of 5.7 (95% CI 3.2-10.2), and LR- of 0.17 (95% CI 0.12-0.22). This novel technology has potential as a useful adjunct to diagnose pneumothorax on thoracic ultrasonography. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. [Management of spontaneous pneumothorax: about 138 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Bouchra; Achachi, Leila; Hayoun, Sohaib; Raoufi, Mohammed; Herrak, Laila; Ftouh, Mustapha El

    2017-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a collection of air in the pleural cavity. We conducted a retrospective study of patients with spontaneous pneumothorax in the Department of Pneumology at the Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat (2009-2011) with the aim to determine the epidemiological, clinical, radiological, therapeutic and evolutionary manifestation of spontaneous pneumothorax. The study involved 138 patients: 128 men and 10 women (17-83 years), with an average age of 44.5 +/- 17.4 years and sex ratio of 12/8. 81.2% of patients were smokers. Clinical symptomatology was chest pain (92%), dyspnea (60%). Chest radiograph showed total unilateral (110 cases); partial (10 cases); localized (6 cases); bilateral (4 cases); right (51.4%) or left (45.7%) PNO (pneumothorax). During our study period we found that 70% of patients had spontaneous primitive pneumothorax and 30% had PNO secondary to Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (44%) and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) (39%). Initial management included patients hospitalization, chest drainage (95%), needle exsufflation (1%), rest and O 2 (4%). It enables the lung to stick to the chest wall within 10 days in 63% of patients. Evolution was favorable in 89% of patients. Immediate complications included: subcutaneous emphysema (5 cases); infection (6 cases) and 3 deaths (cardiorespiratory arrest). Late complications included: recurrences in 11.6%; the first recurrence occurred in 13 cases (chest drainage in 11 cases and oxygen therapy in 2 cases) while the second recurrence occurred in 3 cases (surgery). This study shows the role of chest drainage and monitoring in the management of pneumothorax to avoid complications and especially to prevent recurrences, with a possible need to resort to surgery.

  1. Is pneumothorax after acupuncture so uncommon?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenger, Michael; Bauer, Nicki Eithz; Licht, Peter B

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture is one of the most widely used forms of traditional Chinese medicine often referred to as alternative therapy in the Western World and over the past decades it has become increasingly popular in Denmark. Pneumothorax is known as the most common serious complication following acupuncture......, but it is quite rarely reported. During a three-month period two patients with pneumothorax caused by acupuncture were admitted to our department. The purpose of this case report is to increase awareness of this complication, which may not be so uncommon....

  2. Bradycardia after Tube Thoracostomy for Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yomi Fashola

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of an elderly patient who became bradycardic after chest tube insertion for spontaneous pneumothorax. Arrhythmia is a rare complication of tube thoracostomy. Unlike other reported cases of chest tube induced arrhythmias, the bradycardia in our patient responded to resuscitative measures without removal or repositioning of the tube. Our patient, who had COPD, presented with shortness of breath due to spontaneous pneumothorax. Moments after tube insertion, patient developed severe bradycardia that responded to Atropine. In patients requiring chest tube insertion, it is important to be prepared to provide cardiopulmonary resuscitative therapy in case the patient develops a life-threatening arrhythmia.

  3. Gastrothorax or tension pneumothorax: A diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Sarvesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrothorax, a rare complication following thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm repair, is reported. The clinical features of a gastrothorax and tension pneumothorax are similar and thus, a gastrothorax can masquerade as a tension pneumothorax. The diagnosis is made by a high level of clinical suspicion, chest X-ray shows a distended stomach with air fluid levels and a computerised tomography is useful in assessing the diaphragm and establishing the positions of the various intra-abdominal organs. Also, the risk of an intercostal drainage tube placement and the role of nasogastric tube in avoiding the development of a tension gastrothorax is highlighted.

  4. Chemotherapy-induced Spontaneous Pneumothorax: Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Een Hendarsih

    2016-09-01

    The mechanism of pneumothorax following chemotherapy is not clearly understood yet, however, several hypotheses have been considered: 1 the rupture of a subpleural bulla after chemotherapy; 2 the rupture of an emphysematous bulla in an over expanded portion of the lung which is partially obstructed by a neoplasm; 3 tumor lyses or necrosis due to cytotoxic chemotherapy directly induces the formation of fistula. Dyspnea and chest pain suddenly appear during successful chemotherapy for metastatic chemosensitive tumors should alert the physician to the possibility of SP. The treatment is directed toward lung re-expansion. Chemotherapy induced pneumothorax should be considered as oncologic emergency.

  5. Pneumothorax in intensive-care patients: Ranking of tangential views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantsch, H.; Winkler, M.; Pichler, W.; Mauritz, W.; Lechner, G.; Vienna Univ.

    1990-01-01

    In 55 intensive-care patients an additional tangential view of the chest was taken to demonstrate or exclude a pneumothorax in patients with sudden deterioration of gas exchange and negative ap-chest x-ray, if there was a suspicion of pneumothorax or a confirmed small pneumothorax in the ap-view. In 14 of 42 cases (33.3%) with negative or suspected ap-chest x-ray the tangential view revealed a pneumothorax. 6 of these 14 pneumothoraces were under tension. In 7 out of 11 patients (63.6%) with small pneumothorax, the tangential view showed additionally a tensionpneumothorax. (orig.) [de

  6. Morphometric analysis of the infraorbital foramen, canal and groove using cone beam CT: considerations for creating artificial organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Kaan; Misirli, Melis; Aksoy, Secil; Seki, Umut; Hincal, Evren; Ormeci, Tugrul; Arslan, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the anatomy and variations of the infraorbital foramen and its surroundings via morphometric measurements using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans derived from a 3D volumetric rendering program. 354 sides of CBCT scans from 177 patients were examined in this study. DICOM data from these images were exported to Maxilim® software in order to generate 3D surface models. The morphometric measurements were done for infraorbital foramen (IOF), infraorbital groove (IOG) and infraorbital canal (IOC). All images were evaluated by 1 radiologist. To assess intra-observer reliability, the Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test was used. Differences between sex, side, age and measurements were evaluated using chi-square and paired t-test and measurements were evaluated using 1-way ANOVA tests. Differences were considered significant when p0.05). No significant difference was found according to age groups (p>0.05). These results provide detailed knowledge of the anatomical characteristics in this particular area. CBCT imaging with lower radiation dose and thin slices can be a powerful tool for anesthesia procedures like infra orbital nerve blocks, for surgical approaches like osteotomies and neurectomies and also for generating artificial prostheses.

  7. Hypoxemia after pneumothorax exsufflation: a case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We describe a 36-year-old patient who was admitted to the emergency ward for acute dyspnea due to a spontaneous pneumothorax. He was successfully drained but shortly after presented a severe hypoxemia due to pulmonary oedema secondary to pulmonary re-expansion. The physiopathology behind this complication ...

  8. De spontane pneumothorax; een klinische studie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervaat, Theodorus Johannes

    1963-01-01

    De pneumothorax, een ziektebeeld dat reeds 150 jaar bekend is, heeft voortdurend de aandacht en belangstelling van clinici gehad, vooral nadat de herkenning van dit ziektebeeld door de ontwikkeling van de roentgenologie eenvoudiger wqs geworden.De ontstaanswijze van een bepaalde vorm van

  9. Continuous pneumothorax monitoring by remittance measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, J. F.; Sterenborg, H. J.; van Gemert, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    The feasibility of a noninvasive method, based on a remittance measurement, to monitor continuously for the occurrence of pneumothorax in neonates under ventilation, was investigated through animal experiments. Light from a He-Ne laser (632.8 nm) or a semiconductor laser (790 nm) was incident on the

  10. Four Cases of Postoperative Pneumothorax Among 2814 Consecutive Laparoscopic Gynecologic Surgeries: A Possible Correlation Between Postoperative Pneumothorax and Endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Tetsuya; Nakazawa, Akari; Fukuda, Shinya; Hirota, Yasushi; Izumi, Gentaro; Takamura, Masashi; Harada, Miyuki; Koga, Kaori; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Osuga, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the frequency of pneumothorax after laparoscopic surgery and to identify possible correlations to endometriosis. Retrospective review. Tokyo University Hospital between 2006 and 2013. Four patients among a total of 2814 patients with a postoperative pneumothorax. Laparoscopic surgery for gynecologic benign disease. The main outcome was the clinical frequency and characteristics of the patients with postoperative pneumothorax. We observed 4 (0.14%) cases of postoperative pneumothorax after laparoscopic surgery, all of whom were diagnosed with endometriomas and developed a right-sided pneumothorax. The incidence of postoperative pneumothorax in 1097 patients with endometriomas was 0.36%, which was significantly higher than those without endometriomas. The presence of endometrioma should be considered a risk factor for postoperative pneumothorax in gynecologic laparoscopic surgery. Copyright © 2015 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Thoracoscopic modified pleural tent for spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawachi, Riken; Matsuwaki, Rie; Tachibana, Keisei; Karita, Shin; Nakazato, Yoko; Tanaka, Ryota; Nagashima, Yasushi; Takei, Hidefumi; Kondo, Haruhiko

    2016-08-01

    We developed a modified pleural tent (m-tent) procedure and used it in our hospital in almost 30 consecutive patients with spontaneous pneumothorax. The objective of this study was to clarify the feasibility and effectiveness of a thoracoscopic m-tent for the treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax. From July 2013 to November 2014, 107 patients with spontaneous pneumothorax were treated in our institution. Eighty-nine of these patients were analysed retrospectively. The inclusion criteria for thoracoscopic m-tent for spontaneous pneumothorax were multiple and widespread bullae, postoperative relapse and secondary spontaneous pneumothorax. The surgical procedures were usually performed through three ports. After bullectomy, an m-tent is made to strip the parietal pleura off the chest wall from about the level of the fourth or fifth rib to the apex, and two or three ligations are then applied to fix the pleural tent and lung parenchyma. Patients in whom an m-tent was not indicated underwent bullectomy plus coverage using absorbable materials. Twenty-seven patients underwent bullectomy plus m-tent (m-tent group) and 62 underwent bullectomy plus coverage over a staple line using an absorbable material such as a polyglycolic acid sheet or nitrocellulose sheet (coverage group). No severe postoperative complications were observed in either group. The m-tent and coverage groups showed significant differences in operation time (129 vs 86 min, mean), haemorrhage (12.8 vs 7.2 ml), postoperative hospital stay (3.7 vs 2.9 days) and postoperative painkiller intake (8.6 vs 6.8 days). Recurrence was observed in 1 (3.7%) and 2 patients (3.2%), respectively. The thoracoscopic m-tent procedure requires a longer operation, a longer hospital stay and greater painkiller intake. However, these differences are acceptable, and an m-tent should be considered as an option for pleural reinforcement in spontaneous pneumothorax, especially in patients who are complicated with severe pulmonary

  12. Lung Parenchymal Assessment in Primary and Secondary Pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bintcliffe, Oliver J; Edey, Anthony J; Armstrong, Lynne; Negus, Ian S; Maskell, Nick A

    2016-03-01

    The definition of primary spontaneous pneumothorax excludes patients with known lung disease; however, the assumption that the underlying lung is normal in these patients is increasingly contentious. The purpose of this study was to assess lung structure and compare the extent of emphysema in patients with primary versus secondary spontaneous pneumothorax and to patients with no pneumothorax in an otherwise comparable control group. We identified patients treated for pneumothorax by screening inpatient and outpatient medical records at one medical center in the United Kingdom. From this group, 20 patients had no clinically apparent underlying lung disease and were classified as having a primary spontaneous pneumothorax, and 20 patients were classified as having a secondary spontaneous pneumothorax. We assembled a control group composed of 40 subjects matched for age and smoking history who had a unilateral pleural effusion or were suspected to have a thoracic malignancy and had a chest computed tomography scan suitable for quantitative analysis. Demographics and smoking histories were collected. Quantitative evaluation of low-attenuation areas of the lung on computed tomography imaging was performed using semiautomated software, and the extent of emphysema-like destruction was assessed visually. The extent of emphysema and percentage of low-attenuation areas was greater for patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax than for control subjects matched for age and smoking history (median, 0.25 vs. 0.00%; P = 0.019) and was also higher for patients with secondary pneumothorax than those with primary spontaneous pneumothorax (16.15 vs. 0.25%, P pneumothorax who smoked had significantly greater low-attenuation area than patients with primary pneumothorax who were nonsmokers (0.7 vs. 0.1%, P = 0.034). The majority of patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax had quantifiable evidence of parenchymal destruction and emphysema. The exclusion of patients

  13. Negative chlorine ion chemistry in the upper stratosphere and its application to an artificially created dense electron cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Prasad

    >, instead of reacting with O. It must be emphasized that the present study is speculative at this time, because none of the relevant reactions have been investigated in the laboratory as yet. Nevertheless, it is very safe to say that the scheme of ozone preservation by electron scavenging of the upper stratospheric Cl is much less certain than implied in the studies reported by its original proponents, because those studies neglected the photodetachment from Cl- and made the highly unlikely assumption that the Cl-·H2O anion neither photodissociates nor reacts any further. The situation at the lower altitudes could be even more complex due to the formation of large cluster ions and the ion-induced aerosol formation. The lower atmospheric situation, therefore, requires much more study. The uncertainties in the scavenging scheme due to the electrostatic repulsion in the cloud should also be addressed. Despite the uncertainties about its environmental engineering usefulness, the emerging technology for artificial creation of plasmas, with any desired density and charge in the stratosphere, could have significant pure scientific values in the studies of stratospheric ion chemistry and ion-induced aerosol formation. Such studies have perennially suffered from the extremely low densities of the naturally occurring plasma.

  14. Negative chlorine ion chemistry in the upper stratosphere and its application to an artificially created dense electron cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Prasad

    1995-03-01

    much less certain than implied in the studies reported by its original proponents, because those studies neglected the photodetachment from Cl- and made the highly unlikely assumption that the Cl-·H2O anion neither photodissociates nor reacts any further. The situation at the lower altitudes could be even more complex due to the formation of large cluster ions and the ion-induced aerosol formation. The lower atmospheric situation, therefore, requires much more study. The uncertainties in the scavenging scheme due to the electrostatic repulsion in the cloud should also be addressed. Despite the uncertainties about its environmental engineering usefulness, the emerging technology for artificial creation of plasmas, with any desired density and charge in the stratosphere, could have significant pure scientific values in the studies of stratospheric ion chemistry and ion-induced aerosol formation. Such studies have perennially suffered from the extremely low densities of the naturally occurring plasma.

  15. [Occult pneumothorax: Does it take drain before elective surgery?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensghir, M; Moutaoukil, M; Meziane, M; Jaafari, A; Hemmaoui, B; Haimeur, C

    2016-08-01

    Pneumothorax occult is defined by the presence of a non-visible to standard asymptomatic pneumothorax and pulmonary diagnosed only by X-ray computed tomography. The presence of this type of pneumothorax before planned surgery is a rare situation. What to do remains non-consensual. Through two clinic cases and a literature review, the authors discuss the modalities of management of this entity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Pneumothorax simulated by detachment of parietal pleura associated with pneumomediastinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozeik, C.; Kotterer, O.; Deininger, H.K.

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of blunt chest trauma, where findings on repeated conventional chest radiographs were compatible with pneumothorax developing after 2 days of mechanical high-pressure ventilation. CT showed that the appearance was due to a detachment of the parietal pleura along the lateral, mediastinal and diaphragmatic boundaries of the lungs, imitating a pneumothorax. The case report illustrates the key role of CT in the differential diagnosis of epipleural interstitial air collection versus pneumothorax. (orig./MG)

  17. Pneumothorax simulated by detachment of parietal pleura associated with pneumomediastinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozeik, C. [Radiologie 1, Staedtische Kliniken Darmstadt (Germany); Kotterer, O. [Radiologie 1, Staedtische Kliniken Darmstadt (Germany); Deininger, H.K. [Radiologie 1, Staedtische Kliniken Darmstadt (Germany)

    1994-10-01

    We report a case of blunt chest trauma, where findings on repeated conventional chest radiographs were compatible with pneumothorax developing after 2 days of mechanical high-pressure ventilation. CT showed that the appearance was due to a detachment of the parietal pleura along the lateral, mediastinal and diaphragmatic boundaries of the lungs, imitating a pneumothorax. The case report illustrates the key role of CT in the differential diagnosis of epipleural interstitial air collection versus pneumothorax. (orig./MG)

  18. Postoperative recurrence after VATS for spontaneous pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuno, Gotaro; Tsumura, Makoto; Kokudo, Yasutaka; Muraoka, Atsushi; Tsuruno, Masaki

    2003-01-01

    A total of 88 cases of 81 patients with spontaneous pneumothorax treated at the hospital from March 1992 to August 2001 were subjected to a study of examining preoperative chest CT and thoracographic findings from the standpoint of postoperative recurrence. Preoperative chest CT and thoracography were conducted in 82 cases and 41 cases (including 25 cases with continuous air leakage), respectively. Eight (9.1%) patients developed recurrence of pneumothorax, and three patients of them underwent reoperation. Considering the intraoperative findings, newly formed bullae appeared to be a cause of recurrence. Resulting from these examinations, we conclude that it is difficult to predict the risk factor for postoperative recurrence at this time, in addition, it is important that the area of air leakage can be confirmed by thoracoscopic findings. (author)

  19. Spontaneous pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum in IPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franquet, T.; Gimenez, A.; Torrubia, S.; Sabate, J.M.; Rodriguez-Arias, J.M.

    2000-01-01

    Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are at risk for a variety of acute pulmonary complications, including pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum. Our aim was to describe the radiographic and CT findings and to determine the frequency of complicating spontaneous pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum in patients with IPF. A retrospective study was performed including 78 consecutive patients who underwent CT scanning of the chest and who had confirmed IPF. The chest radiographs and CT scans were reviewed by two chest radiologists and classified as showing features of extra-alveolar air collections. The CT scans showed extra-alveolar air in 9 (11.2 %) of 78 patients (six females and three males; age range 26-90 years, mean age 65 years). Pneumothorax was demonstrated in 5 patients and mediastinal air collections in 4 patients. All patients had dyspnea for 1-48 months (mean 14 months). Of the five cases with pneumothorax, four developed acute onset of dyspnea and pleuritic chest pain, whereas 1 patient had a relatively stable functional status. Of the 4 patients with pneumomediastinum, three presented with nonpleuritic chest pain and acute dyspnea. Chest radiographs showed extra-alveolar air in 6 patients. Three cases were predicted to be negative by chest radiographs. Follow-up CT showed that air collections had resolved completely in 5 patients. Two patients died of respiratory failure within 4 months after CT. Extra-alveolar air should be recognized as a relatively common IPF-related complication. Chest CT is a useful imaging method in determining air collections in patients with IPF that become acutely breathless and their chest radiograph fails to reveal the presence of extra-alveolar air. (orig.)

  20. Recurrent secondary spontaneous pneumothorax in silicosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanda, Gina; Taufik, Feni Fitriani

    2016-01-01

    Silicosis is an occupational lung disease which is caused by inhalation and accumulation of crystalline silica particles in the lung. It commonly occurs in workers involved in quarrying, mining, sandblasting, tunneling, foundry work, and ceramics. Pneumothorax is one of the complications of silicosis with pleural involvement. The occurrence of pneumothorax in a patient with silicosis is a rare event, but it may be fatal. The rate of pneumothorax recurrence in silicosis is usually low. We report a case of recurrent secondary spontaneous pneumothorax in silicosis.

  1. Analysis on the occurrence rate of pneumothorax after percutaneous pneumocentesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Qi; Wang Kun; Ren Ran

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the influence of multiple variable factors on the occurrence rate of pneumothorax associated with transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy of the lung. Methods: Fluoroscopical guided lung biopsies were performed in 46 patients. Variable factors were analyzed including lesion size, location, number of puncture, presence of emphysema and patients position after needle biopsy of the lung. Results: Pneumothorax occurred at 9 (19.6%) of 46 patients and that occurred at 4(44.4%) of 9 emphysematous patients. Among them 2 necessitated chest drainage tube placement. The pneumothorax occurrence rate was 30% (3/10) for lesions of diameter 3 cm or less in size. In the dependent group, pneumothorax occurred in 4 of 20 patients (20%). In the non-dependent group, pneumothorax occurred in 5 of 26 patients (19.2%). Conclusion: The correlation showed that increasing frequency of pneumothorax with decreasing size of lesions. An increased rate of pneumothorax was correlated with presence of emphysema. Patients with emphysema are more likely to have a symptomatic pneumothorax. No significant differences were found in the incidence of pneumothorax between patients placed with the puncture site dependent after biopsy and those placed with the puncture site non-dependent

  2. Video-assisted thoracoscopy treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haitao; Ren Jian; Che Jiaming; Hang Junbiao; Qiu Weicheng; Chen Zhongyuan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To propose a treatment protocol by video thoracoscopy in spontaneous pneumothorax. Methods: One hundred and three patients underwent Video-assisted thoracoscopy (VATS) treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax and hemothorax. Indications included recurrent pneumothorax, persistent air leakage following conservative therapy, complicated hemothorax and CT scan identified bullae formation. Results: No operative deaths occurred, conversion rate was 2.91%, recurrence rate was 0.97%, complication rate was 3.81% and mean postoperative hospital stay was 5.6 days. Conclusions: VATS treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax is better than open chest surgery and also superior than conservative therapy

  3. Management of Pneumothorax in Emergency Medicine Departments: Multicenter Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Abdulkadir; Ozucelik, Dogac Niyazi; Avci, Akkan; Nizam, Ozgur; Dogan, Halil; Topal, Mehmet Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pneumothorax is common and life-threatening clinical condition which may require emergency treatment in Emergency Medicine Departments. Objectives: We aimed to reveal the epidemiological analysis of the patients admitted to the Emergency Department with pneumothorax. Material and Methods: This case-control and multi-center study was conducted in the patients treated with the diagnosis of pneumothorax between 01.01.2010-31.12.2010. Patient data were collected from hospital automation system. According to the etiology of the pneumothorax, study groups were arranged like spontaneous pneumothorax and traumatic pneumothorax. Results: 82.2% (n = 106) of patients were male and 17.8% (n = 23) of patients were female and mean age were 31.3 ± 20,2 (Minimum: 1, Maximum: 87). 68.2% (n = 88) of patients were spontaneous pneumothorax (61.36%, n=79 were primary spontaneous pneumothorax) and 31.8% (n = 41) of patients were traumatic pneumothorax (21.95% were iatrogenic pneumothorax). Main complaint is shortness of breath (52.3%, n=67) and 38% (n=49) of patients were smokers. Posteroanterior (PA) Chest X-Ray has been enough for 64.3% (n = 83) of the patients' diagnosis. Tube thoracostomy is applied to 84.5% (n = 109) of patients and surgery is applied to 9.3% (n = 12) of patients and 6.2% (n = 8) of patients were discharged with conservative treatment. Spontaneous pneumothorax showed statistically significant high recurrence compared with traumatic pneumothorax (P = 0.007). 4.65% of (n = 6) patients died. The average age of those who died (9.3 ± 19.9), statistically were significantly lower the mean age of living patients (32.4 ± 19.7) (t test, P = 0,006). 83.33% of the patients who died were neonatals and in the 0-1 years age group, and five of these patients were secondary spontaneous pneumothorax, and one of these patients were iatrogenic pneumothorax due to mechanical ventilation. Conclusions: Pneumothorax in adults can be treated by tube thoracostomy or

  4. CT diagnosis of unsuspected pneumothorax after blunt abdominal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, S.D. (Univ. of California, San Francisco); Federle, M.P.; Jeffrey, R.B.; Brett, C.M.

    1983-11-01

    Review of abdominal CT scans for evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma yielded 35 cases of pneumothorax, 10 of which had not been diagnosed before CT by clinical examination of plain radiographs. Of the 10 cases initially diagnosed on CT, seven required tube thoracostomy for treatment of the pneumothorax. CT detection of pneumothorax is especially important if mechanical assisted ventilation or general anesthesia is used. Demonstration of pneumothorax requires viewing CT scans of the upper abdomen (lower thorax) at lung windows in addition to the usual soft-tissue windows.

  5. CT diagnosis of unsuspected pneumothorax after blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, S.D.; Federle, M.P.; Jeffrey, R.B.; Brett, C.M.

    1983-01-01

    Review of abdominal CT scans for evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma yielded 35 cases of pneumothorax, 10 of which had not been diagnosed before CT by clinical examination of plain radiographs. Of the 10 cases initially diagnosed on CT, seven required tube thoracostomy for treatment of the pneumothorax. CT detection of pneumothorax is especially important if mechanical assisted ventilation or general anesthesia is used. Demonstration of pneumothorax requires viewing CT scans of the upper abdomen (lower thorax) at lung windows in addition to the usual soft-tissue windows

  6. Bilateral tension pneumothorax following equipment improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambricki, Christine; Schmidt, Carol; Vos, Karen

    2014-02-01

    This case report describes an unexpected event that took place as a result of using improvised equipment. The patient, a 16-year-old female undergoing complex oral surgery, suffered bilateral pneumothorax following the improper use of an airway support device. During the immediate postoperative period with the patient still intubated, oxygen tubing was attached to a right angle elbow connector with the port closed and 10 L/minute oxygen flow was administered to the patient in a manner that did not allow the patient to exhale. Within seconds, pneumothorax was apparent as the patient's vital signs deteriorated, visible swelling was noted in the shoulders and neck, and there was an absence of breath sounds on auscultation. This case study has application beyond the immediate discussion of bilateral pneumothorax, serving as a caution about the unintended consequences of equipment improvisation. In addition to highlighting the hazards of providing patient care with a non-standard device, this study also provides a powerful example of the human factors that can contribute to medical errors in the healthcare setting.

  7. Size of pneumothorax can be a new indication for surgical treatment in primary spontaneous pneumothorax: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayar, Adnan; Kök, Abdulaziz; Citak, Necati; Metin, Muzaffer; Büyükkale, Songül; Gürses, Atilla

    2014-01-01

    Surgical treatment of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) is usually performed in cases of prolonged air leak (PAL) or recurrence. We investigated the effect of the size of pneumothorax in surgically treated PSP cases. Between 2007 and 2008, 181 patients hospitalized with the diagnosis of PSP were prospectively recorded. The size of pneumothorax was calculated in percentages by the method defined by Kircher and Swartzel. Patients were divided into two groups, according to pneumothorax size: Group A (large pneumothorax, ≥50%), and Group B (small or moderate pneumothorax, <50%). The mean size of pneumothorax was 80.5 ± 10.4% in Group A (n = 54, 29%) and 39.5 ± 6.5% in Group B (n = 127, 71%). History of smoking and smoking index were significantly higher in Group A patients (p = 0.02, p <0.001, respectively). Fifty-five patients (29.3%) required surgery because of PAL or ipsilateral recurrence. The rate of patients requiring surgical operation was significantly higher in Group A (51.9%) than in Group B (n = 25; p <0.001). Rates of PAL and recurrence were higher in Group A than in Group B (p = 0.007, p = 0.004, respectively). The size of pneumothorax is larger in those with a smoking history and a higher smoking index. Surgical therapy can be considered in cases with a pneumothorax size ≥50% after the first episode immediately.

  8. Application of artificial removal networks to estimation of the left-to-right cardiac or ductal shunts. Pt. 1. Studies on idealized mathematically created pulmonary radioangiograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudzki, K.; Rudzka, J.; Nowak, S.; Sadowski, T.; Czogala, E.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to examine usefulness of the artificial neural network for classification of the left-to-right cardiac or ductal shunt intensity. Our own program of stimulation of three-layer neural network was used. Studies were carried out on three series of mathematically created, idealized curves. Effect of changing the numbers of neural network processing elements on learning and recognition procedures was examined. There was a relation of the number of the rounds necessary to train up the net to the number of classes according to the shunt size (Qp/Qs) and to the number of curves in each class of training series. Using of learning series containing more curves in each class improves the ability to classification of curves by a trained-up neural network. Reducing the input data to 24 points of the down slope of the curve improves the learning ability of the network and classification of the radioangiograms. These studies suggest that the neural networks could be a useful tool of classification of pulmonary radioangiograms. (author). 2 figs, 4 tabs

  9. Subcutaneous emphysema in cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis without pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakant Dixit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra-alveolar air in the form of subcutaneous tissue emphysema is observed in a variety of clinical settings. Spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema in the absence of pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum is very rare. We report a case of spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema secondary to cavitary pulmonary tuberculosis in the absence of pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum.

  10. Pneumothorax Following Feeding Tube Placement: Precaution and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Zahmatkesh

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Nasojejunal feeding tubes are being used at an increased frequency, but it is not without complications that could be life-threatening. We report two cases of pneumothorax following small-bore feeding tube insertion into the pleural cavity, resulting in pneumothorax. We further discuss the potential measures that can be taken to prevent and treat this serious complication.

  11. Computed tomography in the assessment of idiopathic spontaneous pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Doo Yun; Kim, Hyung Jung

    1991-01-01

    It is well known that idiopathic spontaneous pneumothorax is caused by rupture of the subpleural bleb and presents difficulty in exact detection and localization of the bleb with plain chest X - ray alone. The authors performed chest CT scans for accurate diagnosis of bleb that would act as a guide for optimal management of idiopathic spontaneous pneumothorax patients in order to prevent recurrent pneumothorax. We could detect blebs in 93 % (26/28) of the patients with idiopathic spontaneous pneumothorax, and 68 % (19/ 28) of the patient had bilateral blebs. Sensitivity was 0.63, and false negative was 37% (37/100) of the blebs, and 51% (19/37) of these 37 false negative cases were ruptured blebs. Only 7 % (2/28) of the patients had a single bleb. The authors concluded that CT is a useful method of study for optimal management of idiopathic spontaneous pneumothorax patients

  12. Automated Quantification of Pneumothorax in CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Synho; Salvaggio, Kristen; Gupta, Supriya; Kalra, Mannudeep; Ali, Nabeel U.; Pien, Homer

    2012-01-01

    An automated, computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) algorithm for the quantification of pneumothoraces from Multidetector Computed Tomography (MDCT) images has been developed. Algorithm performance was evaluated through comparison to manual segmentation by expert radiologists. A combination of two-dimensional and three-dimensional processing techniques was incorporated to reduce required processing time by two-thirds (as compared to similar techniques). Volumetric measurements on relative pneumothorax size were obtained and the overall performance of the automated method shows an average error of just below 1%. PMID:23082091

  13. Tension pneumothorax, is it a really life-threatening condition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Tension pneumothorax is a life-threatening occurrence that is infrequently the consequence of spontaneous pneumothorax. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for the development of tension pneumothorax and its effect on clinical outcomes. Methods We reviewed patients who were admitted with spontaneous pneumothorax between August 1, 2003 and December 31, 2011. Electronic medical records and the radiological findings were reviewed with chest x-ray and high-resolution computed tomography scans that were retrieved from the Picture Archiving Communication System. Results Out of the 370 patients included in this study, tension pneumothorax developed in 60 (16.2%). The bullae were larger in patients with tension pneumothorax than in those without (23.8 ± 16.2 mm vs 16.1 ± 19.1 mm; P = 0.007). In addition, the incidence of tension pneumothorax increased with the lung bulla size. Fibrotic adhesion was more prevalent in the tension pneumothorax group than in that without (P = 0.000). The bullae were large in patients with fibrotic adhesion than in those without adhesion (35.0 ± 22.3 mm vs 10.4 ± 11.5 mm; P = 0.000). On multivariate analysis, the size of bullae (odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, P = 0.001) and fibrotic adhesion (OR = 10.76, P = 0.000) were risk factors of tension pneumothorax. Hospital mortality was 3.3% in the tension pneumothorax group and it was not significantly different from those patients without tension pneunothorax (P = 0.252). Conclusions Tension pneumothorax is not uncommon, but clinically fatal tension pneumothorax is extremely rare. The size of the lung bullae and fibrotic adhesion contributes to the development of tension pneumothorax. PMID:24128176

  14. Intraoperative Tension Pneumothorax in a Patient With Remote Trauma and Previous Tracheostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mavarez-Martinez MD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many trauma patients present with a combination of cranial and thoracic injury. Anesthesia for these patients carries the risk of intraoperative hemodynamic instability and respiratory complications during mechanical ventilation. Massive air leakage through a lacerated lung will result in inadequate ventilation and hypoxemia and, if left undiagnosed, may significantly compromise the hemodynamic function and create a life-threatening situation. Even though these complications are more characteristic for the early phase of trauma management, in some cases, such a scenario may develop even months after the initial trauma. We report a case of a 25-year-old patient with remote thoracic trauma, who developed an intraoperative tension pneumothorax and hemodynamic instability while undergoing an elective cranioplasty. The intraoperative patient assessment was made even more challenging by unexpected massive blood loss from the surgical site. Timely recognition and management of intraoperative pneumothorax along with adequate blood replacement stabilized the patient and helped avoid an unfavorable outcome. This case highlights the risks of intraoperative pneumothorax in trauma patients, which may develop even months after injury. A high index of suspicion and timely decompression can be life saving in this type of situation.

  15. Tension Pneumothorax During Surgery for Thoracic Spine Stabilization in Prone Position

    OpenAIRE

    Rankin, Demicha; Mathew, Paul S.; Kurnutala, Lakshmi N.; Soghomonyan, Suren; Bergese, Sergio D.

    2014-01-01

    The intraoperative progression of a simple or occult pneumothorax into a tension pneumothorax can be a devastating clinical scenario. Routine use of prophylactic thoracostomy prior to anesthesia and initiation of controlled ventilation in patients with simple or occult pneumothorax remains controversial. We report the case of a 75-year-old trauma patient with an insignificant pneumothorax on the right who developed an intraoperative tension pneumothorax on the left side while undergoing thora...

  16. Delayed Development of Pneumothorax After Pulmonary Radiofrequency Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clasen, Stephan; Kettenbach, Joachim; Kosan, Bora; Aebert, Hermann; Schernthaner, Melanie; Kroeber, Stefan-Martin; Boemches, Andrea; Claussen, Claus D.; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2009-01-01

    Acute pneumothorax is a frequent complication after percutaneous pulmonary radiofrequency (RF) ablation. In this study we present three cases showing delayed development of pneumothorax after pulmonary RF ablation in 34 patients. Our purpose is to draw attention to this delayed complication and to propose a possible approach to avoid this major complication. These three cases occurred subsequent to 44 CT-guided pulmonary RF ablation procedures (6.8%) using either internally cooled or multitined expandable RF electrodes. In two patients, the pneumothorax, being initially absent at the end of the intervention, developed without symptoms. One of these patients required chest drain placement 32 h after RF ablation, and in the second patient therapy remained conservative. In the third patient, a slight pneumothorax at the end of the intervention gradually increased and led into tension pneumothorax 5 days after ablation procedure. Underlying bronchopleural fistula along the coagulated former electrode track was diagnosed in two patients. In conclusion, delayed development of pneumothorax after pulmonary RF ablation can occur and is probably due to underlying bronchopleural fistula, potentially leading to tension pneumothorax. Patients and interventionalists should be prepared for delayed onset of this complication, and extensive track ablation following pulmonary RF ablation should be avoided.

  17. Ultrasound Findings in Tension Pneumothorax: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inocencio, Maxine; Childs, Jeannine; Chilstrom, Mikaela L; Berona, Kristin

    2017-06-01

    Delayed recognition of tension pneumothorax can lead to a mortality of 31% to 91%. However, the classic physical examination findings of tracheal deviation and distended neck veins are poorly sensitive in the diagnosis of tension pneumothorax. Point-of-care ultrasound is accurate in identifying the presence of pneumothorax, but sonographic findings of tension pneumothorax are less well described. We report the case of a 21-year-old man with sudden-onset left-sided chest pain. He was clinically stable without hypoxia or hypotension, and the initial chest x-ray study showed a large pneumothorax without mediastinal shift. While the patient was awaiting tube thoracostomy, a point-of-care ultrasound demonstrated findings of mediastinal shift and a dilated inferior vena cava (IVC) concerning for tension physiology, even though the patient remained hemodynamically stable. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: This case demonstrates a unique clinical scenario of ultrasound evidence of tension physiology in a clinically stable patient. Although this patient was well appearing without hypotension, respiratory distress, tracheal deviation, or distended neck veins, point-of-care ultrasound revealed mediastinal shift and a plethoric IVC. Given that the classic clinical signs of tension pneumothorax are not uniformly present, this case shows how point-of-care ultrasound may diagnose tension pneumothorax before clinical decompensation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. [Delayed (tension) pneumothorax after placement of a central venous catheter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, E C; van der Vliet, J A

    1999-09-11

    Laborious attempts at introducing a central venous catheter for parenteral nutrition in two women, aged 36 and 62 years, were followed by shortness of breath after 32 and 10 hours, respectively. This symptom was due to a (tension) pneumothorax not visible on earlier roentgenograms. Thoracic drainage led to recovery. In all patients with a central venous catheter an undetected delayed pneumothorax can be present. Urgent chest X-ray examination should be performed in all patients with acute respiratory symptoms. Patients undergoing elective intubation with positive pressure breathing should be examined carefully, since they are at risk of developing a late (tension) pneumothorax.

  19. The sharp edge: a frequent radiographic sign in neonatal pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oestreich, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    The sharp edge sign, an unusually sharply defined silhouette of the heart and/or hemidiaphragm on frontal radiographs of the supine neonate, has been valuable in the initial recognition of pneumothorax. In a prospective study of 50 neonatal pneumothoraces, a sharp edge sign was present on the initial pneumothorax film 49 times. In seven of these, only the hemidiaphragm showed a sharp edge, while the heart margin was superimposed on the vertebral column. Greater awareness of the sharp edge sign would promote earlier recognition of neonatal pneumothorax. 6 refs.; 3 figs

  20. CT detection of occult pneumothorax in head trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tocino, I.M.; Miller, M.H.; Frederick, P.R.; Bahr, A.L.; Thomas, F.

    1984-01-01

    A prospective evaluation for occult pneumothorax was performed in 25 consecutive patients with serious head trauma by combining a limited chest CT examination with the emergency head CT examination. Of 21 pneuomothoraces present in 15 patients, 11 (52%) were found only by chest CT and were not identified clinically or by supine chest radiograph. Because of pending therapeutic measures, chest tubes were placed in nine of the 11 occult pneumothoraces, regardless of the volume. Chest CT proved itself as the most sensitive method for detection of occult pneumothorax, permitting early chest tube placement to prevent transition to a tension pneumothorax during subsequent mechanical ventilation or emergency surgery under general anesthesia

  1. Diagnosis of pneumothorax using a microwave-based detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Geoffrey S. F.; Riechers, Ronald G., Sr.; Pasala, Krishna M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Nozaki, Masako; Ramage, Anthony; Jackson, William; Rosner, Michael; Garcia-Pinto, Patricia; Yun, Catherine; Butler, Nathan; Riechers, Ronald G., Jr.; Williams, Daniel; Zeidman, Seth M.; Rhee, Peter; Ecklund, James M.; Fitzpatrick, Thomas; Lockhart, Stephen

    2001-08-01

    A novel method for identifying pneumothorax is presented. This method is based on a novel device that uses electromagnetic waves in the microwave radio frequency (RF) region and a modified algorithm previously used for the estimation of the angle of arrival of radar signals. In this study, we employ this radio frequency triage tool (RAFT) to the clinical condition of pneumothorax, which is a collapsed lung. In anesthetized pigs, RAFT can detect changes in the RF signature from a lung that is 20 percent or greater collapsed. These results are compared to chest x-ray. Both studies are equivalent in their ability to detect pneumothorax in pigs.

  2. X-ray diagnosis of pneumothorax in intensive care units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galanski, M.; Hartenauer, U.; Krumme, B.

    1981-01-01

    Pneumothorax is the most severe manifestation of pulmonary barotrauma which occurs in mechanical ventilation. Diagnosis of pneumothorax in intensive care radiology is of particular difficulty. Chest radiographs in supine position show a variety of signs which may be helpful but are not conclusive. There are different techniques for verification of ventrally located pneumothorax. 45 0 tangential radiographs of the hemithorax in question are most conclusive for demonstration of extrapulmonary air located inside the pleural cavity. This 45 0 technique is easy to carry out without changing the patients position. (orig.) [de

  3. CT detection of occult pneumothorax in head trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tocino, I.M.; Miller, M.H.; Frederick, P.R.; Bahr, A.L.; Thomas, F.

    1984-11-01

    A prospective evaluation for occult pneumothorax was performed in 25 consecutive patients with serious head trauma by combining a limited chest CT examination with the emergency head CT examination. Of 21 pneuomothoraces present in 15 patients, 11 (52%) were found only by chest CT and were not identified clinically or by supine chest radiograph. Because of pending therapeutic measures, chest tubes were placed in nine of the 11 occult pneumothoraces, regardless of the volume. Chest CT proved itself as the most sensitive method for detection of occult pneumothorax, permitting early chest tube placement to prevent transition to a tension pneumothorax during subsequent mechanical ventilation or emergency surgery under general anesthesia.

  4. Bleb Point: Mimicker of Pneumothorax in Bullous Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelabert, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In patients presenting with severe dyspnea, several diagnostic challenges arise in distinguishing the diagnosis of pneumothorax versus several other pulmonary etiologies like bullous lung disease, pneumonia, interstitial lung disease, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Distinguishing between large pulmonary bullae and pneumothorax is of the utmost importance, as the acute management is very different. While multiple imaging modalities are available, plain radiographs may be inadequate to make the diagnosis and other advanced imaging may be difficult to obtain. Ultrasound has a very high specificity for pneumothorax. We present a case where a large pulmonary bleb mimics the lung point and therefore inaccurately suggests pneumothorax. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(3:447–449.

  5. Deadly pressure pneumothorax after withdrawal of misplaced feeding tube

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Erik Nygaard; Frydland, Martin; Usinger, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many patients have a nasogastric feeding tube inserted during admission; however, misplacement is not uncommon. In this case report we present, to the best of our knowledge, the first documented fatality from pressure pneumothorax following nasogastric tube withdrawal. CASE PRESENTATION......, but our patient died less than an hour after withdrawal. The autopsy report stated that cause of death was tension pneumothorax, which developed following withdrawal of the misplaced feeding tube. CONCLUSIONS: The indications for insertion of nasogastric feeding tubes are many and the procedure...... is considered harmless; however, if the tube is misplaced there is good reason to be cautious on removal as this can unmask puncture of the pleura eliciting pneumothorax and, as this case report shows, result in an ultimately deadly tension pneumothorax....

  6. Pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema secondary to blunt chest injury

    OpenAIRE

    Porhomayon, Jahan; Doerr, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    This is the case of a patient with a history of blunt chest trauma associated with subcutaneous emphysema and pneumothorax. The patient complained of inspiratory stridor on presentation. Anatomical relationships can explain the pathophysiological process.

  7. Pathological effects of lung radiofrequency ablation that contribute to pneumothorax, using a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izaaryene, Jean; Cohen, Frederic; Souteyrand, Philippe; Rolland, Pierre-Henri; Vidal, Vincent; Bartoli, Jean-Michel; Secq, Veronique; Gaubert, Jean-Yves

    2017-11-01

    . The structural properties of the damage can explain why the RFA tract is remains patent after needle withdrawal. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the changes around the RF needle are the same as in the ablated zone. The damage could create fistulous tracts along the needle path between thermo-ablation zone and pleural space. These fistulas could certainly be responsible for severe pneumothorax that occurs in many patients treated with lung RFA.

  8. Novel folliculin (FLCN) mutation and familial spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J-F; Shen, X-Q; Zhu, F; Tian, L

    2017-01-01

    Familial spontaneous pneumothorax is one of the characteristics of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS), which is an autosomal dominant disease caused by the mutation of folliculin (FLCN). To investigate the mutation of FLCN gene in a familial spontaneous pneumothorax. Prospective case study. Clinical and genetic data of a Chinese family with four patients who presented spontaneous pneumothorax in the absence of skin lesions or renal tumors were collected. CT scan of patient's lung was applied for observation of pneumothorax. DNA sequencing of the coding exons (4-14 exons) of FLCN was performed for all 11 members of the family and 100 unrelated healthy controls. CT scan of patient's lung showed spontaneous pneumothorax. A mutation (c. 510C > G) that leads to a premature stop codon (p. Y170X) was found in the proband using DNA sequencing of coding exons (4-14 exons) of FLCN. This mutation was also observed in the other affected members of the family. A nonsense mutation of FLCN was found in a spontaneous pneumothorax family. Our results expand the mutational spectrum of FLCN in patients with BHDS. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Transthoracic needle biopsy: factors effecting risk of pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topal, Ugur; Ediz, Buelent

    2003-01-01

    Objective: to evaluate the factors that could effect the risk of pneumothorax in patients undergoing transthoracic biopsy. Material and methods: variables that could increase the risk of pneumothorax were evaluated in 453 CT-guided transthoracic biopsies. Factors were evaluated in two groups: (1) lesion related (presence of emphysema around the lesion, lesion depth, cavitation, presence of fissure/atelectasis and pleural tag in the needle trajectory); and (2) procedure related (biopsy type, needle size, number of passages, level of experience of the operator). All variables were analysed by χ 2 test and multivariate logistic regression statistics. Results: pneumothorax was developed in 85 (18.8%) out of 453 procedures. A chest tube was inserted in ten (11.7%) of them. Variables that were significantly associated with an increased risk of pneumothorax were depth of the lesion (P<0.001) and severity of the emphysema (P<0.01). Conclusion: the length of the lung parenchyma traversed during the biopsy is the predominant risk factor for pneumothorax in patients undergoing CT-guided transthoracic biopsy. The risk of pneumothorax was also increased with the severity of the emphysema around the lesion

  10. Recurrence rate after thoracoscopic surgery for primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnegård, Hanna H; Rosén, Alice; Sartipy, Ulrik; Bergman, Per

    2017-08-01

    There is an on-going discussion regarding the recurrence rate after surgery for primary spontaneous pneumothorax by video assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) or by thoracotomy access. This study aimed to describe the recurrence rate, and to identify a possible learning curve, following surgery for primary spontaneous pneumothorax by VATS. All patients who underwent surgery for primary spontaneous pneumothorax by VATS at Karolinska University Hospital 2004-2013 were reviewed. Preoperative and operative characteristics were obtained from medical records. Patients were followed-up through telephone interviews or questionnaires and by review of medical records. The primary outcome of interest was time to recurrence of pneumothorax requiring intervention. Outcomes were compared between patients operated during 2004-June 2010 and July 2010-2013. 219 patients who underwent 234 consecutive procedures were included. The mean follow-up times were 6.3 and 2.9 years in the early and late period, respectively. The postoperative recurrence rate in the early period was 16% (11%-25%), 18% (12%-27%), and 18% (12%-27%), at 1, 3 and 5 years, compared to 1.7% (0.4%-6.8%), 7.6% (3.7%-15%), and 9.8% (4.8%-19%) at 1, 3 and 5 years, in the late period (p = 0.016). We found that the recurrence rate after thoracoscopic surgery for primary spontaneous pneumothorax decreased significantly during the study period. Our results strongly suggest that thoracoscopic surgery for pneumothorax involve a substantial learning curve.

  11. Spontaneous pneumothorax after upper mantle radiation therapy for Hodgkin disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paszat, L.; Basrur, V.; Tadros, A.

    1986-01-01

    Between 1967 and 1981, 158 of 256 consecutive adult patients received upper mantle (UM) radiation therapy as part of initial treatment of Hodgkin disease at the Hamilton Regional Cancer Centre. Chemotherapy was also part of the initial treatment in 21 of 158 patients who received UM radiation therapy. Spontaneous pneumothorax was observed in six of 158 patients during remission after UM radiation therapy in this series. Three cases were incidental findings on follow-up radiographs, but three other patients were seen initially with symptoms of spontaneous pneumothorax. The entity occurred in three of 21 patients (14%) treated with UM radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and in three of 137 (2%) treated with UM radiation therapy (P < .05). Within the range of UM doses (3,500-4,000 cGy in 4 weeks), higher dose was not associated with higher risk of spontaneous pneumothorax. Although these cases of spontaneous pneumothorax are clustered in an age range classic for this entity, the incidence of spontaneous pneumothorax in this group of patients is higher than the anticipated lifetime incidence of 1:500 for the general population. This risk of spontaneous pneumothorax after UM radiation therapy may be even higher in patients who also receive chemotherapy

  12. The Role of Incentive Spirometry in Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribadi, Rabbinu R; Singh, Gurmeet; Rumende, Cleopas M

    2016-01-01

    Pneumothorax is the presence of air in the pleural space. Its management consists of noninvasive and invasive therapies and it is determined based on clinical manifestations, type and size of pneumothorax. We present a case of a patient with diagnosis of primary spontaneous pneumothorax treated with incentive spirometry (noninvasive therapy). A 20 year old man came to respirology clinic with chief complaint of shortness of breath. He was recently diagnosed with left pneumothorax based on previous chest X-ray in another health care facilities and was advised to undergo tube thoracostomy but he refused the procedure. On physical examination, vital signs were normal. Chest X-ray showed 33% of pneumothorax or 1.2 cm. He was asked to perform incentive spirometry therapy at home. During 12 days of therapy, shortness of breath slowly disappeared and on repeated chest X-ray, it showed minimal pneumothorax in the left upper hemithorax. Noninvasive treatment such as incentive spirometry can be considered in patient with minimal symptoms and no signs of life-threatening respiratory distress.

  13. Comparison between plain chest film and CT in estimating the size of pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seto, Yuichi

    1995-01-01

    Regarding the patients diagnosed as having traumatic and spontaneous pneumothorax at our emergency center within the past 6 years we examined the distribution of pneumothorax shown by plain chest film and CT, and compared the pneumothorax rate evaluated by Kircher's method with plain chest film and that by one slice method with CT, which was based on full slice integration method with CT. Occult pneumothorax was found in 47.6% of traumatic cases and 11.1% of spontaneous cases. The distribution of pneumothoraces showed no significant differences. However, as compared with classical pneumothorax, the ratio of pneumothoraces in the apicolateral recess in the occult pneumothoraces tended to be lower, whereas the ratio of the ones in the anteromedial recess and in the subpulmonic recess tended to be comparatively high. The plain chest film of occult pneumothorax had been taken on supine position in most cases of traumatic pneumothorax and in more than half the cases of spontaneous pneumothorax. This was considered to be the cause of the unique distribution of pneumothorax. The pneumothorax rate evaluated by Kircher's method tended to be underestimated in comparison with the basic rate, where the correlation coefficient was R=0.84 for traumatic pneumothorax and R=0.14 for spontaneous pneumothorax. Especially in the cases of low pneumothorax rate the correlation was poor. The pneumothorax rate calculated by one slice method produced better figures with the correlation coefficient of R=0.92 for traumatic pneumothorax and R=0.85 for spontaneous pneumothorax. The one slice method was considered to be effective in evaluation of the degree of serious cases, and also for the choice of treatment modality for pneumothorax. (author)

  14. Creating artificial reefs from decommissioned platforms in the North Sea: review of knowledge and proposed programme of research. Vol. 1 of a 2 vol. report. Summary of the main report, with an executive overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aabel, Jens Petter; Cripps, Simon; Jensen, Antony; Picken, Gordon

    1997-12-31

    In the continuing debate on the decommissioning and disposal of North Sea oil and gas platforms, the use of redundant structures as artificial reefs remains an untried possibility. It has been suggested that selected, clean, inert steel components could be used to create offshore reefs to attract finfish, to the benefit fisheries and fishermen. This might be an innovative and cost-effective use of these ``materials and opportunity``, and therefore should be examined more fully before the predicted 20-30 year period of steady decommissioning activity in the North Sea begins in earnest. This report relates on reviewing the use and effectiveness of artificial reefs, summarize existing knowledge of the reef effect of North Sea platforms, outline possible scenarios for the creation and exploitation of platform reefs in the North Sea, highlight gaps in knowledge, and to propose programmes of work to study the reef effect at an inshore and an offshore site in the North Sea. 5 tabs.

  15. Creating artificial reefs from decommissioned platforms in the North Sea: review of knowledge and proposed programme of research. Vol. 1 of a 2 vol. report. Summary of the main report, with an executive overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aabel, Jens Petter; Cripps, Simon; Jensen, Antony; Picken, Gordon

    1998-12-31

    In the continuing debate on the decommissioning and disposal of North Sea oil and gas platforms, the use of redundant structures as artificial reefs remains an untried possibility. It has been suggested that selected, clean, inert steel components could be used to create offshore reefs to attract finfish, to the benefit fisheries and fishermen. This might be an innovative and cost-effective use of these ``materials and opportunity``, and therefore should be examined more fully before the predicted 20-30 year period of steady decommissioning activity in the North Sea begins in earnest. This report relates on reviewing the use and effectiveness of artificial reefs, summarize existing knowledge of the reef effect of North Sea platforms, outline possible scenarios for the creation and exploitation of platform reefs in the North Sea, highlight gaps in knowledge, and to propose programmes of work to study the reef effect at an inshore and an offshore site in the North Sea. 5 tabs.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of oblique chest radiograph for occult pneumothorax: comparison with ultrasonography

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Shokei; Sekine, Kazuhiko; Funabiki, Tomohiro; Orita, Tomohiko; Shimizu, Masayuki; Hayashida, Kei; Kazamaki, Taku; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Kishikawa, Masanobu; Yamazaki, Motoyasu; Kitano, Mitsuhide

    2016-01-01

    Backgraound An occult pneumothorax is a pneumothorax that is not seen on a supine chest X-ray but is detected by computed tomography scanning. However, critical patients are difficult to transport to the computed tomography suite. We previously reported a method to detect occult pneumothorax using oblique chest radiography (OXR). Several authors have also reported that ultrasonography is an effective technique for detecting occult pneumothorax. The aim of this study was to evaluate the useful...

  17. Value of digital radiography in expiration in detection of pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomsen, L.; Natho, O.; Feigen, U.; Kivelitz, D.; Schulz, U.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to find out whether pneumothorax detection and exclusion is superior in expiratory digital chest radiography. Materials and Methods: 131 patients with pneumothorax with paired inspiratory and expiratory chest radiographs were analyzed regarding localization and size of pneumothorax. Sensitivity, specificity, negative (npv) and positive predictive value (ppv) as well as the positive (LR+) and negative likelihood ratio (LR-) were determined in a blinded randomized interobserver study with 116 patients. The evaluation was performed by three board-certified radiologists. Results: In 131 patients, there were 139 pneumothoraces, 135 (97.1 %) were located apical, 88 (63.3 %) lateral and 33 (23.7 %) basal. Sensitivity was 99 % for inspiratory and 97 % for expiratory radiographs. The interobserver study yielded a mean sensitivity of 86.1 %/86.1 %, specificity of 97.3 %/93.4 %, npv of 88.7 %/88.5 % and ppv of 96.7 %/92.1 % for inspiration/expiration. For inspiratory radiographs the LR+/LR- were 40.2/0.14 and for expiration 13.9 and 0.15. McNemar-Test showed no significant difference for the detection of pneumothoraces in in-/exspiration. Conclusion: Inspiratory and expiratory digital radiographs are equally suitable for pneumothorax detection. Inspiratory radiographs are recommended as the initial examination of choice for pneumothorax detection, an additional expiratory radiograph is only recommended in doubtful cases. (orig.)

  18. [Results of conservative treatment in patients with occult pneumothorax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llaquet Bayo, Heura; Montmany Vioque, Sandra; Rebasa, Pere; Navarro Soto, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    An occult pneumothorax is found in 2-15% trauma patients. Observation (without tube thoracostomy) in these patients presents still some controversies in the clinical practice. The objective of the study is to evaluate the efficacy and the adverse effects when observation is performed. A retrospective observational study was undertaken in our center (university hospital level II). Data was obtained from a database with prospective registration. A total of 1087 trauma patients admitted in the intensive care unit from 2006 to 2013 were included. In this period, 126 patients with occult pneumothorax were identified, 73 patients (58%) underwent immediate tube thoracostomy and 53 patients (42%) were observed. Nine patients (12%) failed observation and required tube thoracostomy for pneumothorax progression or hemothorax. No patient developed a tension pneumothorax or experienced another adverse event related to the absence of tube thoracostomy. Of the observed patients 16 were under positive pressure ventilation, in this group 3 patients (19%) failed observation. There were no differences in mortality, hospital length of stay or intensive care length of stay between the observed and non-observed group. Observation is a safe treatment in occult pneumothorax, even in pressure positive ventilated patients. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Lung Ultrasound for Diagnosing Pneumothorax in the Critically Ill Neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Francesco; Rodriguez Fanjul, Javier; Aversa, Salvatore; Chirico, Gaetano; Yousef, Nadya; De Luca, Daniele; Corsini, Iuri; Dani, Carlo; Grappone, Lidia; Orfeo, Luigi; Migliaro, Fiorella; Vallone, Gianfranco; Capasso, Letizia

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of lung ultrasound for the diagnosis of pneumothorax in the sudden decompensating patient. In an international, prospective study, sudden decompensation was defined as a prolonged significant desaturation (oxygen saturation pneumothorax was detected in 26 (62%). Lung ultrasound accuracy in diagnosing pneumothorax was as follows: sensitivity 100%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, and negative predictive value 100%. Clinical evaluation of pneumothorax showed sensitivity 84%, specificity 56%, positive predictive value 76%, and negative predictive value 69%. After sudden decompensation, a lung ultrasound scan was performed in an average time of 5.3 ± 5.6 minutes vs 19 ± 11.7 minutes required for a chest radiography. Emergency drainage was performed after an ultrasound scan but before radiography in 9 cases. Lung ultrasound shows high accuracy in detecting pneumothorax in the critical infant, outperforming clinical evaluation and reducing time to imaging diagnosis and drainage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Identifying Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax from Administrative Databases: A Validation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Frechette

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP is a disorder commonly encountered in healthy young individuals. There is no differentiation between PSP and secondary pneumothorax (SP in the current version of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10. This complicates the conduct of epidemiological studies on the subject. Objective. To validate the accuracy of an algorithm that identifies cases of PSP from administrative databases. Methods. The charts of 150 patients who consulted the emergency room (ER with a recorded main diagnosis of pneumothorax were reviewed to define the type of pneumothorax that occurred. The corresponding hospital administrative data collected during previous hospitalizations and ER visits were processed through the proposed algorithm. The results were compared over two different age groups. Results. There were 144 cases of pneumothorax correctly coded (96%. The results obtained from the PSP algorithm demonstrated a significantly higher sensitivity (97% versus 81%, p=0.038 and positive predictive value (87% versus 46%, p<0.001 in patients under 40 years of age than in older patients. Conclusions. The proposed algorithm is adequate to identify cases of PSP from administrative databases in the age group classically associated with the disease. This makes possible its utilization in large population-based studies.

  1. Ultrasound Evaluation of the Magnitude of Pneumothorax: A New Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Nicolaou, S.; Kirkpatrick, A. W.; Hamilton, D. R.; Campbell, M. R,; Billica, R. D.; Dawson, D. L.; Williams, D. R.; Dulchavsky, S. A.

    2000-01-01

    Pneumothorax is commonly seen in trauma patients; the diagnosis is usually confirmed by radiography. Use of ultrasound for this purpose, in environments such as space flight and remote terrestrial areas where radiographic capabilities are absent, is being investigated by NASA. In this study, the ability of ultrasound to assess the magnitude of pneumothorax in a porcine model was evaluated. Sonography was performed on anesthetized pigs (avg. wt. 50 kg) in both ground-based laboratory (n = 5) and micro gravity conditions (0 g) aboard the KC-135 aircraft during parabolic flight (n = 4). Aliquots of air (50-1 OOcc) were introduced into the chest through a catheter to simulate pneumothorax. Results were video-recorded and digitized for later interpretation by radiologists. Several distinct sonographic patterns of partial lung sliding were noted, including the combination of a sliding zone with a still zone, and a "segmented" sliding zone. These "partial lung sliding" patterns exclude massive pneumothorax manifested by a complete separation of the lung from the parietal pleura. In 0 g, the sonographic picture was more diverse; 1 g differences between posterior and anterior aspects were diminished. CONCLUSIONS: Modest pneumothorax can be inferred by the ultrasound sign of "partial lung sliding". This finding, which increases the negative predictive value of thoracic ultrasound, may be attributed to intermittent pleural contact, small air spaces, or alterations in pleural lubricant. Further studies of these phenomena are warranted.

  2. Characteristics of Neonatal Pneumothorax in Saudi Arabia: Three Years’ Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Al Matary

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify the incidence, clinical characteristics, predisposing factors, morbidity, and mortality among hospitalized neonates with pneumothorax. Methods: The records of 2 204 infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit at King Fahad Medical City, Saudi Arabia, between 2011 and 2014 were reviewed. All newborns hospitalized in the neonatal intensive care unit with pneumothorax were included in the study. Participants were evaluated for baseline characteristics, predisposing factors of neonatal pneumothorax (NP, accompanying disorders, and mortality. Results: Pneumothorax was diagnosed in 86 patients, with an incidence of 3.9%. The most common predisposing factors of NP were bag mask ventilation, followed by hypoplastic lung disease, and mechanical ventilation. Twenty-five (29.1% newborns with pneumothorax died. The most common accompanying disorder was premature rupture of membrane. On multivariate analysis, pulmonary hemorrhage, a birth weight < 2 500 g, and low Apgar score (< 7 at one minute were independently associated with mortality. Conclusions: This study highlights the extent of NP problems among hospitalized neonates and the most common predisposing factors of NP.

  3. Frequency and Intensive Care Related Risk Factors of Pneumothorax in Ventilated Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Bhat Yellanthoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Relationships of mechanical ventilation to pneumothorax in neonates and care procedures in particular are rarely studied. We aimed to evaluate the relationship of selected ventilator variables and risk events to pneumothorax. Methods. Pneumothorax was defined as accumulation of air in pleural cavity as confirmed by chest radiograph. Relationship of ventilator mode, selected settings, and risk procedures prior to detection of pneumothorax was studied using matched controls. Results. Of 540 neonates receiving mechanical ventilation, 10 (1.85% were found to have pneumothorax. Respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration syndrome, and pneumonia were the underlying lung pathology. Pneumothorax mostly (80% occurred within 48 hours of life. Among ventilated neonates, significantly higher percentage with pneumothorax received mandatory ventilation than controls (70% versus 20%; P20 cm H2O and overventilation were not significantly associated with pneumothorax. More cases than controls underwent care procedures in the preceding 3 hours of pneumothorax event. Mean airway pressure change (P=0.052 and endotracheal suctioning (P=0.05 were not significantly associated with pneumothorax. Reintubation (P=0.003, and bagging (P=0.015 were significantly associated with pneumothorax. Conclusion. Pneumothorax among ventilated neonates occurred at low frequency. Mandatory ventilation and selected care procedures in the preceding 3 hours had significant association.

  4. Frequency and Intensive Care Related Risk Factors of Pneumothorax in Ventilated Neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat Yellanthoor, Ramesh; Ramdas, Vidya

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Relationships of mechanical ventilation to pneumothorax in neonates and care procedures in particular are rarely studied. We aimed to evaluate the relationship of selected ventilator variables and risk events to pneumothorax. Methods. Pneumothorax was defined as accumulation of air in pleural cavity as confirmed by chest radiograph. Relationship of ventilator mode, selected settings, and risk procedures prior to detection of pneumothorax was studied using matched controls. Results. Of 540 neonates receiving mechanical ventilation, 10 (1.85%) were found to have pneumothorax. Respiratory distress syndrome, meconium aspiration syndrome, and pneumonia were the underlying lung pathology. Pneumothorax mostly (80%) occurred within 48 hours of life. Among ventilated neonates, significantly higher percentage with pneumothorax received mandatory ventilation than controls (70% versus 20%; P 20 cm H2O and overventilation were not significantly associated with pneumothorax. More cases than controls underwent care procedures in the preceding 3 hours of pneumothorax event. Mean airway pressure change (P = 0.052) and endotracheal suctioning (P = 0.05) were not significantly associated with pneumothorax. Reintubation (P = 0.003), and bagging (P = 0.015) were significantly associated with pneumothorax. Conclusion. Pneumothorax among ventilated neonates occurred at low frequency. Mandatory ventilation and selected care procedures in the preceding 3 hours had significant association. PMID:24876958

  5. Clinical and radiological outcome following pneumothorax after endoscopic lung volume reduction with valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompelmann, D; Benjamin, N; Kontogianni, K; Herth, Fjf; Heussel, C P; Hoffmann, H; Eberhardt, R

    2016-01-01

    Valve implantation has evolved as a therapy for patients with advanced emphysema. Although it is a minimally invasive treatment, it is associated with complications, the most common being pneumothorax. Pneumothorax occurs due to the rapid target lobe volume reduction and may be a predictor of clinical benefit despite this complication. The objective of this study was to conduct an exploratory data analysis of patients who developed a pneumothorax following endoscopic valve therapy for emphysema. This study performed a retrospective evaluation of pneumothorax management and the impact of pneumothorax on clinical outcomes in 70 patients following valve therapy in 381 consecutive patients. Pneumothorax rate following valve therapy was 18%. Pneumothorax management consisted of chest tube insertion, valve removal, and surgical intervention in 87% (61/70), 44% (31/70), and 19% (13/70) of the patients, respectively. Despite pneumothorax, patients experienced modest but significant improvements in lung function parameters (forced expiratory volume in 1 second: 55±148 mL, residual volume: -390±964 mL, total lung capacity: -348±876; all P pneumothorax, which was associated with relevant clinical improvement, was observed in only 21% (15/70) of the patients. Pneumothorax is a frequent severe complication following valve therapy that requires further intervention. Nevertheless, the pneumothorax does not impair the clinical status in the majority of patients. Patients with lobar atelectasis benefit after recovering from pneumothorax in terms of lung function parameters.

  6. Value of digital radiography in expiration in detection of pneumothorax; Wertigkeit der digitalen Roentgenaufnahme in Exspiration zum Nachweis eines Pneumothorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, L.; Natho, O.; Feigen, U.; Kivelitz, D. [Asklepios Klinik St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Schulz, U. [medistat GmbH, Kiel (Germany). Medical Statistics

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to find out whether pneumothorax detection and exclusion is superior in expiratory digital chest radiography. Materials and Methods: 131 patients with pneumothorax with paired inspiratory and expiratory chest radiographs were analyzed regarding localization and size of pneumothorax. Sensitivity, specificity, negative (npv) and positive predictive value (ppv) as well as the positive (LR+) and negative likelihood ratio (LR-) were determined in a blinded randomized interobserver study with 116 patients. The evaluation was performed by three board-certified radiologists. Results: In 131 patients, there were 139 pneumothoraces, 135 (97.1 %) were located apical, 88 (63.3 %) lateral and 33 (23.7 %) basal. Sensitivity was 99 % for inspiratory and 97 % for expiratory radiographs. The interobserver study yielded a mean sensitivity of 86.1 %/86.1 %, specificity of 97.3 %/93.4 %, npv of 88.7 %/88.5 % and ppv of 96.7 %/92.1 % for inspiration/expiration. For inspiratory radiographs the LR+/LR- were 40.2/0.14 and for expiration 13.9 and 0.15. McNemar-Test showed no significant difference for the detection of pneumothoraces in in-/exspiration. Conclusion: Inspiratory and expiratory digital radiographs are equally suitable for pneumothorax detection. Inspiratory radiographs are recommended as the initial examination of choice for pneumothorax detection, an additional expiratory radiograph is only recommended in doubtful cases. (orig.)

  7. Computerized detection of pneumothorax on digital chest radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanada, S.; Doi, K.; MacMahon, H.; Montner, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on neumothoraces that are clinically important abnormalities that usually appear as a subtle, fine line pattern on chest radiographs. We are developing a computer vision system for automated detection of pneumothorax to aid radiologists diagnosis. Chest images were digitized with a 0.175-mm pixel size, yielding a 2,000 x 2,430 matrix size, and 10 bits of gray scale. After indentification of the lung regions, an edge detection filter was employed in the apical areas to enhance a pneumothorax pattern. Ribs were detected with a technique based on statistical analysis of edge gradients and their orientations. Points located on a curved line suggestive of a pneumothorax in this enhanced image were detected with a Hough transform

  8. Open pneumothorax resulting from blunt thoracic trauma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintick, Colleen M

    2008-01-01

    Cases of open pneumothorax have been documented as early as 326 BC. Until the last 50 years, understanding of the epidemiology and treatment of penetrating chest trauma has arisen from military surgery. A better understanding of cardiopulmonary dynamics, advances in ventilatory support, and improvement in surgical technique have drastically improved treatment and increased the survival rate of patients with penetrating thoracic trauma. Open pneumothorax is rare in blunt chest trauma, but can occur when injury results in a substantial loss of the chest wall. This case study presents an adolescent who sustained a large open pneumothorax as a result of being run over by a car. Early and appropriate surgical intervention coupled with coordinated efforts by all members of the trauma team resulted in a positive outcome for this patient.

  9. A Case of Spontaneously Resolved Bilateral Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Kahraman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A condition of intrapleural air-space accumulation in individuals without any history of trauma or lung disease is called as primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP. Sixteen-years-old male patient admitted with complains of chest pain and dyspnea beginning 3 day ago. On physical examination, severity of breath sounds decreased on right side. Chest radiograph was taken and right-sided pneumothorax was detected and tube thoracostomy was inserted. Two months ago the patient referred to a doctor with similar complaints and physical examination and chest radiograph were reported as normal. The radiograph was retrospectively examined and bilateral PSP was detected. We presented the case duo to spontaneous recovery of bilateral PSP is seen very rarely and so contributes data to the literature. In patients admitted to the clinic with chest pain and shortness of breath, pneumothorax should be considered at differential diagnosis.

  10. Hemoptysis following Talc Pleurodesis in a Pneumothorax Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Kakiuchi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to report a case of hemoptysis occurring in combination with secondary spontaneous pneumothorax following chemical pleurodesis by talc. A Japanese male with cancer of renal pelvis was found with the left pneumothorax and multiple lung metastases. A computed-tomography scan revealed severe emphysema throughout the lungs. Talc pleurodesis was employed to arrest air leakage. The patient developed hemoptysis 45 minutes after talc injection into the thorax. This is the first report of hemoptysis following talc pleurodesis. The agent could induce severe inflammation in capillary vessels of the lung following visceral pleura infiltration.

  11. Radiographic aspects of pleural disorders [pleura, hydrothorax, pneumothorax, diaphragmatic hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stambouli, F.

    1995-01-01

    Radiographic modifications of the pleural space and pleura are due to the presence of air (pneumothorax), liquid (hydrothorax), a mass of tissue or displaced abdominal organs (the latter two disorders are often masked by liquid). Effusions are characterised by the presence of intralobar fissures, retraction and collapse of the pulmonary lobes of the thoracic wall and a general diffuse opacification starring ventrally. Pneumothorax is associated with an accentuated radiotransparence of the thorax and a retraction of the lungs, they become separated from the thoracic wall by a space without a pulmonary tissue framework

  12. A rare case of lymphangioleiomyomatosis with recurrent pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Mahishale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM is a rare disease of unknown etiology that traditionally affects young women of childbearing or premenopausal age. It is characterized by proliferation of atypical smooth muscle cells, preferentially along bronchovascular structures that cause progressive respiratory failure. Owing to its unusual and nonspecific presenting symptoms, patients often receive missed or delayed diagnosis. This disease occurs sporadically or in association with the genetic disease-tuberous sclerosis complex. Recurrent pneumothorax is the hallmark of LAM. We present a 16-year-old young female having recurrent pneumothorax with LAM.

  13. Primary Cystic Pleuropulmonary Synovial Sarcoma Presenting as Recurrent Pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D. Johnson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcomas are quite rare, representing 0.1–0.5% of all pulmonary malignancies. We report an entirely cystic monophasic synovial sarcoma in a 25-year-old male who presented with recurrent pneumothorax and no evidence of a mass lesion on imaging. The purpose of this case report is to increase awareness of neoplasms clinically presenting as a pneumothorax with no imagining evidence of a mass-forming lesion and emphasize the significance of fluorescent in situ hybridization testing in nontypical synovial sarcoma cases.

  14. Pneumothorax, without chest wall fracture, following airbag deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Parsons

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Air bags are an automatic crash protection system. They have been shown to reduce mortality from motor vehicle accidents by 31% following direct head-on impacts, by 19% following any frontal impact and by 11% overall. Despite obvious benefits there has been a corresponding increase in the number of injuries resulting from their deployment. We describe a case of a pneumothorax in the absence of chest wall pathology associated with airbag deployment, in a belted driver. There has been one previous description of pneumothorax associated with airbag deployment, in an unbelted driver.

  15. Vented versus unvented chest seals for treatment of pneumothorax and prevention of tension pneumothorax in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirabadi, Bijan S; Terrazas, Irasema B; Koller, Alexandra; Allen, Paul B; Klemcke, Harold G; Convertino, Victor A; Dubick, Michael A; Gerhardt, Robert T; Blackbourne, Lorne H

    2013-07-01

    Unvented chest seals (CSs) are currently recommended for the management of penetrating thoracic injuries in the battlefield. Since no supporting data exist, we compared the efficacy of a preferred unvented with that of a vented CS in a novel swine model of pneumothorax (PTx). An open chest wound was created in the left thorax of spontaneously air-breathing anesthetized pigs (n = 8). A CS was applied over the injury, then tension PTx was induced by incremental air injections (0.2 L) into the pleural cavity via a cannula that was also used to measure intrapleural pressure (IP). Both CS were tested on each pig in series. Tidal volume (V(T)), respiratory rate, IP, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, cardiac output, central venous pressure, pulmonary arterial pressure, venous and peripheral oxygen saturations (SvO2, SpO2) were recorded. Tension PTx was defined as a mean IP equal to or greater than +1 mm Hg plus significant (20-30%) deviation in baseline levels of the previously mentioned parameters and confirmed by chest x-ray study. PaO2 and PaCo2 were also measured. PTx produced immediate breathing difficulty and significant rises in IP and pulmonary arterial pressure and falls in V(T), SpO2, and SvO2. Both CSs returned these parameters to near baseline within 5 minutes of application. After vented CS was applied, serial air injections up to 2 L resulted in no significant change in the previously mentioned parameters. After unvented CS application, progressive deterioration of all respiratory parameters and onset of tension PTx were observed in all subjects after approximately 1.4-L air injection. Both vented and unvented CSs provided immediate improvements in breathing and blood oxygenation in our model of penetrating thoracic trauma. However, in the presence of ongoing intrapleural air accumulation, the unvented CS led to tension PTx, hypoxemia, and possible respiratory arrest, while the vented CS prevented these outcomes.

  16. Two Young Women with Left-sided Pneumothorax Due to Thoracic Endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukumi, Shungo; Suzuki, Hideaki; Morimoto, Masamitsu; Shigematsu, Hisayuki; Okazaki, Mikio; Abe, Masahiro; Kitazawa, Sohei; Nakamura, Kenji; Sano, Yoshifumi

    Pneumothorax associated with thoracic endometriosis (TE) generally occurs in women around 30 years old and it usually affects the right pleural cavity. We herein report two cases of TE associated with left-sided pneumothorax in young women. The prevalence of TE in younger patients may be underestimated if these cases are treated as spontaneous pneumothorax. Pneumothorax occurring in younger patients has not been reported to show laterality. TE-related or catamenial pneumothorax in young women must therefore represent a different clinical entity from the condition seen in older patients.

  17. [Successful surgical treatment for catamenial pneumothorax at the time of menstruation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Hidefumi; Shiraishi, Yuji; Katsuragi, Naoya; Shimoda, Kiyomi; Saitou, Miyako

    2013-11-01

    A 39-year-old female was referred to our hospital due to repeated right pneumothorax. Each episode was related to the onset of menstruation, suggesting catamenial pneumothorax. Thoracoscopy showed multiple blue berry spots on the diaphragm. Partial resection of the diaphragm including these lesions were performed. But she had a recurrent right pneumothorax. Treatment with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue was started, resulting in failure to introduce menopose and the pneumothorax repeatedly appeared again. Reoperation was intentionally done at the time of menstruation enable to find the lesion. Patient is free from pneumothorax more than 6 years after surgery.

  18. On the Stability of Lung Parenchymal Lesions with Applications to Early Pneumothorax Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archis R. Bhandarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous pneumothorax, a prevalent medical challenge in most trauma cases, is a form of sudden lung collapse closely associated with risk factors such as lung cancer and emphysema. Our work seeks to explore and quantify the currently unknown pathological factors underlying lesion rupture in pneumothorax through biomechanical modeling. We hypothesized that lesion instability is closely associated with elastodynamic strain of the pleural membrane from pulsatile air flow and collagen-elastin dynamics. Based on the principles of continuum mechanics and fluid-structure interaction, our proposed model coupled isotropic tissue deformation with pressure from pulsatile air motion and the pleural fluid. Next, we derived mathematical instability criteria for our ordinary differential equation system and then translated these mathematical instabilities to physically relevant structural instabilities via the incorporation of a finite energy limiter. The introduction of novel biomechanical descriptions for collagen-elastin dynamics allowed us to demonstrate that changes in the protein structure can lead to a transition from stable to unstable domains in the material parameter space for a general lesion. This result allowed us to create a novel streamlined algorithm for detecting material instabilities in transient lung CT scan data via analyzing deformations in a local tissue boundary.

  19. Marfan syndrome with multiseptate pneumothorax and mandibular fibrous dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a rare case of pneumothorax due to Marfan syndrome associated with fibrous dysplasia of the mandible. Marfan syndrome and fibrous dysplasia were possibly due to a common etiological factor. The association between the two and other tumors described in literature related to Marfan syndrome is discussed.

  20. Thoracoscopic Surgery for Pneumothorax Following Outpatient Drainage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Atsushi; Yotsumoto, Takuma

    2017-10-20

    We investigated the outcomes of surgery for pneumothorax following outpatient drainage therapy. We reviewed the records of 34 patients who underwent operations following outpatient drainage therapy with the Thoracic Vent at our hospital between December 2012 and September 2016. Indications for outpatient drainage therapy were pneumothorax without circulatory or respiratory failure and pleural effusion. Indications for surgical treatment were persistent air leakage and patient preference for surgery to prevent or reduce the incidence of recurrent pneumothorax. Intraoperatively, 9 of 34 cases showed loose adhesions around the Thoracic Vent, all of which were dissected bluntly. The preoperative drainage duration ranged from 5 to 13 days in patients with adhesions and from 3 to 19 days in those without adhesions, indicating no significant difference. The duration of preoperative drainage did not affect the incidence of adhesions. The operative duration ranged from 30 to 96 minutes in patients with adhesions and from 31 to 139 minutes in those without adhesions, also indicating no significant difference. Outpatient drainage therapy with the Thoracic Vent was useful for spontaneous pneumothorax patients who underwent surgery, and drainage for less than 3 weeks did not affect intraoperative or postoperative outcomes.

  1. Association Between BMI and Recurrence of Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Juntao; Yang, Yang; Zhong, Jianhong; Zuo, Chuantian; Tang, Huamin; Zhao, Huimin; Zeng, Guang; Zhang, Jianfeng; Guo, Jianji; Yang, Nuo

    2017-05-01

    Whether body mass index (BMI) is a significant risk factor for recurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to examine whether BMI and other factors are linked to risk of PSP recurrence. A consecutive cohort of 273 patients was retrospectively evaluated. Patients were divided into those who experienced recurrence (n = 81) and those who did not (n = 192), as well as into those who had low BMI (n = 75) and those who had normal or elevated BMI (n = 198). The two pairs of groups were compared in terms of baseline data, and Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify predictors of PSP recurrence. Rates of recurrence among all 273 patients were 20.9% at 1 year, 23.8% at 2 years, and 28.7% at 5 years. Univariate analysis identified the following significant predictors of PSP recurrence: height, weight, BMI, size of pneumothorax, and treatment modality. Multivariate analyses identified several risk factors for PSP recurrence: low BMI, pneumothorax size ≥50%, and non-surgical treatment. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis indicated that patients with low BMI showed significantly lower recurrence-free survival than patients with normal or elevated BMI (P pneumothorax size ≥50%, and non-surgical treatment were risk factors for PSP recurrence in our cohort. Low BMI may be a clinically useful predictor of PSP recurrence.

  2. Surgical treatment for elderly patients with secondary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igai, Hitoshi; Kamiyoshihara, Mitsuhiro; Ibe, Takashi; Kawatani, Natsuko; Shimizu, Kimihiro

    2016-05-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the validity of surgery for secondary spontaneous pneumothorax (SSP) by comparison with other treatments or with perioperative results for primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP). Between January 2009 and March 2015, 144 patients with SSP, aged 60 years or over, were treated in our institution. We reviewed the patients' characteristics, perioperative results, and relapse rate. Treatment to arrest air-leakage included surgery (n = 79), drainage only (n = 30), and pleurodesis (n = 35), and the pneumothorax relapse rate or mortality before discharge was compared for each. Additionally, we compared the perioperative results or relapse rate between SSP (n = 70) and PSP (n = 70) in patients who underwent 3-port thoracoscopic surgery. There was a significant difference in the relapse rate between the surgery and non-surgery groups (5.3 vs. 27.4 %, p = 0.0006). However, no significant difference in mortality before discharge was determined (p = 0.66). Significant differences were identified between the SSP and PSP groups for operation time, duration of chest drainage, and the length of postoperative hospitalization, and the postoperative morbidity were greater in the SSP group (p pneumothorax relapse, compared with drainage or pleurodesis, and is feasible if the appropriate perioperative management is performed.

  3. Pneumothorax as a Complication of Apnea Testing for Brain Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorton, Lauren Elizabeth; Dhar, Rajat; Woodworth, Lindsey; Anand, Nitin J; Hayes, Benjamin; Ramiro, Joanna Isabelle; Kumar, Abhay

    2016-10-01

    Pneumothorax is an under-recognized complication of apnea testing performed as part of the neurological determination of death. It may result in hemodynamic instability or even cardiac arrest, compromising ability to declare brain death (BD) and viability of organs for transplantation. We report three cases of pneumothorax with apnea testing (PAT) and review the available literature of this phenomenon. Series of three cases supplemented with a systematic review of literature (including discussion of apnea testing in major brain death guidelines). Two patients were diagnosed with PAT due to immediate hemodynamic compromise, while the third was diagnosed many hours after BD. An additional nine cases of PAT were found in the literature. Information regarding oxygen cannula diameter was available for nine patients (range 2.3-5.3 mm), and flow rate was available for ten patients (mean 11 L/min). Pneumothorax was treated to resolution in the majority of patients (n = 8), although only six completed apnea testing following diagnosis/treatment of pneumothorax and only three patients became organ donors afterward. Review of major BD guidelines showed that although use of low oxygen flow rate (usually ≤ 6 L/min) during apnea testing is suggested, the risk of PAT was explicitly mentioned in just one. Development of PAT may adversely affect the process of BD determination and could limit the opportunity for organ donation. Each institution should have preventive measures in place.

  4. Anesthetic management of a horse with traumatic pneumothorax

    OpenAIRE

    Chesnel, Maud-Aline; Aprea, Francesco; Clutton, R. Eddie

    2012-01-01

    A traumatic pneumothorax and severe hemorrhage were present in a mare with a large thoracic wall defect, lung perforation, and multiple rib fractures. General anesthesia was induced to allow surgical exploration. We describe the anesthetic technique, and discuss the management of the ventilatory, hemodynamic, and metabolic disturbances encountered.

  5. A method to detect occult pneumothorax with chest radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shokei; Kishikawa, Masanobu; Hayakawa, Koichi; Narumi, Atsushi; Matsunami, Katsutoshi; Kitano, Mitsuhide

    2011-04-01

    Small pneumothoraces are often not visible on supine screening chest radiographs because they develop anteriorly to the lung. These pneumothoraces are termed occult. Occult pneumothoraces account for an astonishingly high 52% to 63% of all traumatic pneumothoraces. A 19-year-old obese woman was involved in a head-on car accident. The admission anteroposterior chest radiographs were unremarkable. Because of the presence of right chest tenderness and an abrasion, we suspected the presence of a pneumothorax. Thus, we decided to take a supine oblique chest radiograph of the right side of the thorax, which clearly revealed a visceral pleural line, consistent with a diagnosis of traumatic pneumothorax. A pneumothorax may be present when a supine chest radiograph reveals either an apparent deepening of the costophrenic angle (the "deep sulcus sign") or the presence of 2 diaphragm-lung interfaces (the "double diaphragm sign"). However, in practice, supine chest radiographs have poor sensitivity for occult pneumothoraces. Oblique chest radiograph is a useful and fast screening tool that should be considered for cases of blunt chest trauma, especially when transport of critically ill patients to the computed tomographic suite is dangerous or when imminent transfer to another hospital is being arranged and early diagnosis of an occult pneumothorax is essential. Copyright © 2010 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of hand and semiautomatic tracing methods for creating maxillofacial artificial organs using sequences of computed tomography (CT) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Bence T; Aksoy, Seçil; Repassy, Gabor; Csomo, Krisztian; Dobo-Nagy, Csaba; Orhan, Kaan

    2017-06-09

    The aim of this study was to compare the paranasal sinus volumes obtained by manual and semiautomatic imaging software programs using both CT and CBCT imaging. 121 computed tomography (CT) and 119 cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) examinations were selected from the databases of the authors' institutes. The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) images were imported into 3-dimensonal imaging software, in which hand mode and semiautomatic tracing methods were used to measure the volumes of both maxillary sinuses and the sphenoid sinus. The determined volumetric means were compared to previously published averages. Isometric CBCT-based volume determination results were closer to the real volume conditions, whereas the non-isometric CT-based volume measurements defined coherently lower volumes. By comparing the 2 volume measurement modes, the values gained from hand mode were closer to the literature data. Furthermore, CBCT-based image measurement results corresponded to the known averages. Our results suggest that CBCT images provide reliable volumetric information that can be depended on for artificial organ construction, and which may aid the guidance of the operator prior to or during the intervention.

  7. Quo Vadis, Artificial Intelligence?

    OpenAIRE

    Berrar, Daniel; Sato, Naoyuki; Schuster, Alfons

    2010-01-01

    Since its conception in the mid 1950s, artificial intelligence with its great ambition to understand and emulate intelligence in natural and artificial environments alike is now a truly multidisciplinary field that reaches out and is inspired by a great diversity of other fields. Rapid advances in research and technology in various fields have created environments into which artificial intelligence could embed itself naturally and comfortably. Neuroscience with its desire to understand nervou...

  8. Needle Decompression of Tension Pneumothorax with Colorimetric Capnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Nimesh D; Hernandez, Matthew C; Anderson, Jeff R; Ross, Erika K; Zielinski, Martin D; Aho, Johnathon M

    2017-11-01

    The success of needle decompression for tension pneumothorax is variable, and there are no objective measures assessing effective decompression. Colorimetric capnography, which detects carbon dioxide present within the pleural space, may serve as a simple test to assess effective needle decompression. Three swine underwent traumatically induced tension pneumothorax (standard of care, n = 15; standard of care with needle capnography, n = 15). Needle thoracostomy was performed with an 8-cm angiocatheter. Similarly, decompression was performed with the addition of colorimetric capnography. Subjective operator assessment of decompression was recorded and compared with true decompression, using thoracoscopic visualization for both techniques. Areas under receiver operating curves were calculated and pairwise comparison was performed to assess statistical significance (P pneumothorax, that is, the absence of any pathologic/space-occupying lesion, in 100% of cases (10 of 10 attempts). Standard of care needle decompression was detected by operators in 9 of 15 attempts (60%) and was detected in 3 of 10 attempts when tension pneumothorax was not present (30%). True decompression, under direct visualization with thoracoscopy, occurred 15 of 15 times (100%) with capnography, and 12 of 15 times (80%) without capnography. Areas under receiver operating curves were 0.65 for standard of care and 1.0 for needle capnography (P = .002). Needle decompression with colorimetric capnography provides a rapid, effective, and highly accurate method for eliminating operator bias for tension pneumothorax decompression. This may be useful for the treatment of this life-threatening condition. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Creating standards: Creating illusions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Mai Skjøtt

    written standards may open up for the creation of illusions. These are created when written standards' content is not in accordance with the perception standard adopters and standard users have of the specific practice phenomenon's content. This general theoretical argument is exemplified by the specific...

  10. Subinterlobular Pleural Location Is a Risk Factor for Pneumothorax After Bronchoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chino, Haruka; Iikura, Motoyasu; Saito, Nayuta; Sato, Nahoko; Suzuki, Manabu; Ishii, Satoru; Morino, Eriko; Naka, Go; Takasaki, Jin; Izumi, Shinyu; Hojo, Masayuki; Takeda, Yuichiro; Sugiyama, Haruhito

    2016-12-01

    Pneumothorax is one of the most important complications after bronchoscopy. This study was conducted to determine the risk factors for post-bronchoscopy pneumothorax. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 23 consecutive subjects who were diagnosed with iatrogenic pneumothorax after bronchoscopy between August 2010 and February 2014. Forty-six control subjects who did not develop pneumothorax after bronchoscopy were randomly selected. The factors affecting the occurrence of pneumothorax were determined by univariate and multivariate analyses. Among 991 patients who underwent bronchoscopy during the study period, 23 (2.3%) developed pneumothorax after bronchoscopy. Among these 23 subjects, 13 (57%) required chest tube drainage. Compared with the control group (46 randomly selected from 968 subjects who did not develop pneumothorax), the group that developed pneumothorax had a preponderance of women and had more target lesions located in the subpleural area (odds ratio [OR] 7.8, 95% CI 0.9-64), especially those that were close to the interlobular pleura (OR 5.1, 95% CI 1.6-16.1) and the left lung (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.1-9.5). Multivariate analysis revealed that a subinterlobular pleural location of a lesion was a risk factor for pneumothorax (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.1-20.4). Pneumothorax occurred significantly more frequently when bronchoscopy was performed for subinterlobular pleural lesions. Close attention and care should be taken during bronchoscopy, especially when target lesions are abutting the interlobular pleura. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  11. Recurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax in young adults and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Dongsub; Lee, Sungsoo; Haam, Seok Jin; Paik, Hyo Chae; Lee, Doo Yun

    2015-08-01

    Although better nutritional support has improved the growth rates in children, the occurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax has also been increasing in children. The current study attempts to investigate the occurrence and recurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax and the efficacy of surgery for primary spontaneous pneumothorax in young adults and children. A total of 840 patients were treated for pneumothorax at our hospital from January 2006 to December 2010. Exclusion criteria for this study were age >25 or secondary, traumatic or iatrogenic pneumothorax, and a total of 517 patients were included. Patients were classified into three groups according to age at the first episode of primary spontaneous pneumothorax: Group A: ≤16 years; Group B: 17-18 years and Group C: ≥19 years. The study group was composed of 470 male and 47 female patients. There were 234 right-sided, 279 left-sided and 4 bilateral primary spontaneous pneumothoraces. Wedge resection by video-assisted thoracic surgery was performed in 285 patients, while 232 were managed by observation or closed thoracostomy. In the wedge resection group, 51 patients experienced recurrence. The recurrence rates after wedge resection were 27.9% in Group A, 16.5% in Group B and 13.2% in Group C (P = 0.038). The recurrence rates after observation or closed thoracostomy were 45.7% in Group A, 51.9% in Group B and 47.7% in Group C (P = 0.764). In the present study, postoperative recurrence rates were higher than those in the literature. Intense and long-term follow-up was probably one reason for the relatively high recurrence rate. The recurrence rate after wedge resection in patients aged ≤16 years was higher than that in older patients. There was no difference between the recurrence rates after observation or closed thoracostomy, regardless of age. These results suggest that wedge resection might be delayed in children. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  12. Fluoroscopy guided percutaneous catheter drainage of pneumothorax in good mid-term patency with tube drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ga Young; Oh, Joo Hyung; Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Wook

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate efficacy and the safety of percutaneous catheter drainage in patients with pneumothorax that is difficult to treat with closed thoracotomy. We retrospectively reviewed effectiveness of percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) in 10 patients with pneumothorax. The catheter was inserted under fluoroscopic guidance. Seven patients had spontaneous pneumothorax caused by tuberculosis (n =4), reptured bullae (n = 2), and histiocytosis-X (n = 1). Three patients had iatrogenic pneumothorax caused by trauma (n = 1) and surgery (n = 2). All procedures were performed by modified Seldinger's method by using 8F-20F catheter. All catheter were inserted successfully. In 9 of 10 patients, the procedure was curative without further therapy. Duration of catheter insertion ranged from 1 day to 26 days. In the remaining 1 patient in whom multiple pneumothorax occurred after operation, catheter insertion was performed twice. Percutaneous catheter drainage under fluoroscopic guidance is effective and safe procedure for treatment of pneumothorax in patients with failed closed thoracotomy

  13. Spontaneous pneumothorax in paracoccidioidomycosis patients from an endemic area in Midwestern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Lucas G G; Santos, Aline F; Andrade, Ursulla V; Guedes, Carlos Ivan A; Oliveira, Sandra M V L; Chang, Marilene R; Mendes, Rinaldo P; Paniago, Anamaria M M

    2017-02-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is the most important systemic mycosis in Latin America. About 80% of PCM patients are present with its chronic form. The lungs are affected in most patients with the chronic form; however, pleural involvement has rarely been reported. We describe nine cases of PCM that presented with lung involvement and spontaneous pneumothorax. All patients, except one whose condition was not investigated, were smokers. PCM was diagnosed during the pneumothorax episode in three patients, and from 3 to 16 years before the pneumothorax episode in six patients. A total of six patients underwent chest drainage and one died as a direct result of the pneumothorax. We suggest that pneumothorax, although rare, should be considered in PCM patients who present with suddenly worsening dyspnoea. PCM should also be investigated in cases of pneumothorax in adult men from mycosis-endemic areas. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Tension Pneumothorax During Surgery for Thoracic Spine Stabilization in Prone Position

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    Demicha Rankin MD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The intraoperative progression of a simple or occult pneumothorax into a tension pneumothorax can be a devastating clinical scenario. Routine use of prophylactic thoracostomy prior to anesthesia and initiation of controlled ventilation in patients with simple or occult pneumothorax remains controversial. We report the case of a 75-year-old trauma patient with an insignificant pneumothorax on the right who developed an intraoperative tension pneumothorax on the left side while undergoing thoracic spine stabilization surgery in the prone position. Management of an intraoperative tension pneumothorax requires prompt recognition and treatment; however, the prone position presents an additional challenge of readily accessing the standard anatomic sites for pleural puncture and air drainage.

  15. Fluoroscopy guided percutaneous catheter drainage of pneumothorax in good mid-term patency with tube drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ga Young; Oh, Joo Hyung; Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Wook [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-15

    To evaluate efficacy and the safety of percutaneous catheter drainage in patients with pneumothorax that is difficult to treat with closed thoracotomy. We retrospectively reviewed effectiveness of percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) in 10 patients with pneumothorax. The catheter was inserted under fluoroscopic guidance. Seven patients had spontaneous pneumothorax caused by tuberculosis (n =4), reptured bullae (n = 2), and histiocytosis-X (n = 1). Three patients had iatrogenic pneumothorax caused by trauma (n = 1) and surgery (n = 2). All procedures were performed by modified Seldinger's method by using 8F-20F catheter. All catheter were inserted successfully. In 9 of 10 patients, the procedure was curative without further therapy. Duration of catheter insertion ranged from 1 day to 26 days. In the remaining 1 patient in whom multiple pneumothorax occurred after operation, catheter insertion was performed twice. Percutaneous catheter drainage under fluoroscopic guidance is effective and safe procedure for treatment of pneumothorax in patients with failed closed thoracotomy.

  16. Pneumoretroperitoneum and Perirenal Air Associated With Pneumothorax in an Extremely Low-Birth-Weight Infant

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    Belma Saygili Karagol

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Pneumothorax-associated pneumoretroperitoneum and perirenal air have rarely been reported in infants. We report a case of an extremely low-birth-weight infant who developed pneumoretroperitoneum and perirenal air associated with tension pneumothorax and deteriorated acutely despite prompt pleural water-seal vacuum drainage system insertion. Our aim in presenting this case report is to emphasize keeping in mind that there could be extrapleural air leaks, such as pneumoretroperitoneum in patients with pneumothorax.

  17. Anteroposterior chest radiograph vs. chest CT scan in early detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients

    OpenAIRE

    Omar, Hesham R; Mangar, Devanand; Khetarpal, Suneel; Shapiro, David H; Kolla, Jaya; Rashad, Rania; Helal, Engy; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Pneumothorax is a common complication following blunt chest wall trauma. In these patients, because of the restrictions regarding immobilization of the cervical spine, Anteroposterior (AP) chest radiograph is usually the most feasible initial study which is not as sensitive as the erect chest X-ray or CT chest for detection of a pneumothorax. We will present 3 case reports which serve for better understanding of the entity of occult pneumothorax. The first case is an example of a tru...

  18. [Treatment of the first episode of spontaneous pneumothorax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moubachir, H; Zaghba, N; Benjelloun, H; Bakhatar, A; Yassine, N

    2016-11-01

    The management of a first episode of spontaneous pneumothorax is controversial and the best technique to be used as an initial intervention, aspiration or intercostal drainage, is still debated. We present a retrospective case series during two and a half consecutive years describing the immediate management of spontaneous pneumothoraces, comparing aspiration versus thoracic drainage. One hundred and thirty-three clinical files from patients with spontaneous pneumothoraces were analyzed (17 primary and 116 secondary). The pneumothoraces were of varying size and different etiologies. Patients were initially treated with simple aspiration in 68 cases, with an immediate success rate of 37.5%, intercostal drainage in 49 cases, and by rest alone in 16 cases. In case of secondary pneumothorax, aspiration appeared to offer advantages as an initial strategy over intercostal drainage in terms of hospital stay (11 versus 22 days), and with significant effectiveness (37.5%). Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. TRAUMATIC GASTROPLEURAL FISTULA COMPLICATED BY EMPYEMA AND PNEUMOTHORAX

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    Vijay Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We herein report a case of traumatic gastropleural fistula complicated by empyema and pneumothorax which is a rare entity. A 22 year old male was admitted with alleged history of stab injury to left lower chest. Patient was f ound to have left sided pneumothorax, for which intercostal drainage tube was inserted and the patient stabilised. Chest radiograph taken three days after the chest tube insertion showed persistent hydropneumothorax for which the patient underwent a contra st enhanced computed tomography of thorax (CECT. CECT of thorax revealed herniation of fundus of stomach through a defect in the left dome of diaphragm into the left thoracic cavity with leakage of oral contrast into the left pleural cavity. Preoperative diagnosis of gastropleural fistula was made and the same was confirmed in the intraoperative findings. The patient underwent laparotomy with repair of the diaphragmatic defect and closure of the gastric perforation. The patient made an uneventful recovery

  20. Iatrogenic tension pneumothorax in children: two case reports

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    Mayordomo-Colunga Juan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Two cases of iatrogenic tension pneumothorax in children are reported. Case presentations Case 1: A 2-year-old boy with suspected brain death after suffering multiple trauma suddenly developed intense cyanosis, extreme bradycardia and generalized subcutaneous emphysema during apnea testing. He received advanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation and urgent bilateral needle thoracostomy. Case 2: A diagnostic-therapeutic flexible bronchoscopy was conducted on a 17-month-old girl, under sedation-analgesia with midazolam and ketamine. She very suddenly developed bradycardia, generalized cyanosis and cervical, thoracic and abdominal subcutaneous emphysema. Urgent needle decompression of both hemithoraces was performed. Conclusion In techniques where gas is introduced into a child's airway, it is vital to ensure its way out to avoid iatrogenic tension pneumothorax. Moreover, the equipment to perform an urgent needle thoracostomy should be readily available.

  1. EARLY IDENTIFICATION AND BASIC LIFE SUPPORT FOR PNEUMOTHORAX

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    I Wayan Ade Punarbawa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chest injury is one injury that often occurs and need immediate and precise handling that prevent people from death. Chest trauma 1/4 of the trauma that caused the death and 1/3 of those deaths occur in hospitals. One chest injury that often we get to the health center is pneumothorax. WHO declared in 2020 the level of morbidity and mortality from chest injuries will increase, to become the second leading cause of death in the world. From this data that need to know the signs and symptoms of peneumotoraks, identify the signs and symptoms so we can provide basic life support to the patient before the patient was referred to a medical center nearby so as to reduce the morbidity and mortality in patients with pneumothorax.

  2. Bedside Ultrasonography: A Useful Tool For Traumatic Pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumtaz, U.; Zahur, Z.; Chaudhry, M. A.; Warraich, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic accuracy of bedside ultrasound and supine chest radiography for the diagnosis of traumatic pneumothorax. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: PIMS and PAEC General Hospital, Islamabad, from November 2014 to August 2015. Methodology: Patients coming to emergency departments of the study centres, who had sustained chest injuries, were inducted. Their portable bedside ultrasound and supine chest radiographs were taken for assessing pneumothorax and subsequently CT chest was done for confirmation as gold standard. Result: Based on CT findings, sensitivity for ultrasonography and chest radiography was found to be 83.33 percentage and 54.76 percentage, respectively and specificity of 100 percentage for both modalities. Conclusion: Ultrasound can be used as a useful and suitable adjunct to CT in trauma patients as it is easily available, non-invasive, bedside, easily examined with no radiation risk. (author)

  3. An adult case of giant bronchogenic cyst mimicking tension pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcinkaya, Serhat; Vural, A Hakan; Ozal, Hasan

    2010-10-01

    Bronchogenic cysts are usually discovered only incidentally in the adult. A giant bronchogenic cyst in a 19-year-old woman presenting with pain and shortness of breath was mistaken for tension pneumothorax and initially treated with tube thoracostomy. Giant bullae were diagnosed by computed tomography. Bullae resection was undertaken, but the remaining lung tissue required pneumonectomy. Pathologic examination of the specimen confirmed bronchogenic cyst.

  4. A late presenting congenital diaphragmatic hernia misdiagnosed as spontaneous pneumothorax

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    Chitra Sanjeev Juwarkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH is described as (1 failure of diaphragmatic closure at development, (2 presence of herniated abdominal contents into chest and (3 pulmonary hypoplasia. Usually, pleural space is drained urgently when there is respiratory distress and radiological appearance of mediastinal shift. We present a case of a 5-month-old baby, diagnosed as tension pneumothorax and treated with chest drain insertion. CDH was the intraoperative diagnosis.

  5. A Total Pleural Covering for Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Prevents Pneumothorax Recurrence.

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    Masatoshi Kurihara

    Full Text Available Spontaneous pneumothorax is a major and frequently recurrent complication of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM. Despite the customary use of pleurodesis to manage pnenumothorax, the recurrence rate remains high, and accompanying pleural adhesions cause serious bleeding during subsequent lung transplantation. Therefore, we have developed a technique of total pleural covering (TPC for LAM to wrap the entire visceral pleura with sheets of oxidized regenerated cellulose (ORC mesh, thereby reinforcing the affected visceral pleura and preventing recurrence.Since January 2003, TPC has been applied during video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for the treatment of LAM. The medical records of LAM patients who had TPC since that time and until August 2014 are reviewed.TPC was performed in 43 LAM patients (54 hemithoraces, 11 of whom required TPC bilaterally. Pneumothorax recurred in 14 hemithoraces (25.9% from 11 patients (25.6% after TPC. Kaplan-Meier estimates of recurrence-free hemithorax were 80.8% at 2.5 years, 71.7% at 5 years, 71.7% at 7.5 years, and 61.4% at 9 years. The recurrence-free probability was significantly better when 10 or more sheets of ORC mesh were utilized for TPC (P = 0.0018. TPC significantly reduced the frequency of pneumothorax: 0.544 ± 0.606 episode/month (mean ± SD before TPC vs. 0.008 ± 0.019 after TPC (P<0.0001. Grade IIIa postoperative complications were found in 13 TPC surgeries (24.1%.TPC successfully prevented the recurrence of pneumothorax in LAM, was minimally invasive and rarely caused restrictive ventilatory impairment.

  6. A clinical and radiological study on spontaneous pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Kyung Jae; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Byung Soo; Choi, Myung Gwon

    1982-01-01

    A clinical and radiological study was done on 96 cases of spontaneous pneumothorax, encountered in the Dept. of Radiology, Busan National University Hospital during last 3 years from March 1979 to March 1982. The result were summarized as follows: 1. In the age distribution, the ages between 20 and 39 years were most highest, as 54 cases (56.3%). In the sex distribution, the ratio of male to female was 5 : 1 in male predominance. 2. The underlying pathology of the total 96 cases of spontaneous pneumothorax were of tuberculous origin in 33.3 % and non-tuberculous origin in 66.7%. And below 20 years, most were of non- tuberculous origin. 3. In the cases of lung collapse over 2/3, non-tuberculous origin was more than tuberculous origin and had characteristics of significant mediastinal shifting, in contrast to lower percentage of fluid level by chest radiography. 4. The rupture of biebs or bullae was the main immediate causes of spontaneous pneumothorax, independent of the underlying pathology. 5. In only 27 cases (28.1%) among total 96 cases, bullae or biebs could be detected on the chest radiography. 6. In treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax, the closed thoracotomy with under water seal drainage is accepted to be the general method of treatment. But open thoracotomy is considered as the best useful therapeutic procedure to prevent the recurrence, whenever bullae or blebs are found on the chest radiography. 7. In the cases of closed thoracotomy, the recurrent rate was 25.0% and most cases were found at the ipsilateral side of the first attack. 8. Within a week, the collapsed lung were well expanded in most cases of total 96 cases, after closed thoracotomy

  7. Pneumoperitoneum in a patient with pneumothorax and blunt neck trauma

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    Suhail Yaqoob Hakim

    2014-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Free air in the abdomen after blunt traumatic neck injury is very rare. If pneumoperitoneum is suspected in the presence of pneumothorax, exploratory laparotomy should be performed to rule out intraabdominal injury. As, there is no consensus for this plan yet, further prospective studies are warrant. Conservative management for pneumoperitoneum in the absence of viscus perforation is still a safe option in carefully selected cases.

  8. Clinical characteristics and outcome of pneumothorax after stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Kaori; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Tomonari; Matsuo, Yoshio; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Terashima, Kotaro; Shinoto, Makoto; Matsumoto, Keiji; Hirata, Hidenari; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    We retrospectively investigated the clinical characteristics and outcome of pneumothorax after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Between April 2003 and July 2012, 473 patients with lung tumors were treated with SBRT. We identified 12 patients (2.5 %) with pneumothorax caused by SBRT, and evaluated the clinical features of pneumothorax. All of the tumors were primary lung cancers. The severity of radiation pneumonitis was grade 1 in 10 patients and grade 2 in two patients. Nine patients had emphysema. The planning target volume and pleura overlapped in 11 patients, and the tumors were attached to the pleura in 7 patients. Rib fractures were observed in three patients before or at the same time as the diagnosis of pneumothorax. The median time to onset of pneumothorax after SBRT was 18.5 months (4-84 months). The severity of pneumothorax was grade 1 in 11 patients and grade 3 in one patient. Although pneumothorax was a relatively rare late adverse effect after SBRT, some patients demonstrated pneumothorax after SBRT for peripheral lung tumors. Although most pneumothorax was generally tolerable and self-limiting, careful follow-up is needed.

  9. Recurrent Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax is Common Following Chest Tube and Conservative Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Winnie Hedevang; Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Katballe, Niels; Sindby, Jesper Eske; Titlestad, Ingrid Louise; Andersen, Poul Erik; Licht, Peter Bjørn

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies on primary spontaneous pneumothorax reported variable recurrence rates, but they were based on heterogeneous patient populations including secondary pneumothorax. We investigated young patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax exclusively and used a national registry to track readmissions and calculate independent predictors of recurrence. A prospective cohort study of consecutive young patients who were admitted over a 5-year period with their first episode of primary spontaneous pneumothorax and treated conservatively with a chest tube. Baseline characteristics were obtained from questionnaires presented on admittance. All patients were discharged with fully expanded lungs on chest radiography. Patient charts were identified in the national electronic patient registry for detailed information on readmissions due to recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax. We included 234 patients. Male/female = ratio 5/1. After a median observation period of 3.6 years (range 1-6 years), recurrent pneumothorax was observed in 54 %. Ipsilateral recurrence was the most common (79 %) but 30 % also experienced contralateral pneumothorax during the study period. Females had a significantly higher age at debut (p pneumothorax in younger patients with their first episode had a much higher recurrence rate than previously reported. Every doctor who treats patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax should be aware and patients informed.

  10. Effect of needle tract bleeding on occurrence of pneumothorax after transthoracic needle biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topal, U.; Berkman, Yahya M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Occasionally bleeding along the needle trajectory is observed at post-biopsy computed tomographic sections. This study was designed to evaluate the possible effect of needle tract bleeding on the occurrence of pneumothorax and on requirement of chest tube insertion. Materials and methods: Two hundred eighty-four needle biopsies performed in 275 patients in whom the needle traversed the aerated lung parenchyma were retrospectively reviewed. Bleeding along the needle tract, occurrence of pneumothorax and need for chest tube insertion, type and size of the needle, size of the lesion, length of the lung traversed by the needle, presence or absence of emphysema were noted. Effect of these factors on the rate of pneumothorax and needle-tract bleeding was evaluated. The data were analyzed by χ 2 test. Results: Pneumothorax developed in 100 (35%) out of 284 procedures requiring chest tube placement in 16 (16%). Variables that were significantly associated with an increased risk of pneumothorax were depth of the lesion (P 0.05). However, analysis of the relation between length of lung traversed by the needle, tract-bleeding and pneumothorax rate indicated that tract-bleeding had a preventive effect on development of pneumothorax (P 0.05). Conclusion: Bleeding in the needle tract has a preventive effect on the occurrence of the pneumothorax in deep-seated lesions and in the presence of emphysema, although it does not affect the overall rate of pneumothorax

  11. Pneumothorax Secondary to Septic Pulmonary Emboli in a Long-term Hemodialysis Patient with Psoas Abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Masahiro; Kasai, Kenji; Yokoo, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    Pneumothorax secondary to septic pulmonary embolism (SPE) is rare but life-threatening. We herein report a long-term hemodialysis patient with psoas abscess caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, associated with other muscle and splenic abscesses and SPE. Intravenous vancomycin treatment and percutaneous drainage of the psoas abscess rapidly improved her condition. However, the SPE lesions continued to increase, and right-sided pneumothorax occurred 10 days after treatment. The pneumothorax resolved after two months and SPE and all abscesses after four months of treatment. Since late-onset pneumothorax caused by SPE can occur despite successful treatment of the primary infection, care should be taken with such patients.

  12. Minimal pneumothorax with dynamic changes in ST segment similar to myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Seok-Ran; Park, Sung-Wook; Kim, Young-Dae; Ahn, Byung-Jae; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Wang, Il-Jae

    2017-08-01

    Pneumothorax can cause a variety of electrocardiographic changes. ST segment elevation, which is mainly observed in myocardial infarction, can also be induced by pneumothorax. The mechanism is presumed to be a decrease in cardiac output, due to increased intra-thoracic pressure. We encountered a patient with ST segment elevation with minimal pneumothorax. Coronary angiography with ergonovine provocation test and echocardiogram had normal findings. The ST segment elevation was normalized by decreasing the amount of pneumothorax. We reviewed the literature and present possible mechanisms for this condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of pneumothorax CT for the evaluation of aortic invasion by lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoi, Kohei; Mori, Kiyoshi; Miyazawa, Naoto; Magota, Seizo; Honda, Kazuyoshi; Sasagawa, Michizo

    1987-01-01

    To improve the accuracy of T3 diagnosis in lung cancer, Pneumothorax CT was carried out in four patients having diagnosis of plain CT and enhanced CT. Both plain and enhanced CT demonstrated obliteration of low density zone between tumor and the aorta in all cases. In three of four cases, Pneumothorax CT, however, demonstrated free air space where tumor was evaluated to be invaded. Remaining one presented the loss of such free air space even by Pneumothorax CT and was made the diagnosis of aortic invasion, which was confirmed by surgicopathological finding. Pneumothorax CT is useful for the diagnosis of ruling out tumor invasion to the aorta. (author)

  14. Incidence of Pneumothorax in Patients With Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Undergoing Pulmonary Function and Exercise Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveira-DaSilva, Angelo M; Julien-Williams, Patricia; Jones, Amanda M; Moss, Joel

    2016-07-01

    Because pneumothorax is frequent in lymphangioleiomyomatosis, patients have expressed concerns regarding the risk of pneumothorax associated with pulmonary function or exercise testing. Indeed, pneumothorax has been reported in patients with lung disease after both of these tests. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of pneumothorax in patients with lymphangioleiomyomatosis during admissions to the National Institutes of Health Clinical Research Center between 1995 and 2015. Medical records were reviewed to identify patients who had a pneumothorax during their stay at the National Institutes of Health. A total of 691 patients underwent 4,523 pulmonary function tests and 1,900 exercise tests. Three patients developed pneumothorax after pulmonary function tests and/or exercise tests. The incidence of pneumothorax associated with lung function testing was 0.14 to 0.29 of 100 patients or 0.02 to 0.04 of 100 tests. The incidence of pneumothorax in patients undergoing exercise testing was 0.14 to 0.28 of 100 patients or 0.05 to 0.10 of 100 tests. The risk of pneumothorax associated with pulmonary function or exercise testing in patients with lymphangioleiomyomatosis is low. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Tension pneumothorax secondary to automatic mechanical compression decompression device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, A C; Darcy, K J; Cumberbatch, G L A

    2009-02-01

    The details are presented of the first published case of a tension pneumothorax induced by an automatic compression-decompression (ACD) device during cardiac arrest. An elderly patient collapsed with back pain and, on arrival of the crew, was in pulseless electrical activity (PEA) arrest. He was promptly intubated and correct placement of the endotracheal tube was confirmed by noting equal air entry bilaterally and the ACD device applied. On the way to the hospital he was noted to have absent breath sounds on the left without any change in the position of the endotracheal tube. Needle decompression of the left chest caused a hiss of air but the patient remained in PEA. Intercostal drain insertion in the emergency department released a large quantity of air from his left chest but without any change in his condition. Post-mortem examination revealed a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm as the cause of death. Multiple left rib fractures and a left lung laceration secondary to the use of the ACD device were also noted, although the pathologist felt that the tension pneumothorax had not contributed to the patient's death. It is recommended that a simple or tension pneumothorax should be considered when there is unilateral absence of breath sounds in addition to endobronchial intubation if an ACD device is being used.

  16. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in the Setting of Tension Pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Michael; Loarte, Pablo; Mirrer, Brooks; Mallet, Thierry; Salciccioli, Louis; Petrie, Alison; Cohen, Ronny

    2015-01-01

    Background. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is defined as a transient left ventricular dysfunction, usually accompanied by electrocardiographic changes. The literature documents only two other cases of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the latter setting. Methods. A 78-year-old female presented to the ED with severe shortness of breath, hypertension, and tachycardia. On physical exam, heart sounds (S1 and S2) were regular and wheezing was noticed bilaterally. We found laboratory results with a WBC of 20.0 (103/μL), troponin of 16.52 ng/mL, CK-mb of 70.6%, and BNP of 177 pg/mL. The patient was intubated for acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. A chest X-ray revealed a large left-sided tension pneumothorax. Initial echocardiogram showed apical ballooning with a LVEF of 10-15%. A cardiac angiography revealed normal coronary arteries with no coronary disease. After supportive treatment, the patient's condition improved with a subsequent echocardiogram showing a LVEF of 60%. Conclusion. The patient was found to have Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of a tension pneumothorax. The exact mechanisms of ventricular dysfunction have not been clarified. However, multivessel coronary spasm or catecholamine cardiotoxicity has been suggested to have a causative role. We suggest that, in our patient, left ventricular dysfunction was induced by the latter mechanism related to the stress associated with acute pneumothorax.

  17. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy in the Setting of Tension Pneumothorax

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    Michael Gale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is defined as a transient left ventricular dysfunction, usually accompanied by electrocardiographic changes. The literature documents only two other cases of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the latter setting. Methods. A 78-year-old female presented to the ED with severe shortness of breath, hypertension, and tachycardia. On physical exam, heart sounds (S1 and S2 were regular and wheezing was noticed bilaterally. We found laboratory results with a WBC of 20.0 (103/μL, troponin of 16.52 ng/mL, CK-mb of 70.6%, and BNP of 177 pg/mL. The patient was intubated for acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. A chest X-ray revealed a large left-sided tension pneumothorax. Initial echocardiogram showed apical ballooning with a LVEF of 10–15%. A cardiac angiography revealed normal coronary arteries with no coronary disease. After supportive treatment, the patient’s condition improved with a subsequent echocardiogram showing a LVEF of 60%. Conclusion. The patient was found to have Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of a tension pneumothorax. The exact mechanisms of ventricular dysfunction have not been clarified. However, multivessel coronary spasm or catecholamine cardiotoxicity has been suggested to have a causative role. We suggest that, in our patient, left ventricular dysfunction was induced by the latter mechanism related to the stress associated with acute pneumothorax.

  18. Pneumothorax and Pneumomediastinum in Pregnancy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sathiyathasan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Case Report. A 37 years old patient at 40 weeks gestation presented with acute severe hypoxia with a seizure followed by fetal bradycardia. Caesarean section was performed under GA and she was intubated and ventilated. History revealed longstanding right pleural endometriosis with multiple pneumothoraces and hydrothoraces. A CT chest showed extensive bilateral pnenumothoraces. Her clinical condition improved with a left-sided chest drain. Discussion. Severe hypoxia and seizures in a patient with previous history of pnenumothorax are highly suggestive of tension pneumothorax. Radiological investigations are vital for diagnosis. The traditional treatment approach to recurrent pneumothorax has been thorocotomy with bleb or bulla resection and pleurodeisis. The advantages of thorocoscopic surgical treatment over thorocotomy are decreased time of exposure to anaesthetic drugs, rapid lung expansion, decreased post operative pain, and a potentially shorter post operative recovery. In any future pregnancy due to the high risk of recurrence of pneumothorax Contemporary obstetric management should determine the method of delivery and continuous lumbar/epidural anesthesia should be used if at all feasible. Preconceptual counseling about this risk is vital, and women must be advised about potential serious adverse outcomes.

  19. Surgical treatment of catamenial pneumothorax: Report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinobu Ichiki

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Catamenial pneumothorax (CP is a rare entity of spontaneous, recurring pneumothorax in females. Although it has been known to be associated with thoracic endometriosis, varying clinical course and the lack of consistent intraoperative findings have led to conflicting etiological theories. We herein discuss the etiology, clinical course, and surgical treatment of three patients with CP. Three females (aged 40 years, 28 years, and 34 years had recurrent right-sided spontaneous pneumothoraces that coincided with their menses. They had undergone video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS previously. Blueberry spots in the right diaphragm were detected in all three cases. Two patients had recurrence, postoperatively. The other patient, who received luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog therapy for an abdominal endometriosis in the perioperative period and postoperative chemical pleurodesis to prevent recurrence, has been free of recurrence for 15 months, postoperatively. However, pelvic endometriosis was detected in this patient only. Therefore, CP should be suspected in ovulating females with spontaneous pneumothorax, even in the absence of any symptoms associated with pelvic endometriosis. In addition, while performing VATS, careful inspection of the diaphragmatic surface is important. In complicated cases, hormonal suppression therapy and chemical pleurodesis might also be helpful adjunct modalities.

  20. Pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema complicating MIS herniorrhaphy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Browne, J

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: Videoscopic herniorrhaphy is being performed more frequently with advantages claimed over the conventional open approach. This clinical report describes a pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema occurring at the end of an extraperitoneal videoscopic herniorrhaphy. CLINICAL FEATURES: A 25 yr old ASA I man presented for elective extraperitoneal videoscopic hernia repair. Following intravenous induction with fentanyl, midazolam and propofol a balanced anesthetic technique using enflurane in N2O and O2 was used. Apart from a prolonged operating time (195 min), the procedure and anesthetic was uneventful. At the conclusion of the operation, prior to reversal of neuromuscular blockade extensive subcutaneous emphysema was noted on removal of the surgical drapes. Chest radiography revealed a pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax. A 25 FG intercostal tube was inserted and connected to an underwater seal drain. Sedation and positive pressure ventilation was maintained overnight to permit resolution and avoid airway compromise. The clinical and radiological features had resolved by the next morning and the patient\\'s trachea was extubated. His subsequent recovery was uneventful. CONCLUSION: Pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum are well recognised complications of laparoscopic techniques but have not been described following extraperitoneal herniorrhaphy. In this report we postulate possible mechanisms which may have contributed to their development, including inadvertent breach of the peritoneum and leakage of gas around the diaphragmatic herniae or tracking of gas retroperitoneally. The case alerts us to the possibility of this complication occurring in patients undergoing videoscopic herniorrhaphy.

  1. Surgical treatment of catamenial pneumothorax: Report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiki, Yoshinobu; Nagashima, Akira; Yasuda, Manabu; Takenoyama, Mitsuhiro; Toyoshima, Satoshi

    2015-07-01

    Catamenial pneumothorax (CP) is a rare entity of spontaneous, recurring pneumothorax in females. Although it has been known to be associated with thoracic endometriosis, varying clinical course and the lack of consistent intraoperative findings have led to conflicting etiological theories. We herein discuss the etiology, clinical course, and surgical treatment of three patients with CP. Three females (aged 40 years, 28 years, and 34 years) had recurrent right-sided spontaneous pneumothoraces that coincided with their menses. They had undergone video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) previously. Blueberry spots in the right diaphragm were detected in all three cases. Two patients had recurrence, postoperatively. The other patient, who received luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analog therapy for an abdominal endometriosis in the perioperative period and postoperative chemical pleurodesis to prevent recurrence, has been free of recurrence for 15 months, postoperatively. However, pelvic endometriosis was detected in this patient only. Therefore, CP should be suspected in ovulating females with spontaneous pneumothorax, even in the absence of any symptoms associated with pelvic endometriosis. In addition, while performing VATS, careful inspection of the diaphragmatic surface is important. In complicated cases, hormonal suppression therapy and chemical pleurodesis might also be helpful adjunct modalities. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  2. A Total Pleural Covering for Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Prevents Pneumothorax Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Masatoshi; Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Kataoka, Hideyuki; Sato, Teruhiko; Kumasaka, Toshio; Ebana, Hiroki; Yamanaka, Sumitaka; Endo, Reina; Miyahashira, Sumika; Shinya, Noriko; Seyama, Kuniaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous pneumothorax is a major and frequently recurrent complication of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM). Despite the customary use of pleurodesis to manage pnenumothorax, the recurrence rate remains high, and accompanying pleural adhesions cause serious bleeding during subsequent lung transplantation. Therefore, we have developed a technique of total pleural covering (TPC) for LAM to wrap the entire visceral pleura with sheets of oxidized regenerated cellulose (ORC) mesh, thereby reinforcing the affected visceral pleura and preventing recurrence. Methods Since January 2003, TPC has been applied during video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for the treatment of LAM. The medical records of LAM patients who had TPC since that time and until August 2014 are reviewed. Results TPC was performed in 43 LAM patients (54 hemithoraces), 11 of whom required TPC bilaterally. Pneumothorax recurred in 14 hemithoraces (25.9%) from 11 patients (25.6%) after TPC. Kaplan-Meier estimates of recurrence-free hemithorax were 80.8% at 2.5 years, 71.7% at 5 years, 71.7% at 7.5 years, and 61.4% at 9 years. The recurrence-free probability was significantly better when 10 or more sheets of ORC mesh were utilized for TPC (P = 0.0018). TPC significantly reduced the frequency of pneumothorax: 0.544 ± 0.606 episode/month (mean ± SD) before TPC vs. 0.008 ± 0.019 after TPC (Ppneumothorax in LAM, was minimally invasive and rarely caused restrictive ventilatory impairment. PMID:27658250

  3. Outcomes of Contralateral Bullae in Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsub Noh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The management of contralateral bullae incidentally found in radiological studies is controversial, largely due to the unpredictability of the natural course of incidentally found contralateral bullae. This study aimed to identify the factors associated with the contralateral occurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP, and to characterize the outcomes of contralateral bullae incidentally found in radiological studies. Methods: From January 2005 to December 2008, 285 patients were admitted to our institution for PSP, and the patients underwent follow- up until August 2012. The relationships between the following variables and contralateral pneumothorax occurrence were evaluated: age, sex, smoking history, body mass index, ipsilateral recurrence, ipsilateral bullae size, the number of ipsilateral bullae, contralateral bullae size, and the number of contralateral bullae. Results: The study group consisted of 233 males and 29 females. The mean age and mean body index of the patients were 23.85± 9.50 years and 19.63±2.50 kg/m2. Contralateral PSP occurred in 26 patients. The five-year contralateral PSP occurrence- free survival rate was 64.3% in patients in whom contralateral bullae were found. Conclusion: The occurrence of contralateral PSP was associated with younger age, ipsilateral recurrence, and the presence of contralateral bullae. Contralateral PSP occurrence was more common in young patients and patients with recurrent PSP. Single-stage bilateral surgery should be considered if an operation is needed in young patients, patients with recurrent pneumothorax, and patients with contralateral bullae.

  4. Management of paediatric spontaneous pneumothorax: a multicentre retrospective case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Paul D; Blackburn, Carol; Babl, Franz E; Gamage, Lalith; Schutz, Jacquie; Nogajski, Rebecca; Dalziel, Stuart; Donald, Colin B; Druda, Dino; Krieser, David; Neutze, Jocelyn; Acworth, Jason; Lee, Mark; Ngo, Peter K

    2015-10-01

    Paediatric guidelines are lacking for management of spontaneous pneumothorax. Adult patient-focused guidelines (British Thoracic Society 2003 and 2010) introduced aspiration as first-line intervention for primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) and small secondary spontaneous pneumothoraces (SSP). Paediatric practice is unclear, and evidence for aspiration success rates is urgently required to develop paediatric-specific recommendations. Retrospective analysis of PSP and SSP management at nine paediatric emergency departments across Australia and New Zealand (2003-2010) to compare PSP and SSP management. 219 episodes of spontaneous pneumothorax occurred in 162 children (median age 15 years, 71% male); 155 PSP episodes in 120 children and 64 SSP episodes in 42 children. Intervention in PSP vs SSP episodes occurred in 55% (95% CI 47% to 62%) vs 70% (60% to 79%), pmanagement, PSP and SSP management did not differ and ICC insertion was the continuing preferred intervention. Overall success of aspiration was lower than reported results for adults, although success was greater for small than for large pneumothoraces. Paediatric prospective studies are urgently required to determine optimal paediatric interventional management strategies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Chest Computed Tomography (CT) Immediately after CT-Guided Transthoracic Needle Aspiration Biopsy as a Predictor of Overt Pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Tae June; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kang, Young Ae; Kwon, Sung-Youn; Yoon, Ho-Il; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Kyung Won; Lee, Jae Ho

    2009-01-01

    Background/Aims This study examined the correlation between pneumothorax detected by immediate post-transthoracic needle aspiration-biopsy (TTNB) chest computed tomography (CT) and overt pneumothorax detected by chest PA, and investigated factors that might influence the correlation. Methods Adult patients who had undergone CT-guided TTNB for lung lesions from May 2003 to June 2007 at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital were included. Immediate post-TTNB CT and chest PA follow-up at 4 and 16 hours after CT-guided TTNB were performed in 934 patients. Results Pneumothorax detected by immediate chest CT (CT-pneumothorax) was found in 237 (25%) and overt pneumothorax was detected by chest PA follow-up in 92 (38.8%) of the 237 patients. However, overt pneumothorax was found in 18 (2.6%) of the 697 patients without CT-pneumothorax. The width and depth of CT-pneumothorax were predictive risk factors for overt pneumothorax. Conclusions CT-pneumothorax is very sensitive for predicting overt pneumothorax, and the width and depth on CT-pneumothorax are reliable risk factors for predicting overt pneumothorax. PMID:19949733

  6. Is single port enough in minimally surgery for pneumothorax?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocakcioglu, Ilhan; Alpay, Levent; Demir, Mine; Kiral, Hakan; Akyil, Mustafa; Dogruyol, Talha; Tezel, Cagatay; Baysungur, Volkan; Yalcinkaya, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is a widespread used procedure for treatment of primary spontaneous pneumothorax patients. In this study, the adaptation of single-port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach to primary spontaneous pneumothorax patients necessitating surgical treatment, with its pros and cons over the traditional two- or three-port approaches are examined. Between January 2011 and August 2013, 146 primary spontaneous pneumothorax patients suitable for surgical treatment are evaluated prospectively. Indications for surgery included prolonged air leak, recurrent pneumothorax, or abnormal findings on radiological examinations. Visual analog scale and patient satisfaction scale score were utilized. Forty triple-port, 69 double-port, and 37 single-port operations were performed. Mean age of 146 (126 male, 20 female) patients was 27.1 ± 16.4 (range 15-42). Mean operation duration was 63.59 ± 26 min; 61.7 for single, 64.2 for double, and 63.8 min for triple-port approaches. Total drainage was lower in the single-port group than the multi-port groups (P = 0.001). No conversion to open thoracotomy or 30-day hospital mortality was seen in our group. No recurrence was seen in single-port group on follow-up period. Visual analog scale scores on postoperative 24th, 48th, and 72nd hours were 3.42 ± 0.94, 2.46 ± 0.81, 1.96 ± 0.59 in the single-port group; significantly lower than the other groups (P = 0.011, P = 0.014, and P = 0.042, respectively). Patient satisfaction scale scores of patients in the single-port group on 24th and 48th hours were 1.90 ± 0.71 and 2.36 ± 0.62, respectively, indicating a significantly better score than the other two groups (P = 0.038 and P = 0.046). This study confirms the competency of single-port procedure in first-line surgical treatment of primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

  7. Pneumothorax associated with nontuberculous mycobacteria: A retrospective study of 69 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueyama, Masako; Asakura, Takanori; Morimoto, Kozo; Namkoong, Ho; Matsuda, Shuichi; Osawa, Takeshi; Ishii, Makoto; Hasegawa, Naoki; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Goto, Hajime

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease (NTMPD) is increasing worldwide. Secondary spontaneous pneumothorax occurs as a complication of underlying lung disease and is associated with higher morbidity, mortality, and recurrence than primary spontaneous pneumothorax. We here investigated the clinical features and long-term outcomes of pneumothorax associated with NTMPD.We conducted a retrospective study on consecutive adult patients with pneumothorax associated with NTMPD at Fukujuji Hospital and Keio University Hospital from January 1992 to December 2013. We reviewed the medical records of 69 such patients to obtain clinical characteristics, radiological findings, and long-term outcomes, including pneumothorax recurrence and mortality.The median age of the patients was 68 years; 34 patients were women. The median body mass index was 16.8 kg/m. Underlying pulmonary diseases mainly included chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary tuberculosis. On computed tomography, nodules and bronchiectasis were observed in 46 (98%) and 45 (96%) patients, respectively. Consolidation, pleural thickening, interlobular septal thickening, and cavities were most common, and observed in 40 (85%), 40 (85%), 37 (79%), and 36 (77%) patients, respectively. Regarding pneumothorax treatment outcomes, complete and incomplete lung expansion were observed in 49 patients (71%) and 15 patients (22%), respectively. The survival rate after pneumothorax was 48% at 5 years. By the end of the follow-up, 33 patients had died, and the median survival was 4.4 years with a median follow-up period of 1.7 years. The rate of absence of recurrence after the first pneumothorax was 59% at 3 years. By the end of the follow-up, 18 patients had experienced pneumothorax recurrence. Furthermore, 12/18 patients (66%) with recurrent pneumothorax died during the study period. Twenty-three patients (70%) died because of NTMPD progression. Low body mass index (BMI) was a negative

  8. Predictors of pneumothorax after CT-guided transthoracic needle lung biopsy: the role of quantitative CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chami, H.A.; Faraj, W.; Yehia, Z.A.; Badour, S.A.; Sawan, P.; Rebeiz, K.; Safa, R.; Saade, C.; Ghandour, B.; Shamseddine, A.; Mukherji, D.; Haydar, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the association of quantitative computed tomography (CT) measures of emphysema with the occurrence of pneumothorax after CT-guided needle lung biopsy (NLB) accounting for other risk factors. Materials and methods: One hundred and sixty-three CT-guided NLBs performed between 2008 and 2013 with available complete chest CT within 30 days were reviewed for the occurrence of post-procedure pneumothorax. Percent emphysema was determined quantitatively as the percentage of lung voxels below −950 HU on chest CT images using automated software. Multivariable regression was used to assess the association of percent emphysema volume with the occurrence of post-procedure pneumothorax. The association of percent emphysema volume with the pneumothorax size and need for chest tube placement after NLB was also explored. Results: Percent emphysema was significantly associated with the incidence of post-NLB pneumothorax (OR=1.10 95% confidence interval: 1.01–1.15; p=0.03) adjusting for lower-lobe lesion location, needle path length, lesion size, number of passes, and pleural needle trajectory angle. Percent emphysema was not associated with the size of the pneumothorax, nor the need for chest tube placement after NLB. Conclusion: Percent emphysema determined quantitatively from chest CT is a significant predictor of post-NLB pneumothorax. - Highlights: • Examine the association between quantitative emphysema measures & post NLB pneumothorax. • The risk of post-NLB pneumothorax increases with every unit increase in percent emphysema. • Percent emphysema is a significant predictor of pneumothorax post transthoracic NLB. • Quantitative analysis of chest CT offers clinicians' objective measures to assess pneumothorax risk.

  9. Large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma: Is a chest drain always necessary in stable patients? A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Idris, Baig M.; Hefny, Ashraf F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Pneumothorax is the most common potentially life-threatening blunt chest injury. The management of pneumothorax depends upon the etiology, its size and hemodynamic stability of the patient. Most clinicians agree that chest drainage is essential for the management of traumatic large pneumothorax. Herein, we present a case of large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma patient that resolved spontaneously without a chest drain. Presentation of case: A 63- year- old man presented...

  10. Percutaneous Ethanol Injection via an Artificially Induced Right Hydrothorax for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in the Hepatic Dome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Akimichi; Nimura, Yuji; Kamiya, Junichi; Nagino, Masato; Kito, Yasushi

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of sonographically (US) guided percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) via an artificially induced right hydrothorax (transthoracic PEI) to treat US-invisible hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the hepatic dome. Five cirrhotic patients with US-invisible HCC in the hepatic dome, who were poor surgical candidates, underwent transthoracic PEI. An artificial right hydrothorax was created by instilling 500 ml saline, and absolute ethanol was injected transhydrothoracically into the hepatic dome lesion under local anesthesia. The success and complications were assessed radiologically. The patients were followed up serologically and radiologically for 12-44 (mean 28.4) months. Twenty-five hydrothoraces were induced. All hydrothoraces enabled US visualization of the entire hepatic dome. Eight of the nine small lesions were treated successfully by the treatment. Two of the three local recurrences were eradicated by repeat transthoracic PEI. One large lesion was treated by a combination of transthoracic and regular PEI. The only complication was one clinically insignificant pneumothorax. Induction of a right hydrothorax is feasible and safe. The hydrothorax enables US visualization of the entire hepatic dome and permits US-guided PEI for HCC in the hepatic dome that otherwise would not be possible

  11. Pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax as presenting signs in severe Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, Jose L.; Vazquez, Ignacio; Garcia-Tejedor, Jose L. [Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo, Department of Radiology, Vigo (Spain); Gonzalez, Maria L.; Reparaz, Alfredo [Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo, Department of Pediatrics, Vigo (Spain)

    2007-12-15

    We present a 3-year-old child with severe extensive Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia complicated with pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax. Pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum have only exceptionally been described in mild cases of the disease. The radiological findings, differential diagnosis and clinical course are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Pleural Adhesion Assessment as a Predictor for Pneumothorax after Endobronchial Valve Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geffen, Wouter H.; Klooster, Karin; Hartman, Jorine E.; Ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Wolf, Rienhart F. E.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    Background: Pneumothorax after bronchoscopic lung volume reduction using one-way endobronchial valves (EBVs) in patients with advanced emphysema occurs in approximately 20% of patients. It is not well known which factors predict the development of pneumothorax.  Objective: To assess whether pleural

  13. Lung ultrasound accurately detects pneumothorax in a preterm newborn lamb model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Douglas A; Hooper, Stuart B; Binder-Heschl, Corinna; Kluckow, Martin; Gill, Andrew W; LaRosa, Domenic A; Inocencio, Ishmael M; Moxham, Alison; Rodgers, Karyn; Zahra, Valerie A; Davis, Peter G; Polglase, Graeme R

    2016-06-01

    Pneumothorax is a common emergency affecting extremely preterm. In adult studies, lung ultrasound has performed better than chest x-ray in the diagnosis of pneumothorax. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of lung ultrasound (LUS) examination to detect pneumothorax using a preterm animal model. This was a prospective, observational study using newborn Border-Leicester lambs at gestational age = 126 days (equivalent to gestational age = 26 weeks in humans) receiving mechanical ventilation from birth to 2 h of life. At the conclusion of the experiment, LUS was performed, the lambs were then euthanised and a post-mortem exam was immediately performed. We used previously published ultrasound techniques to identify pneumothorax. Test characteristics of LUS to detect pneumothorax were calculated, using the post-mortem exam as the 'gold standard' test. Nine lambs (18 lungs) were examined. Four lambs had a unilateral pneumothorax, all of which were identified by LUS with no false positives. This was the first study to use post-mortem findings to test the efficacy of LUS to detect pneumothorax in a newborn animal model. Lung ultrasound accurately detected pneumothorax, verified by post-mortem exam, in premature, newborn lambs. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  14. Pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax as presenting signs in severe Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Jose L.; Vazquez, Ignacio; Garcia-Tejedor, Jose L.; Gonzalez, Maria L.; Reparaz, Alfredo

    2007-01-01

    We present a 3-year-old child with severe extensive Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia complicated with pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax. Pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum have only exceptionally been described in mild cases of the disease. The radiological findings, differential diagnosis and clinical course are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Pneumothorax size measurements on digital chest radiographs: Intra- and inter- rater reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelle, Andreas; Gjerdevik, Miriam; Grydeland, Thomas; Skorge, Trude D; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Bakke, Per S

    2015-10-01

    Detailed and reliable methods may be important for discussions on the importance of pneumothorax size in clinical decision-making. Rhea's method is widely used to estimate pneumothorax size in percent based on chest X-rays (CXRs) from three measure points. Choi's addendum is used for anterioposterior projections. The aim of this study was to examine the intrarater and interrater reliability of the Rhea and Choi method using digital CXR in the ward based PACS monitors. Three physicians examined a retrospective series of 80 digital CXRs showing pneumothorax, using Rhea and Choi's method, then repeated in a random order two weeks later. We used the analysis of variance technique by Eliasziw et al. to assess the intrarater and interrater reliability in altogether 480 estimations of pneumothorax size. Estimated pneumothorax sizes ranged between 5% and 100%. The intrarater reliability coefficient was 0.98 (95% one-sided lower-limit confidence interval C 0.96), and the interrater reliability coefficient was 0.95 (95% one-sided lower-limit confidence interval 0.93). This study has shown that the Rhea and Choi method for calculating pneumothorax size has high intrarater and interrater reliability. These results are valid across gender, side of pneumothorax and whether the patient is diagnosed with primary or secondary pneumothorax. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Analysis of an Internet Community about Pneumothorax and the Importance of Accurate Information about the Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong Jun; Lee, Sungsoo

    2018-04-01

    The huge improvements in the speed of data transmission and the increasing amount of data available as the Internet has expanded have made it easy to obtain information about any disease. Since pneumothorax frequently occurs in young adolescents, patients often search the Internet for information on pneumothorax. This study analyzed an Internet community for exchanging information on pneumothorax, with an emphasis on the importance of accurate information and doctors' role in providing such information. This study assessed 599,178 visitors to the Internet community from June 2008 to April 2017. There was an average of 190 visitors, 2.2 posts, and 4.5 replies per day. A total of 6,513 posts were made, and 63.3% of them included questions about the disease. The visitors mostly searched for terms such as 'pneumothorax,' 'recurrent pneumothorax,' 'pneumothorax operation,' and 'obtaining a medical certification of having been diagnosed with pneumothorax.' However, 22% of the pneumothorax-related posts by visitors contained inaccurate information. Internet communities can be an important source of information. However, incorrect information about a disease can be harmful for patients. We, as doctors, should try to provide more in-depth information about diseases to patients and to disseminate accurate information about diseases in Internet communities.

  17. Cone-beam computed tomography versus digital periapical radiography in the detection of artificially created periapical lesions: A pilot study of the diagnostic accuracy of endodontists using both techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campello, Abdrea Fagundes; Goncalves, Lucio Souza; Marques, Fabio vidal [Faculty of Dentistry, Estacio de Sa University, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Guedes, Fabio Ribeiro [Faculty of Dentistry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of previously trained endodontists in the detection of artificially created periapical lesions using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital periapical radiography (DPR). An ex vivo model using dry skulls was used, in which simulated apical lesions were created and then progressively enlarged using no.1/2, no.2, no.4, and no.6 round burs. A total of 11 teeth were included in the study, and 110 images were obtained with CBCT and with an intraoral digital periapical radiographic sensor (Instrumentarium dental, Tuusula, Finland) initially and after each bur was used. Specificity and sensitivity were calculated. All images were evaluated by 10 previously trained, certified endodontists. Agreement was calculated using the kappa coefficient. The accuracy of each method in detecting apical lesions was calculated using the chi-square test. The kappa coefficient between examiners showed low agreement (range, 0.17-0.64). No statistical difference was found between CBCT and DPR in teeth without apical lesions (P=.15). The accuracy for CBCT was significantly higher than for DPR in all corresponding simulated lesions (P<.001). The correct diagnostic rate for CBCT ranged between 56.9% and 73.6%. The greatest difference between CBCT and DPR was seen in the maxillary teeth (CBCT, 71.4%; DPR, 28.6%; P<.01) and multi-rooted teeth (CBCT, 83.3%; DPR, 33.3%; P<.01). CBCT allowed higher accuracy than DPR in detecting simulated lesions for all simulated lesions tested. Endodontists need to be properly trained in interpreting CBCT scans to achieve higher diagnostic accuracy.

  18. Artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Earl B

    1975-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence provides information pertinent to the fundamental aspects of artificial intelligence. This book presents the basic mathematical and computational approaches to problems in the artificial intelligence field.Organized into four parts encompassing 16 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the various fields of artificial intelligence. This text then attempts to connect artificial intelligence problems to some of the notions of computability and abstract computing devices. Other chapters consider the general notion of computability, with focus on the interaction bet

  19. Recurrent Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax is Common Following Chest Tube and Conservative Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Winnie Hedevang; Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Katballe, Niels

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Previous studies on primary spontaneous pneumothorax reported variable recurrence rates, but they were based on heterogeneous patient populations including secondary pneumothorax. We investigated young patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax exclusively and used a national...... registry to track readmissions and calculate independent predictors of recurrence. METHODS: A prospective cohort study of consecutive young patients who were admitted over a 5-year period with their first episode of primary spontaneous pneumothorax and treated conservatively with a chest tube. Baseline...... characteristics were obtained from questionnaires presented on admittance. All patients were discharged with fully expanded lungs on chest radiography. Patient charts were identified in the national electronic patient registry for detailed information on readmissions due to recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax...

  20. Pleural Covering Application for Recurrent Pneumothorax in a Patient with Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebana, Hiroki; Otsuji, Mizuto; Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Kurihara, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Seyama, Kuniaki

    2016-06-20

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) is a rare hereditary disease that presents with multiple lung cysts and recurrent pneumothorax. These cysts occupy predominantly the lower-medial zone of the lung field adjacent to the interlobar fissure, and some of them abut peripheral pulmonary vessels. For the surgical management of pneumothorax with BHDS, the conventional approach of resecting all subpleural cysts and bullae is not feasible. Thus, after handling several bullae by using a stapler or performing ligation as a standardized treatment, we applied to a pleural covering technique to thicken the affected visceral pleura and then to prevent recurrence of pneumothorax. We herein report the successful application of a pleural covering technique via thoracoscopic surgery to treat the recurrent pneumothorax of a 30-year-old man with BHDS. This technique is promising for the management of intractable pneumothorax secondary to BHDS.

  1. Clinical experience of intrapleural administration of fibrin glue for secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Takeshi; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Yoshida, Mitsuteru; Kawakami, Yukikiyo; Sakiyama, Shoji; Kondo, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    Secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer is an intractable and serious pathosis, which directly aggravates patients' Quality of Life (QOL) and prognosis. We first select the intrapleural administration of fibrin glue for secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer. From April 2009 to May 2012, we encountered 5 patients who developed secondary pneumothorax during treatment for advanced lung cancer. Their average age was 60.8 years old, and 4 of them had squamous cell carcinoma, 1 had adenocarcinoma, and all had unresectable advanced lung cancer. In 4 of them, the point of air leakage could be detected by pleurography, and leakage could be stopped by the intrapleural administration of fibrin glue. All of them could receive chemotherapy or radiotherapy after treatment for secondary pneumothorax. The intrapleural administration of fibrin glue may be an effective and valid treatment for intractable secondary pneumothorax with advanced lung cancer. (author)

  2. Intelligence: Real or artificial?

    OpenAIRE

    Schlinger, Henry D.

    1992-01-01

    Throughout the history of the artificial intelligence movement, researchers have strived to create computers that could simulate general human intelligence. This paper argues that workers in artificial intelligence have failed to achieve this goal because they adopted the wrong model of human behavior and intelligence, namely a cognitive essentialist model with origins in the traditional philosophies of natural intelligence. An analysis of the word “intelligence” suggests that it originally r...

  3. Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax in Menstruating Women Has High Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Christopher K; Stanifer, Bryan P; Fore-Kosterski, Susan; Gillespie, Colin; Yeldandi, Anjana; Meyerson, Shari; Odell, David D; DeCamp, Malcolm M; Bharat, Ankit

    2016-10-01

    Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) is treated on the basis of studies that have predominantly consisted of tall male subjects. Here, we determined recurrence of PSP in average-statured menstruating women and studied prevalence of catamenial pneumothorax (CP) in this population. Men and menstruating women, aged 18 to 55 years, without underlying lung disease or substance abuse were retrospectively studied between 2009 and 2015. A chest pathologist reviewed all specimens for thoracic endometriosis. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed to determine recurrence. The median age of women (n = 33) and men (n = 183) was 33.4 and 31.6 years, respectively. In women, 9 (27%) had left-sided and 24 (73%) had right-sided PSP, treated with tube thoracostomy. Recurrence occurred in 21 women (64%) with median follow-up of 14 months, and they were treated with thoracoscopic pleurodesis. Right PSP had higher recurrence (70%) than left PSP (56%, p = 0.02). Four women (12%) presented with recurrent tension pneumothorax within 6 months. Eight patients (24%) had PSP within 72 hours of menses, meeting clinical criteria of CP. All these were placed on hormonal suppression after initial episode but went on to experience recurrence that was treated with pleurodesis. Classical endometrial glands were not found in any biopsy specimens obtained during the thoracoscopy. In contrast to female subjects, only 8 average-statured men (4.4%) had recurrence (p < 0.001) with a median follow-up of 16 months. PSP in healthy average-statured menstruating women has high recurrence compared with male counterparts. CP is a clinical diagnosis and often recurs despite hormonal suppression therapy. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Primary spontaneous pneumothorax in menstruating females has high recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Christopher K.; Stanifer, Bryan P.; Fore-Kosterski, Susan; Gillespie, Colin; Yeldandi, Anjana; Meyerson, Shari; Odell, David D.; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Bharat, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) is treated based on studies that have predominantly consisted of tall male subjects. Here we determined recurrence of PSP in average-statured menstruating women and studied prevalence of catamenial pneumothorax (CP) in this population. Methods Males and menstruating females, aged 18-55 years, without underlying lung disease or substance abuse were retrospectively studied between 2009-2015. A chest pathologist reviewed all specimens for thoracic endometriosis. Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed to determine recurrence. Results The median age of females (n=33) and males (n=183) was 33.4 and 31.6 years, respectively. In females, nine (27%) had left-sided and 24 (73%) had right-sided PSP, treated with tube thoracostomy. Recurrence occurred in 21 (64%) females with median follow up of 14 months and was treated with thoracoscopic pleurodesis. Right PSP had higher recurrence (70%) compared to left (56%, p=0.02). Four females (12%) presented with recurrent tension pneumothorax within six months. Eight (24%) patients had PSP within 72 hours of menses, meeting clinical criteria of CP. All these were placed on hormonal suppression after initial episode but went on to develop recurrence that was treated with pleurodesis. However, classic endometrial glands were not found in any biopsy specimens obtained during the thoracoscopy. In contrast to female subjects, only 8 (4.4%) average-statured males had recurrence (p<0.001) with a median follow up of 16 months. Conclusions PSP in healthy average-statured menstruating women has high recurrence compared to male counterparts. CP is a clinical diagnosis and often recurs despite hormonal suppression therapy. PMID:27345097

  5. Prospective Evaluation of Thoracic Ultrasound in the Detection of Pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, K. W.; Hamilton, D. R.; Kirkpatrick, A. W.; Billica, R. D.; Williams, D. R.; Diebel, L. N.; Sargysan, A. E.; Dulchavsky, S. A.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Pneumothorax (PTX) occurs commonly in trauma patients and is confirmed by examination and radiography. Thoracic ultrasound (VIS) has been suggested as an alternative method for rapidly diagnosing PTX when X-ray is unavailable as in rural, military, or space flight settings; however, its accuracy and specificity are not known. Methods: We evaluated the accuracy of thoracic U/S detection of PTX compared to radiography in stable, emergency patients with a high suspicion of PTX at a Level-l trauma center over a 6-month period. Following University and NASA Institutional Review Board approval, informed consent was obtained from patients with penetrating or blunt chest trauma, or with a history consistent with PTX. Whenever possible, the presence or absence of the " lung sliding" sign or the "comet tail" artifact were determined by U/S in both hemithoraces by residents instructed in thoracic U/S before standard radiologic verification of PTX. Results were recorded on data sheets for comparison to standard radiography. Results: Thoracic VIS had a 94% sensitivity; two PTX could not be reliably diagnosed due to subcutaneous air; the true negative rate was 100%. In one patient, the VIS exam was positive while X ray did not confirm PTX; a follow-up film 1 hour later demonstrated a small PTX. The average time for bilateral thoracic VIS examination was 2 to 3 minutes. Conclusions: Thoracic ultrasound reliably diagnoses pneumothorax. Presence of the "lung sliding" sign conclusively excludes pneumothorax. Expansion of the FAST examination to include the thorax should be investigated.

  6. Pleurectomy versus pleural abrasion for primary spontaneous pneumothorax in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joharifard, Shahrzad; Coakley, Brian A; Butterworth, Sonia A

    2017-05-01

    Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) represents a common indication for urgent surgical intervention in children. First episodes are often managed with thoracostomy tube, whereas recurrent episodes typically prompt surgery involving apical bleb resection and pleurodesis, either via pleurectomy or pleural abrasion. The purpose of this study was to assess whether pleurectomy or pleural abrasion was associated with lower postoperative recurrence. The records of patients undergoing surgery for PSP between February 2005 and December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Recurrence was defined as an ipsilateral pneumothorax requiring surgical intervention. Bivariate logistic regressions were used to identify factors associated with recurrence. Fifty-two patients underwent 64 index operations for PSP (12 patients had surgery for contralateral pneumothorax, and each instance was analyzed separately). The mean age was 15.7±1.2years, and 79.7% (n=51) of patients were male. In addition to apical wedge resection, 53.1% (n=34) of patients underwent pleurectomy, 39.1% (n=25) underwent pleural abrasion, and 7.8% (n=5) had no pleural treatment. The overall recurrence rate was 23.4% (n=15). Recurrence was significantly lower in patients who underwent pleurectomy rather than pleural abrasion (8.8% vs. 40%, p<0.01). In patients who underwent pleural abrasion without pleurectomy, the relative risk of recurrence was 2.36 [1.41-3.92, p<0.01]. Recurrence of PSP is significantly reduced in patients undergoing pleurectomy compared to pleural abrasion. Level III, retrospective comparative therapeutic study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Usefulness of CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous needle biopsy in the presence of pneumothorax during biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O, Dong Hyun; Cho, Young Jun; Park, Yong Sung; Hwang, Cheol Mok; Kim, Keum Won; Kim, Ji Hyung

    2006-01-01

    When pneumothorax occurs during a percutaneous needle biopsy, the radiologist usually stops the biopsy. We evaluated the usefulness of computed tomographic (CT) fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous needle biopsy in the presence of pneumothorax during biopsy. We performed 288 CT fluoroscopy guided percutaneous needle biopsies to diagnose the pulmonary nodules. Twenty two of these patients had pneumothorax that occurred during the biopsy without obtaining an adequate specimen. After pneumothorax occurred, we performed immediate CT fluoroscopy guided percutaneous needle biopsies using an 18-gauge cutting needle. We evaluated the success rate of the biopsies and also whether or not the pneumothorax progressed. We classified these patients into two groups according to whether the pneumothorax progressed (Group 2) or not (Group 1) by measuring the longest distance between the parietal pleura and the visceral pleura both in the early and late pneumothorax. Additionally, we analyzed the relationship between the progression of pneumothorax after biopsy and 1) the depth of the pulmonary nodule; 2) the number of biopsies; 3) the presence or absence of emphysema at the biopsy site; and 4) the size of the pulmonary nodule. Biopsy was successful in 19 of 22 nodules (86.3%). Of the 19 nodules, 12 (63.2%) were malignant and 7 (36.8%) were benign. Twelve patients (54.5%) were classified as group 1 and 10 patients (45.4%) as group 2. The distance between the lung lesion and pleura showed a statistically significant difference between these two groups: ≤ 1 cm in distance for group 1 (81.8%) and group 2 (18.2%), and > 1 cm in distance for group 1 (30%) and group 2 (70%), ρ 0.05). When early pneumothorax occurs during a biopsy, CT fluoroscopy guided percutaneous needle biopsy is an effective and safe procedure. Aggravation of pneumothorax after biopsy is affected by the depth of the pulmonary nodule

  8. Pneumothorax Risk Factors in Smokers with and without Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Brian D.; Foreman, Marilyn G.; Bowler, Russell; Jacobson, Francine; Make, Barry J.; Castaldi, Peter J.; San José Estépar, Raúl; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: The demographic, physiological, and computed tomography (CT) features associated with pneumothorax in smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are not clearly defined. Objectives: We evaluated the hypothesis that pneumothorax in smokers is associated with male sex, tall and thin stature, airflow obstruction, and increased total and subpleural emphysema. Methods: The study included smokers with and without COPD from the COPDGene Study, with quantitative chest CT analysis. Pleural-based emphysema was assessed on the basis of local histogram measures of emphysema. Pneumothorax history was defined by subject self-report. Measurements and Main Results: Pneumothorax was reported in 286 (3.2%) of 9,062 participants. In all participants, risk of prior pneumothorax was significantly higher in men (odds ratio [OR], 1.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08–2.22) and non-Hispanic white subjects (OR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.34–2.69). Risk of prior pneumothorax was associated with increased percent CT emphysema in all participants and participants with COPD (OR, 1.04 for each 1% increase in emphysema; 95% CI, 1.03–1.06). Increased pleural-based emphysema was independently associated with risk of past pneumothorax in all participants (OR, 1.05 for each 1% increase; 95% CI, 1.01–1.10). In smokers with normal spirometry, risk of past pneumothorax was associated with non-Hispanic white race and lifetime smoking intensity (OR, 1.20 for every 10 pack-years; 95% CI, 1.09–1.33). Conclusions: Among smokers, pneumothorax is associated with male sex, non-Hispanic white race, and increased percentage of total and subpleural CT emphysema. Pneumothorax was not independently associated with height or lung function, even in participants with COPD. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00608764). PMID:25295410

  9. Pneumothorax risk factors in smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Brian D; Foreman, Marilyn G; Bowler, Russell; Jacobson, Francine; Make, Barry J; Castaldi, Peter J; San José Estépar, Raúl; Silverman, Edwin K; Hersh, Craig P

    2014-11-01

    The demographic, physiological, and computed tomography (CT) features associated with pneumothorax in smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are not clearly defined. We evaluated the hypothesis that pneumothorax in smokers is associated with male sex, tall and thin stature, airflow obstruction, and increased total and subpleural emphysema. The study included smokers with and without COPD from the COPDGene Study, with quantitative chest CT analysis. Pleural-based emphysema was assessed on the basis of local histogram measures of emphysema. Pneumothorax history was defined by subject self-report. Pneumothorax was reported in 286 (3.2%) of 9,062 participants. In all participants, risk of prior pneumothorax was significantly higher in men (odds ratio [OR], 1.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-2.22) and non-Hispanic white subjects (OR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.34-2.69). Risk of prior pneumothorax was associated with increased percent CT emphysema in all participants and participants with COPD (OR, 1.04 for each 1% increase in emphysema; 95% CI, 1.03-1.06). Increased pleural-based emphysema was independently associated with risk of past pneumothorax in all participants (OR, 1.05 for each 1% increase; 95% CI, 1.01-1.10). In smokers with normal spirometry, risk of past pneumothorax was associated with non-Hispanic white race and lifetime smoking intensity (OR, 1.20 for every 10 pack-years; 95% CI, 1.09-1.33). Among smokers, pneumothorax is associated with male sex, non-Hispanic white race, and increased percentage of total and subpleural CT emphysema. Pneumothorax was not independently associated with height or lung function, even in participants with COPD. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00608764).

  10. Tension Pneumothorax and Subcutaneous Emphysema Complicating Insertion of Nasogastric Tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narjis AL Saif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nasogastric tube has a key role in the management of substantial number of hospitalized patients particularly the critically ill. In spite of the apparent simple insertion technique, nasogastric tube placement has its serious perhaps fatal complications which need to be carefully assessed. Pulmonary misplacement and associated complications are commonplace during nasogastric tube procedure. We present a case of tension pneumothorax and massive surgical emphysema in critically ill ventilated patient due to inadvertent nasogastric tube insertion and also discussed the risk factors, complication list, and arrays of techniques for safer tube placement.

  11. Orthorexia nervosa with hyponatremia, subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastimum, pneumothorax, and pancytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Won; Kim, Jeong Yup; Go, Gang Ji; Jeon, Eun Sil; Pyo, Heui Jung; Kwon, Young Joo

    2011-06-01

    30-year-old male was admitted with general weakness and drowsy mental status. He had eaten only 3-4 spoons of brown rice and fresh vegetable without salt for 3 months to treat his tic disorder, and he had been in bed-ridden state. He has had weight loss of 14 kg in the last 3 months. We report a patient with orthorexia nervosa who developed hyponatremia, metabolic acidosis, subcutaneous emphysema, mediastinal emphysema, pneumothorax, and pancytopenia and we will review the literature. Also, we mention to prevent refeeding syndrome, and to start and maintain feeding in malnourished patients.

  12. Pneumomediastinum and bilateral pneumothorax following near drowning in shallow water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhiya Govindaraj

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We report pneumomediastinum, bilateral pneumothorax and acute respiratory distress syndrome in a victim of near drowning who was intoxicated and did not have thoracic or neck trauma. Chest radiograph revealed the above findings, later confirmed by computed tomography. He was in shock and also had gastrointestinal (GI bleeding and renal dysfunction. With adequate resuscitative measures including fluids, blood transfusions, intercostal tube drainage and mechanical ventilation he made a complete recovery. Good prognostic indicators in near drowning patients include higher Glasgow Coma Scale, short submersion time and quick resuscitative measures even in the presence of serious cardiorespiratory or hemodynamic compromise.

  13. Pneumomediastinum and bilateral pneumothorax following near drowning in shallow water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalin Viswanathan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We report pneumomediastinum, bilateral pneumothorax and acute respiratory distress syndrome in a victim of near drowning who was intoxicated and did not have thoracic or neck trauma. Chest radiograph revealed the above findings, later confirmed by computed tomography. He was in shock and also had gastrointestinal (GI bleeding and renal dysfunction. With adequate resuscitative measures including fluids, blood transfusions, intercostal tube drainage and mechanical ventilation he made a complete recovery. Good prognostic indicators in near drowning patients include higher Glasgow Coma Scale, short submersion time and quick resuscitative measures even in the presence of serious cardiorespiratory or hemodynamic compromise.

  14. Clinical and radiological outcome following pneumothorax after endoscopic lung volume reduction with valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gompelmann D

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available D Gompelmann,1,2 N Benjamin,1 K Kontogianni,1 FJF Herth,1,2 CP Heussel,2–4 H Hoffmann,2,5 R Eberhardt1,2 1Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik at University of Heidelberg, 2German Center for Lung Research, 3Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Thoraxklinik at University of Heidelberg, 4Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, 5Thoracic Surgery, Thoraxklinik at University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Introduction: Valve implantation has evolved as a therapy for patients with advanced emphysema. Although it is a minimally invasive treatment, it is associated with complications, the most common being pneumothorax. Pneumothorax occurs due to the rapid target lobe volume reduction and may be a predictor of clinical benefit despite this complication. Objective: The objective of this study was to conduct an exploratory data analysis of patients who developed a pneumothorax following endoscopic valve therapy for emphysema. Materials and methods: This study performed a retrospective evaluation of pneumothorax management and the impact of pneumothorax on clinical outcomes in 70 patients following valve therapy in 381 consecutive patients. Results: Pneumothorax rate following valve therapy was 18%. Pneumothorax management consisted of chest tube insertion, valve removal, and surgical intervention in 87% (61/70, 44% (31/70, and 19% (13/70 of the patients, respectively. Despite pneumothorax, patients experienced modest but significant improvements in lung function parameters (forced expiratory volume in 1 second: 55±148 mL, residual volume: -390±964 mL, total lung capacity: -348±876; all P<0.05. Persistent lobar atelectasis 3 months after recovering from pneumothorax, which was associated with relevant clinical improvement, was observed in only 21% (15/70 of the patients. Conclusion: Pneumothorax is a frequent severe complication following valve therapy that requires further intervention

  15. Percutaneous pigtail catheter in the treatment of pneumothorax in major burns: the best alternative? Case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Raul; Ghanem, Omar; Diroma, Frank; Milner, Stephen M; Gerold, Kevin B; Price, Leigh A

    2015-05-01

    Multiple factors place burn patients at a high risk of pneumothorax development. Currently, no specific recommendations for the management of pneumothorax in large total body surface area (TBSA) burn patients exist. We present a case of a major burn patient who developed pneumothorax after central line insertion. After the traditional large bore (24 Fr) chest tube failed to resolve the pneumothorax, the pneumothorax was ultimately managed by a percutaneous placed pigtail catheter thoracostomy placement and resulted in its complete resolution. We will review the current recommendations of pneumothorax treatment and will highlight on the use of pigtail catheters in pneumothorax management in burn patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  16. Pneumomediastinum and Pneumothorax Associated with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rivera, Fermín; Colón Rivera, Xavier; González Monroig, Hernán A; Garcia Puebla, Juan

    2018-01-30

    BACKGROUND Pneumonia is one of the most common causes of death from infectious disease in the United States (US). Although most cases of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are secondary to bacterial infection, up to one-third of cases are secondary to viral infection, most commonly due to rhinovirus and influenza virus. Pneumonia due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) is rare, and there is limited knowledge of the pathogenesis and clinical complications. This report is of a fatal case of HSV pneumonia associated with bilateral pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum. CASE REPORT A 36-year-old homeless male Hispanic patient, who was a chronic smoker, with a history of intravenous drug abuse and a medical history of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), was admitted to hospital as an emergency with a seven-day history of productive purulent cough. The patient was admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU) with a diagnosis of CAP, with intubation and mechanical ventilation. Broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) was performed and was positive for HSV. The patient developed bilateral pneumothorax with pneumomediastinum, which was fatal, despite aggressive clinical management. CONCLUSIONS Pneumonia due to HSV infection is uncommon but has a high mortality. Although HSV pneumonia has been described in immunocompromised patients, further studies are required to determine the pathogenesis, early detection, identification of patients who are at risk and to determine the most effective approaches to prophylaxis and treatment for HSV pneumonia.

  17. The floating cardiac fat pad-sign of occult pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Claire; Bokhari, S A Jamal

    2016-08-01

    Pneumothoraces are a possible sequela of chest trauma with potential morbidity and mortality if not recognized and treated promptly. A portable supine chest radiograph is frequently the first radiologic study performed in the setting of trauma. While large pneumothoraces can be readily recognized on these radiographs, smaller pneumothoraces are missed in up to 15 % of trauma patients. There are many radiographic signs of occult pneumothoraces, and we are presenting a new radiographic sign of occult pneumothorax. The floating cardiac fat pad sign occurs when pleural air collects anteriorly and superiorly in the most non-dependent portion of the chest lifting the pericardial fat pad off the diaphragm. Lung markings are still seen surrounding the pericardial fat pad due to the inflated lower lobe of the lung resting dependently. Rapid and accurate identification of pneumothoraces is critical but often difficult on chest radiographs. Although there are many existing radiographic signs for identification of pneumothorax, prospective identification of small pneumothoraces is still relatively poor. Here, we describe an additional sign which aides in the detection of pneumothoraces, the floating cardiac fat pad. When present, this should prompt further evaluation with chest CT or upright chest radiograph.

  18. The frequency and treatment of pneumothorax associated with pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masaki; Takahashi, Koji; Komatsu, Teruya; Tanaka, Toru; Kato, Tatsuo; Fujinaga, Takuji

    2017-02-01

    Characteristics of pneumothorax associated with nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) infection are rarely reported, especially in terms of surgical treatments. Our objectives were to show the tendency and clinical courses of pneumothorax due to NTM and discuss the way of therapy in our hospital. We retrospectively analyzed 557 patients with NTM infection over a period of 5 years at the Nagara Medical Center. A total of 12 out of the 557 patients (2.2%) suffered from pneumothorax caused by NTM infection without other pulmonary diseases. The diagnosis of all NTM cases was mycobacterium avium complex. Of these 12 patients, three required observation only (25%), five required drainage only (42%), and four required surgery after drainage (33%). The four surgically treated patients suffered from empyema as well as pneumothorax. They were in worse nutritional condition than non-surgically treated patients. For the patients requiring surgery, we selected reasonable surgical methods; we sutured the fistula of lung in all cases and covered it with muscle or omentum or polyglycolic acid sheets without a case in which endobronchial embolization was performed in advance before surgery. Finally, all pneumothorax healed. Thereafter, three of these four patients took unfavorable courses: progressing malnutrition, complications worsening or contralateral pneumothorax. We should select an appropriate treatment including surgery against NTM-associated pneumothorax without losing an opportunity because of its intractability and exhausting effect.

  19. Predictors of pneumothorax after CT-guided transthoracic needle lung biopsy: the role of quantitative CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chami, H A; Faraj, W; Yehia, Z A; Badour, S A; Sawan, P; Rebeiz, K; Safa, R; Saade, C; Ghandour, B; Shamseddine, A; Mukherji, D; Haydar, A A

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the association of quantitative computed tomography (CT) measures of emphysema with the occurrence of pneumothorax after CT-guided needle lung biopsy (NLB) accounting for other risk factors. One hundred and sixty-three CT-guided NLBs performed between 2008 and 2013 with available complete chest CT within 30 days were reviewed for the occurrence of post-procedure pneumothorax. Percent emphysema was determined quantitatively as the percentage of lung voxels below -950 HU on chest CT images using automated software. Multivariable regression was used to assess the association of percent emphysema volume with the occurrence of post-procedure pneumothorax. The association of percent emphysema volume with the pneumothorax size and need for chest tube placement after NLB was also explored. Percent emphysema was significantly associated with the incidence of post-NLB pneumothorax (OR=1.10 95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.15; p=0.03) adjusting for lower-lobe lesion location, needle path length, lesion size, number of passes, and pleural needle trajectory angle. Percent emphysema was not associated with the size of the pneumothorax, nor the need for chest tube placement after NLB. Percent emphysema determined quantitatively from chest CT is a significant predictor of post-NLB pneumothorax. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Three-step management of pneumothorax: time for a re-think on initial management†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Takahito; Taniguchi, Yohei; Saito, Tomohito; Konobu, Toshifumi; Saito, Yukihito

    2013-01-01

    Pneumothorax is a common disease worldwide, but surprisingly, its initial management remains controversial. There are some published guidelines for the management of spontaneous pneumothorax. However, they differ in some respects, particularly in initial management. In published trials, the objective of treatment has not been clarified and it is not possible to compare the treatment strategies between different trials because of inappropriate evaluations of the air leak. Therefore, there is a need to outline the optimal management strategy for pneumothorax. In this report, we systematically review published randomized controlled trials of the different treatments of primary spontaneous pneumothorax, point out controversial issues and finally propose a three-step strategy for the management of pneumothorax. There are three important characteristics of pneumothorax: potentially lethal respiratory dysfunction; air leak, which is the obvious cause of the disease; frequent recurrence. These three characteristics correspond to the three steps. The central idea of the strategy is that the lung should not be expanded rapidly, unless absolutely necessary. The primary objective of both simple aspiration and chest drainage should be the recovery of acute respiratory dysfunction or the avoidance of respiratory dysfunction and subsequent complications. We believe that this management strategy is simple and clinically relevant and not dependent on the classification of pneumothorax. PMID:23117233

  1. Relationship of spontaneous pneumothorax cases seen in Eastern Black Sea region with meteorological changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamac, Mustafa Esat; Karapolat, Sami; Turkyilmaz, Atila; Seyis, Kubra Nur; Tekinbas, Celal

    2017-08-01

    The relationship of climate changes or weather conditions with the incidence of pneumothorax has been explored for many years. We aimed at revealing the effects of meteorological changes on the incidence of pneumothorax in the Eastern Black Sea region where spontaneous pneumothorax cases are seen relatively more frequently. The records of 195 subjects (179 males and 16 females) who had been monitored and treated due to spontaneous pneumothorax between January 2006 and December 2012 at our clinic were reviewed retrospectively, and their relationship was investigated with the meteorological data obtained by going through the database archive records of the 11th Regional Meteorology Directorate for the years between 2006 and 2012. Wind velocity was observed to be less in the days of having spontaneous pneumothorax than in the days of having no spontaneous pneumothorax, and the difference was found statistically significant ( P = 0.026). The people of our region whose active lifestyle is reflected in their working life, social life, and even in their folk dances usually take a rest in the days of slower wind speed. We think that this state of resting leads to an increase in the frequency of spontaneous pneumothorax.

  2. Ketorolac does not reduce effectiveness of pleurodesis in pediatric patients with spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizardo, Radhames E; Langness, Simone; Davenport, Katherine P; Kling, Karen; Fairbanks, Timothy; Bickler, Stephen W; Grabowski, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Antiinflammatory medications are thought to reduce the effectiveness of pleurodesis performed for the treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax. We reviewed our experience with children undergoing video-assisted thorascopic surgery (VATS) with pleurodesis for pneumothorax to determine if ketorolac administration influences patient outcomes. A retrospective review of patients who underwent VATS pleurodesis for spontaneous pneumothorax from 2009 to 2013 at a pediatric hospital was performed. Length of stay, radiographic pneumothorax resolution prior to discharge, and ipsilateral recurrence rates were compared in patients who did and did not receive perioperative ketorolac. Over a 50-month period, 51 patients underwent VATS with mechanical pleurodesis for spontaneous pneumothorax. The average age was 15.5years, and 76% were male. Ketorolac was administered to 26/51 patients. There were no differences in average length of stay (11.3 vs 10.9days, p=0.36), incidence of residual pneumothorax at discharge (22/41 vs 19/41, p=0.48), or ipsilateral recurrence (5/10 vs 5/10, p=1). Despite the intrinsic antiinflammatory properties of ketorolac, our data suggests that its use for patients undergoing pleurodesis for spontaneous pneumothorax does not detrimentally influence the outcomes of surgery. Therefore, we conclude that ketorolac can be used for pain control in this population. Large-scale studies are warranted to validate these findings. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Evaluation of chest computed tomography in patients after pneumonectomy to predict contralateral pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniwa, Tomohiro; Saito, Yukihito; Saito, Tomohito; Kaneda, Hiroyuki; Imamura, Hiroji

    2009-01-01

    Contralateral pneumothorax is a severe complication after pneumonectomy. We evaluated the mediastinal shift and the residual lung in patients who had undergone pneumonectomy to predict the incidence of contralateral pneumothorax. We evaluated 21 cases of pneumonectomy performed from 1996 to 2006. For this study, we excluded patients with recurrent neoplasm, empyema, or hemothorax. We reviewed the computed tomography (CT) results of 13 patients who had undergone pneumonectomy to compare the bullae in the residual lungs, carina shifts, and herniation of the residual lungs before and after pneumonectomy. When evaluating the degree of herniation 4-6 cm below the carina, the anterior and posterior pulmonary hernias were classified as grade A, B, or C. We also investigated the preoperative respiratory function in all 13 patients. Two patients suffered contralateral pneumothorax after left pneumonectomy. Both patients who suffered contralateral pneumothorax after pneumonectomy had bullae. The percentage forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1.0% ) was <70% in these two patients. Carina shifts and lung herniation were found to be greater after left pneumonectomy than after right pneumonectomy. The bullae in the lung and obstructive pulmonary disease are associated not only with spontaneous pneumothorax but also with contralateral pneumothorax after pneumonectomy. Lung herniation and mediastinal shift are greater after left pneumonectomy than after right pneumonectomy, which may be related to contralateral pneumothorax after pneumonectomy. (author)

  4. A novel structural risk index for primary spontaneous pneumothorax: Ankara Numune Risk Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkas, Yucel; Peri, Neslihan Gulay; Kocer, Bulent; Kaplan, Tevfik; Alhan, Aslihan

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to reveal a novel risk index as a structural risk marker for primary spontanoeus pneumothorax using body mass index and chest height, structural risk factors for pneumothorax development. Records of 86 cases admitted between February 2014 and January 2015 with or without primary spontaneous pneumothorax were analysed retrospectively. The patients were allocated to two groups as Group I and Group II. The patients were evaluated with regard to age, gender, pneumothorax side, duration of hospital stay, treatment type, recurrence, chest height and transverse diameter on posteroanterior chest graphy and body mass index. Body mass index ratio per cm of chest height was calculated by dividing body mass index with chest height. We named this risk index ratio which is defined first as 'Ankara Numune Risk Index'. Diagnostic value of Ankara Numune Risk Index value for prediction of primary spontaneous pneumothorax development was analysed with Receiver Operating Characteristics curver. Of 86 patients, 69 (80.2%) were male and 17 (19.8%) were female. Each group was composed of 43 (50%) patients. When Receiver Operating Characteristics curve analysis was done for optimal limit value 0.74 of Ankara Numune Risk Index determined for prediction of pneumothorax development risk, area under the curve was 0.925 (95% Cl, 0.872-0.977, p pneumothorax development however it is insufficient for determining recurrence. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  5. Partial pleural covering for intractable pneumothorax in patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Akira; Hirono, Tatsuhiko; Watanabe, Takehiro; Hasegawa, Go; Tanaka, Reiko; Furuya, Mitsuko

    2017-03-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) is an inherited disorder associated with a germline mutation of the folliculin (FLCN) gene. Most patients with BHD have multiple pulmonary cysts, and are at high risk of repeated pneumothorax. Although an increasing number of patients are diagnosed with BHD by genetic testing, therapeutic approaches for intractable pneumothorax have not yet been described. We treated three patients who had repeated episodes of pneumothorax. All had multiple pulmonary cysts in the lower lobes, and two had a family history of pneumothorax. Video-assisted thoracic surgery was used to perform wedge resections and partial pleural covering of the cystic lesions. The partial pleural covering technique used sheets of polyglycolic acid felt or regenerative oxidized cellulose mesh. The resected tissues underwent histopathological evaluation, and peripheral blood leukocytes were tested for FLCN mutations. The operative times were less than 2 h, and there were no complications. The resected cysts had histopathological features characteristic of BHD lung. All patients were found to have FLCN germline mutations; thus their repeated pneumothoraces were a manifestation of BHD. None of the patients developed respiratory problems after undergoing the partial pleural covering procedure, and they have all been well without pneumothorax for 30 months or more. Partial pleural covering combined with resection of protruding cysts should be a safe and effective therapeutic approach for BHD patients with intractable pneumothorax. Further investigation is needed to establish a detailed protocol for treatment of pneumothorax that results in minimal functional impairment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Management of Open Pneumothorax in Tactical Combat Casualty Care: TCCC Guidelines Change 13-02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Frank K; Dubose, Joseph J; Otten, Edward J; Bennett, Donald R; Gerhardt, Robert T; Kheirabadi, Bijan S; Gross, Kriby R; Cap, Andrew P; Littlejohn, Lanny F; Edgar, Erin P; Shackelford, Stacy A; Blackbourne, Lorne H; Kotwal, Russ S; Holcomb, John B; Bailey, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-01

    During the recent United States Central Command (USCENTCOM) and Joint Trauma System (JTS) assessment of prehospital trauma care in Afghanistan, the deployed director of the Joint Theater Trauma System (JTTS), CAPT Donald R. Bennett, questioned why TCCC recommends treating a nonlethal injury (open pneumothorax) with an intervention (a nonvented chest seal) that could produce a lethal condition (tension pneumothorax). New research from the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research (USAISR) has found that, in a model of open pneumothorax treated with a chest seal in which increments of air were added to the pleural space to simulate an air leak from an injured lung, use of a vented chest seal prevented the subsequent development of a tension pneumothorax, whereas use of a nonvented chest seal did not. The updated TCCC Guideline for the battlefield management of open pneumothorax is: ?All open and/ or sucking chest wounds should be treated by immediately applying a vented chest seal to cover the defect. If a vente chest seal is not available, use a non-vented chest seal. Monitor the casualty for the potential development of a subsequent tension pneumothorax. If the casualty develops increasing hypoxia, respiratory distress, or hypotension and a tension pneumothorax is suspected, treat by burping or removing the dressing or by needle decompression.? This recommendation was approved by the required two-thirds majority of the Committee on TCCC in June 2013. 2013.

  7. Oblique Chest X-Ray: An Alternative Way to Detect Pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulay, Cumhur Murat; Yaldız, Sadık; Bilge, Adnan

    2018-03-16

    To identify occult pneumothorax with oblique chest X-ray (OCXR) in clinically suspected patients. In this retrospective study, we examined 1082 adult multitrauma patients who were admitted to our emergency service between January 2016 and January 2017. Clinical findings that suggest occult pneumothorax were rib fracture, flail chest, chest pain, subcutaneous emphysema, abrasion or ecchymosis and moderate to severe hypoxia in clinical parameters. All of these patients underwent anteroposterior chest X-ray (APCXR), but no pneumothorax could be detected. Upon this, OCXR was performed using mobile X-ray equipment. Traumatic pneumothorax was observed in 421 (38.9%) of 1082 patients. We applied OCXR to 26 multitrauma patients. Occult pneumothorax was evaluated at 22 patients (2.03%) in 1082 multitrauma patients. The 22 patients who had multitrauma occult pneumothorax on OCXR were internated at intensive care unit (ICU) and follow-up was done using OCXR and APCXR. OCXR can be an alternative imaging technique to identify occult pneumothorax in some trauma patients at emergency room and also follow period at ICU.

  8. The factor analysis of the incidence of pneumothorax after CT-guided transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Tao; Yu Hongguang; Wang Yong; Yang Sifu; Wang Xiaoxuan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the impact of multiple factors on the incidence of pneumothorax associated with CT-guided transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy. Methods: The sign of pneumothorax after 162 cases (lesion diameter from 1 cm to 6 cm) CT-guided transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy was observed and its relationship with multivariate factors were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression model. Results: Thirty-two cases presented pneumothorax accounting for 19. 8%. Single variate analysis showed that the sign of pneumothorax related to intercurrent COPD, distance from lesion and chest wall, needle dwelling time and lesion diameter. 67 patients of intercurrent COPD with postoperative pneumothorax occurred in 22 cases (32.8%); With respect to those having lesions close to the chest wall (48 cases), and the cases with the distance between the chest wall and lesions less than 2 cm (55 cases) and greater than 2 cm (59 cases), the postoperative pneumothorax occurred in 0, 14 (25.5%), 18 (30.5%) cases respectively; For those patients with needle in the chest residence time of less than 10 minutes (82 cases), 10-20 minutes (51 cases), more than 20 minutes (28 cases) after the occurrence of pneumothorax were 8 (9.6%), 10(19.6%), 14 (50%) cases respectively; In contrast, those with lesion diameter less than 2 cm (65 cases), 2-4 cm(52 cases), more than 4cm(45 cases) were 19 (29.2%), 8 (15.4%) and 5 (11.1% ) respectively. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the prior three factor's were risk factors of pneumothorax (OR=4.652, 4.030, 2.855 respectively). Conclusions: To avoid the pneumothorax, caution must be taken with respect to CT-guided transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy, patients with intercurrent COPD, long distance between lesion and chest wall, and smaller lesion diameter. For operation the needle dwell time within thorax should be minimized. (authors)

  9. Variables affecting the risk of pneumothorax and intrapulmonal hemorrhage in CT-guided transthoracic biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.F.; Straub, R.; Moghaddam, S.R.; Maataoui, A.; Gurung, J.; Thalhammer, A.; Vogl, T.J.; Jacobi, V.; Wagner, T.O.F.; Ackermann, H.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of various variables on the rate of pneumothorax and intrapulmonal hemorrhage associated with computed tomography (CT)-guided transthoracic needle biopsy of the lung were evaluated retrospectivly. One hundred and thirty-three patients underwent CT guided biopsy of a pulmonary lesion. Two patients were biopsied twice. Variables analyzed were lesion size, lesion location, number of pleural needle passes, lesion margin, length of intrapulmonal biopsy path and puncture time. Eighteen-gauge (18G) cutting needles (Trucut, Somatex, Teltow, Germany) were used for biopsy. Pneumothorax occured in 23 of 135 biopsies (17%). Chest tube placement was required in three out of 23 cases of pneumothorax (2% of all biopsies). Pneumothorax rate was significantly higher when the lesions were located in the lung parenchyma compared with locations at the pleura or chest wall (P < 0.05), but all pneumothorax cases which required chest tube treatment occured in lesions located less than 2 cm from the pleura. Longer puncture time led to an increase in pneumothorax rate (P < 0.05). Thirty-seven (27%) out of 135 biopsies showed perifocal hemorrhage. Intrapulmonal biopsy paths longer than 4 cm showed significantly higher numbers of perifocal hemorrhage and pneumothorax (P < 0.05). Significantly more hemorrhage occured when the pleura was penetrated twice during the puncture (P < 0.05). Lesion size <4 cm is strongly correlated with higher occurence of perifocal hemorrhage (P < 0.05). Lesion margination showed no significant effect on complication rate. CT-guided biopsy of smaller lesions correlates with a higher bleeding rate. Puncture time should be minimized to reduce pneumothorax rate. Passing the pleura twice significantly increases the risk of hemorrhage. Intrapulmonal biopsy paths longer than 4 cm showed significantly higher numbers of perifocal hemorrhage as well as pneumothorax. (orig.)

  10. The evaluation of cases with pneumothorax in the neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müsemma Karabel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Early diagnosis and treatment is essentialin reducing mortality in newborns with pneumothorax. Inthis study, newborns with a diagnosis of pneumothorax inneonatal intensive care unit of our hospital were evaluatedand aimed to increase the awareness of physicians.Methods: 12 cases with pneumothorax were evaluatedretrospectively. The gender, birth weight, gestational age,mode of delivery, the presence of underlying disease,pneumothorax localization, implementation of the surfactantand mechanical ventilation and existence or absenceof mortality were recorded.Results: During the study, pneumothorax was detected12 patients. Male/female ratio was 1.4. Eight of the patientshad born with cesarean delivery, the mean birthweight of cases was 2623±912 g and, 66.7% of caseswere term babies. Pneumothorax was observed in thefirst week of life in all patients and it occurred spontaneouslyin 4 patients. The frequency of bilateral pneumothoraxwas 41.7%. For the treatment, closed tube drainagewas performed in 9 patients. The overall mortality ratewas 66.7%. Half of the patients who died had congenitalanomalies such as diaphragmatic eventration (n=1,hydrocephalus (n=1, encephalocel (n=1, non-immunehydrops fetalis (n=1.Conclusion: Additional congenital anomalies, such asPDAs and persistent pulmonary hypertension were foundto be effective on mortality in neonates with pneumothorax.Although, it is a life-threatening condition, the emergencytreatment is life saving. Therefore, in patients withrisk factors, keeping pneumothorax in mind is also thefirst step of the treatment. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4 (3:289-292Key words: Newborn, respiratuar distress, pneumothorax,treatment, outcome

  11. Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information Technology Quarterly, 1985

    1985-01-01

    This issue of "Information Technology Quarterly" is devoted to the theme of "Artificial Intelligence." It contains two major articles: (1) Artificial Intelligence and Law" (D. Peter O'Neill and George D. Wood); (2) "Artificial Intelligence: A Long and Winding Road" (John J. Simon, Jr.). In addition, it contains two sidebars: (1) "Calculating and…

  12. [Case of tension pneumothorax associated with asthma attack during general anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Ueki, Ryusuke; Kusuyama, Kazuki; Okano, Yukari; Tatara, Tsuneo; Tashiro, Chikara

    2010-05-01

    We report a case of tension pneumothorax associated with asthma attack during general anesthesia. An 86-year-old woman with dementia underwent cataract surgery under general anesthesia. At 70 min after the start of operation, airway pressure suddenly increased from 19 to 28 cm HO2O. In spite of bag ventilation with 100% oxygen, Sp(O2) decreased to 81%. Chest-Xp showed typical image of tension pneumothorax. Chest drainage was immediately performed, after which Pa(O2) recovered soon. She was extubated on postoperative day 1 without any neurological disorder. Hyperinflation of fragile alveoli by mechanical ventilation was likely a cause of tension pneumothorax.

  13. Scintigraphic pattern of pneumothorax complicating Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in patients with AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finestone, H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F.; Wasserman, I.; Garcia, H.

    1990-01-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is a serious though infrequently reported pulmonary complication of AIDS. An unsuspected lung collapse was discovered via gallium scintigraphy for the study of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Neither the pneumonia nor the pneumothorax were apparent on the most recent chest roentgenogram. In evaluating gallium images during the work-up of AIDS patients with associated pulmonary pathology, the possible complication of lung collapse should be considered. If pneumothorax is suspected on gallium imaging, a chest roentgenogram in expiration must be obtained for prompt delineation of this serious, yet correctable, condition

  14. Generative Artificial Intelligence : Philosophy and Theory of Artificial Intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zant, Tijn; Kouw, Matthijs; Schomaker, Lambertus; Mueller, Vincent C.

    2013-01-01

    The closed systems of contemporary Artificial Intelligence do not seem to lead to intelligent machines in the near future. What is needed are open-ended systems with non-linear properties in order to create interesting properties for the scaffolding of an artificial mind. Using post-structuralistic

  15. Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Harold O.; Burford, Anna Marie

    1990-01-01

    Delineates artificial intelligence/expert systems (AI/ES) concepts; provides an exposition of some business application areas; relates progress; and creates an awareness of the benefits, limitations, and reservations of AI/ES. (Author)

  16. Database in Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Julia

    1986-01-01

    Describes a specialist bibliographic database of literature in the field of artificial intelligence created by the Turing Institute (Glasgow, Scotland) using the BRS/Search information retrieval software. The subscription method for end-users--i.e., annual fee entitles user to unlimited access to database, document provision, and printed awareness…

  17. Pneumothorax as a complication of lung volume recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik J.A. Westermann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Lung volume recruitment involves deep inflation techniques to achieve maximum insufflation capacity in patients with respiratory muscle weakness, in order to increase peak cough flow, thus helping to maintain airway patency and improve ventilation. One of these techniques is air stacking, in which a manual resuscitator is used in order to inflate the lungs. Although intrathoracic pressures can rise considerably, there have been no reports of respiratory complications due to air stacking. However, reaching maximum insufflation capacity is not recommended in patients with known structural abnormalities of the lungs or chronic obstructive airway disease. We report the case of a 72-year-old woman who had poliomyelitis as a child, developed torsion scoliosis and post-polio syndrome, and had periodic but infrequent asthma attacks. After performing air stacking for 3 years, the patient suddenly developed a pneumothorax, indicating that this technique should be used with caution or not at all in patients with a known pulmonary pathology

  18. Tension pneumothorax accompanied by type A aortic dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hifumi, Toru; Kiriu, Nobuaki; Inoue, Junichi; Koido, Yuichi

    2012-11-09

    A 51-year-old man was brought to the emergency room because of a sudden onset of severe dysponea. On presentation, his blood pressure was 94/55 mm Hg. Oxygen saturation was 86% while he was receiving 10 l/min oxygen through a non-rebreather mask. On physical examination, no jugular venous distention was noted, but breath sounds over the left lung were diminished. A bedside chest radiograph showed left tension pneumothorax, for which urgent needle decompression followed by chest thoracostomy was performed. Ventricular tachycardia developed, but a biphasic shock at 120 J immediately restored normal sinus rhythm. His vital signs, however, did not improve. A CT scan of the chest showed type A aortic dissection with bullae in the upper lobe of the left lung. He had an emergency operation for distal aortic arch displacement and was discharged on the 37th day of hospitalisation.

  19. [Pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (PLCH) revealed by pneumothorax: about a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajiai, Hafsa; Rachidi, Mariam; Serhane, Hind; Aitbatahar, Salma; Amro, Lamyae

    2016-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease of unknown etiology characterized by the infiltration of Langerhans cells in one or more organs. It has a polymorphic clinical presentation. We report the case of Mr R.Y, age 22, with 8 pack year history of smoking, admitted to hospital with complete spontaneous right-sided pneumothorax. Chest drainage was performed with good evolution. Control chest CT scan showed multiple diffuse cyst formations, predominant in the upper lobes. Lab and imaging tests were performed in order to detect systemic histiocytosis with negative results. Patient's evolution was marked by pneumothorax recurrence; pleurodesis and lung biopsy were performed which confirmed the diagnosis. The diagnosis of Langerhans cell histiocytosis should be evoked in front of pneumothorax associated with lung cystic. The diagnosis is easy in front of a suggestive clinical and radiological picture. Nevertheless, therapeutic options are limited and pneumothorax recurrence is common.

  20. Pneumothorax following Endobronchial Valve Therapy and Its Impact on Clinical Outcomes in Severe Emphysema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gompelmann, Daniela; Herth, Felix J. F.; Slebos, Dirk Jan; Valipour, Arschang; Ernst, Armin; Criner, Gerard J.; Eberhardt, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients who achieve significant target lobe volume reduction (TLVR) following endobronchial valve (EBV) treatment may experience substantial improvements in clinical outcome measures. However, in cases of rapid TLVR, the risk of pneumothorax increases due to parenchymal rupture of the

  1. Recidiverende pneumothorax på grund af traumatisk diafragmalæsion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehnert, Per; Christensen, Merete; Ravn, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    We present a case where a patient is diagnosed with a traumatic right-sided diaphragmatic rupture ten years after the trauma, after eight incidences of pneumothorax and two thoracoscopic operations. Ten years before the current case, the female patient was the victim of a blunt thoraco-abdominal ......We present a case where a patient is diagnosed with a traumatic right-sided diaphragmatic rupture ten years after the trauma, after eight incidences of pneumothorax and two thoracoscopic operations. Ten years before the current case, the female patient was the victim of a blunt thoraco......-abdominal trauma. In the following years, she had recurrent right-sided pneumothorax and no effect of thoracoscopic surgery. In connection with the third thoracoscopic operation, a right-sided diaphragm lesion was discovered. We believe that part of the syndrome catamenial pneumothorax, where air is thought...

  2. Computed tomography and blood gas analysis of anesthetized bloodhounds with induced pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, M.; Hartsfield, S.; Matthews, N.; White, G.; Slater, M.; Thoos, J.

    1993-01-01

    Increasingly severe degrees of pneumothorax were produced in 6 adult anesthetized bloodhounds. Computed tomography (CT) of the thorax was performed on each dog to evaluate the effects of pneumo thorax on thoracic and on pulmonary cross-sectional area (TA and PA). Arterial PO 2 (PaO 2 ) and PCO 2 (PaCO 2 ), heart rate (HR), and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) were determined and related to the severity of pneumothorax. Volumes of air equal to 1, 1.5 and 2 times functional residual capacity of the lung produced approximately 33%, 40%, and 50% reductions in pulmonary area respectively. These amounts of atelectasis correspond to a radiographically “moderate” degree of pneumothorax. As severity of pneumothorax increased, thoracic area consistently increased, PaO 2 consistently decreased, and PaCO 2 consistently increased, with all being statistically significant relationships (p 0.2)

  3. Left-Sided Catamenial Pneumothorax with Thoracic Endometriosis and Bullae in the Alveolar Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ryo; Kurihara, Masatoshi; Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Ebana, Hiroki; Yamanaka, Sumitaka

    2017-04-20

    Catamenial pneumothorax (CP) is generally caused by intraperitoneal air leaking from the uterus into the thoracic cavity via a defect in the endometrial tissue of the diaphragm and is usually detected in the right thorax. We report a case of left-sided CP caused by endometriosis in the visceral pleura and with no abnormal findings in the diaphragm. A 33-year-old female patient presented at the end of a course of low-dose contraceptive pills for pelvic endometriosis, with spontaneous pneumothorax in the left chest. Chest CT revealed a bulla in the left upper lung lobe. The patient underwent partial resection of the lung. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of endometrial stromal tissue in the visceral pleura and confirmed this as the cause of pneumothorax since there were no observable abnormalities in the diaphragm. This case suggests that immunohistochemical examination of patients with spontaneous pneumothorax can detect alternative endometrial lesions.

  4. A case of simultaneous bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax after the Nuss procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Shunichiro; Miyazawa, Masahisa; Kashimoto, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Mitsui, Fumihiko; Tsunoda, Hajime; Kunitomo, Kazuyoshi; Chisuwa, Hisanao; Haba, Yoshiaki

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of simultaneous bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax caused by a pleuro-pleural communication formed from Nuss procedure for pectus excavatum. A 17-year-old man with a history of Nuss operation complained chest pain and dyspnea. A chest roentgenogram demonstrated a tiny bilateral pneumothorax and two metallic bars inserted at the Nuss procedure. Computed tomography revealed furthermore a bulla in the apex of the left lung. The bilateral pneumothorax critically deteriorated after 4 days from onset and urgent bilateral chest drainages were performed. Nevertheless the drainages the full expansion of both lungs was not obtained and air leakage only from left side was continued. A video-assisted left bullectomy was performed 9 days after the tube insertion. The two bars penetrating anterior mediastinal pleura were thought to be a cause of the simultaneous bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax.

  5. Boerhaave's syndrome and tension pneumothorax secondary to Norovirus induced forceful emesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venø, Søren; Eckardt, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Boerhaave's syndrome or spontaneous esophageal perforation is a rare condition, with high mortality. We describe a case of Boerhaave's syndrome presenting with tension pneumothorax. The patient was infected with Norovirus and developed Boerhaave's syndrome, initially thought to be gastroenteritis...

  6. Spontaneous pneumothorax after intensive chemotherapy in endometrial cancer: A rare complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Ruei Chen

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Rapid shrinkage of a pulmonary space-occupying tumor sometimes causes rare but life-threatening spontaneous pneumothoraces. We report the first case of a spontaneous pneumothorax after using paclitaxel plus carboplatin in the treatment of endometrial cancer.

  7. Relationship between onset of spontaneous pneumothorax and weather conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishina, Taijiro; Watanabe, Atsushi; Miyajima, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Junji

    2017-09-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) results from the rupture of blebs or bullae. It has been suggested that changes in weather conditions may trigger the onset of SP. Our aim was to examine the association between the onset of primary SP with weather changes in the general population in Sapporo, Japan. From January 2008 through September 2013, 345 consecutive cases with a diagnosis of primary SP were reviewed. All cases of primary SP developed in the area within 40 km from the Sapporo District Meteorological Observatory. Climatic measurements were obtained from the Observatory, which included 1-h readings of weather conditions. Logistic regression model was used to obtain predicted risks for the onset of SP with respect to weather conditions. SP occurred significantly when the atmospheric pressure decreased by - 18 hPa or less during 96 h before the survey date (odds ratio = 1.379, P = 0.026), when the pressure increased by 15 hPa or more during 72 h before the survey date (odds ratio = 1.095, P = 0.007) and when maximum fluctuation in atmospheric pressure over 22 hPa was observed during 96 h before the survey date (odds ratio = 1.519, P = 0.001). Other weather conditions, including the presence of thunderstorms, were not significantly correlated with the onset of pneumothorax. Changes in atmospheric pressure influence the onset of SP. Future studies on the relationship between the onset of SP and weather conditions on days other than before the onset and with large number of patients may enable us to predict the onset of SP in various regions and weather conditions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of atmospheric pressure on the incidence of spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Raúl; Díez, Manuel Mariano; Medrano, María José; Vera, Cristina; Guillamot, Paloma; Sánchez, Ana; Ratia, Tomás; Granell, Javier

    2014-01-01

    This study analyses the relationship between the incidence of idiopathic spontaneous pneumothorax (ISP) and atmospheric pressure (AP). A total of 288 cases of ISP were included, 229 men and 59 women. The AP of the day of diagnosis, of the 3 prior days and the monthly average was registered. The association between the incidence of ISP and AP was analyzed by calculating standardized incidence ratio (SIR) and Poisson regression. The AP on the day of admission (mean±standard deviation) (1,017.9±7 hectopascals [hPa]) was higher than the monthly average AP (1,016.9±4.1 hPa) (P=.005). There was a monthly distribution pattern of ISP with the highest incidence in the months of January, February and September and the lowest in April. When AP was less than 1,014 hPa, there were fewer cases registered than what would statistically have been expected (58/72 cases). In contrast, when the pressure was higher than 1,019 hPa, the registered cases were more than expected (109/82 cases) (SIR=1.25; 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.51). The risk of ISP increased 1.15 times (95% CI: 1.05 to 1.25, P=.001) for each hPa of AP, regardless of sex, age and monthly average AP. A dose-response relationship was observed, with progressive increases in risk (IRR=1.06 when the AP was 1,014-1016 hPa; 1.17 hPa when the AP was 1,016-1,019 hPa and 1.69 when AP was superior to 1,019 hPa) (P for trend=.089). The AP is a risk factor for the onset of idiopathic spontaneous pneumothorax. Copyright © 2012 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. An unusual case of primary spontaneous tension pneumothorax in a jamaican female.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M; French, S; Cornwall, D

    2014-06-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is a well-recognized entity with a classical presentation of acute onset chest pain and shortness of breath. It may be complicated by the development of a tension pneumothorax or a haemopneumothorax. We report an interesting case of a spontaneous tension haemopneumothorax which presented atypically and was diagnosed on computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest. The clinical and pathophysiological characteristics and treatment of this unusual entity is discussed.

  10. An Unusual Case of Primary Spontaneous Tension Pneumothorax in a Jamaican Female

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, M; French, S; Cornwall, D

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is a well-recognized entity with a classical presentation of acute onset chest pain and shortness of breath. It may be complicated by the development of a tension pneumothorax or a haemopneumothorax. We report an interesting case of a spontaneous tension haemopneumothorax which presented atypically and was diagnosed on computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest. The clinical and pathophysiological characteristics and treatment of this unusual entity is discussed.

  11. Predictors of pneumothorax following endoscopic valve therapy in patients with severe emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompelmann, Daniela; Lim, Hyun-Ju; Eberhardt, Ralf; Gerovasili, Vasiliki; Herth, Felix Jf; Heussel, Claus Peter; Eichinger, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic valve implantation is an effective treatment for patients with advanced emphysema. Despite the minimally invasive procedure, valve placement is associated with risks, the most common of which is pneumothorax. This study was designed to identify predictors of pneumothorax following endoscopic valve implantation. Preinterventional clinical measures (vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, residual volume, total lung capacity, 6-minute walk test), qualitative computed tomography (CT) parameters (fissure integrity, blebs/bulla, subpleural nodules, pleural adhesions, partial atelectasis, fibrotic bands, emphysema type) and quantitative CT parameters (volume and low attenuation volume of the target lobe and the ipsilateral untreated lobe, target air trapping, ipsilateral lobe volume/hemithorax volume, collapsibility of the target lobe and the ipsilateral untreated lobe) were retrospectively evaluated in patients who underwent endoscopic valve placement (n=129). Regression analysis was performed to compare those who developed pneumothorax following valve therapy (n=46) with those who developed target lobe volume reduction without pneumothorax (n=83). Low attenuation volume% of ipsilateral untreated lobe (odds ratio [OR] =1.08, P=0.001), ipsilateral untreated lobe volume/hemithorax volume (OR =0.93, P=0.017), emphysema type (OR =0.26, P=0.018), pleural adhesions (OR =0.33, P=0.012) and residual volume (OR =1.58, P=0.012) were found to be significant predictors of pneumothorax. Fissure integrity (OR =1.16, P=0.075) and 6-minute walk test (OR =1.05, P=0.077) were also indicative of pneumothorax. The model including the aforementioned parameters predicted whether a patient would experience a pneumothorax 84% of the time (area under the curve =0.84). Clinical and CT parameters provide a promising tool to effectively identify patients at high risk of pneumothorax following endoscopic valve therapy.

  12. Presenting hydrothorax predicts failure of needle aspiration in primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kwok Kei; Lui, Chun Tat; Ho, Chik Leung; Tsui, Kwok Leung; Fung, Hin Tat

    2016-06-01

    The objective was to evaluate if existence of hydrothorax in initial chest radiograph predicts treatment outcome in patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax who received needle thoracostomy. This is a retrospective cohort study carried out from January 2011 to August 2014 in 1 public hospital in Hong Kong. All consecutive adult patients aged 18years or above who attended the emergency department with the diagnosis of primary spontaneous pneumothorax with needle aspiration performed as primary treatment were included. Age, smoking status, size of pneumothorax, previous history of pneumothorax, aspirated gas volume and presence of hydropneumothorax in initial radiograph were included in the analysis. The outcome was success or failure of the needle aspiration. Logistic regression was used to identify the predicting factors of failure of needle aspiration. There were a total of 127 patients included. Seventy-three patients (57.5%) were successfully treated with no recurrence upon discharge. Among 54 failure cases, 13 patients (10.2%) failed immediately after procedure as evident by chest radiograph and required second treatment. Forty-one patients (32.3%) failed upon subsequent chest radiographs. Multivariate logistic regression showed factors independently associated with the failure of needle aspiration, which included hydropneumothorax in the initial radiograph (odds ratio [OR]=4.47 [1.56i12.83], P=.005), previous history of pneumothorax (OR=3.92 [1.57-9.79], P=.003), and large size of pneumothorax defined as apex-to-cupola distance ≥5cm (OR=2.75 [1.21-6.26], P=.016). Hydropneumothorax, previous history of pneumothorax, and large size were independent predictors of failure of needle aspiration in treatment of primary spontaneous pneumothorax. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Outcome of primary spontaneous pneumothorax: Could drug abuse have an effect?

    OpenAIRE

    Esmaeel, Hend M.; Radwan, Rania A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The progressively rising issue of drug abuse in Egypt among young adults could affect the outcome of a well known problem encountered in such age group as primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP). Objective: To assess the impact of an oral drug abuse on the outcome of primary spontaneous pneumothorax. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted on 65 male patients, mean age 25.85 ± 5.08, admitted to the inpatient chest department, Sohag University hospital with...

  14. Needle Decompression of Tension Pneumothorax Tactical Combat Casualty Care Guideline Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-06

    suspected torso trauma , consider a tension pneumothorax and decompress the chest on the side of the injury with a 14-gauge, 3.25 inch (8cm) needle...and known or suspected torso trauma , consider a tension pneumothorax and decompress the chest on the side of the injury with a 14-gauge, 3.25 inch...these studies used civilian volunteers, retrospective trauma database analysis and cadavers to measure the mean chest wall thickness. This population

  15. Pneumothorax in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome: focus on risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Terzic

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pneumothorax is a life threatening condition, more often seen in immature infants receiving mechanical ventilation. It carries a significant risk of death and impaired outcome.Objective: To determine predictive factors for the occurrence of pneumothorax in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS.Patients and methods: The present study was conducted in a tertiary research and educational hospital, NICU, Pediatric Clinic UKC Sarajevo, from January 2010 to December 2013. All infants had chest X-ray at admission, and were treated due to RDS with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP, mechanical ventilation, or high frequency oscillatory ventilation. At admission we registered data regarding birth weight, gestational age, Apgar score, prenatally given steroids. Inclusion criteria were fulfilled by 417 infants. Data about timing, circumstances, side and treatment of pneumothorax were gathered from medical records.Results: Mean birth weight was 1,477 g, mean gestational age 29.6 weeks. We report 98 infants who did not survive. We also report incidence of pneumothorax in 5% of the infants with RDS. In this study pneumothorax and non-pneumothorax groups didn’t differ regarding sex, gestational age (median 29 and 30 nor birth weight (p = 0.818. Apgar score at the 1st and 5th minute of life had no influence in genesis of pulmonary air leak, neither prenatally given steroids (p = 0.639, nor surfactant administration. There was a low coverage of preterm infants with prenatal steroids (overall 28.29%. We found that FiO2 ≥ 0.4 in the first 12 hours of life, and need for mechanical ventilation are predicting factors for developing pneumothorax (p < 0.05.Conclusion: Together with mechanical ventilation, inspired fraction of oxygen higher than 40%, needed to provide adequate oxygenation in the first 12 hours of life in preterm infants, could be a predictive factor in selecting the highest risk babies for development of

  16. Case report: an electrocardiogram of spontaneous pneumothorax mimicking arm lead reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieters, J Scott; Carlin, Joseph P; Morris, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    There are several previously documented findings for electrocardiograms (ECGs) of spontaneous pneumothorax. These findings include axis deviation, T-wave inversion, and right bundle branch block. When an ECG has the arm leads incorrectly placed, the ECG will display right axis deviation and inversion of the P waves in lead I. There have been no previously published ECGs of spontaneous pneumothorax that have shown the same findings as reversal of the limb leads of an ECG. A possible finding of spontaneous pneumothorax is an identical finding to that of an ECG that has been flagged for limb lead reversal. A patient presented in the emergency setting with acute chest pain and shortness of breath caused by a tension pneumothorax. An ECG was administered; findings indicated reversal of the arm leads (right axis deviation and inverted P waves in lead I), but there was no actual limb lead reversal present. ECG findings resolved upon resolution of the pneumothorax. If a patient presents with chest pain and shortness of breath, and the patient's ECG is flagged for limb lead reversal despite being set up correctly, the physician should raise clinical suspicion for a possible spontaneous pneumothorax. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical characteristics of catamenial and non-catamenial thoracic endometriosis-related pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Mizuki; Kurihara, Masatoshi; Haga, Takahiro; Ebana, Hiroki; Kataoka, Hideyuki; Mizobuchi, Teruaki; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2015-11-01

    A major pathogenic factor for catamenial pneumothorax is thoracic endometriosis. However, thoracic endometriosis-related pneumothorax (TERP) can develop as either catamenial or non-catamenial pneumothorax (CP). Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate the clinical differences between catamenial and non-catamenial TERP. The clinical and pathological data in female patients who underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery at the Pneumothorax Research Center during an 8-year period were retrospectively reviewed. This study included 150 female patients with surgico-pathologically confirmed TERP. The subjects were divided into two groups, those having all of the pneumothorax episodes in the catamenial period (CP group) and those who did not (non-CP group). We compared the clinical characteristics and surgico-pathological findings between these two groups. Of the 150 TERP patients, 55 (36.7%) were classified in the CP group, and 95 (63.3%) in the non-CP group. In regard to the locations of endometriosis, all TERP patients had diaphragmatic endometriosis, while pleural implantation was recognized in 34 of the 55 (61.8%) patients in the CP group and 42 of the 95 (44.2%) patients in the non-CP group (P pneumothorax episodes. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  18. Hormonal therapy after the operation for catamenial pneumothorax - is it always necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subotic, D; Mikovic, Z; Atanasijadis, N; Savic, M; Moskovljevic, D; Subotic, D

    2016-04-14

    Our recent clinical observations put into question the routine hormonal therapy for pneumothorax recurrence prevention, in patients operated for catamenial pneumothorax (CP). Retrospective review of the treatment of four women operated for CP in a recent 32-months period. The four presented patients with CP represent 4.8 % of the overall number of patients operated for spontaneous pneumothorax and 19 % of women operated for pneumothorax in the same period. In all patients, typical multiple diaphragm holes existed. The involved part of the diaphragm was removed with diaphragm suture in three patients, whilst in one patient, a diaphragm placation was done. Endometriosis was histologically confirmed in two patients. During the follow-up period of 6-43 months, none of the patients underwent a postoperative hormonal therapy for different reasons, and in none of them the pneumothorax recurrence occurred. The clinical course of these patients, with the absence of the pneumothorax recurrence despite the omission of the hormonal treatment, suggests that the appropriateness of the routine hormonal treatment with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogues for 6-12 months, should be reconsidered and re-evaluated in further studies.

  19. Malfunction of a Heimlich flutter valve causing tension pneumothorax: case report of a rare complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braunstein Volker A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thoracic injuries play an important role in major trauma patients due to their high incidence and critical relevance. A serious consequence of thoracic trauma is pneumothorax, a condition that quickly can become life-threatening and requires immediate treatment. Decompression is the state of the art for treating tension pneumothorax. There are many different methods of decompression using different techniques, devices, valves and drainage systems. Referring to our case report we would like to discuss the utilization of these devices. Case presentation We report of a patient suffering from tension pneumothorax despite insertion of a chest drain at the accident scene. The decompression was by tube thoracostomy which was connected to a Heimlich flutter valve. During air transportation the patient suffered from cardiorespiratory arrest with asystole and was admitted to the trauma room undergoing manual chest compressions. The initial chest film showed a persisting tension pneumothorax, despite the chest tube that had been correctly placed and connected properly to the Heimlich valve. We assume that the Heimlich valve leaves did not open up and thus tension pneumothorax was not released. Conclusion We would like to raise awareness to the fact that if a Heimlich flutter valve is applied in the pre-hospital setting it should be used with caution. Failure in this type of valve may lead to recurrent tension pneumothorax.

  20. [Pneumothorax Caused by Multiple Pulmonary Metastases of a Uterine Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomura, Shin; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Yada, Masaki; Kondo, Chiaki

    2017-09-01

    A 53-year-old woman who had undergone hystero-oophorectomy for uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma in our hospital 9 months previously was referred to our hospital because of bilateral pneumothorax. Chest computed tomography scan on admission revealed multiple thin-walled cavity nodules in both lung and a bilateral pneumothorax, suggesting pulmonary metastases of the uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma. We surgically treated the pneumothorax and diagnosed the nodules as metastatic lesions. They were pathologically diagnosed as metastatic uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma.

  1. Large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma: Is a chest drain always necessary in stable patients? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Baig M; Hefny, Ashraf F

    2016-01-01

    Pneumothorax is the most common potentially life-threatening blunt chest injury. The management of pneumothorax depends upon the etiology, its size and hemodynamic stability of the patient. Most clinicians agree that chest drainage is essential for the management of traumatic large pneumothorax. Herein, we present a case of large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma patient that resolved spontaneously without a chest drain. A 63- year- old man presented to the Emergency Department complaining of left lateral chest pain due to a fall on his chest at home. On examination, he was hemodynamically stable. An urgent chest X-ray showed evidence of left sided pneumothorax. CT scan of the chest showed pneumothorax of more than 30% of the left hemithorax (around 600ml of air) with multiple left ribs fracture. Patient refused tube thoracostomy and was admitted to surgical department for close observation. The patient was managed conservatively without chest tube insertion. A repeat CT scan of the chest has shown complete resolution of the pneumothorax. The clinical spectrum of pneumothorax varies from asymptomatic to life threatening tension pneumothorax. In stable patients, conservative management can be safe and effective for small pneumothorax. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second reported case in the English literature with large pneumothorax which resolved spontaneously without chest drain. Blunt traumatic large pneumothorax in a clinically stable patient can be managed conservatively. Current recommendations for tube placement may need to be reevaluated. This may reduce morbidity associated with chest tube thoracostomy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Artificial Consciousness or Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Spanache Florin

    2017-01-01

    Artificial intelligence is a tool designed by people for the gratification of their own creative ego, so we can not confuse conscience with intelligence and not even intelligence in its human representation with conscience. They are all different concepts and they have different uses. Philosophically, there are differences between autonomous people and automatic artificial intelligence. This is the difference between intelligence and artificial intelligence, autonomous versus a...

  3. [Artificial organs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguin, Thibaut; Dupret-Bories, Agnès; Debry, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Research has been fighting against organ failure and shortage of donations by supplying artificial organs for many years. With the raise of new technologies, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, many organs can benefit of an artificial equivalent: thanks to retinal implants some blind people can visualize stimuli, an artificial heart can be proposed in case of cardiac failure while awaiting for a heart transplant, artificial larynx enables laryngectomy patients to an almost normal life, while the diabetic can get a glycemic self-regulation controlled by smartphones with an artificial device. Dialysis devices become portable, as well as the oxygenation systems for terminal respiratory failure. Bright prospects are being explored or might emerge in a near future. However, the retrospective assessment of putative side effects is not yet sufficient. Finally, the cost of these new devices is significant even if the advent of three dimensional printers may reduce it. © 2017 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  4. Iatrogenic pneumothorax: Experience of a Moroccan Emergency Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. El Hammoumi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of iatrogenic pneumothorax (IPx will increase with invasive procedures particularly at training hospitals, that is why we have made a retrospective study of the common diagnostic or therapeutic causes of IPx and its impact on morbidity. From January 2011 to December 2011, 36 patients developed IPx as emergencies, after an invasive procedure. Their mean age was 38 years (range: 19–69 years. Of the patients, 21 (58% were male and 15 (42% were female. The purpose was diagnostic in 6 cases and therapeutic in 30 cases. In 8 patients (22% the procedure was performed due to underlying lung diseases and in 28 patients (78% for other diseases. The procedure most frequently causing IPnx was central venous catheterization, with 20 patients (55%, other frequent causes were mechanical ventilation in 8 cases (22% (of whom we reported 3 cases of bilateral pneumothorax, 6 cases of thoracentesis (16% and 2 patients had life-saving percutaneous tracheotomy. The majority of our patients were managed by a small chest tube placement (unilateral n = 30, bilateral n = 3. The average duration of drainage was 3 days (range: 1–15 days, sadly one of our patients died of ischemic brain damage 15 days after tracheotomy.At training hospitals the incidence of IPnx will increase with the increase in invasive procedures, which should only be performed by experienced personnel or under their supervision. Resumo: A incidência de pneumotórax iatrogénico (IPx vai aumentar com procedimentos invasivos particularmente em hospitais de formação, sendo esse o motivo pelo qual fizemos um estudo retrospetivo do diagnóstico ou das causas terapêuticas comuns de IPx e do seu impacto na morbilidade. Desde janeiro de 2011 até dezembro de 2011, 36 pacientes desenvolveram IPx como emergências, depois de um procedimento invasivo. A sua média de idades foi de 38 anos (intervalo: 19-69 anos. Dos pacientes, 21 (58% eram do sexo

  5. Iatrogenic pneumothorax: experience of a Moroccan Emergency Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. El Hammoumi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of iatrogenic pneumothorax (IPx will increase with invasive procedures particularly at training hospitals, which is why we have made a retrospective study of the common diagnostic or therapeutic causes of IPx and its impact on morbidity. From January 2011 to December 2012, 36 patients developed IPx as emergencies, after an invasive procedure .Their mean age was 38 years (range: 19-69 years. Of the patients, 21 (58% were male and 15 (42% were female. The purpose was diagnostic in 6 cases and therapeutic in 30 cases. In 8 patients (22% the procedure was performed due to underlying lung diseases and in 28 patients (78% for other diseases. The procedure most frequently causing IPnx was central venous catheterization, with 20 patients (55%, other frequent causes were mechanical ventilation, 8 cases (22% of whom we reported 3 cases of bilateral pneumothorax, 6 cases of thoracentesis (16% and 2 patients had life-saving percutaneous tracheotomy. The majority of our patients were managed by a small chest tube placement (unilateral n = 30, bilateral n = 3.The average duration of drainage was 3 days (range: 1-15 days, sadly one of our patients died of ischemic brain damage 15 days after tracheotomy.At training hospitals the incidence of IPnx will increase with the increase in invasive procedures, which should only be performed by experienced personnel or under their supervision. Resumo: A incidência de pneumotórax iatrogénico (IPx vai aumentar com procedimentos invasivos particularmente em hospitais de formação, sendo esse o motivo pelo qual fizemos um estudo retrospetivo do diagnóstico ou das causas terapêuticas comuns de IPx e do seu impacto na morbidade. Desde janeiro de 2011 até dezembro de 2012, 36 pacientes desenvolveram IPx como emergências, depois de um procedimento invasivo. A sua média de idades foi de 38 anos (intervalo: 19-69 anos. Dos pacientes, 21 (58% eram do sexo masculino e 15 (42% do sexo feminino. O objetivo

  6. When Is the Optimal Timing of the Surgical Treatment for Secondary Spontaneous Pneumothorax?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hyun Woo; Kim, Young-Du; Choi, Si Young; Park, Jae Kil

    2017-01-01

    Objectives  The definition of spontaneous pneumothorax is accumulation of air in the pleural space, resulting in dyspnea or chest pain. Unlike primary spontaneous pneumothorax, secondary pneumothorax can be a life-threatening condition and spontaneous healing rate is uncommon. Although surgery is the most effective treatment modality for pneumothorax, surgical management and timing is difficult where there is underlying lung disease and/or medical comorbidities. Prolonged air leakage increases the morbidity and mortality in thoracic surgery. We hypothesized that duration of air leakage before operation may lead to increase in complications. Methods  This study is a retrospective review of 155 consecutive patients with air leakage who underwent bullectomy for secondary spontaneous pneumothorax from January 2005 to July 2013. The patients were divided according to the duration of preoperative air leakage. The patients were followed-up until the time of last visit or death. Postoperative morbidity and mortality were assessed and the risk factors for complications were analyzed. Results  The median age was 65 years (range, 52-88) with male predominance (96.13%). The median duration of preoperative air leakage was 6 days (range, 1-30). The median surgery time was 90 minutes (range, 25-300) and median hospital stay after operation was 7 days (range, 3-75). Postoperative complications occurred in 38 patients (24.52%) and postoperative recurrence was shown to have occurred in 8 patients (5.16%). With multivariate analysis, risk factors for postoperative complications were: underlying interstitial lung disease and air leakage > 5 days before operation. Conclusion  Persistent air leakage was a major surgical indication for pneumothorax. Early surgical treatment reduced postoperative complications for secondary spontaneous pneumothorax. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Neonatal Pneumothorax Pressures Surpass Higher Threshold in Lung Recruitment Maneuvers: An In Vivo Interventional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pizarro, Patricio; García-Fernández, Javier; Canfrán, Susana; Gilsanz, Fernando

    2016-02-01

    Causing pneumothorax is one of the main concerns of lung recruitment maneuvers in pediatric patients, especially newborns. Therefore, these maneuvers are not performed routinely during anesthesia. Our objective was to determine the pressures that cause pneumothorax in healthy newborns by a prospective experimental study of 10 newborn piglets (pneumothorax. Animals under anesthesia and bilateral chest tube catheterization were randomly allocated to 2 groups: one with PEEP and fixed inspiratory driving pressure of 15 cm H2O (PEEP group) and the second one with PEEP = 0 cm H2O and non-fixed inspiratory driving pressure (zero PEEP group). In both groups, the ventilation mode was pressure-controlled, and PIP was raised at 2-min intervals, with steps of 5 cm H2O until air leak was observed through the chest tubes. The PEEP group raised PIP through 5-cm H2O PEEP increments, and the zero PEEP group raised PIP through 5-cm H2O inspiratory driving pressure increments. Pneumothorax was observed with a PIP of 90.5 ± 15.7 cm H2O with no statistically significant differences between the PEEP group (92 ± 14.8 cm H2O) and the zero PEEP group (89 ± 18.2 cm H2O). The zero PEEP group had hypotension, with a PIP of 35 cm H2O; the PEEP group had hypotension, with a PIP of 60 cm H2O (P = .01). The zero PEEP group presented bradycardia, with PIP of 40 cm H2O; the PEEP group presented bradycardia, with PIP of 70 cm H2O (P = .002). Performing recruitment maneuvers in newborns without lung disease is a safe procedure in terms of pneumothorax. Pneumothorax does not seem to occur in the clinically relevant PIPs of pneumothorax PIP in poorly compliant lungs. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  8. Artificial intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Ennals, J R

    1987-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence: State of the Art Report is a two-part report consisting of the invited papers and the analysis. The editor first gives an introduction to the invited papers before presenting each paper and the analysis, and then concludes with the list of references related to the study. The invited papers explore the various aspects of artificial intelligence. The analysis part assesses the major advances in artificial intelligence and provides a balanced analysis of the state of the art in this field. The Bibliography compiles the most important published material on the subject of

  9. LHC Create

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    LHC Create is an upcoming 2-day workshop held at IdeaSquare in November. Participants from CERN and IPAC school of design will compete to design an exhibit that explains why CERN does what it does. The winner will have their exhibit fully realised and made available to experiments, institutes, and tourism agencies around the world.

  10. Creating Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, John

    Encouraging exploration and practice, this book offers hundreds of exercises and numerous tips covering every step involved in creating poetry. Each chapter is a self-contained unit offering an overview of material in the chapter, a definition of terms, and poetry examples from well-known authors designed to supplement the numerous exercises.…

  11. Management of computed tomography-detected pneumothorax in patients with blunt trauma: experience from a community-based hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefny, Ashraf F; Kunhivalappil, Fathima T; Matev, Nikolay; Avila, Norman A; Bashir, Masoud O; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Diagnoses of pneumothorax, especially occult pneumothorax, have increased as the use of computed tomography (CT) for imaging trauma patients becomes near-routine. However, the need for chest tube insertion remains controversial. We aimed to study the management of pneumothorax detected on CT among patients with blunt trauma, including the decision for tube thoracostomy, in a community-based hospital. METHODS Chest CT scans of patients with blunt trauma treated at Al Rahba Hospital, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, from October 2010 to October 2014 were retrospectively studied. Variables studied included demography, mechanism of injury, endotracheal intubation, pneumothorax volume, chest tube insertion, Injury Severity Score, hospital length of stay and mortality. RESULTS CT was performed in 703 patients with blunt trauma. Overall, pneumothorax was detected on CT for 74 (10.5%) patients. Among the 65 patients for whom pneumothorax was detected before chest tube insertion, 25 (38.5%) needed chest tube insertion, while 40 (61.5%) did not. Backward stepwise likelihood regression showed that independent factors that significantly predicted chest tube insertion were endotracheal intubation (p = 0.01), non-United Arab Emirates nationality (p = 0.01) and pneumothorax volume (p = 0.03). The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the best pneumothorax volume that predicted chest tube insertion was 30 mL. CONCLUSION Chest tube was inserted in less than half of the patients with blunt trauma for whom pneumothorax was detected on CT. Pneumothorax volume should be considered in decision-making regarding chest tube insertion. Conservative treatment may be sufficient for pneumothorax of volume < 30 mL. PMID:28741012

  12. Management of computed tomography-detected pneumothorax in patients with blunt trauma: experience from a community-based hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefny, Ashraf F; Kunhivalappil, Fathima T; Matev, Nikolay; Avila, Norman A; Bashir, Masoud O; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2018-03-01

    Diagnoses of pneumothorax, especially occult pneumothorax, have increased as the use of computed tomography (CT) for imaging trauma patients becomes near-routine. However, the need for chest tube insertion remains controversial. We aimed to study the management of pneumothorax detected on CT among patients with blunt trauma, including the decision for tube thoracostomy, in a community-based hospital. Chest CT scans of patients with blunt trauma treated at Al Rahba Hospital, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, from October 2010 to October 2014 were retrospectively studied. Variables studied included demography, mechanism of injury, endotracheal intubation, pneumothorax volume, chest tube insertion, Injury Severity Score, hospital length of stay and mortality. CT was performed in 703 patients with blunt trauma. Overall, pneumothorax was detected on CT for 74 (10.5%) patients. Among the 65 patients for whom pneumothorax was detected before chest tube insertion, 25 (38.5%) needed chest tube insertion, while 40 (61.5%) did not. Backward stepwise likelihood regression showed that independent factors that significantly predicted chest tube insertion were endotracheal intubation (p = 0.01), non-United Arab Emirates nationality (p = 0.01) and pneumothorax volume (p = 0.03). The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the best pneumothorax volume that predicted chest tube insertion was 30 mL. Chest tube was inserted in less than half of the patients with blunt trauma for whom pneumothorax was detected on CT. Pneumothorax volume should be considered in decision-making regarding chest tube insertion. Conservative treatment may be sufficient for pneumothorax of volume < 30 mL. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  13. Occult pneumothorax in trauma patients: should this be sought in the focused assessment with sonography for trauma examination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Michael M K

    2005-01-01

    At present, CT scan is the gold standard for detecting occult traumatic pneumothorax not apparent on supine chest X-ray radiograph. Recently there were suggestions to expand focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST) to include thoracic ultrasound for detecting pneumothorax. The aim of the present study is to determine the incidence of occult pneumothorax (as shown by CT) in the subgroup of trauma patients undergoing FAST. Review of all trauma patients with FAST done from 1 June 2001 to 31 October 2002. Incidence of occult pneumothorax as diagnosed by CT was determined. Patients were not counted as having true occult pneumothorax if they had chest drains inserted before arrival or imaging studies. Selected clinical findings were tested for association with occult pneumothorax. In total, 143 patients underwent FAST, of whom 137 (95.8%) had chest X-ray examination performed. Of the 137 patients 59 required CT abdomen and/or thorax. Occult pneumothorax was found in three patients (2.1%). A history of thorax and/or abdominal injury plus one or more of: (i) mechanisms potentially causing major trauma; (ii) abnormal chest examination; and (iii) chest X-ray radiograph abnormality in the absence of pneumothorax, was significantly associated with the presence of occult pneumothorax (P = 0.03, Fisher's exact test; sensitivity: 100%; specificity: 71%; likelihood ratio: 3.42). The incidence of occult pneumothorax in the subgroup of trauma patients undergoing FAST is low. It implies that routine screening for its presence by adding thoracic ultrasound to FAST is unnecessary. Identifying those at risk of occult pneumothorax for further investigation appeared feasible.

  14. Atmospheric temperature and pressure influence the onset of spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motono, Nozomu; Maeda, Sumiko; Honda, Ryumon; Tanaka, Makoto; Machida, Yuichiro; Usuda, Katsuo; Sagawa, Motoyasu; Uramoto, Hidetaka

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the influence of the changes in the atmospheric temperature (ATemp) and the atmospheric pressure (APres) on the occurrence of a spontaneous pneumothorax (SP). From January 2000 to March 2014, 192 consecutive SP events were examined. The ATemp and APres data at the onset of SP, as well as those data at 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 h prior to the onset time, were analyzed. The frequencies of SP occurrence were not statistically different according to the months or seasons, but were statistically different according to the time period (P < .01) and SP events occurred most frequently from 12:00 to 18:00. SP events frequently occurred at an ATemp of 25 degrees Celsius or higher. There was a significantly negative correlation between the APres and the ATemp at the SP onset time. The values of change in the APres from 36 to 24 h prior to SP onset were significantly lower than the preceding values. In this study, we observed that a SP event was likely to occur in the time period from 12:00 to 18:00, at an ATemp of 25 degrees Celsius or higher, and at 24-36 h after a drop of APres. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Location of Ruptured Bullae in Secondary Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinseok Choi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The surgical treatment of secondary spontaneous pneumothorax (SSP can be complicated by fragile lung parenchyma. The preoperative prediction of air leakage could help prevent intraoperative lung in-jury during manipulation of the lung. Common sites of bulla development and ruptured bullae were inves-tigated based on computed tomography (CT and intraoperative findings. Methods: The study enrolled 208 patients with SSP who underwent air leak control through video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS. We retrospectively reviewed the sites of bulla development on preoperative CT and the rupture sites during VATS. Results: Of the 135 cases of right-sided SSP, the most common rupture site was the apical segment (31.9%, followed by the azygoesophageal recess (27.4%. Of the 75 cases on the left side, the most com-mon rupture site was the apical segment (24.0%, followed by the anterior basal segment (17.3%. Conclusion: The azygoesophageal recess and parenchyma along the cardiac border were common sites of bul-la development and rupture. Studies of respiratory lung motion to measure the pleural pressure at the lung surface could help to determine the relationship between cardiogenic and diaphragmatic movement and bulla formation or rupture.

  16. Pneumothorax detection in chest radiographs using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, Aviel; Konen, Eli; Greenspan, Hayit

    2018-02-01

    This study presents a computer assisted diagnosis system for the detection of pneumothorax (PTX) in chest radiographs based on a convolutional neural network (CNN) for pixel classification. Using a pixel classification approach allows utilization of the texture information in the local environment of each pixel while training a CNN model on millions of training patches extracted from a relatively small dataset. The proposed system uses a pre-processing step of lung field segmentation to overcome the large variability in the input images coming from a variety of imaging sources and protocols. Using a CNN classification, suspected pixel candidates are extracted within each lung segment. A postprocessing step follows to remove non-physiological suspected regions and noisy connected components. The overall percentage of suspected PTX area was used as a robust global decision for the presence of PTX in each lung. The system was trained on a set of 117 chest x-ray images with ground truth segmentations of the PTX regions. The system was tested on a set of 86 images and reached diagnosis accuracy of AUC=0.95. Overall preliminary results are promising and indicate the growing ability of CAD based systems to detect findings in medical imaging on a clinical level accuracy.

  17. Needle thoracostomy for tension pneumothorax: the Israeli Defense Forces experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jacob; Nadler, Roy; Schwartz, Dagan; Tien, Homer; Cap, Andrew P; Glassberg, Elon

    2015-06-01

    Point of injury needle thoracostomy (NT) for tension pneumothorax is potentially lifesaving. Recent data raised concerns regarding the efficacy of conventional NT devices. Owing to these considerations, the Israeli Defense Forces Medical Corps (IDF-MC) recently introduced a longer, wider, more durable catheter for the performance of rapid chest decompression. The present series represents the IDF-MC experience with chest decompression by NT. We reviewed the IDF trauma registry from January 1997 to October 2012 to identify all cases in which NT was attempted. During the study period a total of 111 patients underwent chest decompression by NT. Most casualties (54%) were wounded as a result of gunshot wounds (GSW); motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) were the second leading cause (16%). Most (79%) NTs were performed at the point of injury, while the rest were performed during evacuation by ambulance or helicopter (13% and 4%, respectively). Decreased breath sounds on the affected side were one of the most frequent clinical indications for NT, recorded in 28% of cases. Decreased breath sounds were more common in surviving than in nonsurviving patients. (37% v. 19%, p chest tube was installed on the field in 35 patients (32%), all after NT. Standard NT has a high failure rate on the battlefield. Alternative measures for chest decompression, such as the Vygon catheter, appear to be a feasible alternative to conventional NT.

  18. Videothorascopic laser therapy with bullectomy and pleurodesis for spontaneous pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tos, M.; Corsi, M.; Bellaviti, N.; Giuliani, L.; Santambrogio, L.; Mezzetti, M.

    1992-01-01

    Use of Nd:YAG laser in thoracic surgery has been suggested and mainly employed for recanalization of the airways through bronchoscopy in patients affected by inoperable bronchial cancer. Lo Cicero et al described laser effects and effectiveness on lung tissue to control or seal air leaks, using both CO 2 or Nd:YAG equipment. This first report is positively confirmed by experience when performing atypical lung resections with aid of Nd:YAG laser beam, especially concerning hemostasis and air leakage control. In a previous report authors suggested that laser fiber could not be inserted into the operative channel of the thorascope or mediastinalscope. A superb exposure of the pleural cavity is nowadays obtainable linking thorascope to a videocamera with external monitor and videothorascopy has been suggested and described in the management of spontaneous pneumothorax. Ablation of blebs and pleurodesis were earlier treated by application of electrocautery, but many experiences indicate possible advantages related with the use of the laser instead of traditional methods. (author). 10 refs

  19. Risk factors of pneumothorax in percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Kwang Joo; Shin, Hyung Cheol; Kwon, Ryang; Jo, Byung June; Oh, Sei Jung; Ahn, Chang Su; Kim, Hyung Jung

    1997-01-01

    Percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy is known to be a useful diagnostic method for the diagnosis of various pulmonary diseases. Its diagnostic yield is high, and it is safe, but complications such as pneumothorax can occasionally occur. We reviewed the complications arising after needle aspiration biopsy and analyzed the risk factors of pneumothorax. The medical records and radiographic studies of 157 patients with various pulmonary diseases who underwent needle aspiration biopsy of the lung between 1990 and 1996 were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical features, treatment, and courses of complications were reviewed, and risk factors of pneumothorax such as depth and size of lesion, diameter of needle, number of punctures, and obstructive pulmonary abnormalities were analyzed. Complications occurred in 40 of 157cases(25.5%), namely pneumothorax in 26(16.6%), hemoptysis in 11(7%), hemothorax in two(1.3%), and recurrence of malignancy at the site of aspiration in one(0.6%). When the patients were divided into three groups according to depth of lesion, there were significant difference in the incidence of pneumothorax;the results were as follows:less than 2cm, 12.9%;between 2 and 4cm, 24.1%;and larger than 4cm, 57.1%(p<0.05). In pulmonary function testing, FVC(Forced Vital Capacity) of patients with pneumothorax was less than that of patients without(2.6±0.9L vs 3.1±0.8L, p<0.05), but FEV1(Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second), FEV1%(percentage of predicted FEV1), FEV1/FVC, and FVC% (percentage of predicted FVC) were not different between the two groups. The incidence of pneumothorax in patients with pleura-at-tached lesion (9%) was lower than that of those with non-attached lesion(26%, p=3D0.01). The age of patients, size of lesion, diameter of the needle, guidance methods and number of aspirations showed no significant relationship with pneumothorax. In needle aspiration biopsy of the lung, depth of lesion and passage of a needle through aerated lung are

  20. Efficacy of an opposite position aspiration on resolution of pneumothorax following CT-guided lung biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, L-C; Du, Y; Yang, H-F; Xie, M-G; Liao, H-Q; Zhang, Y-D; Li, L; Wang, Q; Hu, L

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of aspiration in an opposite position to deal with pneumothorax after CT-guided lung biopsy. Methods: A retrospective study was developed involving 210 patients with pneumothorax who had undergone CT-guided percutaneous core biopsies from January 2012 to March 2014 for various pulmonary lesions. Asymptomatic patients with minimal pneumothorax were treated conservatively. Simple manual aspiration was performed for symptomatic patients with minimal pneumothorax and for all patients with moderate to large pneumothorax. An opposite position aspiration was performed when simple manual aspiration failed. The efficacy of simple manual aspiration and the opposite position aspiration was observed. Results: Among 210 patients with pneumothorax, 128 (61.0%) asymptomatic patients with minimal pneumothorax were treated conservatively. The remaining 82 were treated with attempted simple manual aspiration. Out of these 82 patients, simple manual aspiration was successful in 58 (70.7%, 58/82) cases. The complete and partial regression rates were 17.2% (10/58) and 82.8% (48/58), respectively. In the other 24 patients (29.3%, 24/82), simple aspiration technique was ineffective. An opposite position (from prone to supine or vice versa) was applied, and a new biopsy puncture site was chosen for reaspiration. This procedure was successful in 22 patients but not in 2 patients who had to have a chest tube insertion. The complete and partial regression rates were 25.0% (6/24) and 66.7% (16/24), respectively. Applying the new method, the total effective rate of aspiration improved significantly from 70.7% (58/82) to 97.6% (80/82). Conclusion: The opposite position aspiration can be safe, effective and minimally invasive treatment for CT-guided lung biopsy-induced pneumothorax thus reducing the use of chest tube significantly. Advances in knowledge: (1) Opposite position aspiration can elevate the success rate of aspiration significantly (from 70.7% to 97

  1. Artificial Reefs

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An artificial reef is a human-made underwater structure, typically built to promote marine life in areas with a generally featureless bottom, control erosion, block...

  2. An 18-year-old man with recurrent pneumothorax since he was 10-year-old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Meral; Çobanoğlu, Nazan

    2016-12-01

    An 18-year-old male patient was referred to the department of pediatric pulmonology with a history of recurrent pneumothorax. Initial pneumothorax occurred at the age of 10. Following diagnosis of congenital lobar emphysema, he had five episodes of pneumothorax and subsequently underwent right-lower lobe anterobasal segmentectomy. Based on thoracic computed tomography (CT) and clinical manifestation, Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome was suspected and confirmed following genetic testing. BHD syndrome is a rare tumor predisposition syndrome first described in 1977. The syndrome is characterized by skin fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts, recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax, and renal cell cancer. The underlying cause is a germline mutation in the folliculin (FLCN) gene located on chromosome 17p11.2. Clinical manifestation usually appears after the age of 20 years. In this case, we report a case of BHD with episodes of recurrent pneumothorax, the first of which occurred at the age of 10 years. Pulmonologists should be aware of this syndrome in patients with a personal and family history of pneumothoraces and CT findings of multiple pulmonary cysts as additional evaluation and testing may be warranted. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:E41-E43. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. 86Rb Distribution in the Lung of the Rabbit with Pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, Kap To

    1972-01-01

    86 Rb uptake of some organs and tissues, eg. both lungs, both renal cortices. small intestine, liver and skeletal muscle were studied in the control and the rabbit subjected to pneumothorax. 86 Rb in the form of chloride mixed with physiological saline was intravenously injected. The doses were 100 μc for a rabbit. The rabbits were sacrificed at intervals of 10, 20, 40, and 60 seconds after the injection of 86 Rb, by the injection of saturated KCI solution. After scarification, the organ and tissue sample were quickly removed. 86 Rb uptake in gm of the organs and tissues were measured. On the basis of uptake value, administered doses and body weight, % dose/gm tissues per 200 gm body weight was calculated. Followings were the results: 1. Pneumothorax resulted in a marked elevation in 86 Rb uptake value of collapsed lung and returned to normal level lately. 2. Contralateral lung of pneumothorax also showed marked elevation in 86 Rb uptake value and recovered to normal level. 3. Initial 86 Rb uptake value of liver, small intestine of the rabbit with pneumothorax showed some elevation as compared to control, but that of late stage were similar with control. 4. Local blood flow determination by means of 86 Rb uptake were inadequate in the collapsed lung of pneumothorax. 5. It was suggested that the mechanism for the initial elevation of 86 Rb uptake value in each organs and tissue were different from each other.

  4. Pneumothorax and the Value of Chest Radiography after Ultrasound-Guided Thoracocentesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pihlajamaa, K.; Bode, M.K.; Puumalainen, T.; Lehtimaeki, A.; Marjelund, S.; Tikkakoski, T.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence, the operator's experience, and other variables that may influence the development of pneumothorax or re-expansion edema after ultrasound (US)-guided thoracocentesis. Material and Methods: The medical records of 264 procedures in 212 patients who had undergone US-guided thoracocentesis in our radiology department or intensive care unit during the period 1996-2001 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Post-thoracocentesis pneumothorax occurred in 11 cases, the incidence being 4.2% (11/264). None of the pneumothoraces occurred in the 10 mechanically ventilated patients. All but one patient with pneumothorax were asymptomatic or had only minor symptoms. Chest tube drainage was needed in one patient with a large pneumothorax. No re-expansion edema was recorded, although 1500 ml or more pleural fluid was aspirated in 29 patients. The operator's experience had no effect on the complication rate. Needle size was the only significant variable that contributed to the pneumothorax rate. Conclusion: US-guided thoracocentesis can be done equally as safely by residents as by senior radiologists. The safety and feasibility of the method are evident among mechanically ventilated intensive care patients. Our results do not support the routine use of post-thoracocentesis chest radiography

  5. Retained guidewire penetrating through the aorta into the thorax: an unusual cause of recurrent bilateral pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YongHun; Yu, JunSik; Kim, YoHan; Lee, WooSurng

    2016-01-01

    Although numerous complications of the Seldinger technique have been reported in the literature, only a few complications are related to guidewires. We here report a case of a patient with a guidewire lost and retained in the aorta during vertebral artery stenting. Unfortunately, the guidewire in the aorta was not detected for 5 years, and it penetrated through the aorta into the left thorax, leading to recurrent left pneumothorax. No physician identified the wandering guidewire in the left thorax, and the recurrent left pneumothorax was only managed with closed thoracostomy drainage several times. After 4 months, the patient presented to our hospital with repeated severe chest pain, and newly developed right pneumothorax was diagnosed on chest X-rays. We meticulously evaluated the radiological findings of the other hospitals to identify the cause of the recurrent pneumothorax and discovered that the lost and wandering guidewire had crossed over from the left to the right thorax through the anterior mediastinum. The guidewire was identified as the cause of the recurrent bilateral pneumothorax, and the patient was successfully treated with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery without any events. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  6. Changes in electrocardiographic findings after closed thoracostomy in patients with spontaneous pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonjae; Lee, Yoonje; Kim, Changsun; Choi, Hyuk Joong; Kang, Bossng; Lim, Tae Ho; Oh, Jaehoon; Kang, Hyunggoo; Shin, Junghun

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aimed to describe electrocardiographic (ECG) findings in spontaneous pneumothorax patients before and after closed thoracostomy. Methods This is a retrospective study which included patients with spontaneous pneumothorax who presented to an emergency department of a tertiary urban hospital from February 2005 to March 2015. The primary outcome was a difference in ECG findings between before and after closed thoracostomy. We specifically investigated the following ECG elements: PR, QRS, QTc, axis, ST segments, and R waves in each lead. The secondary outcomes were change in ST segment in any lead and change in axis after closed thoracostomy. Results There were two ECG elements which showed statistically significant difference after thoracostomy. With right pneumothorax volume of greater than 80%, QTc and the R waves in aVF and V5 significantly changed after thoracostomy. With left pneumothorax volume between 31% and 80%, the ST segment in V2 and the R wave in V1 significantly changed after thoracostomy. However, majority of ECG elements did not show statistically significant alteration after thoracostomy. Conclusion We found only minor changes in ECG after closed thoracostomy in spontaneous pneumothorax patients. PMID:28435901

  7. A deep azygoesophageal recess may increase the risk of secondary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Kawashima, Mitsuaki; Kuwano, Hideki; Nagayama, Kazuhiro; Nitadori, Jyunichi; Anraku, Masaki; Sato, Masaaki; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Jun

    2017-09-01

    The azygoesophageal recess (AER) is known as a possible cause of bulla formation in patients with spontaneous pneumothorax. However, there has been little focus on the depth of the AER. We evaluated the relationship between the depth of the AER and pneumothorax development. We conducted a retrospective study of 80 spontaneous pneumothorax patients who underwent surgery at our institution. We evaluated the depth of the AER on preoperative computed tomography scans. Ruptured bullae at the AER were found in 12 patients (52.2%) with secondary spontaneous pneumothorax (SSP) and 8 patients (14.0%) with primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) (p < 0.001). In patients with ruptured bullae at the AER, 10 SSP patients (83.3%) had a deep AER while only 2 PSP patients (25%) had a deep AER (p = 0.015). A deep AER was more frequently associated with SSP than with PSP. A deep AER may contributes to bulla formation and rupture in SSP patients.

  8. Recurrent Spontaneous Pneumothorax during the Recovery Phase of ARDS Due to H1N1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canan Bor

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The pregnant patients are prone to influenza A (H1N1 virus infection, which may rapidly progress to lower respiratory tract infection and subsequent respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Pneumothorax might develop in ARDS under mechanical ventilation. But post-ARDS pneumothorax in spontaneously breathing patient has not been reported in the literature. We report a 31-year old pregnant woman infected with influenza A (H1N1 virus and progressed to ARDS. Mechanical ventilation with high PEEP improved patient's gas exchange parameters within 3 weeks. However spontaneous pneumothorax was developed one week after she weaned off the ventilator. After successful drainage therapy, the patient was discharged. However she re-admitted to the hospital because of a recurrent pneumothorax one week later. She was discharged in good health after being treated with negative continuous pleural aspiration for 10 days. Influenza might cause severe pulmonary infection and death. In addition to diffuse alveolar damage, sub-pleural and intrapulmonary air cysts might occur in influenza-related ARDS and may lead to spontaneous pneumothorax. This complication should always be considered during the recovery period of ARDS and a long-term close follow-up is necessary.

  9. Natural - synthetic - artificial!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2010-01-01

    The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life.......The terms "natural," "synthetic" and "artificial" are discussed in relation to synthetic and artificial chromosomes and genomes, synthetic and artificial cells and artificial life....

  10. Pneumothorax as a complication of combination antiangiogenic therapy in children and young adults with refractory/recurrent solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interiano, Rodrigo B; McCarville, M Beth; Wu, Jianrong; Davidoff, Andrew M; Sandoval, John; Navid, Fariba

    2015-09-01

    Antiangiogenic agents show significant antitumor activity against various tumor types. In a study evaluating the combination of sorafenib, bevacizumab, and low-dose cyclophosphamide in children with solid tumors, an unexpectedly high incidence of pneumothorax was observed. We evaluated patient characteristics and risk factors for the development of pneumothorax in patients receiving this therapy. Demographics, clinical course, and radiographic data of 44 patients treated with sorafenib, bevacizumab and cyclophosphamide were reviewed. Risk factors associated with the development of pneumothorax were analyzed. Pneumothorax likely related to study therapy developed in 11 of 44 (25%) patients of whom 33 had pulmonary abnormalities. Median age of patients was 14.7 years (range, 1.08-24.5). Histologies associated with pneumothorax included rhabdoid tumor, synovial sarcoma, osteosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, Wilms tumor, and renal cell carcinoma. Cavitation of pulmonary nodules in response to therapy was associated with pneumothorax development (Ppneumothorax was 5.7 weeks (range, 2.4-31). The development of cavitary pulmonary nodules in response to therapy is a risk factor for pneumothorax. As pneumothorax is a potentially life-threatening complication of antiangiogenic therapy in children with solid tumors, its risk needs to be evaluated when considering this therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstad, Astrid; Rasmussen, Knut Einar; Parmer, Marthe Petrine

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports development of a new approach towards analytical liquid-liquid-liquid membrane extraction termed parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction. A donor plate and acceptor plate create a sandwich, in which each sample (human plasma) and acceptor solution is separated by an arti......This paper reports development of a new approach towards analytical liquid-liquid-liquid membrane extraction termed parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction. A donor plate and acceptor plate create a sandwich, in which each sample (human plasma) and acceptor solution is separated...... by an artificial liquid membrane. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction is a modification of hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction, where the hollow fibers are replaced by flat membranes in a 96-well plate format....

  12. Cannabis increased the risk of primary spontaneous pneumothorax in tobacco smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedevang Olesen, Winnie; Katballe, Niels; Sindby, Jesper Eske

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Previous smaller case series suggested that cannabis smoking may cause spontaneous pneumothorax, but this finding remains controversial. We investigated the possible association between smoking tobacco and cannabis and the risk of having a primary spontaneous pneumothorax in a large...... tobacco and cannabis were obtained from questionnaires presented on admittance. We compared our findings with those of a population-based control group matched by age, sex and geographical area. Calculated odds ratios were compared using the Fisher’s exact test for small frequencies and the χ2 test.......61–14.14, P cannabis and tobacco in men increased the risk of spontaneous pneumothorax significantly (odds ratio = 8.74, 95% confidence interval: 4.30–19.51, P 

  13. Total pleural covering technique for intractable pneumothorax in patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Yoshihisa; Fukui, Eriko; Kitahara, Naoto; Okura, Eiji; Ohta, Mitsunori

    2016-07-01

    We report a patient with vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) who developed pneumothorax and was treated with a total pleural covering technique (TPC). A 24-year-old man developed repeat pneumothorax with intermittent hemo-sputum. Based on unusual radiological manifestations of lung lesions and physical findings, EDS was suspected as an underlying cause of the pneumothorax. Surgical treatment was performed using a mediastinal fat pad and TPC, and no relapse was seen up to 2 years after surgery. TPC is a less invasive surgical approach for selected patients with vEDS. Accurate underlying diagnosis of vEDS and systemic evaluation of vascular complications are necessary before planning surgery.

  14. The influence of chest tube size and position in primary spontaneous pneumothorax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Sara S.; Riber, Lars P S; Olesen, Winnie H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Optimal chest tube position in the pleural cavity is largely unexplored for the treatment of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP). We investigated whether type, size and position of chest tubes influenced duration of treatment for PSP. Methods: A retrospective follow-up study of all...... patients admitted with PSP over a 5-year period. Traumatic, iatrogenic and secondary pneumothoraxes were excluded. Gender, age, smoking habits, type and size of chest tube used (pigtail catheter or surgical chest tube) were recorded from the patients' charts. All chest X-rays upon admittance...... and immediately following chest tube placement were retrieved and re-evaluated for size of pneumothorax (categorized into five groups) and location of the chest tube tip (categorized as upper, middle or lower third of the pleural cavity). All data were analysed in a Cox proportional hazards regression model...

  15. Surgical treatment versus conventional chest tube drainage in primary spontaneous pneumothorax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Winnie Hedevang; Katballe, Niels; Sindby, Jesper Eske

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Primary spontaneous pneumothorax frequently recurs after chest tube management. Evidence is lacking whether patients may benefit from surgery following their first episode. METHODS: We performed a multicentre, randomized trial and enrolled young, otherwise healthy patients admitted...... with their first episode of primary spontaneous pneumothorax and treated using conventional chest tube drainage. Patients underwent high-resolution computed tomography on fully expanded lungs, and using web-based randomization, we assigned patients to continued conservative chest tube treatment or chest tube...... treatment to prevent recurrence in patients with their first presentation of primary spontaneous pneumothorax and should be the standard of care when high-resolution computed tomography demonstrates bullae ≥2 cm. Clinical trial registration: ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT 02866305....

  16. Iatrogenic Pneumothorax as a Complication to Delayed Breast Reconstruction With Tissue Expander—A Case Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willert, Cecilie Balslev; Bredgaard, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    Breast reconstruction with expander implant is the most common breast reconstructive procedure. Irradiated patients are seldom reconstructed this way because the tissue expansion is difficult and the complication rates are higher. Pneumothorax is a serious condition and can be seen as a complicat......Breast reconstruction with expander implant is the most common breast reconstructive procedure. Irradiated patients are seldom reconstructed this way because the tissue expansion is difficult and the complication rates are higher. Pneumothorax is a serious condition and can be seen...... as a complication to the operation. Literature is sparse; hence, the only study is by Schneider et al who found an incidence of 0.55%. The study focused on immediate reconstruction only and did not report the percentage of irradiated patients. We present a unique case of iatrogenic pneumothorax in a previously...

  17. Ultrasound as a Screening Tool for Central Venous Catheter Positioning and Exclusion of Pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Rabia; Knio, Ziyad O; Mahmood, Feroze; Oren-Grinberg, Achikam; Leibowitz, Akiva; Bose, Ruma; Shaefi, Shahzad; Mitchell, John D; Ahmed, Muneeb; Bardia, Amit; Talmor, Daniel; Matyal, Robina

    2017-07-01

    Although real-time ultrasound guidance during central venous catheter insertion has become a standard of care, postinsertion chest radiograph remains the gold standard to confirm central venous catheter tip position and rule out associated lung complications like pneumothorax. We hypothesize that a combination of transthoracic echocardiography and lung ultrasound is noninferior to chest radiograph when used to accurately assess central venous catheter positioning and screen for pneumothorax. All operating rooms and surgical and trauma ICUs at the institution. Single-center, prospective noninferiority study. Patients receiving ultrasound-guided subclavian or internal jugular central venous catheters. During ultrasound-guided central venous catheter placement, correct positioning of central venous catheter was accomplished by real-time visualization of the guide wire and positive right atrial swirl sign using the subcostal four-chamber view. After insertion, pneumothorax was ruled out by the presence of lung sliding and seashore sign on M-mode. Data analysis was done for 137 patients. Chest radiograph ruled out pneumothorax in 137 of 137 patients (100%). Lung ultrasound was performed in 123 of 137 patients and successfully screened for pneumothorax in 123 of 123 (100%). Chest radiograph approximated accurate catheter tip position in 136 of 137 patients (99.3%). Adequate subcostal four-chamber views could not be obtained in 13 patients. Accurate positioning of central venous catheter with ultrasound was then confirmed in 121 of 124 patients (97.6%) as described previously. Transthoracic echocardiography and lung ultrasound are noninferior to chest x-ray for screening of pneumothorax and accurate central venous catheter positioning. Thus, the point of care use of ultrasound can reduce central venous catheter insertion to use time, exposure to radiation, and improve patient safety.

  18. Outcome and risk factors of recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy in young adults with primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Takashi; Takahashi, Yusuke; Uehara, Hirofumi; Matsutani, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Masafumi

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the risk factors of recurrence of pneumothorax following thoracoscopic bullectomy in young adults. Between January, 2005 and September, 2015, 167 patients aged ≤40 years underwent initial thoracoscopic bullectomy for primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) at our hospital. Recurrence-free probability was calculated from the date of surgery to recurrence or last follow-up, using the Kaplan-Meier method. Sixteen (9.6%) of the 167 patients suffered a recurrence (collective total, 16 recurrences). The recurrence-free intervals were 3-107 months (median 25.8 months), and the 5-year recurrence-free probability was 85.9%. Multivariate Cox analysis demonstrated that age ≤23 years (p = 0.029) and a history of ipsilateral pneumothorax before surgery (p = 0.029) were significantly associated with higher risk of recurrence. The 5-year recurrence-free probability was 72.3% for patients aged ≤23 years and a history of ipsilateral pneumothorax before surgery and 94.1% for those with neither of these factors (p = 0.001). Recurrence developed within 3 years after surgery in 14 of the 16 patients. Patients ≤23 years of age with a history of ipsilateral pneumothorax before surgery are at significantly high risk of its recurrence, frequently within 3 years; thus, the risk of postoperative recurrence of a pneumothorax must be kept in mind.

  19. Surgical Intervention for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax in Pediatric Population: When and Why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Fanny; Chung, Patrick H Y; Hung, Esther L Y; Yuen, Chi Sum; Tam, Paul K H; Wong, Kenneth K Y

    2017-08-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax in pediatric patients is relatively uncommon. The management strategy varies in different centers due to dearth of evidence-based pediatric guidelines. In this study, we reviewed our experience of thoracoscopic management of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) in children and identified risk factors associated with postoperative air leakage and recurrence. We performed a retrospective analysis of pediatric patients who had PSP and underwent surgical management in our institution between April 2008 and March 2015. Demographic data, radiological findings, interventions, and surgical outcomes were analyzed. A total of 92 patients with 110 thoracoscopic surgery for PSP were identified. The indications for surgery were failed nonoperative management with persistent air leakage in 32.7%, recurrent ipsilateral pneumothorax in 36.4%, first contralateral pneumothorax in 14.5%, bilateral pneumothorax in 10%, and significant hemopneumothorax in 5.5%. Bulla was identified in 101 thoracoscopy (91.8%) with stapled bullectomy performed. 14.5% patients had persistent postoperative air leakage and treated with reinsertion of thoracostomy tube and chemical pleurodesis. 17.3% patients had postoperative recurrence occurred at mean time of 11 months. Operation within 7 days of symptoms onset was associated with less postoperative air leakage (P = .04). Bilateral pneumothorax and those with abnormal radiographic features had significantly more postoperative air leakage (P = .002, P < .01 respectively) and recurrence (P < .01, P = .007). Early thoracoscopic mechanical pleurodesis and stapled bullectomy after thoracostomy tube insertion could be offered as a primary option for management of large PSP in pediatric population, since most of these patients had bulla identified as the culprit of the disease.

  20. Occult pneumothorax in Chinese patients with significant blunt chest trauma: incidence and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ka L; Graham, Colin A; Yeung, Janice H H; Ahuja, Anil T; Rainer, Timothy H

    2010-05-01

    Occult pneumothorax (OP) is a pneumothorax not visualised on a supine chest X-ray (CXR) but detected on computed tomography (CT) scanning. With increasing CT use for trauma, more OP may be detected. Management of OP remains controversial, especially for patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. This study aimed to identify the incidence of OP using thoracic CT as the gold standard and describe its management amongst Hong Kong Chinese trauma patients. Analysis of prospectively collected trauma registry data. Consecutive significantly injured trauma patients admitted through the emergency department (ED) suffering from blunt chest trauma who underwent thoracic computed tomography (TCT) between in calendar years 2007 and 2008 were included. An OP was defined as the identification (by a specialist radiologist) of a pneumothorax on TCT that had not been previously detected on supine CXR. 119 significantly injured patients were included. 56 patients had a pneumothorax on CXR and a further 36 patients had at least one OP [OP incidence 30% (36/119)]. Bilateral OP was present in 8/36 patients, so total OP numbers were 44. Tube thoracostomy was performed for 8/44 OP, all were mechanically ventilated in the ED. The remaining 36 OP were managed expectantly. No patients in the expectant group had pneumothorax progression, even though 8 patients required subsequent ventilation in the operating room for extrathoracic surgery. The incidence of OP (seen on TCT) in Chinese patients in Hong Kong after blunt chest trauma is higher than that typically reported in Caucasians. Most OP were managed expectantly without significant complications; no pneumothorax progressed even though some patients were mechanically ventilated. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ultrasound detection of pneumothorax compared with chest X-ray and computed tomography scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarsheth, Khanjan; Kurek, Stanley

    2011-04-01

    Pneumothorax after trauma can be a life threatening injury and its care requires expeditious and accurate diagnosis and possible intervention. We performed a prospective, single blinded study with convenience sampling at a Level I trauma center comparing thoracic ultrasound with chest X-ray and CT scan in the detection of traumatic pneumothorax. Trauma patients that received a thoracic ultrasound, chest X-ray, and chest CT scan were included in the study. The chest X-rays were read by a radiologist who was blinded to the thoracic ultrasound results. Then both were compared with CT scan results. One hundred and twenty-five patients had a thoracic ultrasound performed in the 24-month period. Forty-six patients were excluded from the study due to lack of either a chest X-ray or chest CT scan. Of the remaining 79 patients there were 22 positive pneumothorax found by CT and of those 18 (82%) were found on ultrasound and 7 (32%) were found on chest X-ray. The sensitivity of thoracic ultrasound was found to be 81.8 per cent and the specificity was found to be 100 per cent. The sensitivity of chest X-ray was found to be 31.8 per cent and again the specificity was found to be 100 per cent. The negative predictive value of thoracic ultrasound for pneumothorax was 0.934 and the negative predictive value for chest X-ray for pneumothorax was found to be 0.792. We advocate the use of chest ultrasound for detection of pneumothorax in trauma patients.

  2. Missed diagnosis of atresia of the right pulmonary artery in woman with left-sided pneumothorax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagnegård, Hanna; Ryom, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Isolated pulmonary atresia is an uncommon condition, which can go undiagnosed for a long time in asymptomatic patients. Sometimes, diagnosis can be made at pregnancy due to respiratory symptoms. There is no known increased risk of pneumothorax. We here present a case where a second-time pregnant...... woman with an unknown atresia of the right pulmonary artery received a left-sided pneumothorax. The diagnosis was initially missed in spite of adequate imaging and the condition progressed to respiratory stop. We describe the course of diagnostics and the chosen strategy of treatment....

  3. Spontaneous Interlobar Pneumothorax in a Localized Fibrous Tumor of in the Pleura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Tong [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    We report a case of a localized fibrous tumor of in the pleura pleura; this tumor was associated with interlobar pneumothorax, which, to our knowledge, has not been reported to date. A 63-year-old woman presented with an incidentally-detected nodule, which was seen on her chest radiograph. It presented as a mural nodule within a cystic lesion, on the chest radiograph and axial CT, and a reformatted sagittal CT image could then be diagnosed as a pleural tumor associated with interlobar pneumothorax.

  4. Spontaneous Interlobar Pneumothorax in a Localized Fibrous Tumor of in the Pleura

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Tong

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a localized fibrous tumor of in the pleura pleura; this tumor was associated with interlobar pneumothorax, which, to our knowledge, has not been reported to date. A 63-year-old woman presented with an incidentally-detected nodule, which was seen on her chest radiograph. It presented as a mural nodule within a cystic lesion, on the chest radiograph and axial CT, and a reformatted sagittal CT image could then be diagnosed as a pleural tumor associated with interlobar pneumothorax.

  5. Risk factors for postoperative recurrence of spontaneous pneumothorax treated by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperatori, Andrea; Rotolo, Nicola; Spagnoletti, Marco; Festi, Luigi; Berizzi, Fabio; Di Natale, Davide; Nardecchia, Elisa; Dominioni, Lorenzo

    2015-05-01

    Over the past two decades, video-assisted thoracoscopic blebectomy and pleurodesis have been used as a safe and reliable option for treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax. The aim of this study is to evaluate the long-term outcome of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax in young patients, and to identify risk factors for postoperative recurrence. We retrospectively analysed the outcome of VATS treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax in our institution in 150 consecutive young patients (age ≤ 40 years) in the years 1997-2010. Treatment consisted of stapling blebectomy and partial parietal pleurectomy. After excluding 16 patients lost to follow-up, in 134 cases [110 men, 24 women; mean age, 25 ± 7 standard deviation years; median follow-up, 79 months (range: 36-187 months)], we evaluated postoperative complications, focusing on pneumothorax recurrence, thoracic dysaesthesia and chronic chest pain. Risk factors for postoperative pneumothorax recurrence were analysed by logistic regression. Of 134 treated patients, 3 (2.2%) required early reoperation (2 for bleeding; 1 for persistent air leaks). Postoperative (90-day) mortality was nil. Ipsilateral pneumothorax recurred in 8 cases (6.0%) [median time of recurrence, 43 months (range: 1-71 months)]. At univariate analysis, the recurrence rate was significantly higher in women (4/24) than in men (4/110; P = 0.026) and in patients with >7-day postoperative air leaks (P = 0.021). Multivariate analysis confirmed that pneumothorax recurrence correlated independently with prolonged air leaks (P = 0.037) and with female gender (P = 0.045). Chronic chest wall dysaesthesia was reported by 13 patients (9.7%). In 3 patients, (2.2%) chronic thoracic pain (analogical score >4) was recorded, but only 1 patient required analgesics more than once a month. VATS blebectomy and parietal pleurectomy is a safe procedure for treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax in young patients, with a 6% long

  6. Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis presenting as spontaneous pneumothorax treated with sirolimus - A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ajay Kumar; Joshi, Ambarish; Mishra, Amritesh Ranjan; Kant, Surya; Singh, Arpita

    2018-01-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is a very common medical emergency. Patients are often treated without treating the underlying cause. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare cystic lung disease. Until recently, diagnosis of LAM was a challenge with nearly 100% mortality in 10 years, but better understanding of the disease through research and better radiological techniques and newer drugs such as sirolimus has improved the survival in such patients. We are presenting a rare case of LAM presenting as a secondary spontaneous pneumothorax treated with sirolimus. PMID:29487252

  7. Bilateral pneumothorax with extensive subcutaneous emphysema manifested during third molar surgery. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, J; Irie, A; Dotsu, H; Inokuchi, T

    2000-10-01

    This report describes a case of bilateral pneumothorax with extensive subcutaneous emphysema in a 45-year-old man that occurred during surgery to extract the left lower third molar, performed with the use of an air turbine dental handpiece. Computed tomographic scanning showed severe subcutaneous emphysema extending bilaterally from the cervicofacial region and the deep anatomic spaces (including the pterygomandibular, parapharyngeal, retropharyngeal, and deep temporal spaces) to the anterior wall of the chest. Furthermore, bilateral pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum were present. In our patient, air dissection was probably caused by pressurized air being forced through the operating site into the surrounding connective tissue.

  8. Artificial sweeteners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raben, Anne Birgitte; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Artificial sweeteners can be a helpful tool to reduce energy intake and body weight and thereby risk for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Considering the prevailing diabesity (obesity and diabetes) epidemic, this can, therefore, be an important alternative to natural, calorie-containin......Artificial sweeteners can be a helpful tool to reduce energy intake and body weight and thereby risk for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Considering the prevailing diabesity (obesity and diabetes) epidemic, this can, therefore, be an important alternative to natural, calorie......-containing sweeteners. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current evidence on the effect of artificial sweeteners on body weight, appetite, and risk markers for diabetes and CVD in humans....

  9. Artificial Intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Warwick, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    if AI is outside your field, or you know something of the subject and would like to know more then Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a brilliant primer.' - Nick Smith, Engineering and Technology Magazine November 2011 Artificial Intelligence: The Basics is a concise and cutting-edge introduction to the fast moving world of AI. The author Kevin Warwick, a pioneer in the field, examines issues of what it means to be man or machine and looks at advances in robotics which have blurred the boundaries. Topics covered include: how intelligence can be defined whether machines can 'think' sensory

  10. Artificial intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perret-Galix, D.

    1992-01-01

    A vivid example of the growing need for frontier physics experiments to make use of frontier technology is in the field of artificial intelligence and related themes. This was reflected in the second international workshop on 'Software Engineering, Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems in High Energy and Nuclear Physics' which took place from 13-18 January at France Telecom's Agelonde site at La Londe des Maures, Provence. It was the second in a series, the first having been held at Lyon in 1990

  11. Assessment of bullae with high-resolution CT in patients with spontaneous pneumothorax: comparison with video-assisted thoracoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung Rae; Oh, Yu Whan; Noh, Hyung Jun; Cho, Kyu Ran; Lee, Ki Yeol; Kang, Eun Young; Kim, Jung Hyuk

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the findings on high-resolution CT (HRCT) of the chest with those on video-assisted thoracoscopy for the detection of bullae in patients who had undergone an operation for spontaneous pneumothorax, and we also wished to evaluate the relationship between the characteristics of bullae on HRCT and development of spontaneous pneumothorax. Fifty patients with spontaneous pneumothorax who had undergone both HRCT of the chest and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery were included in the study. Spontaneous pneumothoraces were classified as either primary or secondary pneumothorax, and as initial or recurrent pneumothorax. The HRCT scans were obtained with 1 mm slice thickness and a 5 mm scan interval. Two radiologists retrospectively compared the HRCT findings of the chest with those findings on video-assisted thoracoscopy for the detection of bullae, and they evaluated the value of HRCT for diagnosing bullae. In addition, we assessed the size and number of bullae in these patients, and we also evaluated the relationship between those findings of bullae and the development of spontaneous pneumothorax. Bullae were detected in 40 patients by using video-assisted thoracoscopy, and HRCT showed bullae in 38 of these patients. Bullae were not identified with video-assisted thoracoscopy in the remaining ten patients, and among these ten patients, bullae were not demonstrated by HRCT in eight of them. Therefore, the sensitivity and specificity of HRCT for the detection of bullae were 95% (38/40| and 80% (8/10), respectively. The average size of the bullae of the affected hemithorax and the contralateral un-affected hemithorax was 1.97 cm ± 2.30 and 1.24 cm±1.46, respectively. Pneumothorax was more frequently observed in the hemithorax with larger bullae (p 0.05). The average size of bullae in patients with secondary pneumothorax and those bullae of patients with primary pneumothorax was 4.44 cm±4.06 and 1.42 cm±1.26, respectively. The

  12. Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wash, Darrel Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Making a machine seem intelligent is not easy. As a consequence, demand has been rising for computer professionals skilled in artificial intelligence and is likely to continue to go up. These workers develop expert systems and solve the mysteries of machine vision, natural language processing, and neural networks. (Editor)

  13. Risk factors for severity of pneumothorax after CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsy using the single-needle method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakizawa, Hideaki; Toyota, Naoyuki; Hieda, Masashi; Hirai, Nobuhiko; Tachikake, Toshihiro; Matsuura, Noriaki; Oda, Miyo; Ito, Katsuhide

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the risk factors for the severity of pneumothorax after computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous lung biopsy using the single-needle method. We reviewed 91 biopsy procedures for 90 intrapulmonary lesions in 89 patients. Patient factors were age, sex, history of ipsilateral lung surgery and grade of emphysema. Lesion factors were size, location and pleural contact. Procedure factors were position, needle type, needle size, number of pleural punctures, pleural angle, length of needle passes in the aerated lung and number of harvesting samples. The severity of pneumothorax after biopsy was classified into 4 groups: "none", "mild", "moderate" and "severe". The risk factors for the severity of pneumothorax were determined by multivariate analyzing of the factors derived from univariate analysis. Pneumothorax occurred in 39 (43%) of the 91 procedures. Mild, moderate, and severe pneumothorax occurred in 24 (26%), 8 (9%) and 7 (8%) of all procedures, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that location, pleural contact, number of pleural punctures and number of harvesting samples were significantly associated with the severity of pneumothorax (p < 0.05). In conclusion, lower locations and non-pleural contact lesions, increased number of pleural punctures and increased number of harvesting samples presented a higher severity of pneumothorax.

  14. Risk factors for severity of pneumothorax after CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsy using the single-needle method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakizawa, Hideaki; Hieda, Masashi; Oda, Miyo; Toyota, Naoyuki; Hirai, Nobuhiko; Tachikake, Toshihiro; Matsuura, Noriaki; Ito, Katsuhide

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the risk factors for the severity of pneumothorax after computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous lung biopsy using the single-needle method. We reviewed 91 biopsy procedures for 90 intrapulmonary lesions in 89 patients. Patient factors were age, sex, history of ipsilateral lung surgery and grade of emphysema. Lesion factors were size, location and pleural contact. Procedure factors were position, needle type, needle size, number of pleural punctures, pleural angle, length of needle passes in the aerated lung and number of harvesting samples. The severity of pneumothorax after biopsy was classified into 4 groups: 'none', 'mild', 'moderate' and 'severe'. The risk factors for the severity of pneumothorax were determined by multivariate analyzing of the factors derived from univariate analysis. Pneumothorax occurred in 39 (43%) of the 91 procedures. Mild, moderate, and severe pneumothorax occurred in 24 (26%), 8 (9%) and 7 (8%) of all procedures, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that location, pleural contact, number of pleural punctures and number of harvesting samples were significantly associated with the severity of pneumothorax (p<0.05). In conclusion, lower locations and non-pleural contact lesions, increased number of pleural punctures and increased number of harvesting samples presented a higher severity of pneumothorax. (author)

  15. Delayed pneumothorax complicating minor rib fracture after chest trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Shian; Huang, Yao-Kuang; Liu, Yun-Hen; Liu, Hui-Ping; Kao, Chiung-Lun

    2008-06-01

    Pneumothorax (PTX) after trauma is a preventable cause of death. Drainage procedures such as chest tube insertion have been traditionally advocated to prevent fatal tension PTX. We evaluated the safety of close observation in patients with delayed PTX complicating rib fracture after minor chest trauma. Adult patients (>18 years) with a diagnosis of chest trauma and 3 or fewer fractured ribs were reviewed. Case patients were divided according to age, location and number of fractured ribs, mechanism of trauma, and initial pulmonary complication after thoracic trauma for comparative analysis. There were 207 male (70.2%) and 88 female (29.8%) patients whose ages ranged from 18 to 93 years (median, 55 years). The mechanisms of trauma were a motor vehicle accident in 207 patients, falls in 66, pedestrian injury in 10, and assaults in 14. Ninety-five patients sustained 1 rib fracture, 95 had 2 rib fractures, and 105 suffered 3 rib fractures. Right-sided injury occurred in 164 cases, left-sided injury did in 127, and bilateral injury did in 4. The most frequent location of rib fractures was from the fourth rib to the ninth rib. The initial pulmonary complications after trauma were PTX in 16 patients, hemothorax in 43, pneumohemothorax in 14, lung contusion in 75, and isolated subcutaneous emphysema (SubcEmph) in 33. Thirty percent of the patients (n = 5/16) who presented with traumatic PTX were observed safely without drainage. Delayed PTX was recorded in 16 patients, occurring mostly during the first 2 days of their admission. Associated extrathoracic injury was recorded in 189 patients. The mean hospital stay of the patients was 7.66 days. Longer hospital stay was related to increasing number of fractured ribs, need for thoracic drainage, and the presence of associated extrathoracic injury. The mortality rate for the entire group was 2%. The presence of SubcEmph was the only risk factor associated with the development of delayed PTX. Patients sustaining blunt chest

  16. Delayed pneumothorax after laparoscopic sigmoid colectomy in a patient without underlying lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richie K Huynh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present an unusual case of a delayed pneumothorax occurring approximately 72 h post-operatively in a patient without any underlying lung disease who had undergone laparoscopic sigmoid colon resection. The patient was in her mid-40s with a body mass index of 28.0 and had no history of smoking. Her spontaneous pneumothorax manifested without any precipitating events or complications during recovery. There was no evidence of any infectious process. There were no central line attempts and all ports were placed intra-peritoneally, and there was no evidence of any subcutaneous emphysema. One possible mechanism of injury that we propose is barotrauma from an extended period of time in Trendelenburg position. Notably, the only abnormal finding throughout the entire post-operative period preceding the delayed pneumothorax was a PO 2 desaturation the day before. This case highlights the necessity to examine and investigate any desaturation post-operatively and deliberate its possible significance. Furthermore, it demonstrates that, even during a normal recovery period for a patient without any underlying lung disease or risk factors, spontaneous pneumothorax could still develop in a delayed fashion multiple days post-operatively from a laparoscopic procedure.

  17. Micropower Impulse Radar: A Novel Technology for Rapid, Real-Time Detection of Pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip D. Levy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumothorax detection in emergency situations must be rapid and at the point of care. Current standards for detection of a pneumothorax are supine chest X-rays, ultrasound, and CT scans. Unfortunately these tools and the personnel necessary for their facile utilization may not be readily available in acute circumstances, particularly those which occur in the pre-hospital setting. The decision to treat therefore, is often made without adequate information. In this report, we describe a novel hand-held device that utilizes Micropower Impulse Radar to reliably detect the presence of a pneumothorax. The technology employs ultra wide band pulses over a frequency range of 500 MHz to 6 GHz and a proprietary algorithm analyzes return echoes to determine if a pneumothorax is present with no user interpretation required. The device has been evaluated in both trauma and surgical environments with sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 85%. It is has the CE Mark and is available for sale in Europe. Post market studies are planned starting in May of 2011. Clinical studies to support the FDA submission will be completed in the first quarter of 2012.

  18. Le pneumothorax spontané comme une manifestation évolutive de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Le pneumothorax spontané comme une manifestation évolutive de la polyarthrite rhumatoide: à propos d'une observation clinique et revue de la litterature. Magaye Gaye, Assane Ndiaye, Mouhamed Lamine Fall, Souleymane Diatta, Papa Adama Dieng, Papa Salmane Ba, Amadou Gabriel Ciss, Mouhamadou Ndiaye ...

  19. Pneumothorax complicating botulinum toxin injection in the body of a dilated oesophagus in achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusten, Bas L. A. M.; Samsom, Melvin; Smout, André J. P. M.

    2003-01-01

    Botulinum toxin is used for an increasing number of indications in the field of gastroenterology. We report a case in which injection of botulinum toxin in the dilated tubular oesophagus in a patient with achalasia was complicated by a pneumothorax necessitating suction drainage

  20. Emphysema and pneumothorax after percutaneous tracheostomy: case reports and an anatomic study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkers, B.G.; Veen, J.A. van; Kooloos, J.G.M.; Pickkers, P.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den; Hillen, B.; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2004-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: Part 1: To describe cases of emphysema (subcutaneous and/or mediastinal) and pneumothorax after percutaneous dilational tracheostomy (PDT) in a series of 326 patients, and to review the existing literature describing the incidence and possible mechanisms. Part 2: To analyze the

  1. Surgical management of spontaneous pneumothorax: are there any prognostic factors influencing postoperative complications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpy, Jean-Philippe; Pagès, Pierre-Benoit; Mordant, Pierre; Falcoz, Pierre-Emmanuel; Thomas, Pascal; Le Pimpec-Barthes, Francoise; Dahan, Marcel; Bernard, Alain

    2016-03-01

    There are no guidelines regarding the surgical approach for spontaneous pneumothorax. It has been reported, however, that the risk of recurrence following video-assisted thoracic surgery is higher than that following open thoracotomy (OT). The objective of this study was to determine whether this higher risk of recurrence following video-assisted thoracic surgery could be attributable to differences in intraoperative parenchymal resection and the pleurodesis technique. Data for 7647 patients operated on for primary or secondary spontaneous pneumothorax between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2012 were extracted from Epithor®, the French national database. The type of pleurodesis and parenchymal resection was collected. Outcomes were (i) bleeding, defined as postoperative pleural bleeding; (ii) pulmonary and pleural complications, defined as atelectasis, pneumonia, empyema, prolonged ventilation, acute respiratory distress syndrome and prolonged air leaks; (iii) in-hospital length of stay and (iv) recurrence, defined as chest drainage or surgery for a second pneumothorax. Of note, 6643 patients underwent videothoracoscopy and 1004 patients underwent OT. When compared with the thoracotomy group, the videothoracoscopy group was associated with more parenchymal resections (62.4 vs 80%, P = 0.01), fewer mechanical pleurodesis procedures (93 vs 77.5%, P pneumothorax, videothoracoscopy is associated with a higher rate of recurrence than OT. This difference might be attributable to differences in the pleurodesis technique rather than differences in the parenchymal resection. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  2. Pneumothorax in a Preterm Infant Monitored by Electrical Impedance Tomography: A Case Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, M.; Frerichs, I.; de Jongh, F. H. C.; van Veenendaal, M. B.; van Kaam, A. H.

    2011-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a noninvasive bedside tool for monitoring regional changes in ventilation. We report, for the first time, the EIT images of a ventilated preterm infant with a unilateral pneumothorax, showing a loss of regional ventilation in the affected lung during both

  3. Effect of Needle Aspiration of Pneumothorax on Subsequent Chest Drain Insertion in Newborns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Madeleine C; Heiring, Christian; Doglioni, Nicoletta

    2018-01-01

    Importance: Treatment options for a symptomatic pneumothorax in newborns include needle aspiration (NA) and chest drain (CD) insertion. There is little consensus as to the preferred treatment, reflecting a lack of evidence from clinical trials. Objective: To investigate whether treating pneumotho......Importance: Treatment options for a symptomatic pneumothorax in newborns include needle aspiration (NA) and chest drain (CD) insertion. There is little consensus as to the preferred treatment, reflecting a lack of evidence from clinical trials. Objective: To investigate whether treating...... was 5 tertiary European neonatal intensive care units. Infants receiving respiratory support (endotracheal ventilation, continuous positive airway pressure, or supplemental oxygen >40%) who had a pneumothorax on CR that clinicians deemed needed treatment were eligible for inclusion. Interventions...... was inserted if clinicians deemed that the response was inadequate. For CD insertion, a drain was inserted between the ribs and was left in situ. Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was whether a CD was inserted on the side of the pneumothorax within 6 hours of diagnosis. Results: A total of 76...

  4. [Gas tamponade following intraoperative pneumothorax on a single lung: A case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Jaouhari, S D; Mamane Nassirou, O; Meziane, M; Bensghir, M; Haimeur, C

    2017-04-01

    Intraoperative pneumothorax is a rare complication with a high risk of cardiorespiratory arrest by gas tamponade especially on a single lung. We report the case of a female patient aged 53 years who benefited from a left pneumonectomy on pulmonary tuberculosis sequelae. The patient presented early postoperative anemia with a left hemothorax requiring an emergency thoracotomy. In perioperative, the patient had a gas tamponade following a pneumothorax of the remaining lung, and the fate has been avoided by an exsufflation. Intraoperative pneumothorax can occur due to lesions of the tracheobronchial airway, of the brachial plexus, the placement of a central venous catheter or barotrauma. The diagnosis of pneumothorax during unipulmonary ventilation is posed by the sudden onset of hypoxia associated with increased airway pressures and hypercapnia. The immediate life-saving procedure involves fine needle exsufflation before the placement of a chest tube. Prevention involves reducing the risk of barotrauma by infusing patients with low flow volumes and the proper use of positive airway pressure, knowing that despite protective ventilation, barotraumas risk still exists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Pneumothorax following ERCP: Report of four cases and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Schepers (Nicolien); H.R. van Buuren (Henk)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe report four patients with pneumothorax as a complication of ERCP with sphincterotomy. With conservative treatment all patients recovered. Previously, 16 comparable cases have been reported in the literature. The main risk factor for this rare complication seems (pre-cut)

  6. Management approach for recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax in consecutive pregnancies based on clinical and radiographic findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixson George R

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To describe management and clinical features observed in a patient's seven spontaneous pneumothoraces that developed during two consecutive pregnancies involving both hemithoraces. Materials and methods A 21 year old former smoker developed three spontaneous left pneumothoraces in the index pregnancy, having already experienced four right pneumothorax events in a prior pregnancy at age 19. Results Chest tubes were required in several (but not all hospitalizations during these two pregnancies. Following her fourth right pneumothorax, thoracoscopic excision of right apical lung blebs and mechanical pleurodesis was performed. The series of left pneumothoraces culminated in mini-thoracotomy and thoracoscopically directed mechanical pleurodesis. For both pregnancies unassisted vaginal delivery was performed with no adverse perinatal sequelae. With the exception of multiple pneumothoraces, there were no additional pregnancy complications. Conclusion Spontaneous pneumothorax in pregnancy is believed to be a rare phenomenon, yet the exact incidence is unknown. Here we present the first known case of multiple spontaneous pneumothoraces in two consecutive pregnancies involving both hemithoraces. Clinical management coordinated with obstetrics and surgical teams facilitated a satisfactory outcome for both pregnancies. The diagnosis of pneumothorax should be contemplated in any pregnant patient with dyspnea and chest pain, followed by radiographic confirmation.

  7. Pneumothorax monitoring by remittance measurement: Comparison between experimental model and animal studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, J. F.; Menovsky, T.; van Straaten, H. L.; Sterenborg, H. J.; Koppe, J. G.; van Gemert, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    Pneumothorax monitoring by remittance measurement in neonatology is investigated using model experiments. The results are compared to previous animal experiments. A multifibre probe is used to measure the change in remittance at 632.8 nm and 790 nm as a function of the thickness of a layer of air

  8. Localized air foci in the lower thorax in the patients with pneumothorax: skip pneumothoraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Naoya; Kiguchi, Takao; Shiotani, Motoi; Maeda, Haruo

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the characteristics and imaging features of localized air foci in the lower thorax in patients with pneumothorax using thin-section multidetector computed tomography. Of 10,547 consecutive CT examinations comprising the chest, the CT scans of 146 patients with ordinary pneumothoraces were identified and retrospectively evaluated. The study group included 110 male and 36 female patients (mean age, 50 years; range, 1-93 years). All examinations were performed at our institution between January 2009 and December 2009. Cause of pneumothorax was classified as traumatic or non-traumatic. Localized air foci in the lower thorax were defined as being localized air collections in the lower thorax that did not appear to be adjacent to the lung. If these criteria were met, the shape, size, location laterality, and number of foci were evaluated. Associations with trauma, sex, severity of the pneumothorax, and laterality were evaluated using the χ(2) test. All P values pneumothorax commonly had localized air foci in the lower thorax. Because such foci can mimic pneumoperitoneum, accurate recognition of them is required to avoid confusion with free intraperitoneal air, especially in traumatic cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical manifestations of tension pneumothorax: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Although health care providers utilize classically described signs and symptoms to diagnose tension pneumothorax, available literature sources differ in their descriptions of its clinical manifestations. Moreover, while the clinical manifestations of tension pneumothorax have been suggested to differ among subjects of varying respiratory status, it remains unknown if these differences are supported by clinical evidence. Thus, the primary objective of this study is to systematically describe and contrast the clinical manifestations of tension pneumothorax among patients receiving positive pressure ventilation versus those who are breathing unassisted. Methods/Design We will search electronic bibliographic databases (MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews) and clinical trial registries from their first available date as well as personal files, identified review articles, and included article bibliographies. Two investigators will independently screen identified article titles and abstracts and select observational (cohort, case–control, and cross-sectional) studies and case reports and series that report original data on clinical manifestations of tension pneumothorax. These investigators will also independently assess risk of bias and extract data. Identified data on the clinical manifestations of tension pneumothorax will be stratified according to whether adult or pediatric study patients were receiving positive pressure ventilation or were breathing unassisted, as well as whether the two investigators independently agreed that the clinical condition of the study patient(s) aligned with a previously published tension pneumothorax working definition. These data will then be summarized using a formal narrative synthesis alongside a meta-analysis of observational studies and then case reports and series where possible. Pooled or combined estimates of the occurrence rate of clinical manifestations will be calculated using

  10. Artificial Consciousness or Artificial Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spanache Florin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Artificial intelligence is a tool designed by people for the gratification of their own creative ego, so we can not confuse conscience with intelligence and not even intelligence in its human representation with conscience. They are all different concepts and they have different uses. Philosophically, there are differences between autonomous people and automatic artificial intelligence. This is the difference between intelligence and artificial intelligence, autonomous versus automatic. But conscience is above these differences because it is neither conditioned by the self-preservation of autonomy, because a conscience is something that you use to help your neighbor, nor automatic, because one’s conscience is tested by situations which are not similar or subject to routine. So, artificial intelligence is only in science-fiction literature similar to an autonomous conscience-endowed being. In real life, religion with its notions of redemption, sin, expiation, confession and communion will not have any meaning for a machine which cannot make a mistake on its own.

  11. Time-dependent analysis of incidence, risk factors and clinical significance of pneumothorax after percutaneous lung biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Woo Hyeon; Park, Chang Min; Yoon, Soon Ho; Lim, Hyun-Ju; Hwang, Eui Jin; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Goo, Jin Mo

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate the time-dependent incidence, risk factors and clinical significance of percutaneous lung biopsy (PLB)-related pneumothorax. From January 2012-November 2015, 3,251 patients underwent 3,354 cone-beam CT-guided PLBs for lung lesions. Cox, logistic and linear regression analyses were performed to identify time-dependent risk factors of PLB-related pneumothorax, risk factors of drainage catheter insertion and those of prolonged catheter placement, respectively. Pneumothorax occurred in 915/3,354 PLBs (27.3 %), with 230/915 (25.1 %) occurring during follow-ups. Risk factors for earlier occurrence of PLB-related pneumothorax include emphysema (HR=1.624), smaller target (HR=0.922), deeper location (HR=1.175) and longer puncture time (HR=1.036), while haemoptysis (HR=0.503) showed a protective effect against earlier development of pneumothorax. Seventy-five cases (8.2 %) underwent chest catheter placement. Mean duration of catheter placement was 3.2±2.0 days. Emphysema (odds ratio [OR]=2.400) and longer puncture time (OR=1.053) were assessed as significant risk factors for catheter insertion, and older age (parameter estimate=1.014) was a predictive factor for prolonged catheter placement. PLB-related pneumothorax occurred in 27.3 %, of which 25.1 % developed during follow-ups. Smaller target size, emphysema, deeply-located lesions were significant risk factors of PLB-related pneumothorax. Emphysema and older age were related to drainage catheter insertion and prolonged catheter placement, respectively. • One-fourth of percutaneous lung biopsy (PLB)-related pneumothorax occurs during follow-up. • Smaller, deeply-located target and emphysema lead to early occurrence of pneumothorax. • Emphysema is related to drainage catheter insertion for PLB-related pneumothorax. • Older age may lead to prolonged catheter placement for PLB-related pneumothorax. • Tailored management can be possible with time-dependent information of PLB-related pneumothorax.

  12. Digital Genesis: Computers, Evolution and Artificial Life

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Tim; Dorin, Alan; Korb, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The application of evolution in the digital realm, with the goal of creating artificial intelligence and artificial life, has a history as long as that of the digital computer itself. We illustrate the intertwined history of these ideas, starting with the early theoretical work of John von Neumann and the pioneering experimental work of Nils Aall Barricelli. We argue that evolutionary thinking and artificial life will continue to play an integral role in the future development of the digital ...

  13. Outcomes of the Tower Crane Technique with a 15-mm Trocar in Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yooyoung Chong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS pulmonary wedge resection has emerged as the standard treatment for primary spontaneous pneumothorax. Recently, single-port VATS has been introduced and is now widely performed. This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of the Tower crane technique as novel technique using a 15-mm trocar and anchoring suture in primary spontaneous pneumothorax. Methods: Patients who underwent single- port VATS wedge resection in Chungnam National University Hospital from April 2012 to March 2014 were enrolled. The medical records of the enrolled patients were reviewed retrospectively. Results: A total of 1,251 patients were diagnosed with pneumothorax during this period, 270 of whom underwent VATS wedge resection. Fifty-two of those operations were single-port VATS wedge resections for primary spontaneous pneumothorax performed by a single surgeon. The median age of the patients was 19.3±11.5 years old, and 43 of the patients were male. The median duration of chest tube drainage following the operation was 2.3±1.3 days, and mean postoperative hospital stay was 3.2±1.3 days. Prolonged air leakage for more than three days following the operation was observed in one patient. The mean duration of follow-up was 18.7±6.1 months, with a recurrence rate of 3.8%. Conclusion: The tower crane technique with a 15-mm trocar may be a promising treatment modality for patients presenting with primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

  14. Do atmospheric conditions influence the first episode of primary spontaneous pneumothorax?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyndrickx, Maxime; Le Rochais, Jean-Philippe; Icard, Philippe; Cantat, Olivier; Zalcman, Gérard

    2015-09-01

    Several studies suggest that changes in airway pressure may influence the onset of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP). The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of atmospheric changes on the onset of the first episode of PSP. We retrospectively analysed cases of pneumothorax admitted to our department between 1 January 2009 and 31 October 2013. Patients with recurrent pneumothorax, traumatic pneumothorax, older than 35 years or presenting history of underlying pulmonary disease were excluded. Meteorological data were collected from the Météo-France archives. Variation (Δ) of mean atmospheric pressure, and relative humidity, were calculated for each day between the day at which symptoms began (D-day), the day before first symptoms (D-1), 2 days before the first symptoms (D-2) and 3 days before the first symptoms (D-3). Six hundred and thirty-eight cases of pneumothorax were observed during the period of this study; 106 of them (16.6%) were a first episode of PSP. We did not observe any significant differences between days with or without PSP admission for any of the weather parameters that we tested. We could not find any thresholds in the variation of atmospheric pressure that could be used to determine the probability of PSP occurrence. Variation of atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, rainfall, wind speed and temperature were not significantly related to the onset of the first episode of PSP in healthy patients. These results suggest that the scientific community should focus on other possible aetiological factors than airway pressure modifications. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  15. Perinatal risk factors for pneumothorax and morbidity and mortality in very low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Muñoz Rodrigo, Fermín; Urquía Martí, Lourdes; Galán Henríquez, Gloria; Rivero Rodríguez, Sonia; Tejera Carreño, Patricia; Molo Amorós, Silvia; Cabrera Vega, Pedro; Rodríguez Ramón, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    To determine the perinatal risk factors for pneumothorax in Very-Low-Birth-Weight (VLBW) infants and the associated morbidity and mortality in this population. Retrospective analysis of data collected prospectively from a cohort of VLBW neonates assisted in our Unit (2006-2013). We included all consecutive in-born patients with ≤ 1500 g, without severe congenital anomalies. Perinatal history, demographics, interventions and clinical outcomes were collected. Associations were evaluated by logistic regression analysis. During the study period, 803 VLBW infants were assisted in our Unit, of whom 763 were inborn. Ten patients (1.2%) died in delivery room, and 18 (2.2%) with major congenital anomalies were excluded. Finally, 735 (91.5%) neonates were included in the study. Seventeen (2.3%) developed pneumothorax during the first week of life [median (IQR): 2 (1-2) days]. After correcting for GA and other confounders, prolonged rupture of membranes [aOR =1.002 (95% CI 1.000-1.003); p = 0.040] and surfactant administration [aOR = 6.281 (95% CI 1.688-23.373); p = 0.006] were the independent risk factors associated with pneumothorax. Patients with pneumothorax had lower probabilities of survival without major brain damage (MBD): aOR = 0.283 (95% CI = 0.095-0.879); p = 0.029. Pneumothorax in VLBW seems to be related to perinatal inflammation and surfactant administration, and it is significantly associated with a reduction in the probabilities of survival without MBD.

  16. Analysis of the factors associated with radiofrequency ablation-induced pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillams, A.R.; Lees, W.R.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To define the characteristics most likely to result in radiofrequency ablation (RFA)-induced pneumothorax. Methods and materials: CT-guided RFA was performed in 79 tumours in 55 lungs in 37 patients, 16 were women, mean age 62 years (range 34-83). Three had primary lung cancer, 34 had metastases. The number, size, and location of tumours, electrode type, treatment parameters, length of electrode trajectory through aerated lung, background emphysema, prior interventions, and use of positive-pressure ventilation were analysed. The size, timing of any pneumothoraces, and intervention were recorded. Results: Pneumothorax occurred in 21 of the 25 lungs treated (38%), 18 immediate and three delayed. Seventeen of the 21 (81%) occupied less than 30% of the hemithorax, whereas in four cases >31% was involved. Eight of the 55 (15%) pneumothoraces required aspiration. The length of the electrode trajectory through aerated lung in those who developed a pneumothorax was 5.4 ± 4.7 cm versus 1.9 ± 2.7 in those who did not (p = 0.001). The mean number of tumours ablated was higher in the pneumothorax group, 1.7 ± 1 versus 1.3 ± 0.6 (p = 0.03), as was the number of electrode positions, 6 ± 3.9 versus 3.6 ± 2.2 (p = 0.01). On multivariate analysis only the needle trajectory through aerated lung was significant (p = 0.04). Conclusions: The number of tumours, electrode positions, and the anticipated electrode trajectory through aerated lung impacts on the likelihood of a pneumothorax. These considerations should be factored into patient selection, the choice of approach, and trajectory used in RFA

  17. Randomized clinical trial of pigtail catheter versus chest tube in injured patients with uncomplicated traumatic pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulvatunyou, N; Erickson, L; Vijayasekaran, A; Gries, L; Joseph, B; Friese, R F; O'Keeffe, T; Tang, A L; Wynne, J L; Rhee, P

    2014-01-01

    Small pigtail catheters appear to work as well as the traditional large-bore chest tubes in patients with traumatic pneumothorax, but it is not known whether the smaller pigtail catheters are associated with less tube-site pain. This study was conducted to compare tube-site pain following pigtail catheter or chest tube insertion in patients with uncomplicated traumatic pneumothorax. This prospective randomized trial compared 14-Fr pigtail catheters and 28-Fr chest tubes in patients with traumatic pneumothorax presenting to a level I trauma centre from July 2010 to February 2012. Patients who required emergency tube placement, those who refused and those who could not respond to pain assessment were excluded. Primary outcomes were tube-site pain, as assessed by a numerical rating scale, and total pain medication use. Secondary outcomes included the success rate of pneumothorax resolution and insertion-related complications. Forty patients were enrolled. Baseline characteristics of 20 patients in the pigtail catheter group were similar to those of 20 patients in the chest tube group. No patient had a flail chest or haemothorax. Pain scores related to chest wall trauma were similar in the two groups. Patients with a pigtail catheter had significantly lower mean(s.d.) tube-site pain scores than those with a chest tube, at baseline after tube insertion (3.2(0.6) versus 7.7(0.6); P pneumothorax, use of a 14-Fr pigtail catheter is associated with reduced pain at the site of insertion, with no other clinically important differences noted compared with chest tubes. NCT01537289 (http://clinicaltrials.gov). © 2013 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Should bedside sonography be used first to diagnose pneumothorax secondary to blunt trauma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donmez, Halil; Tokmak, Turgut Tursem; Yildirim, Afra; Buyukoglan, Hakan; Ozturk, Mehmet; Yaşar Ayaz, Umit; Mavili, Ertugrul

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND.: Our purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of bedside sonography (US) in the detection of pneumothorax secondary to blunt thoracic trauma. METHODS.: In this prospective study, 240 hemithoraces of 120 consecutive patients with multiple trauma were evaluated with chest radiographs (CXR) and bedside thoracic US for the diagnosis of pneumothorax. CT examinations were performed in 68 patients. Fifty-two patients who did not undergo CT examinations were excluded from the study. US examinations were performed independently at bedside by two radiologists who were not informed about CXR and CT findings. CXRs were interpreted by two radiologists who were unaware of the US and CT results. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of CXR and US were calculated. RESULTS.: One hundred thirty-six hemithoraces were assessed in 68 patients. A total of 35 pneumothoraces were detected in 33 patients. On US, the diagnosis of pneumothorax was correct in 32 hemithoraces. In 98 hemithoraces without pneumothorax, US was normal. With US examination, there were three false-positive and three false-negative results. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and overall accuracy of US were 91.4%, 97%, 91.4%, 97%, and 97%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of CXR were 82.7%, 89.7%, 68.5%, 95%, and 89.5%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS.: Bedside thoracic US is an accurate method that can be used in trauma patients instead of CXR for the detection of pneumothorax. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Non-Invasive Pneumothorax Detector Final Report CRADA No. TC02110.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, J. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Purcell, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-29

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and ElectroSonics Medical Inc. (formerly known as BIOMEC, Inc.), to develop a non-invasive pneumothorax detector based upon the micropower impulse radar technology invented at LLNL. Under a Work for Others Subcontract (L-9248), LLNL and ElectroSonics successfully demonstrated the feasibility of a novel device for non-invasive detection of pneumothorax for emergency and long-term monitoring. The device is based on Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) Ultra Wideband (UWB) technology. Phase I experimental results were promising, showing that a pneumothorax volume even as small as 30 ml was clearly detectable from the MIR signals. Phase I results contributed to the award of a National Institute of Health (NIH) SBIR Phase II grant to support further research and development. The Phase II award led to the establishment of a LLNL/ElectroSonics CRADA related to Case No. TC02045.0. Under the subsequent CRADA, LLNL and ElectroSonics successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the pneumothorax detection in human subject research trials. Under this current CRADA TC02110.0, also referred to as Phase II Type II, the project scope consisted of seven tasks in Project Year 1; five tasks in Project Year 2; and four tasks in Project Year 3. Year 1 tasks were aimed toward the delivery of the pneumothorax detector design package for the pre-production of the miniaturized CompactFlash dockable version of the system. The tasks in Project Years 2 and 3 critically depended upon the accomplishments of Task 1. Since LLNL’s task was to provide subject matter expertise and performance verification, much of the timeline of engagement by the LLNL staff depended upon the overall project milestones as determined by the lead organization ElectroSonics. The scope of efforts were subsequently adjusted accordingly to commensurate with funding

  20. Artificial Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David R; Palacios-González, César; Harris, John

    2016-04-01

    It seems natural to think that the same prudential and ethical reasons for mutual respect and tolerance that one has vis-à-vis other human persons would hold toward newly encountered paradigmatic but nonhuman biological persons. One also tends to think that they would have similar reasons for treating we humans as creatures that count morally in our own right. This line of thought transcends biological boundaries-namely, with regard to artificially (super)intelligent persons-but is this a safe assumption? The issue concerns ultimate moral significance: the significance possessed by human persons, persons from other planets, and hypothetical nonorganic persons in the form of artificial intelligence (AI). This article investigates why our possible relations to AI persons could be more complicated than they first might appear, given that they might possess a radically different nature to us, to the point that civilized or peaceful coexistence in a determinate geographical space could be impossible to achieve.

  1. Artificial intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Duda, Antonín

    2009-01-01

    Abstract : Issue of this work is to acquaint the reader with the history of artificial inteligence, esspecialy branch of chess computing. Main attention is given to progress from fifties to the present. The work also deals with fighting chess programs against each other, and against human opponents. The greatest attention is focused on 1997 and duel Garry Kasparov against chess program Deep Blue. The work is divided into chapters according to chronological order.

  2. Artificial heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-18

    Super-pure plutonium-238 could use heat produced during fission to power an implanted artificial heart. Three model hearts have worked for some time. Concern that excess heat would make the procedure unsafe for humans has broadened the search for another energy source, such as electrohydraulic drive or an external power battery. A back pack approach may provide an interim solution until materials are developed which can withstand heart activity and be small enough for implantation.

  3. Computed tomography or necropsy diagnosis of multiple bullae and the treatment of pneumothorax in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Min; Han, Sungyoung; Shin, Jun-Seop; Min, Byoung-Hoon; Jeong, Won Young; Lee, Ga Eul; Kim, Min Sun; Kim, Ju Eun; Chung, Hyunwoo; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2017-10-01

    Pulmonary bullae and pneumothorax have various etiologies in veterinary medicine. We diagnosed multiple pulmonary bullae combined with or without pneumothorax by computed tomography (CT) or necropsy in seven rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) imported from China. Two of seven rhesus macaques accompanied by pneumothorax were cured by fixation of ruptured lung through left or right 3rd intercostal thoracotomy. Pneumonyssus simicola, one of the etiologies of pulmonary bullae, was not detected from tracheobronchiolar lavage. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report on the CT-aided diagnosis of pulmonary bullae and the successful treatment of combined pneumothorax by thoracotomy in non-human primates (NHPs). © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Expert Statement : Pneumothorax Associated with Endoscopic Valve Therapy for Emphysema - Potential Mechanisms, Treatment Algorithm, and Case Examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valipour, Arschang; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; de Oliveira, Hugo G.; Eberhardt, Ralf; Freitag, Lutz; Criner, Gerard J.; Herth, Felix J. F.

    2014-01-01

    The use of endoscopically placed unidirectional valves for the treatment of emphysema is increasing. With better patient selection, there is also an increased likelihood of complications associated with the procedure, such as postprocedural pneumothorax. There is, however, little evidence of

  5. Large pneumothorax in blunt chest trauma: Is a chest drain always necessary in stable patients? A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baig M. Idris

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Blunt traumatic large pneumothorax in a clinically stable patient can be managed conservatively. Current recommendations for tube placement may need to be reevaluated. This may reduce morbidity associated with chest tube thoracostomy.

  6. Small-bore chest tubes seem to perform better than larger tubes in treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iepsen, Ulrik Winning; Ringbæk, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and complications of surgical (large-bore) chest tube drainage with smaller and less invasive chest tubes in the treatment of non-traumatic pneumothorax (PT). ......The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and complications of surgical (large-bore) chest tube drainage with smaller and less invasive chest tubes in the treatment of non-traumatic pneumothorax (PT). ...

  7. Artificial graphites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maire, J.

    1984-01-01

    Artificial graphites are obtained by agglomeration of carbon powders with an organic binder, then by carbonisation at 1000 0 C and graphitization at 2800 0 C. After description of the processes and products, we show how the properties of the various materials lead to the various uses. Using graphite enables us to solve some problems, but it is not sufficient to satisfy all the need of the application. New carbonaceous material open application range. Finally, if some products are becoming obsolete, other ones are being developed in new applications [fr

  8. Clinical assessment compared with chest X-Ray after removal of chest tube to diagnose pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeed, F. A.; Noor, Q. U. H.; Mehmood, U.; Imtiaz, T.; Zafar, U.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical judgment in ruling out pneumothorax during the removal of the chest tube by auscultating the chest before removal and after the extubation of the chest tube in comparison to x ray radiological results. Study Design: Descriptive cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Lahore Pakistan, from August 2015 to March 2016. Material and Methods: A sample size of 100 was calculated. Patients were selected via non probability purposive sampling. Children under 14 years were not included. The patients with mal-positioned chest tube, surgical site infection, air leak and the patients with more than one chest tube on one side were excluded. A proforma was made and filled by one person. Chest tubes were removed by two trained senior registrars according to a protocol devised. It was ensured that there was no air leak present before removal clinically and radiologically. Another chest x-ray was done within 24 hours of extubation to detect any pathology that might have occurred during the process. Any complication in the patient clinically was observed till the x-ray film became available. Two sets of readings were obtained. Set A included auscultation findings and set B included x ray results. Results: Out of 100 patients, 60 (60 percent) were males and 40 (40 percent) females. The ages of the patients ranged between 17-77 years. Mean age of the patient was 43.27 ± 17.05 years. In set A out of 100 (100 percent) no pneumothorax developed clinically. In set B out of 100 patients 99 (99 percent) showed no pneumothorax on chest x ray, only 1 (1 percent) showed pneumothorax which was not significant (less than 15 percent on X ray). However, the patient remained asymptomatic clinically and there was no need of reinsertion of the chest tube. Conclusion: Auscultatory findings in diagnosing a significant pneumothorax are justified. Hence, if the chest tube is removed according to the protocol, clinically by

  9. Catamenial pneumothorax: a rare entity? Report of 5 cases and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visouli, Aikaterini N.; Darwiche, Kaid; Mpakas, Andreas; Papagiannis, Antonios; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Stylianaki, Aikaterini; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Courcoutsakis, Nicolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Objective Spontaneous recurrent pneumothorax during menstruation is reported as catamenial pneumothorax. It is encountered in 3-6% of spontaneous pneumothorax cases among menstruating women. The percentage among women referred for surgery is significantly higher (25-30%). Although it usually involves the right-side (85-95%) it can be left-sided or bilateral. It is associated with diaphragmatic perforations and/or thoracic endometriosis. There is pelvic endometriosis in up to 30-51% of cases. The lesions that are not always found may present as small or larger holes at the central tendon of the diaphragm, as red, blueberry, brown spots or larger nodules at the diaphragm, the visceral or parietal pleura. Lesion histology may reveal endometriosis. We present 5 cases of catamenial pneumothorax treated surgically during the last 6 years. Patients and methods Five women, with a mean age of 34+/-9.9 years (median 38, range, 19-45 years) presented with right-sided recurrent catamenial pneumothorax. In 3 patients diaphragmatic perforation(s) were found; perforation suturing (n=1), and diaphragmatic plication reinforced with bovine pericardial patch (n=1) were performed. All patients underwent atypical resection of upper and/or middle lobe segments of lung parenchyma that appeared abnormal (haemorrhagic/emphysematous or blebs). Four patients underwent pleurodesis and 1 patient underwent pleurectomy. Four interventions were performed through video assisted thoracoscopic surgery, while diaphragmatic plication was performed through a video assisted mini-thoracotomy. Histology did not reveal endometriosis tissue. Results The postoperative course was uneventful. The patients were extubated in theatre and were discharged home at a mean of 7+/-4 days (median 6 days, range, 4-14 days). Two of them received hormonal therapy [Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) analogue] postoperatively. At a follow-up of 14.16 patient-years (mean 2.83+/-1.08 years, range, 1.33-3.83 years) there was

  10. Apex-to-Cupola Distance Following VATS Predicts Recurrence in Patients With Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jia-Ming; Lai, Wu-Wei; Yen, Yi-Ting; Tseng, Yau-Lin; Chen, Ying-Yuan; Wu, Ming-Ho; Chen, Wei; Light, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Our study sought to determine whether the size of the residual apical pleural space in young patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) following video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is associated with the risk of recurrence. We retrospectively reviewed patients (≤30 years’ old) with primary spontaneous pneumothorax following thoracoscopic surgery (2002–2010) in a university-affiliated hospital. The size of residual apical pleural space was estimated by measuring the apex-to-cupola distance on a postoperative chest radiograph at 2 time windows: first between postoperative day (POD) 0 and 3, and second between POD 4 and 14. A total of 149 patients were enrolled with a median follow-up of 11.2 months (interquartile range, 0.95–29.5 months), of whom 141 (94.6%) were male with a mean age of 20 years. The postoperative recurrence rate was 11.4%. Comparing the characteristics between the patients with and without recurrent pneumothorax, the patients with recurrence were younger (18.2 + 2.4 vs 20.7 + 3.7 years, P = 0.008), with a lower rate of pleurodesis (35% vs1 69%, P = 0.037), longer apex-to-cupola distance at POD 0 to 3 (22.41 ± 19.56 vs 10.07 ± 10.83 mm, P pneumothorax, age 10 mm (P = 0.027, OR: 5.319), and no pleurodesis during VATS (P = 0.022, OR: 5.042) were independent risk factors for recurrent pneumothorax. The recurrence rate was not low (11.4%) in young patients with PSP following VATS. Residual apical pleural space with apex-to-cupola distance of 10 mm or greater at POD 0 to 3, younger age, and no pleurodesis would increase postoperative recurrence of primary spontaneous pneumothorax. PMID:26376396

  11. Incidence of iatrogenic pneumothorax in the United States in teaching vs. non-teaching hospitals from 2000 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Jason; Seifi, Ali

    2016-08-01

    Iatrogenic pneumothorax is a patient safety indicator (PSI) representing a complication of procedures such as transthoracic needle aspiration, subclavicular needle stick, thoracentesis, transbronchial biopsy, pleural biopsy, and positive pressure ventilation. This study examined whether there was a significant difference in rate of iatrogenic pneumothorax in teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals from 2000 to 2012. We performed a retrospective cohort study on iatrogenic pneumothorax incidence from 2000 to 2012 using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) database. Pairwise t tests were performed. Odds ratios and P values were calculated, using a Bonferroni-adjusted α threshold, to examine differences in iatrogenic pneumothorax incidence in teaching vs. non-teaching hospitals. Our study revealed that after the year 2000, teaching hospitals had significantly greater iatrogenic pneumothorax incidence compared to non-teaching hospitals in every year of the study period (Ppneumothorax occurred with significantly greater incidence in teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals from 2000 to 2012. This trend may have been enhanced by the residency duty-hour regulations implemented in 2003 in teaching institutions, or due to higher rates of procedures in teaching institutions due to the nature of a tertiary center. Iatrogenic pneumothorax was more prevalent in teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals after the year 2000. Further randomized control studies are warranted to evaluate the etiology of this finding. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Polymeric membrane materials for artificial organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Hiroyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Many polymeric materials have already been used in the field of artificial organs. However, the materials used in artificial organs are not necessarily created with the best material selectivity and materials design; therefore, the development of synthesized polymeric membrane materials for artificial organs based on well-defined designs is required. The approaches to the development of biocompatible polymeric materials fall into three categories: (1) control of physicochemical characteristics on material surfaces, (2) modification of material surfaces using biomolecules, and (3) construction of biomimetic membrane surfaces. This review will describe current issues regarding polymeric membrane materials for use in artificial organs.

  13. Bilateral tension pneumothorax resulting from a bicycle-to-bicycle collision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin, Frank; Sereboe, Lawrence; Tettey, Mark Mawutor; Aniteye, Ernest; Bankah, Patrick; Frimpong-Boateng, Kwabena

    2009-01-01

    Bilateral tension pneumothorax occurring as a result of recreational activity is exceedingly rare. A 10-year-old boy with no previous respiratory symptoms was involved in a bicycle-to-bicycle collision during play. He was the only one hurt. A few hours later, he was rushed to the general casualty unit of the emergency department of our institution with respiratory distress, diminished bilateral chest excursions and diminished breath sounds. The correct diagnosis was made after a chest radiograph was obtained in the course of resuscitation at the casualty unit. Pleural space needle decompression was suggestive of tension only on the right. Bilateral tube thoracostomies provided effective relief. He was discharged from hospital after a week in excellent health. This case illustrates the need for children to have safety instruction to reduce the risks of recreational bicycling. Chest radiography may be needed to establish the diagnosis of bilateral tension pneumothorax. Needle thoracostomy decompression is not always effective.

  14. Ipsilateral reexpansion pulmonary edema after drainage of a spontaneous pneumothorax: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conen Anna

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a case of ipsilateral reexpansion pulmonary edema occurring after the insertion of a chest tube in a patient with spontaneous pneumothorax. The patient received supplemental oxygen via a non-rebreather face mask to compensate for hypoxemia. 24 hours after the acute event, the patient recovered completely without residual hypoxemia. Reexpansion pulmonary edema after the insertion of a thoracic drainage for pneumothorax or pleural effusion is a rare complication with a high mortality rate up to 20%. It should be considered in case of hypoxemia following the insertion of a chest tube. The exact pathophysiology leading to this complication is not known. Risk factors for reexpansion pulmonary edema should be evaluated and considered prior to the insertion of chest tubes. Treatment is supportive.

  15. Spontaneous Pneumothorax in Birt-Hogg-Dube' Syndrome: Two Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hyoung Ju; Woo, Ok Hee; Yong, Hwan Seok; Kang, Eun Young; Kim, Hyun Koo; Choi, Young Ho; Shin, Bong Kyung; Kim, Yoon Kyung [Korea University School of Medicine, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    Birt-Hogg-Dube'(BHD) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder that is characterized by skin fibrofolliculomas, renal tumors and multiple lung cysts with or without spontaneous pneumothorax. The disease is caused by germline mutations in the FLCN gene that codes for a protein of unknown function called folliculin. Patients with BHD syndrome do not always have all three manifestations of the skin, kidney and lung. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no case report of the radiologic findings of the lung manifestation in a patient with BHD syndrome in Korea. We report here on two cases of BHD syndrome that presented with spontaneous pneumothorax. The pulmonary abnormalities consisted of multiple thin-walled cysts of various sizes and shapes in both lungs

  16. Catamenial pneumothorax revealing diaphragmatic endometriosis: a case report and revue of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aissa, Sana; Benzarti, Wafa; Alimi, Faouzi; Gargouri, Imen; Salem, Halima Ben; Aissa, Amène; Fathallah, Khadija; Abdelkade, Atef Ben; Alouini, Rafika; Garrouche, Abdelhamid; Hayoun, Abdelaziz; Abdelghani, Ahmed; Benzarti, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Catamenial pneumothorax (CP) is a rare entity of spontaneous, recurring pneumothorax in women. We aim to discuss the etiology, clinical course, and surgical treatment of a 42-year-old woman with CP. This patient had a right-sided spontaneous pneumothoraces occurred one week after menses. She had under-gone video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) because of a persistent air leak under chest tube. VATS revealed multiple diaphragmatic fenestrations with an upper right nodule. Defects were removed and a large part of the diaphragm was resected. Pleural abrasion was then performed over the diaphragm. Diaphragmatic endometriosis was confirmed by microscopic examination. Medical treatment with GnRH agonists was prescribed, and after recovery, the patient has been symptoms free for 20 months.

  17. A case report of displaced anterior junction line mimicking pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Yang Hyun; Sung, Dong Wook; Hong, Hyun Pyo; Yoon, Yup; Lee, Eil Seong

    1998-01-01

    On PA chest radiography, the anterior junction line (AJL) is seen to project from the upper right to the lower left of the upper third of the body of the sternum and represents the visceral and parietal pleura of each lung and a small quantity of mediastinal fat. In a patient with volume loss or expansion of a hemithorax, the AJL shows considerable shift and on PA chest radiography may mimic pneumothroax, the AJL shows considerable shift and on PA chest radiography may mimic pneumothorax or pneumomediastimum. In such cases, widening and hyperlucency of the retrosternal space, seen on lateral view, which represents herniated lung with a shift of AJL, may be helpful for differentiation from pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum. (author). 8 refs., 2 figs

  18. Trauma-induced "Macklin effect" with pneumothorax and large pneumomediastinum, disguised by allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Saverio, Salomone; Kawamukai, Kenji; Biscardi, Andrea; Villani, Silvia; Zucchini, Luca; Tugnoli, Gregorio

    2013-09-01

    A 56-year-old man presented spontaneously to the Emergency Department complaining of facial and neck oedema after assumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS). The triage nurse assigned the patient to Accident & Emergency (A&E) doctor as probable allergic reaction to NSAIDS. Chest X-ray (CXR), ordered after 24 hours, revealed a huge subcutaneous chest and neck emphysema without clearly visible pneumothorax. Subsequent chest CT scan showed a small left pneumothorax and a large amount of air in the mediastinum. The patient was conservatively treated since he was eupnoeic and hemodynamically stable. The pathophysiology of pneumomediastinum was first described by Macklin in 1939. The Macklin effect involves alveolar ruptures with air dissection along bronchovascular sheaths to the mediastinum. In this case the patient did not report in his history a recent blunt thoracic trauma and the initial suspicion of an allergic reaction has prevented physicians to immediately achieve the correct diagnosis.

  19. Pneumothorax in pediatric patients: management strategies to improve patient outcomes [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Matthew; Rocker, Joshua; Pade, Kathryn H

    2017-03-22

    The clinical presentation of pneumothorax is highly variable. Spontaneous pneumothoraces may present with subtle symptoms when a small air leak is present, but can progress to hemodynamic instability in the setting of tension physiology. The etiologies are broad and the severity can vary greatly. A trauma patient with a pneumothorax may also have the added complexity of other potentially life-threatening injuries. While there is a wealth of evidence-based guidelines for the management of pneumothoraces in the adult literature, the approach to pediatric patients is largely extrapolated from that literature without a significant evidence base. In this issue, aspects of the history and physical examination, the use of various diagnostic imaging modalities, and the range of interventions available to the emergency clinician are discussed. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  20. In Defense of Artificial Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiller, Derek

    2017-06-01

    If it is within our power to provide a significantly better world for future generations at a comparatively small cost to ourselves, we have a strong moral reason to do so. One way of providing a significantly better world may involve replacing our species with something better. It is plausible that in the not-too-distant future, we will be able to create artificially intelligent creatures with whatever physical and psychological traits we choose. Granted this assumption, it is argued that we should engineer our extinction so that our planet's resources can be devoted to making artificial creatures with better lives. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Spontaneous pneumothorax associated with pulmonary fibrosis in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala Cerra, Gabriel; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael; Lozano Tagua, Carlos Fernando; Sabogal Barrios, Ruben

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary involvement in patients with neurofibromatosis has been repetitively reported as a very rare complication in type 1 variety. It is characterized by pulmonary interstitial disease, pulmonary fibrosis and bullaes, the last with high risk of rupture. We described a case of spontaneous pneumothorax in a patient with type 2 neurofibromatosis, as consequence of pulmonary fibrotic changes. To our knowledge this association had not been reported.

  2. Incarcerated Diaphragmatic Hernia with Bowel Perforation Presenting as a Tension Pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. Offman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We present an interesting case of a patient with a previously known diaphragmatic hernia in which the colon became incarcerated, ischemic and finally perforated. She had no prior history of abdominal pain or vomiting, yet she present with cardiovascular collapse. To our knowledge, this is the only case report of a tension pneumothorax associated with perforated bowel that was not in the setting of trauma or colonoscopy. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(2:142-144.

  3. Localized air foci in the lower thorax in the patients with pneumothorax: Skip pneumothoraces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Takeshi, E-mail: higuchi@hosp.niigata.niigata.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Niigata City General Hospital, 463-7 Chuo-ku, Shumoku, Niigata 950-1197 (Japan); Takahashi, Naoya, E-mail: nandtr@hosp.niigata.niigata.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Niigata City General Hospital, 463-7 Chuo-ku, Shumoku, Niigata 950-1197 (Japan); Kiguchi, Takao, E-mail: takakig@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Niigata City General Hospital, 463-7 Chuo-ku, Shumoku, Niigata 950-1197 (Japan); Shiotani, Motoi, E-mail: Shiotani14@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Niigata Cancer Center Hospital, 2-15-3 Chuo-ku, Kawagishicho, Niigata 951-8566 (Japan); Maeda, Haruo, E-mail: h-maeda@hosp.niigata.niigata.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Niigata City General Hospital, 463-7 Chuo-ku, Shumoku, Niigata 950-1197 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To investigate the characteristics and imaging features of localized air foci in the lower thorax in patients with pneumothorax using thin-section multidetector computed tomography. Materials and methods: Of 10,547 consecutive CT examinations comprising the chest, the CT scans of 146 patients with ordinary pneumothoraces were identified and retrospectively evaluated. The study group included 110 male and 36 female patients (mean age, 50 years; range, 1–93 years). All examinations were performed at our institution between January 2009 and December 2009. Cause of pneumothorax was classified as traumatic or non-traumatic. Localized air foci in the lower thorax were defined as being localized air collections in the lower thorax that did not appear to be adjacent to the lung. If these criteria were met, the shape, size, location laterality, and number of foci were evaluated. Associations with trauma, sex, severity of the pneumothorax, and laterality were evaluated using the χ{sup 2} test. All P values <0.05 were considered significant. Results: Localized air foci in the lower thorax presented as slit-like or small ovoid air collections in the lowest part of the pleural space. These foci were observed in 79/146 (54.1%) patients. The traumatic pneumothoraces group showed a higher prevalence of these features than the non-traumatic group. Some foci that were situated in the anterior part mimicked the appearance of free intraperitoneal air. Conclusion: Patients with pneumothorax commonly had localized air foci in the lower thorax. Because such foci can mimic pneumoperitoneum, accurate recognition of them is required to avoid confusion with free intraperitoneal air, especially in traumatic cases.

  4. Massive Emphysema and Pneumothorax Following Shoulder Arthroscopy under General Anaesthesia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariyate, Mohammad J; Kachooei, Amir R; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H

    2017-11-01

    The patient was a 61-year-old female with massive rotator cuff tear who had no history of smoking, COPD, asthma, or other pulmonary diseases. Four hours following shoulder arthroscopy, the patient developed progressive dyspnea, which was diagnosed as pneumothorax with subcutaneous emphysema extending to the neck and face. Chest tube was inserted promptly. The patient was discharged with a good condition after 7 days. Follow up of the patient for the next 3 months was uneventful.

  5. Massive Emphysema and Pneumothorax Following Shoulder Arthroscopy under General Anaesthesia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad J. Shariati

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The patient was a 61-year-old female with massive rotator cuff tear who had no history of smoking, COPD, asthma, or other pulmonary diseases. Four hours following shoulder arthroscopy, the patient developed progressive dyspnea, which was diagnosed as pneumothorax with subcutaneous emphysema extending to the neck and face. Chest tube was inserted promptly. The patient was discharged with a good condition after 7 days. Follow up of the patient for the next 3 months was uneventful.

  6. Single-staged uniportal VATS in the supine position for simultaneous bilateral primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Soo

    2017-05-15

    Simultaneous bilateral primary spontaneous pneumothorax (SBPSP) is rare, but requires surgery on both sides, in patients with definite bilateral bullae to prevent life-threatening conditions. Recently, uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) has been widely accepted as a less invasive technique for the treatment of pneumothorax. Thus, we introduced single-staged uniportal VATS technique in the supine position, for the management of two cases of SBPSP. A 17-year-old boy presented with bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax and he underwent single-staged uniportal VATS in the supine position. Single wide draping in consecutive bilateral approaches removes the needs of changing patients' position. Whole thoracoscopic procedure for wedge resection of bullae lesions was conducted without difficulty. The total operation time took 65 min and the patient discharged 3 days after the operation. The patient was followed for 24 months without recurrence of both sides. Another 18-year-old boy was admitted with bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax and single-staged uniportal VATS was also performed in the supine position. The total operation time took 79 min and the patient discharged on postoperative day 4. He was followed for 19 months without recurrence of both sides. Single-staged uniportal VATS approach yielded satisfactory results from simplicity that not requires position change compared to conventional multi-ports VATS in the lateral position, and with better cosmetics. This technique is thought to be a feasible procedure in selective patients with SBPSP or with contralateral bullae for preventive role.

  7. Localized air foci in the lower thorax in the patients with pneumothorax: Skip pneumothoraces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Naoya; Kiguchi, Takao; Shiotani, Motoi; Maeda, Haruo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the characteristics and imaging features of localized air foci in the lower thorax in patients with pneumothorax using thin-section multidetector computed tomography. Materials and methods: Of 10,547 consecutive CT examinations comprising the chest, the CT scans of 146 patients with ordinary pneumothoraces were identified and retrospectively evaluated. The study group included 110 male and 36 female patients (mean age, 50 years; range, 1–93 years). All examinations were performed at our institution between January 2009 and December 2009. Cause of pneumothorax was classified as traumatic or non-traumatic. Localized air foci in the lower thorax were defined as being localized air collections in the lower thorax that did not appear to be adjacent to the lung. If these criteria were met, the shape, size, location laterality, and number of foci were evaluated. Associations with trauma, sex, severity of the pneumothorax, and laterality were evaluated using the χ 2 test. All P values <0.05 were considered significant. Results: Localized air foci in the lower thorax presented as slit-like or small ovoid air collections in the lowest part of the pleural space. These foci were observed in 79/146 (54.1%) patients. The traumatic pneumothoraces group showed a higher prevalence of these features than the non-traumatic group. Some foci that were situated in the anterior part mimicked the appearance of free intraperitoneal air. Conclusion: Patients with pneumothorax commonly had localized air foci in the lower thorax. Because such foci can mimic pneumoperitoneum, accurate recognition of them is required to avoid confusion with free intraperitoneal air, especially in traumatic cases

  8. Sensitivity of bedside ultrasound and supine anteroposterior chest radiographs for the identification of pneumothorax after blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, R Gentry; Stone, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    Supine anteroposterior (AP) chest radiographs in patients with blunt trauma have poor sensitivity for the identification of pneumothorax. Ultrasound (US) has been proposed as an alternative screening test for pneumothorax in this population. The authors conducted an evidence-based review of the medical literature to compare sensitivity of bedside US and AP chest radiographs in identifying pneumothorax after blunt trauma. MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched for trials from 1965 through June 2009 using a search strategy derived from the following PICO formulation of our clinical question: patients included adult (18 + years) emergency department (ED) patients in whom pneumothorax was suspected after blunt trauma. The intervention was thoracic ultrasonography for the detection of pneumothorax. The comparator was the supine AP chest radiograph during the initial evaluation of the patient. The outcome was the diagnostic performance of US in identifying the presence of pneumothorax in the study population. The criterion standard for the presence or absence of pneumothorax was computed tomography (CT) of the chest or a rush of air during thoracostomy tube placement (in unstable patients). Prospective, observational trials of emergency physician (EP)-performed thoracic US were included. Trials in which the exams were performed by radiologists or surgeons, or trials that investigated patients suffering penetrating trauma or with spontaneous or iatrogenic pneumothoraces, were excluded. The methodologic quality of the studies was assessed. Qualitative methods were used to summarize the study results. Data analysis consisted of test performance (sensitivity and specificity, with 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) of thoracic US and supine AP chest radiography. Four prospective observational studies were identified, with a total of 606 subjects who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The sensitivity and specificity of US for the detection of pneumothorax ranged from

  9. Rapid needle-out patient-rollover approach after cone beam CT-guided lung biopsy: effect on pneumothorax rate in 1,191 consecutive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Im [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Min; Goo, Jin Mo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    To investigate the effect of rapid needle-out patient-rollover approach on the incidence of pneumothorax and drainage catheter placement due to pneumothorax in C-arm Cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB) of lung lesions. From May 2011 to December 2012, 1227 PTNBs were performed in 1191 patients with a 17-gauge coaxial needle. 617 biopsies were performed without (conventional-group) and 610 with rapid-rollover approach (rapid-rollover-group). Overall pneumothorax rates and incidences of pneumothorax requiring drainage catheter placement were compared between two groups. There were no significant differences in overall pneumothorax rates between conventional and rapid-rollover groups (19.8 % vs. 23.1 %, p = 0.164). However, pneumothorax rate requiring drainage catheter placement was significantly lower in rapid-rollover-group (1.6 %) than conventional-group (4.2 %) (p = 0.010). Multivariate analysis revealed male, age > 60, bulla crossed, fissure crossed, pleura to target distance > 1.3 cm, emphysema along needle tract, and pleural punctures ≥ 2 were significant risk factors of pneumothorax (p < 0.05). Regarding pneumothorax requiring drainage catheter placement, fissure crossed, bulla crossed, and emphysema along needle tract were significant risk factors (p < 0.05), whereas rapid-rollover approach was an independent protective factor (p = 0.002). The rapid needle-out patient-rollover approach significantly reduced the rate of pneumothorax requiring drainage catheter placement after CBCT-guided PTNB. (orig.)

  10. Use of endobronchial valve insertion to treat relapsing pneumothorax: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Fei; Tian, Qing; Chen, Liang'an; Li, Chunyan; Zhang, Shu; Liu, Xingchen; Xiao, Binbin

    2017-07-01

    Backgorund and Aims: Unidirectional endobronchial valves have recently been shown to be beneficial as treatment for persistent air leaks. This report presents a first case of endobronchial valve implantation to treat relapsing pneumothorax in a Chinese patient, and also presents a review of the literature on the use of one-way valve insertion for the treatment of persistent air leaks. The patient did undergo a recent but failed chest tube intervention. By bronchoscopy and using Chartis® system measurements, the upper left lobe (including the left apical bronchus) was closed using a catheter. After the expected decrease in airflow following bronchial occlusion, increased air pressure and decreased spilled air were noted; it was concluded that the pneumothorax was located in the left upper lobe. A Zephyr ® endobronchial valve was placed in the left upper apical bronchus. The health benefits of the procedure were noticed in the following days. Our review suggests that the use of endobronchial valves could be used as an effective, minimally invasive, low-risk intervention for patients with pneumothorax that cannot be treated surgically. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Thoracoscopic CO laser coagulation shrinkage of blebs in treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensaki, Koji; Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Keiichi; Takagi, Keigo; Tanaka, Susumu; Kikuchi, Makoto

    1992-06-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is a common disease in young people. Operative intervention has been done in most of the recurrent cases. Recently thoracoscopic treatment has been tested as a less invasive treatment modarity. We adopted carbon monoxide (CO) laser for thoracoscopic treatment of recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax. CO laser (wavelength; 5.4 micrometers ) could be delivered by chalcogenide glass (As - S) covered with a teflon sheath and ZnSe fiber tip. The sterilized flexible bronchoscope was inserted through the thoracoscopic outer sheath under local anesthesia. Shrinkage of blebs was obtained by non-contact method of CO laser irradiation. Laser power at the tip was 2.5 - 5 W and irradiation duration was 0.5 s each. Excellent shrinkage of bleb and bulla could be obtained by CO laser without perforation complication. Advantages of CO laser as a thoracoscopic treatment were: (1) capability of fiber delivery (flexible thoracoscopy was easy to operate and clear to visualize the blebs which were frequently found at the apical portion of the lung, and (2) shallow extinction length (good shrinkage of blebs, low risk of perforation, and thin layer of carbonization). In conclusion, our new technique of thoracoscopic CO laser irradiation was found to be a safe and effective treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax.

  12. Laryngeal fracture due to blunt trauma presenting with pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narcı, Adnan; Embleton, Didem Baskın; Ayçiçek, Abdullah; Yücedağ, Fatih; Cetinkurşun, Salih

    2011-01-01

    Injuries due to traffic accidents are frequent in childhood, and they have high mortality and morbidity. Laryngeal injury due to a traffic accident is a rare pathology and might be missed if not suspected. Here we present a laryngeal fracture in a child after a blunt chest trauma during a traffic accident that presented with pneumomediastinum and pneumothorax. A 14-year-old girl was referred for pneumomediastinum. Her physical examination was normal except subcutaneous emphysema, edema and tenderness in the cervical area, hoarseness, facial and extremity abrasions and ecchymoses. Chest tomography revealed pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum, and cranial tomography revealed maxillofacial fractures. Upper airway damage was suspected, flexible endoscopy revealed right vocal cord paralysis and cervical tomography revealed thyroid cartilage fracture. The fracture was repaired and tracheotomy was performed. She was discharged on postoperative day 6. Facial fractures were repaired in another center. Tracheotomy was removed on postoperative day 20. Her hoarseness, although decreased, still persists. Pneumomediastinum is a rare result of a laryngeal fracture and if not suspected, the fracture can easily be missed. It should be kept in mind after blunt cervical trauma with pneumomediastinum and/or pneumothorax. Direct endoscopy and cervical tomography may be necessary for the differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Traumatic Hemothorax and Pneumothorax Detected by EFAST Compared with Chest Radio- graphy at Siriraj Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lertpong Somcharit

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: EFAST is the evaluation of thoracoabdominal injury in trauma patients. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic utility of EFAST for detection of traumatic pneumothorax and hemothorax compared to standard routine chest radiography at Siriraj Hospital. Methods: From January 2013 to April 2015, 119 patients who visited the Division of Trauma, Siriraj Hospital were included in the study. EFAST was performed during the initial resuscitation of the injured patients and plain chest radiographs were obtained as routine hospital protocols. Patients’ charts were retrospectively reviewed and real-time EFAST examinations were compared to the results of chest radiographs. EFAST diagnosis was con- sidered positive when there was absence of normal sliding lung signs (pneumothorax and presence of free fluid above the diaphragm (hemothorax. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of EFAST for the diagnosis of pneumothorax and hemothorax were 76%, 100%, 100%, and 93%, respectively, whereas the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of plain chest radiographs were 80%, 100%, 100% and 94.9%, respectively. Conclusion: EFAST shows similar diagnostic accuracy compared to plain supine AP chest radiograph. The results are operator-dependent and higher accuracy can be achieved by well-trained emergency health care personnel. EFAST can be performed during resuscitation, and still provides promising results which can lead to early treat- ment procedure. Under experienced hands, EFAST is considered effective. This study suggests that it should be used as a complimentary procedure in all thoracic injured patients’ evaluations.

  14. Spontaneous Pneumothorax: A retrospective study of twenty-five patients and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batouk, A.; Jastaniah, S.; Grillo, I.A.; Malatani, T.S.; Al-Saigh, A.H.; Al-Shehri, M.Y.; Softah, A.; Ali, K.A.M.; Teklu, B.

    1996-01-01

    We present a retrospective study of 25 patients with spontaneous pneumothorax (three recurrent) comprising 16 Saudis (nine males and seven females) and eight non-Saudi's (eight males and one female), seen at the Asir Central Hospital, Abha, over a period of 45 months. Almost one-third of patients (9/25) had no underlying cause discernible by our investigational facilities (chest x-ray, ultrasonography, computed tomographic scan and flexible bronchofiberscopy). Underlying pneumonia (three patients), pulmonary tuberculosis (two patients), lung abscess (one patient) and congenital bullae (one patient) constituted the etiology in another third of the spontaneous pneumothorax patients. Other underlying pulmonary diseases, precipitating spontaneous pneumothorax in the group included pulmonary fibrosis, metastatic mesothelioma and immunosuppression in a medulloblastoma patient undergoing chemotherapy with the development of chickenpox. Closed thoracostomy tube drainage was the only method of treatment in 20 out of 25 patients, with three failures of closed thoracostomy tube drainage needing thoractomy and resection of blebs/bullae. The only complication was empyema in two of the patients. Two patients were successfully treated conservatively with observation alone. (author)

  15. Chest Computed Tomographic Image Screening for Cystic Lung Diseases in Patients with Spontaneous Pneumothorax Is Cost Effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nishant; Langenderfer, Dale; McCormack, Francis X; Schauer, Daniel P; Eckman, Mark H

    2017-01-01

    Patients without a known history of lung disease presenting with a spontaneous pneumothorax are generally diagnosed as having primary spontaneous pneumothorax. However, occult diffuse cystic lung diseases such as Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD), lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis (PLCH) can also first present with a spontaneous pneumothorax, and their early identification by high-resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) chest imaging has implications for subsequent management. The objective of our study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of HRCT chest imaging to facilitate early diagnosis of LAM, BHD, and PLCH. We constructed a Markov state-transition model to assess the cost-effectiveness of screening HRCT to facilitate early diagnosis of diffuse cystic lung diseases in patients presenting with an apparent primary spontaneous pneumothorax. Baseline data for prevalence of BHD, LAM, and PLCH and rates of recurrent pneumothoraces in each of these diseases were derived from the literature. Costs were extracted from 2014 Medicare data. We compared a strategy of HRCT screening followed by pleurodesis in patients with LAM, BHD, or PLCH versus conventional management with no HRCT screening. In our base case analysis, screening for the presence of BHD, LAM, or PLCH in patients presenting with a spontaneous pneumothorax was cost effective, with a marginal cost-effectiveness ratio of $1,427 per quality-adjusted life-year gained. Sensitivity analysis showed that screening HRCT remained cost effective for diffuse cystic lung diseases prevalence as low as 0.01%. HRCT image screening for BHD, LAM, and PLCH in patients with apparent primary spontaneous pneumothorax is cost effective. Clinicians should consider performing a screening HRCT in patients presenting with apparent primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

  16. Pulmonary emphysema is a predictor of pneumothorax after CT-guided transthoracic pulmonary biopsies of pulmonary nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendeckel, Derik; Kromrey, Marie-Luise; Ittermann, Till; Schäfer, Sophia; Mensel, Birger; Kühn, Jens-Peter

    2017-01-01

    Pneumothoraces are the most frequently occurring complications of CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic pulmonary biopsies (PTPB). The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of pre-diagnostic lung emphysema on the incidence and extent of pneumothoraces and to establish a risk stratification for the evaluation of the pre-procedure complication probability. CT-guided PTPB of 100 pre-selected patients (mean age 67.1±12.8 years) were retrospectively enrolled from a single center database of 235 PTPB performed between 2012-2014. Patients were grouped according to pneumothorax appearance directly after PTPB (group I: without pneumothorax, n = 50; group II: with pneumothorax, n = 50). Group II was further divided according to post-interventional treatment (group IIa: chest tube placement, n = 24; group IIb: conservative therapy, n = 26). For each patient pre-diagnostic percentage of emphysema was quantified using CT density analysis. Emphysema stages were compared between groups using bivariate analyses and multinomial logistic regression analyses. Emphysema percentage was significantly associated with the occurrence of post-interventional pneumothorax (p = 0.006). Adjusted for potential confounders (age, gender, lesion size and length of interventional pathway) the study yielded an OR of 1.07 (p = 0.042). Absolute risk of pneumothorax increased from 43.4% at an emphysema rate of 5% to 73.8% at 25%. No differences could be seen in patients with pneumothorax between percentage of emphysema and mode of therapy (p = 0.721). The rate of lung emphysema is proportionally related to the incidence of pneumothorax after CT-guided PTPB and allows pre-interventional risk stratification. There is no association between stage of emphysema and post-interventional requirement of chest tube placement.

  17. COMPARISON OF THORACIC ULTRASONOGRAPHY AND RADIOGRAPHY FOR THE DETECTION OF INDUCED SMALL VOLUME PNEUMOTHORAX IN THE HORSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partlow, Jessica; David, Florent; Hunt, Luanne Michelle; Relave, Fabien; Blond, Laurent; Pinilla, Manuel; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre

    2017-05-01

    Small volume pneumothorax can be challenging to diagnose in horses. The current standard method for diagnosis is standing thoracic radiography. We hypothesized that thoracic ultrasonography would be more sensitive. Objectives of this prospective, experimental study were to describe a thoracic ultrasound method for detection of small volume pneumothorax in horses and to compare results of radiography and ultrasound in a sample of horses with induced small volume pneumothorax. Six mature healthy horses were recruited for this study. For each horse, five 50 ml air boluses were sequentially introduced via a teat cannula into the pleural space. Lateral thoracic radiographs and standardized ultrasound (2D and M-mode) examinations of both hemithoraces were performed following administration of each 50 ml air bolus. Radiographs and ultrasound images/videos were analyzed for detection of pneumothorax by four independent investigators who were unaware of treatment status. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, negative predictive values, and agreement among investigators (Kappa test, κ) were calculated for radiography, 2D and M-mode ultrasound. Comparisons were made using a chi-squared exact test with significance set at P pneumothorax detection (P = 0.02 and P = 0.04, respectively). Specificity and positive predictive values were similar for all three imaging modalities (P = 1). Agreement between investigators for pneumothorax detection was excellent for 2D ultrasound (κ = 1), very good for M-mode ultrasound (κ = 0.87), and good for radiography (κ = 0.79). Findings from this experimental study supported the use of thoracic ultrasonography as a diagnostic method for detecting pneumothorax in horses. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  18. Pneumothorax Complicating Coaxial and Non-coaxial CT-Guided Lung Biopsy: Comparative Analysis of Determining Risk Factors and Management of Pneumothorax in a Retrospective Review of 650 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A; Alsubhi, Mohammed; Emam, Ahmed; Lehnert, Thomas; Beeres, Martin; Jacobi, Volkmar; Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Vogl, Thomas J; Naguib, Nagy N

    2016-02-01

    To assess the scope and determining risk factors related to the development of pneumothorax throughout CT-guided biopsy of pulmonary lesions in coaxial and non-coaxial techniques and the outcome of its management. The study included CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsies in 650 consecutive patients (407 males, 243 females; mean age 54.6 years, SD 5.2) from November 2008 to June 2013 in a retrospective design. Patients were classified according to lung biopsy technique into coaxial group (318 lesions) and non-coaxial group (332 lesions). Exclusion criteria for biopsy were lesions pneumothorax were classified into: (a) Technical risk factors, (b) patient-related risk factors, and (c) lesion-associated risk factors. Radiological assessments were performed by two radiologists in consensus. Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher's exact tests were used for statistical analysis. p values pneumothorax complicating CT-guided lung biopsy was less in the non-coaxial group (23.2 %, 77 out of 332) than the coaxial group (27 %, 86 out of 318). However, the difference in incidence between both groups was statistically insignificant (p = 0.14). Significant risk factors for the development of pneumothorax in both groups were emphysema (p pneumothorax in the non-coaxial group was significantly correlated to the number of specimens obtained (p = 0.006). This factor was statistically insignificant in the coaxial group (p = 0.45). The biopsy yield was more diagnostic and conclusive in the coaxial group in comparison to the non-coaxial group (p = 0.008). Simultaneous incidence of pneumothorax and pulmonary hemorrhage was 27.3 % (21/77) in non-coaxial group and in 30.2 % (26/86) in coaxial group. Conservative management was sufficient for treatment of 91 out of 101 patients of pneumothorax in both groups (90.1 %). Manual evacuation of pneumothorax was efficient in 44/51 patients (86.3 %) in both groups and intercostal chest tube was applied after failure of manual evacuation (7

  19. Dynamic cardiomyoplasty using artificial muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Minakawa, Masahito; Fukui, Kozo; Fukuda, Ikuo

    2008-01-01

    Dynamic cardiomyoplasty using latissimus dorsi muscle was previously used to compensate for congestive heart failure. Now, however, this method is not acceptable because the long-term result was not as expected owing to fatigue of the skeletal muscle. BioMetal fiber developed by Toki Corporation is one of the artificial muscles activated by electric current. The behavior of this fiber is similar to that of organic muscle. We made an artificial muscle like the latissimus dorsi using BioMetal fiber and tested whether we could use this new muscle as a cardiac supporting device. Testing one Biometal fiber showed the following performance: practical use maximal generative force was 30 g, exercise variation was 50%, and the standard driving current was 220 mA. We created a 4 x 12-cm tabular artificial muscle using 8 BioMetal fibers as a cardiac support device. We also made a simulation circuit composed of a 6 x 8-cm soft bag with unidirectional valves, reservoir, and connecting tube. The simulation circuit was filled with water and the soft bag was wrapped with the artificial muscle device. After powering the device electrically at 9 V with a current of 220 mA for each fiber, we measured the inside pressure and observed the movement of the artificial device. The artificial muscle contracted in 0.5 s for peak time and squeezed the soft bag. The peak pressure inside the soft bag was measured as 10 mmHg. Although further work will be needed to enhance the speed of deformability and movement simulating contraction, we conclude that artificial muscle may be potentially useful as a cardiac assistance device that can be developed for dynamic cardiomyoplasty.

  20. Spontaneous Pneumothorax as a Complication of Septic Pulmonary Embolism in an Intravenous Drug User: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau-Chyun Sheu

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis has been the major cause of morbidity and mortality among intravenous drug users (IDUs with infections, mostly involving the tricuspid valve and presenting multiple septic pulmonary embolisms. Numerous pulmonary complications of septic pulmonary embolism have been described, but only a few have reported spontaneous pneumothorax. Our patient, a 23-year-old heroin addict, was hospitalized for tricuspid endocarditis and septic pulmonary embolism. Acute onset of respiratory distress occurred on his seventh hospital day and rapidly resulted in hypoxemia. Immediate bedside chest radiograph demonstrated left pneumothorax. It was thought to be a spontaneous pneumothorax, because he had not undergone any invasive procedure before the occurrence of pneumothorax. His clinical condition improved after the insertion of an intercostal chest tube. He later underwent surgery to replace the tricuspid valve as a result of the large size of the vegetation and poor control of infection. He ultimately survived. Pneumothorax is a possible lethal complication of septic pulmonary embolism in IDUs with right-sided endocarditis and should be considered in such patients when respiratory distress occurs acutely during their hospitalization.

  1. Resolution of persistent pneumothorax by use of blood pleurodesis in a dog after surgical correction of a diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merbl, Yael; Kelmer, Efrat; Shipov, Anna; Golani, Yael; Segev, Gilad; Yudelevitch, Sigal; Klainbart, Sigal

    2010-08-01

    A 15-kg (33-lb) pregnant female mixed-breed dog of unknown age was referred because of a 10-day history of difficulty breathing. Physical examination findings were dyspnea, tachypnea, decreased bronchovesicular sounds (bilateral), muffled heart sounds, and abdominal distention with palpable fetuses. Hematologic abnormalities included anemia, leukocytosis, and thrombocytosis. Abnormalities detected during serum biochemical analysis included decreases in concentrations of albumin, sodium, triglycerides, and total calcium and increases in activities of alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase. Thoracic radiography revealed a diaphragmatic hernia with fetuses and a soft tissue or fluid opacity within the thoracic cavity. Exploratory celiotomy, ovariohysterectomy, partial sternotomy, placement of a right-sided thoracostomy tube, and herniorrhaphy were performed. After surgery, pneumothorax developed, and the thoracostomy tube was used to remove pleural effusion and free air. The pneumothorax did not resolve after continuous drainage of the thoracic cavity for 4 days. Autologous blood pleurodesis was performed by infusion of 80 mL (6 mL/kg [2.73 mL/lb]) of whole blood. The pneumothorax resolved immediately after injection of the blood. Blood pleurodesis was used for resolution of pneumothorax in a dog after correction of a diaphragmatic hernia. Blood pleurodesis may provide a simple, safe, and inexpensive medical treatment for resolution of persistent (duration>5 days) pneumothorax when surgery is not an option.

  2. Methodology Investigation of AI(Artificial Intelligence) Test Officer Support Tool. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    American Association for Artificial inteligence A! ............. Artificial inteliigence AMC ............ Unt:ed States Army Maeriel Comand ASL...block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Artificial Intelligence, Expert Systems Automated Aids to Testing 9. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and...identify by block number) This report covers the application of Artificial Intelligence-Techniques to the problem of creating automated tools to

  3. Artificially Engineered Protein Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun Jung; Holmberg, Angela L; Olsen, Bradley D

    2017-06-07

    Modern polymer science increasingly requires precise control over macromolecular structure and properties for engineering advanced materials and biomedical systems. The application of biological processes to design and synthesize artificial protein polymers offers a means for furthering macromolecular tunability, enabling polymers with dispersities of ∼1.0 and monomer-level sequence control. Taking inspiration from materials evolved in nature, scientists have created modular building blocks with simplified monomer sequences that replicate the function of natural systems. The corresponding protein engineering toolbox has enabled the systematic development of complex functional polymeric materials across areas as diverse as adhesives, responsive polymers, and medical materials. This review discusses the natural proteins that have inspired the development of key building blocks for protein polymer engineering and the function of these elements in material design. The prospects and progress for scalable commercialization of protein polymers are reviewed, discussing both technology needs and opportunities.

  4. Renal cancer and pneumothorax risk in Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome; an analysis of 115 FLCN mutation carriers from 35 BHD families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, A. C.; Gijezen, L. M.; Jonker, M. A.; van Doorn, M. B. A.; Oldenburg, R. A.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, K. Y.; Leter, E. M.; van Os, T. A.; van Grieken, N. C. T.; Jaspars, E. H.; de Jong, M. M.; Bongers, E. M. H. F.; Johannesma, P. C.; Postmus, P. E.; van Moorselaar, R. J. A.; van Waesberghe, J-H T. M.; Starink, T. M.; van Steensel, M. A. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Menko, F. H.

    2011-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition caused by germline FLCN mutations, and characterised by fibrofolliculomas, pneumothorax and renal cancer. The renal cancer risk, cancer phenotype and pneumothorax risk of BHD have not yet been fully clarified. The main focus of this

  5. Renal cancer and pneumothorax risk in Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome; an analysis of 115 FLCN mutation carriers from 35 BHD families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, A. C.; Gijezen, L. M.; Jonker, M. A.; van Doorn, M. B. A.; Oldenburg, R. A.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, K. Y.; Leter, E. M.; van Os, T. A.; van Grieken, N. C. T.; Jaspars, E. H.; de Jong, M. M.; Johannesma, P. C.; Postmus, P. E.; van Moorselaar, R. J. A.; van Waesberghe, J-H T. M.; Starink, T. M.; van Steensel, M. A. M.; Gille, J. J. P.; Menko, F. H.; Bongers, Ernie M. H. F.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Birt-Hogg-Dube (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition caused by germline FLCN mutations, and characterised by fibrofolliculomas, pneumothorax and renal cancer. The renal cancer risk, cancer phenotype and pneumothorax risk of BHD have not yet been fully clarified. The main

  6. Transport modeling: An artificial immune system approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodorović Dušan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an artificial immune system approach (AIS to modeling time-dependent (dynamic, real time transportation phenomenon characterized by uncertainty. The basic idea behind this research is to develop the Artificial Immune System, which generates a set of antibodies (decisions, control actions that altogether can successfully cover a wide range of potential situations. The proposed artificial immune system develops antibodies (the best control strategies for different antigens (different traffic "scenarios". This task is performed using some of the optimization or heuristics techniques. Then a set of antibodies is combined to create Artificial Immune System. The developed Artificial Immune transportation systems are able to generalize, adapt, and learn based on new knowledge and new information. Applications of the systems are considered for airline yield management, the stochastic vehicle routing, and real-time traffic control at the isolated intersection. The preliminary research results are very promising.

  7. [Transbronchoscopic end-tidal carbon dioxide detection for location of the leading bronchus in patients with pneumothorax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yiming; Lin, Huihuang

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) detection for location of the leading bronchus in patients with pneumothorax. Transbronchoscopic EtCO2 detection was performed in 4 patients with intractable pneumothorax in whom transbronchoscopic balloon detection failed to localize the leading bronchus. A specific bronchus was suspected to be the leading bronchus when its EtCO2 value was significantly lower than that of the main bronchus of the affected lung. After the pleural air leakage was successfully sealed by bronchial occlusion of the suspected bronchus, the EtCO2 was confirmed to indicate the leading bronchus. Transbronchoscopic EtCO2 detection successfully located the leading bronchus in all 4 patients. Transbronchoscopic EtCO2 detection is a new method of locating the leading bronchus in patients with intractable pneumothorax.

  8. Simple aspiration versus intercostal tube drainage for primary spontaneous pneumothorax in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson-Chahhoud, Kristin V; Wakai, Abel; van Agteren, Joseph Em; Smith, Brian J; McCabe, Grainne; Brinn, Malcolm P; O'Sullivan, Ronan

    2017-09-07

    For management of pneumothorax that occurs without underlying lung disease, also referred to as primary spontaneous pneumothorax, simple aspiration is technically easier to perform than intercostal tube drainage. In this systematic review, we seek to compare the clinical efficacy and safety of simple aspiration versus intercostal tube drainage for management of primary spontaneous pneumothorax. This review was first published in 2007 and was updated in 2017. To compare the clinical efficacy and safety of simple aspiration versus intercostal tube drainage for management of primary spontaneous pneumothorax. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 1) in the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE (1966 to January 2017); and Embase (1980 to January 2017). We searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry for ongoing trials (January 2017). We checked the reference lists of included trials and contacted trial authors. We imposed no language restrictions. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adults 18 years of age and older with primary spontaneous pneumothorax that compared simple aspiration versus intercostal tube drainage. Two review authors independently selected studies for inclusion, assessed trial quality, and extracted data. We combined studies using the random-effects model. Of 2332 publications obtained through the search strategy, seven studies met the inclusion criteria; one study was ongoing and six studies of 435 participants were eligible for inclusion in the updated review. Data show a significant difference in immediate success rates of procedures favouring tube drainage over simple aspiration for management of primary spontaneous pneumothorax (risk ratio (RR) 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69 to 0.89; 435 participants, 6 studies; moderate-quality evidence). Duration of hospitalization however was significantly less for patients treated by simple aspiration (mean

  9. Unethical Research: How to Create a Malevolent Artificial Intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Pistono, Federico; Yampolskiy, Roman V.

    2016-01-01

    Cybersecurity research involves publishing papers about malicious exploits as much as publishing information on how to design tools to protect cyber-infrastructure. It is this information exchange between ethical hackers and security experts, which results in a well-balanced cyber-ecosystem. In the blooming domain of AI Safety Engineering, hundreds of papers have been published on different proposals geared at the creation of a safe machine, yet nothing, to our knowledge, has been published o...

  10. Incidental finding of congenital pericardial and mediastinal pleural defect by pneumothorax in an adult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Y.; Matsusaka, Y.; Nemoto, E.; Hashizume, T.; Kaseda, S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital pericardial defect (CPD) is an uncommon anomaly. If once cardiac herniation occurs, it threatens life. We report a case of left-sided pneumothorax with consequent protrusion of the heart into left thoracic cavity through not only a large CPD but also congenital pleuropericardium window. Case presentation: A 67-year-old man presenting with sudden-onset left-sided chest pain and slight dyspnea was referred to our hospital. Chest X-ray showed a left lung collapse, and also revealed a pneumopericardium along the right border of the ascending aorta. Subsequent computed tomography (CT) scan revealed that the heart was displaced into the left hemithorax. Thus, we diagnosed the patient with pneumothorax and a defect of the pericardial and mediastinal pleurae. Subsequently, a chest tube was inserted into the left thoracic cavity, and the collapsed lung was promptly inflated. The cardiac position was reinstated within mediastinum as evidenced by follow-up CT scan. The QRS axis on his electrocardiogram (ECG) was altered from 52° to 73°. Together with the cardiac relocation evidenced by the QRS axis shift on ECG and findings of CT, we determined that there was a low potential for complications and opted against surgical repair. Discussion: When the CPD is sufficiently large, surgical intervention is not necessary. The size of the CPD can be assessed not only by CT findings, but the alteration of the QRS axis on ECG also provides useful information whether cardiac herniation can be resolved by the inflated lung. - Highlights: • We reported a case of congenital pericardial defect (CPD) with pneumothorax. • We described how to manage to alleviate life-threatening complications. • The size of CPD was assessed by CT findings and the alteration of QRS axis on ECG

  11. Results of surgical treatment for secondary spontaneous pneumothorax according to underlying diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Junji; Nagayama, Kazuhiro; Hino, Haruaki; Nitadori, Jun-ichi; Anraku, Masaki; Murakawa, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Jun

    2016-04-01

    The outcome of surgical treatment for secondary spontaneous pneumothorax (SSP) has rarely been investigated. We retrospectively reviewed 183 patients who underwent surgery for SSP. We categorized the patients into three groups according to underlying diseases: Group A (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), Group B (interstitial pneumonia [IP]) and Group C (others). We defined treatment success as surgery without hospital mortality, postoperative complications, death within 6 months or ipsilateral recurrence of pneumothorax within 2 years. We assessed the risk factors for unsuccessful treatment using a Cox regression hazard model. There were 123 patients in Group A, 20 in Group B and 40 in Group C. The hospital mortality rates were 2, 15 and 0% in Groups A, B and C, respectively. The hospital mortality, morbidity and pneumothorax recurrence rates in the IP group were higher than in the other groups. The 5-year overall survival rates were 78, 32 and 84% in Groups A, B and C, respectively; the prognosis of the IP group was significantly poorer. The treatment success rates were 86, 45 and 83% in Groups A, B and C, respectively. SSPs caused by IP and SSPs requiring open surgery were identified as the risk factors for unsuccessful treatment. Surgery for SSP caused by underlying diseases other than IP yielded favourable results. However, a careful examination of surgical indication and a realistic disclosure for informed consent are required for patients with SSP caused by IP, because of the high treatment failure rate. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  12. Effectiveness of Ambulatory Tru-Close Thoracic Vent for the Outpatient Management of Pneumothorax: A Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Pyo; Haam, Seok Jin; Lee, Sungsoo; Lee, Geun Dong; Joo, Seung-Moon; Yum, Tae Jun; Lee, Kwang-Hun

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the technical feasibility, procedural safety, and long-term therapeutic efficacy of a small-sized ambulatory thoracic vent (TV) device for the treatment of pneumothorax. From November 2012 to July 2013, 18 consecutive patients (3 females, 15 males) aged 16-64 years (mean: 34.7 ± 14.9 years, median: 29 years) were enrolled prospectively. Of these, 15 patients had spontaneous pneumothorax and 3 had iatrogenic pneumothorax. A Tru-Close TV with a small-bore (11- or 13-Fr) catheter was inserted under bi-plane fluoroscopic assistance. Technical success was achieved in all patients. Complete lung re-expansion was achieved at 24 hours in 88.9% of patients (16/18 patients). All patients tolerated the procedure and no major complications occurred. The patients' mean numeric pain intensity score was 2.4 (range: 0-5) in daily life activity during the TV treatment. All patients with spontaneous pneumothorax underwent outpatient follow-up. The mean time to TV removal was 4.7 (3-13) days. Early surgical conversion rate of 16.7% (3/18 patients) occurred in 2 patients with incomplete lung expansion and 1 patient with immediate pneumothorax recurrence post-TV removal; and late surgical conversion occurred in 2 of 18 patients (11.1%). The recurrence-free long-term success rate was 72.2% (13/18 patients) during a 3-year follow-up period from November 2012 to June 2016. TV application was a simple, safe, and technically feasible procedure in an outpatient clinic, with an acceptable long-term recurrence-free rate. Thus, TV could be useful for the immediate treatment of pneumothorax.

  13. Effectiveness of ambulatory tru-close thoracic vent for the outpatient management of pneumothorax: A prospective pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Pyo; Lee, Sung Soo; Lee, Geun Dong; Joo, Seung Moon; Yum, Tae Jun; Lee, Kwang Hun; Haam, Seok Jin

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the technical feasibility, procedural safety, and long-term therapeutic efficacy of a small-sized ambulatory thoracic vent (TV) device for the treatment of pneumothorax. From November 2012 to July 2013, 18 consecutive patients (3 females, 15 males) aged 16–64 years (mean: 34.7 ± 14.9 years, median: 29 years) were enrolled prospectively. Of these, 15 patients had spontaneous pneumothorax and 3 had iatrogenic pneumothorax. A Tru-Close TV with a small-bore (11- or 13-Fr) catheter was inserted under bi-plane fluoroscopic assistance. Technical success was achieved in all patients. Complete lung re-expansion was achieved at 24 hours in 88.9% of patients (16/18 patients). All patients tolerated the procedure and no major complications occurred. The patients' mean numeric pain intensity score was 2.4 (range: 0–5) in daily life activity during the TV treatment. All patients with spontaneous pneumothorax underwent outpatient follow-up. The mean time to TV removal was 4.7 (3–13) days. Early surgical conversion rate of 16.7% (3/18 patients) occurred in 2 patients with incomplete lung expansion and 1 patient with immediate pneumothorax recurrence post-TV removal; and late surgical conversion occurred in 2 of 18 patients (11.1%). The recurrence-free long-term success rate was 72.2% (13/18 patients) during a 3-year follow-up period from November 2012 to June 2016. TV application was a simple, safe, and technically feasible procedure in an outpatient clinic, with an acceptable long-term recurrence-free rate. Thus, TV could be useful for the immediate treatment of pneumothorax

  14. Usefulness and Limitation of Manual Aspiration Immediately After Pneumothorax Complicating Interventional Radiological Procedures with the Transthoracic Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Takuji; Kato, Takeharu; Hirota, Tatsuya; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of simple aspiration of air from the pleural space to prevent increased pneumothorax and avoid chest tube placement in cases of pneumothorax following interventional radiological procedures performed under computed tomography fluoroscopic guidance with the transthoracic percutaneous approach. While still on the scanner table, 102 cases underwent percutaneous manual aspiration of a moderate or large pneumothorax that had developed during mediastinal, lung, and transthoracic liver biopsies and ablations of lung and hepatic tumors (independent of symptoms). Air was aspirated from the pleural space by an 18- or 20-gauge intravenous catheter attached to a three-way stopcock and 20- or 50-mL syringe. We evaluated the management of each such case during and after manual aspiration. In 87 of the 102 patients (85.3%), the pneumothorax had resolved completely on follow-up chest radiographs without chest tube placement, but chest tube placement was required in 15 patients. Requirement of chest tube insertion significantly increased in parallel with the increased volume of aspirated air. When receiver-operating characteristic curves were applied retrospectively, the optimal cutoff level of aspirated air on which to base a decision to abandon manual aspiration alone and resort to chest tube placement was 670 mL. Percutaneous manual aspiration of the pneumothorax performed immediately after the procedure might prevent progressive pneumothorax and eliminate the need for chest tube placement. However, when the amount of aspirated air is large (such as more than 670 mL), chest tube placement should be considered

  15. Prognostic Factors Influencing the Development of an Iatrogenic Pneumothorax for Computed Tomography-Guided Radiofrequency Ablation of Upper Renal Tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, B.K.; Kim, C.K.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation of upper renal tumors is considered a minimally invasive treatment, but this technique may cause pneumothorax. Purpose: To assess retrospectively the prognostic factors influencing the development of iatrogenic pneumothorax for RF ablation of upper renal tumors. Material and Methods: Computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation was performed in 24 patients (21 men, three women; age range 31-77 years, mean age 53.3 years) with 28 upper renal tumors. Various factors for pneumothorax-complicated (PC) upper renal tumors and non-pneumothoracic (NP) upper renal tumors were compared during RF ablation to determine which of the factors were involved in the development of pneumothorax. Results: Among 28 upper renal tumors in 24 patients, a pneumothorax occurred accidentally in six patients with eight tumors and intentionally in two patients with two tumors. This complication was treated with conservative management, instead of tube drainage. PC upper renal tumors had shorter distance from the lung or from the costophrenic line to the tumor, a larger angle between the costophrenic line and the tumor, and a higher incidence of intervening lung tissue than NP upper renal tumors (P<0.01). Intervening lung tissue was more frequently detected on CT images obtained with the patient in the prone position than on CT images obtained with the patient in the supine position. Conclusion: The presence of intervening lung tissue and the close proximity between an upper renal tumor and the lung are high risk factors for developing an iatrogenic pneumothorax. Pre-ablation CT scan should be performed in the prone position to exactly evaluate intervening lung tissue

  16. Effectiveness of ambulatory tru-close thoracic vent for the outpatient management of pneumothorax: A prospective pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Pyo; Lee, Sung Soo; Lee, Geun Dong; Joo, Seung Moon; Yum, Tae Jun; Lee, Kwang Hun [Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University Health System, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Haam, Seok Jin [Dept. of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Ajou University Hospital, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    This study aimed to assess the technical feasibility, procedural safety, and long-term therapeutic efficacy of a small-sized ambulatory thoracic vent (TV) device for the treatment of pneumothorax. From November 2012 to July 2013, 18 consecutive patients (3 females, 15 males) aged 16–64 years (mean: 34.7 ± 14.9 years, median: 29 years) were enrolled prospectively. Of these, 15 patients had spontaneous pneumothorax and 3 had iatrogenic pneumothorax. A Tru-Close TV with a small-bore (11- or 13-Fr) catheter was inserted under bi-plane fluoroscopic assistance. Technical success was achieved in all patients. Complete lung re-expansion was achieved at 24 hours in 88.9% of patients (16/18 patients). All patients tolerated the procedure and no major complications occurred. The patients' mean numeric pain intensity score was 2.4 (range: 0–5) in daily life activity during the TV treatment. All patients with spontaneous pneumothorax underwent outpatient follow-up. The mean time to TV removal was 4.7 (3–13) days. Early surgical conversion rate of 16.7% (3/18 patients) occurred in 2 patients with incomplete lung expansion and 1 patient with immediate pneumothorax recurrence post-TV removal; and late surgical conversion occurred in 2 of 18 patients (11.1%). The recurrence-free long-term success rate was 72.2% (13/18 patients) during a 3-year follow-up period from November 2012 to June 2016. TV application was a simple, safe, and technically feasible procedure in an outpatient clinic, with an acceptable long-term recurrence-free rate. Thus, TV could be useful for the immediate treatment of pneumothorax.

  17. A Case of Pneumothorax due to High-Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygen Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çapan Konca

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Invasive and noninvasive mechanical ventilation (MV applications are used for patients with respiratory insufficiency. Noninvasive MV has been increasingly used in pediatric intensive care units in recent years. For this purpose, high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC oxygen therapy is a treatment method that has been increasingly used. Despite the numerous studies reporting the advantages of this method, there are also a few studies reporting that undesirable conditions can be observed. In this paper, in order to contribute to the literature, we present a 3-month-old baby who developed pneumothorax during HFNC implementation.

  18. An unusual cause of spontaneous pneumothorax: the Mounier-Kuhn syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, B D

    2012-02-01

    We present the case of a 54-year old woman referred to our service with an unusual presentation of an under-diagnosed condition. A life-long non-smoker, she was referred to respiratory services by our emergency department with a left sided pneumothorax, progressive dyspnoea on exertion, and recurrent chest infections. Subsequent investigation yielded findings consistent with Mounier-Kuhn syndrome (Tracheobronchomegaly), a condition characterised by marked dilatation of the proximal airways, recurrent chest infection, and consequent emphysema and bronchiectasis. Although rarely diagnosed, some degree of Mounier-Kuhn syndrome may occur in up to 1 in 500 adults.

  19. An unusual cause of spontaneous pneumothorax: the Mounier-Kuhn syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, B D

    2011-05-01

    We present the case of a 54-year old woman referred to our service with an unusual presentation of an under-diagnosed condition. A life-long non-smoker, she was referred to respiratory services by our emergency department with a left sided pneumothorax, progressive dyspnoea on exertion, and recurrent chest infections. Subsequent investigation yielded findings consistent with Mounier-Kuhn syndrome (Tracheobronchomegaly), a condition characterised by marked dilatation of the proximal airways, recurrent chest infection, and consequent emphysema and bronchiectasis. Although rarely diagnosed, some degree of Mounier-Kuhn syndrome may occur in up to 1 in 500 adults.

  20. Pneumothorax 'unmasked'. A compilation of essential, masked diagnostic signs for fresh-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schratter, M.; Richter-Schlosser, R.; Knittel, M.; Schratter-Sehn, A.U.

    1997-01-01

    This review presents a compilation and explanation of the indirect signs pointing to occurrence of a pneumothorax, going into detail as to their diagnostic worth. In the case of diagnostic information bearing remaining uncertainties it is recommended to perform CT scans for orientation, with patients in bed but transportable; with bedfast, non-transportable patients, bedside scans can be made in horizontal beam mode, positioning the patient so as to show as full as possible the pneumo-suspected body side, or selecting a slightly oblique beam mode from caudal to cranial position, if patient is restricted to lying on his back. (orig./CB) [de

  1. Cryptogenic organising pneumonia presenting with spontaneous pneumothorax and the value of procalcitonin: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Kang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptogenic Organising Pneumonia (COP is a relatively rare condition and can be difficult to differentiate from Community acquired pneumonia (CAP. We report two cases which demonstrate the importance of considering this differential diagnosis in patients with spontaneous pneumothorax who have raised inflammatory markers or lung infiltrates. Our report highlights the value of serum procalcitonin as a biomarker in differentiating between community acquired pneumonia and cryptogenic organising pneumonia especially in the context of a high serum C-reactive protein. Furthermore, the cases show early diagnosis and prompt treatment with corticosteroids may impact the clinical outcome.

  2. Cryptogenic organising pneumonia presenting with spontaneous pneumothorax and the value of procalcitonin: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chong; Vali, Yusuf; Naeem, Muhammad; Reddy, Raja

    2017-01-01

    Cryptogenic Organising Pneumonia (COP) is a relatively rare condition and can be difficult to differentiate from Community acquired pneumonia (CAP). We report two cases which demonstrate the importance of considering this differential diagnosis in patients with spontaneous pneumothorax who have raised inflammatory markers or lung infiltrates. Our report highlights the value of serum procalcitonin as a biomarker in differentiating between community acquired pneumonia and cryptogenic organising pneumonia especially in the context of a high serum C-reactive protein. Furthermore, the cases show early diagnosis and prompt treatment with corticosteroids may impact the clinical outcome.

  3. The Pilgaard-Dahl syndrome: laughter-induced pneumothorax - one of the many potentially detrimental consequences of laughter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Dorthe Bach; El Fassi, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    In this article we propose the eponym Pilgaard-Dahl syndrome (named after two Danish revue actors). The syndrome consists of laughter-induced pneumothorax in smoking middle-aged men when exposed to hearty humour. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of spontaneous pneumothorax - in particular...... the Pilgaard-Dahl syndrome - is described. Finally, the occurrence of other detrimental effects of laughter as syncope, extreme bradycardia, asthma bouts, headache, stroke, death, and incontinence are described, as well as initiatives expected to minimise the occurrence of good mood are proposed....

  4. In diagnosis of pleural effusion and pneumothorax in the intensive care unit patients: Can chest us replace bedside plain radiography?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ElShaimaa Mohamed Mohamed

    2018-06-01

    Conclusions: In evaluation of ICU patients with pleural effusion and pneumothorax, chest US is the first bedside tool with high diagnostic performance. These chest conditions are urgent especially in seriously ill patients, as both need US guided drainage. Chest US has many advantages, including non invasive examination in multiple planes, free of radiation hazard, less expensive, real-time, high sensitivity and diagnostic accuracy in chest lesions detection. Lung ultrasound is being exclusive than bedside chest X-ray and equal to chest CT in diagnosing pleural effusion and pneumothorax.

  5. Synthetic biology and the moral significance of artificial life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    , Powell and Savulescu's definition of artificial life does not capture all core projects of synthetic biology or the ethical concerns that have been voiced, and their definition of moral significance fails to take into account the possibility that creating artificial life is conditionally acceptable......I discuss the moral significance of artificial life within synthetic biology via a discussion of Douglas, Powell and Savulescu's paper 'Is the creation of artificial life morally significant’. I argue that the definitions of 'artificial life’ and of 'moral significance’ are too narrow. Douglas...

  6. Pneumothorax detection in chest radiographs using local and global texture signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geva, Ofer; Zimmerman-Moreno, Gali; Lieberman, Sivan; Konen, Eli; Greenspan, Hayit

    2015-03-01

    A novel framework for automatic detection of pneumothorax abnormality in chest radiographs is presented. The suggested method is based on a texture analysis approach combined with supervised learning techniques. The proposed framework consists of two main steps: at first, a texture analysis process is performed for detection of local abnormalities. Labeled image patches are extracted in the texture analysis procedure following which local analysis values are incorporated into a novel global image representation. The global representation is used for training and detection of the abnormality at the image level. The presented global representation is designed based on the distinctive shape of the lung, taking into account the characteristics of typical pneumothorax abnormalities. A supervised learning process was performed on both the local and global data, leading to trained detection system. The system was tested on a dataset of 108 upright chest radiographs. Several state of the art texture feature sets were experimented with (Local Binary Patterns, Maximum Response filters). The optimal configuration yielded sensitivity of 81% with specificity of 87%. The results of the evaluation are promising, establishing the current framework as a basis for additional improvements and extensions.

  7. Pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum and pneumopericardium complications arising from a case of wisdom tooth extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-H. Chen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old woman underwent surgical tooth extraction. Several hours after the procedure, the woman complained of severe retrosternal pain and mild dyspnea. Subsequent imaging revealed subcutaneous emphysema from the mandibular region extending to the mediastinum and left side pneumothorax, as well as pneumopericardium. After treatment with antibiotics and analgesics, the patient recovered without any complications. Resumo: Uma mulher de 25 anos foi submetida a uma extração dentária. Várias horas após o procedimento, a mulher queixou-se de dor retroesternal aguda e dispneia ligeira. Imagiologia posterior revelou enfisema subcutâneo da região mandibular estendendo-se ao mediastino e pneumotórax à esquerda, bem como pneumopericárdio. Após o tratamento com antibióticos e analgésicos, a paciente recuperou sem quaisquer complicações. Keywords: Pneumothorax, Mediastinal infection, Palavras-chave: Pneumotórax, Infeção do mediastino

  8. Artificial Hydration and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ... Your Health Resources Healthcare Management Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Artificial Hydration and Nutrition Share Print Patients who ...

  9. Artificial Disc Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND A SPECIALIST Treatments Artificial Disc Replacement (ADR) Patient Education Committee Jamie Baisden The disc ... Disc An artificial disc (also called a disc replacement, disc prosthesis or spine arthroplasty device) is a ...

  10. Artificial life and Piaget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Ulrich; Grobman, K H.

    2003-04-01

    Artificial life provides important theoretical and methodological tools for the investigation of Piaget's developmental theory. This new method uses artificial neural networks to simulate living phenomena in a computer. A recent study by Parisi and Schlesinger suggests that artificial life might reinvigorate the Piagetian framework. We contrast artificial life with traditional cognitivist approaches, discuss the role of innateness in development, and examine the relation between physiological and psychological explanations of intelligent behaviour.

  11. Effect of ageing and pulmonary inflammation on the incidence and number of cross-bridging structures in pneumothorax patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Koji; Aburano, Tamio

    2011-01-01

    Background. There is an improved prognosis for T4 non-small-cell lung cancer in patients who show particular patterns of direct mediastinal invasion. The particular patterns suggest the presence of direct pathways other than the pulmonary hilum between each of the lungs and the mediastinum/chest wall. Purpose. To determine the incidence and number of such direct pathways in pneumothorax patients as well as the factors that affect the development of these pathways. Material and Methods. Two radiologists independently analyzed multidetector computed tomographic images of 81 patients with pneumothorax to assess the incidence and distribution pattern of the cross-bridging structures in the pleural cavity. Results. Cross-bridging structures were observed in the right pneumothorax in 34/54 (63%) patients and in the left pneumothorax in 19/32 (59%) patients. The number of cross-bridging structures was found to be positively correlated with ageing and pulmonary disease. The distribution patterns of cross-bridging structures were found to be specific in formation and often in repeated locations, regardless of the presence of pulmonary disease or the age of the patient. Conclusion. Cross-bridging structures in pneumothoraces were found more frequently in older patients and in patients with pulmonary disease. However, some of the cross-bridging structures may have been congenital because of their specific formations and repeated locations

  12. CT-guided lung biopsy: incidence of pneumothorax after instillation of NaCl into the biopsy track

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billich, Christian; Brenner, Gerhard; Schmidt, Stefan A.; Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Pauls, Sandra [University of Ulm, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Ulm (Germany); Muche, Rainer [University of Ulm, Institute of Biometrics, Ulm (Germany); Krueger, Stefan [University of Ulm, Department of Internal Medicine, Ulm (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate whether instillation of NaCl 0.9% solution into the biopsy track reduces the incidence of pneumothoraces after CT-guided lung biopsy. A total of 140 consecutive patients with pulmonary lesions were included in this prospective study. All patients were alternatingly assigned to one of two groups: group A in whom the puncture access was sealed by instillation of NaCl 0.9% solution during extraction of the guide needle (n = 70) or group B for whom no sealing was performed (n = 70). CT-guided biopsy was performed with a 18-G coaxial system. Localization of lesion (pleural, peripheral, central), lesion size, needle-pleural angle, rate of pneumothorax and alveolar hemorrhage were evaluated. In group A, the incidence of pneumothorax was lower compared to group B (8%, 6/70 patients vs. 34%, 24/70 patients; P < 0.001). All pneumothoraces occurred directly post punctionem after extraction of the guide needle. One patient in group A and eight patients in group B developed large pneumothoraces requiring chest tube placement (P = 0.01). The frequency of pneumothorax was independent of other variables. After CT-guided biopsy, instillation of NaCl 0.9% solution into the puncture access during extraction of the needle significantly reduces the incidence of pneumothorax. (orig.)

  13. Effect of ageing and pulmonary inflammation on the incidence and number of cross-bridging structures in pneumothorax patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Koji; Aburano, Tamio (Dept. of Radiology, Asahikawa Medical Univ., Asahikawa, Hokkaido (Japan)), email: tomoaki3est@gmail.com

    2011-12-15

    Background. There is an improved prognosis for T4 non-small-cell lung cancer in patients who show particular patterns of direct mediastinal invasion. The particular patterns suggest the presence of direct pathways other than the pulmonary hilum between each of the lungs and the mediastinum/chest wall. Purpose. To determine the incidence and number of such direct pathways in pneumothorax patients as well as the factors that affect the development of these pathways. Material and Methods. Two radiologists independently analyzed multidetector computed tomographic images of 81 patients with pneumothorax to assess the incidence and distribution pattern of the cross-bridging structures in the pleural cavity. Results. Cross-bridging structures were observed in the right pneumothorax in 34/54 (63%) patients and in the left pneumothorax in 19/32 (59%) patients. The number of cross-bridging structures was found to be positively correlated with ageing and pulmonary disease. The distribution patterns of cross-bridging structures were found to be specific in formation and often in repeated locations, regardless of the presence of pulmonary disease or the age of the patient. Conclusion. Cross-bridging structures in pneumothoraces were found more frequently in older patients and in patients with pulmonary disease. However, some of the cross-bridging structures may have been congenital because of their specific formations and repeated locations

  14. CT-guided lung biopsy: incidence of pneumothorax after instillation of NaCl into the biopsy track

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billich, Christian; Brenner, Gerhard; Schmidt, Stefan A.; Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Pauls, Sandra; Muche, Rainer; Krueger, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate whether instillation of NaCl 0.9% solution into the biopsy track reduces the incidence of pneumothoraces after CT-guided lung biopsy. A total of 140 consecutive patients with pulmonary lesions were included in this prospective study. All patients were alternatingly assigned to one of two groups: group A in whom the puncture access was sealed by instillation of NaCl 0.9% solution during extraction of the guide needle (n 70) or group B for whom no sealing was performed (n = 70). CT-guided biopsy was performed with a 18-G coaxial system. Localization of lesion (pleural, peripheral, central), lesion size, needle-pleural angle, rate of pneumothorax and alveolar hemorrhage were evaluated. In group A, the incidence of pneumothorax was lower compared to group B (8%, 6/70 patients vs. 34%, 24/70 patients; P < 0.001). All pneumothoraces occurred directly post punctionem after extraction of the guide needle. One patient in group A and eight patients in group B developed large pneumothoraces requiring chest tube placement (P 0.01). The frequency of pneumothorax was independent of other variables. After CT-guided biopsy, instillation of NaCl 0.9% solution into the puncture access during extraction of the needle significantly reduces the incidence of pneumothorax. (orig.)

  15. Conventional vs  invert-grayscale X-ray for diagnosis of pneumothorax in the emergency setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musalar, Ekrem; Ekinci, Salih; Ünek, Orkun; Arş, Eda; Eren, Hakan Şevki; Gürses, Bengi; Aktaş, Can

    2017-09-01

    Pneumothorax is a pathologic condition in which air is accumulated between the visceral and parietal pleura. After clinical suspicion, in order to diagnose the severity of the condition, imaging is necessary. By using the help of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) direct conventional X-rays are converted to gray-scale and this has become a preferred method among many physicians. Our study design was a case-control study with cross-over design study. Posterior-anterior chest X-rays of patients were evaluated for pneumothorax by 10 expert physicians with at least 3years of experience and who have used inverted gray-scale posterior anterior chest X-ray for diagnosing pneumothorax. The study included posterior anterior chest X-ray images of 268 patients of which 106 were diagnosed with spontaneous pneumothorax and 162 patients used as a control group. The sensitivity of Digital-conventional X-rays was found to be higher than that of inverted gray-scale images (95% CI (2,08-5,04), ppneumothorax. Prospective studies should be performed where diagnostic potency of inverted gray-scale radiograms is tested against gold standard chest CT. Further research should compare inverted grayscale to lung ultrasound to assess them as alternatives prior to CT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mutations of the Birt–Hogg–Dubé gene in patients with multiple lung cysts and recurrent pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunji, Yoko; Akiyoshi, Taeko; Sato, Teruhiko; Kurihara, Masatoshi; Tominaga, Shigeru; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Seyama, Kuniaki

    2007-01-01

    Rationale Birt–Hogg–Dubé (BHD) syndrome, a rare inherited autosomal genodermatosis first recognised in 1977, is characterised by fibrofolliculomas of the skin, an increased risk of renal tumours and multiple lung cysts with spontaneous pneumothorax. The BHD gene, a tumour suppressor gene located at chromosome 17p11.2, has recently been shown to be defective. Recent genetic studies revealed that clinical pictures of the disease may be variable and may not always present the full expression of the phenotypes. Objectives We hypothesised that mutations of the BHD gene are responsible for patients who have multiple lung cysts of which the underlying causes have not yet been elucidated. Methods We studied eight patients with lung cysts, without skin and renal disease; seven of these patients have a history of spontaneous pneumothorax and five have a family history of pneumothorax. The BHD gene was examined using PCR, denaturing high‐performance liquid chromatography and direct sequencing. Main results We found that five of the eight patients had a BHD germline mutation. All mutations were unique and four of them were novel, including three different deletions or insertions detected in exons 6, 12 and 13, respectively and one splice acceptor site mutation in intron 5 resulting in an in‐frame deletion of exon 6. Conclusions We found that germline mutations of the BHD gene are involved in some patients with multiple lung cysts and pneumothorax. Pulmonologists should be aware that BHD syndrome can occur as an isolated phenotype with pulmonary involvement. PMID:17496196

  17. Uniportal versus three-port video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for spontaneous pneumothorax: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shi-Lei; Huang, Jin-Bo; Yang, Yan-Long

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether or not uniportal video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is beneficial for spontaneous pneumothorax remains inconclusive. This meta-analysis aimed to summarize the available evidence to assess the feasibility and advantages of uniportal VATS for the treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax compared with three-port VATS. Methods Eligible publications were identified by searching the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Wanfang Data databases and CQVIP. Odds ratios (OR) and standardized mean differences (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated to compare dichotomous and continuous variables, respectively. Results This meta-analysis was based on 17 studies and included a total of 988 patients with spontaneous pneumothorax. No death was reported during the perioperative period. Compared with three-port VATS groups, there was a statistically significant difference in uniportal VATS groups regarding postoperative hospital stay (SMD= −0.58; 95% CI: −1.04 to −0.12; P=0.01), paresthesia (OR=0.13; 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.24; Pparesthesia as well as an improvement in patients’ satisfaction. This meta-analysis indicated that using uniportal VATS to treat spontaneous pneumothorax was safe and feasible, and it may be a better alternative procedure because of its advantage in reducing postoperative pain and paresthesia. PMID:26793349

  18. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN DETERMINATION OF MARKETING CUSTOMER STRATEGY

    OpenAIRE

    Markić, Brano; Bijakšić, Sanja; Šantić, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Artificial intelligence is a computer-based analytical process that tends to create computational systems which we would incline to be called intelligent. Expert systems are the most important part of the artificial intelligence from economic perspective. Expert systems attempt to mimic the human thought process including reasoning and optimization. “Knowledge” is represented by a set of “if-then” rules in a form of knowledge base. The results of artificial intelligence system implementation ...

  19. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE IN DETERMINATION OF MARKETING CUSTOMER STRATEGY

    OpenAIRE

    Markić, Brano; Bijakšić, Sanja; Šantić, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Artificial intelligence is a computer-based analytical process that tends to create computational systems which we would incline to be called intelligent. Expert systems are the most important part of the artificial intelligence from economic perspective. Expert systems attempt to mimic the human thought process including reasoning and optimization. “Knowledge” is represented by a set of “if-then” rules in a form of knowledge base. The results of artificial intelligence system implementation ...

  20. Early pneumothorax as a feature of response to crizotinib therapy in a patient with ALK rearranged lung adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gennatas, Spyridon; Stanway, Susana J; Thomas, Robert; Min, Toon; Shah, Riyaz; O’Brien, Mary ER; Popat, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Single arm phase 1 and 2 studies on Crizotinib in ALK-positive patients so far have shown rapid and durable responses. Spontaneous pneumothoraces as a result of response to anti-cancer therapy are rare in oncology but have been documented in a number of tumour types including lung cancer. This includes cytotoxic chemotherapy as well as molecular targeted agents such as gefitinib and Bevacizumab. These often require chest drain insertion or surgical intervention with associated morbidity and mortality. They have also been associated with response to treatment. This is the first report we are aware of documenting pneumothorax as response to crizotinib therapy. A 48-year-old Caucasian male presented with a Stage IV, TTF1 positive, EGFR wild-type adenocarcinoma of the lung. He received first line chemotherapy with three cycles of cisplatin-pemetrexed chemotherapy with a differential response, and then second-line erlotinib for two months before further radiological evidence of disease progression. Further analysis of his diagnostic specimen identified an ALK rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). He was commenced on crizotinib therapy 250 mg orally twice daily. At his 4-week assessment he had a chest radiograph that identified a large left-sided pneumothorax with disease response evident on the right. Chest CT confirmed a 50% left-sided pneumothorax on a background of overall disease response. A chest tube was inserted with complete resolution of the pneumothorax that did not recur following its removal. Our case demonstrates this potential complication of crizotinib therapy and we therefore recommend that pneumothorax be considered in patients on crizotinib presenting with high lung metastatic burden and with worsening dyspnoea

  1. Influence of Mechanical Ventilation on the Incidence of Pneumothorax During Infraclavicular Subclavian Vein Catheterization: A Prospective Randomized Noninferiority Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eugene; Kim, Hyun Joo; Hong, Deok Man; Park, Hee-Pyoung; Bahk, Jae-Hyon

    2016-09-01

    It remains unclear whether we have to interrupt mechanical ventilation during infraclavicular subclavian venous catheterization. In practice, the clinicians' choice about lung deflation depends on their own discretion. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of mechanical ventilation on the incidence of pneumothorax during infraclavicular subclavian venous catheterization. A total of 332 patients, who needed subclavian venous catheterization, were randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 groups: catheterizations were performed with the patients' lungs under mechanical ventilation (ventilation group, n = 165) or without mechanical ventilation (deflation group, n = 167). The incidences of pneumothorax and other complications such as arterial puncture, hemothorax, or catheter misplacements and the success rate of catheterization were compared. The incidences of pneumothorax were 0% (0/165) in the ventilation group and 0.6% (1/167) in the deflation group. The incidence of pneumothorax in the deflation group was 0.6% higher than that in the ventilation group and the 2-sided 90% confidence interval for the difference was (-1.29% to 3.44%). Because the lower bound for the 2-sided 90% confidence interval, -1.29%, was higher than the predefined noninferiority margin of -3%, the inferiority of the ventilation group over the deflation group was rejected at the .05 level of significance. Other complication rates and success rates of catheterization were comparable between 2 groups. The oxygen saturation dropped below 95% in 9 patients in the deflation group, while none in the ventilation group (P = .007). The success and complication rates were similar regardless of mechanical ventilation. During infraclavicular subclavian venous catheterization, interruption of mechanical ventilation does not seem to be necessary for the prevention of pneumothorax.

  2. Occult pneumothorax in blunt trauma: is there a need for tube thoracostomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M; Teo, L T; Goh, M H; Leow, J; Go, K T S

    2016-12-01

    Occult pneumothorax (OPTX) is defined as air within the pleural cavity that is undetectable on normal chest X-rays, but identifiable on computed tomography. Currently, consensus is divided between tube thoracostomy and conservative management for OPTX. The aim of this retrospective study is to determine whether OPTX can be managed conservatively and whether any adverse events occur under conservative management. Data on all trauma patients from 1 Jan 2010 to 31 December 2012 were obtained from our hospital's trauma registry. All patients with occult pneumothorax who had chest X-ray (CXR) and any CT scan visualizing the thorax were included. The exclusion criteria included those with penetrating wounds; CXR showing pneumothorax, hemothorax, or hemopneumothorax; those with prophylactic chest tube insertion before CT; and those with no CT diagnosis of OPTX. The complications of these patients were analyzed to determine if tube thoracostomy is necessary for OPTX and whether not inserting it would alter the outcome significantly. A total of 1564 cases were reviewed and 83 patients were included. Of these 83 patients, 35 (42.2 %) had tube thoracostomy after OPTX detection and 48 (57.8 %) were observed initially. Patients who had tube thoracostomy had similar ISS compared to those without (median ISS 17 vs. 18.5, p = 0.436). Out of the 48 patients who did not have tube thoracostomy on detection of an OPTX, 4 (8.3 %) had complications. In the group of 35 patients who had tube thoracostomy on detection of an OPTX, 7 (20 %) had complications. Of the 83 patients, a total of 12 patients had IPPV, of which 7 (58.3 %) had tube thoracostomy and 5 (41.7 %) did not. Patients who had tube thoracostomy under our care have a statistically significant likelihood of experiencing any complication compared to those without tube thoracostomy (odds ratio 9.92. The median length of stay was also longer (13 days) in those who had tube thoracostomy compared to those without (5

  3. Pneumothorax Complicating Coaxial and Non-coaxial CT-Guided Lung Biopsy: Comparative Analysis of Determining Risk Factors and Management of Pneumothorax in a Retrospective Review of 650 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A., E-mail: nour410@hotmail.com; Alsubhi, Mohammed, E-mail: mohammedal-subhi@yahoo.com; Emam, Ahmed, E-mail: morgan101002@hotmail.com; Lehnert, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.lehnert@kgu.de; Beeres, Martin, E-mail: beeres@gmx.net; Jacobi, Volkmar, E-mail: volkmar.jacobi@kgu.de; Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana, E-mail: tatjanagruber2004@yahoo.com; Scholtz, Jan-Erik, E-mail: janerikscholtz@gmail.com; Vogl, Thomas J., E-mail: t.vogl@em.uni-frankfurt.de; Naguib, Nagy N., E-mail: nagynnn@yahoo.com [Johan Wolfgang Goethe – University Hospital, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    PurposeTo assess the scope and determining risk factors related to the development of pneumothorax throughout CT-guided biopsy of pulmonary lesions in coaxial and non-coaxial techniques and the outcome of its management.Materials and MethodsThe study included CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsies in 650 consecutive patients (407 males, 243 females; mean age 54.6 years, SD 5.2) from November 2008 to June 2013 in a retrospective design. Patients were classified according to lung biopsy technique into coaxial group (318 lesions) and non-coaxial group (332 lesions). Exclusion criteria for biopsy were lesions <5 mm in diameter, uncorrectable coagulopathy, positive-pressure ventilation, severe respiratory compromise, pulmonary arterial hypertension, or refusal of the procedure. Risk factors related to the occurrence of pneumothorax were classified into: (a) Technical risk factors, (b) patient-related risk factors, and (c) lesion-associated risk factors. Radiological assessments were performed by two radiologists in consensus. Mann–Whitney U test and Fisher’s exact tests were used for statistical analysis. p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant.ResultsThe incidence of pneumothorax complicating CT-guided lung biopsy was less in the non-coaxial group (23.2 %, 77 out of 332) than the coaxial group (27 %, 86 out of 318). However, the difference in incidence between both groups was statistically insignificant (p = 0.14). Significant risk factors for the development of pneumothorax in both groups were emphysema (p < 0.001 in both groups), traversing a fissure with the biopsy needle (p value 0.005 in non-coaxial group and 0.001 in coaxial group), small lesion, less than 2 cm in diameter (p value of 0.02 in both groups), location of the lesion in the basal or mid sections of the lung (p = 0.003 and <0.001 in non-coaxial and coaxial groups, respectively), and increased needle track path within the lung tissue of more than 2.5 cm (p = 0.01 in both

  4. Pneumothorax Complicating Coaxial and Non-coaxial CT-Guided Lung Biopsy: Comparative Analysis of Determining Risk Factors and Management of Pneumothorax in a Retrospective Review of 650 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nour-Eldin, Nour-Eldin A.; Alsubhi, Mohammed; Emam, Ahmed; Lehnert, Thomas; Beeres, Martin; Jacobi, Volkmar; Gruber-Rouh, Tatjana; Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Vogl, Thomas J.; Naguib, Nagy N.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo assess the scope and determining risk factors related to the development of pneumothorax throughout CT-guided biopsy of pulmonary lesions in coaxial and non-coaxial techniques and the outcome of its management.Materials and MethodsThe study included CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsies in 650 consecutive patients (407 males, 243 females; mean age 54.6 years, SD 5.2) from November 2008 to June 2013 in a retrospective design. Patients were classified according to lung biopsy technique into coaxial group (318 lesions) and non-coaxial group (332 lesions). Exclusion criteria for biopsy were lesions <5 mm in diameter, uncorrectable coagulopathy, positive-pressure ventilation, severe respiratory compromise, pulmonary arterial hypertension, or refusal of the procedure. Risk factors related to the occurrence of pneumothorax were classified into: (a) Technical risk factors, (b) patient-related risk factors, and (c) lesion-associated risk factors. Radiological assessments were performed by two radiologists in consensus. Mann–Whitney U test and Fisher’s exact tests were used for statistical analysis. p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant.ResultsThe incidence of pneumothorax complicating CT-guided lung biopsy was less in the non-coaxial group (23.2 %, 77 out of 332) than the coaxial group (27 %, 86 out of 318). However, the difference in incidence between both groups was statistically insignificant (p = 0.14). Significant risk factors for the development of pneumothorax in both groups were emphysema (p < 0.001 in both groups), traversing a fissure with the biopsy needle (p value 0.005 in non-coaxial group and 0.001 in coaxial group), small lesion, less than 2 cm in diameter (p value of 0.02 in both groups), location of the lesion in the basal or mid sections of the lung (p = 0.003 and <0.001 in non-coaxial and coaxial groups, respectively), and increased needle track path within the lung tissue of more than 2.5 cm (p = 0.01 in both

  5. Creating the next generation control system software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    A new 1980's style support package for future accelerator control systems is proposed. It provides a way to create accelerator applications software without traditional programming. Visual Interactive Applications (VIA) is designed to meet the needs of expanded accelerator complexes in a more cost effective way than past experience with procedural languages by using technology from the personal computer and artificial intelligence communities. 4 refs

  6. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plate Share Create Your Plate ! Share: Seven Simple Steps to Create Your Plate It's simple and effective ... foods within each food category. Try these seven steps to get started: Using your dinner plate, put ...

  7. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Association Events Messaging Tools Recruiting Advocates Local Market Planning Training Webinars News & Events Advocacy News Call ... Meals > Create Your Plate Share: Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Create Your ...

  8. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the differences in types of vegetables. When creating your plate at home, remember that half of ... effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets you still choose the foods ...

  9. Applying Fuzzy Artificial Neural Network OSPF to develop Smart ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2018-03-05

    Mar 5, 2018 ... Fuzzy Artificial Neural Network to create Smart Routing. Protocol Algorithm. ... manufactured mental aptitude strategy. The capacity to study .... Based Energy Efficiency in Wireless Sensor Networks: A Survey",. International ...

  10. Magnetic artificial cilia for microfluidic propulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaderi, S.N.; den Toonder, J.M.J.; Onck, P.R.

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are tiny hair-like structures that cover the surfaces of biological cells. One of their functions is to generate flow. Artificial cilia are mechanical actuators that are designed to mimic the motion of natural cilia in order to create fluid transport in microchannels. These fluid propulsion

  11. Magnetic Artificial Cilia for Microfluidic Propulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaderi, Syed N.; den Toonder, Jaap M. J.; Onck, Patrick R.; Bordas, Stéphane P.A.; Balint, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are tiny hair-like structures that cover the surfaces of biological cells. One of their functions is to generate flow. Artificial cilia are mechanical actuators that are designed to mimic the motion of natural cilia in order to create fluid transport in microchannels. These fluid propulsion

  12. Artificial intelligence and knowledge management

    OpenAIRE

    Hoesch, Hugo Cesar; Barcellos, Vânia

    2006-01-01

    This article intends to make an analysis about the Artificial Intelligence (AI) and the Knowledge Management (KM). Faced with the dualism mind and body how we be able to see it AI? It doesn’t intent to create identical copy of human being, but try to find the better form to represent all the knowledge contained in our minds. The society of the information lives a great paradox, at the same time that we have access to an innumerable amount of information, the capacity and the forms of its proc...

  13. Spontaneous pneumothorax

    OpenAIRE

    Wakai, Abel P

    2011-01-01

    History of present illness: A 16-year-old male with asthma was brought to the emergency department by his parents for increasing right-sided chest pain associated with cough and mild dyspnea over the past week. Albuterol inhaler did not provide relief. He denied recent trauma, fever, sweats, and chills. The patient’s vitals and oxygen saturations were stable. Physical exam revealed a tall, slender body habitus with no signs of chest wall injuries. Bilateral breath sounds were present, but ...

  14. Spontaneous pneumothorax after radiation therapy for breast cancer. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuboshima, Kenji; Kishimoto, Koji; Oda, Teiji

    2010-01-01

    A 41-year-old asymptomatic woman was referred to our hospital for a right pneumothorax noted incidentally on a chest radiograph. She had undergone surgery, radiation at a total dose of 60 Gy, and adjuvant chemotherapy therapy for right breast cancer 14 months previously. A chest tube was inserted into the right pleural cavity. Although the right lung expanded immediately, air leakage increased gradually and the right lung collapsed again three days after drainage. Computed tomography (CT) revealed the thickening of the frontal pleura of the right lower lobe, which resulted from radiation therapy, with chest tube compression and no blebs. We selected video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). The thoracoscopic view showed air leakage from the pleural fissures compressed by the chest tube. Plication was performed for this lesion and air leakage was stopped. No findings of recurrence have been noted since the operation. (author)

  15. Tension pneumothorax during peroral endoscopic myotomy for treatment of esophageal achalasia under general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Shih Li

    Full Text Available Abstract More and more endoscopically gastrointestinal procedures require anesthesiologists to perform general anesthesia, such as "peroral endoscopic myotomy". Peroral endoscopic myotomy is a novel invasive treatment for the primary motility disorder of esophagus, called esophageal achalasia. Despite of its minimally invasive feature, there are still complications during the procedure which develop to critical conditions and threat patients’ lives. Herein we describe a case about tension pneumothorax subsequent to esophageal rupture during peroral endoscopic myotomy. The emergent management of the complication is stated in detail. The pivotal points of general anesthesia for patients undergoing peroral endoscopic myotomy are emphasized and discussed. Also, intraoperative and post-operative complications mentioned by literature are integrated.

  16. Bilateral pneumothorax, surgical emphysema and pneumomediastinum in a young male patient following MDMA intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiechina, Nonyelum Evangeline; Jayakumar, Ahrane; Khan, Yusra; Bass, James

    2018-04-07

    MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) or 'Ecstasy' is an illicit drug frequently used by young people at parties and 'raves'. It is readily available in spite of the fact that it is illegal. 1 It is perceived by a lot of young people as being 'harmless', but there have been a few high-profile deaths associated with its use. 2 Known side effects of MDMA include hyperthermia, rhabdomyolysis, coagulopathy and cardiac arrhythmias. 3 Rarer side effects include surgical emphysema and pneumomediastinum, which have been better described with cocaine abuse. 4-6 We present a case of bilateral pneumothorax, surgical emphysema and pneumomediastinum in a young man after taking ecstasy. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Delayed Tension Pneumothorax - Identification and Treatment in Traumatic Bronchial Injury: An Interesting Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amit; Rattan, Amulya; Kumar, Sunil; Rathi, Vinita

    2017-09-01

    A 13-year-old girl, who did not receive any treatment for few hours following Road Traffic Injury (RTI), reported to the Casualty Department and found to have patent airway with clinically normal C spine, air-hunger (RR 42/minute), trachea deviated to left, distended neck veins and absent breath sounds on the right side. The chest X-ray she carried, done immediately after the injury, showed right sided tension pneumothorax. She was put on oxygen at 11 L/minute and an Intercostal chest tube drainage (ICD) was inserted on right side. Her oxygen saturation (40%) failed to improve. ICD bag showed continuous bubbling and air entry remained absent on the right side. An urgent right thoracotomy was done which revealed right main bronchus tear; the tear was repaired using interrupted Prolene ® sutures. Patient recovered well and was discharged 10 days later in a stable condition.

  18. A case of radiation-related pneumonia and bilateral tension pneumothorax after extended thymectomy and adjuvant radiation for thymoma with myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasone, Etsuko; Nakayama, Masayuki; Bando, Masashi; Endo, Shunsuke; Hironaka, Mitsugu; Sugiyama, Yukihiko

    2010-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a 2-month history of progressive cough and dyspnea. He had undergone thymectomy for thymoma with myasthenia gravis. Adjuvant radiation of 50 Gy had been performed until 6 months before the symptoms developed. Chest computed tomography showed infiltrative findings even outside the irradiated area. We diagnosed radiation-related pneumonia, and 30 mg per day prednisolone was initiated. On the final day, he developed bilateral tension pneumothorax. After chest tube drainage, the right S 5 bulla was resected with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). The right pneumothorax caused the bilateral tension pneumothorax, because the right and left thoracic cavity communicated in the anterior mediastinum after thymectomy. We should be aware of the risk of bilateral tension pneumothorax following radiation-related pneumonia after extended thymectomy and adjuvant radiation in patients with myasthenia gravis. (author)

  19. The usefulness of two-port video-assisted thoracosopic surgery in low-risk patients with secondary spontaneous pneumothorax compared with open thoracotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Taek Park

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: In selected patients with secondary spontaneous pneumothorax treated with surgical approach, two-port VATS resulted in shorter postoperative drainage period and hospital stay compared with open thoracotomy.

  20. Clinician-performed Beside Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Traumatic Pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bon S. Ku

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prior studies have reported conflicting results regarding the utility of ultrasound in thediagnosis of traumatic pneumothorax (PTX because they have used sonologists with extensiveexperience. This study evaluates the characteristics of ultrasound for PTX for a large cohort oftrauma and emergency physicians.Methods: This was a prospective, observational study on a convenience sample of patientspresenting to a trauma center who had a thoracic ultrasound (TUS evaluation for PTX performedafter the Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma exam. Sonologists recorded theirfindings prior to any other diagnostic studies. The results of TUS were compared to one or more ofthe following: chest computed tomography, escape of air on chest tube insertion, or supine chestradiography followed by clinical observation.Results: There were 549 patients enrolled. The median injury severity score of the patients was 5(inter-quartile range [IQR] 1-14; 36 different sonologists performed TUS. Forty-seven of the 549patients had traumatic PTX, for an incidence of 9%. TUS correctly identified 27/47 patients with PTXfor a sensitivity of 57% (confidence interval [CI] 42-72%. There were 3 false positive cases of TUSfor a specificity of 99% (CI 98%-100%. A “wet” chest radiograph reading done in the trauma bayshowed a sensitivity of 40% (CI 23-59 and a specificity of 100% (99-100.Conclusion: In a large heterogenous group of clinicians who typically care for trauma patients, thesonographic evaluation for pneumothorax was as accurate as supine chest radiography. Thoracicultrasound may be helpful in the initial evaluation of patients with truncal trauma.

  1. Needle thoracostomy in the treatment of a tension pneumothorax in trauma patients: what size needle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengerink, Imme; Brink, Peter R; Laupland, Kevin B; Raber, Earl L; Zygun, Dave; Kortbeek, John B

    2008-01-01

    A tension pneumothorax requires immediate decompression using a needle thoracostomy. According to advanced trauma life support guidelines this procedure is performed in the second intercostal space (ICS) in the midclavicular line (MCL), using a 4.5-cm (2-inch) catheter (5-cm needle). Previous studies have shown a failure rate of up to 40% using this technique. Case reports have suggested that this high failure rate could be because of insufficient length of the needle. To analyze the average chest wall thickness (CWT) at the second ICS in the MCL in a trauma population and to evaluate the length of the needle used in needle thoracostomy for emergency decompression of tension pneumothoraces. Retrospective review of major trauma admissions (Injury Severity Score >12) at the Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary, Canada, who underwent a computed tomography chest scan admitted in the period from October 2001 until March 2004. Subgroup analysis on men and women, /=40 years of age was defined a priori. CWT was measured to the nearest 0.01 cm at the second ICS in the MCL. The mean CWT in the 604 male patients and 170 female patients studied averaged 3.50 cm at the left second ICS MCL and 3.51 cm on the right. The mean CWT was significantly higher for women than men (p 4.5 cm and 24.1% to 35.4% of the women studied. A catheter length of 4.5 cm may not penetrate the chest wall of a substantial amount (9.9%-35.4%) of the population, depending on age and gender. This study demonstrates the need for a variable needle length for relief of a tension pneumothorax in certain population groups to improve effectiveness of needle thoracostomy.

  2. Pleural ultrasonography versus chest radiography for the diagnosis of pneumothorax: review of the literature and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrajab, Saadah; Youssef, Asser M; Akkus, Nuri I; Caldito, Gloria

    2013-09-23

    Ultrasonography is being increasingly utilized in acute care settings with expanding applications. Pneumothorax evaluation by ultrasonography is a fast, safe, easy and inexpensive alternative to chest radiographs. In this review, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the current literature comparing ultrasonography and chest radiography for the diagnosis of pneumothorax. We searched English-language articles in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library dealing with both ultrasonography and chest radiography for diagnosis of pneumothorax. In eligible studies that met strict inclusion criteria, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of pleural ultrasonography in comparison with chest radiography for the diagnosis of pneumothorax. We reviewed 601 articles and selected 25 original research articles for detailed review. Only 13 articles met all of our inclusion criteria and were included in the final analysis. One study used lung sliding sign alone, 12 studies used lung sliding and comet tail signs, and 6 studies searched for lung point in addition to the other two signs. Ultrasonography had a pooled sensitivity of 78.6% (95% CI, 68.1 to 98.1) and a specificity of 98.4% (95% CI, 97.3 to 99.5). Chest radiography had a pooled sensitivity of 39.8% (95% CI, 29.4 to 50.3) and a specificity of 99.3% (95% CI, 98.4 to 100). Our meta-regression and subgroup analyses indicate that consecutive sampling of patients compared to convenience sampling provided higher sensitivity results for both ultrasonography and chest radiography. Consecutive versus nonconsecutive sampling and trauma versus nontrauma settings were significant sources of heterogeneity. In addition, subgroup analysis showed significant variations related to operator and type of probe used. Our study indicates that ultrasonography is more accurate than chest radiography for detection of pneumothorax. The results support the previous investigations in this field, add new valuable information

  3. Chest ultrasonography for the emergency diagnosis of traumatic pneumothorax and haemothorax: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staub, Leonardo Jönck; Biscaro, Roberta Rodolfo Mazzali; Kaszubowski, Erikson; Maurici, Rosemeri

    2018-03-01

    To assess the accuracy of the chest ultrasonography for the emergency diagnosis of traumatic pneumothorax and haemothorax in adults. Systematic review and meta-analysis. PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science and LILACS (up to 2016) were systematically searched for prospective studies on the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography for pneumothorax and haemothorax in adult trauma patients. The references of other systematic reviews and the included studies were checked for further articles. The characteristics and results of the studies were extracted using a standardised form, and their methodological quality was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2). Primary analysis was performed considering each hemithorax as an independent unit, while secondary analysis considered each patient. The global diagnostic accuracy of the chest ultrasonography was estimated using the Rutter-Gatsonis hierarchical summary ROC method. Moreover, Reitsma's bivariate model was used to estimate the sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio (LR + ) and negative likelihood ratio (LR-) of each sonographic sign. This review was previously registered (PROSPERO CRD42016048085). Nineteen studies were included in the review, 17 assessing pneumothorax and 5 assessing haemothorax. The reference standard was always chest tomography, alone or in parallel with chest radiography and observation of the chest tube. The overall methodological quality of the studies was low. The diagnostic accuracy of chest ultrasonography had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.979 for pneumothorax (Fig). The absence of lung sliding and comet-tail artefacts was the most reported sonographic sign of pneumothorax, with a sensitivity of 0.81 (95% confidence interval [95%CI], 0.71-0.88), specificity of 0.98 (95%CI, 0.97-0.99), LR+ of 67.9 (95%CI, 26.3-148) and LR- of 0.18 (95%CI, 0.11-0.29). An echo-poor or anechoic area in the pleural space was the only sonographic sign for

  4. Artificial reefs and reef restoration in the Laurentian Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Matthew W.; Roseman, Edward; Pritt, Jeremy J.; Kennedy, Gregory W.; Manny, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    We reviewed the published literature to provide an inventory of Laurentian Great Lakes artificial reef projects and their purposes. We also sought to characterize physical and biological monitoring for artificial reef projects in the Great Lakes and determine the success of artificial reefs in meeting project objectives. We found records of 6 artificial reefs in Lake Erie, 8 in Lake Michigan, 3 in Lakes Huron and Ontario, and 2 in Lake Superior. We found 9 reefs in Great Lakes connecting channels and 6 reefs in Great Lakes tributaries. Objectives of artificial reef creation have included reducing impacts of currents and waves, providing safe harbors, improving sport-fishing opportunities, and enhancing/restoring fish spawning habitats. Most reefs in the lakes themselves were incidental (not created purposely for fish habitat) or built to improve local sport fishing, whereas reefs in tributaries and connecting channels were more frequently built to benefit fish spawning. Levels of assessment of reef performance varied; but long-term monitoring was uncommon as was assessment of physical attributes. Artificial reefs were often successful at attracting recreational species and spawning fish; however, population-level benefits of artificial reefs are unclear. Stressors such as sedimentation and bio-fouling can limit the effectiveness of artificial reefs as spawning enhancement tools. Our investigation underscores the need to develop standard protocols for monitoring the biological and physical attributes of artificial structures. Further, long-term monitoring is needed to assess the benefits of artificial reefs to fish populations and inform future artificial reef projects.

  5. Artificial cognition architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Crowder, James A; Friess, Shelli A

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this book is to establish the foundation, principles, theory, and concepts that are the backbone of real, autonomous Artificial Intelligence. Presented here are some basic human intelligence concepts framed for Artificial Intelligence systems. These include concepts like Metacognition and Metamemory, along with architectural constructs for Artificial Intelligence versions of human brain functions like the prefrontal cortex. Also presented are possible hardware and software architectures that lend themselves to learning, reasoning, and self-evolution

  6. Artificial Intelligence Study (AIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-02-01

    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGNECE HARDWARE ....... 2-50 AI Architecture ................................... 2-49 AI Hardware ....................................... 2...ftf1 829 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE STUDY (RIS)(U) MAY CONCEPTS 1/3 A~NLYSIS AGENCY BETHESA RD R B NOJESKI FED 6? CM-RP-97-1 NCASIFIED /01/6 M |K 1.0...p/ - - ., e -- CAA- RP- 87-1 SAOFŔ)11 I ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE STUDY (AIS) tNo DTICFEBRUARY 1987 LECT 00 I PREPARED BY RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS

  7. Artificial Intelligence in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinney, E. J.; Prša, A.; Guinan, E. F.; Degeorge, M.

    2010-12-01

    From the perspective (and bias) as Eclipsing Binary researchers, we give a brief overview of the development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications, describe major application areas of AI in astronomy, and illustrate the power of an AI approach in an application developed under the EBAI (Eclipsing Binaries via Artificial Intelligence) project, which employs Artificial Neural Network technology for estimating light curve solution parameters of eclipsing binary systems.

  8. Inteligencia artificial en vehiculo

    OpenAIRE

    Amador Díaz, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Desarrollo de un robot seguidor de líneas, en el que se implementan diversas soluciones de las áreas de sistemas embebidos e inteligencia artificial. Desenvolupament d'un robot seguidor de línies, en el qual s'implementen diverses solucions de les àrees de sistemes encastats i intel·ligència artificial. Follower robot development of lines, in which various solutions are implemented in the areas of artificial intelligence embedded systems.

  9. STANFORD ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE PROJECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE , GAME THEORY, DECISION MAKING, BIONICS, AUTOMATA, SPEECH RECOGNITION, GEOMETRIC FORMS, LEARNING MACHINES, MATHEMATICAL MODELS, PATTERN RECOGNITION, SERVOMECHANISMS, SIMULATION, BIBLIOGRAPHIES.

  10. Subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, pneumoperitoneum, and pneumoretroperitoneum by insufflation of compressed air at the external genitalia in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramori, Katsumi; Takahashi, Yukiko; Handa, Noritoshi; Aikawa, Hisayuki

    2009-04-01

    A 7-year-old girl with concurrent subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, pneumoperitoneum, and pneumoretroperitoneum arrived at our facility. Compressed air at 5 atm of pressure was insufflated through the nozzle of a spray gun over her external genitalia. She was admitted for a small amount of genital bleeding and significant subcutaneous emphysema extending from the cheek to the upper body. Radiographic examination of the abdomen was suggestive of a visceral perforation, but she was managed conservatively and discharged in satisfactory condition without surgical intervention. The female genitalia possibly served as the entry point for air into the retroperitoneum and peritoneal cavity, with subsequent migration of air through the esophageal hiatus that resulted in pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, and extensive subcutaneous emphysema.

  11. A case of pneumothorax following bougie-guided intubation in a patient undergoing excision of an intraventricular space occupying lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanan Rajagopal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 46-year-old female with intraventricular space occupying lesion was posted for craniotomy and excision of the same. Immediately following routine induction of general anaesthesia and a bougie-guided intubation, she developed increased airway pressures and desaturation associated with a decreased air entry on the right side of the chest suggestive of a right-sided pneumothorax which was confirmed with radio imaging and following the placement of chest drain the saturation improved and airway pressures decreased. To be faced with a pneumothorax following an intubation could be surprising for a non-suspecting anaesthesiologist and it can have important implications especially in neurosurgical cases where a tight control of intracranial pressure is warranted. Hence, this case report emphasises the need for a high index of clinical suspicion for proper management and safe patient outcome.

  12. Artificial life and life artificialization in Tron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Dantas Figueiredo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cinema constantly shows the struggle between the men and artificial intelligences. Fiction, and more specifically fiction films, lends itself to explore possibilities asking “what if?”. “What if”, in this case, is related to the eventual rebellion of artificial intelligences, theme explored in the movies Tron (1982 and Tron Legacy (2010 trat portray the conflict between programs and users. The present paper examines these films, observing particularly the possibility programs empowering. Finally, is briefly mentioned the concept of cyborg as a possibility of response to human concerns.

  13. Histiocytose langerhansienne pulmonaire révélée par un pneumothorax: à propos d’un cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajiai, Hafsa; Rachidi, Mariam; Serhane, Hind; Aitbatahar, Salma; Amro, Lamyae

    2016-01-01

    L’histiocytose langerhansienne est une affection rare d’étiologie inconnue caractérisée par une infiltration d’un ou plusieurs organes, par des cellules de type Langerhans. Elle a une présentation clinique polymorphe. Nous rapportons le cas de Mr R.Y, âgé de 22 ans, tabagique à 8 PA, admis pour pneumothorax total spontané droit. Un drainage thoracique a été réalisé avec bonne évolution. La TDM thoracique de contrôle a objectivé de multiples formations kystiques diffuses prédominant aux lobes supérieurs. Un bilan a été réalisé à la recherche d’une histiocytose systémique mais s’est révélé négatif. L’évolution était marquée par la récidive du pneumothorax, le recours à une pleurodèse et la réalisation d’une biopsie pulmonaire qui a confirmé le diagnostic. Le diagnostic de l’HistiocytoseLangerhansienne doit être évoqué devant un pneumothorax sur poumon kystique. Le diagnostic est aisé devant un tableau clinique et radiologique évocateur. Néanmoins, les possibilités thérapeutiques restent limitées et la récidive du pneumothorax est fréquente. PMID:28154724

  14. Risk factors and treatment of pneumothorax secondary to granulomatosis with polyangiitis: a clinical analysis of 25 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xuhua; Zhang, Yongfeng; Lu, Yuewu

    2018-01-15

    To investigate the risk factors and treatment strategies for pneumothorax secondary to granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA). Retrospective analysis of cases with pneumothorax secondary to GPA from our own practice and published on literature. A total of 25 patients, 18 males and 7 females, mean age 44 ± 15.7 years, were analyzed. Diagnosis included pneumothorax (11 cases), hydropneumothorax (n = 5), empyema (n = 8) and hemopneumothorax (n = 1). 88% (22/25) patients showed single/multiple pulmonary/ subpleural nodules with/without cavitation on chest imaging. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were both elevated. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents were used in 16 cases. Five cases received steroid pulse therapy, of which 4 patients survived. Pleural drainage was effective in some patients. Seven patients underwent surgical operations. In the 10 fatal cases, infection and respiratory failure were the most common cause. Lung biopsy/ autopsy showed lung/pleural necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis, breaking into the chest cavity, pleural fibrosis, bronchial pleural fistula, etc. The mean age in the death group was greater than the survival group (53 ± 12.9 years vs 40.1 ± 14.7 years, p = 0.05), the ineffective pleural drainage was also higher in the death group (5/5 vs 0/7, p = 0.01). Pneumothorax was seen in the active GPA, due to a variety of reasons, and gave rise to high fatality rate. Aggressive treatment of GPA can improve the prognosis. Older and lack of response for pleural drainage indicates poor prognosis.

  15. Create Your Plate

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  19. MDCT quantification is the dominant parameter in decision–making regarding chest tube drainage for stable patients with traumatic pneumothorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wenli; Lee, June-Goo; Fikry, Karim; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Novelline, Robert; de Moya, Marc

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly believed that the size of a pneumothorax is an important determinant of treatment decision, in particular regarding whether chest tube drainage (CTD) is required. However, the volumetric quantification of pneumothoraces has not routinely been performed in clinics. In this paper, we introduced an automated computer-aided volumetry (CAV) scheme for quantification of volume of pneumothoraces in chest multi-detect CT (MDCT) images. Moreover, we investigated the impact of accurate volume of pneumothoraces in the improvement of the performance in decision-making regarding CTD in the management of traumatic pneumothoraces. For this purpose, an occurrence frequency map was calculated for quantitative analysis of the importance of each clinical parameter in the decision-making regarding CTD by a computer simulation of decision-making using a genetic algorithm (GA) and a support vector machine (SVM). A total of 14 clinical parameters, including volume of pneumothorax calculated by our CAV scheme, was collected as parameters available for decision-making. The results showed that volume was the dominant parameter in decision-making regarding CTD, with an occurrence frequency value of 1.00. The results also indicated that the inclusion of volume provided the best performance that was statistically significant compared to the other tests in which volume was excluded from the clinical parameters. This study provides the scientific evidence for the application of CAV scheme in MDCT volumetric quantification of pneumothoraces in the management of clinically stable chest trauma patients with traumatic pneumothorax. PMID:22560899

  20. Management of spontaneous pneumothorax compared to British Thoracic Society (BTS) 2003 guidelines: a district general hospital audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medford, Andrew Rl; Pepperell, Justin Ct

    2007-10-01

    In 1993, the British Thoracic Society (BTS) issued guidelines for the management of spontaneous pneumothorax (SP). These were refined in 2003. To determine adherence to the 2003 BTS SP guidelines in a district general hospital. An initial retrospective audit of 52 episodes of acute SP was performed. Subsequent intervention involved a junior doctor educational update on both the 2003 BTS guidelines and the initial audit results, and the setting up of an online guideline hyperlink. After the educational intervention a further prospective re-audit of 28 SP episodes was performed. Management of SP deviated considerably from the 2003 BTS guidelines in the initial audit - deviation rate 26.9%. After the intervention, a number of clinical management deviations persisted (32.1% deviation rate); these included failure to insert a chest drain despite unsuccessful aspiration, and attempting aspiration of symptomatic secondary SPs. Specific tools to improve standards might include a pneumothorax proforma to improve record keeping and a pneumothorax care pathway to reduce management deviations compared to BTS guidelines. Successful change also requires identification of the total target audience for any educational intervention.

  1. Occult pneumothorax in the blunt trauma patient: tube thoracostomy or observation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Heather; Ellsmere, James; Tallon, John; Kirkpatrick, Andrew

    2009-09-01

    The term occult pneumothorax (OP) describes a pneumothorax that is not suspected on the basis of either clinical examination or initial chest radiography, but is subsequently detected on computed tomography (CT) scan. The optimal management of OP in the blunt trauma setting remains controversial. Some physicians favour placement of a thoracostomy tube for patients with OP, particularly those undergoing positive pressure ventilation (PPV), while others favour close observation without chest drainage. This study was conducted both to determine the incidence of OP and to describe its current treatment status in the blunt trauma population at a Canadian tertiary trauma centre. Of interest were the rates of tube thoracostomy vs. observation without chest drainage and their respective outcomes. A retrospective review was conducted of the Nova Scotia Trauma Registry. The data on all consecutive blunt trauma patients between October 1994 and March 2003 was reviewed. Outcome measures evaluated include length of stay, discharge status-dead vs. alive, intervention and time to intervention (tube thoracostomy and its relation to institution of PPV). Direct comparison was made between the OP with tube thoracostomy group and OP without tube thoracostomy group (observation or control group). They were compared in terms of their baseline characteristics and outcome measures. In 1881 consecutive blunt trauma patients over a 102-month period there were 307 pneumothoraces of which 68 were occult. Thirty five patients with OP underwent tube thoracostomy, 33 did not. Twenty nine (82.8%) with tube thoracostomy received positive pressure ventilation (PPV), as did 16 (48.4%) in the observation group. Mean injury severity score (ISS) for tube thoracostomy and observation groups were similar (25.80 and 22.39, p=0.101) whereas length of stay (LOS) was different (17.4 and 10.0 days, p=0.026). Mortality was similar (11.4% and 9.1%). There were no tension pneumothoraces. The natural history of

  2. Quantification of pneumothorax volume on chest radiographs: comparison between the collins' and the axel's methods with three-dimensional CT as the standard of reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Keun; Kim, Hyung Jin; Lee, Kyung Hee; Kim, Joung Taek; Kim, Kwang Ho; Suh, Chang Hae; Han, Heon

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. In a preliminary study, we evaluated the accuracy of 3-D (three-dimensional) CT for the estimation of pneumothorax volume and for providing the optimal postprocessing method for clinical study. In the clinical study, we determined which of the two methods, Collins' and Axel's, was more accurate for the estimation of pneumothorax volume, as seen on chest radiographs, using 3-D CT as the standard of reference. In the preliminary study, 3-D CT was applied to phantoms and to four patients with pneumothorax using two different postprocessing methods, manual contour delineation and thresholding. In the clinical study, 3-D CT was performed in 13 patients with pneumothorax. For the purpose of evaluating conventional radiographs, a localizer scan was used for comparing the accuracy of Collins' method with that of Axel's method, with 3-D CT as the standard of reference. The preliminary study revealed that 3-D CT estimated pneumothorax volume with great accuracy and that manual contour delineation and thresholding measured volume equally well. Because of the shorter postprocessing time required with thresholding than with manual contour delineation (5 min versus 30 min), the former was used during clinical study. The results of this indicated close correlation between the measurements obtained using Collins' method on chest radiographs and those obtained by 3-D CT(r=0.95, p 0.05). 3-D CT can estimate pneumothorax volume with great accuracy. Collins' method is superior to Axel's method for the quantification of pneumothorax volume as seen on chest radiographs

  3. Retrospective Evaluation of Safety, Efficacy and Risk Factors for Pneumothorax in Simultaneous Localizations of Multiple Pulmonary Nodules Using Hook Wire System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yan; Xu, Xiao-Quan; Pan, Xiang-Long; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Hai; Yuan, Mei; Kong, Ling-Yan; Pu, Xue-Hui; Chen, Liang; Yu, Tong-Fu

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the hook wire system in the simultaneous localizations for multiple pulmonary nodules (PNs) before video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), and to clarify the risk factors for pneumothorax associated with the localization procedure. Between January 2010 and February 2016, 67 patients (147 nodules, Group A) underwent simultaneous localizations for multiple PNs using a hook wire system. The demographic, localization procedure-related information and the occurrence rate of pneumothorax were assessed and compared with a control group (349 patients, 349 nodules, Group B). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to determine the risk factors for pneumothorax during the localization procedure. All the 147 nodules were successfully localized. Four (2.7%) hook wires dislodged before VATS procedure, but all these four lesions were successfully resected according to the insertion route of hook wire. Pathological diagnoses were acquired for all 147 nodules. Compared with Group B, Group A demonstrated significantly longer procedure time (p pneumothorax (p = 0.019). Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that position change during localization procedure (OR 2.675, p = 0.021) and the nodules located in the ipsilateral lung (OR 9.404, p pneumothorax. Simultaneous localizations for multiple PNs using a hook wire system before VATS procedure were safe and effective. Compared with localization for single PN, simultaneous localizations for multiple PNs were prone to the occurrence of pneumothorax. Position change during localization procedure and the nodules located in the ipsilateral lung were independent risk factors for pneumothorax.

  4. Extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (EFAST) in the diagnosis of pneumothorax: experience at a community based level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandipati, Kalyana C; Allamaneni, Shyam; Kakarla, Ravindra; Wong, Alfredo; Richards, Neil; Satterfield, James; Turner, James W; Sung, Kae-Jae

    2011-05-01

    Early identification of pneumothorax is crucial to reduce the mortality in critically injured patients. The objective of our study is to investigate the utility of surgeon performed extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (EFAST) in the diagnosis of pneumothorax. We prospectively analysed 204 trauma patients in our level I trauma center over a period of 12 (06/2007-05/2008) months in whom EFAST was performed. The patients' demographics, type of injury, clinical examination findings (decreased air entry), CXR, EFAST and CT scan findings were entered into the data base. Sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were calculated. Of 204 patients (mean age--43.01+/-19.5 years, sex--male 152, female 52) 21 (10.3%) patients had pneumothorax. Of 21 patients who had pneumothorax 12 were due to blunt trauma and 9 were due to penetrating trauma. The diagnosis of pneumothorax in 204 patients demonstrated the following: clinical examination was positive in 17 patients (true positive in 13/21, 62%; 4 were false positive and 8 were false negative), CXR was positive in 16 (true positive in 15/19, 79%; 1 false positive, 4 missed and 2 CXR not performed before chest tube) patients and EFAST was positive in 21 patients (20 were true positive [95.2%], 1 false positive and 1 false negative). In diagnosing pneumothorax EFAST has significantly higher sensitivity compared to the CXR (P=0.02). Surgeon performed trauma room extended FAST is simple and has higher sensitivity compared to the chest X-ray and clinical examination in detecting pneumothorax. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Creating more effective graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Naomi B

    2012-01-01

    A succinct and highly readable guide to creating effective graphs The right graph can be a powerful tool for communicating information, improving a presentation, or conveying your point in print. If your professional endeavors call for you to present data graphically, here's a book that can help you do it more effectively. Creating More Effective Graphs gives you the basic knowledge and techniques required to choose and create appropriate graphs for a broad range of applications. Using real-world examples everyone can relate to, the author draws on her years of experience in gr

  6. USE OF ARTIFICIAL LIGHT IN MUSHROOM CULTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Poyedinok

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Artificial light is used in greenhouses to increase productivity and quality of agricultural and ornamental plants. Despite the awareness of the fact that light also plays important role in the life of nonhotosynthetic organisms, such as fungi, its using in their biotechnology cultivation is currently limited. Science has quite a large amount information about the influence of artificial light of different nature on morphogenesis, metabolic processes and productivity of more than 100 species of fungi, many of which are valuable producers of biologically active compounds. Themechanisms of photoreactions of various fungi, which is an integral part of a purposeful photoregulation their activity in biotechnological processes are described. The analysis of the researches and of the experience of their practical application allows predicting potential of using artificial light in mushroom growing industry, as well as in creating highly productive, environmentally clean technologies of targeted synthesis of the final product.

  7. Create Your Plate

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    Full Text Available ... Food Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans and a Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods donate en -- A Future Without Diabetes - a- ...

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    Full Text Available ... Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High Blood Pressure Physical Activity High Blood Glucose ... Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart- ...

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  17. [Total artificial heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antretter, H; Dumfarth, J; Höfer, D

    2015-09-01

    To date the CardioWest™ total artificial heart is the only clinically available implantable biventricular mechanical replacement for irreversible cardiac failure. This article presents the indications, contraindications, implantation procedere and postoperative treatment. In addition to a overview of the applications of the total artificial heart this article gives a brief presentation of the two patients treated in our department with the CardioWest™. The clinical course, postoperative rehabilitation, device-related complications and control mechanisms are presented. The total artificial heart is a reliable implant for treating critically ill patients with irreversible cardiogenic shock. A bridge to transplantation is feasible with excellent results.

  18. Primary spontaneous pneumothorax in children: the role of CT in guiding management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, A.K. [Department of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: arvradio@yahoo.com; Sellars, M.E.K. [Department of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Wallis, C. [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); Cohen, G. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom); McHugh, K. [Department of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom)

    2005-04-01

    AIM: Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) is rare in older children and most likely to be associated with apical subpleural blebs; there is a significant risk of recurrence. Our aim was to assess the radiological findings and final treatment of PSP in children presenting at our institution. METHODS: The study included 3 children presenting over a 15-month period at our institution with PSP; the clinical features at presentation and examination findings were recorded. The chest radiographic and CT appearances and findings at surgery were reviewed. RESULTS: In all cases, chest pain and breathlessness were presenting features and initial treatment included intercostal chest drainage. Chest radiographs on admission raised the suspicion of unilateral apical blebs in 2 children and bilateral apical blebs in the 3rd. Chest CT demonstrated apical blebs/cysts in all 3 children. The cysts ranged in size from 0.5 to 3.0 cm and were bilateral in 2 children. Surgery confirmed the radiological findings in all cases. CONCLUSION: CT is of value in the detection of apical pleural blebs in children with PSP. On CT, particular attention should be paid to the lung apices, where majority of blebs in otherwise healthy young patients are located. Prompt diagnosis of a morphological abnormality in these children is likely to expedite definitive surgical treatment.

  19. Etiology of spontaneous pneumothorax in 105 HIV-infected patients without highly active antiretroviral therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivero, Antonio; Perez-Camacho, Ines; Lozano, Fernando; Santos, Jesus; Camacho, Angela; Serrano, Ascencion; Cordero, Elisa; Jimenez, Francisco; Torres-Tortosa, Manuel; Torre-Cisneros, Julian

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Spontaneous pneumothorax (SP) is a frequent complication in non-treated HIV-infected patients as a complication of opportunistic infections and tumours. Objective: To analyse the aetiology of SP in non-treated HIV patients. Patients and methods: Observational study of SP cases observed in a cohort of 9831 of non-treated HIV-infected patients attended in seven Spanish hospitals. Results: 105 patients (1.06%) developed SP. The aetiological cause was identified in 89 patients. The major causes identified were: bacterial pneumonia (36 subjects, 34.3%); Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PJP) (31 patients, 29.5%); and pulmonary tuberculosis (17 cases, 15.2%). The most common cause of SP in drugs users was bacterial pneumonia (40%), whereas PJP was more common (65%) in sexual transmitted HIV-patients. The most common cause of bilateral SP was PJP (62.5%) whereas unilateral SP was most commonly associated with bacterial pneumonia (40.2%). The most common cause of SP in patients with a CD4+ lymphocyte count >200 cells/ml and in patients without AIDS criteria was bacterial pneumonia. PJP was the more common cause in patients with a CD4+ lymphocyte count <200 cells/ml or with AIDS. Conclusion: The incidence of SP in non-treated HIV-infected patients was 1.06%. The aetiology was related to the patients risk practices and to their degree of immunosuppression. Bacterial pneumonia was the most common cause of SP.

  20. The outcome and risk factors for recurrence and extended hospitalization of secondary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yoshitaro; Suzuki, Yohei; Demura, Ryo; Kawai, Hideki

    2018-03-01

    Secondary spontaneous pneumothorax (SSP) is difficult to treat by itself and due to its association with serious underlying diseases. It has a high rate of recurrence and often requires extended hospitalization. Therefore, we evaluated the outcome and risk factors associated with recurrence and extended hospitalization. We retrospectively examined 61 patients with SSP, and evaluated the patients' characteristics, underlying diseases, introduction of home oxygen therapy, Brinkman index, and X-ray imaging findings to determine the risk factors for recurrence and extended hospitalization. There were 28 patients (46.0%) with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 8 (13.1%) with interstitial pneumonia, 16 (26.2%) with massive emphysema, and 9 (14.8%) with other diseases. Adhesion and mediastinal shift visualized by X-ray imaging were observed in 37 (37.9%) and 25 patients (40.1%), respectively. Recurrence occurred in 25 patients (40.9%) and the average hospitalization duration was 14.5 days (±11.2). A multivariate analysis showed that adhesion on X-ray imaging was a significant risk factor for recurrence (odds ratio 4.90, 95% confidence interval 1.38-21.44) and mediastinal shift on X-ray imaging was a significant risk factor for extended hospitalization (odds ratio 6.05, 95% confidence interval 1.44-31.06). Findings from X-ray imaging, and not underlying diseases, are risk factors for recurrence and extended hospitalization.