WorldWideScience

Sample records for arthritis

  1. Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injected into painful joints or given by mouth. Disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are used to treat autoimmune arthritis. They include methotrexate, sulfasalazine, hydroxychloroquine, and leflunomide. ...

  2. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  3. Viral arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Arthritis may be a symptom of many virus-related illnesses. It usually disappears on its own without ... the rubella vaccine, only a few people develop arthritis. No risk factors are known.

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  5. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  6. Gonococcal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000453.htm Gonococcal arthritis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Gonococcal arthritis is inflammation of a joint due to a ...

  7. Infectious Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  8. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  9. Fungal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000444.htm Fungal arthritis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fungal arthritis is swelling and irritation (inflammation) of a joint ...

  10. Sporotrichal arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Sporotrichal arthritis is a rare disease entity. Diagnosis is often difficult and delayed. Presentation may be either monoarticular or polyarticular. A case of polyarticular sporotrichal arthritis which exemplifies these problems is reported.

  11. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Call for Letters of Interest Call for Topics Axial Spondyloarthritis Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis Gout Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis ... be affected. Psoriatic arthritis in the spine, called spondylitis , causes stiffness in the back or neck, and ...

  12. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  13. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  14. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... increased risk of developing an inflammatory eye problem (iritis or uveitis). Eye inflammation may persist independently of the arthritis. Because iritis usually does not cause symptoms, regular exams by ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life ...

  16. Posttraumatic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Pickering, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    Posttraumatic arthritis (i.e., degenerative joint disease secondary to injury) is a particular problem in young, active patients. It limits the activities of these vigorous individuals, and the compromised joint must be endured for a long time. The knee is used as an example of a joint commonly involved in this process. Conditions predisposing patients to posttraumatic arthritis are discussed, as are some treatment modalities, including rest, ice therapy, anti-inflammatory medications, physio...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  18. Gouty arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelemy, C.R.; Nakayama, D.A.; Lightfoot, R.W. Jr.; Wortmann, R.L.; Carrera, G.F.

    1984-01-01

    A prospective analysis of 60 patients with gout was undertaken to evaluate the radiographic spectrum of gouty arthritis in patients treated in the era of hypouricemic therapy. Twenty-two of these patients were clinically tophaceous; 36 were considered to have radiographic findings diagnostic of gouty arthritis by strict radiographic criteria. Up to 24% of the patients denied symptoms in joints with radiographic changes of gout; 42% with no evidence of tophi on clinical examination had radiographic changes characteristic of gout. Radiographic assessment can be extremely helpful in the management of gout by documenting the degree and extent of bony involvement, particularly in patients with limited symptoms or without clinical tophi.

  19. Arthritis of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    .org Arthritis of the Hand Page ( 1 ) The hand and wrist have multiple small joints that work together to ... a shoelace. When the joints are affected by arthritis, activities of daily living can be difficult. Arthritis ...

  20. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are similar, CPPD arthritis can be confused with: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Exams and Tests Most arthritic ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Gout Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  1. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; McInnes, Iain B

    2016-10-22

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, which can cause cartilage and bone damage as well as disability. Early diagnosis is key to optimal therapeutic success, particularly in patients with well-characterised risk factors for poor outcomes such as high disease activity, presence of autoantibodies, and early joint damage. Treatment algorithms involve measuring disease activity with composite indices, applying a treatment-to-target strategy, and use of conventional, biological, and newz non-biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. After the treatment target of stringent remission (or at least low disease activity) is maintained, dose reduction should be attempted. Although the prospects for most patients are now favourable, many still do not respond to current therapies. Accordingly, new therapies are urgently required. In this Seminar, we describe current insights into genetics and aetiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, assessment, therapeutic agents, and treatment strategies together with unmet needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Septic arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Ahaideb Abdulaziz

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is an increasing number of rheumatoid patients who get septic arthritis. Chronic use of steroids is one of the important predisposing factors. The clinical picture of septic arthritis is different in immunocompromised patients like patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The diagnosis and management are discussed in this review article.

  3. Septic arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Ahaideb Abdulaziz

    2008-01-01

    Abstract There is an increasing number of rheumatoid patients who get septic arthritis. Chronic use of steroids is one of the important predisposing factors. The clinical picture of septic arthritis is different in immunocompromised patients like patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The diagnosis and management are discussed in this review article.

  4. [Rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, J; Lange, U; Müller-Ladner, U

    2005-07-29

    The development of novel anti-rheumatic drugs revolutionizes currently therapeutic strategies and diagnostic management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, facilitating the goal of true remission instead of only symptomatic treatment as in former years. Since early treatment is known to be crucial for the longterm outcome, imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and high-frequency ultrasonography including Doppler sonography, which allow direct visualization of very early pathologic alterations of synovitis, or even initial destruction, become increasingly important. Besides the established therapy with methotrexate, new drugs such as leflunomide or the use of various combination therapies have been successfully introduced into the therapeutic armamentarium. Especially the introduction of cytokine-antagonists such as TNF-a inhibitors target the aim of remission. In addition, the upcoming therapeutic agents, which influence very effectively the inflammatory and destructive process need also to be integrated into the concert of different therapeutic strategies in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, which includes the mandatory complementary factors such as physiotherapy, ergotherapy and orthopedic surgery.

  5. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and ankylosing spondylitis. Modifiable risk ... involve the following: Medications. Nonpharmacologic therapies. Physical or occupational therapy. Splints or joint assistive aids. Patient education and ...

  6. Forms of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  8. Arthritis in America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part of aging. The most common types are osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, and fibromyalgia. Arthritis costs ... file ePub file RIS file Page last reviewed: March 7, 2017 Page last updated: March 7, 2017 ...

  9. Sex and Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Call for Letters of Interest Call for Topics Axial Spondyloarthritis Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis Gout Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis ... fibromyalgia , scleroderma , osteoarthritis , rheumatoid ... spondylitis , Raynaud’s phenomenon and juvenile arthritis also may experience: ...

  10. Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Østergaard, Mikkel; Terslev, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic...

  11. Arthritis and the Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some of the complaints—inflammation, pain, stiffness, excessive warmth, injuries. Even bunions can be manifestations of arthritis. Arthritis may be treated in many ways. Patient education is important. Physical therapy and exercise may be indicated, accompanied by ...

  12. How undifferentiated arthritis evolves into chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Woude, D; Toes, R E M; Scherer, H U

    2014-08-01

    Undifferentiated arthritis (UA) is a frequently occurring clinical presentation with a variable outcome. While some forms of UA will spontaneously remit, other forms will progress to chronic arthritis; an outcome that would preferably be prevented. Which immunological factors are normally at the basis of resolution of inflammation, and what, on the other hand, causes inflammation to persist? This review provides an overview of the immunological mechanisms involved in these two scenarios, including specific examples of how these mechanisms apply, or can be influenced in rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, what do we know about risk factors for chronic arthritis, such as the development of autoantibodies? The recent years have provided many insights concerning risk factors for autoantibody-positive versus autoantibody-negative rheumatoid arthritis, which are discussed along with a possible pathophysiological model incorporating autoantibodies into the larger process of disease development. Finally, the evolution of the autoantibody response over time is described.

  13. Fungal arthritis simulating juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Haapasaari, J; Essen, R V; Kahanpää, A; Kostiala, A A; Holmberg, K; Ahlqvist, J

    1982-01-01

    Petriellidium boydii is often isolated from maduromycosis but has recently been associated with arthritis. A previously healthy 6-year-old boy developed chronic purulent arthritis of the knee after a bicycle accident. Culture of aspirate grew no pathogens and antibiotic treatment had no effect. Culture of synovial fluid grew P boydii, which responded initially to amphotericin but reappeared after six months. Subsequent treatment with miconazole was stopped after development of haematuria. The...

  14. Infections and arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; Ravindran, Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can all cause arthritis of either acute or chronic nature, which can be divided into infective/septic, reactive, or inflammatory. Considerable advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques in the recent decades resulting in better treatment outcomes in patients with infective arthritis. Detection of emerging arthritogenic viruses has changed the epidemiology of infection-related arthritis. The role of viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis is increasingly being recognized. We discuss the various causative agents of infective arthritis and emphasize on the approach to each type of arthritis, highlighting the diagnostic tests, along with their statistical accuracy. Various investigations including newer methods such as nucleic acid amplification using polymerase chain reaction are discussed along with the pitfalls in interpreting the tests.

  15. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... wrists, or knees. It also affects the eyes. Spondyloarthritis of children resembles the disorder in adults and ...

  16. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Chinese 繁體中文 ) What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? (in Korean 한국어 ) What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? (in Vietnamese bằng ... his or her own body tissues. Researchers are learning many things about why and how this happens. ...

  17. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prakken, Berent; Albani, Salvatore; Martini, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterised by arthritis of unknown origin with onset before age of 16 years. Pivotal studies in the past 5 years have led to substantial progress in various areas, ranging from disease classification to new treatments. Gene expres

  18. Arthritis and Veterans

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-09

    One in three veterans has arthritis. This podcast provides information on how veterans can improve their quality of life with physical activity and other arthritis management strategies.  Created: 11/9/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/9/2015.

  19. Cardiovascular comorbidity in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Holmqvist, Marie E

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is based on four different studies, all focusing on co-morbidities in rheumatoid arthritis. Diabetes mellitus is assessed as a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis, the temporal relationship between ischemic heart disease and rheumatoid arthritis, and the extent of coronary stenosis in rheumatoid arthritis, is studied. The rationale for this is that patients with rheumatoid arthritis suffer an increased risk of ischemic heart disease that cannot be explained by traditional risk fa...

  20. [Septic arthritis and spondylitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Yosuke

    2014-10-01

    Septic arthritis and spondylitis in elderly adult are uncommon disease. But symptoms and signs of septic arthritis and spondylitis are an important medical emergency, with high mortality and morbidity. Delayed or inadequate treatment can result in irreversible joint destruction and neurological condition. Early diagnoses as well as prompt and effective treatment are essential for avoiding severe outcomes. In spite of advances in diagnostic imaging techniques, the incidence of septic arthritis and spondylitis appears to have been increased. The aging of the population, the widespread use of immunosuppressant therapies, including systemic corticosteroids, cytokines and anticytokines, and growing resistance to conventional antibiotics seem to be the major cause.

  1. Juvenile chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwood, T R; Woo, P

    1995-05-01

    The nomenclature and classification criteria for arthritis in children should be dealt with initially as separate issues, although they are undoubtedly intertwined. The classification criteria should aim to delineate homogeneous patient populations, yet should be flexible enough to incorporate advances in disease knowledge. It should be recognized that arriving at an international consensus for classification criteria will merely provide a set of operational definitions to facilitate research, and not a set of diagnostic criteria. Indeed the only point to obtaining consensus is to begin a process of systematic ongoing review of the criteria. The labels attached to any of these diseases should facilitate accurate communication. In view of the heterogeneous nature of childhood arthritis, consideration should be given to using a broad umbrella term such as juvenile or childhood arthritis only for communicating with the lay public. Medical nomenclature should be formulated to reflect accurately homogeneous subgroups of arthritis, and should not artificially proscribe a relationship between paediatric and adult disease.

  2. Arthritis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial ... Content Article Body Arthritis is an inflammation of the joints that produces swelling, redness, heat, and pain. Although it is typically thought of as a ...

  3. Arthritis and IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain and stiffness in the lower spine and sacroiliac joints (at the bottom of the back). Interestingly, and ... addition to causing arthritis of the spine and sacroiliac joints, ankylosing spondylitis can cause inflammation of the eyes, ...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Connect With ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spondylitis News Osteoarthritis News Gout News Osteoporosis News Lupus News Fibromyalgia News Patient Corner Arthritis Drug Information ... Connect With Us Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research Center Myositis Center ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any advice you receive from your rheumatologist. Click A Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and ... About Victoria Ruffing, RN Ms. Ruffing has been a member of the Arthritis Center since 2000, currently ...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis 101 2010 E.S.C.A.P.E. Study Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How ...

  8. Th17 cytokines and arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W. Lubberts (Erik)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractTh17 cells are implicated in human autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), although it has not been established whether this persistent destructive arthritis is driven by Th1 and/or Th17 cells. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) contributes to the pathogenesis of arthritis as has b

  9. [Arthritis and clinical history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Lígia; Sampaio, Luzia; Pinto, José; Ventura, Francisco S

    2011-01-01

    In front of a patient with arthritis, clinical good-sense tells that the most probable diagnosis are the most prevalent ones. Nevertheless, we have to exclude a multiplicity of other aetiologies, less frequent, but with highest implications in the therapeutic conduct. Infections by Brucella and by Borrelia are rare causes of chronic arthritis, yet are diagnosis to consider, even when the clinical manifestations aren't the most typical, as there still exist endemic areas in Portugal. Here we report two clinical cases about patients with arthritis for more than one year, subject to ineffective exams ant treatments. Only the clinical history could put on evidence clinical-epidemiological data, suggestive of Brucellosis and Lyme Disease, namely the professional contact with infected animals, and the history of probable erythema migrans, that pointed toward the correct diagnosis. So, with directed therapeutic, there was complete resolution of the inflammatory symptoms.

  10. Dermatoglyphics in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindranath R

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been referred to Division of Human Genetics for counselling. Qualitative dermatoglyphics comprising of finger print pattern, interdigital pattern, hypothenar pattern and palmar crease were studied on 26 female and 11 male rheumatoid arthritis patients. Comparison between patient male and control male; and patient female and control female has been done. ′Chi′ square test was performed. In male patients, with hands together, arches were increased, loops/ whorls were decreased. Partial Simian crease was significantly increased. In the right hand, patterns were increased in the 3rd interdigital area. On the other hand, in female patients there was a significant increase in whorls and decrease in loops on the first finger on both the hands, increase in arches on the 3rd finger; both arches and whorls on the 4th finger of left hand. Present study has emphasized that dermatoglyphics could be applied as a diagnostic tool to patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlin, Troels

    2002-08-19

    The new classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is described in this review. Clinical characteristics divide JIA in to subtypes: systemic, oligoarticular (persistent and extended type), RF-positive and--negative polyarticular, enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. In addition to the clinical characteristics, genetic and biochemical differences suggest that JIA could be regarded as a general term covering various diseases. Complications described are uveitis, temporomandibular joint affection and growth disturbances. The therapeutic strategy should be planned individually according to age, subtype and disease activity and carried out as teamwork with several specialties. Drugs showing significant effectiveness in controlled studies are primarily methotrexate and sulphasalazine. An immunomodulating agent, etanercept, a soluble TNF alpha-receptor fusion protein, has shown a promising effect in severe polyarticular JIA refractory to methotrexate treatment.

  12. Neonatal Candida arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal arthritis is an uncommon yet serious disorder in the newborn. Delay in diagnosis and management can lead to significant morbidity. We report our experience with management of two such cases. Two preterm neonates with multifocal arthritis caused by Candida were studied. Diagnosis was made by clinical examination, laboratory investigations, radiological investigations and culture. Both were treated by aspiration, arthrotomy and antifungal therapy. One patient recovered fully from the infection while the other had growth disturbances resulting in limb length inequality at recent followup. Prompt and expeditious evacuation of pus from joints and antifungal therapy is imperative for treatment. Associated osteomyelitis leads to further difficulty in treatment.

  13. Psoriatic Arthritis Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Varisco, Valentina; Ditto, Maria Chiara; Benucci, Maurizio; Atzeni, Fabiola

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of new biological drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis has led to the creation of a number of registries in Europe and the United States. Most of them are sponsored by national rheumatology societies, and provide information that is useful in clinical practice concerning the clinical characteristics, efficacy, and safety of all licensed biological drugs. Their findings also help to improve our understanding of the quality of life and working ability of patients receiving biological drugs, and suggest methods for allocating resources. However, there are only a few registries for psoriatic arthritis, and efforts should be made to increase their number to obtain further reliable and useful data.

  14. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, D; Seng, Q B; Malik, A S; Choo, K E

    1996-09-01

    Neonatal septic arthritis has always been considered as separate from its counterpart in older children. The condition is uncommon but serious. Affected neonates usually survive, but with permanent skeletal deformities. Ten cases of neonatal septic arthritis were diagnosed between January 1989 and December 1993 in the neonatal intensive care units of two referral hospitals in the state of Kelantan, Malaysia. All except one neonate was born prematurely. The mean age of presentation was 15.6 days. Joint swelling (10/10), increased warmth (7/10) and erythema of the overlying skin (7/10) were the common presenting signs. Vague constitutional symptoms preceded the definitive signs of septic arthritis in all cases. The total white cell counts were raised with shift to the left. The knee (60%) was not commonly affected, followed by the hip (13%) and ankle (13%). Three neonates had multiple joint involvement. Coexistence of arthritis with osteomyelitis was observed in seven neonates. The commonest organism isolated was methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (9/10). Needle aspiration was performed in nine neonates and one had incision with drainage. Follow up data was available for five neonates and two of these had skeletal morbidity. Early diagnosis by frequent examination of the joints, prompt treatment and control of nosocomial infection are important for management.

  15. Juvenile arthritis and uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, J J

    1990-01-01

    The association between juvenile arthritis and uveitis is reviewed. Some children with the HLA-B27 related spondyloarthropathies develop anterior uveitis. About 20% of patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) who are negative for IgM rheumatoid factor develop a frequently bilateral, nongranulomatous chronic anterior uveitis. Risk factors for uveitis in JRA patients are: female gender, pauciarticular onset of arthritis, presence of circulating antinuclear antibodies, and the antigens HLA-DW5 and HLA-DPw2. Uveitis is rare after seven years or more have elapsed from the onset of arthritis. The visual prognosis in patients with uveitis is good in 25% and fair in 50%. The remaining 25% develop visual impairment from complicated cataract and/or secondary inflammatory glaucoma. The potential benefit of cytotoxic agents in the treatment of intractable uveitis is outweighed by the risk of serious side effects. The management of secondary inflammatory glaucoma is unsatisfactory, but the results of treatment of complicated cataracts by lensectomy-vitrectomy are good.

  16. Arthritis Pain Reliever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-12-27

    Learn more about the benefits of physical activity and the types and amounts of exercise helpful for people with arthritis.  Created: 12/27/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/27/2011.

  17. IMAGING OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D'Angelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Imaging of psoriatic arthritis (PsA is important for two reasons: the differential diagnosis from other arthritides and the assessment of structural damage that can be inhibited by the new drugs such as the anti-TNFα agents. Plain film radiographic findings of peripheral arthritis have been important in elaborating the concept of PsA as a separate disease entity. Characteristic aspects of psoriatic peripheral arthritis help the differentiation from rheumatoid arthritis. High-resolution ultrasonography (US, US combined with power Doppler (PDUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be used to image joint synovitis of PsA. Radiologic features of spondylitis associated with psoriasis are similar to spondylitis associated with reactive arthritis and differ from those of primary ankylosing spondylitis (AS and the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease. MRI is very sensitive for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis. There have been no MRI studies on the spine of patients with PsA. In primary AS bone oedema in the vertebral bodies is an indicator of active disease and can ameliorate during anti-TNFα therapy. Historically, plain film radiography have played a pivotal role in defining enthesitis lesions of SpA. However, entheseal bone changes appear late. US and MRI have proved to be a highly sensitive and non invasive tools. Recent US and MRI studies on both finger and toe dactylitis have established that dactylitis is due to flexor tenosynovitis and marked adjacent soft tissue swelling with a variable degree of small joint synovitis. There is no evidence of enthesitis of the insertion of the flexor digitorum tendons and of the attachment of the caspsule of the digit joints. Key words: Enthesitis, dactylitis, spondyloarthritis, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, imaging

  18. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions juvenile idiopathic arthritis juvenile idiopathic arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Juvenile idiopathic arthritis refers to a group of conditions involving joint ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone."

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone." Past Issues / Summer 2014 ... Alternative Medicine http://nccam.nih.gov NIHSeniorHealth.gov—Rheumatoid Arthritis ... ...

  20. Clinical management of septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharff, Katie A; Richards, Eric P; Townes, John M

    2013-06-01

    Septic arthritis is a rheumatologic emergency as joint destruction occurs rapidly and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Accurate diagnosis can be particularly challenging in patients with underlying inflammatory joint disease. This review outlines the risk factors for septic arthritis and summarizes the causative bacterial organisms. We highlight advances in antibiotic management with a focus on new drugs for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and discuss the use of adjunctive therapies for treatment of septic arthritis in adults.

  1. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  2. Septic arthritis in adult horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstanjen, B; Boehart, S; Cislakova, M

    2010-01-01

    Septic arthritis in horses is a serious disease which can become life-threatening. In case the infection can be eliminated before irreversible joint damage occurs, complete recovery is possible. This article gives an overview of the literature concerning etiology, diagnosis and strategies of therapy in cases of septic arthritis in adult horses, with special reference to novel options of treatment.

  3. Kartagener syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rébora, Martin Esteban; Cuneo, Julia Ana; Marcos, Josefina; Marcos, Juan Carlos

    2006-02-01

    We report the case of a 38-year-old female patient, affected with Kartagener syndrome (primary ciliary dyskinesia), who developed seropositive and erosive rheumatoid arthritis. According to our review, there are only 6 cases reported so far with this association without a definite etiopathogenic linkage recognized in common. Chronic infections resulting from the ciliary dysfunction might be a trigger for rheumatoid arthritis.

  4. Psoriatic arthritis as a mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Berthelot

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that inflammatory arthritis/enthesitis and psoriasis coexist more frequently than would be expected by chance: for instance, in a study of 1285 patients with psoriasis seen in an hospital, 483 (38% were suffering from arthritis/ enthesitis, including 40 patients classified as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA (3%, 177 (14% as undifferentiated arthritis (UA, and 266 (21% as Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA (1. Although lower percentages have been noticed in the general population with psoriasis (6% of PsA in an extensive study of 1844 patients with psoriasis (2, they were superior to 5% (i.e. at least 5 times greater than the figures found for patients without psoriasis (3-7.

  5. Combination therapy for pain management in inflammatory arthritis (rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, other spondyloarthritis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Ramiro; H. Radner; D. van der Heijde; A. van Tubergen; R. Buchbinder; D. Aletaha; R.B.M. Landewé

    2011-01-01

    Despite optimal therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, many people with inflammatory arthritis (IA) continue to have persistent pain that may require additional therapy. To assess the benefits and safety of combination pain therapy for people with IA (rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosi

  6. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides.

  7. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Results. Different types of osteolysis were revealed in 80 (21,6% pts. Osteolytic variant of joint damage was present in 29 pts. 33 pts had acral, 48 — intra-articular osteolysis and 16 - true bone atrophy. Frequency and intensity of bone resorption were associated with severity of PA. Acral osteolysis correlated with arthritis of distal interphalangeal joints and onychodystrophy. Intra-articular osteolysis was most often present in distal interphalangeal joints of hands and metacarpophalangeal joints (39,6% and 41,7% respectively. Characteristic feature of PA was combination of prominent resorption with formation of bone ankylosis and periosteal reaction. Ankylosis was present in 33,3% of pts with intra-articular osteolysis and in 60% of pts with combination of different osteolysis variants. Systemic reaction of microcirculation in synovial biopsies was most prominent in osteolytic variant: marked thickening of capillary and venule basal membrane with high level of acid phosphatase, increased capillary and precapillary blood flow with stasis features, vascular lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, productive vasculitis with annular wall thickening, thrombovasculitis and villi deep layer sclerosis. Conclusion. Different variants of osteolysis show bone involvement in PA. Acral and intra- articular osteolysis association with bone ankylosis and periostitis proves their common pathogenetic entity.

  8. Fungal arthritis and osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Rakhi; Hadley, Susan

    2005-12-01

    Fungal arthritis and osteomyelitis are uncommon diseases and generally present in an indolent fashion. The incidence of fungal bone and joint dis-ease is increasing with an increase in the prevalence of factors predisposing to invasive fungal disease, such as the use of central venous catheters, broad spectrum antibiotics, immunosuppression, and abdominal surgery. Definitive diagnosis relies on bone or synovial culture or biopsy. Successful management has traditionally consisted of amphotericin B in combination with surgical debridement. Given the rarity of this disease, treatment is not well defined, but reports of success with the use of azole antifungal agents, including itraconazole, fluconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole, are promising.

  9. Pain and microcrystalline arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramonda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcrystals are responsible for some of the most common and complex arthropathies which are often accompanied by intense, severe pain and inflammatory reactions. The main pathogens are crystals of monosodium urate (MSU, responsible for the gout, calcium pyrophosphate (CPP, which deposits also in various clinical forms of arthopathies, and basic calcium phosphate associated with osteoarthritis. In this context, the microcrystal arthritis is characterized by multiple, acute attacks followed by chronic pain, disability, impaired quality of life, and increased mortality. Given their chronic nature, they represent an ever more urgent public health problem. MSU and CPP crystals are also able to activate nociceptors. The pain in mycrocrystalline arthritis (MCA is an expression of the inflammatory process. In the course of these diseases there is an abundant release of inflammatory molecules, including prostaglandins 2 and kinins. Interleukin-1 represents the most important cytokine released during the crystal-induced inflammatory process. Therefore, clinically, pain is the most important component of MCA, which lead to functional impairment and disability in a large proportion of the population. It is fundamental to diagnose these diseases as early as possible, and to this aim, to identify appropriate and specific targets for a timely therapeutic intervention.

  10. JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I N Sartika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is the most common rheumatic condition in children. JRA is defined as persistent arthritis in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks, with the onset before age 16 years. The etiology of JRA is unknown. Antigen activated CD4+ T cell stimulate monocytes, macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts to produce the cytokines Interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-? and to secrete matrix metalloproteinases, which lead to chronic inflammation due to infiltration of inflammatory cell, angiogenesis, destruction of cartilage and bone with pannus formation. The 3 major subtypes of JRA are based on the symptoms at disease onset and are designated systemic onset, pauciarticular onset, and polyarticular onset. For all patients, the goals of therapy are to decrease chronic joint pain and suppress the inflammatory process. Poor prognostic have been observed in patients with polyarticular onset, rheumatoid factor, persistent morning stiffness, tenosynovitis, involvement of the small joints, rapid appearance of erosions, active late onset childhood, subcutaneous nodules, or antinuclear antibody.

  11. Radiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schacherl, M.

    1985-09-23

    An introductory summary of the imaging-diagnosis will be given. The necessity of acquiring a catalogue of application to particular imaging methods is emphasized. Discussion of step by step diagnosis regarding rheumatologic questions is given on example of the hand. Technically insufficient radiographs and bad habits during diagnostic analysis are pointed out. Radiologic problems in differentiating arthritis/osteoarthrosis will be mentioned. The discussion of these points is followed by outlining the radiology of rheumatoid arthritis and the complexity of this disease. Introduction of a new stage classification. Finally twelve basic radiologic types of rheumatoid arthritis will be presented.

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Expert Ask a Question Physician Corner RAVE: The Rheumatoid Arthritis Vital Education Initiative Rheumatology Conference Rheumatology Rounds Case Rounds Radiology Rounds Pathophysiology of the Rheumatic Diseases Our Research Patient-Centered ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Expert Ask a Question Physician Corner RAVE: The Rheumatoid Arthritis Vital Education Initiative Rheumatology Conference Rheumatology Rounds Case Rounds Radiology Rounds Pathophysiology of the Rheumatic Diseases Our Research Patient-Centered ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: psoriatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PubMed Nograles KE, Brasington RD, Bowcock AM. New insights into the pathogenesis and genetics of psoriatic arthritis. ... healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... D; Biologics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Genetics and Genomics Study Syndicate; Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium, Concannon P, Onengut-Gumuscu S, Rich SS, Deloukas P, Gonzalez-Gay MA, Rodriguez-Rodriguez L, Ärlsetig L, Martin J, ...

  16. Therapy strategies in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Laura C

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a heterogeneous condition with a myriad of different clinical presentations. It commonly affects the skin and musculoskeletal system causing psoriasis, peripheral arthritis, axial arthritis, enthesitis and dactylitis. Many patients also have related conditions, such as those within the metabolic syndrome and associated spondyloarthritis (SpA) conditions including inflammatory bowel disease and uveitis. Any therapeutic strategy must be tailored to the individual patient, taking into account her/his complete clinical presentation and comorbidities. New treatment recommendations from the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) provide evidence based recommendations on effective therapies for the management of each different manifestation of PsA, and how treatment may be affected by comorbidities (1). However, the limited evidence comparing different treatment strategies in PsA is recognised as a limitation in these recommendations and further information is detailed below.

  17. Dermatitis herpetiformis and rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singal Archana

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35- year-old deaf and dumb woman with clinical and histopothological diagnosis of dermatitis herpetiforrnis (DH is reported for its rare association with rheumatoid arthritis (PA.

  18. Uveitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, J J

    1990-01-01

    About 20% of patients with juvenile chronic arthritis develop uveitis which is frequently bilateral. Risk factors for uveitis are: female gender, pauciarticular onset of arthritis, presence of circulating antinuclear antibodies, and the antigens HLA-DW5 and HLA-DPw2. The visual prognosis in patients with uveitis is good in 25% and fair in 50%. The remaining 25% develop cataract and/or glaucoma. The management of glaucoma is unsatisfactory, but the results of cataract surgery by lensectomy are good.

  19. Arthritis in America PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-03-07

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the March 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Many adults in the United States have arthritis. Learn how to reduce the pain of arthritis, as well as manage the condition.  Created: 3/7/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/7/2017.

  20. Artritis Temprana Early Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hasta la década de los años ochenta se consideraba a la artritis reumatoide (AR como una enfermedad poco frecuente, de gravedad leve a moderada, que tenía una evolución lentamente, progresiva hacia el daño articular y la incapacidad. El aborde terapéutico convencional hasta ese momento, era el tratamiento clásico de la pirámide.Until the early the eighties was considered rheumatoid arthritis to (RA as a rare disease of mild to moderate severity, which had a slowly evolution towards joint damage and disability. The conventional therapeutic option until then, was the classic treatment of the pyramid.

  1. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper.

  2. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupa H Bhatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA is the most chronic musculoskeletal disease of pediatric population. The chronic course of disease has a great impact on oral health. Temporomandibular joint is involved in JIA causing limited mouth opening with progressive open bite, retrognathia, microgenia and bird like appearance. Joints of upper and lower extremities are also involved. Effect on upper limb function leads to difficulty with fine motor movements required for brushing and flossing. This increases incidence of caries and periodontal disease in children. The cause of JIA is still poorly understood and none of the available drugs for JIA can cure the disease. However, prognosis has improved as a result of progress in disease classification and management. The dental practitioner should be familiar with the symptoms and oral manifestations of JIA to help manage as multidisciplinary management is essential.

  3. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-05-17

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented.

  4. Biologic therapy of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanov Nemanja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and juvenile idiopathic/rheumatoid arthritis (JIA are chronic, inflammatory, systemic, auto-immune diseases characterized by chronic arthritis leading to progressive joint erosions. The individual functional and social impact of rheumatoid arthritis is of great importance. Disability and joint damage occur rapidly and early in the course of the disease. The remarkably improved outcomes have been achieved initiating biologic therapy with close monitoring of disease progression. Biologic agents are drugs, usually proteins, which can influence chronic immune dysregulation resulting in chronic arthritis. According to the mechanism of action these drugs include: 1 anti-TNF drugs (etanercept, infiximab, adalimumab; 2 IL-1 blocking drugs (anakinra; 3 IL-6 blocking drugs (tocilizumab; 4 agents blocking selective co-stimulation modulation (abatacept; 5 CD 20 blocking drugs (rituximab. Biologics targeting TNF-alpha with methotrexate have revolutionized the treatment of RA, producing significant improvement in clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes not seen previously. The new concept of rheumatoid arthritis treatment defines early diagnosis, early aggressive therapy with optimal doses of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and, if no improvement has been achieved during six months, early introduction of biologic drugs. The three-year experience of biologic therapy in Serbia has shown a positive effect on disease outcome.

  5. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  6. Having Rheumatoid Arthritis May Increase Heart Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162038.html Having Rheumatoid Arthritis May Increase Heart Risk Treating inflammation linked to ... TUESDAY, Nov. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People with rheumatoid arthritis may have an increased risk for a heart ...

  7. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  8. Therapeutical approach to rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Gourni

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic disease characterized by inflammation of the synovial joints, and loss of the function leading to disability. The ultimate goal in managing RA is to prevent joint damage and to maintain functional ability. Although, οver the past decade, major advances have been made in our understanding of the factors that are crucial in regulating this disease, still the managment of the disease remains difficult.Aim : Τhe aim of the present study was the evaluation of the therapeutical approch on rheumatoid arthritis. The method οf this study included bibliography research from both the review and the research literature which referred to the relation between therapy and rheumatoid arthritis.Results : The majority of research studies showed thatthe main therapy on rheumatoid arthritis included medication therapy, modification of everyday living ensuring rest, physical exercise and finally surgical procedure. Individuals suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, apart from physical problems usually cope with mental disorders, that exert a negative indluence on their quality of life.Conclusively :Information and early screening of high risk may decrease the long-term consequnences on health. Monitoring from a group of specialists should serve as a cornerstone when planning a program of intervention.

  9. Differential Diagnosis of Polyarticular Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujalte, George G A; Albano-Aluquin, Sheila A

    2015-07-01

    Polyarticular arthritis is commonly encountered in clinical settings and has multiple etiologies. The first step is to distinguish between true articular pain and nonarticular or periarticular conditions by recognizing clinical patterns through the history and physical examination. Once pain within a joint or joints is confirmed, the next step is to classify the pain as noninflammatory or inflammatory in origin. Noninflammatory arthritis, which is mostly related to osteoarthritis, has a variable onset and severity and does not have inflammatory features, such as warm or swollen joints. Osteoarthritis usually presents with less than one hour of morning stiffness and pain that is aggravated by activity and improves with rest. A review of systems is usually negative for rashes, oral ulcers, or other internal organ involvement. In contrast, inflammatory arthritis generally causes warm, swollen joints; prolonged morning stiffness; and positive findings on a review of systems. Once inflammatory arthritis is suspected, possible diagnoses are sorted by the pattern of joint involvement, which includes number and type of joints involved, symmetry, and onset. The suspicion for inflammatory arthritis should be confirmed by the appropriate serologic/tissue and/or imaging studies in the clinical setting or in consultation with a subspecialist.

  10. [Pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequerré, Thierry; Richez, Christophe

    2012-10-01

    These last years were especially marked by the best understanding of the physiopathological mechanisms at the onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the processes of joint inflammation and joint destruction. RA is more and more considered as a syndrome with at least two clinical entities with different phenotype and profiles: seronegative RA and seropositive RA. In RA with ACPA, it is the process of immunization, that is the immunological reaction against citrullinated peptides, that leads to the disease. The peptide citrullination is directly favored by environmental factors such as tobacco, infection to Porphyromonas gingivalis and alcohol. The immunization supposes a genetic predisposition including approximately 22 genetic factors including the molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and PTPN22. Finally, joint damage result at the same time from an excess of destruction (RANK/RANKL, TNFalpha) and from a defect of bone reparation by the way Wnt/Frizzled. It is thanks to the best understanding of RA physiopathology that leads to development of targeted treatments and specially processing for this disease.

  11. Prostaglandins and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Fattahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, autoimmune, and complex inflammatory disease leading to bone and cartilage destruction, whose cause remains obscure. Accumulation of genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, and dysregulated immune responses are necessary for mounting this self-reacting disease. Inflamed joints are infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of cellular and soluble mediators of the immune system, such as T cells, B cells, macrophages, cytokines, and prostaglandins (PGs. Prostaglandins are lipid inflammatory mediators derived from the arachidonic acid by multienzymatic reactions. They both sustain homeostatic mechanisms and mediate pathogenic processes, including the inflammatory reaction. They play both beneficial and harmful roles during inflammation, according to their site of action and the etiology of the inflammatory response. With respect to the role of PGs in inflammation, they can be effective mediators in the pathophysiology of RA. Thus the use of agonists or antagonists of PG receptors may be considered as a new therapeutic protocol in RA. In this paper, we try to elucidate the role of PGs in the immunopathology of RA.

  12. Psoriatic arthritis: imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lubrano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques to assess psoriatic arthritis (PsA include radiography, ultrasonography (US, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography (CT and bone scintigraphy. The radiographic hallmark of PsA is the combination of destructive changes (joint erosions, tuft resorption, osteolysis with bone proliferation (including periarticular and shaft periostitis, ankylosis, spur formation and non-marginal syndesmophytes. US has an increasing important role in the evaluation of PsA. In fact, power Doppler US is useful mainly for its ability to assess musculoskeletal (joints, tendons, entheses and cutaneous (skin and nails involvement, to monitor efficacy of therapy and to guide steroid injections at the level of inflamed joints, tendon sheaths and entheses. MRI allows direct visualization of inflammation in peripheral and axial joints, and peripheral and axial entheses, and has dramatically improved the possibilities for early diagnosis and objective monitoring of the disease process in PsA. MRI has allowed explaining the relationships among enthesitis, synovitis and osteitis in PsA, supporting a SpA pattern of inflammation where enthesitis is the primary target of inflammation. CT has little role in assessment of peripheral joints, but it may be useful in assessing elements of spine disease. CT accuracy is similar to MRI in assessment of erosions in sacroiliac joint involvement, but CT is not as effective in detecting synovial inflammation. Bone scintigraphy lacks specificity and is now supplanted with US and MRI techniques.

  13. Overview of the radiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, P.A.; Job-Deslandre, C.H.; Lalande, G.; Adamsbaum, C

    2000-02-01

    Plain films remain the basic tool for diagnosis and follow-up evaluation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this paper, we review the new classification of JIA: systemic arthritis, oligoarthritis (persistent), oligoarthritis (extended), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor negative), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor positive), enthesitis related arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and unclassified arthritis. We will also review regional abnormalities of three stages: an early stage, an intermediate stage, a late stage, as well as the differential diagnosis.

  14. BIOBEHAVIORAL THERAPY OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shabanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the study is connected with need to expand the arsenal of treatment methods patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study examined the efficacy of biobehavioral therapy in a comprehensive program of treatment patients with rheumatoid arthritis (medical therapy in combination with biobehavioral therapy. It has been shown when compared with the control group (isolated drug therapy maintaining  clinical  response  in  short-term  follow-up  study  in  the  intervention  group.  Statistically    significant relationship the volitional control of the alpha rhythm of EEG (increased power of the alpha rhythm with a reduction in pain intensity in the in neurofeedback program and positive dynamics of the main characteristics of the alpha rhythm have been drmonstrated. Inclusion in the treatment program of arthritis biobehavioral approach has reduced the dose of pain medication, so reducing aggression of pharmacotherapy.

  15. Dietetic recommendations in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rosa Alhambra-Expósito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that has a significant effect on patients’ physical, emotional, and social functioning. For decades, patients have used different diets to try to improve the symptoms of RA. The possible benefits of dietary therapy for rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed in this article. Nutritional objectives for RA, are to halt the loss of bone mass, promote healing of bone fractures and improving bone-associated inflammatory disorders and joints. In general, diets low in saturated fat, rich in polyunsaturated fats: omega 3 and omega 6, rich in complex carbohydrates and fiber are recommended.

  16. Cutaneous manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanu Prakash

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a multisystem autoimmune disease, affecting the joints predominantly, and extra-articular sites like skin, lungs, heart etc. The American College of Rheumatology (ACR in collaboration with the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR in 2010, revised the 1987 ACR classification criteria for RA. The criteria covered four areas (joint involvement, serodiagnosis, acute phase reactants, duration of arthritis and established a point value on a scale of 0 to 10. Patients with a value of 6 or higher are classified as having RA.

  17. [Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branimir Anić; Miroslav Mayer

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune systemic disease that primarily affects joints. Etiology and the pathogenesis of RA are complex, involving many types of cells, among others macrophages, T and B cells, fibro- blasts, chondrocytes and dendritic cells. Despite well documented role of many genes and epigenetic modifications in the development and evolution of the disease, in most RA patients there is no clear predisposing factor present. Environmental factors involved in RA pathogenesis are cigarette smoke, industrial pollutants like silica crystals, disturbances of intestinal, lung, and oral microbiota and some specific bacterial and viral infectious agents and their components. In the initial disease stage there are qualitative and quantitative disturbances ofpeptide citrulination as well as other protein modifications, followed by antigen presenting cell (APC) (macrophages and dendritic cells) and fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS) activation. Some microbes foster this processes by APC and FLS direct and indirect activation. In the second stage APC's elicit specific humoral B cell re- sponse resulting in specific antibodies production and T cell autoreactivity. Inherited and acquired defects in T and B cell responses caused by repeated activation of innate immunity as well as loss of tolerance, elicit chronic autoimmune inflammation, primarily of synovial membranes, and development of cellular panus. Pathologic activation of the osteoclasts and release of the immune system effector molecules and the proteolytic enzymes damage the cartilage, bone and tendons composition and structure. Persistent inflammation through its complex mechanisms results in many systemic and extraarticular RA manifestations of almost all organ systems, resulting in severe complications and comorbidities such as rheumatoid lung, carditis, vasculitis, cahexia, anemia, accelerated atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebrovascular vascular disease, lymphoma, osteoporosis, depression etc

  18. SEPTIC ARTHRITIS OF THE HIP IN ADULTS: A RARE PRESENTATION

    OpenAIRE

    Kuppa; Yerukala; Dema; Sujith; Venkateswar Reddy

    2015-01-01

    Septic Arthritis also known as infectious arthritis, can be bacterial or fungal arthritis. The condition is an inflammation of a joint that is caused by an infection. Typically, Septic Arthritis affects one large joint in the body such as knee or hip. Generally, Septic Arthritis is present with complete absorption of the head of the ...

  19. Genetics in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Heleen Marion

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a non-common disease in children that can persist into adulthood. JIA is considered to be an auto-immune disease. Genetic factors play a role in the pathogenesis. In a new cohort of JIA patients from North-West European descent genetic candidate gene associatio

  20. Handout on Health: Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... immunodeficiency. This discovery led to the idea that drugs blocking Janus kinases would suppress the immune system and might be protective against the damaging inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis and certain other autoimmune diseases. NIH AMP Program: The NIH awarded grants to ...

  1. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards...

  2. Glucocorticoids in early rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everdingen, Amalia A. van

    2002-01-01

    For 50 years, glucocorticoids (GC) are used for symptomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the last decade, results from clinical studies of treatment with GC as additional therapy to long-acting antirheumatic drugs in patients with early RA suggested also disease-modifying properties of

  3. Citrullinated Chemokines in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Clavel C, Arnaud J, Nogueira L, et al. Epitopes of human fibrin recognized by the rheumatoid arthritis-specific autoantibodies to citrullinated... Clavel C, Chapuy-Regaud S, Al Badine R, Mechin MC, et al. Peptidyl arginine deiminase type 2 (PAD-2) and PAD-4 but not PAD-1, PAD-3, and PAD-6 are

  4. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; Bijlsma, Johannes W J;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aiming at therapeutic targets has reduced the risk of organ failure in many diseases such as diabetes or hypertension. Such targets have not been defined for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: /st> To develop recommendations for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes in RA. METHODS...

  5. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H;

    2016-01-01

    to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. CONCLUSIONS: Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients with...

  6. Diagnostic Delay in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbaek, Karen; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Primdahl, Jette

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To prevent joint damage among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is a need to minimize delays from the onset of symptoms until the initiation of appropriate therapy. The present study explored the factors that have an impact on the time it takes for Danish patients with RA...

  7. COMORBIDITY IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Panafidina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The peak onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA is at 30-55 years of age. At this age, the patients have also other concomi- tant diseases (comorbidities that affect the course and prognosis of RA, the choice of its treatment policy, quality of life of the patients. Objective: to identify the most important and common comorbidities in patients with RA. Subjects and methods. Two hundred patients (median age 55 [46; 61] years were enrolled; there was a preponderance of women (82.5% with median disease duration 5 [1; 10] years, seropositive for IgM rheumatoid factor (83.0% and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (81.6% with moderate and high disease activity (median DAS28 value 3.9 [3.1; 4.9]. Varying degrees of destructive changes in hand and foot joints were radiologically detected in 71.2% of the patients; 64.5% of the patients had Functional Class II. Methotrexate was given to 69.5% of the patients; therapy with biological agents was used in 21.0% of the cases. 15.5% of the patients did not receive DMARD or biologics. 43.0% of the patients with RA received glucocorticoids. Results. Comorbidities were present in 72.0% of the patients with RA. The most common diseases were hypertension (60.0%, dyslipidemia (45.0%, fractures at various sites (29.5%, and coronary heart disease (21.0%. Myocardial infarction and stroke were observed in 1.5 and 1.0% of cases, respectively. There was diabetes mellitus (DM in 7.5% of the cases and osteoporosis in 15.5% of the patients. 81.7% of the patients with RA and hypertension and 80.0% of those with RA and DM received antihypertensive and sugar-lowering therapy, respectively. At the same time the RA patients with dyslipidemia and osteoporosis received specific drugs far less frequently (30.0 and 29.0%, respectively. Conclusion. Comorbidities are frequently encountered in RA. By taking into account the fact that cardiovascular dis- eases are a main cause of death in RA; it is necessary to adequately and timely

  8. Endomorphins in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and experimental arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessop, David S; Fassold, Alexander; Wolff, Christine; Hofbauer, Rafael; Chover-Gonzalez, Antonio; Richards, Louise J; Straub, Rainer H

    2010-04-01

    The opioid tetrapeptides endomorphins (EM)-1 and EM-2 are widely expressed in central nervous system and immune tissues of rats and humans. Their analgesic properties are well characterized but they also have anti-inflammatory properties. EM-1 significantly attenuated the onset of hindpaw inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated the presence of EMs in T cells, macrophages, and fibroblasts in synovial tissues from patients with osteo- or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In an ex vivo superfusion system, EM-1 potently inhibited the release of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 from synovial tissues from patients with osteo- or RA. These results demonstrate that EMs are endogenously synthesized within human immune cells and have the potential to act as potent therapeutic agents in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease. We discuss the clinical potential for EM analogues chemically modified to resist proteolytic degradation and identify modified protease-resistant analogues with enhanced bioactivity.

  9. Polyarticular septic arthritis in an immunocompetent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, J; Dinneen, A; Heilpern, G

    2013-03-01

    Septic arthritis is an uncommon condition with an incidence of 2-3/100,000. It is clinically notable, however, as it is a rapidly destructive joint disease with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Polyarticular septic arthritis has an estimated incidence of 15% of all cases of infectious arthritis. We report a case of polyarticular septic arthritis with involvement of bilateral shoulders and wrist to highlight the importance of early diagnosis and treatment as well as the high mortality rates associated with this condition. Bilateral septic shoulder arthritis poses a challenge to treat, and its significance should not be underestimated as even with early surgical intervention and aggressive antibiotic and fluid resuscitation death is a sad but perhaps not uncommon outcome. It is therefore imperative that the diagnosis of polyarticular septic arthritis is kept prominent in the physician's mind when confronted with a patient with symptomatic polyarthralgia.

  10. Acromioclavicular septic arthritis and sternoclavicular septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Sally A; Agger, William A; Saterbak, Andrew T

    2015-03-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) and sternoclavicular (SC) septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis are rare, especially in immunocompetent individuals. We report a case of septic AC joint with pyomyositis of the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles and a separate case with septic SC joint with pyomysitis of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Both patients had similar presentations of infections with Staphylococcus aureus and were successfully treated with surgical incision and drainage followed by prolonged antibiotic therapy.

  11. Septic arthritis due to Roseomonas mucosa in a rheumatoid arthritis patient receiving infliximab therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipsas, Nikolaos V; Papaparaskevas, Joseph; Stefanou, Ioanna; Kalatzis, Konstantinos; Vlachoyiannopoulos, Panayiotis; Avlamis, Athina

    2006-08-01

    We report a case of septic arthritis due to Roseomonas mucosa in a rheumatoid arthritis patient receiving infliximab therapy. This is the first report of septic arthritis due to R. mucosa, and infliximab therapy might be a predisposing factor because this infection was never reported in the pre-anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapy period.

  12. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  13. Equine Septic Arthritis and Serum Amyloid A

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, Elsa Karen

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection within a joint, septic arthritis, is a serious condition in horses that can lead to long-term joint disease if the infection is not resolved quickly. Equine septic arthritis is diagnosed primarily based on clinical signs and synovial fluid cytology. Septic synovial fluid is characterized by significant elevations in total protein (TP) and total nucleated cell count (TNCC). However, in some cases it can be difficult to distinguish between septic arthritis and non-septic joi...

  14. Polyarticular septic arthritis following septic circumcision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Tim M; McGrath, Patrick; McConnachie, Charles C

    2007-01-01

    Ritual circumcision during an initiation ceremony for young adults is common practice in parts of South Africa. We report on a case of polyarticular septic arthritis in a seventeen-year-old man following septicaemia after circumcision, resulting in severe fixed flexion deformities of both knees. This case illustrates an unusual cause of polyarticular septic arthritis and the treatment difficulties associated with delayed presentation. It is also a reminder of the consequences of untreated acute septic arthritis.

  15. Septic arthritis in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingyuan Alvin; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah

    2015-04-01

    Septic arthritis has long been considered an orthopedic emergency. Historically, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus have been the most common causes of septic arthritis worldwide but in the modern era of biological therapy and extensive use of prosthetic joint replacements, the spectrum of microbiological causes of septic arthritis has widened considerably. There are also new approaches to diagnosis but therapy remains a challenge, with a need for careful consideration of a combined medical and surgical approach in most cases.

  16. Retinal occlusive vasculer disorder and rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Ortak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic inflammatory disease that affected older women with many ocular manifestations. Also, these systemic diseases can cause retinal vein occlusion and arterial occlusion that lead to serious and permanent visual loss. Rheumatoid arthritis's the most common manifestation is that retinal vasculitis and retinal vascular complications are associated with this complication. In this review, retinal vascular occlusive diseases are presented to associated with rheumatoid arthritis in literature. Rheumatoid arthritis and its complications have been outlined and was made to create a new perspective. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(1.000: 71-73

  17. Galectin-3: A key player in arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yong; Yéléhé-Okouma, Mélissa; Ea, Hang-Korng; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Reboul, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Arthritis is more and more considered as the leading reason for the disability in the world, particularly regarding its main entities, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The common feature of arthritis is inflammation, which is mainly supported by synovitis (synovial inflammation), although the immune system plays a primary role in rheumatoid arthritis and a secondary one in osteoarthritis. During the inflammatory phase of arthritis, many pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators are secreted by infiltrating immune and resident joint cells, which are responsible for cartilage degradation and excessive bone remodeling. Amongst them, a β-galactoside-binding lectin, galectin-3, has been reported to be highly expressed and secreted by inflamed synovium of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients. Furthermore, galectin-3 has been demonstrated to induce joint swelling and osteoarthritis-like lesions after intra-articular injection in laboratory animals. However, the mechanisms underlying its pathophysiological role in arthritis have not been fully elucidated. This review deals with the characterization of arthritis features and galectin-3 and summarizes our current knowledge of the contribution of galectin-3 to joint tissue lesions in arthritis.

  18. Fungal osteomyelitis and septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bariteau, Jason T; Waryasz, Gregory R; McDonnell, Matthew; Fischer, Staci A; Hayda, Roman A; Born, Christopher T

    2014-06-01

    Management of fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis is challenging, especially in the setting of immunodeficiency and conditions that require immunosuppression. Because fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis are rare conditions, study of their pathophysiology and treatment has been limited. In the literature, evidence-based treatment is lacking and, historically, outcomes have been poor. The most common offending organisms are Candida and Aspergillus, which are widely distributed in humans and soil. However, some fungal pathogens, such as Histoplasma, Blastomyces, Coccidioides, Cryptococcus, and Sporothrix, have more focal areas of endemicity. Fungal bone and joint infections result from direct inoculation, contiguous infection spread, or hematogenous seeding of organisms. These infections may be difficult to diagnose and eradicate, especially in the setting of total joint arthroplasty. Although there is no clear consensus on treatment, guidelines are available for management of many of these pathogens.

  19. Nutritional considerations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touger-Decker, R

    1988-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. The severity of the disease process adversely affects nutritional status. Articular changes, such as small joint deformities and temporomandibular joint syndrome, alter the ability to self-feed. The inflammatory process may increase metabolic rate. Ingestion, digestion, absorption, and excretion may be compromised by secondary manifestations of the disease. Comprehensive nutrition assessment incorporates evaluation of disease and treatment-specific factors, along with the usual assessment parameters. Abnormal values for certain assessment parameters do not necessarily reflect nutritional status. Treatment methods, including medications, may have an impact on nutritional status, assessment tools, and self-feeding. Nutrition management goals focus on identification and implementation of feeding strategies. Evaluation of the ability to feed oneself includes consideration of functional status, secondary manifestations, and medical treatment. Multiple feeding modalities may be required. Oral supplements, tube feedings, and parenteral nutrition may be employed to meet the nutrition needs of the individual with rheumatoid arthritis.

  20. Clinimetric criteria of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Galasso

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease, mainly poli-artycular, among wide-spread chronic inflammatory diseases, that cause pain, functional limitation, damage and joints deformations, and disability. It is characterized by turns of active inflammation and remission phases. Inflammation degree and persistence are associated to a bad functional prognosis and progressive joint disability. These patients management require a continuous valuation of inflammatory activity index of disease both therapeutic management and to prevent disablement process. We focus on many valuation index of joint disability and functional damage. Very important are both the scales of auto-values concerning the pain and the joint swelling and clinical data get by physician to valuate activity index of disease as defined by DAS28. Significant data come by health-related quality of life, disability and by AIMS2 (Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale.

  1. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  2. Metabolite Space of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    van Wietmarschen, Herman; van der Greef, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Metabolites play numerous roles in the healthy and diseased body, ranging from regulating physiological processes to providing building blocks for the body. Therefore, understanding the role of metabolites is important in elucidating the etiology and pathology of diseases and finding targets for new treatment options. Rheumatoid arthritis is a complex chronic disease for which new disease management strategies are needed. The aim of this review is to bring together and integrate information a...

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self–servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, „Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL–100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL–100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self-servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, "Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL-100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL-100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and can

  5. Atherosclerosis in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jednacz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arteries. Clinical consequences of the atherosclerotic process occur in the adult population, however atherosclerotic process begins in childhood. The classic risk factors for atherosclerosis include obesity, dyslipidaemia, age, gender or family history. In recent years, attention has been drawn to the similarity between atherosclerotic inflammatory processes and inflammatory changes in the course of systemic connective tissue disease, in particular systemic lupus etythematosus (SLE or rheumatoid arthritis (RA. There is also observed the similarity of the pathogenetic background of development of atherosclerosis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are observed in the course of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also homocysteine concentrations, which may play a significant role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions, are observed higher in patients with JIA. Some studies revealed higher carotid intima-media thickness (IMT index values in children with JIA. In view of the fact that atherosclerotic process begins as early as in childhood, the introduction of appropriate preventive measures in children is a matter of utmost importance.

  6. The potential use of microcalorimetry in rapid differentiation between septic arthritis and other causes of arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, E; Hügle, T; Daikeler, T; Voide, C; Borens, O; Trampuz, A

    2015-03-01

    Current diagnostic methods in differentiating septic from non-septic arthritis are time-consuming (culture) or have limited sensitivity (Gram stain). Microcalorimetry is a novel method that can rapidly detect microorganisms by their heat production. We investigated the accuracy and time to detection of septic arthritis by using microcalorimetry. Patients older than 18 years of age with acute arthritis of native joints were prospectively included. Synovial fluid was aspirated and investigated by Gram stain, culture and microcalorimetry. The diagnosis of septic arthritis and non-septic arthritis were made by experienced rheumatologists or orthopaedic surgeons. Septic arthritis was diagnosed by considering the finding of acute arthritis together with findings such as positive Gram stain or positive culture of synovial fluid or positive blood culture. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing septic arthritis and the time to positivity of microcalorimetry were determined. Of 90 patients (mean age 64 years), nine had septic arthritis, of whom four (44 %) had positive Gram stain, six (67 %) positive synovial fluid culture and four (44 %) had positive blood culture. The sensitivity of microcalorimetry was 89 %, the specificity was 99 % and the mean detection time was 5.0 h (range, 2.2-8.0 h). Microcalorimetry is an accurate and rapid method for the diagnosis of septic arthritis. It has potential to be used in clinical practice in diagnosing septic arthritis.

  7. Report - Recurrent hip arthritis diagnosed as juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tung-Ming; Yang, Kuender D; Yong, Su-Boon

    2016-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood. It is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with arthritis of unknown etiology that begins before the age of 16 and persists for longer than 6 weeks. In this report, the case of a child who suffered recurrent alternative hip arthritis with bilateral hip arthritis is examined, in which he was finally diagnosed as suffering from Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A 14-year-old boy of Taiwanese origin presented with a normal birth and developmental history. At the age of 10, right-side hip joint pain was experienced, which later migrated to the left side. On further inspection, synovium hypertrophy, cartilage erosion and hip turbid fluid accumulation were found and aseptic arthritis was presumed to be the primary cause. However, after re-examining both his clinical history and presentation, Juvenile idiopathic arthritis was the final diagnosis. Any child presenting with repeat joint swelling are at risk of Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This is still to be the case if symptoms recede or heal and no initial diagnosis is made. Therefore, a better understanding of the risk of recurrent arthritis is needed. It cannot be emphasized strongly enough that Juvenile idiopathic arthritis should be suspected at all times when a child suffers from recurrent aseptic arthritis of the hip joint.

  8. Arthritis and X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Pedro; Santos, Alexandra; Faria, Emília; Silva, Jorge; Malcata, Armando; Chieira, Celso

    2008-01-01

    Primary immunodeficiencies are defined as genetically determined functional and/or quantitative abnormalities in one or more of the components of the immune system. Immunodeficiency and arthritis can be related, although the mechanisms are not always clear. Different causes for immunodeficiency can secondarily be found in patients with arthritis; on the other hand, arthritis can be a manifestation of primary immunodeficiency. Arthritis occurs chiefly in humoral primary immunodeficiencies, namely in X-linked agammaglobulinemia and common variable immunodeficiency, and may be one of the warning signs for primary immunodeficiency. We report a case of arthritis as the presenting feature of X-linked agammaglobulinemia. In X-linked agammaglobulinemia, arthritis may be a consequence of infection, most notably by Mycoplasma, or of immune dysfunction itself. In children, and occasionally in young adults, a combination of arthritis and hypogammaglobulinemia should suggest primary immunodeficiency, although other causes of hypogammaglobulinemia must be excluded. Physicians evaluating patients with arthritis should be aware of this fact so that an early diagnosis can be pursued as it is of extreme importance in the optimal management and prognosis of these patients.

  9. Symptomatic manubriosternal joint involvement in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    The manubriosternal joint is commonly involved in rheumatoid arthritis but rarely gives rise to symptoms. A patient is reported with seropositive, erosive rheumatoid arthritis, who developed symptoms resembling pleuritic pain, arising from synovitis of the manubriosternal joint. Treatment with intra-articular steroid injection resolved these symptoms rapidly.

  10. Symptomatic manubriosternal joint involvement in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doube, A; Clarke, A K

    1989-06-01

    The manubriosternal joint is commonly involved in rheumatoid arthritis but rarely gives rise to symptoms. A patient is reported with seropositive, erosive rheumatoid arthritis, who developed symptoms resembling pleuritic pain, arising from synovitis of the manubriosternal joint. Treatment with intra-articular steroid injection resolved these symptoms rapidly.

  11. Autoimmune correlation of rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Lalitha Tanjore Arunachalam

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis, both, chronic inflammatory diseases share certain common diagnostic, pathological, immunogenetic and therapeutic features. A recently discovered enzymatic mimicry between human and bacterial species is novel and it opens up a new terrain for therapeutic blockade in the management of rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Socioeconomic status and risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Merete Blak; Jacobsen, Søren; Klarlund, Mette;

    2006-01-01

    To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association.......To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association....

  13. Treatment of early rheumatoid and undifferentiated arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heimans, Lotte

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on different aspects of treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and undifferentiated arthritis (UA), based on the results of three intervention studies; the IMPROVED-study, the BeSt study and the PROMPT study. This thesis discusses the results of different treatment

  14. Patient education for adults with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemsma, R.P.; Kirwan, J.R.; Taal, E.; Rasker, H.J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Patient education shows short-term benefits for adults with rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose was to examine the effectiveness of patient education interventions on health status (pain, functional disability, psychological well-being and disease activity) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

  15. Psoriatic arthritis: from pathogenesis to therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, Oliver

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a multigenic autoimmune disease that involves synovial tissue, entheseal sites and skin, and that may result in significant joint damage. Although there are no diagnostic tests for psoriatic arthritis, research has identified consistent features that help to distinguish the condition from other common rheumatic diseases. Comparison of HLA-B and HLA-C regions in psoriatic arthritis with those in psoriasis without joint involvement demonstrates significant differences, such that psoriatic arthritis cannot be viewed simply as a subset of genetically homogeneous psoriasis. T-cell receptor phenotypic studies have failed to identify antigen-driven clones, and an alternative hypothesis for CD8 stimulation involving innate immune signals is proposed. Finally, imaging studies have highlighted entheseal involvement in psoriatic arthritis, and it is possible that entheseal-derived antigens may trigger an immune response that is critically involved in disease pathogenesis.

  16. Brucellar sternoclavicular arthritis, the forgotten complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, A M; Muhtaseb, S A; Al-Mudallal, D S; Marafie, A A; Habib, F M

    1988-06-01

    Of 511 cases of brucellosis studied between December 1983 and February 1986, four (0.8%) had sternoclavicular (STCL) arthritis. Two were male and two female, and only one was younger than 50 years old. All four cases had significantly high specific IgG antibody titres (1 of 1280), measured by the indirect immunofluorescent (IIF) test, and two had Brucella melitensis isolated from their blood. In two cases, STCL arthritis was the presenting problem, and it was associated in one with ankle arthritis, hepatitis, renal impairment, orogenital ulcers and a haematological picture of myelodysplasia; in the other it was a relapsing STCL arthritis. In the remaining two cases, STCL arthritis was part of an extensive osteoarticular disease, which was associated in one with cachexia, liver cirrhosis, heart failure and prostatitis with urine retention, and in the other with severe thrombocytopenia. Excellent results were obtained from six to eight weeks' therapy with streptomycin, rifampicin and cotrimoxazole or tetracycline.

  17. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  18. Biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheul, M K; Fearon, U; Trouw, L A; Veale, D J

    2015-11-01

    Rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis are systemic inflammatory conditions characterized by a chronic form of arthritis, often leading to irreversible joint damage. Early treatment for patients with rheumatic diseases is required to reduce or prevent joint injury. However, early diagnosis can be difficult and currently it is not possible to predict which individual patient will develop progressive erosive disease or who may benefit from a specific treatment according to their clinical features at presentation. Biomarkers are therefore required to enable earlier diagnosis and predict prognosis in both rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. In this review we will examine the evidence and current status of established and experimental biomarkers in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis for three important purposes; disease diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy.

  19. Current concepts in the treatment of gouty arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhen-hua; Waizy, Hazibullah

    2013-02-01

    Gouty arthritis is an extremely painful condition that causes functional impairment. Gouty arthritis has become increasingly complex because of multiple comorbidities, iatrogenic factors and hyperuricemia that is refractory to treatment. In this review, we present a general overview of gouty arthritis including its pathophysiology, clinical presentations, diagnosis, predisposing factors and prophylactic therapy for preventing gouty arthritis flares.

  20. Cardiovascular involvement in psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. De Gennaro Colonna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, genetically determined and immunomediated inflammatory skin disease that affects 2-3% of the Caucasian population. A considerable proportion of these patients develop a form of inflammatory arthritis known as psoriatic arthritis (PsA, although the prevalence of this has not been well defined. Patients with PsA have a higher mortality rate than the general population and the risk of mortality is related to disease severity at the time of presentation. Endothelial dysfunction and early atherosclerosis have been found in patients with PsA without any cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors, and experts believe that CVD is one of the leading causes of death, as it is in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Various disease-related mechanisms may be involved in the development of premature vascular damage in both cases, including an increased synthesis of proinflammatory mediators (such as cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules, autoantibodies against endothelial cell components, perturbations in T-cell subsets, genetic polymorphisms, hyperhomocysteinemia, oxidative stress, abnormal vascular repair, and iatrogenic factors. In a recent study of 22 patients with PsA without any signs of CVD, we found that the plasma concentration of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA levels were significantly high and coronary flow reserve (CFR was significantly reduced. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between CFR and plasma ADMA levels in the PsA group. The significant correlation between the reduced CRF and increased ADMA levels suggests that, like patients with early RA, PsA patients suffer from endothelial dysfunction and impaired coronary microcirculation. Active PsA is a risk factor for CVD, and so PsA patients should be screened for subclinical forms of the disease and its risk factors, and an early treatment approach should be adopted.

  1. Glucocorticoids in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malattia, Clara; Martini, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Although the use of corticosteroids in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is now much more limited owing to the availability of methotrexate and biological agents, there are clinical scenarios where it is still indicated. For example, corticosteroids may be indicated for intraarticular injections to prevent joint deformities, as a "bridge" drug to relieve symptoms in polyarticular disease while waiting for methotrexate and biologics to exert their full therapeutic effects, and in the treatment of chronic iridocyclitis, macrophage activation syndrome, and systemic JIA, although the advent of interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 blockers has greatly reduced the latter indication.

  2. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Karl [Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Radiology Department, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    Over the past decade there have been considerable changes in the classification and imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Radiology now has a considerable role in the management of JIA, the differential diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and detecting complications. The different imaging modalities available, their role and limitations are discussed in this article and the various disease features that the radiologist should be aware of are described. An approach to the imaging of the child with joint disease and in the monitoring of disease complications are also discussed. (orig.)

  3. LABORATORY FINDINGS IN PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Todesco

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis (PsA has been classically defined as an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis. However, in comparison with other relevant inflammatory arthropathies, in which a definite diagnosis is frequently possible only by means of laboratory investigations, in PsA true laboratory diagnostic markers are lacking. Some markers are utilised more to differentiate other diseases than to characterise PsA. For example in polyarticular PsA, which may be in some cases indistinguishable from RA, the rheumatoid factor (RF or the more specific and recently introduced antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP, may be useful to better identify RA. However, RF was found in 5% to 13% of patients with PsA, and anti-CCP may be observed in almost similar percentage. The determination of ESR and/or CRP is frequently disappointing in PsA, since they are both elevated in only half of the patients with PsA. However, ESR and/or CRP are included in the most utilised response criteria for RA, such as ACR and DAS, and, in addition are also considered reliable in the assessment of PsA. Furthermore, elevated levels of ESR have been proposed as one of the best predictors of damage progression and, in addition, a low ESR seems protective, while an ESR >15 mm/h is one of the factors associated with an increased mortality in PsA. The synovial fluid (SF effusion is much higher in PsA, in comparison with other arthropathies. When available, SF analysis may offer additive information useful for the diagnosis, such as the increased number of leukocytes, which underlines the inflammatory nature of the effusion even in a patient with normal serum levels of acute phase response. We found that elevated IL-1 levels in SF of patients with early disease (<6 months, may be predictive of an evolution in polyarticular form at follow-up. This observation is in keeping with the crucial role that inflammatory cytokines play in PsA, probably related to a genetic

  4. Psoriatic arthritis: genetics and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mathieu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis is a complex disease affecting primarily peripheral and axial joints and entheses together with the skin. The pathogenesis is characterized by a genetic background and by inflammatory mechanisms which may be triggered by environmental factors. Several susceptibility genes have been investigated; they include HLA genes, genes within the HLA region and genes outside the HLA region. T cells, including the recently described subset Th17, are thought to play an important role in the acute and chronic phases of the disease. Some of these findings allowed novel therapeutic interventions or opened new promising approaches in treatment. The most relevant data of the literature are summarized and discussed.

  5. SEPTIC ARTHRITIS OF THE HIP IN ADULTS: A RARE PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Septic Arthritis also known as infectious arthritis, can be bacterial or fungal arthritis. The condition is an inflammation of a joint that is caused by an infection. Typically, Septic Arthritis affects one large joint in the body such as knee or hip. Generally, Septic Arthritis is present with complete absorption of the head of the Femur in infants. A case was encountered in which the complete absorption of the femoral head was seen in adults also

  6. Ankle arthritis predicts polyarticular disease course and unfavourable outcome in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjörnsson, Anna-Clara; Aalto, Kristiina; Broström, Eva W;

    2015-01-01

    the first eight years of disease. Ankle arthritis was least common in the persistent oligoarticular category (25%) and most common in children with extended oligoarticular (83%) and polyarticular RF-negative (85%) JIA. Children who developed ankle arthritis during the first year of disease were younger......OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the occurrence, clinical characteristics and prognostic factors associated with ankle arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS: 440 children with JIA were followed for eight years in a prospective Nordic population-based cohort study. Data...... on remission was available for 427 of these children. Occurrence of clinically assessed ankle arthritis was analysed in relation to JIA category, clinical characteristics and remission data eight years after disease onset. RESULTS: In 440 children with JIA, 251 (57%) experienced ankle arthritis during...

  7. Complementary medicine in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Atzeni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM for chronic conditions has increased in recent years. CAM is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions and patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA frequently try CAM. This review summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massage, supplements. However, for the great majority of these therapies no evidencebased (clinical randomized trials results are available. CAM is usually used in addition to, and not as a substitute for conventional therapies. The motivation of patients to try CAM is complex; the willingness to take control of their healthcare, the desire to try everything available, the mass-media pressure and the erroneous notion that CAM is without risks. In fact, none of these treatments is totally devoid of risks. While the use of complementary and alternative modalities for the treatment of RA continues to increase, rigorous clinical trials examining their efficacy are needed before definitive recommendations regarding the application of these modalities can be made.

  8. Indirect costs of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciborski, Filip; Kłak, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Brygida

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that in Poland about 400,000 persons in general suffer from inflammatory joint diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Epidemiological surveys documenting the frequency and disturbance of musculoskeletal disorders in the Polish population are few in number. Most of the estimations are based on epidemiological data from other countries (prevalence of 0.5-1%). According to the data of the National Health Fund in Poland 135,000-157,000 persons in total are treated because of rheumatoid arthritis per year [ICD10 (International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems): M05, M06]. In the case of this group of diseases indirect costs significantly outweigh the direct costs. Indirect costs increase together with activity level of the disease. The cost analysis of productivity loss of RA patients indicates that sickness absenteeism and informal care are the most burdensome. At the national level it amounts in total from 1.2 billion to 2.8 billion PLN per year, depending on the method of analysis. These costs could be significantly reduced through early diagnosis and introduction of effective treatment.

  9. Inhibition of inflammatory arthritis using fullerene nanomaterials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L Dellinger

    Full Text Available Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC. Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked FcγR- and TNF-α-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-α-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and FcγR-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-κB activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-α. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis.

  10. Inhibition of inflammatory arthritis using fullerene nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellinger, Anthony L; Cunin, Pierre; Lee, David; Kung, Andrew L; Brooks, D Bradford; Zhou, Zhiguo; Nigrovic, Peter A; Kepley, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA) is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC). Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked FcγR- and TNF-α-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-α-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and FcγR-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-κB activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA) were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-α. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis.

  11. Chronic Lyme disease arthritis: review of the literature and report of a case of wrist arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerpella, T A; Engber, W D

    1992-05-01

    A case of Lyme arthritis with advanced degenerative changes localized to the midcarpal joint was treated with a limited wrist arthrodesis with relief of pain and improved function. Chronic Lyme arthritis occurs as the third stage of Lyme disease. Serologic testing and a history of a characteristic rash may be helpful in the diagnosis. Radiographic and histopathologic findings are nonspecific, with both degenerative and inflammatory characteristics. Intravenous antibiotics provide an effective treatment of chronic Lyme arthritis.

  12. Chronic joint symptoms and prior arthritis diagnosis in community surveys: implications for arthritis prevalence estimates.

    OpenAIRE

    Feinglass, Joe; Nelson, Cynthia; Lawther, Timothy; Chang, Rowland W.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Alternative definitions of arthritis in community surveys provide very different estimates of arthritis prevalence among older Americans. This telephone interview study examines prevalence estimates based on the current Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) arthritis case definition. METHODS: Interviews were conducted with 851 Chicago residents age 45 and older. Logistic regression was used to compare the age and sex controlled prevalence of poor health, restricted ac...

  13. Marine oil supplements for arthritis pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senftleber, Ninna K.; Nielsen, Sabrina M.; Andersen, Jens Rikardt

    2017-01-01

    Arthritis patients often take fish oil supplements to alleviate symptoms, but limited evidence exists regarding their efficacy. The objective was to evaluate whether marine oil supplements reduce pain and/or improve other clinical outcomes in patients with arthritis. Six databases were searched...... systematically (24 February 2015). We included randomized trials of oral supplements of all marine oils compared with a control in arthritis patients. The internal validity was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool and heterogeneity was explored using restricted maximum of likelihood (REML)-based meta...

  14. Fungal arthritis of the wrist caused by Candida parapsilosis during infliximab therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Hideaki; Miura, Toshiki; Morita, Euan; Morizaki, Yutaka; Uehara, Kosuke; Ohe, Takashi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2012-11-01

    A 60-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis, who had been treated with infliximab, presented with uncontrollable wrist arthritis. Fungal arthritis caused by Candida parapsilosis was confirmed by examining her aspirated joint fluid. Her infliximab therapy was interrupted, and antifungal therapy with fluconazole was started. After the fungal infection had been ameliorated, surgical debridement and arthrodesis of the wrist joint were conducted, and her symptoms completely resolved. Although fungal arthritis is rare, it should be considered as a differential diagnosis of exacerbated monoarthritis in patients treated with biological agents.

  15. Rapidly progressing polyarticular septic arthritis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Sandeep; LeBel, Marie-Eve

    2012-07-01

    Septic arthritis is an orthopedic emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Polyarticular involvement is a relatively rare phenomenon occurring primarily in high-risk patients. In this article, we report the rare case of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis presenting with an acute episode of septic arthritis involving most of the joints of the body. Surprisingly, his bilateral total hip arthroplasties were completely unaffected. Unusual polyarticular presentations of septic arthritis, though rare, must still be considered within the differential diagnosis by all healthcare providers when treating certain high-risk groups.

  16. A Comparative Metabolomic Evaluation of Behcet's Disease with Arthritis and Seronegative Arthritis Using Synovial Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Joong Kyong; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Jungyeon; Hwang, Jiwon; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Cha, Hoon-Suk

    2015-01-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) with arthritis is often confused with seronegative arthritis (SNA) because of shared clinical symptoms and the lack of definitive biomarkers for BD. To investigate possible metabolic patterns and potential biomarkers of BD with arthritis, metabolomic profiling of synovial fluid (SF) from 6 patients with BD with arthritis and 18 patients with SNA was performed using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. A total of 123 metabolites were identified from samples. Orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis showed clear discrimination between BD with arthritis and SNA. A set of 11 metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers for BD using variable importance for projection values and the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Compared with SNA, BD with arthritis exhibited relatively high levels of glutamate, valine, citramalate, leucine, methionine sulfoxide, glycerate, phosphate, lysine, isoleucine, urea, and citrulline. There were two markers identified, elevated methionine sulfoxide and citrulline, that were associated with increased oxidative stress, providing a potential link to BD-associated neutrophil hyperactivity. Glutamate, citramalate, and valine were selected and validated as putative biomarkers for BD with arthritis (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 61.1%). This is the first report to present potential biomarkers from SF for discriminating BD with arthritis from SNA. The metabolomics of SF may be helpful in searching for potential biomarkers and elucidating the clinicopathogenesis of BD with arthritis.

  17. 78 FR 36305 - Proposed Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune... Arthritis (including inflammatory, autoimmune, crystalline and infectious arthritis) and Dysbaric... inflammatory, autoimmune, crystalline and infectious arthritis) and Dysbaric Osteonecrosis Disability...

  18. 78 FR 65450 - Agency Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Non-Degenerative Arthritis (Including Inflammatory, Autoimmune... (including inflammatory, autoimmune, crystalline and infectious arthritis) and Dysbaric Osteonecrosis...-Degenerative Arthritis (including inflammatory, autoimmune, crystalline and infectious arthritis) and...

  19. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team ... may play a role in triggering the disease. Genetic factors are also thought to play a role. ...

  20. SIGNIFICANCE OF PERIPHERAL ARTHRITIS IN ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS

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    Sh. F. Erdes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to elucidate the role of peripheral arthritis in ankylosing spondylitis (AS and its impact on therapy choice in daily practice of rheumatologists. Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 330 consecutive patients with AS referred to rheumatologists during 4 months in 24 cities and towns of the Russian Federation. A specially designed clinical schedule was filled out for all the patients. Results. Peripheral arthritis was present in 47% of patients, including in 17 and 46% who had upper and lower limb joint involvement, respectively. Patients with peripheral arthritis had higher ESR, BASDAI and ASDAS-ESR levels. They were also found to have more marked functional disorders than the patients with its isolated axial variant. The clinical signs of hip joint involvement were detected in 56% of the patients and they were bilateral in 43%. In the rheumatologists' opinion, 24 (8% needed total hip joint replacement. Conclusion. Peripheral arthritis aggravates AS.

  1. Management of melioidosis osteomyelitis and septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, R P; Mathew, M; Smith, J; Morse, L P; Mehta, J A; Currie, B J

    2015-02-01

    Little information is available about several important aspects of the treatment of melioidosis osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. We undertook a retrospective review of 50 patients with these conditions in an attempt to determine the effect of location of the disease, type of surgical intervention and duration of antibiotic treatment on outcome, particularly complications and relapse. We found that there was a 27.5% risk of osteomyelitis of the adjacent bone in patients with septic arthritis in the lower limb. Patients with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of an adjacent bone were in hospital significantly longer (p = 0.001), needed more operations (p = 0.031) and had a significantly higher rate of complications and re-presentation (p = 0.048). More than half the patients (61%), most particularly those with multifocal bone and joint involvement, and those with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis of an adjacent bone who were treated operatively, needed more visits to theatre.

  2. Marine oil supplements for arthritis pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senftleber, Ninna K.; Nielsen, Sabrina M.; Andersen, Jens Rikardt;

    2017-01-01

    Arthritis patients often take fish oil supplements to alleviate symptoms, but limited evidence exists regarding their efficacy. The objective was to evaluate whether marine oil supplements reduce pain and/or improve other clinical outcomes in patients with arthritis. Six databases were searched...... systematically (24 February 2015). We included randomized trials of oral supplements of all marine oils compared with a control in arthritis patients. The internal validity was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool and heterogeneity was explored using restricted maximum of likelihood (REML)-based meta...... interval, CI, -0.42 to -0.07; heterogeneity, I2 = 63%. A significant effect was found in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (22 trials; -0.21; 95% CI, -0.42 to -0.004) and other or mixed diagnoses (3 trials; -0.63; 95% CI, -1.20 to -0.06), but not in osteoarthritis patients (5 trials; -0.17; 95% CI, -0...

  3. Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0408 TITLE: Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0408 5c... pathogenesis of RA that can ultimately be targeted to prevent RA. This project has proposed to use a unique set of serum samples and clinical data

  4. ▼ Apremilast for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    ▼ Apremilast (Otezla - Celgene Europe Ltd.) is a novel orally administered immunomodulatory medicine licensed for the treatment of plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. The company suggests that it has demonstrated proven and durable efficacy in both conditions and has a favourable safety profile with no requirement for drug-specific pre-screening or ongoing laboratory monitoring. Here we review the evidence on the safety and efficacy of apremilast in the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

  5. Clinical management of septic arthritis in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrochers, André; Francoz, David

    2014-03-01

    Synovial fluid, ultrasound, and radiographic imaging are common diagnostic tools for septic arthritis. Mycoplasma septic arthritis is suspected in calves with clinical signs of otitis and pneumonia. Commonly affected joints are carpus, stifle, and tarsus. Treatment strategy must include long-term antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, and joint lavage. Knowledge of communication and boundaries for commonly affected joints is essential to perform joint lavage and arthrotomy.

  6. Innovative medicines for treatment of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levitan A.l.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of effective treatment of psoriatic arthritis has not been solved yet. The search for new therapeutic options is very active in many directions. At the stage of clinical trials are drugs that block interleukin-17-a (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab, drugs that suppress interleukin-12 and interleukin-23 (ustekinumab. To modern means to ensure psoriatic arthritis include drugs that are inhibitors of small molecules orkinase pathways (apremilast, tofacitinib.

  7. [Septic arthritis of thoracic facet joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Abdelghani, K; Gérard-Dran, D; Combe, B

    2009-08-01

    Septic arthritis of the facet joint is a rare condition. We report a case of septic arthritis of both a thoracic facet joint and a wrist. Clinical manifestations were consistent with a spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine demonstrated infection of facet joints of T1 and T2. A surgical biopsy of the wrist isolated a type B streptococcus. The same organism was found in urine culture. The patient had an uneventful recovery on antibiotics.

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Amandeep; Naik, Shobha; Pai, Anuradha; Anuradha, Ardra

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT) in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  9. Treatment of acute septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pääkkönen, Markus; Peltola, Heikki

    2013-06-01

    Acute septic arthritis is a rare, but potentially devastating disease. The treatment is initiated intravenously, but can be safely switched to oral after 2-4 days providing large doses of a well-absorbing antibiotic and, for time-dependent antibiotics, 4 times-a-day administration are used. Empiric treatment should always cover Staphylococcus aureus and common respiratory pathogens, whereas Kingella kingae and Salmonella are important only regionally. Studies conducted by our group have shown that a total course of 10 days may suffice for previously healthy children in a Western setting. Treatment of neonates, patients with immunodeficiency or cases caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus, may deserve a different approach.

  10. [Pulmonary manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawska, Justyna; Domysławska, Izabela; Bagrowska, Magdalena; Sierakowski, Stanislaw

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by destructive cartilages, bones and other structures formed joints. RA belongs to connective tissue diseases represented by systemic nature, internal illness, extra-articular features and rapidly progress of atherosceirosis. The extra-articular complications cause the reduction of patient longevity. The frequency of symptoms in patient with RA and respiratory disorders occur in 10-20% of cases. Pulmonary complications are the second most common cause of premature of patient deaths. Respiratory disorders associated with RA are devided into 3 groups: infection, lung disease caused by drugs and pulmonary manifestation connected by RA. These last affect interstitial tissue, bronchioli, pulmonary vessels, pleura, also are presented by pulmonary rheumatoid nodules and pulmonary hypertension.

  11. Collagen Biomarkers for Arthritis Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Birmingham

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common form of chronic arthritis is osteoarthritis (OA with prevalence as high as 80% after age 75 (Arden and Nevitt, 2006. The incidence of OA is expected to increase as the population ages, increasing the socioeconomic burden of OA. Despite the signifi cant burden of this disease, no drug has been identifi ed that can effectively modify disease progression (Moskowitz and Hooper, 2005; Abadie et al. 2004. However, slowing disease progress and improvement in quality of life may be achieved by behavioral modifi cations, such as weight loss and exercise. Many patients with early OA will progress to disability and joint replacement. Physical examination and radiographic studies are relatively poor means for detecting disease early or predicting progression. Therefore, identifi cation of factors to facilitate early OA diagnosis and prognosis is a major focus of current OA research (Lohmander and Felson, 2004; Lohmander, 2004; Garnero and Delmas, 2003.

  12. Nail abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, C; Cribier, B; Sibilia, J; Kuntz, J L; Grosshans, E

    1997-12-01

    Many nail abnormalities have traditionally been described in association with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but their specificity has never been assessed in a controlled study. Our purpose was to evaluate the frequency and the specificity of nail changes associated with RA in a case-controlled study including 50 patients suffering from RA and 50 controls. For each patient, a general skin examination was performed and the 20 nails were examined. The nail features were noted and classified. A chi 2 test or a Fisher test was used to compare the two groups. The only nail abnormalities significantly associated with RA were longitudinal ridging on nine or 10 finger nails (29 patients in the RA group vs. three in the controls, chi 2: P nail (24 patients vs. 10, chi 2: P nail changes were noticed but were not frequent enough to be significant. The presence of longitudinal ridging on the finger nails was significantly associated with RA.

  13. [Team management of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Loët, X; Vittecoq, O

    2001-12-01

    The main objectives of team management of rheumatoid arthritis are to stop structural damage of joints and to reduce functional, psychological, socioprofessional and economic consequences. Team management requires the collaboration, around the patient, of a rheumatologist, a nurse, a psychologist, a physiotherapist, an occupational therapist, an orthopaedic surgeon at the same time, in the same place. More and more patients wish to manage their disease by themselves. Team care should not be proposed to every patient; it must be reserved to patients whose condition required such an approach because of the severity of the disease, comorbidity, psychological or socioprofessionnal difficulties. Team management should be personalized. Utility of team management is now accepted; out-patient administration is as effective as in-patient one. A good educational program is very important. However, search is still needed to define optimal modalities of team management and tools to measure the efficiency of this approach.

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Sodhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  15. [Physiotherapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spamer, M; Georgi, M; Häfner, R; Händel, H; König, M; Haas, J-P

    2012-07-01

    Control of disease activity and recovery of function are major issues in the treatment of children and adolescents suffering from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Functional therapies including physiotherapy are important components in the multidisciplinary teamwork and each phase of the disease requires different strategies. While in the active phase of the disease pain alleviation is the main focus, the inactive phase requires strategies for improving motility and function. During remission the aim is to regain general fitness by sports activities. These phase adapted strategies must be individually designed and usually require a combination of different measures including physiotherapy, occupational therapy, massage as well as other physical procedures and sport therapy. There are only few controlled studies investigating the effectiveness of physical therapies in JIA and many strategies are derived from long-standing experience. New results from physiology and sport sciences have contributed to the development in recent years. This report summarizes the basics and main strategies of physical therapy in JIA.

  16. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: how can the radiologist help the clinician?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azouz, E.M. [Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Radiology Department, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2008-06-15

    The classification of the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) is based on clinical criteria and includes: 1. Systemic arthritis 2. Oligoarthritis 3. Polyarthritis, rheumatoid factor positive 4. Polyarthritis, rheumatoid factor negative 5. Enthesitis-related arthritis 6. Psoriatic arthritis 7. Undifferentiated arthritis. Systematic arthritis is different from the other arthritides. It is associated with fever, rash, hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. The arthritis is polyarticular and symmetrical. The enlarged liver, spleen and lymph nodes may be detected and followed clinically and, more accurately, with the help of cross-sectional imaging modality such as US or MRI. CT should be avoided in children because of the ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  17. Childhood Arthritis: Rate of Different Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karambin Mohammad Mehdi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available To determine the rate of different types of arthritis in children. We prepared a retrospective descriptive study and included the whole 100 cases of arthritis referred to 17-Shahrivar Hospital, Rasht, Guilan during a 3 years period. Using their medical files, data including age, sex, season of admission, history of trauma, signs and symptoms, lab findings and duration of hospitalization were collected. SPSS 13.0 (statistical software applied for statistical analysis. The most common age of involvement ranged 6-9 years. Septic arthritis, brucellosis, and rheumatoid fever were the most frequent causes of arthritis in our study. Fever and restricted range of motion had the highest rate among different signs and symptoms. Lab data demonstrated leukocytosis, positive CRP, and increased ESR among 74, 79.5, and 73 percent of our patients, respectively. According to the high prevalence of septic arthritis and the arthritis due to brucellosis and rheumatoid fever, it seems that mentioned diseases are still major problems in the issue of hygiene management.

  18. Burden of childhood-onset arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassett Afton L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile arthritis comprises a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases causing erosive arthritis in children, often progressing to disability. These children experience functional impairment due to joint and back pain, heel pain, swelling of joints and morning stiffness, contractures, pain, and anterior uveitis leading to blindness. As children who have juvenile arthritis reach adulthood, they face possible continuing disease activity, medication-associated morbidity, and life-long disability and risk for emotional and social dysfunction. In this article we will review the burden of juvenile arthritis for the patient and society and focus on the following areas: patient disability; visual outcome; other medical complications; physical activity; impact on HRQOL; emotional impact; pain and coping; ambulatory visits, hospitalizations and mortality; economic impact; burden on caregivers; transition issues; educational occupational outcomes, and sexuality. The extent of impact on the various aspects of the patients', families' and society's functioning is clear from the existing literature. Juvenile arthritis imposes a significant burden on different spheres of the patients', caregivers' and family's life. In addition, it imposes a societal burden of significant health care costs and utilization. Juvenile arthritis affects health-related quality of life, physical function and visual outcome of children and impacts functioning in school and home. Effective, well-designed and appropriately tailored interventions are required to improve transitioning to adult care, encourage future vocation/occupation, enhance school function and minimize burden on costs.

  19. Bilateral Cricoarytenoid Arthritis: A Cause of Recurrent Upper Airway Obstruction in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Pradhan, Pradeep; Bhardwaj, Abhishek; Venkatachalam, VP

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral cricoarytenoid joint arthritis with history of rheumatoid arthritis, presented with stridor to the outpatient department. Endolaryngoscopy revealed adducted vocal cords and a nodule over left arytenoid which later confirmed to be rheumatoid nodule on histopathologic examination. Initially, although patient responded well to medical treatment, recurrence was noticed after 6 months follow-up.

  20. Why golimumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rossini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Golimumab is an anti-TNF monoclonal antibody administred subcutaneously once a month and produced with an innovative technology that minimizes immunogenicity. This paper reviews and updates the main studies on the efficacy, safety and pharmacoeconomic aspects of treatment with golimumab of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Comprehensive assessment of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci in a large psoriatic arthritis cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2012-08-01

    A number of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility genes have been identified in recent years. Given the overlap in phenotypic expression of synovial joint inflammation between RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), the authors explored whether RA susceptibility genes are also associated with PsA.

  2. Moraxella infectious arthritis: first report in an adult.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbaum, J; Lieberman, D. H.; Katz, W A

    1980-01-01

    The first occurrence of septic arthritis due to moraxella in an adult is reported. The clinical presentation mimicked disseminated gonococcaemia with associated gonococcal arthritis except for an atypical rash. Diagnosis was made by culture.

  3. Could a Germ Link Gum Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 162571.html Could a Germ Link Gum Disease, Rheumatoid Arthritis? Study may offer new insight into the cause ... the long-noticed connection between gum disease and rheumatoid arthritis, a new study suggests. The discovery might also ...

  4. Psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbjornsson, B; Ejstrup, L; Gran, J T;

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries.......To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) in the Nordic countries....

  5. Elevated rheumatoid factor and long term risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Schnohr, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis.......To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis....

  6. Risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2012-01-01

    To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke.......To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke....

  7. Septic arthritis in the central part of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen Andreasen, Rikke; Andersen, Nanna Skaarup; Just, Søren Andreas;

    Septic arthritis in the central part of Denmark, Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, volume 73, supplement 2, p. 287......Septic arthritis in the central part of Denmark, Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, volume 73, supplement 2, p. 287...

  8. What Are Osteoporosis and Arthritis and How Are They Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What Are Osteoporosis and Arthritis and How Are They Different? Fast ... and Arthritis Cope? What About Pain? What Is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a disease that makes bones weak ...

  9. Osteoporosis and Arthritis: Two Common but Different Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions Osteoporosis and Arthritis: Two Common but Different Conditions Publication ... between these conditions. Osteoporosis Arthritis For Your Information Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones ...

  10. JUVENILE CHRONIC ARTHRITIS WITH EYE LESION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S O Salugina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A bstract. Objective, to describe a series of pts with JRA/JCA and uveitis. Material and methods. The study included 81 pts with JRA and uveitis. There were 68 girls-84%, 13 boys-16%. We studied the clinical manifestations, the antinuclear antibodies (ANA using HEP-2 cells for the 33 pts with uveitis and 46 pts without uveitis, HLA status was determined for 36 pts. Results. 85,2% of the children had arthritis before uveitis. The mean age at onset of arthritis was 3,5 year (range: 1-10 yrs, the mean age at onset of uveitis was 6 year (range: 2-15 yrs. The mean interval between the onset of arthritis and uveitis was 3,02 years (range: 3,5 yrs before arthritis onset to 12,5 yrs after. In 68,1% pts the diagnosis of uveitis was made within 5 yrs after onset of arthritis. 93% of pts had mono-oligoarticular onset, but 50% had poliarticular course. 23,5% of pts had functional disability 3-4 classes. Ocular complications were developed in 53.1%: cataracts-38,3%, band keratopathy-11,1%, glaucoma-2,5%. 93,9% of 33 studied children with arthritis and uveitis were ANA positive, 9,1% were RF positive. 18,1 % had HLA-DR8 (p<0,001, 83,3% - HLA-A2 (p<0,00l, HLA-B27 - 30,6 % (p<0,00l. Conclusion. Clinical and laboratory data of our pts suggest that: lthe combination of arthritis and uveitis would be named JCA with uveitis; 2 according our opinion JCA with uveitis is separate nosological form among the juvenile arthritides.

  11. Pseudoseptic pseudogout in progressive pseudorheumatoid arthritis of childhood.

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley, J D

    1987-01-01

    Progressive pseudorheumatoid arthritis of childhood is an uncommon arthropathy of unknown aetiology, which is related to spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia tarda. Previous reports have noted the absence of joint inflammation in this disease. An adult is described here with this arthropathy, who developed episodic acute inflammatory arthritis that mimicked septic arthritis, but proved to be pseudogout. The relation between pseudogout and progressive pseudorheumatoid arthritis of childhood is discussed.

  12. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: therapeutic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikanza, Ian C

    2002-01-01

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) is the most common childhood chronic systemic autoimmune inflammatory disease. The therapeutic approach to JRA has, to date, been casual and based on extensions of clinical experiences gained in the management of adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The physiology of inflammation has been systemically studied and this has led to the identification of specific therapeutic targets and the development of novel approaches to the management of JRA. The classical treatments of the disease such as methotrexate, sodium aurothiomalate and sulfasalazine, are not always effective in controlling RA and JRA. This has necessitated the development of novel agents for treating RA, most of which are biological in nature and are targeted at specific sites of the inflammatory cascades. These biological therapeutic strategies in RA have proved successful and are being applied in the management of JRA. These developments have been facilitated by the advances in molecular biology which have heralded the advent of biodrugs (recombinant proteins) and gene therapy, in which specific genes can be introduced locally to enhance in vivo gene expression or suppress gene(s) of interest with a view to down-regulating inflammation. Some of these biodrugs, such as anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFalpha), monoclonal antibodies (infliximab, adalimumab), TNF soluble receptor constructs (etanercept) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) have been tested and shown to be effective in RA. Etanercept has now been licensed for JRA. Clinical trials of infliximab in JRA are planned. Studies show that the clinical effects are transient, necessitating repeated treatments and the risk of vaccination effects. Anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10, transforming growth factor-beta and interferon-beta (IFN-beta) are undergoing clinical trials. Many of these agents have to be administered parenterally and production costs are very high; thus, there is a need

  13. Cytokine profiles in peripheral blood and whole blood cell cultures associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Sørensen, Lars Korsbaek; Stoltze, Kaj

    2005-01-01

    Cytokines play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. An obvious question is whether patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis share blood cytokine profiles distinguishing them from individuals free of disease....

  14. Kingella kingae causing septic arthritis in Felty's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, D A; Settas, L

    1983-08-01

    A case of septic arthritis of the elbow caused by Kingella kingae, a Gram-negative bacillus, is described. The patient had long-standing, severe rheumatoid arthritis and Felty's syndrome. This appears to be the first report from the United Kingdom of Kingella kingae as the aetiological agent of septic arthritis.

  15. Kingella kingae causing septic arthritis in Felty's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, D A; Settas, L

    1983-01-01

    A case of septic arthritis of the elbow caused by Kingella kingae, a Gram-negative bacillus, is described. The patient had long-standing, severe rheumatoid arthritis and Felty's syndrome. This appears to be the first report from the United Kingdom of Kingella kingae as the aetiological agent of septic arthritis.

  16. 76 FR 29767 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... arthritis attacks. ILARIS has also been shown to extend the time to the next attack and reduce the...

  17. Molecular targets in arthritis and recent trends in nanotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder Kaur; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Due to its severity and increasing epidemiology, arthritis needs no description. There are various forms of arthritis most of which are disabling, very painful, and common. In spite of breakthroughs in the field of drug discovery, there is no cure for arthritis that can eliminate the disease permanently and ease the pain. The present review focuses on some of the most successful drugs in arthritis therapy and their side effects. Potential new targets in arthritis therapy such as interleukin-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor alpha, osteopontin, and several others have been discussed here, which can lead to refinement of current therapeutic modalities. Mechanisms for different forms of arthritis have been discussed along with the molecules that act as potential biomarkers for arthritis. Due to the difficulty in monitoring the disease progression to detect the advanced manifestations of the diseases, drug-induced cytotoxicity, and problems with drug delivery; nanoparticle therapy has gained the attention of the researchers. The unique properties of nanoparticles make them highly attractive for the design of novel therapeutics or diagnostic agents for arthritis. The review also focuses on the recent trends in nanoformulation development used for arthritis therapy. This review is, therefore, important because it describes the relevance and need for more arthritis research, it brings forth a critical discussion of successful drugs in arthritis and analyses the key molecular targets. The review also identifies several knowledge gaps in the published research so far along with the proposal of new ideas and future directions in arthritis therapy.

  18. 38 CFR 4.58 - Arthritis due to strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arthritis due to strain... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.58 Arthritis due to strain. With service incurred lower extremity amputation or shortening, a disabling arthritis, developing...

  19. 77 FR 14529 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis who have had an inadequate response to one or more...

  20. Cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović-Rackov Ljiljana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the clinical significance of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha, IL-12, IL-15 and IL-18 in evaluation of the activity of rheumatoid arthritis. Cytokine concentrations in serum samples and synovial fluid were measured by immnnoenzymatic methods using kits for human interleukins and the Disease Activity Score 28 in 64 patients with active disease. The control group consisted of 25 subjects with arthritis of the knee and osteoarthrosis. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have significantly high (p<0.01 concentrations of examined cytokines in relation to patients with osteoarthritis. By comparing concentrations in 30 patients with high, 14 patients with moderate and 20 patients with mild activity of rheumatoid arthritis, it was established that patients with high degree of disease activity have significantly high (p<0.01; p<0.05 concentrations of examined cytokines in the blood and synovial fluid in relation to patients with moderate and mild disease. We have concluded that cytokine concentrations are good indicators of the degree of rheumatoid arthritis activity. This research is a contribution to understanding the insufficiently known pathogenetic mechanisms of cytokines, especially IL-18, in active disease. .

  1. Update on Therapeutic Approaches for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Eugénia; Gomes, Andreia; Preto, Ana; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common chronic inflammatory and destructive arthropathy that consumes considerable personal, social and economic costs. It consists of a syndrome of pain, stiffness and symmetrical inflammation of the synovial membrane (synovitis) of freely moveable joints such as the knee (diarthrodial joints). Although the etiology of rheumatoid arthritis is unclear, the disease is characterized by inflammation of the synovial lining of diarthrodial joints, high synovial proliferation and an influx of inflammatory cells, macrophages and lymphocytes through angiogenic blood vessels. Diseasemodifying antirheumatic drugs slow disease progression and can induce disease remission in some patients. Methotrexate is the first line therapy, but if patients become intolerant to this drug, biologic agents should be used. The development of biological substances for the treatment of rheumatic conditions has been accompanied by ongoing health economic discussions regarding the implementation of these highly effective, but accordingly, highly priced drugs are the standard treatment guidelines of rheumatic diseases. In this way, more efficient strategies have to be identified. Despite numerous reviews in rheumatoid arthritis in the last years, this area is in constant development and updates are an urgent need to incorporate new advances in rheumatoid arthritis research. This review highlights the immunopathogenesis rationale for the current therapeutic strategies in rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. PULMONARY INVOLVEMENT IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Bestaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune disease with erosive and destructive polyarthritis and systemic manifestations. Pulmonary involvement (PI is common in RA. With high-resolution computed tomography, the detection rate of PI in RA is as high as 50%. PI is a direct cause of death in 10–20% of patients with RA. Autoimmune mechanisms play a leading part in the development of PI in RA. Under the hypothesis advanced by M. Selman et al., that impaired alveolocyte regeneration processes after injury rather inflammation underlie the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. The pathological process is triggered by damaged alveolocytes and characterized by the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, the suppressed apoptosis of the latter, and the enhanced activity of pneumofibrosis-stimulating cytokines. This gives rise to remodeling of the extracellular matrix, including destruction of the basement membrane, angiogenesis, and fibrosis. The paper considers the types of lung injury in RA and main methods for diagnosis and therapy.

  3. Cardiac involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. De Gennaro Colonna

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic disease of unknown etiology characterized by a chronic inflammatory process mainly leading to destruction of synovial membrane of small and major diarthrodial joints. The prevalence of RA within the general adult population is about 1% and female subjects in fertile age result mostly involved. It’s an invalidating disease, associated with changes in life quality and a reduced life expectancy. Moreover, we can observe an increased mortality rate in this population early after the onset of the disease. The mortality excess can be partially due to infective, gastrointestinal, renal or pulmonary complications and malignancy (mainly lung cancer and non- Hodgkin lymphoma. Among extra-articular complications, cardiovascular (CV involvement represents one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Every cardiac structure can be affected by different pathogenic pathways: heart valves, conduction system, myocardium, endocardium, pericardium and coronary arteries. Consequently, different clinical manifestations can be detected, including: pericarditis, myocarditis, myocardial fibrosis, arrhythmias, alterations of conduction system, coronaropathies and ischemic cardiopathy, valvular disease, pulmonary hypertension and heart failure. Considering that early cardiac involvement negatively affects the prognosis, it is mandatory to identify high CV risk RA patients to better define long-term management of this population.

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkstra, J.; Dijkstra, P.F.; Klundert, W. v. d.

    1985-02-01

    The course of rheumatoid arthritis in the shoulder is evaluated in 143 patients. In a period of 29 years, 630 X-rays were taken of 286 shoulders. In this series 2 or more X-rays per shoulder were taken of 89 patients (29 male, 60 female). The various changes in the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints were described. Gross destruction appears to be rare, compared to the more frequently seen minor cystic changes. The progress of the disease is often slow or halting. One or both of the shoulders in some of the patients (15 male and 29 female) did not have any detectable X-rays changes, although some of them were followed up for more than 20 years. During our follow-up it became apparent that the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints do not follow the same course neither in time nor in severity of joint destruction. Therefore, we divided the shoulder joint into the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joint. One normal stage and 5 stages of pathology are recognised to fit into previously published schemes of the other joints. Stage 5 appears to be a new phenomenon of neojoint formation, under the previous humeral head with the inferior glenoid rim. Joint disease in the acromioclavicular joint could be divided only into 3 stages.

  5. [Personalized Medicine in Rheumatoid Arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Shunichi

    2015-10-01

    Medical strategy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has markedly advanced in recent years. The introductions of biologics and methotrexate as an anchor drug have made it possible to not only suppress pain and inflammation (clinical remission), but also to inhibit joint destruction (structural remission), leading to cure of the disease. In order to achieve this target, it is the most important to diagnose RA early and promote disease remission. However, since the condition and pathology are diverse among patients, optimal treatment for each patient is desired (personalized medicine). Treatment should be performed under consideration of the disease state such as activity, prognosis regarding joint destruction, and complications. It is also important to clarify the patient characteristics, such as responsiveness to the drugs and risk of adverse effects. Biomarkers, such as proteomics and pharmacogenomics (genetic polymorphism, etc.), are indispensable for personalized medicine. We have established a predictive model for methotrexate hepatotoxicity, consisting of 13 SNPs with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 89%, although the model should be validated with a larger-scale prospective study. RA is a multifactorial disorder with clinically heterogeneous features. Gene-environment interaction is closely involved in the production of anti-CCP antibodies (ACPA); thereafter, secondary stimuli of joints may lead to symptoms of RA. Joint injury, emotional stress, and infections often trigger the onset of RA. Cure can be achieved through complete remission by early aggressive treatment and returning to the pre-clinical state of RA with environmental improvement.

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis: Disease or syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanich, Jessica A; Carter, John D; Whittum-Hudson, Judith; Hudson, Alan P

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been described in the medical literature for over two hundred years, but its etiology remains unknown. RA displays phenotypic heterogeneity, and it is a relatively prevalent clinical entity: it affects approximately 1% of the population, resulting in enormous pathologic sequelae. Earlier studies targeting the cause(s) of RA suggested potential infectious involvement, whereas more recent reports have focused on a genetic origin of the disease. However, neither infection nor genetics, nor any other single factor is currently accepted as causative of RA. In this article we review studies relating to the etiology of RA, and those of several related matters, and we conclude that the literature indeed does provide insight into the causes underlying the initiation of RA pathogenesis. Briefly, given the remarkable phenotypic variation of RA, especially in its early stages, as well as a number of other characteristics of the condition, we contend that RA is not a discrete clinical entity with a single etiological source. Rather, we argue that it represents a common clinical endpoint for various starting points, each of which is largely guided by as yet poorly understood aspects of the genetic background of the affected individual. Adoption of this alternative view of the origin of RA will have significant consequences for future research and for development of new therapeutic interventions for this burdensome condition.

  7. Pain syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Sergeyevna Filatova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Subjects and methods. One hundred and eighty-three patients with valid rheumatoid arthritis (RA were examined to study the specific fea tures of chronic pain syndrome. The DN4 neuropathic pain diagnostic questionnaire was used to divide all the patients into 2 groups: 1 78 patients with the neuropathic component of pain (NCP and 2 105 patients without the latter. Results. A clinical neurological examination could reveal peripheral nervous system lesion in 96% of Group 1 patients and in 4% of Group 2 ones. The patients with NCP were ascertained to be older, they were longer ill with RA, had higher clinical, X-ray stages and functional class, as well as higher pain intensity. However, no differences were found between the two groups in the values of disease activity (DAS 28 and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. There was a high rate (71% of depressive disorders, the prevalence and degree of which in RA patients were determined by the characteristics of disease severity and did not depend on the presence of NCP. Discussion. The performed study demonstrated that, along with an obligate nociceptive mechanism, the patients with RA had neurogenic and psychogenic components of pain in 43 and 71% of cases, respectively. Consequently, chronic pain syndrome in RA is commonly mixed and both the activity of the inflammatory process and the magnitude of neurogenic and psychogenic components should be borne in mind for optimal pain control.

  8. Gouty arthritis in the human aging process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Secchi Batista

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aging process has gained universal recognition and is occurring at an accelerated pace. Gout is a metabolic disorder in which an overproduction and / or decreased excretion of uric acid, leading to the deposition of crystals of sodium monourato joints and soft tissue. The present study was based on a literature review that aimed to analyze the incidence of gouty arthritis in the human aging process. To this end, we searched for articles indexed journals, books, among others, published in English and Portuguese, using the keywords "Human Aging", "Rheumatic Diseases", "Drop" and "Gouty Arthritis". The data obtained suggest that the prevalence of gout is higher in men, affecting oligo / polyarticular inflammatory symptoms with smaller and often with involvement of small joints of the hands also may be the coexistence of gout with other autoimmune diseases such as ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis, should be performed nutritional treatment and medication.

  9. Imaging Reactive Oxygen Species in Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Tsung Chen

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of arthritides. Luminol was used as the primary reporter of ROS and photons resulting from the chemiluminescence reaction were detected using a super-cooled CCD photon counting system. Luminol was injected intravenously into groups of animals with different models of arthritis. Imaging signal correlated well with the severity of arthritis in focal and pan-arthritis as determined by histological measurement of ROS by formazan. Measurements were highly reproducible, sensitive, and repeatable. In vivo chemiluminescence imaging is expected to become a useful modality to elucidate the role of ROS in the pathogenesis of arthritides and in determining therapeutic efficacy of protective therapies.

  10. Anterior uveitis in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, J J

    1977-10-01

    The ocular and systemic characteristics of 160 patients with anterior uveitis and seronegative juvenile rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed. Chronic uveitis occurred in 131 patients, 76% of whom were girls. Both eyes were involved in 70% of the cases. Band keratopathy occurred in 41% of the eyes, cataract in 42%, and secondary glaucoma in 19%. Only 11 patients had uveitis before the onset of arthritis. Notable correlations included a pauciarticular onset of arthritis in 95% of the patients, and positive tests for antinuclear antibody in 82%. Of 29 patients with acute anterior uveitis, 27 were boys. The inflammation responded well to therapy, and serious complications did not occur. At follow-up 21 patients had typical ankylosing spondylitis, and five had sacroiliitis. The incidence of positive results of tests for HLA-B27 antigen was 94%.

  11. Screening for uveitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, J J

    1989-03-01

    Three hundred and fifteen patients with anterior uveitis associated with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) were studied in order to identify the various risk factors for uveitis. Girls were more susceptible to uveitis than boys by a ratio of 3:1. In 94% of cases the uveitis was diagnosed after the development of arthritis. The risk of uveitis was small after seven or more years had elapsed from the onset of arthritis. Patients with pauciarticular onset JCA had the highest risk of uveitis and systemic onset patients the least risk. The presence of circulating antinuclear antibody was also an important marker for an increased risk of uveitis. A regimen for routine screening of patients is suggested.

  12. Imaging reactive oxygen species in arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Tsung; Tung, Ching-Hsuan; Weissleder, Ralph

    2004-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of arthritides. Luminol was used as the primary reporter of ROS and photons resulting from the chemiluminescence reaction were detected using a super-cooled CCD photon counting system. Luminol was injected intravenously into groups of animals with different models of arthritis. Imaging signal correlated well with the severity of arthritis in focal and pan-arthritis as determined by histological measurement of ROS by formazan. Measurements were highly reproducible, sensitive, and repeatable. In vivo chemiluminescence imaging is expected to become a useful modality to elucidate the role of ROS in the pathogenesis of arthritides and in determining therapeutic efficacy of protective therapies.

  13. The association between rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leech, Michelle T; Bartold, P M

    2015-04-01

    The relationship between rheumatoid arthritis and poor oral health has been recognised for many decades. The association between periodontal infection and the risk of developing RA has been the subject of epidemiological, clinical and basic science research in recent times. Converging and reproducible evidence now makes a clear case for the role of specific periodontal infective pathogens in initiating, amplifying and perpetuating rheumatoid arthritis. The unique enzymatic properties of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis and its contribution to the burden of citrullinated peptides is now well established. The impact of localized infection such as periodontitis in shaping specific anti-citrullinated peptide immune responses highlights a key area for treatment, prevention and risk assessment in rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. CONVENTIONAL THERAPY OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: EVIDENCE-BASED REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Soriano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis is a heterogeneous condition, the pattern of which is determined by any combination of pathology affecting peripheral joints, the enthesis and the spine. There is a paucity of evidence for most of the conventional agents used to treat psoriatic arthritis, with many of them being used on the basis of experience in rheumatoid arthritis. Herein, we summarise the evidence compiled relating to effectiveness of treatment for various manifestation of PsA. For those patients with progressive forms of arthritis who may benefit from intervention of newer biological therapies, the continued use of conventional therapy needs ever increasing scrutiny. Key words: Psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis, therapy

  15. Colchicine-responsive protracted gouty arthritis with systemic inflammatory reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Fumiaki; Migita, Kiyoshi; Haramura, Tomoko; Sumiyoshi, Remi; Kawakami, Atsushi; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2014-05-01

    Acute gouty arthritis is a severe but self-limiting arthritis caused by inflammatory responses to urate crystals. Oral colchicines are effective for initial stages or prophylaxis, but generally, colchicines are ineffective for established gouty arthritis. We describe an unusual case of gouty arthritis with systemic inflammatory reactions, including high fever and polymyalgia. Refractory polyarthritis and high fever were eradicated by colchicine treatment. Genetic analysis revealed a heterozygous mutation in exon 2 of the MEFV gene (E148Q). This case underscores the possibility that MEFV gene mutations may modify the phenotype of gouty arthritis.

  16. Septic arthritis caused by Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Costa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Peptostreptococcus spp are commensal organisms, usually involved in periodontal disease. Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus is an anaerobic gram-negative cocci, difficult to isolate due to its slow growth. Septic arthritis by this microorganism is a rare entity, but it can occur by hematogenous dissemination from a distant focus. Colonization and growth are more likely to occur in an already damaged articulation. We report the case of a 57 year-old woman with peripheral spondyloarthritis who developed knee septic arthritis by Peptostreptococcus asaccharolyticus.

  17. Psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis: differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Maddalena; Caso, Francesco; Scarpa, Raffaele; Megna, Matteo; Patrì, Angela; Balato, Nicola; Costa, Luisa

    2016-08-01

    Psoriasis frequency ranges from 1 to 3 % in white population, and arthritis occurs in 10-40 % of psoriasis patients, representing a relevant health issue. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthropathy, associated with psoriasis, in which ocular-, intestinal-, metabolic-, and cardiovascular-related manifestations can variably coexist. In order to favor early PsA and psoriasis diagnosis, it is crucial to rule out other conditions that can resemble the disease and delay appropriate therapeutic approach. Therefore, the aim of this review is to focus on PsA and psoriasis differential diagnosis.

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis and cryptogenic organising pneumonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, J H; Woodhead, M A; Sheppard, M N; du Bois, R M

    1991-05-01

    We describe three patients with rheumatoid arthritis who presented with non-specific pulmonary symptoms, a restrictive defect in lung function and bilateral changes on chest radiograph. Lung histology showed characteristic features of cryptogenic organising pneumonitis and treatment with steroids produced significant improvement. The clinical and laboratory features of cryptogenic organising pneumonitis (otherwise known as bronchiolitis obliterans organising pneumonia, 'BOOP') are discussed and compared with those of bronchiolitis obliterans with which the condition should not be confused. Cryptogenic organising pneumonitis should be considered as one of the pulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis, but lung biopsy is essential to make the diagnosis.

  19. Adherence to methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Henning; Eriksen, Stine A; Christensen, Robin;

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To study adherence to methotrexate (MTX) and factors of importance thereof in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Patients with a hospital diagnosis of RA (ICD10 codes M05.X or M06.X) after January 1, 1997, and aged ≥18 years at the date of first diagnosis/contact, with ......Objectives. To study adherence to methotrexate (MTX) and factors of importance thereof in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Patients with a hospital diagnosis of RA (ICD10 codes M05.X or M06.X) after January 1, 1997, and aged ≥18 years at the date of first diagnosis...

  20. [HLA antigens in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumba, I V; Sochnev, A M; Kukaĭne, E M; Burshteĭn, A M; Benevolenskaia, L I

    1990-01-01

    Antigens of I class HLA system (locus A and B) were investigated in 67 patients of Latvian nationality suffering from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Associations of HLA antigens with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis partially coincided with the ones revealed earlier. Typing established an increased incidence of antigen B27 (p less than 0.01) and gaplotype A2, B40 (p less than 0.01). Antigen B15 possessed a protective action with respect to JRA. Interlocus combinations demonstrated a closer association with the disease than a single antigen. The authors also revealed markers of various clinico-anatomical variants of JRA.

  1. Main Ocular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Saray Quignon Santana

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is considered an autoimmune disease in which articular and extra articular manifestations are produced and contribute to alter the functional capacity of the individual. This study consists on performing a bibliographical review showing the main ocular manifestations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It is our purpose to give you our experiences to the students as well as the internal medicine, ophthalmology and rheumatologist residents about this topic. The ophthalmological consultation of sick patients contributes to the prevention of ocular illnesses which are characteristic of the base disease and improve the ocular health.

  2. Orofacial pain, jaw function, and temporomandibular disorders in adult women with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis or persistent juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, M.; Zak, M.; Jensen, B.L.;

    2001-01-01

    Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis......Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis...

  3. IL33 in rheumatoid arthritis: potential contribution to pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Rafaela Bicalho Viana; Kakehasi, Adriana Maria; Melo de Andrade, Marcus Vinicius

    A better understanding of the inflammatory mechanisms of rheumatoid arthritis and the development of biological therapy revolutionized its treatment, enabling an interference in the synovitis - structural damage - functional disability cycle. Interleukin 33 was recently described as a new member of the interleukin-1 family, whose common feature is its pro-inflammatory activity. Its involvement in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including autoimmune diseases, raises the interest in the possible relationship with rheumatoid arthritis. Its action has been evaluated in experimental models of arthritis as well as in serum, synovial fluid and membrane of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It has been shown that the administration of interleukin-33 exacerbates collagen-induced arthritis in experimental models, and a positive correlation between cytokine concentrations in serum and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and disease activity was found. This review discusses evidence for the role of interleukin-33 with a focus on rheumatoid arthritis.

  4. SECONDARY OSTEOARTHRITIS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Starodubtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problems of comorbidities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Two or more RA-related conditions were diagnosed according to the results of the QUEST-RA program implemented in 34 countries. Osteoarthritis along with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and osteoporosis was detected among the most commonly diseases. Owing to expanded diagnostic capabilities, the recognition and treatment of the comorbidities have recently received much attention, as embodied in the draft Association of Rheumatologists of Russia Guidelines for RA management (2014; Part 1. The concept and major characteristics of secondary osteoarthritis in RA are analyzed. It is precisely the inflammatory process and underlying disease-related risk factors, including treatment, that have impact on the development of secondary osteoarthritis and patients’ quality of life as a whole. All this allows an inference about the mechanisms closely intertwined with the underlying disease for the development of secondary osteoarthritis, which initiates cartilage damage and further remodeling. Primary and secondary osteoarthritis was comparatively analyzed. Particular emphasis is placed on current cartilage biomarkers, their diagnostic value and role in monitoring the efficiency of treatment in clinical trials. The paper provides a comparative analysis of detectable serum and urine biomarkers according to the results of the complex analysis made by the National Institutes of Health. Particular attention is given to cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP. Foreign authors’ investigations suggest that there is a relationship between serum COMP levels and disease severity and joint X-ray changes. There is evidence for the efficacy of hyaluronic acid used in the treatment of secondary osteoarthritis in patients with RA. 

  5. [Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszewska, Agnieszka; Madej, Marta; Wiland, Piotr

    2016-03-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies). RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%. New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP) and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33). Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  6. Kidney involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lazzarini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a widespread disease and its renal involvement, relatively common, is clinically significant because worsens course and mortality of the primary disease. There is still no agreement on the prevalence of renal disorders in RA: data analysis originates from different sources, as death certificates, autopsies, clinical and laboratory findings and kidney biopsies, each with its limitations. Histoimmunological studies on bioptical specimens of patients with RA and kidney damage, led to clarify prevalent pathologies. In order of frequency: glomerulonephritis and amyloidosis (60-65% and 20-30% respectively, followed by acute or chronic interstitial nephritis. Kidney injury during RA includes secondary renal amyloidosis, nephrotoxic effects of antirheumatic drugs and nephropathies as extra-articular manifestations (rheumatoid nephropathy. Amyloidosis affects survival, increases morbidity and is the main cause of end stage renal disease in patients with RA and nephropathy. Strong association between RA activity and amyloidosis needs the use of immunosuppressive and combined therapies, to prevent this complication and reduce risk of dialysis. Long-lasting and combined RA pharmacotherapy involves various renal side effects. In this review we describe NSAIDs and DMARDs (Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs nephrotoxicity, particularly by gold compounds, D-penicillamine, cyclosporine A and methotrexate. Rare cases of IgA glomerulonephritis during immunomodulating therapy with leflunomide and TNF blocking receptor (etanercept are reported; real clinical significance of this drug-related nephropathy will be established by development of RA treatment. In RA nephropathies, mesangial glomerulonephritis is the most frequent histological lesion (35-60 % out of biopsies from patients with urinary abnormalities and/or kidney impairment, followed by minimal change glomerulopathy (3-14% and p-ANCA positive necrotizing crescentic

  7. Biomarkers of (osteo)arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobasheri, Ali; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Arthritic diseases are a major cause of disability and morbidity, and cause an enormous burden for health and social care systems globally. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis. The key risk factors for the development of OA are age, obesity, joint trauma or instability. Metabolic and endocrine diseases can also contribute to the pathogenesis of OA. There is accumulating evidence to suggest that OA is a whole-organ disease that is influenced by systemic mediators, inflammaging, innate immunity and the low-grade inflammation induced by metabolic syndrome. Although all joint tissues are implicated in disease progression in OA, articular cartilage has received the most attention in the context of aging, injury and disease. There is increasing emphasis on the early detection of OA as it has the capacity to target and treat the disease more effectively. Indeed it has been suggested that this is the era of "personalized prevention" for OA. However, the development of strategies for the prevention of OA require new and sensitive biomarker tools that can detect the disease in its molecular and pre-radiographic stage, before structural and functional alterations in cartilage integrity have occurred. There is also evidence to support a role for biomarkers in OA drug discovery, specifically the development of disease modifying osteoarthritis drugs. This Special Issue of Biomarkers is dedicated to recent progress in the field of OA biomarkers. The papers in this Special Issue review the current state-of-the-art and discuss the utility of OA biomarkers as diagnostic and prognostic tools.

  8. X-linked agammaglobulinemia combined with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zaihua; Kang, Yuli; Lin, Zhenlang; Huang, Yanjing; Lv, Huoyang; Li, Yasong

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. XLA can also present in combination with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the major chronic rheumatologic disease in children. We report herein the first known case of a juvenile patient diagnosed with XLA combined with JIA that later developed into invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic polyarthritis. An additional comprehensive review of XLA combined with JIA and invasive K. pneumoniae septic arthritis is also presented. XLA was identified by the detection of BTK mutations while the diagnosis of JIA was established by clinical and laboratory assessments. Septic arthritis caused by invasive K. pneumoniae was confirmed by culturing of the synovia and gene detection of the isolates. Invasive K. pneumoniae infections can not only result in liver abscesses but also septic arthritis, although this is rare. XLA combined with JIA may contribute to invasive K. pneumoniae infection.

  9. Pharmacology of glucocorticoids in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spies, Cornelia M.; Bijlsma, Johannes W. J.; Burmester, Gerd-Ruediger; Buttgereit, Frank

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) provide one of the most effective treatments for rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, their long-term use is marred by undesired side effects. Increased understanding of the mechanisms of glucocorticoid action enables the development of novel drugs, such as SEGRAs or liposomal g

  10. Group Education for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taal, Erik; Riemsma, Rob P.; Brus, Herman L.M.; Seydel, Erwin R.; Rasker, Johannes J.; Wiegman, Oene

    1993-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis must learn to adjust their exercise, rest and medication to the varying activity of the disease. Patient education can help patients in making the right decisions about adjustments in their treatment regimen and in attaining ¿self-management¿ behaviors. We develope

  11. New agents for scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bois, M.H.W. de [Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital, Leiden (Netherlands); Pauwels, E.K.J. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Leiden (Netherlands); Breedveld, F.C. [Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital, Leiden (Netherlands)

    1995-11-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals have been used as investigative tools for the detection and treatment of arthritis activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) since the 1950s. Against the background of the pathophysiology of RA, the current status of joint scintigraphy and possible future developments are reviewed. Both non-specific (radiolabelled leucocytes and technetium-99m labelled human immunoglobulin) and specific targeting radiopharmaceuticals (including radiolabelled antibodies) are considered. The use of radiopharmaceuticals in the detection of arthritis activity has the advantages of allowing direct imaging of joints by means of whole-body scintigraphy and of joints that are difficult to assess clinically or radiographically. Promising results have been obtained with radiolabelled anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibodies and with somatostatin receptor imaging, but more data are available regarding {sup 99m}Tc-IgG scintigraphy, which differentiates between the various degrees of arthritis activity and thus facilitates the choice of antirheumatic drug. Newer promising approaches to the imaging of RA include the use of radiolabelled J001 and cytokines, though studies on these are limited at present. (orig.)

  12. Candidate gene studies in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daha, Nina Ashira

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic auto-immune disorder, of which persistent synovitis, bone erosions and auto-antibody formation are characteristic features. Although the etiology of the disease remains largely unknown, it is established that genetic risk factors play a pivotal role in disease patho

  13. [Osteoporosis and fracture in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norimatsu, H

    2001-05-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis often have periarticular and generalized osteoporosis. Bone resorption develops through increased productions of cytokines and prostaglandines by synovium and bone. Important risk factors of osteoporosis are functional impairment, postmenopausal state, and corticosteroids usage. Osteoporotic fracture occurs at the spinal body, femoral neck, distal radius, and periprosthetic bone.

  14. Sedentary behaviour in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Tanja; Beyer, Nina; Aadahl, Mette

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite increasing interest in investigating sedentary behaviour (SB) in the general population and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is little documentation of the subjective experiences of SB in patients with RA. This study aimed to examine how patients with RA...

  15. Alpine Iceman Was a Martyr to Arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    Otzi,the 5000-year old mummy pulled from a glacier in the Tyrolean Alps in 1991,was apparently not in the best of health before he succumbed to the cold of the mountainside.The first X-rays of the mummified body show that he suffered from painful arthritis,multiple rib fractures and hardening of the arteries.

  16. JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (TERMINOLOGICALAND CLASSIFICATION ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N N Kuzmina

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Basing on the data of home and foreign literature and on the long-term experience of pediatric rheumatologists, terminologic and classification aspects of Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA are presented. Approaches to developing of diagnostic and classification of JRA criteria in future are described.

  17. Systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimaz, Rolando

    2016-09-01

    Systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SoJIA) is a systemic inflammatory disease which has up to now been classified as a category of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. However, in this context, systemic inflammation has been associated with dysregulation of the innate immune system, suggesting that it may rather be part of the spectrum of autoinflammatory disorders. The disease is in fact unique with regard to the other JIA categories, in terms of clinical manifestations, prognosis, and response to conventional immunosuppressant therapies. It is characterized clinically by fever, lymphadenopathy, arthritis, rash, and serositis. IL-1 and IL-6 play a major role in the pathogenesis of SoJIA, and treatment with IL-1 and IL-6 inhibitors has shown to be highly effective. However, complications of SoJIA, including macrophage activation syndrome, limitations in functional outcome by arthritis and long-term damage from chronic inflammation continue to be a major issue in patients' care. Recent advances on the pathogenesis and treatment have revolutionized the care and prognosis of this potentially life-threatening pediatric condition.

  18. 5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Lyme Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvikar, Sheila L.; Steere, Allen C.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS In the United States, Lyme arthritis is the most common feature of late stage infection with the tick-borne spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, usually beginning months after the initial tick bite. However, in some patients, including most of those seen today, the earlier phases of the infection are asymptomatic and arthritis is the presenting manifestation of the disease. Patients with Lyme arthritis have intermittent or persistent attacks of joint swelling and pain in one or a few large joints, especially the knee, usually over a period of several years, without prominent systemic manifestations. Serologic testing is the mainstay of diagnosis. Synovial fluid PCR testing for B. burgdorferi DNA is often positive prior to treatment, but it is not a reliable marker of spirochetal eradication after antibiotic therapy. Responses to oral or intravenous antibiotic treatment are generally excellent, although a small percentage of patients have persistent synovitis after 2-3 months of oral and IV antibiotics, which usually then responds to anti-inflammatory therapies, disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), or synovectomy. This chapter reviews the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of Lyme arthritis. PMID:25999223

  19. The human microbiome and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verwoerd, Anouk; ter Haar, Nienke M.; de Roock, Sytze; Vastert, Sebastiaan J.; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood. The pathogenesis of JIA is thought to be the result of a combination of host genetic and environmental triggers. However, the precise factors that determine one's susceptibility to JIA remain to be unravelled. The

  20. [Biopharmaceuticals in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baslund, B.; Bendtzen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The current status on the use of biopharmaceuticals in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is reviewed. Blocking of TNF-alpha, co-stimulation of CD28+ T-cells and depletion of CD20+ B-cells are all effective ways to diminish inflammation and joint damage. However, not all patients react...

  1. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrich, Christian; Diddens, Heyke C.; Nosir, Hany R.; Siebert, Werner E.

    1995-03-01

    The only early therapy of rheumatoid arthritis in orthopedic surgery is a synovectomy, which is restricted to more or less big joints. A laser-synovectomy of small joints is ineffective yet. An alternative method may be photodynamic therapy. In our study we describe the photodynamic effect of Photosan 3 in a cell culture study.

  2. Retrocalcaneal bursitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldenstein-Schainberg, C; Homsi, C; Rodrigues Pereira, R M; W. Cossermelli

    1992-01-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis has been described in various adult rheumatic diseases and septic bursitis unrelated to previous bursal disease has been reported in children. The case is reported here of a girl with juvenile chronic arthritis who developed non-septic retrocalcaneal bursitis; the diagnosis was suggested by a combination of clinical and radiographic studies and was confirmed by ultrasonography.

  3. Septic arthritis in the newborn and infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajdobranski Đorđe R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Septic arthritis represents an intra-articular infection caused by pyogenic bacteria. During the earliest childhood it is considered to be a systemic septic condition and demands early diagnosis and prompt surgical treatment. Material and methods This is a retrospective analysis of patients with septic arthritis treated at the Department of Orthopedics of the Pediatric Surgery Clinic in Novi Sad, over a 10-year period. We are also presenting a case of a 12-day-old newborn baby, with clear radiological signs of osteoarthritis of the right knee. Results A retrospective study included the period 1991-2000, and showed that 15 patients, aged 10 days - 12 months were treated for osteoarthritis. The most common localization was the hip, in 60% of cases. In 11 patients the causative agent was Staphylococcus aureus while in the 4 remaining patients the bacteriologic finding was negative. One patient died of generalized sepsis. Discussion In neonates and infants septic arthritis is characterized by atypical clinical picture, often causing delayed diagnosis. In the initial phases of the disease ultrasonographic findings were of greater use compared to radiological imaging, due to relatively late appearance of radiological signs of disease. Conclusions Due to possible development of serious and irreversible damage, even lethal outcome, septic arthritis requires early diagnosis, prompt administration of antibiotics and early surgical treatment. It is a quite unique area in Pediatric Orthopedics where missed or delayed diagnosis may have serious consequences.

  4. [Regaining quality of life despite rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Madame

    2016-01-01

    A patient aged 32 who had been living with her partner for a few years, is diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. They both needed to understand and adapt. The caregivers had a frontline role in the multidisciplinary care but addressing the impact on the patient's sexual quality of life remains difficult. The patient describes her experience and how harmony and desire were re-established.

  5. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in juvenile chronic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, L; Horst, G; Limburg, P; deGraeffMeeder, ER; Kuis, W; Kallenberg, C

    1997-01-01

    Objective, To evaluate the diagnostic significance of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) by assessing the prevalence of ANCA in juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) (n = 93) of either oligoarticular, polyarticular, or systemic onset. To investigate the prevalence of ANCA in other diseases of c

  6. Established rheumatoid arthritis - new imaging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, Fiona M; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2007-01-01

    New imaging modalities are assuming an increasingly important role in the investigation and management of rheumatoid arthritis. It is now possible to obtain information about all tissues within the joint in three dimensions using tomographic techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI...

  7. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse...

  8. On the origin of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anders J; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Houen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease with a complex origin. Previous studies have reported heritability estimates on RA at about 60%. Only 16% of the genetic background of the disease has been disclosed so far. The purpose of the present investigation was to provide an optimized...

  9. WORK DISABILITY IN EARLY RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DOEGLAS, D; SUURMEIJER, T; KROL, B; SANDERMAN, R; VANLEEUWEN, M; van Rijswijk, Maria

    1995-01-01

    Objective-To assess the impact of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on work status. Methods-The employment status of 119 patients who had jobs before the onset of RA was examined. Patients with work disability were compared with those without, for several disease characteristics, therapeutic regimen,

  10. Optimizing Exercise Programs for Arthritis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulware, Dennis W.; Byrd, Shannon L.

    1993-01-01

    Exercise can help decrease pain and improve function in people with rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. Physicians must provide individualized, realistic, enjoyable exercise programs that help affected joints, build fitness, and maximize patient compliance. Physicians must also provide appropriate follow-up care, adjusting the exercise program…

  11. Gut Microbes Linked to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of microorganisms that live in and on the human body. These microbes outnumber the body’s cells by 10 ... this is indeed the case.” — by Carol Torgan, Ph.D. Related Links Feeling Out of ... Autoimmune Diseases Rheumatoid Arthritis References: Expansion ...

  12. Biological agents in polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarilyo, Gil; Tarp, Simon; Foeldvari, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Although various biological agents are in use for polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pJIA), head-to-head trials comparing the efficacy and safety among them are lacking. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of biological agents in pJIA using all currentl...

  13. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Andrew D.; Fischer, Philip R.; Reed, Ann M.; Wylam, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  14. Parental rheumatoid arthritis and childhood epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom, Ane Lilleøre; Wu, Chunsen; Olsen, Jørn;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the influence of parental rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on risk of epilepsy. METHODS: We performed a nationwide cohort study including all singletons born in Denmark from 1977 to 2008 (n = 1,917,723) through individual linkage to nationwide Danish registries. The children were...

  15. Relation Between Rheumatoid Arthritis and Hearing Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Doosti

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some of the studies have shown that RA (Rheumatoid Arthritis may cause hearing disorders. These disorders can result in problems later in life, so survey of correlation between rheumatoid arthritis and hearing disorders is important . Methods: This was a case-control study which has done from December 2004 to August 2006 at Shaheed Sadoughi hospital in Yazd. In this study, 50 Rheumatoid arthritis patients as case group (100 ears with 50 persons as control group who were of the same age, sex and job (100 ears were compared. Results: Patients were 21-67 years old and the mean age was 47.58 years(It was the same as the control group.From 50 cases (controls 42 were women and 8 were men . Audiometric tests in different frequencies showed that hearing loss in high frequencies, especially in 8000 Hz was significantly different in the two groups. Also, acoustic reflex was absent in case group and this too was significantly different.The evaluation of sensory neural hearing loss showed that this hearing loss was sensory, not neural . Conclusion: In Rheumatoid arthritis, middle and inner ear disorders have been shown. But some patients aren't aware of their hearing loss and they have no clinical complains, so frequent evaluation of audiometric tests is recommended. Hearing disorders can be controlled by therapeutic and rehabilitation procedures in these patients.

  16. Campylobacter jejuni enteritis and reactive arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Short, C. D.; Klouda, P T; Smith, Lorna

    1982-01-01

    A further case of reactive arthritis following Campylobacter jejuni enteritis is reported. The interim results of a small prospective study are discussed. It may be desirable to do serological studies for campylobacter infection in the investigation of mono- or polyarthritis of acute onset.

  17. Determinants of disease course in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linn-Rasker, Suzanne Paulowna

    2006-01-01

    Reumatoide arthritis (RA) is een ernstige, chronische ontstekingsziekte van de gewrichten. Hoofdstuk 1 is een introductie in epidemiologische gegevens over RA en factoren van invloed op ziektebeloop. Hoofdstuk 2 bespreekt de voorspellende waarde van anti-CCP antistoffen bij patiënten met nog niet te

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Alison J

    2005-12-01

    Septic arthritis (SA) is a common orthopedic condition encountered in horses that are presented to equine veterinarians. Successful out-come is dependent on prompt and thorough evaluation and treatment. This article briefly reviews the pathophysiology, outlines diagnostics, describes treatment options and prognostics, and discusses current research in diagnosis and treatment of SA.

  19. Computed tomographic feature of tuberculous arthritis

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    Kim, Hak Hee; Lee, Hae Giu; Cha, Eun Suk; Kang, Kyung Jin; Jeon, Jeong Su; Park, Young Ha; Yim, Jung Ik; Bahk, Yong Whee [Catholic University Medical Collage, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-07-15

    The sparsity of publication concerning CT findings of tuberculous arthritis prompted authors to retrospectively evaluate 12 patients with tuberculous arthritis for characteristic CT findings. In each patients, the diagnosis of tuberculous arthritis was confirmed by surgery or biopsy. The CT examinations were evaluated by two radiologists retrospectively. Involved joints were the hip joint in seven patients, the sacroiliac joint in three patients, and the shoulder and ankle joint in one patient each. CT features included subchondral bony erosion(12 patients), soft tissue mass in the joint space(nine), widening of the joint space(eight), ipsilateral music atrophy(eight), thickening of the joint capsule(seven), intra-articular effusion(six), soft tissue abscess(five), and bony sclerosis(four). In seven patients with the duration of symptoms less than 1 year, thickening of joint capsule and intra-articular effusion were the predominant findings, while bony sclerosis, gross bone destruction, and soft tissue mass in joint space were seen in five patients with the duration of symptoms longer than 1 year. Our results indicate that CT is useful in the diagnosis of tuberculous arthritis by demonstrating characteristic pathologic changes of the joint space, soft tissue abnormality and bony involvement.

  20. [Dry eye syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanská, V; Hlinomazová, Z; Fojtík, Z; Nemec, P

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to review the incidence of the dry eye syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, evaluate the association among the incidence of the dry eye syndrome, presence of positive rheumatoid factor (RF), the RA stage, and the duration of the disease. The group consisted of altogether 100 patients, 16 men and 84 women; the average age was 58.9 years (SD 14.6). The average duration of RA was 12.3 years, SD 11.0. In each patient, the Schirmer test I was performed, the presence of the LIPCOF (Lid Parallel Conjunctival Folds) on the slit lamp was assessed, the BUT (Tear Break-Up Time) was measured and vital fluorescein staining was performed. In each patient the data of the presence or absence of the RF in the serum, RA severity according to the X-ray examination, and the disease duration were recorded. The Pearson's association test for nominal variables was used for statistical evaluation of the association between the rheumatoid arthritis presence and the dry eye syndrome. In our group of 100 patients, the Schirmer test I was positive in 67% of patients. Positive BUT was marked in 84 % of patients. The conjunctival folds were present in 45 % of patients only. The pathological findings after cornea fluorescein staining appeared in 18 % of patients. The dry eye syndrome incidence was marked in 74% of patients with RA. Subjective difficulties were declared by 38.3% of patients only. The local treatment was already established in 23.0% of patients only. We did not find statistically significant correlation between the RF positive rheumatoid arthritis appearance and dry eye syndrome, nor between the stage of the rheumatoid arthritis and presence of the dry eye syndrome. We proved statistical connection between the presence of dry eye syndrome and the duration of rheumatoid arthritis longer than 10 years. Keratoconjunctivitis sicca is the most common ocular complication in rheumatoid arthritis patients. We proved the connection

  1. HOW TO LIVE WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS???

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parle Milind

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a chronic auto-immune disease characterized by painful inflammation of the joints and surrounding tissues, leading to long term disability. Rheumatoid arthritis can begin at any age but has its peak between 35 to 55 years of age. RA shows hereditary linkage. Women and smokers are most often affected. The patient doesn’t feel any symptoms during inactive state of the disease. RA progresses in a symmetrical pattern involving both the sides of the body. Once rheumatoid arthritis is confirmed by diagnosis, treatment should start as early as possible. The treatment for rheumatoid arthritis focuses initially on reducing the joint inflammation and pain with the use of analgesics and anti-inflammatory agents. In the next stage, joint function is restored by administering Disease Modifying Anti-rheumatic Drugs (DMARDs thus preventing joint deformity. Treatment is generally based on the degree of severity of RA. Patients with mild RA are advised to take rest and are prescribed analgesics and anti-inflammatory medicines, which include fast acting drugs like NSAIDs. Slow acting drugs like (DMARDs such as methotrexate, sulfasalazine, lelflunomide etc., and Body’s reaction modifiers (BRMs such as rituximab, anankinra, infliximab etc., are reserved for patients suffering from moderate to severe RA. The patient is advised to undertake regular exercises like walking, stretching, swimming or cycling, which are aimed at reducing body weight. The patient suffering from arthritis can carry out his normal day-to-day activities with the help of proper medication and regular exercise.

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past ... are prone to fracture). Source: NIAMS Who Gets Rheumatoid Arthritis? The disease occurs in all racial and ethnic ...

  3. 76 FR 28440 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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  17. 78 FR 59945 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

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  18. 77 FR 9671 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

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  19. 77 FR 1702 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and... individual intramural programs and projects conducted by the National Institute of Arthritis and..., MD, Ph.D., Scientific Director, National Institute of Arthritis & Musculoskeletal and Skin...

  20. 77 FR 4048 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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  1. 78 FR 7790 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meeting

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  7. 75 FR 34752 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

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  9. 76 FR 6806 - National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases; Notice of Closed Meetings

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  18. Effect of raloxifene on arthritis and bone mineral density in rats with collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ikuta; Hagino, Hiroshi; Okano, Toru; Enokida, Makoto; Teshima, Ryota

    2011-02-01

    We studied the effect of raloxifene (RAL) on arthritis and bone mineral density (BMD) in rats with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Seven-month-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: rats without CIA (CNT), CIA rats that underwent ovariectomy (OVX) and were treated with RAL (CIA + OVX + RAL), CIA rats that underwent OVX and were treated with vehicle (CIA + OVX + Veh), CIA rats that had sham surgery and were treated with RAL (CIA + sham + RAL), and CIA rats that had sham surgery and were treated with vehicle (CIA + sham + Veh). RAL was orally administered at 10 mg/kg every day for 3 weeks, beginning 1 week after initial sensitization until death at 4 weeks. Every week until death, we evaluated hind paw thickness and arthritis score. BMD was measured by peripheral quantitative computed tomography at the distal metaphysis and the diaphysis of the femur; we also performed histomorphometry of the proximal tibia and histological evaluation of arthritis. RAL administration suppressed hind paw thickness and arthritis score and prevented decreases in BMD and cortical thickness. In the histomorphometric analysis, bone-resorption parameters were significantly lower in the RAL groups than in the Veh groups. RAL significantly inhibited synovial proliferation in CIA rats. RAL effects on arthritis and bone were apparent regardless of whether an animal had undergone OVX. RAL could suppress arthritis and bone loss in estrogen-replete or -depleted rats. These findings, using an animal model, indicate the potential usefulness of RAL as an effective treatment for premenopausal RA patients as well as postmenopausal ones.

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of enthesitis-related arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss PF

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Pamela F WeissDivision of Rheumatology and Center for Pediatric Clinical Effectiveness, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Departments of Pediatrics and Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is a chronic, inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. The enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA JIA category describes a clinically heterogeneous group of children including some who have predominately enthesitis, enthesitis and arthritis, juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, or inflammatory bowel disease-associated arthropathy. ERA accounts for 10%–20% of JIA. Common clinical manifestations of ERA include arthritis, enthesitis, and acute anterior uveitis. Axial disease is also common in children with established ERA. Treatment regimens for ERA, many of them based on adults with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, include the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, and biologic agents either individually or in combination.Keywords: juvenile arthritis, enthesitis, sacroillitis, epidemiology, therapy

  20. [Enzyme studies on the pathogenesis of experimental mycoplasma arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, G

    1975-01-01

    Biochemical studies of rats with mycoplasma arthritis revealed new findings in pathogenesis and pathophysiology. Preliminary examinations showed that mycoplasmas release specific endonucleases and exonucleases. In evaluating the isoenzymes of the lactate dehydrogenases, malate dehydrogenases as well as of the esterases, which provide certain parallels with human rheumatoid arthritis we made several new observations. Thus a mycoplasma infection which resembles rheumatoid arthritis, leads to an inhibition of the DNA repair. We were able to proof this enzymekinetically and autoradiographically. We also observed for the first time the occurrence of DNA antibodies in this type of arthritis. It is possible that there is a relation between inhibition of DNA repair and the occurrence of DNA antibodies. Thus mycoplasma infection seems to influence DNA metabolism. There are interesting parallels concerning DNA antibodies and DNA-repair between experimental micoplasma arthritis and human systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. A case of fungal arthritis caused by Hansenula anomala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Wook; Lee, Tong-Joo; Kim, Myung-Ku; Lee, Moon; Jung, Jae-Ho

    2010-03-01

    Hansenula anomala (H. anomaly) is part of the normal flora in the alimentary tract and throat. It has been reported to be an organism causing opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients. However, cases of fungal arthritis caused by H. anomala are rare. We encountered a case of H. anomala arthritis in a 70-year-old man who was treated with an empirical antibiotic treatment and surgery under the impression of septic arthritis. However, the patient did not improve after antibiotic therapy and surgery. Consequently, knee joint aspiration was performed again, which identified fungal arthritis caused by H. anomala. It was treated successfully with amphotericin B and fluconazole. When treating arthritis patients with diabetes, it is important to consider the possibility of septic arthritis by H. anomala and provide the appropriate treatment.

  2. Isolated polyarticular septic arthritis: an atypical presentation of meningococcal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Michael; Brooks, Heather; Kalantarinia, Kambiz

    2008-04-01

    We are presenting a case of a 19-year-old college student with sudden-onset, asymmetric polyarticular arthritis with Neisseria meningitidis 10 days after an acute upper respiratory infection consisting of fevers, chills, pharyngitis, and productive cough. Primary meningococcal septic arthritis is a rare entity. A majority of these cases present in a monoarticular fashion. The synovial fluid findings, although compatible with inflammatory arthritis, are not typical of septic arthritis. This entity, although rare, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of septic arthritis of large joints, especially since N. meningitiditis does not grow well on routine culture media. A literature review on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of primary meningococcal septic arthritis is presented.

  3. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zordo, Tobias de; Mlekusch, Sabine P.; Feuchtner, Gudrun M. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mur, Erich [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Schirmer, Michael [Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital of the Elisabethines Klagenfurt, Voelkermarkter Strasse 15-19, 9020 Klagenfurt (Austria); Klauser, Andrea S. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: andrea.klauser@i-med.ac.at

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity.

  4. [Unusual presentation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and autoimmune hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Prieto, M; Carbonero Celis, M J; Cuadrado Caballero, M C

    2015-01-01

    The coexistence of autoimmune hepatitis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis is very rare. This is the case of an 18 month old female patient whose first sign of disease was torticollis due to an underlying atlanto-axial subluxation. Three months later, bilateral knee arthritis developed and she was diagnosed with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Throughout the disease a persistent elevation of liver enzymes was noted, combined with positive antinuclear antibodies and hypergammaglobulinemia, reaching the diagnosis of concomitant autoimmune hepatitis.

  5. An important step towards completing the rheumatoid arthritis cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Venrooij, W.J.W. van; Pruijn, G.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    In the previous issue of Arthritis Research & Therapy data are presented showing that circulating immune complexes containing citrullinated fibrin(ogen) are present in anti-citrullinated protein antibody-positive rheumatoid arthritis patients, and that such immune complexes co-localize with complement factor C3 in the rheumatoid synovium. These results corroborate the idea that citrullination is intimately involved in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis and complete our model (the rhe...

  6. Reactive arthritis induced by recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Marr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile colitis is a common infection that can be difficult to resolve and may result in recurrent infections. Reactive arthritis is a rare presentation of this disease and its treatment is not well differentiated in the literature. We describe a case of reactive arthritis occurring in a patient with a history of recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis while currently receiving a taper of oral vancomycin. His arthritis symptoms resolved with corticosteroids and continued treatment with anticlostridial antibiotics.

  7. A Case of Fungal Arthritis Caused by Hansenula Anomala

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sung-Wook; Lee, Tong-Joo; Kim, Myung-Ku; Lee, Moon; Jung, Jae-Ho

    2010-01-01

    Hansenula anomala (H. anomaly) is part of the normal flora in the alimentary tract and throat. It has been reported to be an organism causing opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients. However, cases of fungal arthritis caused by H. anomala are rare. We encountered a case of H. anomala arthritis in a 70-year-old man who was treated with an empirical antibiotic treatment and surgery under the impression of septic arthritis. However, the patient did not improve after antibiotic the...

  8. Streptococcus pyogenes sternoclavicular septic arthritis in a healthy adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savcic-Kos, Radmila M; Mali, Padmavati; Abraham, Ajit; Issa, Meltiady; Rangu, Venu; Nasser, Rana

    2014-12-01

    Sternoclavicular septic arthritis is a rare infection, accounting for approximately 1% of septic arthritis in the general population. Staphylococcus aureus is the predominant etiologic agent, and it usually occurs in relatively young adults with some type of predisposition to infection. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of group A streptococcal, sternoclavicular arthritis in a previously healthy 62-year-old male patient. We present a detailed history and physical examination, with laboratory findings, imaging studies, cultures, and therapy.

  9. Streptococcus pyogenes Sternoclavicular Septic Arthritis in a Healthy Adult

    OpenAIRE

    Savcic-Kos, Radmila M.; Mali, Padmavati; Abraham, Ajit; Issa, Meltiady; Rangu, Venu; Nasser, Rana

    2014-01-01

    Sternoclavicular septic arthritis is a rare infection, accounting for approximately 1% of septic arthritis in the general population. Staphylococcus aureus is the predominant etiologic agent, and it usually occurs in relatively young adults with some type of predisposition to infection. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of group A streptococcal, sternoclavicular arthritis in a previously healthy 62-year-old male patient. We present a detailed history and physical examina...

  10. Is yoga a suitable treatment for rheumatoid arthritis: current opinion

    OpenAIRE

    Telles S; Singh N

    2012-01-01

    Shirley Telles, Nilkamal SinghPatanjali Research Foundation, Haridwar, IndiaAbstract: We reviewed published literature regarding the use of yoga for managing rheumatoid arthritis to determine whether adequate evidence exists to suggest its usefulness as a therapy. A search for previous studies involving yoga and rheumatoid arthritis in PubMed yielded eight reports. These studies reported the benefits of yoga in the physical and mental health of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), suggest...

  11. Oral bacterial DNAs in synovial fluids of arthritis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Moen, Ketil; Johan G. Brun; Eribe, Emenike R.K.; Olsen, Ingar; Jonsson, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Arthritis may be triggered by microbial constituents, more specifically, bacterial cell wall fragments, or bacterial DNA. The aim of this study was to analyze the amount of oral bacterial DNA in synovial fluids (SF) of arthritis patients. SF from 15 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, 15 arthritides (non-RA) patients and 9 osteoarthritis (control) patients were extracted for oral bacterial DNA. DNA was used in a checkerboard DNA/DNA hybridization set-up, in order to identify 40 different spec...

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Assayag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease affecting about 1% of the population. Interstitial lung disease is a serious and frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD is characterized by several histopathologic subtypes. This article reviews the proposed pathogenesis and risk factors for RA-ILD. We also outline the important steps involved in the work-up of RA-ILD and review the evidence for treatment and prognosis.

  13. Footwear characteristics in people with inflammatory arthritis in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, K.; Lahiri, M.; Cheung, P. P.; Santosa, A.; Rome, K

    2016-01-01

    Background Foot problems are common in people with inflammatory arthritis. Despite suitable footwear having the potential to alleviate pain, improve mobility and maintain independence, previous studies have found many people with inflammatory arthritis wearing poorly fitting and inappropriate footwear. Footwear styles and characteristics have not been reported in a Singapore inflammatory arthritis population. The objective of this study was to identify current footwear styles and characterist...

  14. Candida arthritis in a patient diagnosed with spondyloarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remzi Çevik

    Full Text Available Abstract Candida arthritis is an unusual manifestation that usually affects the knees. A 35-year-old man presented with a 2-month history of pain and swelling in the right knee. Swelling persisted after anti-inflammatory treatment. Peripheric spondyloarthritis was considered, but methotrexate, sulfasalazine, and methylprednisolone did not reduce the swelling. Direct examination of synovial fluid and a culture were positive for Candida albicans. Intravenous and intra-articular amphotericin-B were administered. The arthritis regressed and a culture and direct staining showed negative results. Candida arthritis should be considered in patients with arthritis that is resistant to treatment and prolonged, even if risk factors are absent.

  15. Osteoporosis diagnostics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Węgierska, Małgorzata; Dura, Marta; Blumfield, Einat; Żuchowski, Paweł; Waszczak, Marzena; Jeka, Sławomir

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic connective tissue disease. The development of comorbidities often occurs in the course of RA. One of them is osteoporosis, which has serious social and economic effects and may contribute to the increase in the degree of disability and premature death of the patient. Due to the young age in which RA disease occurs, densitometry (DXA) of the lumbar spine is the basic examination in osteoporosis diagnostics. In the course of RA, much more frequently than in healthy persons of the same age, osteoporotic fractures of vertebral bodies occur, which hinder a correct assessment in the DXA test. Rheumatoid arthritis patients often undergo computed tomography (CT) examination of the abdominal cavity for other medical indications than suspected spinal injury. Then, CT examination may also serve for the assessment of bone density, especially in patients with osteoporotic fractures.

  16. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O'Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease.

  17. Biologic interventions for fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Celia; Choy, Ernest H S; Hewlett, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    : To evaluate the effect of biologic interventions on fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following electronic databases up to 1 April 2014: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Current Controlled Trials...... Register, the National Research Register Archive, The UKCRN Portfolio Database, AMED, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Social Science Citation Index, Web of Science, and Dissertation Abstracts International. In addition, we checked the reference lists of articles identified for inclusion for additional studies...... and contacted key authors. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials if they evaluated a biologic intervention in people with rheumatoid arthritis and had self reported fatigue as an outcome measure. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers selected relevant trials, assessed methodological...

  18. Cytokines in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangge, H; Schauenstein, K

    1998-06-01

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), unlike rheumatoid arthritis of adulthood (RA), is a heterogenous disease comprising at least five subtypes that differ in clinical course and prognosis, and require different therapeutical approaches. As compared to RA, the production of local and systemic cytokines in JRA have not yet been as extensively investigated. In this article we review the available literature on cytokine expression in serum and synovial fluid in all five different subtypes of JRA. Even though the data are still fragmentary, the evidence so far suggests that the determination of serum cytokines yields relevant information as to clinical subtype and inflammatory activity of the disease. Furthermore, the cytokine data suggest that the pathogenesis of JRA may even by more heterogenous than defined by the clinical subtypes. Finally, future directions of research in this area are proposed, and-based on the latest results-arguments for (anti)cytokine therapies in JRA are critically discussed.

  19. Dual diagnosis: rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsahin, Mustafa; Dikici, Suber; Kocaman, Gülsen; Besir, Fahri Halit; Baltaci, Davut; Ataoglu, Safinaz

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) is the most common rheumatologic disease in children. Moreover, multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most frequent demyelinating disease and has been associated with various chronic inflammatory diseases. However, its association with JRA has not been frequently described. Autoimmunity in both JRA and MS has been documented in the scientific literature, although there has been no definitive finding that patients with JRA are prone to the development of MS. An increasing frequency of MS resulting from an increased use of antitumor necrosis factor agents in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic inflammatory diseases has been reported recently. In this study, we report on the development of MS in a patient with JRA who did not have a history of antitumor necrosis factor use.

  20. GANGGUAN PERTUMBUHAN MANDIBULA PADA JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Puspitawati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA is a systemic disease on childhood, which has chronic arthritis as its most prominent manifestation. One very common complication of JRA is growth disturbance. JRA involving temporomandibular joint usually result in mandibular growth retardation which eventually can lead to micrognathia, retrognathia, malocclusion and other mandibulofacial developmental aberrations. Factors considered to be the cause of these growth and developmental disturbances are: congenital, the disease's direct effect on the condyle, functional deficiency of the temporomandibular joint, duration, age of disease onset and type of the JRA and corticosteroid therapy. However, the mechanism for the mandibulofacial growth and developmental aberrations due to JRA are not fully understood. This literature review will discuss the hypotheses concerning mechanisms of those growth and developmental disturbances, especially based on clinical and radiographic studies on JRA cases.

  1. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.

  2. Induction of lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, J.L.; Schell, R.F.; Hejka, A.; England, D.M.; Konick, L.

    1988-09-01

    In studies of experimental Lyme disease, a major obstacle has been the unavailability of a suitable animal model. We found that irradiated LSH/Ss Lak hamsters developed arthritis after injection of Borrelia burgdorferi in the hind paws. When nonirradiated hamsters were injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi, acute transient synovitis was present. A diffuse neutrophilic infiltrate involved the synovia and periarticular structures. The inflammation was associated with edema, hyperemia, and granulation tissue. Numerous spirochetes were seen in the synovial and subsynovial tissues. The histopathologic changes were enhanced in irradiated hamsters. The onset and duration of the induced swelling were dependent on the dose of radiation and the inoculum of spirochetes. Inoculation of irradiated hamsters with Formalin-killed spirochetes or medium in which B. burgdorferi had grown for 7 days failed to induce swelling. This animal model should prove useful for studies of the immune response to B. burgdorferi and the pathogenesis of Lyme arthritis.

  3. Brucellar Arthritis Involving Left Sternoclavicular Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senem Şaş

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a widely spread zoonosis and an important global public health problem, especially in the Mediterranean region. Brucellosis is a systemic infectious disease, and it is transmitted to humans by consumption of raw milk or its by-products as well as by contact with products of infected animals. Clinical findings differ depending on the Brucella species, the host, and the duration of illness. The diagnosis of brucellosis is made by positive culture. Since the organism is cultured on blood, the examination is made primarily on the basis of suspicion as well as the high levels of humoral antibody titer. The disease may cause various complications. The most common complications of brucellosis are osteoarticular complications, including arthritis, bursitis, and tendinitis. In this report, brucellar arthritis involving the sternoclavicular joint (STCJ is presented. In this report we present a rare example of an osteoarticular complication caused by brucellosis

  4. Treatment of psoriatic arthritis: management recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossec, Laure; Smolen, Josef S

    2015-01-01

    Given the varied therapeutic options available for the management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA), recommendations for the management of PsA have been developed by several expert groups. These recommendations deal mainly with pharmacological treatments. At the international level, 2 recommendations sets are available: these have been developed by the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) and by the European League against Rheumatism (EULAR). These recommendations were published in 2009 and in 2012, respectively; and updates of these recommendations are currently ongoing. The first sets of recommendations dealt with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, glucocorticoids, conventional synthetic disease modifying drugs and tumour necrosis factor inhibitors; the 2015 sets of recommendations also deal with new drugs with other mechanisms of action, namely ustekinumab, secukinumab and apremilast. In the present paper, we will review these management recommendations.

  5. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripa Akter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated.

  6. One year in an Alaskan arthritis clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templin, D

    1999-10-01

    During 1997 visits were made by 852 individuals to an arthritis clinic in Alaska serving predominantly Alaska Natives. Three hundred twenty- seven of these were seen for the first time. The ratio of women to men was 3:1. Rheumatoid Arthritis was the most common arthritic condition seen, followed by Degenerative Joint Disease and Spondyloarthropathies. Three hundred five Tlingit and 246 Eskimo made up 65% of the patients seen that year. Methotrexate was the most frequently used Disease Modifying Antirheumatic Drug but the other such drugs were prescribed as well. Recording demographic and clinical information on a portable computer at the time of visit provided record linkage and the data for this report and was used in Health Care Planning.

  7. Septic arthritis caused by Kingella kingae.

    OpenAIRE

    Gay, R M; Lane, T W; Keller, D C

    1983-01-01

    A normal part of the oral flora, Kingella kingae has seldom been recognized as the cause of serious clinical infections. We report a case of documented septic arthritis caused by K. kingae in an otherwise healthy infant. We suggest that it may be more common than thought based on the general unfamiliarity with this organism and the fact that several dozen clinical isolates have been identified by reference laboratories.

  8. Nociceptive neurons detect cytokines in arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Schaible, Hans-Georg

    2014-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines are major mediators in the pathogenesis of diseases of joints such as rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. This review emphasizes that proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6 and interleukin-17 are also mediators of pain by directly acting on the nociceptive system. Proportions of nociceptive sensory neurons express receptors for these cytokines, and the application of cytokines rapidly changes the excitabil...

  9. [Genomic approach to pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Ryo

    2012-11-01

    Genetic studies identified multiple genes and polymorphisms that increase risk to develop rheumatoid arthritis. Genomic approach is characterized with its integrative style using mathematical and statistical models. Its main targets include (1)combinatorial effect of multiple genetic and environmental factors, (2)heterogeneity of pathological states and its individuality, and (3)their chronological heterogeneity. Genomic approach will clarify pathophysiology of various diseases along with the progresses in molecular biology and other researches on individual molecules.

  10. How citrullination invaded rheumatoid arthritis research

    OpenAIRE

    van Venrooij, W J; Pruijn, G.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Citrullination and the immune response to citrullinated proteins have been fundamental for the early recognition of rheumatoid arthritis by serological tests and a better understanding of its pathophysiology. In the first years after the initial publications, the focus was on the antibodies directed to citrullinated proteins. It is now realized that citrullinating enzymes and citrullinated proteins may have important roles in the maintenance of the inflammatory processes in the joints. There ...

  11. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O’Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-01-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors o...

  12. Therapeutic implications of autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Aletaha, Daniel; Blüml, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterised by the presence of autoantibodies. Their value for diagnostic/prognostic purposes has been well established. In contrast, their role in established disease and their associations with disease activity is less clear. Moreover, as evidence is accumulating that these autoantibodies are causally involved in certain key aspects of the disease, such as the initiation and perpetuation of joint inflammation or join destruction, ...

  13. Epigenetics in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Glant, Tibor T.; Mikecz, Katalin; Tibor A Rauch

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of studies show that besides the inherited genetic architecture (that is, genomic DNA), various environmental factors significantly contribute to the etiology of rheumatoid arthritis. Epigenetic factors react to external stimuli and form bridges between the environment and the genetic information-harboring DNA. Epigenetic mechanisms are implicated in the final interpretation of the encoded genetic information by regulating gene expression, and alterations in their profile...

  14. A rare cause of septic arthritis: melioidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldera, Aruna Sanjeewa; Kumanan, Thirunavukarasu; Corea, Enoka

    2013-10-01

    Melioidosis is a pyogenic infection with high mortality caused by the bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei. As the clinical presentation is not distinctive, a high index of clinical suspicion is required for diagnosis. We present a case of a 50-year-old farmer who was diabetic and a chronic alcoholic, who presented to us with pneumonia, followed by septic arthritis. He was ultimately diagnosed as having melioidosis.

  15. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and lymphoedema: lymphangiographic aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmit, P.; Brunelle, F. [Service de Radiopediatrie, Groupe Hospitalier Necker-Enfants-Malades, Paris (France); Prieur, A.M. [Unite Fonctionnelle de Rhumatologie Infantile, Groupe Hospitalier Necker-Enfants-Malades, Paris (France)

    1999-05-01

    We report a 5{sup 1}/{sub 2}-year-old boy with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and lower-limb lymphoedema. US, MRI and lymphangiography were performed. Based on the lymphangiographic study, we propose a pathogenesis based on obstruction of normal superficial lymphatic vessels in the affected limb. This is discussed with other pathogenetic factors proposed in the 16 previously reported cases of lymphoedema complicating JRA. (orig.) With 3 figs., 5 refs.

  16. Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: Topical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Leonidovna Korsakova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The topical issues of the diagnosis and treatment of psoriasis (Ps and psoriatic arthritis (PsA are discussed. The characteristics and treatments of Ps and the methods for the diagnosis of PsA in Ps are presented; the extraarticular manifestations of PsA, its radiological signs, criteria for a treatment response, the current principles of therapy, and prognosis in these patients are described.

  17. Comorbidities in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Amir; Zisman, Devy

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are often affected by numerous comorbidities that carry significant morbidity and mortality. Reported comorbidities include diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune eye disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, depression, and fibromyalgia. All health care providers for patients with PsA should recognize and monitor those comorbidities, as well as understand their effect on patient management to ensure an optimal clinical outcome. PMID:28178440

  18. Leucopenia during sulphasalazine treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Marabani, M; Madhok, R; Capell, H A; Hunter, J A

    1989-01-01

    Leucopenia appears to be a more frequent complication of sulphasalazine treatment in rheumatoid arthritis than in inflammatory bowel disease and poses a management problem. In this study leucopenia was found in 20 patients, 14 of whom were participating in prospective studies (252 patients), giving an incidence of 5.6%. Treatment had to be discontinued in half of these patients. Most (14) episodes of leucopenia occurred early in treatment (less than 24 weeks) but some occurred late and sustai...

  19. Targets of Immune Regeneration in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Hohensinner, Philipp J.; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2014-01-01

    Many of the aging-related morbidities, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disease and infectious susceptibility are linked to a decline in immune competence with a concomitant rise in proinflammatory immunity, placing the process of immune aging at the center of aging biology. Immune aging affects individuals over the age of 50 years and is accelerated in patients with the autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis. Curiously, immune aging results in a marked decline of ...

  20. JUVENILE IDIOPATHIC ARTHRITIS – A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paresh H

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The prevalence of Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA is 0.86 per 1000 children. Subcutaneous nodules have been reported in 5% to 10% of children with JIA. Approximately 90% of patients with RA and subc utaneous nodules test positive for rheumatoid factor (RF, and approximately 40% o f all RF-seropositive patients with RA have subcutaneous nodules, whereas only 6% in volvement is seen in seronegative cases. We hereby report a case of atypical Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA in a 6 year old, female child with joint pain & myalgia along with subcutaneous nodules over the dorsum of feet, hands and elbows. Joint pain initial ly involving the left ankle, slowly progressed to involve the knee, shoulder, wrist, metacar pophalangeal and interphalangeal joints over a period of one year. Joint involvement was not symmetric. RF was Negative. Fundoscopy examination was normal. Histopathological examinat ion revealed a central zone of Fibrinoid necrosis surrounded by epithelioid h istiocytes and occasional lymphocytes. Differential diagnosis of Rheumatoid Nodule (R N or Subcutaneous Granuloma Annulare (SGA or Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum was made. In light of clinicopathological findings, both SGA and NLD were ruled out a nd the diagnosis of Juvenile idiopathic arthritis presenting as RF-negative polyarthritis was made.

  1. Diagnosis and classification of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Eli M; Berkun, Yackov

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that the term Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) comprises not one disease but several. Moreover, recent studies strongly suggest that some of these clinico-pathophysiologic entities appear to cross current diagnostic categories. The ultimate goal of the JIA classification is to facilitate development of better, more specific therapy for different forms of disease though improved understanding of pathophysiology. The past two decades have witnessed significant advances in treatment and improved outcomes for many children with chronic arthritis. However, understanding of the basic biologic processes underlying these diseases remains far from complete. As a result, even the best biologic agents of today represent "halfway technologies". Because they do not treat fundamental biologic processes, they are inherently expensive, need to be given for a long time in order to ameliorate the adverse effects of chronic inflammation, and do not cure the disease. Pediatric rheumatology is now entering an era in which diagnostic categories may need to change to keep up with discovery. A more precise, biologically based classification is likely to contribute to development of more specific and improved treatments for the various forms of childhood arthritis. In this review, we discuss how genetic, gene expression, and immunologic findings have begun to influence how these diseases are understood and classified.

  2. Advances in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivar, Nancy; Van Vollenhoven, Ronald F

    2014-01-01

    The intense pursuit of novel therapies in rheumatoid arthritis has provided physicians with an assorted set of biologic drugs to treat patients with moderate to severe disease activity. Nine different biologic therapies are currently available: seven inhibitors of pro-inflammatory cytokines (five targeting tumor necrosis factor [TNF], one interleukin [IL]-1 and one IL-6), as well as a T- and a B-lymphocyte targeting agent. All these drugs have roughly similar efficacy profiles and are approved as first- or second-line therapy in patients who failed to respond to conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and in most cases for first line use in rheumatoid arthritis as well. Despite the irrefutable clinical and radiological benefits of biologic therapies, there are still low rates of patients achieving stable remission. Therefore, the quest for new and more effective biologic therapies continues and every year new drugs are tested. Simultaneously, optimal use of established agents is being studied in different ways. Recently, the approval of the first small molecule targeting intracellular pathways has opened a new chapter in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Other emerging treatment strategies include the activation of regulatory T cells as well as new cytokine-targeting therapies.

  3. Total lymphoid irradiation of intractable rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, M.; Fritz, H.; Sauer, R.

    1986-12-01

    Eleven patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation, (total dose 20 Gy). Lasting improvement in clinical symptoms was found in four patients during treatment and the remaining patients experienced similar benefit within 2 months of irradiation. There was marked reduction in exacerbations and number of joints involved. Morning stiffness, joint swelling and tenderness decreased. Complications included severe fatigue during treatment and acute bacterial arthritis in multiple joints in one patient. Four patients have since died, one of renal failure, another of cardiogenic shock following surgery 3 and 24 months after total lymphoid irradiation. Both had generalised amyloidosis. The third patient developed joint empyema and died of toxic cardiac failure. The fourth died 3 months after resection of a Kaposi's sarcoma complicated by wound infection which responded to treatment. Immunologically, total lymphoid irradiation resulted in suppression of the absolute lymphocyte count and reduction in T-helper cells, the number of T-suppressor cells remaining unchanged. These data provide evidence of T-cell involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Total lymphoid irradiation can induce sustained improvement in clinical disease activity, but severe, possibly fatal, side-effects cannot be ignored.

  4. Gemcitabine-induced gouty arthritis attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottiglieri, Sal; Tierson, Neil; Patel, Raina; Mo, Jae-Hyun; Mehdi, Syed

    2013-09-01

    In this case report, we review the experience of a patient who presented with early stage pancreatic cancer (Stage IIb) who underwent a Whipple procedure and adjuvant chemoradiation. The patient's past medical history included early stage colon cancer in remission, post-traumatic-stress-disorder, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, osteoarthritis, gout, and pre-diabetes. Chemotherapy initially consisted of weekly gemcitabine. The patient developed acute gouty attacks after his second dose of gemcitabine, which brought him to the emergency room for emergent treatment on several occasions. Gemcitabine was held and treatment began with fluorouracil and concurrent radiation. After completion of his chemoradiation with fluorouracil, he was again treated with weekly gemcitabine alone. As soon as the patient started gemcitabine chemotherapy the patient developed gouty arthritis again, requiring discontinuation of chemotherapy. The patient received no additional treatment until his recent recurrence 8 months later where gemcitabine chemotherapy was again introduced with prophylactic medications consisting of allopurinol 100 mg by mouth daily and colchicine 0.6 mg by mouth daily throughout gemcitabine chemotherapy, and no signs of gouty arthritis occurred. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing gout attacks associated with gemcitabine therapy. There is limited data available describing the mechanism that gouty arthritis may be precipitated from gemcitabine chemotherapy. Further monitoring and management may be required in patients receiving gemcitabine chemotherapy with underlying gout.

  5. The conundrum of juvenile psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelli, Angelo; Consolaro, Alessandro; Schiappapietra, Benedetta; Martini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JPsA) has provided paediatric rheumatologists with a controversial topic for many years. The principal area of contention centres on the discordance between its treatment as a single diagnostic category in current classification schemes and the demonstration of its heterogeneous nature. A further point of debate is the distinctiveness of JPsA as an entity. Owing to these uncertainties, the concept of JPsA has evolved over the years and there have been several changes in its definition and diagnostic criteria. Recently, strong evidence has been provided that the spectrum of JPsA include at least two distinct subgroups, one that has the same characteristics as early-onset ANA-positive JIA, and another that is part of the spectrum of spondyloarthropathies and resembles the forms of psoriatic arthritis in adults that belong to the same disease family. These findings call for a revision of the classification of childhood arthritis, that refutes the assumptions that children with JPsA constitute a single homogeneous population and that JPsA should be considered an individual disease entity.

  6. Septic arthritis in the temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mahdi Al-Khalisy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a rare event that has only been reported a few dozen times worldwide. This case is remarkable for septic arthritis of the TMJ joint in an otherwise healthy male. Case Report: A 24-year-old male presented to the emergency department with periauricular swelling, erythema, fever, myalgia′s and generalized joint pain. He had previously sought medical attention and was placed on ciprofloxacin. However, he developed facial swelling and a rash and had to discontinue the antibiotic. On physical exam the patient had a large swelling and tenderness in his left periauricular area, with erythema and deviation of the right mandible which limited his ability to open the mouth. A computed tomography showed mild asymmetric soft tissue swelling in the left pharyngeal region but did not show joint effusion. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging did show effusion of the joint space. The effusion was drained, and the synovial fluid was submitted for gram stain, culture, and sensitivity. The cultures grew menthicillin sensitive Staphyloccocus Aureus. The patient was discharged to complete a two week course of intravenous (IV Ceftriaxone and IV Vancomycin via home infusion. Conclusion: Septic Arthritis of the TMJ is a rare event with very specific clinical symptoms. Due to the low sensitivity of the computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging should be considered when computed tomography scan is negative for TMJ effusion.

  7. Asymptomatic atlantoaxial subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadali Nazarinia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study is conducted to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation in rheumatoid arthritis patients by plain radiographs and its relation to demographic and clinical characteristics, disease activity measures and medications. 100 rheumatoid arthritis patients (18 male and 82 female were selected randomly, according to the American college of Rheumatology Criteria, who were under follow up in the rheumatology clinic. A complete history was taken, and physical examination has been done with focus on the cervical spine to determine their demographic data, disease duration, age of disease onset, drug history, swollen and tender joint counts, and ESR, Hb, CRP, RF levels. The disease activity of patients with rheumatoid arthritis was measured using the disease activity score 28. Radiographs of the cervical spine included lateral views taken in flexion, extension, neutral position of the neck and anterioposterior and odontoid projection view. Asymptomatic cervical spine subluxation was found in 17 of the 100 patients (17%. The prevalence of, anterior atlantoaxial subluxation, atlantoaxial impaction and subaxial subluxation was 10(10%, 5(5% and 6(6%, respectively. Posterior subluxation was not detected. The only characteristic that showed meaningful relationship with cervical spine subluxation was CRP (P=0.036. Our results showed that patients with RA, who have cervical spine subluxation cannot be distinguished on the basis of symptoms. Cervical spine involvement is common and may be asymptomatic, indicating routine cervical spine imaging is needed in patients with RA.

  8. K/BxN serum transfer arthritis as a model for human inflammatory arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Deen Christensen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis (STA model is a murine model in which the immunological mechanisms occurring in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and other arthritides can be studied. To induce K/BxN STA, serum from arthritic transgenic K/BxN mice is transferred to naive mice and manifestations of arthritis occur a few days later. The inflammatory response in the model is driven by autoantibodies against the ubiquitously expressed self-antigen, glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6PI, leading to the formation of immune complexes that drive the activation of different innate immune cells such as neutrophils, macrophages and possibly mast cells. The pathogenesis further involves a range of immune mediators including cytokines, chemokines, complement factors, Toll-like receptors, Fc receptors, and integrins, as well as factors involved in pain and bone erosion. Hence, even though the K/BxN STA model mimics only the effector phase of RA, it still involves a wide range of relevant disease mediators. Additionally, as a murine model for arthritis, the K/BxN STA model has some obvious advantages. Firstly, it has a rapid and robust onset of arthritis with 100% incidence in genetically identical animals. Secondly, it can be induced in a wide range of strain backgrounds and can therefore also be induced in gene-deficient strains to study the specific importance of disease mediators. Even though G6PI might not be an essential autoantigen, for example, in RA, the K/BxN STA model is a useful tool to understand how autoantibodies in general drive the progression of arthritis by interacting with downstream components of the innate immune system. Finally, the model has also proven useful as a model wherein arthritic pain can be studied. Taken together, these features make the K/BxN STA model a relevant one for RA and it is a potentially valuable tool especially for the pre-clinical screening of new therapeutic targets for RA and perhaps other forms of inflammatory

  9. Sirt2 suppresses inflammatory responses in collagen-induced arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jiangtao [Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, Yantaishan Hospital, 91 Jiefang Road, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China); Sun, Bing; Jiang, Chuanqiang; Hong, Huanyu [Department of Orthopaedics, Yantaishan Hospital, 91 Jiefang Road, Yantai, Shandong 264001 (China); Zheng, Yanping, E-mail: yanpingzheng@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 44 Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Sirt2 expression decreases in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). •Sirt2 knockout aggravates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. •Sirt2 knockout increases levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the serum. •Sirt2 deacetylates p65 and inhibits pro-inflammatory factors expression. •Sirt2 rescue abates severity of arthritis in mice with CIA. -- Abstract: Arthritis is a common autoimmune disease that is associated with progressive disability, systemic complications and early death. However, the underling mechanisms of arthritis are still unclear. Sirtuins are a NAD{sup +}-dependent class III deacetylase family, and regulate cellular stress, inflammation, genomic stability, carcinogenesis, and energy metabolism. Among the sirtuin family members, Sirt1 and Sirt6 are critically involved in the development of arthritis. It remains unknown whether other sirtuin family members participate in arthritis. Here in this study, we demonstrate that Sirt2 inhibits collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) using in vivo and in vitro evidence. The protein and mRNA levels of Sirt2 significantly decreased in joint tissues of mice with CIA. When immunized with collagen, Sirt2-KO mice showed aggravated severity of arthritis based on clinical scores, hind paw thickness, and radiological and molecular findings. Mechanically, Sirt2 deacetylated p65 subunit of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) at lysine 310, resulting in reduced expression of NF-κB-dependent genes, including interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1(MCP-1), RANTES, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and MMP-13. Importantly, our rescue experiment showed that Sirt2 re-expression abated the severity of arthritis in Sirt2-KO mice. Those findings strongly indicate Sirt2 as a considerably inhibitor of the development of arthritis.

  10. MR imaging findings of acute gouty arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyung Kyu [Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jee Young [Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jin Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical and MR imaging features of acute gouty arthritis and to define the characteristic findings that would be helpful for differentiating acute gouty arthritis from septic arthritis. The authors retrospectively studied seven patients who suffered from acute gouty arthritis. The MR imaging findings were analyzed by two musculoskeletal radiologists who focused on joint effusion, subchondral bone erosion, bone marrow edema, synovial thickening (regular and even, or irregular and nodular), and the soft tissue changes (edema or abscess). The clinical records of the patients were reviewed with regard to age and gender, the clinical presentation and the laboratory findings (serum uric acid, WBC, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and synovial fluid culture). The patients consisted of six men and one woman whose mean age was 41 years (age range:24-65 years). The joints involved were the knee (n=6), and ankle (n=1). Two patients had medical histories of gouty attacks that involved the first metatarsophalangeal joint. In six cases, the serum uric acid level during acute attacks was elevated. In all the patients, the affected joint became swollen, hot, erythematous and extremely tender, and this was accompanied by a high ESR and a high C-reactive protein level at the time of presentation. The results of Gram stain and culture of the synovial fluid were negative. In all patients, the MR images showed large amounts of joint effusion, thick irregular and nodular synovial thickening and soft tissue edema without subchondral bone erosions and soft tissue abscess. In one case, subchondral bone marrow edema of the medial femoral condyle was present. In five cases, there were multiple low signal foci in the joint on the spin-echo T2-weighted MR image. Even though the MR imaging findings of acute gouty arthritis are nonspecific, it should be considered as a possible diagnosis when a large amount of joint effusion

  11. Salmonella enteridis Septic Arthritis: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esat Uygur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nontyphoidal salmonellosis causes significant morbidity, is transmitted via fecal-oral route, and is a worldwide cause of gastroenteritis, bacteremia, and local infections. Salmonella is a less common etiologic factor for septic arthritis compared with other gram-negative bacteria. Cases. We present two septic arthritis cases with Salmonella enteridis as a confirmed pathogen and also discuss the predisposing factors and treatment. Discussion. Septic arthritis is an orthopedic emergency. The gold standard treatment of septic arthritis is joint debridement, antibiotic therapy according to the culture results, and physiotherapy, which should start in the early postoperative period to prevent limitation of motion. Salmonella is an atypical agent for septic arthritis. It must be particularly kept in mind as an etiologic factor for the acute arthritis of a patient with sickle cell anemia and systemic lupus erythematosus. Clinicians should be cautious that the white blood cell count in synovial fluid can be under 50.000/mm3 in immune compromised individuals with septic arthritis. The inflammatory response can be deficient, or the microorganism may be atypical. Conclusion. Atypical bacteria such as Salmonella species in immune compromised patients can cause joint infections. Therefore, Salmonella species must always be kept in mind for the differential diagnosis of septic arthritis in a clinically relevant setting.

  12. Identification of urinary peptide biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelique Stalmach

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis are associated with improved outcomes but current diagnostic tools such as rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated protein antibodies have shown limited sensitivity. In this pilot study we set out to establish a panel of urinary biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis using capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. We compared the urinary proteome of 33 participants of the Scottish Early Rheumatoid Arthritis inception cohort study with 30 healthy controls and identified 292 potential rheumatoid arthritis-specific peptides. Amongst them, 39 were used to create a classifier model using support vector machine algorithms. Specific peptidic fragments were differentially excreted between groups; fragments of protein S100-A9 and gelsolin were less abundant in rheumatoid arthritis while fragments of uromodulin, complement C3 and fibrinogen were all increasingly excreted. The model generated was subsequently tested in an independent test-set of 31 samples. The classifier demonstrated a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 93% in diagnosing the condition, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93 (p<0.0001. These preliminary results suggest that urinary biomarkers could be useful in the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Further studies are currently being undertaken in larger cohorts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other athridities to assess the potential of the urinary peptide based classifier in the early detection of rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. The surgical treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: a new era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiphorou, E; Konan, S; MacGregor, A J; Haddad, F S; Young, A

    2014-10-01

    There has been an in increase in the availability of effective biological agents for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis as well as a shift towards early diagnosis and management of the inflammatory process. This article explores the impact this may have on the place of orthopaedic surgery in the management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  14. Home Care Guide on Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (For Parents).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesecke, Linda L.; And Others

    The booklet, written by the medical staff of a children's hospital, provides information for parents of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Arthritis is a swelling of the joint(s) in children and lasts for over 6 weeks (sometimes many years). Aspirin is the main medicine given for JRA, and it works not only to control pain but also,…

  15. Anti-IL-1alpha autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslind, K; Svensson, Birte; Svenson, M;

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  16. Bowel associated dermatosis – arthritis syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Dayavathi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a rare case of Bowel Associated Dermatosis – Arthritis Syndrome in a young patient with complex Crohn's disease who presented with fever, arthritis, rash and worsening of diarrhea with abdominal pain, who promptly responded to a short course of steroids.

  17. Prognostic laboratory markers of joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindqvist, E; Henriksen, Karen Eberhardt; Bendtzen, K;

    2005-01-01

    To investigate whether determination of a set of laboratory markers at baseline provides prognostic information on joint damage in hands and feet in rheumatoid arthritis.......To investigate whether determination of a set of laboratory markers at baseline provides prognostic information on joint damage in hands and feet in rheumatoid arthritis....

  18. Anti-cytokine therapy in chronic destructive arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, W.B. van den

    2001-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) are considered to be master cytokines in chronic, destructive arthritis. Therapeutic approaches in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients have so far focused mainly on TNF, which is a major inflammatory mediator in RA and a potent inducer of IL-1; ant

  19. Arthritis Awareness (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-05-19

    As the U.S. population ages, so does the frequency of certain chronic diseases, such as arthritis. In this podcast, Dr. Kamil Barbour discusses ways to manage arthritis.  Created: 5/19/2016 by MMWR.   Date Released: 5/19/2016.

  20. 77 FR 64524 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice...

  1. 75 FR 55805 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice...

  2. 78 FR 32403 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice and... meeting. Agenda: On July 22, 2013, the committee will discuss the Assessment of...

  3. 77 FR 13611 - Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Arthritis Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food... of Committee: Arthritis Advisory Committee. General Function of the Committee: To provide advice...

  4. The Child with Arthritis in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzo, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Arthritis is a condition often associated with the elderly. However, arthritis affects approximately 275,000 children nationwide. Symptoms may vary from one swollen joint to multiply affected joints coupled with fatigue, fever, and rash. Its effect on the school-age child can range from missing a few days of school per year to hospitalizations…

  5. Understanding Arthritis Promoting Healthy Lifestyles for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremethick, Mary Jane; Hogan, Patricia I.; Coleman, Barb; Adams, Kady

    2010-01-01

    One of the goals of "Healthy People 2010" is to decrease the incidence of limitation in physical activity due to arthritis. Physical education, recreation, and dance professionals can play an important role in meeting this objective by addressing barriers to physical activity and exercise in older adults with arthritis, and by successfully…

  6. Which patients improve the most from arthritis rehabilitation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagel, Sofia; Lindqvist, Elisabet; Petersson, Ingemar F

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in arthritis rehabilitation performed by multidisciplinary teams in patients with chronic inflammatory arthritis. Predictors of change in health-related quality of life and the proportion of patients with clinical improvement were investi...

  7. CDC Vital Signs–Arthritis in America

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-03-07

    This podcast is based on the March 2017 CDC Vital Signs report. Many adults in the United States have arthritis. Learn how to reduce the pain of arthritis, as well as manage the condition.  Created: 3/7/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 3/7/2017.

  8. Arthritis Awareness (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-05-19

    Roughly 52.5 million adults in the United States have arthritis. This podcast discusses the importance of physical activity and maintaining a healthy weight in order to prevent arthritis and/or lessen symptoms.  Created: 5/19/2016 by MMWR.   Date Released: 5/19/2016.

  9. Ureaplasma septic arthritis in an immunosuppressed patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Michael David; Cardenas, Ana Maria; Birnbaum, Belinda K; Gluckman, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Mycoplasmas, including Ureaplasma and Mycoplasma species, are uncommon but important causes of septic arthritis, especially affecting immunosuppressed patients. Many of the reported cases have been associated with congenital immunodeficiency disorders, especially hypogammaglobulinemia. Mycoplasmas are difficult to grow in the laboratory, and these infections may be underdiagnosed using culture techniques. We report a case of a 21-year-old woman with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and hip arthroplasties treated with rituximab and adalimumab who developed urogenital infections and soft tissue abscesses followed by knee arthritis with negative routine cultures. Ureaplasma species was identified from synovial fluid on 2 separate occasions using a broad-range 16S ribosomal RNA gene polymerase chain reaction. Azithromycin led to rapid improvement in symptoms, but after completion of therapy, involvement of the hip prosthesis became apparent, and again, 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction was positive for Ureaplasma species. The literature is reviewed with a discussion of risk factors for Mycoplasma septic arthritis, clinical presentation, methods of diagnosis, and treatment.

  10. Periodontal and hematological characteristics associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Westergaard, Jytte; Stoltze, Kaj

    2006-01-01

    Periodontitis shares several clinical and pathogenic characteristics with chronic arthritis, and there is some degree of coexistence. The aims of this study were to elucidate whether patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), juvenile...

  11. AN INTERESTING CASE OF PNEUMOTHORAX IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruthi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available : Rheumatoid Arthritis is a multisystem disease with pulmonary manifestations including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, obliterative bronchiolitis, pneumonitis, bronchiectasis as well as pneumothorax. Cases of rheumatoid arthritis with active tuberculosis disease have been documented as well as reactivation of latent tuberculosis as a result of methotrexate therapy with or without systemic steroids has led to a renewed interest in the association of the two diseases. We report the case of rheumatoid arthritis in a young female patient who presented with cough and fever of fortnight duration and rapidly developed spontaneous pneumothorax that eventually required surgical pneumonectomy. CONCLUSION: Even though patients with rheumatoid arthritis can present with spontaneous pneumothorax due to rupture of rheumatic nodules, Common diseases like tuberculosis should be kept in mind while treating pulmonary complaints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, especially those who are on methotrexate therapy

  12. Streptococcus gordonii septic arthritis : two cases and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yombi Jean cyr

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite advances in antimicrobial and surgical therapy, septic arthritis remains a rheumatologic emergency that can lead to rapid joint destruction and irreversible loss of function. In adults, Staphylococcus aureus is the most common microorganism isolated from native joints. Streptococcus gordonii is a prominent member of the viridans group of oral bacteria and is among the bacteria most frequently identified as being primary agent of subacute bacterial endocarditis. To the best of our knowledge, Streptococcus gordonii has not yet been described as agent of septic arthritis. Case Presentation We describe here two cases of septic arthritis due to Streptococcus gordonii. It gives us an opportunity to review epidemiology, diagnosis criteria and management of septic arthritis. Conclusion Although implication of S. gordonii as aetiologic agent of subacute endocarditis is well known, this organism is a rare cause of septic arthritis. In this case, the exclusion of associated endocarditis is warranted.

  13. Microcirculation of the juvenile knee in chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bünger, Cody; Bülow, J; Tøndevold, E

    1986-01-01

    In order to investigate pathogenetic factors in growth abnormalities of the knee in hemophilic arthropathy and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, the hemodynamic changes of the knee following chronic synovial inflammation and elevated joint pressure were studied in puppies. Unilateral arthritis was i....... The growth plates formed borders for the extension of these changes. The increased permeability and surface area between blood and bone in arthritis may accelerate the resorption and subsequent destruction of subchondral bone in chronic arthropathies of the juvenile knee.......In order to investigate pathogenetic factors in growth abnormalities of the knee in hemophilic arthropathy and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, the hemodynamic changes of the knee following chronic synovial inflammation and elevated joint pressure were studied in puppies. Unilateral arthritis...

  14. Evaluating and mitigating fracture risk in established rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Matthew B; Saag, Kenneth G

    2015-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis are predisposed to systemic bone loss, and they are at an increased risk of fractures. Although there are similarities in the patient demographics between rheumatoid arthritis patients and the general population of osteoporosis patients, there are factors, particularly the use of glucocorticoids, which are specific to rheumatoid arthritis. These factors can lead to an increased risk of bone loss and fracture. Given that fractures are often very debilitating, especially in elderly patients, it is of paramount importance for the practicing rheumatologist to be aware of ways to reduce the risk of fracture in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This review discusses currently available modalities for fracture risk assessment as well as pharmacologic and lifestyle interventions available to treat and prevent bone loss in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  15. The diagnosis and treatment of arthritis in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, R J

    1983-01-01

    In this paper on the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis in horses, both degenerative arthritis and septic arthritis are considered. Diagnosis should be made on the combination of clinical examination together with the use of diagnostic aids such as radiology, intra-articular local anaesthesia and synovial fluid analysis. Intra-articular therapy appears to be the most effective in the treatment of degenerative arthritis. Excellent responses to therapy have been reported with corticosteroids, sodium hyaluronate, orgotein and synovial fluid transfer, where joints showed an absence of degenerative changes on radiographs. In septic arthritis, systemic treatment with the appropriate antibiotic, following bacterial culture and sensitivity testing, can produce good results if prompt diagnosis is made.

  16. Can imaging be used for inflammatory arthritis screening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the utility of imaging in the diagnostic work-up of suspected and undifferentiated axial and peripheral inflammatory arthritis. Radiographic findings, that is, late damage but not early inflammation, are part of the classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis (RA......), ankylosing spondylitis, spondyloarthritis (SpA), and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and they are generally part of the early examination program in arthritis.Computed tomography visualizes calcified tissue with high resolution but is rarely used unless radiography is unclear and MRI unavailable...... of RA, PsA, and SpA.MRI and US are part of the recent American College of Rheumatology/European League against Rheumatism 2010 classification criteria for RA (can be used to count involved joints), and MRI is part of the SpondyloArthritis International Society criteria for axial and peripheral Sp...

  17. Septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint: an uncommon location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Morillo, Melania; Mateo Soria, Lourdes; Riveros Frutos, Anne; Tejera Segura, Beatriz; Holgado Pérez, Susana; Olivé Marqués, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Septic pyogenic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint is a rare entity that occurs in immunosuppressed patients or those with discontinuity of defense barriers. There are only 15 cases described in the literature. The diagnosis is based on clinical features and the isolation of a microorganism in synovial fluid or blood cultures. The evidence of arthritis by imaging (MRI, ultrasound or scintigraphy) may be useful. Antibiotic treatment is the same as in septic arthritis in other locations. Staphylococcus aureus is the microorganism most frequently isolated. Our objective was to describe the clinical features, treatment and outcome of patients diagnosed with septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular joint at a Rheumatology Department. We developed a study with a retrospective design (1989-2012). The medical records of patients with septic arthritis were reviewed (101 patients). Those involving the acromioclavicular joint were selected (6 patients; 6%).

  18. Australian Paediatric Rheumatology Group standards of care for the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Jane; Murray, Kevin; Boros, Christina; Chaitow, Jeffrey; Allen, Roger C; Akikusa, Jonathan; Adib, Navid; Piper, Susan E; Singh-Grewal, Davinder

    2014-09-01

    This standards document outlines accepted standards of management for children, adolescents and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Australia. This document acknowledges that the chronic inflammatory arthritis conditions (JIA) in childhood are different diseases from inflammatory arthritis in adults and that specific expertise is required in the care of children with arthritis.

  19. Post-traumatic arthritis in patient with Jadassohn’s anetoderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rondinone

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe the emergence of arthritis following a physical trauma, in a young man with clinical and histopathologic features of primary anetoderma (Jadassohn type of 13 years’ duration. Diagnosis of post-traumatic arthritis in a young patient with genetic predisposition was assumed. Indeed septic arthritis and other possible cause of arthritis were ruled out.

  20. Application of a Novel Diagnostic Rule in the Differential Diagnosis between Acute Gouty Arthritis and Septic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Choi, Sang-Tae; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Joo-Hyun; Yoon, Bo-Young

    2015-06-01

    Septic arthritis and gout are major diseases that should be suspected in patients with acute monoarthritis. These two diseases are clinically similar and often indistinguishable without the help of synovial fluid analysis. Recently, a novel diagnostic rule for gout without synovial fluid analysis was developed and showed relevant performances. This study aimed to determine whether this diagnostic rule could perform well in distinguishing gout from septic arthritis. The diagnostic rule comprises 7 clinical and laboratory variables, each of which is given a specified score. The probability of gout is classified into 3 groups according to the sum of the scores: high (≥ 8), intermediate (> 4 to arthritis (n = 54) based on synovial fluid analysis. The mean sum of scores of acute gout patients was significantly higher than that of those with septic arthritis (8.6 ± 0.2 vs. 3.6 ± 0.32, P arthritis (Eta[η]: 0.776). The prevalence of acute gouty arthritis, as confirmed by the presence of monosodium crystal, was 95.5% (61/64), 57.5% (19/33), and 5.1% (2/39) in high, intermediate and low probability group, respectively. The recently introduced diagnostic rule properly discriminates acute gout from septic arthritis. It may help physicians diagnose gout in cases difficult to be differentiated from septic arthritis.

  1. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis: A Knowledge Transfer Strategy to Empower Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Lineker, Sydney; Bell, Mary; Wells, George; Casimiro, Lynn; Egan, Mary; Cranney, Ann; Tugwell, Peter; Wilson, Keith G.; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to help people with arthritis become aware of and utilize Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Osteoarthritis (OA) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) as they relate to self-management strategies. Second, to evaluate the impact of specific Knowledge Translation (KT) activities on CPG uptake. More…

  2. Autoantibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides predict progression to rheumatoid arthritis in patients with undifferentiated arthritis - A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, F.A. van; Linn-Rasker, S.P.; Venrooij, W.J.W. van; Jong, B.A. de; Breedveld, F.C.; Verweij, C.L.; Toes, R.E.M.; Huizinga, T.W.J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common, severe, chronic inflammatory joint disease. Since the disease may initially be indistinguishable from other forms of arthritis, early diagnosis can be difficult. Autoantibodies seen in RA can be detected years before clinical symptoms develop. In an

  3. Autoantibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides predict progression to rheumatoid arthritis in patients with undifferentiated arthritis: a prospective cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, van FA; Linn-Rasker, SP; Venrooij, W.J.; Jong, B.A.; Breedveld, F.C.; Verweij, C.L.; Toes, RE; Huizinga, T.W.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common, severe, chronic inflammatory joint disease. Since the disease may initially be indistinguishable from other forms of arthritis, early diagnosis can be difficult. Autoantibodies seen in RA can be detected years before clinical symptoms develop. In an

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis-associated autoantibodies in non-rheumatoid arthritis patients with mucosal inflammation : a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Koen M. J.; de Smit, Menke J.; Brouwer, Elisabeth; de Kok, Fenne A. C.; Kraan, Jan; Altenburg, Josje; Verheul, Marije K.; Trouw, Leendert A.; van Winkelhoff, Arie Jan; Vissink, Arjan; Westra, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis-associated autoantibodies (RA-AAB) can be present in serum years before clinical onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It has been hypothesized that initiation of RA-AAB generation occurs at inflamed mucosal surfaces, such as in the oral cavity or lungs. The aim of t

  5. Arthritis in the highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pile, K D; Richens, J E; Laurent, R M; Bhatia, K; Prasad, M L; Lupiwa, T; Hudson, B J; Tapsall, J; McPetrie, R

    1993-01-01

    Acute polyarthritis is an important cause of morbidity in many tropical countries. Classification has often been difficult, with the term tropical polyarthritis used for those in whom a diagnosis could not be made. The implication that this is a distinct entity is probably incorrect, with likely causes being septic arthritis or post-infective reactive arthritis. This study aimed to determine the types of arthritis found in 43 patients (30 men) presenting consecutively to the Goroka Base Hospital in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea. Gonococcal arthritis was diagnosed in eight patients (six men) on the basis of isolation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from the joint aspirate. In all cases the N gonorrhoeae was identified by the closed culture system on chocolate agar, but not always by routine plating. There were no specific clinical features that identified patients with a gonococcal septic arthritis. The remaining 34 patients had an undifferentiated oligoarthritis. The pattern of arthritis in men and women was of a lower limb pauciarticular arthritis with a predilection for the knee and ankle joints. A total of 30% of male patients had a history of urethral discharge and 44% of all patients had preceding diarrhoea. Arthritis was the only feature in 59% of patients and in 32% there was an associated enthesitis. In this study most patients had an oligoarthritis consistent with a reactive arthritis or a septic arthritis due to N gonorrhoeae. Broth inoculation of synovial fluid was the best method to isolate N gonorrhoeae, with standard methods for gonococcal isolation failing in some patients. It is recommended that the term 'tropical polyarthritis' is no longer used as it does not refer to a specific entity but consists of several known arthritides.

  6. Is air pollution a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essouma, Mickael; Noubiap, Jean Jacques N

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory debilitating disease triggered by a complex interaction involving genetic and environmental factors. Active smoking and occupational exposures such as silica increase its risk, suggesting that initial inflammation and generation of rheumatoid arthritis-related autoantibodies in the lungs may precede the clinical disease. This hypothesis paved the way to epidemiological studies investigating air pollution as a potential determinant of rheumatoid arthritis. Studies designed for epidemiology of rheumatoid arthritis found a link between traffic, a surrogate of air pollution, and this disease. Furthermore, a small case-control study recently found an association between wood smoke exposure and anticyclic citrullinated protein/peptide antibody in sera of patients presenting wood-smoke-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, reports addressing impact of specific pollutants on rheumatoid arthritis incidence and severity across populations are somewhat conflicting. In addition to the link reported between other systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases and particulate matters/gaseous pollutants, experimental observation of exacerbated rheumatoid arthritis incidence and severity in mice models of collagen-induced arthritis after diesel exhaust particles exposure as well as hypovitaminosis D-related autoimmunity can help understand the role of air pollution in rheumatoid arthritis. All these considerations highlight the necessity to extend high quality epidemiological researches investigating different sources of atmospheric pollution across populations and particularly in low-and-middle countries, in order to further explore the biological plausibility of air pollution's effect in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. This should be attempted to better inform policies aiming to reduce the burden of rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. Prevalence and occupational impact of arthritis in Saskatchewan farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Gjevre, Regina M; Trask, Catherine; King, Nathan; Koehncke, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural workers have physically demanding occupations. In this study of Saskatchewan farmers, the authors examined (1) self-reported prevalence of physician-diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis; and (2) the impact of these chronic arthridities on engagement in physical tasks related to farming. This study was conducted through a cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from the Saskatchewan Farm Injury Cohort Study in which 2,473 adult residents upon 1,216 farms participated. Collected survey data included demographic and health information; regional musculoskeletal symptoms for each participant assessed via the Standard Nordic Questionnaire; and engagement in various specific physical tasks or activities associated with mixed farming practices. Of the 2,473 respondents, 13% reported chronic arthritic diagnoses (10% osteoarthritis, 4% rheumatoid arthritis, with 1% from each category overlapping with both forms of arthritis). Participants reporting arthritis were more likely to also report disabling musculoskeletal symptoms involving their shoulders, elbows, hands, lower back, hips, knees, and ankles. Farmers with arthritis reported less participation in all physical farming activities studied, including various machinery operations, herd maintenance and veterinary activities, overhead work, shoveling/pitchfork work, and lifting/carrying. When adjusted for age, gender, and comorbidities, operation of combines and shoveling/pitchfork work continued to be significantly less engaged in by farmers with arthritis. The overall prevalence of arthritis was consistent with general population prevalence, although the category of rheumatoid arthritis was overrepresented. Farmers with arthritis were significantly less likely to participate in combine operation and shoveling/pitchfork chores compared with their counterparts without arthritis.

  8. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis - a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkó, Júlia; Besenyei, Timea; Laki, Judit; Glant, Tibor T; Mikecz, Katalin; Szekanecz, Zoltán

    2013-10-01

    The "Bermuda triangle" of genetics, environment and autoimmunity is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Various aspects of genetic contribution to the etiology, pathogenesis and outcome of RA are discussed in this review. The heritability of RA has been estimated to be about 60 %, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11-37 %. Apart from known shared epitope (SE) alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*01 and DRB1*04, other HLA alleles, such as HLA-DRB1*13 and DRB1*15 have been linked to RA susceptibility. A novel SE classification divides SE alleles into S1, S2, S3P and S3D groups, where primarily S2 and S3P groups have been associated with predisposition to seropositive RA. The most relevant non-HLA gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with RA include PTPN22, IL23R, TRAF1, CTLA4, IRF5, STAT4, CCR6, PADI4. Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 30 loci involved in RA pathogenesis. HLA and some non-HLA genes may differentiate between anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA) seropositive and seronegative RA. Genetic susceptibility has also been associated with environmental factors, primarily smoking. Some GWAS studies carried out in rodent models of arthritis have confirmed the role of human genes. For example, in the collagen-induced (CIA) and proteoglycan-induced arthritis (PgIA) models, two important loci - Pgia26/Cia5 and Pgia2/Cia2/Cia3, corresponding the human PTPN22/CD2 and TRAF1/C5 loci, respectively - have been identified. Finally, pharmacogenomics identified SNPs or multiple genetic signatures that may be associated with responses to traditional disease-modifying drugs and biologics.

  9. MRI findings of treated bacterial septic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierry, Guillaume; Huang, Ambrose J.; Chang, Connie Y.; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to report the MRI findings that can be encountered in successfully treated bacterial septic arthritis. The study included 12 patients (8 male and 4 female; mean age 38 years, range 9-85) with 13 proven cases of bacterial septic arthritis. The joints involved were hip (n = 3), knee (n = 3), shoulder (n = 2), sacroiliac (n = 2), ankle (n = 1), wrist (n = 1), and elbow (n = 1). MRI examinations following surgical debridement and at initiation of antibiotic therapy and after successful treatment were compared for changes in effusion, synovium, bone, and periarticular soft tissues. Imaging findings were correlated with microbiological and clinical findings. Joint effusions were present in all joints at baseline and regressed significantly at follow-up MRI (p = 0.001). Abscesses were present in 5 cases (38 %), and their sizes decreased significantly at follow-up (p = 0.001). Synovial enhancement and thickening were observed in all joints at both baseline and follow-up MRI. Myositis/cellulitis was present in 10 cases (77 %) at baseline and in 8 cases (62 %) at follow-up MRI. Bone marrow edema was present in 10 joints (77 %) at baseline and persisted in 8 joints (62 %). Bone erosions were found in 8 joints (62 %) and persisted at follow-up MRI in all cases. The sizes of joint effusions and abscesses appear to be the factors with the most potential for monitoring therapy for septic arthritis, since both decreased significantly following successful treatment. Synovial thickening and enhancement, periarticular myositis/cellulitis, and bone marrow edema can persist even after resolution of the infection. (orig.)

  10. [Interstitial lung disease in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froidevaux-Janin, Sylvie; Dudler, Jean; Nicod, Laurent P; Lazor, Romain

    2011-11-23

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is found in up to 30% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is clinically manifest in 5 to 10%, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. The most frequent histopathological forms are usual interstitial pneumonia and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Another recently described presentation is combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. Similarly to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, acute exacerbation of ILD may occur in RA and is associated with severe prognosis. Smoking is a known risk factor of RA and may also play a role in the pathogenesis of RA-associated ILD, in combination with genetic and immunologic mechanisms. Several treatments of RA may also lead to drug-induced ILD.

  11. [Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariacher-Gehler, S; Wyss-Näther, A; Aeschlimann, A G

    2001-08-01

    Both Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS) are chronic, inflammatory systemic diseases. RA predominantly manifests itself in the peripheral joints, whereas AS most prominently in the spine. As time progresses the roles of active and physical therapy become increasingly important. The aims of intensive and dynamic exercise for patients with RA and AS are formulated following the ICIDH-2. Thus, the aims are a direct equation of body function, activities and participation. The benefits of exercise therapy are increased joint mobility, increased muscle strength, improved functional ability and better cardiorespiratory function without incurring a flare of the disease.

  12. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: LABORATORY MODELS OF THE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Orlovskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The  establishment and  application of animal  models  represent effective  tools  for  research  in rheumatoid arthritis (RA pathogenesis. Animal models that replicate various mechanisms reflecting all aspects of RA, including early RA pathology, have provided important insights into studying etiology and pathogenetic mechanisms of RA in humans. This review article was compiled in order to give an introduction to the current state of RA models.  Application of these  experimental disorders  for testing  potential therapeutic approaches will help to make better predictions for drug efficiency in human RA

  13. Septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Edward W K; McKillop, Graham; Prasad, Sai; Walker, William S

    2007-03-01

    Pyarthrosis of the manubriosternal joint is exceedingly rare. Its rarity defies an early diagnosis, and other causes of chest pain would normally be ruled out first. We describe a patient with a short history of chest pain, pyrexia, and raised inflammatory markers. A destroyed manubriosternal joint with a large abscess was found during surgical exploration. This case illustrates an unusually rapid development of septic arthritis involving a fibrocartilaginous joint in an otherwise healthy young man. Nine other cases have been described in the literature and are reviewed. Early diagnosis followed by adequate surgical drainage and antibiotic therapy led to a good outcome.

  14. [Pool exercise therapy of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, E M; Lund, H; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    2001-10-01

    Aquatic therapy is a subgroup of balneotherapy and consists of exercises in a hot water pool. It uses the physical properties of water to achieve better mobility for patients whose pain, lack of muscle strength, and joint deformities are inhibiting factors when exercising on land. Pool therapy shows positive effects as part of the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis patients, but too few studies with an acceptable design and a well-defined patient group have been carried out. The documentation available on aquatic therapy indicates that more large clinical, controlled, and randomised studies must be conducted.

  15. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a clinical overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, J

    2000-02-01

    The chronic arthritides in childhood remain a poorly understood group of conditions. Their classification has been a source of much confusion over the years with differences in terminology between Europe and North America. A significant step forward in paediatric rheumatology has been the recent development of an internationally agreed classification system which uses the overall term juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The various subtypes of JIA and their clinical features are described, together with an overview of their differential diagnosis, complications and outcomes. An outline of current management strategies is given and potential future developments highlighted.

  16. Psoriatic arthritis management update - biotherapeutic options.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saber, Tajvur P

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a seronegative spondyloarthropathy (SpA) occurring in up to 30% of patients with psoriasis. It has a wide variation of annual incidence (median 6.4, range 0.1-3.1 per 10(5) people), based on analysis of 13 incidence and prevalence reviews published between 1987 and December 2006. Conventional treatments with antiinflammatory and disease modifying or antirheumatic drugs are not efficacious in all patients, in particular those with axial disease. This review examines new pharmacological developments in the treatment of PsA with a focus on biologic therapies.

  17. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: the paediatric perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Alison [Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Department of Adolescent Rheumatology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); McDonagh, Janet E. [Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Institute of Child Health, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    Paediatric rheumatology is a relatively new specialty that has developed rapidly over the last 30 years. There have been major advances, which have included improvements in the classification and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The former has led to enhanced international collaboration with disease registries, multicentre research and the development of new therapeutic agents. This has resulted in improved disease control and remission induction in many. There is, however, still significant morbidity associated with JIA during childhood, adolescence and adulthood, and challenges for the future include early identification of those with a poorer prognosis, appropriate administration of safe therapies and optimizing outcomes as young people move through adolescence into adulthood. (orig.)

  18. Psoriatic arthritis: treatment strategies using biologic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Palazzi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The traditional management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA includes NSAIDs, corticosteroids and DMARDs. Advancement in the knowledge of the immunopathogenesis of PsA has been associated with the development of biologic agents which have revolutionized the management of the disease. Among biologics drugs, there are the 4 currently availablee anti-TNFα blocking agents (etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab and golimumab which are more effective than traditional DMARDs on symptoms/signs of inflammation, quality of life, function, and in inhibiting the progression of the structural joint damage. Despite of the high cost, TNF inhibitors are costeffective on both the musculoskeletal and skin manifestations of psoriatic disease.

  19. Staphylococcal septic arthritis in three horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, R J; Love, D N

    1979-04-01

    Three horses were diagnosed as having monarticular septic arthritis due to Staphylococcus aureus on the basis of culture of articular cartilage, synovial membrane and/or synovial fluid. The organisms were all well recognised human phage types and in two cases demonstrated beta-lactamase (penicillinase) activity. Details of case histories are presented and the bacteriological techniques and antibiotic management with cloxacillin, methicillin and penicillin discussed. Following treatment, sterile cultures of synovial fluid were achieved in all cases, but in two horses the infections resulted in degenerative articular changes. This necessitated arthrodesis of the fetlock joint in one case.

  20. Advances in TCM Symptomatology of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梢

    2002-01-01

    @@ In view of the rich experiences and new advances in TCM treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, it is very promising to find a further breakthough in the field of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Treating the disease by means of differentiation of symptoms and signs is a distinctive feature of TCM, however the difficult and also the major point would be the research of mechanism of its symptomatology. The following is a summary of the advances in the study of symptomatology, especially its epidemiology, the role of immune system and blood rheology made since 1987 when the ARA criteria1 was published.

  1. The rehabilitative approach in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Pappone

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The rehabilitative approach for the patient with rheumatoid arthritis should be early, global and complementary to an early pharmacological therapy, in the context of a multidisciplinary approach, that should include physicians with different specialties and other health professionals. Evaluation scales assessing disability and quality of life are necessary for the rehabilitative approach. These can be classified in 2 groups: specific tools and generic tools, each evaluating different components of the health status. After the evaluation and the definition of the aims of the rehabilitation, a rehabilitative project, potentially including physical therapies, therapeutic exercises, occupational therapy and orthosis should be defined.

  2. Septic arthritis caused by Mycobacterium marinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, Jaume; Conesa, Xavier; Pisa, Jose; Moreno, Josefa; Siles, Eduard; Novell, Josep

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of infection by Mycobacterium marinum is rising, mainly due to the increasing popularity of home aquariums. The infection typically manifests as skin lesions, with septic arthritis being a rare presentation form. The disease is difficult to diagnose even when there is a high clinical suspicion, as culture in specific media may not yield positive findings. Thus, establishment of appropriate treatment is often delayed. Synovectomy, capsular thinning, and joint drainage together with prolonged, combined antibiotic therapy may be needed to cure the infection.

  3. Role of ultrasound in managing rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Hilde Berner; Terslev, Lene

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a valid and reliable imaging tool for evaluation of joint and tendon inflammation as well as cartilage and erosions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Synovitis is usually scored semiquantitatively for both gray scale synovitis and power Doppler activity, and use...... are better tolerated and have increased efficacy, as compared with palpation guidance, and should thus be included in rheumatologic practice. Different methods such as three-dimensional US, contrast-enhanced US and fusion imaging methods are all possible US approaches that may be used in treatment of RA...

  4. Gold nephropathy in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husserl, F E; Shuler, S E

    1979-01-01

    A 2-year-old girl was treated with gold salts for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Treatment had to be discontinued when persistent proteinuria was detected. As this case report indicates, close monitoring of the urine is mandatory during treatment with gold salts to detect early signs of toxicity: hematuria followed by casts and then proteinuria as therapy is continued. Histologic examination with electron microscopy will help to differentiate the different forms of gold toxicity. When the findings are consistent with gold-induced renal involvement, therapy should be discontinued. The gold nephropathy usually resolves in time, with no permanent renal damage.

  5. Linkage Between Periodontal Disease and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The past decades have significantly widened the perspectives of the chronic oral infectious disease known as periodontitis. The disease is regarded as a bacterial infection resulting in low-grade inflammation of the periodontal tissues, and both the associated release of pro-inflammatory mediators...... and the presence of bacteria in the periodontal pockets, which, as the result of daily procedures, may spread after penetration of the vasculature, are possible mediators of systemic consequences. The present chapter deals with the possible association of periodontitis with rheumatoid arthritis, which may possess...

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis association at 6q23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Wendy; Barton, Anne; Ke, Xiayi; Eyre, Steve; Hinks, Anne; Bowes, John; Donn, Rachelle; Symmons, Deborah; Hider, Samantha; Bruce, Ian N; Wilson, Anthony G; Marinou, Ioanna; Morgan, Ann; Emery, Paul; Carter, Angela; Steer, Sophia; Hocking, Lynne; Reid, David M; Wordsworth, Paul; Harrison, Pille; Strachan, David; Worthington, Jane

    2009-01-01

    The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) identified nine single SNPs putatively associated with rheumatoid arthritis at P = 1 × 10 -5 - 5 × 10-7 in a genome-wide association screen. One, rs6920220, was unequivocally replicated (trend P = 1.1 × 10-8) in a validation study, as described here. This SNP maps to 6q23, between the genes oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 3 (OLIG3) and tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3). PMID:17982455

  7. Application physiotherapy in rehabilitation rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Nogas, Angela; Grygus, Igor; Prymachok, Liudmyla

    2016-01-01

    Nogas Angela, Grygus Igor, Prymachok Liudmyla. Application physiotherapy in rehabilitation rheumatoid arthritis. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2016;6(11):184-194. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.166045 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/3985       The journal has had 7 points in Ministry of Science and Higher Education parametric evaluation. Part B item 755 (23.12.2015). 755 Journal of Education, Health and Sport eISSN 239...

  8. Discordance between self-reported arthritis and musculoskeletal signs and symptoms in older women

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, TKT; Parkinson, Lynne; Cunich, Michelle; Byles, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Background Arthritis is a gendered disease where women have a higher prevalence and more disability than men with arthritis of the same age. Health survey data is a major source of information for monitoring of the burden of arthritis. The validity of self-reported arthritis and the determinants of its accuracy among women have not been thoroughly studied. The objectives of this study were to: 1) examine the agreement between self-report diagnosed arthritis and musculoskeletal signs and sympt...

  9. Different duration of Colchicine for preventing recurrence of Gouty arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Karimzadeh

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gout is a Common recurrent clinical syndrome characterized by increased serum uric acid and recurrent attacks of acute arthritis. Colchicine is used for Prophylaxis against recurrence of arthritis, but the duration of its administration has mentioned variable. In this study, optimal duration of prophylactic colchicine for prevention of gouty arthritis was assessed. Methods : In a clinical trial 190 patients with gouty arthritis divided randomly to group 1,2and 3 and received colchicine for 3 to 6, 7 to 9 and 10 to 12 months then colchicine discontinued and the patients followed one year for recurrence of arthritis. Result assessed by survival analysis with Kaplan –Meier method. Results: The probability of recurrence of arthritis (in order of duration of colchicine prophylaxis was 54%, 27.5% and 23%, respectively. The difference between group one and others was statistically significant, but between group 2 and 3 was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The most suitable duration of colchicine prophylaxis that accompanied with lower recurrence rate was 7-9 months, which seems more cost -effective than 10-12 months regimen. Key words: Gout, Colchicine, Arthritis, Recurrence

  10. Risk factors for asymptomatic ventricular dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-García, Carlos; Rocío, Sánchez-Santillán; Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Eduardo, Canseco; López-Campos, José Luis; Keirns-Davis, Candace

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to describe echocardiographic abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, concurrent systemic comorbidities, rheumatologic clinical activity, serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory activity. Methods. In an observational, cross-sectional study, rheumatoid arthritis outpatients were included (n = 105). Conventional transthoracic echocardiographic variables were compared between patients with arthritis and non-RA controls (n = 41). For rheumatoid arthritis patients, articular activity and rheumatologic and inflammatory markers were obtained. Results. Ventricular dysfunction was found in 54.3% of the population: systolic (18.1%), diastolic (32.4%), and/or right (24.8%), with lower ejection fraction (P Pulmonary hypertension was found in 46.9%. Other echocardiographic findings included increased left atrial diameter (P = 0.01), aortic diameter (P = 0.01), ventricular septum (P = 0.01), left ventricular posterior wall (P = 0.013), and right ventricular (P = 0.01) and atrial diameters compared to control subjects. Rheumatoid factor and anti-CCP antibodies levels were significantly elevated in cases with ventricular dysfunction. Angina and myocardial infarction, diabetes, and dyslipidemia were the main risk factors for ventricular dysfunction. Conclusions. Ventricular dysfunction is common in rheumatoid arthritis and associated with longer disease duration and increased serologic markers of rheumatoid arthritis. Screening for cardiac abnormalities should be considered in this kind of patients.

  11. Therapeutic effect of quercetin in collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleagrahara, Nagaraja; Miranda-Hernandez, Socorro; Alim, Md Abdul; Hayes, Linda; Bird, Guy; Ketheesan, Natkunam

    2017-03-22

    Quercetin, a bioactive flavonoid with anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and protective properties, is a potential agent for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is the most commonly used animal model for studying the pathogenesis of RA. This study analysed the therapeutic role of quercetin in collagen-induced arthritis in C57BL/6 mice. The animals were allocated into five groups that were subjected to the following treatments: negative (untreated) control, positive control (arthritis-induced), arthritis+methotrexate, arthritis+quercetin, and arthritis+methotrexate+quercetin. Assessments of weight, oedema, joint damage, and cytokine production were used to determine the therapeutic effect of quercetin. This study demonstrated for the first time the anti-inflammatory and protective effects of quercetin in vivo in CIA. The results also showed that the concurrent administration of quercetin and methotrexate did not offer greater protection than the administration of a single agent. The use of quercetin as a monotherapeutic agent resulted in the lowest degree of joint inflammation and the highest protection. The reduced severity of the disease in animals treated with quercetin was associated with decreased levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-17, and MCP-1. In conclusion, this study determined that quercetin, which was non-toxic, produced better results than methotrexate for the protection of joints from arthritic inflammation in mice. Quercetin may be an alternative treatment for RA because it modulates the main pathogenic pathways of RA.

  12. DRD1-DRD5 EXPRESSION PROFILES IN ARTHRITIS RHEUMATOID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. SADEGHI KOUPAEI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesThe cause of rheumatoid arthritis (RA as a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease is still unknown. It appears that both genetic and environmental factors play a role in its pathogenesis. Recent studies reveal that in addition to the CNS, immune cells synthesis neurotransmitters so that these catecholamines can regulate immune functions. The aim of this study is to evaluate the dopamine receptor gene expression profiles on peripheral blood mononuclear cells of rheumatoid arthritis patients in comparison with normal individuals.Material & MethodsIn the present study, we investigated dopamine receptor gene expression in PBMCs of 40 RA patients and 40 healthy individuals using Real Time-PCR.The specificities of the obtained Real time PCR products for the respective dopamine receptors fragments were confirmed by sequenced analysis capillary systemResultsWe found that DRD1-DRD5 types of dopamine receptors genes expression profiles of rheumatoid arthritis patients differ compared to healthy individuals. Moreover, a significant difference of DR2 and DR4 gene expression was seen in rheumatoid arthritis patients.ConclusionThis study showed that some types of dopamine receptors genes expression profiles alter in rheumatoid arthritis patients with comparison to healthy individuals Moreover, this alteration possibly could result in dysfunction of dopaminergic system in immune cells and finally lead to rheumatoid arthritis.Keywords: Rheumatoid arthritis, Dopamine receptor, Gene expression, Human peripheral blood lymphocytes, Real Time- Polymerase Chain Reaction

  13. The pathogenesis of bone erosions in gouty arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Naomi; Thiele, Ralf G

    2010-11-01

    The characteristic radiographic hallmarks of chronic gouty arthritis are the presence of macroscopic tophi and erosions with overhanging edges and relative preservation of the joint space. In recent years there has been more insight into the processes underlying the development of bone erosions in gouty arthritis. This review discusses the mechanical, pathological, cellular and immunological factors that may have a role in the pathogenesis of bone erosions in gouty arthritis. It highlights the evidence suggesting that monosodium urate crystal deposition is associated with the presence of underlying osteoarthritis and the important role of osteoclasts and the receptor for activation of nuclear factor κ B (RANK) and RANK ligand (RANK-RANKL) pathway in the pathogenesis of gouty erosions. Gouty arthritis is primarily driven by interleukin 1β (IL-1β). IL-1β has been implicated in bone destruction and erosions in other inflammatory arthridities. Thus, future IL-1 inhibitors may prevent and treat erosion formation due to tophaceous gouty arthritis. This review discusses imaging modalities and highlights ultrasongraphic evidence suggesting a significant relationship between the presence of the gouty tophus and bone erosions as well as the frequent presence of persistent low-grade inflammation in asymptomatic chronic tophaceous gouty arthritis on high-resolution ultrasonography. It is the tophus eroding the underlying bone that is pivotal for the development of bone erosions in gouty arthritis.

  14. Bone and Joint Infections in Children: Septic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Anil; Aggarwal, Aditya N

    2016-08-01

    The pathological invasion of a joint and subsequent inflammation is known as septic arthritis. The knee and hip are the most frequently involved joints. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of septic arthritis in children. An acute onset of illness with an inflamed painful joint and restricted movements and inability to use joint (pseudoparalysis) clinically indicates septic arthritis. The diagnosis is difficult in a neonate or young child where refusal to feed, crying, discomfort during change of diaper (if hip is involved) or attempted joint movement may be the only findings. Fever and other systemic signs may also be absent in neonates. Septic arthritis is diagnosed clinically, supported by appropriate radiological and laboratory investigations. The peripheral blood white cell count is frequently raised with a predominance of polymorphonuclear cells. The acute phase reactants such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) are often markedly raised. Ultrasonography and MRI are preferred investigations in pediatric septic arthritis. Determination of infecting organism in septic arthritis is the key to the correct antibiotic choice, treatment duration and overall management. Joint aspirate and/or blood culture should be obtained before starting antibiotic treatment. Several effective antibiotic regimes are available for managing septic arthritis in children. Presence of large collections, thick pus, joint loculations and pus evacuating into surrounding soft tissues are main indications for surgical drainage. Joint aspiration can be a practical alternative in case the lesion is diagnosed early, with uncomplicated presentations and superficial joints.

  15. Agmatine ameliorates adjuvant induced arthritis and inflammatory cachexia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taksande, Brijesh G; Gawande, Dinesh Y; Chopde, Chandrabhan T; Umekar, Milind J; Kotagale, Nandkishor R

    2017-02-01

    The present study investigated the pharmacological effect of agmatine in Complete Freud Adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis and cachexia in rats. The rats were injected with CFA (0.1ml/rat) to induced symptoms of arthritis. Day 8 onwards of CFA administration, rats were injected daily with agmatine for next 7days, and arthritis score, body weights and food intake were monitored daily (g). Since cachexia is known to produce severe inflammation, malnutrition and inhibition of albumin gene expression, we have also monitored the total proteins, albumin, TNF-α and IL-6 levels in arthritic rats and its modulation by agmatine. In the present study, CFA treated rats showed a progressive reduction in both food intake and body weight. In addition analysis of blood serum of arthritis animals showed a significant reduction in proteins and albumin and significant elevation in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and Interleukins (IL)-6. Chronic agmatine (20-40mg/kg, ip) treatment not only attenuated the signs of arthritis but also reverses anorexia and body weight loss in CFA treated rats. In addition, agmatine restored total protein and albumin and reduces TNF-α and IL-6 levels in arthritis rats. These results suggest that agmatine administration can prevent the body weights loss and symptoms of arthritis via inhibition of inflammatory cytokines.

  16. Hamster and Murine Models of Severe Destructive Lyme Arthritis

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    Erik Munson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ- deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology.

  17. [Optic neuritis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Daniela M R; Buscatti, Izabel M; Lourenço, Benito; Monti, Fernanda C; Paz, José Albino; Silva, Clovis A

    2014-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) was rarely reported in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients, particularly in those under anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha blockage. However, to our knowledge, the prevalence of ON in JIA population has not been studied. Therefore, 5,793 patients were followed up at our University Hospital and 630 (11%) had JIA. One patient (0.15%) had ON and was reported herein. A 6-year-old male was diagnosed with extended oligoarticular JIA, and received naproxen and methotrexate subsequently replaced by leflunomide. At 11 years old, he was diagnosed with aseptic meningitis, followed by a partial motor seizure with secondary generalization. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalogram showed diffuse disorganization of the brain electric activity and leflunomide was suspended. Seven days later, the patient presented acute ocular pain, loss of acuity for color, blurred vision, photophobia, redness and short progressive visual loss in the right eye. A fundoscopic exam detected unilateral papilledema without retinal exudates. Orbital MRI suggested right ON. The anti-aquaporin 4 (anti-AQP4) antibody was negative. Pulse therapy with methylprednisolone was administered for five days, and subsequently with prednisone, he had clinical and laboratory improvement. In conclusion, a low prevalence of ON was observed in our JIA population. The absence of anti-AQP4 antibody and the normal brain MRI do not exclude the possibility of demyelinating disease associated with chronic arthritis. Therefore, rigorous follow up is required.

  18. TREATMENT OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS BY A

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    B.Sai Mrudula,

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The immune system is a complex organization of cells and antibodies designed normally to seek and destroy invaders of the body particularly infections. Rheumatoid arthritis is an auto immune disease that mistakenly attacks our own immune system and damage tissues around joints, tendons, ligaments and muscles by means of T-cell differentiation. Dendritic cells are main important APC’s .These cells on maturation combines with MHC molecules and co-receptors like CD-80, CD-40 activates T-cells and B-cells. This main action is regulated by IL-12gene in dendritic cells. Tolerogenic vaccination signifies exotic tool that is launched in to humans or domestic animals with an intention to enroot immunity and to generate immunological tolerance that is condition marked by stolidity to a specific antigen. Here in this critique we have cited applicability of RNA modified DC in treatment of Rheumatoid arthritis. By using the method of RNA interference using siRNAIL12 treated DC we can treat RA by decreasing T-cell responses towards our own cells.

  19. Pulmonary involvement in early rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Hisham M; Eisa, Ashraf A; Arafat, Waleed R; Marie, Mohamed A

    2011-02-01

    Pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is common and can be due to the disease itself as well as to the therapies used to treat it. The purpose of this study was to disclose the pulmonary involvement in early RA patients not more than 2 years disease duration using the computed tomography (CT) as well as the pulmonary function tests as ways of pulmonary involvement assessment. Forty patients aged 37.6 ± 10.3 with early rheumatoid arthritis not more than 2 years of disease duration were recruited for the study. All patients were assessed clinically for their RA with DAS28, which was utilized for disease activity determination. Ten percent of our patients were found to be clinically involved by interstitial lung disease (ILD), where 27% have abnormal HRCT finding and 32.5% with abnormal PFT. Predilection for clinically manifest ILD was evident in active RA patients with high DAS28 score, seropositive RA patients, and in patients receiving steroids and anti-TNFα therapy. ILD occurs early in the course of RA, with more predilection for clinically active RA disease.

  20. [Rheumatoid arthritis: diagnostics and therapy 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, H-M

    2012-07-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) should be suspected if patients do not only complain of joint pain, but suffer from joint swelling, sensation of heat, hyperemia and warmth around the joints. An arthritic joint pain should be most prominent at night time or early in the morning and cause morning stiffness (> 30 min) of the joint, exercise will improve the symptoms. Diagnosis of RA will be even more likely if wrists, MCP- or PIP joints are affected. Serologic procedures will test for rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated antibodies (CCP Ab). One needs to keep in mind that positive results for rheumatoid factor or CCP Ab alone never proves the diagnosis of RA. After diagnosis therapy should be started immediately, recruiting physiotherapy, pain medication, corticosteroids and disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), primarily methotrexate. At the latest after failure of two DMARDs biologics like TNF-α-blockers, an Interleukin-6-Receptor-antibody, a B-cell-specific antibody or a rather T-cell-specific biologic will be initiated. Aim of therapy is freedom of symptoms of an ongoing arthritis, low dosage of immunosuppressants (especially corticosteroids maximally 5 mg/day), stop of radiological progression and prevention of long term consequences of inflammation like myocardial infarction, stroke or lymphoma.

  1. IKRAI: Intelligent Knee Rheumatoid Arthritis Identification

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    Abdulkader Helwan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid joint inflammation is characterized as a perpetual incendiary issue which influences the joints by hurting body tissues Therefore, there is an urgent need for an effective intelligent identification system of knee Rheumatoid arthritis especially in its early stages. This paper is to develop a new intelligent system for the identification of Rheumatoid arthritis of the knee utilizing image processing techniques and neural classifier. The system involves two principle stages. The first one is the image processing stage in which the images are processed using some techniques such as RGB to grayscale conversion, rescaling, median filtering, background extracting, images subtracting, segmentation using canny edge detection, and features extraction using pattern averaging. The extracted features are used then as inputs for the neural network which classifies the X-ray knee images as normal or abnormal (arthritic based on a backpropagation learning algorithm which involves training of the network on 400 X-ray normal and abnormal knee images. The system was tested on 400 x-ray images and the network shows good performance during that phase, resulting in a good identification rate 95.5 %.

  2. Managing juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Madeleine J; Dick, Andrew D; Lee, Richard J W; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Carreño, Ester; Guly, Catherine M; Ross, Adam H

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral chronic anterior uveitis is an extra-articular feature of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Although figures vary, uveitis occurs in approximately 11%-13% of patients with this disease and is most commonly associated with the female gender, oligoarthritis, and presence of antinuclear antibodies. The disease has an insidious onset and is often asymptomatic. Managing patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis-associated uveitis remains challenging as the disease may prove to be refractory to traditional treatment regimens. Stepwise immunomodulatory therapy is indicated, with new biologic drugs being used last in cases of refractory uveitis. Small scale studies and practice have provided the evidence to undertake randomized control trials to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapies, such as infliximab and adalimumab. These have demonstrated promising results, with further data awaited from ongoing trials for adalimumab (as SYCAMORE and ADJUVITE trials). Lower grade evidence is supporting the use of newer biologics such as rituximab, daclizumab, tocilizumab, and abatacept in those cases refractory to anti-tumor necrosis factor-α therapy.

  3. Sea urchin spine arthritis in the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schefflein, Javin; Umans, Hilary; Ellenbogen, David; Abadi, Maria

    2012-09-01

    We present a case of sea urchin spine arthritis (SUSA) in a 33-year-old woman who sustained penetrating trauma to the interphalangeal (IP) joint of the hallux while snorkeling in Japan. Serial radiographs and MRI were obtained over a period from 7 weeks to 10 months following injury. At 7 weeks radiographs revealed periarticular osteopenia and subtle marginal erosion, similar to the appearance of tuberculous arthritis. Over the ensuing months, radiographs and MRI documented progressive marginal and periarticular erosions with synovitis, despite preservation of cartilage space and restoration of bone mineral density. Delayed radiographs and imaging features mimic gouty arthropathy. Only the history points to the proper diagnosis, which was confirmed by histopathology, demonstrating necrobiotic granuloma with central fibrinoid necrosis following synovectomy and arthrodesis. The majority of previous case reports affected the hand, with few cases in the feet. In all, radiographic illustrations were limited and demonstrated only minimal osteolysis and periosteal reaction. No other report included MRI or serial radiographs over a long period to illustrate the natural progression of the disease.

  4. The human microbiome and juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwoerd, Anouk; Ter Haar, Nienke M; de Roock, Sytze; Vastert, Sebastiaan J; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-09-20

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood. The pathogenesis of JIA is thought to be the result of a combination of host genetic and environmental triggers. However, the precise factors that determine one's susceptibility to JIA remain to be unravelled. The microbiome has received increasing attention as a potential contributing factor to the development of a wide array of immune-mediated diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. Also in JIA, there is accumulating evidence that the composition of the microbiome is different from healthy individuals. A growing body of evidence indeed suggests that, among others, the microbiome may influence the development of the immune system, the integrity of the intestinal mucosal barrier, and the differentiation of T cell subsets. In turn, this might lead to dysregulation of the immune system, thereby possibly playing a role in the development of JIA. The potential to manipulate the microbiome, for example by faecal microbial transplantation, might then offer perspectives for future therapeutic interventions. Before we can think of such interventions, we need to first obtain a deeper understanding of the cause and effect relationship between JIA and the microbiome. In this review, we discuss the existing evidence for the involvement of the microbiome in JIA pathogenesis and explore the potential mechanisms through which the microbiome may influence the development of autoimmunity in general and JIA specifically.

  5. Interstitial lung involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vladimirovich Bestaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease of unknown etiology, characterized by chronic erosive arthritis and extraarticular manifestations. Pulmonary involvement is one of the common extraarticular manifestations of RA and may show itself as bronchial tree lesions, rheumatoid nodules, Caplan's syndrome, and lesions in the pleura or pulmonary interstitium (interstitial lung involvement (ILI. High-resolution computed tomography allows the diagnosis of ILI in RA in nearly 70% of cases although the incidence of ILI may be lower (4 to 30% depending on diagnostic methods and patient selection criteria. There are several histopathological types of ILI, the differential diagnosis of which can be troublesome. Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia are major types of RA-associated ILI. UIP-pattern ILI has a more severe course than ILI with other histological patterns. The clinical presentation of ILI may be complicated by the likely toxic effect of a number of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs used to treat RA, such as methotrexate and leflunomide, and biological agents (BAs, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors. The pathogenesis of pulmonary involvement in RA and the role of synthetic DMARDs and BAs in the development of ILI call for further investigations.An extraarticular manifestation, such as ILI, affects the choice of treatment policy in patients with RA.The relevance of a study of ILI is beyond question. The paper discusses the state-of-the-art of investigations in this area.

  6. Psoriatic arthritis treatment: biological response modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mease, P J; Antoni, C E

    2005-03-01

    In recent years there has been a surge of interest in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders as a result of the development and application of targeted biological therapies. The elucidation of the overlapping cellular and cytokine immunopathology of such diverse conditions as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn's disease, and psoriasis points to specific targets for bioengineered proteins or small molecules. Similar to clinical trials in RA, trials in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) have shown excellent clinical results with the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockers, etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab in a variety of domains including the joints, quality of life, function, and slowing of disease progress as evidenced radiologically. In addition, these agents have shown benefit in domains more unique to PsA, such as the skin lesions of psoriasis, enthesitis, and dactylitis, pointing out the similar pathogenesis of the disease in the skin, the tendons, and the synovial membrane. This therapy has been generally safe and well tolerated in clinical trials of PsA. Other logical candidates for targeted therapy in development include other anti-TNF agents, costimulatory blockade agents that affect T cell function, blockers of other cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1, 6, 12, 15, or 18, and B cell modulatory medicines. Also, it will be useful to learn more about the effects of combining traditional disease modifying drugs and the newer biologicals.

  7. Macrophages - silent enemies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świdrowska-Jaros, Joanna; Orczyk, Krzysztof; Smolewska, Elżbieta

    2016-07-06

    The inflammatory response by secretion of cytokines and other mediators is postulated as one of the most significant factors in the pathophysiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The effect of macrophage action depends on the type of their activation. Classically activated macrophages (M1) are responsible for release of molecules crucial for joint inflammation. Alternatively activated macrophages (M2) may recognize self antigens by scavenger receptors and induce the immunological reaction leading to autoimmune diseases such as JIA. Molecules essential for JIA pathophysiology include: TNF-α, the production of which precedes synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis; IL-1 as a key mediator of synovial damage; chemotactic factors for macrophages IL-8 and MCP-1; IL6, the level of which correlates with the radiological joint damage; MIF, promoting the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6; CCL20 and HIF, significant for the hypoxic synovial environment in JIA; GM-CSF, stimulating the production of macrophages; and IL-18, crucial for NK cell functions. Recognition of the role of macrophages creates the potential for a new therapeutic approach.

  8. Total ankle replacement for posttraumatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weme, Rebecca A Nieuwe; van Solinge, Guido; N Doornberg, Job; Sierevelt, Inger; Haverkamp, Daniël; Doets, H Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Most studies on total ankle replacement (TAR) have used a case mix of patients. We evaluated the outcome of TAR performed for end-stage arthritis either because of fracture or ligamentous injury. Patients and methods We prospectively followed 88 consecutive patients (50 postfracture ankles and 40 ankles with instability arthritis (2 bilateral)) who underwent TAR between 2001 and 2009. Mean follow-up for both groups was 5 years. Results Preoperative varus deformity of 10° or more was present in 23 ankles in the instability group. At 6 years, survival with revision or salvage fusion as an endpoint was 87% (95% CI: 74–99) in the postfracture group and 79% (95% CI: 63–94) in the instability group. Progressive periprosthetic osteolysis was seen in 23 ankles, and required salvage fusion in 6. The number of reoperations was similar in both groups. Clinical outcome, as assessed with 2 ankle scores and 2 questionnaires, showed good results and was similar at the latest follow-up. Interpretation The outcome was similar in the postfracture and instability groups and also similar to that reported in series including a case mix of patients. In contrast to earlier reports, preoperative frontal plane deformity in this series was not identified as a risk factor for failure. PMID:25772269

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Periodontal Disease. An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Archana; Almas, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    A review of the epidemiological, pathological and immunological relationships between two chronic inflammatory diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease (PD). RA is a chronic inflammatory disease of the joints, characterized by loss of connective tissue and mineralized structures, the so-called "synovial membrane." Periodontitis is the inflammatory destruction of the periodontal attachment and alveolar bone. While the etiology of these two diseases may differ, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are similar. And it is possible that individuals manifesting both PD and RA may suffer from a unifying underlying systemic deregulation of the inflammatory response. There is an overproduction of a variety of cytokines and MMPs that appears to be common in both diseases. Oral health parameters should be more closely monitored in patients with RA, an autoimmune disease. Data suggest that periodontal therapies combined with routine RA treatments further improve RA status. Interventions to prevent, minimize or treat periodontitis in arthritis patients will definitely promise a better quality of life for these patients.

  10. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and oral health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobus, Agnieszka; Kierklo, Anna; Sielicka, Danuta; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2016-05-04

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory disease of connective tissue in children. It is characterized by progressive joint destruction which causes preserved changes in the musculoskeletal system. The literature describes fully clinical symptoms and radiological images in different subtypes of JIA. However, there is still a limited number of studies reporting on the medical condition of the oral cavity of ill children. JIA can affect hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity by: the general condition of the child's health, arthritis of the upper limbs, as the result of the pharmacotherapy, changes in secretion and composition of saliva, inflammation of the temporomandibular joint and facial deformity. The study summarizes the available literature on the condition of the teeth and periodontal and oral hygiene in the course of JIA. The presence of diverse factors that modify the oral cavity, such as facial growth, functioning of salivary glands, or the supervision and care provided by adults, prevents clear identification if JIA leads to severe dental caries and periodontal disease. Despite conflicting results in studies concerning the clinical oral status, individuals with JIA require special attention regarding disease prevention and maintenance of oral health.

  11. Pathogenesis and early detection of inflammatory arthritis: the role of musculoskeletal symptoms, infections and arthritis-related comorbidities in primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielen, M.; Beers-Tas, M. van; Korevaar, J.; Schaardenburg, D. van

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aim: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease characterized by clinically apparent inflammatory arthritis (IA). A preclinical phase has been recognized in which symptoms arise and ambulatory care utilization increases. However, information on location and timing of

  12. RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL IN CHIKUNGUNYA ARTHRITIS CASES

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    Mansoor

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Chikungunya virus is no stranger to the Indian sub- continent. Since its first isolation in Calcutta [1] in 1963, there have been several reports of chikung unya virus infection in different parts of India [2], [3], [4]. The last outbreak of chikungunya virus infection o ccurred in India in 1971. Subsequently there has been no activ e or passive surveillance carried out in the country and therefore, it ‘seemed’ that the virus h ad ‘disappeared’ from the subcontinent [5] However, recent reports of large scale outbreaks of fever caused by chikungunya virus infection in several parts of Southern India have confirmed th e re-emergence of this virus. It has been estimated that over 1,80,000 cases have occurred in India since December 2005 [6] Andhra Pradesh (AP was the first state to report this dise ase in December 2005, and one of the worst affected (over 80,000 suspected cases . Over 12% of patients who contract chikungunya virus infection develop chronic joint symptoms [7] . OBJECTIVE: To test the efficacy of chloroquine in reducing the pain of chikungunya induced arthritis a s compared to paracetamol. METHODOLOGY: A Randomized Clinical Trial was carried out in a c ommunity attached to urban health centre of PESIMSR, Kuppam during August 2006. Among the 132 cases of arthritis, 86 persons were selected based on their availability and consent to participate. They were divided into two randomly assigned groups namely Cat egory–1(Chloroquine group and Category–2 ( Paracetamol group. Chloroquine tablet -155 mg and Paracetamol tablet - 500 mg were administered as a single dose to the two groups respectively. The groups were followed up for 8 days and the results were analyzed. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Analysis was carried out by using S.P.S.S. package. Asymptoic test statistic an d X 2 MH (Chi square test were used to evaluate the effect of the drugs. RESULTS OF THE STUDY: The decrease of pain in chikungunya arthritis cases was

  13. Brevundimonas vesicularis septic arthritis in an immunocompetent child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, Yael; Zmira, Samra; Amir, Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Septic arthritis is a rapidly destructive form of joint disease. The most common causative agents in children are Staphylococcus aureus and Kingella kingae, followed by group A Streptococcus and Streptococcus pneumoniae, and in neonates, enterobacteracea and group B Streptococcus. In this paper, we describe a previously healthy toddler with septic arthritis of the shoulder joint caused by Brevundimonas vesicularis. Prompt treatment with cefuroxime resulted in a full recovery. This is the first report of septic arthritis in humans caused by this microorganism, and the first description of B. vesicularis infection in an immunocompetent child.

  14. Lyme disease in the differential diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Karadağ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinically, there are some differences between rheumatoid arthritis (RA and Lyme disease. Although Lyme arthritis exhibits marked differences from RA, it can cause erosion at joint due to chronic proliferative synovitis as similar to RA. In the literature, a case was reported where both entities were seen together. In this manuscript, we aimed to present a case with symmetric arthritis at small hand joints and arthralgia at wrist that mimicked RA but diagnosed as Lyme disease by history, clinical presentation and laboratory findings, and successfully treated.

  15. [Ankle joint arthritis--etiology, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uri, Ofir; Haim, Amir

    2008-11-01

    Ankle joint arthritis causes functional limitation and affects the quality of life many patients. It follows traumatic injuries, inflammatory joint arthritis, primary osteoarthritis, hemochromatosis and infections. Understanding the unique anatomy and biomechanics of the ankle is important for diagnosis and treatment of ankle joint pathology. The treatment of ankle joint arthritis has advanced considerably in recent years and it is still a surgical challenge. Total ankle replacement seems to be a promising form of treatment, even though current data does not demonstrate advantages over ankle joint arthrodesis.

  16. A sonographic spectrum of psoriatic arthritis: "the five targets".

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gutierrez, Marwin

    2010-02-01

    Ultrasound is a rapidly evolving technique that is gaining an increasing success in the assessment of psoriatic arthritis. Most of the studies have been aimed at investigating its ability in the assessment of joints, tendons, and entheses in psoriatic arthritis patients. Less attention has been paid to demonstrate the potential of ultrasound in the evaluation of skin and nail. The aim of this pictorial essay was to show the main high-frequency grayscale and power Doppler ultrasound findings in patients with psoriatic arthritis at joint, tendon, enthesis, skin, and nail level.

  17. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sung-Won; Cho, Jin-Yong; Kim, Hyeon-Min

    2016-08-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature.

  18. [Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: report of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintor, Fernanda; Carrasco, Rolando; Verdugo-Avello, Francisco; Landaeta, Mirtha

    2015-06-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is an uncommon condition, caused by hematic bacterial migration or direct migration of other head and neck infections. We report a 41 year old female who presented a right temporomandibular joint involvement, with bone destruction of the mandibular condyle and an infectious process spreading to the temporal space, following a necrotizing medial and external otitis with associated mastoiditis. A septic arthritis of the TMJ by continuity was diagnosed and treated with antimicrobials, TMJ arthrocentesis and occlusal stabilization, with a positive evolution. However, the patient remains in control due a secondary TMJ osteoarthritis caused by the septic arthritis.

  19. Trace element analysis in rheumatoid arthritis under chrysotheraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, R.; Paradis, P.; Monaro, S.; Barrette, M.; Lamoureux, G.; Menard, H.-A.

    1981-03-01

    Proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis is used to measure trace element concentrations in blood serum from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Initially trace element contaminations in blood-collecting and storing devices are determined. Then mean values and nyctemeral cycles are measured both in normal subjects and patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other similar pathologies. Abnormal concentrations of Cu and Zn and anomalies in the nyctemeral cycle are found in the patients. In the second phase of the project, the special case of chrysotherapeutically treated (gold salt treatment) rheumatoid arthritis patients is studied for extended periods of time (up to 53 weeks).

  20. Impaired NK cell functionality and increased TNF-α production as biomarkers of chronic chikungunya arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanapati, Subrat; Ganu, Mohini; Giri, Prashant; Kulkarni, Shruti; Sharma, Meenal; Babar, Prasad; Ganu, Ashok; Tripathy, Anuradha S

    2017-04-01

    The chronic chikungunya arthritis symptoms closely mimic the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) symptoms, thus making it difficult to distinguish between these two clinical entities. The current comparative study characterizes NK (CD3(-)CD56(+)) and NK-like T (CD3(+)CD56(+)) cell responses in patients with chronic chikungunya arthritis and RA. Phenotype and functions of NK and NK-like T cells repertoire were assessed in 56 chronic chikungunya arthritis, 26 RA patients and 82 controls using flow cytometry. TNF-α and IFN-γ-secreting NK-like T cells were high in both chronic arthritis patients than in controls. Percentage of TNF-α(+) NK cells was higher in RA patients than in controls. Percentage of perforin(+) NK cells was low in both chronic arthritis patient groups. Among the patient groups, expressions of perforin(+) and IFN-γ(+) NK-like T cells were higher in RA. Overall, our data show reduced frequency of NK-like T cells, lower expression of perforin(+) NK, higher expression of TNF-α(+) NK-like T and IFN-γ(+) NK-like T cells as the markers of chronic arthritic diseases. In the absence of any specific treatment for chronic chikungunya induced arthritis and promising results of anti-TNF-α therapy against RA, current data may form the basis for future in vivo studies and has scope as possible therapeutics against chikungunya.

  1. Human Lyme arthritis and the immunoglobulin G antibody response to the 37-kilodalton arthritis-related protein of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Carlos A; Rothemich, Monika; Drouin, Elise E; Glickstein, Lisa; Steere, Allen C

    2005-05-01

    In Borrelia burgdorferi-infected C3H-scid mice, antiserum to a differentially expressed, 37-kDa spirochetal outer-surface protein, termed arthritis-related protein (Arp), has been shown to prevent or reduce the severity of arthritis. In this study, we determined the immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody responses to this spirochetal protein in single serum samples from 124 antibiotic-treated human patients with early or late manifestations of Lyme disease and in serial serum samples from 20 historic, untreated patients who were followed longitudinally from early infection through the period of arthritis. These 20 patients were representative of the spectrum of the severity and duration of Lyme arthritis. Among the 124 antibiotic-treated patients, 53% with culture-proven erythema migrans (EM) had IgG responses to recombinant glutathione S-transferase (GST)-Arp, as did 59% of the patients with facial palsy and 68% of those with Lyme arthritis. In addition, 75 to 80% of the 20 past, untreated patients had reactivity with this protein when EM was present, during initial episodes of joint pain, or during the maximal period of arthritis. There was no association at any of these three time points between GST-Arp antibody levels and the severity of the maximal attack of arthritis or the total duration of arthritis. Thus, after the first several weeks of infection, 60 to 80% of patients had IgG antibody responses to GST-Arp, but this response did not correlate with the severity or duration of Lyme arthritis.

  2. Changes in Soluble CD18 in Murine Autoimmune Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Reflect Disease Establishment and Treatment Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Jalilian, Babak; Keller, Kresten Krarup;

    2016-01-01

    in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: The level of sCD18 was analyzed with a time-resolved immunoflourometric assay in 1) plasma from early treatment naïve RA patients during a treat-to-target strategy (the OPERA cohort), 2) plasma from chronic RA patients, 3) serum from SKG and CIA mice...... associated with radiographic progression. Correspondingly, the serum level of sCD18 was decreased in SKG mice 6 weeks after arthritis induction compared with healthy littermates. The sCD18 levels in both SKG and CIA mice exhibited a biphasic course after arthritis induction with an initial increase above...

  3. "Immune Complexes in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Lynn Moore

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract for invited review in Molecular Mechanisms of Immune Complex Pathophysiology thematic issue to be published in Frontiers in Immunology. Immune Complexes(ICin Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA Terry L. Moore, MD, FAAP, FACR, MACR Professor of Internal Medicine,Pediatrics, and Molecular Biology and Immunology Director of Adult and Pediatric Rheumatology Saint Louis University School of Medicine Saint Louis, Missouri 631`04,USA Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA reflects a group of clinically heterogeneous, autoimmune disorders in children characterized by chronic arthritis and hallmarked by elevated levels of circulating immune complexes (CICs and associated complement activation by-products in their sera. ICs have been detected in patients’ sera with JIA utilizing a variety of methods, including the anti-human IgM affinity column,C1q solid phase assay, polyethylene glycol precipitation, Staphylococcal Protein A separation method, anti-C1q/C3 affinity columns, and FcγRIII affinity method. As many as 75% of JIA patients have had IC detected in their sera. The CIC proteome in JIA patients has been examined to elucidate disease-associated proteins that are expressed in active disease. Evaluation of these IC s have shown the presence of multiple peptide fragments by SDS-PAGE and 2-DE. Subsequently, all isotypes of rheumatoid factor (RF, isotypes of anti-cyclic citrullinated (CCP peptide antibodies, IgG, C1q, C4, C3, and the membrane attack complex (MAC were detected in these IC. Complement activation and levels of IC correlate with disease activity in JIA, indicating their role in the pathophysiology of the disease. This review will summarize the existing literature and discuss the role of possible protein modification that participates in the generation of immune response. We will address the possible role of these events in the development of ectopic germinal centers that become the secondary site of plasma cell development in JIA. We

  4. Chronotherapy for rheumatoid arthritis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    To H

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hideto To Department of Medical Pharmaceutics, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama, Japan Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an autoimmune disorder of unknown etiology. Morning stiffness, a characteristic feature of RA, shows a 24-hour rhythm. Cytokines, which are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of RA, also exhibit a 24-hour rhythm, with a peak in the early morning. These rhythms have been attributed to the endogenous hormone balance and changes in expression levels of clock-related genes. Chronotherapy based on the 24-hour rhythm of RA has been performed using glucocorticoids and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. In a previous study, it was reported that modified-release prednisone tablets were administered to patients with RA at night, which demonstrated that the severity of morning stiffness was markedly less than that in patients receiving the standard treatment. Methotrexate (MTX is the most frequently used RA drug worldwide. In a basic study, cytokines and inflammatory responses in RA model animals showed 24-hour rhythms, based on which MTX was administered and exerted dosing time-dependent antirheumatic effects. Plasma C-reactive protein and cytokine levels also exhibit 24-hour rhythms in patients with RA, with peaks occurring in the early morning. MTX has been shown to markedly inhibit the exacerbation of arthritis in patients with RA when it is administered as inflammatory responses and tumor necrosis factor-α levels begin to increase. Tacrolimus (TAC is an immunosuppressive agent that is administered to patients who undergo organ transplants. Since one of the mechanisms of action of TAC is the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production, it is used as an RA therapeutic drug. When TAC was previously administered in the early light or early dark phase to RA model animals, the group treated in the early light phase had notably inhibited

  5. Efficacy of Fish Oil in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Heidari

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Ingestion of fish oil fatty acids (omega - 3 fatty acids inhibits the formation of arachidonic acid - derived cytokines and leads to production of compounds with diminished biological activity. Beneficial effects of dietary supplementation with fish oil in rheumatoid arthritis have been shown in many controlled trials."nMethods : 43 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis entered in a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to recieve either lOgr fish oil daily (treatment group or corn oil (placebo group. Baseline drugs and usual diet were continued without any changes. Disease variables were evaluated at baseline and after completion of study period."nThe changes in disease variables were compared by paired t-tesl in each group. Comparison of the two groups was done by t-test. Functional capacity was compared by Wilcoxon ranks test."nResults : 19 patients in treatment group and 20 patients in placebo group completed the study which lasted eight weeks . In the treatment group, joint pain index decreased from 30±11 at baseline, to 18±11 at the end of study period (P < 0.01. Joint swelling index decreased from 8 ± 4 to 2 ± 4, (P< 0.01, morning stiffness from 87 ± 41 to 24±16 minutes (P < 0.01. In the placebo group the above variable changes were from 19±14 to 25±14 ; 8±8 to 7±6 and 80±71 to 76±75 minutes respectively, which were not significant . The differences between the treatment and placebo groups were significant in joint swelling index (P < 0.05, morning stiffness (P<0.01 and functioal capacity (p< 0.005, the differences in joint pain index and grip strenght did not quite achieve statstical significance. During study period there were no adverese effects with fish oil consumption."nConclusion : Fish oil supplemention has anti-inflamatory effects in rheumatoid arthritis. Further studies are needed to recommend its long - term usage concomittant with other drugs in all patients

  6. Treatment in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasapçopur, Özgür; Barut, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of the childhood with the highest risk of disability. Active disease persists in the adulthood in a significant portion of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis despite many developments in the diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, initiation of efficient treatment in the early period of the disease may provide faster control of the inflammation and prevention of long-term harms. In recent years, treatment options have also increased in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis owing to biological medications. All biological medications used in children have been produced to target the etiopathogenesis leading to disease including anti-tumor necrosis factor, anti-interleukin 1 and anti-interleukin 6 drugs. In this review, scientific data about biological medications used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options will be discussed. PMID:26078691

  7. Septic manubriosternal arthritis in a patient with Reiter's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Linthoudt, D; De Torrente, A; Humair, L; Ott, H

    1987-06-01

    A man with a quiescent Reiter's disease presented with abrupt upper chest pain. This symptom resulted from a septic arthritis of the manubriosternal joint due to staphylococcus aureus cultured from the synovial fluid.

  8. Can Depression Up Odds for Arthritis Linked to Psoriasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163780.html Can Depression Up Odds for Arthritis Linked to Psoriasis? Mood ... 24, 2017 FRIDAY, Feb. 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression in people with the chronic inflammatory skin disease ...

  9. Pregnancy in Chronic Arthritis: Only a Matter of Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    aloma Vela

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic arthritis often affects women of childbearing age. The old concept that having chronic arthritis constitutes a major obstacle to women when planning a pregnancy is now obsolete. Thanks to our current capacity to control the activity of rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic inflammatory conditions, and due to the availability of highly effective drugs such as tumour necrosis factor inhibitor agents and other biological agents, many women with these diseases are now able to consider the challenge of childbearing and raising children. Careful pre-conceptional evaluation and risk assessment constitutes the first step of proper care, which can be individualised according to the disease. More than ever, rheumatologists must know how to deal with this situation, and must be able to provide adequate counselling regarding the control of arthritis during conception and pregnancy.

  10. Bite force and temporomandibular disorder in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenneberg, B; Kjellberg, H; Kiliaridis, S

    1995-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functional condition of the stomatognathic system in children suffering from juvenile chronic arthritis, with respect to bite force and temporomandibular disorder in relation to radiographic abnormalities of the mandibular condyle, occlusal factors and systemic disease parameters. Thirty-five children with juvenile chronic arthritis were compared to 89 healthy children with an Angle Class I occlusion and 62 children with an Angle Class II malocclusion. Subjective symptoms and clinical signs of temporomandibular disorder and radiographic mandibular condylar changes were more common in children with juvenile chronic arthritis than in the two comparison groups. Maximal molar and incisal bite forces and maximal molar bite force endurance times were also significantly reduced in children with juvenile chronic arthritis. It is concluded that the differences between the groups are caused mainly by the systemic inflammatory disease itself, but a functional influence of weakened masticatory muscles cannot be excluded.

  11. Effect of Combination Therapy on Joint Destruction in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, N.; Hubeck-Graudal, T.; Tarp, S.

    2014-01-01

    on progression of radiographic joint erosions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods and Findings: The following combination drug therapies compared versus single DMARD were investigated: Double DMARD: 2 DMARDs (methotrexate, sulfasalazine, leflunomide, injectable gold, cyclosporine, chloroquine...

  12. Treatment in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasapçopur, Özgür; Barut, Kenan

    2015-03-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic rheumatic disease of the childhood with the highest risk of disability. Active disease persists in the adulthood in a significant portion of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis despite many developments in the diagnosis and treatment. Therefore, initiation of efficient treatment in the early period of the disease may provide faster control of the inflammation and prevention of long-term harms. In recent years, treatment options have also increased in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis owing to biological medications. All biological medications used in children have been produced to target the etiopathogenesis leading to disease including anti-tumor necrosis factor, anti-interleukin 1 and anti-interleukin 6 drugs. In this review, scientific data about biological medications used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and new treatment options will be discussed.

  13. Biological Therapies for Rheumatoid Arthritis : Progress to Date

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malviya, Gaurav; Salemi, Simonetta; Lagana, Bruno; Diamanti, Andrea Picchianti; D'Amelio, Raffaele; Signore, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Biologic drugs for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have revolutionized the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies, which include murine, chimeric, humanized, fully human antibodies and fusion proteins. These biologics bind to their targets w

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis; a possible link via citrullination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Smit, M J; Tonckens-Brouwer, Elisabeth; Vissink, A; van Winkelhoff, A J

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and chronic and aggressive periodontitis are chronic inflammatory disorders characterized by deregulation of the host inflammatory response. Increased secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators results in soft and hard tissue destruction of the synovium and periodontium respec

  15. Periodontitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis : What Do We Know?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Smit, Menke J.; Westra, Johanna; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Janssen, Koen M. J.; Vissink, Arjan; van Winkelhoff, Arie Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Currently, in the field of rheumatology, there is much attention given towards the possible causality between periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), specifically regarding the role of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg). This bacterium is unique, having a citrullinating enzyme. Antibodie

  16. What People with Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People With Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available in: PDF (88 KB) Related Resources ... Management Strategies Resources For Your Information What Is Osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which the bones ...

  17. Impairment and disability: Renoir's adaptive coping strategies against rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Evan; Chung, Kevin C

    2012-12-01

    Pierre-Auguste Renoir was one of the most influential painters in art history, but few people know that he suffered from debilitating rheumatoid arthritis. Despite his arthritis, he was able to maintain an incredible level of precision and efficiency with his painting. More importantly, he remained positive and did not let his condition affect his passion for painting or take away from the beauty that he saw in the world around him. Renoir applied a wide variety of coping mechanisms and used his ingenuity to come up with different ways to continue painting even as his arthritis weakened him. Renoir's long battle with rheumatoid arthritis serves as an inspiration to patients who experience the pain and limited mobility associated with this disease, encouraging them to persevere and to develop coping mechanisms that prevent the effects of their impairment from disabling them.

  18. Poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Krasniqi, Xhevdet; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Gashi, Masar; Berisha, Blerim; Abazi, Flora; Koçinaj, Dardan

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of a 49-year-old patient who developed poststaphylococcal coagulase negative reactive arthritis. The woman presented with constitutional symptoms, arthritis, urinary infection and conjunctivitis. The blood culture was positive for the staphylococcal coagulase negative infection. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were elevated, whereas the rheumatoid factor was negative. Radiographic findings confirmed diagnosis of pleuropneumonia, and one year later of chr...

  19. A role for anti-HSP60 antibodies in arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Bennike, Tue; Christiansen, Gunna;

    2013-01-01

    As a result of the high sequence similarity between HSP60 proteins, found in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, it has been suggested, but never concluded, that anti-HSP60 antibodies could be of importance in the pathology of arthritis diseases explained by a concept named molecular mimicry......60. In this review, these new findings are compared with old questioning the durability of molecular mimicry as a hypothesis for arthritis pathogenesis....

  20. Effects by periodontitis on pristane-induced arthritis in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Kaja; Lönnblom, Erik; Tour, Gregory; Kats, Anna; Mydel, Piotr; Georgsson, Pierre; Hultgren, Catharina; Kharlamova, Nastya; Norin, Ulrika; Jönsson, Jörgen; Lundmark, Anna; Hellvard, Annelie; Lundberg, Karin; Jansson, Leif; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2016-01-01

    Background An infection-immune association of periodontal disease with rheumatoid arthritis has been suggested. This study aimed to investigate the effect of pre-existing periodontitis on the development and the immune/inflammatory response of pristane-induced arthritis. Methods We investigated the effect of periodontitis induced by ligature placement and Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) infection, in combination with Fusobacterium nucleatum to promote its colonization, on the develop...

  1. Total ankle arthroplasty in end-stage ankle arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Demetracopoulos, Constantine A.; Halloran, James P.; Maloof, Paul; Samuel B Adams; Parekh, Selene G.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in ankle prosthesis design, combined with improved surgical techniques for correction of coronal plane deformity and ligamentous balancing, have led to a resurgence of interest in total ankle arthroplasty for the treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis. Although ankle arthrodesis has long been considered the gold standard treatment for ankle arthritis, recent studies have shown that patients who undergo total ankle replacement have equivalent pain relief and improved functi...

  2. Diagnosis of septic arthritis and initial antibiotic treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Bombaci, Hasan; Canbora, Kerem; Onur, Gokhan; Gorgec, Mucahit; Dosoglu, Nilgun

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: This study was designed to determine the similarities and differences in clinical, laboratory and radiographic presentation of septic arthritis in childhood and at adult ages, to find out its etiological profile, and to establish an antibiotic treatment protocol for the initial period and for patients in whom the causative agent could not be identified. Methods: Thirty-four patients (age range 15 months to 85 years) who underwent surgery with a diagnosis of septic arthritis wer...

  3. Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma with Polyarthritis Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yachoui, Ralph; Farooq, Nouman; Amos, Jonathan V; Shaw, Gene R

    2016-12-01

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL) is a rare subtype of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). AITL typically presents with lymphadenopathy, fever, rash, hepatosplenomegaly, and rarely polyarthritis. We report the case of a 50-year-old female who presented with lymphadenopathy, rash, and symmetric polyarthritis. She was later diagnosed with AITL and was treated with chemotherapy with resolution of arthritis. AITL should be suspected in paitents presenting with rheumatoid-like arthritis and diffuse lymphadenopathy.

  4. Immunological evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with itolizumab

    OpenAIRE

    Aira, Lazaro E.; Hernández, Patricia; Prada, Dinorah; Chico, Araceli; Gómez, Jorge A.; González, Zuyén; Fuentes, Karla; Viada, Carmen; Mazorra, Zaima

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease characterized by joint inflammation that affects approximately 1% of the general population. Itolizumab, a monoclonal antibody specific for the human CD6 molecule mainly expressed on T lymphocytes, has been shown to inhibit proliferation of T cells and proinflammatory cytokine production in psoriasis patients. We have now assessed the immunological effect of itolizumab in combination with methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis by analyzing clinical ...

  5. Physical activity maintenance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeppenthin, K; Esbensen, Bente Appel; Østergaard, Mikkel

    2014-01-01

    were analysed using systematic text condensation, inspired by Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological methodology. RESULTS: The analysis revealed three categories: (1) knowing and enjoying the body; (2) responsibility and challenges; (3) autonomy and social belonging. On the basis of these categories...... with non-arthritis populations. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that physical activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis may be understood as a resource to resist disability and to feel and stay healthy while creating and sustaining meaningfulness in life....

  6. Controlling Arthritis (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-11-14

    Arthritis affects more than one in five adults and is the most common cause of disability in the United States. It occurs often in people with chronic conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes, as well as those who are obese. In this podcast, Dr. Kamil Barbour discusses ways to control arthritis.  Created: 11/14/2013 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/14/2013.

  7. Controlling Arthritis (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-11-14

    Arthritis affects more than one in five adults and is the most common cause of disability in the U.S. It occurs often in people with chronic conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes, as well as those who are obese. This podcast discusses arthritis symptoms and how to control the condition.  Created: 11/14/2013 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/14/2013.

  8. Experimental arthritis induced by a clinical Mycoplasma fermentans isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giono Silvia

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycoplasma fermentans has been associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, it was detected in the joints and blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but it is not clear yet how the bacteria enter the body and reach the joints. The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of M. fermentans to induce experimental arthritis in rabbits following inoculation of the bacteria in the trachea and knee joints. Methods P-140 and PG-18 strains were each injected in the knee joints of 14 rabbits in order to evaluate and compare their arthritogenicity. P-140 was also injected in the trachea of 14 rabbits in order to test the ability of the bacteria to reach the joints and induce arthritis. Results M. fermentans produced an acute arthritis in rabbits. Joint swelling appeared first in rabbits injected with P-140, which caused a more severe arthritis than PG-18. Both strains were able to migrate to the uninoculated knee joints and they were detected viable in the joints all along the duration of the experiment. Changes in the synovial tissue were more severe by the end of the experiment and characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils and substitution of adipose tissue by connective tissue. Rabbits intracheally injected with P-140 showed induced arthritis and the bacteria could be isolated from lungs, blood, heart, kidney, spleen, brain and joints. Conclusion M. fermentans induced arthritis regardless of the inoculation route. These findings may help explain why mycoplasmas are commonly isolated from the joints of rheumatic patients.

  9. Brucella Septic Arthritis: Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatehi Elnour Elzein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is one of the commonest zoonotic infections worldwide. The disease is endemic in Saudi Arabia, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean area. Osteoarticular involvement is a frequent manifestation of brucellosis. It tends to involve the sacroiliac joints more commonly; however, spondylitis and peripheral arthritis are increasingly reported. Brucellosis can be overlooked especially in the presence of companion bacteria. Hence, it should be suspected in all patients with septic arthritis in endemic areas or in patients visiting such areas.

  10. Exercise reduces depressive symptoms in adults with arthritis: Evidential value

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine whether evidential value exists that exercise reduces depression in adults with arthritis and other rheumatic conditions. METHODS Utilizing data derived from a prior meta-analysis of 29 randomized controlled trials comprising 2449 participants (1470 exercise, 979 control) with fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus, a new method, P-curve, was utilized to assess for evidentiary worth as well as dismiss the possibility of discriminati...

  11. Preparation and evaluation of functional foods in adjuvant arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis is an animal model that closely resembles rheumatoid arthritis in humans. It is a successful working model used to study new anti-inflammatory agents. In previous studies (animal and clinical) we have shown that evening primrose oil, fish oil and the methanol extract of date fruits and fenugreek seeds have anti-inflammatory activity and that the methanol extract of dates has an antioxidant effect. Based on these studies, the aim of the present study was to prepare 7 functio...

  12. Cricoarytenoid joint involvement in rheumatoid arthritis: radiologic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Antonio; Fusconi, Massimo; Macri, Gian Franco; Marinelli, Caterina; Polettini, Elisabetta; Benincasa, Anna Teresa; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis rarely involves the cricoarytenoid joint. The possible consequent symptom includes hoarseness, dysphagia, odynophagia, dysfunctional dysphonia, and acute dyspnea. Etiologic diagnosis is possible with high-resolution computed tomography, which can show spacing of the articular cartilage, density and volume alterations, and subluxation of the cartilage. However, these radiologic signs are not pathognomonic for rheumatoid arthritis, and they should be combined with anamnestic data.

  13. MRI quantification of rheumatoid arthritis: current knowledge and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Mikael; Østergaard, Mikkel; Cimmino, Marco A

    2009-01-01

    The international consensus on treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) involves early initiation of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) for which a reliable identification of early disease is mandatory. Conventional radiography of the joints is considered the standard method for detect......The international consensus on treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) involves early initiation of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) for which a reliable identification of early disease is mandatory. Conventional radiography of the joints is considered the standard method...

  14. Reappraisal of the clinical use of leflunomide in rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter BB Jones

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Peter BB Jones1,2, Douglas HN White21Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, 2Rheumatology Department, Waikato Hospital, Hamilton, New ZealandAbstract: Leflunomide is a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD that has been in routine clinical use for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and psoriatic arthritis for a decade. In RA, clinical trials of up to two years’ duration showed that leflunomide monotherapy was equivalent to methotrexate in clinical and radiographic disease outcomes (tender and swollen joint counts, physician and patient global assessments, American College of Rheumatology and Disease Activity Score responses, slowing or halting of radiographic progression. In a number of studies, quality of life measurements indicated that leflunomide is superior to methotrexate. Leflunomide has been studied in combination with methotrexate and shows efficacy in patients only partly responsive to this agent. Recent trials have shown that leflunomide can be used safely with biologic DMARDs, including antitumor necrosis factor agents and rituximab as part of the treatment algorithm in place of methotrexate as a cotherapy. Leflunomide has demonstrated efficacy as a monotherapy in psoriatic arthritis, and it also has a beneficial effect in psoriasis. Postmarketing studies have shown that retention on treatment with leflunomide is equal to methotrexate and superior to other DMARDs. In general, its side effect profile is acceptable compared with other DMARDS, with nausea, diarrhea, and hair fall occurring commonly, but only rarely leading to discontinuation. Liver toxicity is the most significant problem in clinical use although it is uncommon. Peripheral neuropathy, hypertension, pneumonitis, and cytopenia occur more rarely. Leflunomide is contraindicated in pregnancy and should be used with caution in women during child-bearing years. In this review, the place of leflunomide in therapy

  15. Septic arthritis caused by Kingella kingae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J M; Bass, J W

    1983-10-01

    Kingella kingae is a slow-growing, fastidious gram-negative coccobacillus that is a normal inhabitant of the oropharynx of man, but it has rarely been implicated as a human pathogen. Two cases of septic arthritis caused by this organism are reported along with a review of seven previously reported cases of infections caused by this organism. Bone and joint infections predominate. Gram's-stained smears of pus from bone or joint fluid aspirate have been negative for organisms, and a delay of growth in cultures with initial difficulty in classification of the isolate is characteristic. Kingella kingae organisms have been uniformly sensitive to the penicillins and all other commonly used antibiotics that were tested. Response to treatment was good in all nine patients found to have infections caused by this organism.

  16. Characteristics of resistin in rheumatoid arthritis angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chen-Ming; Huang, Chun-Yin; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2016-06-01

    Adipokines have been reported to be involved in the regulation of various physiological processes, including the immune response. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an example of a systemic immune disease that causes chronic inflammation of the synovium and bone destruction in the joint. Recent therapeutic strategies based on the understanding of the role of cytokines and cellular mechanisms in RA have improved our understanding of angiogenesis. On the other hand, endogenous endothelial progenitor cells, which are a population isolated from peripheral blood monocytes have recently been identified as a homing target for pro-angiogeneic factor and vessel formation. In this review, we summarize the effects of common adipokines, such as adiponectin, leptin and resistin in RA pathogenesis and discuss other potential mechanisms of relevance for the therapeutic treatment of RA.

  17. Prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudin Koshy

    2016-09-01

    Results: 18 patients had evidence of pulmonary tuberculosis. 5 patients had active disease and 13 patients had evidence of healed pulmonary tuberculosis. The prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis was 8.3%. This is much higher than the prevalence in the Indian population which is 13-25 per thousand. Of the 5 patients who had active disease 3 patients were on leflunamide for 1 year or more. On analysis it was found that patients on leflunamide were at an increased risk of developing tuberculosis (p <0.001 and the risk estimate showed an odds ratio of 14.2. Conclusions: Prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis in the study population was found to be 8.3%. In countries with high prevalence of latent and active tuberculosis, rheumatoid arthritis patients should be carefully monitored for pulmonary tuberculosis before and during the treatment with immunosuppressive drugs. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(9.000: 3729-3732

  18. Preclinical lung disease in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Perez, Alejandro; Luburich, Patricio; Rodriguez-Sanchon, Benigno; Dorca, Jordi; Nolla, Joan Miquel; Molina-Molina, Maria; Narvaez-Garcia, Javier

    2016-02-01

    Early detection and treatment of lung disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may ameliorate disease progression. The objectives of this study were to investigate the frequency of asymptomatic lung abnormalities in early RA patients and the potential association of positive RA blood reactive biomolecules with lung involvement. A prospective observational study was performed in a cohort of patients with early RA (joint symptoms disease with a baseline chest radiograph (CR) and complete pulmonary function tests (PFTs). In those patients with lung abnormalities on the CR or PFTs, a high-resolution chest computed tomography scan (HRCT) was performed. We included 40 patients (30 women). Altered PFTs were detected in 18 (45%) of these patients. These cases had a diffusion lung transfer capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO) of disease is present in up to 45% of early RA patients and can be determined by PFTs and ACPA levels.

  19. Total shoulder replacement in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, O; Fruensgaard, S; Johannsen, Hans Viggo

    1996-01-01

    A prospective study of 62 Neer mark II total shoulder arthroplasties performed during the period from 1981 to 1990 on 51 patients with rheumatoid arthritis was undertaken to evaluate factors associated with component loosening and proximal humeral migration. Thirty-two (51%) showed proximal...... migration of the humerus before surgery was performed. The mean follow-up time was 92 months (range 52 to 139 months). The results revealed proximal migration in 55% of the patients (34 shoulders), and 40% (25 shoulders) showed progressive radiographic loosening of the glenoid component. Five of 12 press......-fit humeral components demonstrated progressive radiographic loosening, whereas no signs of loosening were found in 50 cemented humeral components. In spite of progressive component loosening and progressive migration, this study demonstrated good pain relief in 89% of the patients (55 shoulders) and also...

  20. [Diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, K

    2014-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis today is still not curable but satisfactory treatable. Treatment targets include clinical remission (or at least low disease activity), lack of radiological destructions and functional disability as well as acceptable life quality and unimpaired working ability. Diagnosing and adequately treating the disease as early as possible is essential for a favourable long-term outcome. Treatment to target with validation and if necessary modification at least every three months until target is achieved ensures good results. Predominantly treatment starts with a combination of methotrexate and glucocorticoids followed by a conventional DMARD combination and then addition of a biologic DMARD in case of failing target. Presence of adverse risk factors and/or high disease activity a cDMARD/bDMARD combination might be used already after starting treatment failure. Additional treatment options such as physiotherapy should be added. Altogether with current treatment possibilities burden of disease declined dramatically in recent years.

  1. Rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility genes: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczowska, Izabela

    2014-09-18

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, inflammatory autoimmune disease sustained by genetic factors. Various aspects of the genetic contribution to the pathogenetics and outcome of RA are still unknown. Several genes have been indicated so far in the pathogenesis of RA. Apart from human leukocyte antigen, large genome wide association studies have identified many loci involved in RA pathogenesis. These genes include protein tyrosine phosphatase, nonreceptor type 22, Peptidyl Arginine Deiminase type IV, signal transducer and activator of transcription 4, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4, tumor necrosis factor-receptor associated factor 1/complement component 5, tumor necrosis factor and others. It is important to determine whether a combination of RA risk alleles are able to identify patients who will develop certain clinical outcomes, such myocardium infarction, severe infection or lymphoma, as well as to identify patients who will respond to biological medication therapy.

  2. Think Rheumatoid Arthritis: Causes, Consequences, and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Smolen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prof Josef Smolen opened the symposium and briefly described the aims of the meeting. Co-host Prof Constantino Pitzalis first discussed the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, identifying the pro-inflammatory cytokines involved and explaining why specific drugs only work in certain conditions. Prof Simon Jones followed with a discussion on comorbidities and adverse events associated with interleukin (IL-6 intervention in rheumatic disease. Dr Frank McKenna presented on the psychological impact of RA, including mood changes and development of depressive disorders, and Prof Smolen described the upcoming therapeutic approaches for the condition while also comparing and contrasting existing treatment options. The symposium concluded with a question and answer session.

  3. PROBLEMS OF EPIGENOME IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    V A Kozlov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA that is a brilliant representative of the large family of autoimmune diseases remains to be, by and large, a disease that is far from being adequately investigated. This concerns the etiology and pathogenesis of the disease and effective approaches to its treatment. The review gives the data available in the literature on the role of epigenomic mechanisms regulating the functioning of genes in both immunocompetent cells and synovial fibroblasts, the major targets of autoimmune cells. The presence of a few sources of hypomethylated DNA in RA patients suggests that these molecules make a considerable contribution to the pathogenesis of the disease. Furthermore, the found hypermethylation of certain genes, besides the pathogenetic value of this phenomenon, may be used to develop new approaches to treating RA, which are based on the demethylation processes of these genes.

  4. Pain in rheumatoid arthritis: a critical review

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    P. Sarzi-Puttini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA are frequently afflicted by pain, which may be caused by joint inflammation (leading to structural joint damage or secondary osteoarthritis, and may be increased by central sensitisation. Non-inflammatory pain may also confuse the assessment of disease activity, and so the aim of treatment is not only to combat inflammatory disease, but also relieve painful symptoms. In order to ensure effective treatment stratification, it is necessary to record a patients medical history in detail, perform a physical examination, and objectively assess synovitis and joint damage. The management of pain requires various approaches that include pharmacological analgesia and biological and non-biological treatments. Although joint replacement surgery can significantly improve RA-related pain, it may only be available to patients with the most severe advanced disease.

  5. Chondrosternal Arthritis in Infant: An Unusual Entity

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    Athina Nikolarakou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary arthritis of chondrosternal joint is very rare and occurs in infants less than 18 months of age. Presentation is most often subacute but may be acute. Child presents with a parasternal mass with history of fever and/or local signs of infection. Clinical symptoms vary from a painless noninflammatory to a painful mass with local tenderness and swelling, while fever may be absent. Laboratory data show low or marginally raised levels of white blood cells and C-reactive protein, reflecting, respectively, the subacute or acute character of the infection. It is a self-limiting affection due to the adequate immune response of the patient. Evolution is generally good without antibiotherapy with a progressive spontaneous healing. A wait-and-see approach with close follow-up in the first weeks is the best therapeutic option.

  6. Pain Coping Strategies for Children with Arthritis

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    Kim J. Rosenzweig

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To present information on pain management strategies for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Methods. The second author developed a manual to present pain management strategies to children. The use of the manual was pilot-tested with a group of children with JIA. Telephone interviews were used to gather information on implementation of pain management strategies. Results. Children were able to implement the pain management strategies. Children reported a reduction in daily pain experiences related to JIA when using the pain management strategies. Conclusions. The pain management strategies were successful as an adjunctive intervention for short-term pain management. Pain symptoms related to JIA can severely limit children's participation in daily activities. Further study on how children use pain management strategies to improve their involvement in daily activities will provide useful clinical information.

  7. [Basic research overview in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common autoimmune disease with a prevalence of 0.5-1.0% worldwide. Although advances in understanding the pathogenesis of RA have led to new therapeutics with good outcomes, the real cause of the disease is still unknown. RA is characterized by synovial inflammation and hyperplasia, which erodes cartilage and bone, and autoantibody production (rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)). There are many critical questions on the mechanism of the disease onset and progression: How genetic and environmental factors interact with each other? Why does the inflammatory response localize in joints? What are the key players to perpetuate synovial inflammation? In this review, we summarize pathogenetic advances in these issues especially from the point of view of basic research.

  8. [Tofacitinib for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2016-06-01

    The combined use of synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (sDMARDs) such as methotrexate and biological DMARDs (bDMARDs) has revolutionized treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Remission is now realistic targets, achieved by a large proportion of RA patients. However, bDMARDs are limited to intravenous or subcutaneous uses and orally available small but strong products have been developed. Oral administration of tofacitinib targeting the Janus kinase (JAK) is significantly effective than placebo in active RA patients with sDMARD-naïve, inadequately responsive to sDMARDs or TNF-inhibitors. The efficacy was rapid and as strong as adalimumab, a TNF-inhibitor. The common adverse events were related to infection, hematologic and hepatic disorders and association of tofacitinib with carcinogenicity and infections remains debated.

  9. Adipokines as Potential Biomarkers in Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Annalisa Del Prete

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic systemic inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by severe joint injury. Recently, research has been focusing on the possible identification of predictor markers of disease onset and/or progression, of joint damage, and of therapeutic response. Recent findings have uncovered the role of white adipose tissue as a pleiotropic organ not only specialized in endocrine functions but also able to control multiple physiopathological processes, including inflammation. Adipokines are a family of soluble mediators secreted by white adipose tissue endowed with a wide spectrum of actions. This review will focus on the recent advances on the role of the adipokine network in the pathogenesis of RA. A particular attention will be devoted to the action of these proteins on RA effector cells, and on the possibility to use circulating levels of adipokines as potential biomarkers of disease activity and therapeutic response.

  10. Part II. Therapy for rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Viktorovna Demidova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available On 23–25 May 2013, the Karolinska Institute (Stockholm, Sweden with the support of MSD company held a meeting on a Clinical Observational Program for rheumatologists, which was attended by the well-known rheumatologists and leading specialists of the Institute Prof. R. van Vollenhoven, Prof. L. Klareskog, Dr. E. af Klint, and Dr. C. Carlens. The reports and interactive sessions discussed the problems of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, including early RA (pathology, pathogenesis, and treatment, registers of with rheumatic diseases; ultrasound diagnosis of inflammatory locomotor diseases; biological therapy for rheumatic diseases; organization of work in the research immunological laboratory, outpatient/day hospital units of a rheumatology clinic. The Program was also attended by physicians from different European countries (Sweden, Germany, Russia, Spain, Greece, etc.. Below is given an overview of the proceedings of the Clinical Observational Program.

  11. Is Hearing Impairment Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Bjoerndal, Kristine; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2016-01-01

    and ComDisDome to cover all relative reports. The following keywords were used: hearing loss, hearing difficulties, hearing disorders, hearing impairment, sensorineural hearing loss, conductive hearing loss, mixed hearing loss, autoimmune hearing loss, drug ototoxicity, drug-induced hearing loss, hearing......BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, inflammatory disease that affects 1% of the population. The auditory system may be involved during the course of disease; however the association of RA and hearing impairment has not been clearly defined. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review...... is to evaluate published clinical reports related to hearing impairment in patients with RA. Furthermore, we discuss possible pathologies and associated factors as well as new treatment modalities. METHOD: A thorough literature search was performed using available databases including Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane...

  12. Leflunomide in complex treatment for rheumatoid arthritis

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    Yu A Olyunin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available It is noted that within recent years the severity of rheumatoid arthritis has noticeably diminished, as evidenced by the studies performed. This transformation is largely caused by the emergence of new first-line anti-inflammatory drugs (FLAIDs, leflunomide (LF, Arava in particular. The experience gained during its 10-year wide clinical application shows that LF is as good as with methotrexate (MT in the therapeutic potential and tolerance and supposedly can compare well with this agent in future. LF provides a significant clinical improvement in much earliest periods and has a more positive effect on patients 'functional status than MT. LF slows down articular destruction to a greater extent than MT given in combination with folic acid. By and large LF is well tolerated and causes adverse reactions less frequently than other FLAIDs.

  13. Cicatricial Ectropion Secondary to Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracitelli, Carolina P. B.; Osaki, Tammy Hentona; Valdrighi, Natalia Yumi; Viana, Giovanni André Pires; Osaki, Midori Hentona

    2015-01-01

    Ectropion is characterized by the eversion of the eyelid margin and the consequent exposure of the conjunctiva and cornea. The shortening of the anterior lamella of the lid causes cicatricial ectropion. We described a case of skin pathology causing cicatricial ectropion. The case is about a 68-year-old woman with a 2-year history of psoriatic arthritis. She complained of eyelid tearing and redness for two years. Due to the psoriasis, she presented a very dry skin, also in the periocular region, resulting in cicatricial ectropion. A skin graft was indicated to correct the eyelid malposition. Careful investigation should be performed in patients who have a skin disease that can lead to cicatricial ectropion. PMID:25810938

  14. Coexistence of rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczyńska, Tacjana Anna; Węgierska, Małgorzata; Żuchowski, Paweł; Dura, Marta; Zalewska, Joanna; Waszczak, Marzena; Jeka, Sławomir

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are chronic progressive inflammatory diseases, leading to joint damage and reducing the physical fitness of patients. They are among the most common rheumatic diseases. However, their etiology and symptomatology are different. Formerly, AS was often wrongly diagnosed as RA. Today there are no major diagnostic difficulties in differentiation between these diseases, thanks to modern laboratory tests and imaging. However, a problem may arise when the patient has symptoms typical for both diseases simultaneously. Cases of coexistence of RA with AS - according to our best knowledge - are rare. This study aims to compare our experience in diagnosis and treatment of concomitant RA and AS with the experience of other researchers. Implementation of the proper diagnostic algorithm, allowing for correct diagnosis of both diseases in one patient, may be useful for differential diagnosis of similar cases in the future.

  15. Metalloproteinases: potential therapeutic targets for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2015-01-01

    In different inflammatory diseases, many metalloproteinases are over expressed and thought to promote progression of the disease. Understanding roles of these enzymes in disease progression as well as in normal homeostasis is crucial to identify target enzymes for the disease. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the autoimmune inflammatory diseases in which around 1-2 % of the world populations are suffered from. Roles of metalloproteinases are well documented in RA, but so far none of them is proposed to be a target enzyme. However, there are at least three enzymes that can potentially be molecular targets to inhibit progression of RA. Understanding roles of these enzymes in more detail and developing highly selective inhibitors to these enzymes would be essential for novel antimetalloproteinase therapies in future.

  16. Clinical Orofacial Examination in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Peter; Twilt, Marinka; Spiegel, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    review. The level of evidence for the 5 recommendations was derived primarily from descriptive studies, such as cross-sectional and case-control studies. CONCLUSION: Five recommendations are proposed for the orofacial examination of patients with JIA to improve the clinical practice and aid standardized......OBJECTIVE: To develop international consensus-based recommendations for the orofacial examination of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), for use in clinical practice and research. METHODS: Using a sequential phased approach, a multidisciplinary task force developed and evaluated...... a set of recommendations for the orofacial examination of patients with JIA. Phase 1: A Delphi survey was conducted among 40 expert physicians and dentists with the aim of identifying and ranking the importance of items for inclusion. Phase 2: The task force developed consensus about the domains...

  17. Novel Treatment Concepts in Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Tristan; Kavanaugh, Arthur

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of highly effective therapies and clearly defined targets has altered the treatment paradigm in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Validated classification criteria and outcome measures specific to PsA have helped standardize a therapeutic approach to this heterogeneous disease that affects multiple clinical domains. This article discusses the importance of early intervention using a treat-to-target strategy; emerging evidence for tight control based on minimal disease activity criteria; disease considerations specific to PsA (prognostic markers, biomarkers, subclinical disease, comorbidities); and new treatment strategies to deal with refractory disease (eg, tumor necrosis factor inhibitor switching and use of novel disease-modifying therapies) and controlled disease (eg, tapering or discontinuing biologic therapy).

  18. Septic Arthritis of the Shoulder Complicating Pregnancy

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    Sara Raiser

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Septic arthropathy leads to rapid joint destruction, impairment, and disability. Staphylococcus can be particularly virulent to bone and joints leading to adverse obstetric events. At 28 of weeks gestation, a patient presented with pyelonephritis and progressive left shoulder pain. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated early clavicular destruction and acromial involvement. Glenohumeral joint aspiration produced Staphylococcus aureus. The patient then had premature rupture of membranes and progressed rapidly to preterm delivery. Placental pathology revealed chorioamnionitis and microabscesses. Treatment of the infected joint required further surgical drainage and bone resection as well as extended antibiotics. It is important to remember that joint pain in pregnancy may indicate infective arthritis, and pyelonephritis can be a source of such an infection. Evaluation includes magnetic resonance imaging and consultation for joint aspiration. Prompt recognition and treatment are necessary to prevent joint destruction.

  19. Periodontal condition in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo de Paula Ishi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this clinical study was to investigate if periodontal disease and rheumatoid arthritis (RA are associated. The study included 39 RA patients (test group and 22 age- and gender-matched healthy individuals (control group. Questionnaires on general and oral health were applied and a complete periodontal exam, including visible plaque, marginal bleeding, attachment loss (AL and number of teeth present, was also performed by a single calibrated examiner. Diabetes mellitus patients and smokers were excluded. RA patients had fewer teeth, higher prevalence of sites presenting dental plaque and a higher frequency of sites with advanced attachment loss. Although the prevalence of dental plaque was higher in the test group (Chi-square test, p = 0.0006, the percentage of sites showing gingival bleeding was not different (Fisher’s exact test, p > 0.05. Based on our results, we suggest that there is an association between periodontal disease and RA.

  20. Autoantibodies to Posttranslational Modifications in Rheumatoid Arthritis

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    Agata N. Burska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoantibodies have been associated with human pathologies for a long time, particularly with autoimmune diseases (AIDs. Rheumatoid factor (RF is known since the late 1930s to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The discovery of anticitrullinated protein antibodies in the last century has changed this and other posttranslational modifications (PTM relevant to RA have since been described. Such PTM introduce neoepitopes in proteins that can generate novel autoantibody specificities. The recent recognition of these novel specificities in RA provides a unique opportunity to understand human B-cell development in vivo. In this paper, we will review the three of the main classes of PTMs already associated with RA: citrullination, carbamylation, and oxidation. With the advancement of research methodologies it should be expected that other autoantibodies against PTM proteins could be discovered in patients with autoimmune diseases. Many of such autoantibodies may provide significant biomarker potential.