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Sample records for arthritis psoriatic arthritis

  1. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis

  2. Psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  3. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your body. Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the ... physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help ...

  4. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past 10 years, a number of well-controlled surveys of psoriatic patients selective for the presence of arthritis have been conducted. A Canadian group reported that of 100 patients admitted to the hospital for treatment of psoriasis, 32 had clinical or radiologic evidence of psoriatic arthritis, and 17 had both types of evidence. Eighty patients with radiologic evidence of spinal or sacroiliac involvement were asymptomatic, and seven had clinical evidence of peripheral arthritis but without radiologic evidence. The authors concluded that psoriatic arthritis is a common event in patients with severe psoriasis and that it is associated with more extensive skin disease than is found in patients without arthritis. The information gathered from these epidemiologic studies coupled with clinical, radiologic, and serologic characteristics have provided the basis for the current belief that psoriatic arthritis is indeed a distinct entity

  5. Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more! Email * Zipcode Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis Psoriatic arthritis can develop slowly with mild symptoms, or it ... severe. Early recognition, diagnosis and treatment of psoriatic arthritis can help prevent or limit extensive joint damage ...

  6. Treating Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to find out more! Email * Zipcode Treating Psoriatic Arthritis Treatment for psoriatic arthritis can relieve pain, reduce swelling, help keep joints ... recommend treatments based on the type of psoriatic arthritis, its severity and your reaction to treatment. Download ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: psoriatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions psoriatic arthritis psoriatic arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Psoriatic arthritis is a condition involving joint inflammation (arthritis) that ...

  8. Psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease which develops in patients with psoriasis. It is characteristic that the rheumatoid factor in serum is absent. Etiology of the disease is still unclear but a number of genetic associations have been identified. Inheritance of the disease is multilevel and the role of environmental factors is emphasized. Immunology of PsA is also complex. Inflammation is caused by immunological reactions leading to release of kinins. Destructive changes in bones usually appear after a few months from the onset of clinical symptoms. Typically PsA involves joints of the axial skeleton with an asymmetrical pattern. The spectrum of symptoms include inflammatory changes in attachments of articular capsules, tendons, and ligaments to bone surface. The disease can have divers clinical course but usually manifests as oligoarthritis. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of PsA. Classical radiography has been used for this purpose for over a hundred years. It allows to identify late stages of the disease, when bone tissue is affected. In the last 20 years many new imaging modalities, such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR), have been developed and became important diagnostic tools for evaluation of rheumatoid diseases. They enable the assessment and monitoring of early inflammatory changes. As a result, patients have earlier access to modern treatment and thus formation of destructive changes in joints can be markedly delayed or even avoided

  9. Psoriatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that often occurs with a skin condition called psoriasis . ... inflammatory condition. About 1 in 20 people with psoriasis may develop arthritis with the skin condition. In most cases, psoriasis ...

  10. Imaging in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggenborg, René Panduro; Østergaard, Mikkel; Terslev, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory joint disease characterized by arthritis and often enthesitis in patients with psoriasis, presenting a wide range of manifestations in various patterns. Imaging procedures are primarily conventional radiography, ultrasonography (US), and magnetic...

  11. Genetic epidemiology: Psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Barton, Anne C

    2002-01-01

    The existence of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct clinical entity remains a topic of debate; some authors propose that it is simply the co-occurrence of psoriasis and inflammatory arthritis. However, a distinct entity is likely to have distinct susceptibility factors in addition to those that contribute to psoriasis and inflammatory arthritis alone. These aetiological factors may be genetic and/or environmental, and in this review, the evidence for distinct psoriatic arthritis genetic suscep...

  12. Epidemiology of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Salvarani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies on psoriatic arthritis have long been hampered by the absence of widely accepted classification criteria. The development of the CASPAR (ClASsification criteria for Psoriatic ARthritis criteria has recently provided the framework for conducting epidemiological studies in psoriatic arthritis using uniform recruitment criteria. However, so far, only a minority of studies have adopted such criteria. In addition to the lack of shared classification criteria, differences in study settings, designs, and ascertainment methods have contributed to yield substantial disparities in the estimates of the incidence (from 3,02 to 23,1 cases per 100,000 people and prevalence (from 49,1 to 420 cases per 100,000 people of psoriatic arthritis around the globe. Overall, the available data suggests that the prevalence of psoriasis in the general population is approximately 2-3%, with about a third of patients with psoriasis having arthritis. Therefore, psoriatic arthritis may affect 0,3- 1,0% of the population, a frequency not dissimilar from that of rheumatoid arthritis. Future epidemiological studies should be carried out in larger numbers of patients diagnosed using consistent criteria.

  13. Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and psoriatic arthritis. Email * Zipcode The National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) is a non-profit organization with a mission to drive efforts to cure psoriatic disease and improve the lives of those affected. Copyright © 1996-2015 National Psoriasis Foundation/USA Bottom Menu About NPF About Us Annual ...

  14. Physical Activity and Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out more! Email * Zipcode Physical Activity and Psoriatic Arthritis Physical activity plays an important role in overall well-being. If you have psoriatic arthritis, moderate exercise may offer specific benefits, including improved ...

  15. Psoriatic arthritis as a mountain

    OpenAIRE

    Berthelot, J M

    2011-01-01

    There is no doubt that inflammatory arthritis/enthesitis and psoriasis coexist more frequently than would be expected by chance: for instance, in a study of 1285 patients with psoriasis seen in an hospital, 483 (38%) were suffering from arthritis/ enthesitis, including 40 patients classified as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) (3%), 177 (14%) as undifferentiated arthritis (UA), and 266 (21%) as Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) (1). Although lower percentages have been noticed in the general population with...

  16. IMAGING OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D'Angelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Imaging of psoriatic arthritis (PsA is important for two reasons: the differential diagnosis from other arthritides and the assessment of structural damage that can be inhibited by the new drugs such as the anti-TNFα agents. Plain film radiographic findings of peripheral arthritis have been important in elaborating the concept of PsA as a separate disease entity. Characteristic aspects of psoriatic peripheral arthritis help the differentiation from rheumatoid arthritis. High-resolution ultrasonography (US, US combined with power Doppler (PDUS and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be used to image joint synovitis of PsA. Radiologic features of spondylitis associated with psoriasis are similar to spondylitis associated with reactive arthritis and differ from those of primary ankylosing spondylitis (AS and the spondylitis associated with inflammatory bowel disease. MRI is very sensitive for the early diagnosis of sacroiliitis. There have been no MRI studies on the spine of patients with PsA. In primary AS bone oedema in the vertebral bodies is an indicator of active disease and can ameliorate during anti-TNFα therapy. Historically, plain film radiography have played a pivotal role in defining enthesitis lesions of SpA. However, entheseal bone changes appear late. US and MRI have proved to be a highly sensitive and non invasive tools. Recent US and MRI studies on both finger and toe dactylitis have established that dactylitis is due to flexor tenosynovitis and marked adjacent soft tissue swelling with a variable degree of small joint synovitis. There is no evidence of enthesitis of the insertion of the flexor digitorum tendons and of the attachment of the caspsule of the digit joints. Key words: Enthesitis, dactylitis, spondyloarthritis, ultrasound, magnetic resonance, imaging

  17. CLINICAL PRESENTATION OF PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    M. Atteno; Peluso, R.; R. Scarpa

    2011-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a spondyloarthropathy, which occurs in patients with skin and/or nail psoriasis. Basing its characterization on morphological purposes, several types of arthritis have been described. Alternatively, we propose a simplified classification into three subsets, focusing on the levels of expression of cutaneous and articular elements which devise this syndrome. The first is established psoriatic arthritis which occurs in patients with evident or remittent skin and/or nail ps...

  18. Psoriatic arthritis: imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lubrano

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Imaging techniques to assess psoriatic arthritis (PsA include radiography, ultrasonography (US, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography (CT and bone scintigraphy. The radiographic hallmark of PsA is the combination of destructive changes (joint erosions, tuft resorption, osteolysis with bone proliferation (including periarticular and shaft periostitis, ankylosis, spur formation and non-marginal syndesmophytes. US has an increasing important role in the evaluation of PsA. In fact, power Doppler US is useful mainly for its ability to assess musculoskeletal (joints, tendons, entheses and cutaneous (skin and nails involvement, to monitor efficacy of therapy and to guide steroid injections at the level of inflamed joints, tendon sheaths and entheses. MRI allows direct visualization of inflammation in peripheral and axial joints, and peripheral and axial entheses, and has dramatically improved the possibilities for early diagnosis and objective monitoring of the disease process in PsA. MRI has allowed explaining the relationships among enthesitis, synovitis and osteitis in PsA, supporting a SpA pattern of inflammation where enthesitis is the primary target of inflammation. CT has little role in assessment of peripheral joints, but it may be useful in assessing elements of spine disease. CT accuracy is similar to MRI in assessment of erosions in sacroiliac joint involvement, but CT is not as effective in detecting synovial inflammation. Bone scintigraphy lacks specificity and is now supplanted with US and MRI techniques.

  19. Psoriatic arthritis as a mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Berthelot

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt that inflammatory arthritis/enthesitis and psoriasis coexist more frequently than would be expected by chance: for instance, in a study of 1285 patients with psoriasis seen in an hospital, 483 (38% were suffering from arthritis/ enthesitis, including 40 patients classified as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA (3%, 177 (14% as undifferentiated arthritis (UA, and 266 (21% as Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA (1. Although lower percentages have been noticed in the general population with psoriasis (6% of PsA in an extensive study of 1844 patients with psoriasis (2, they were superior to 5% (i.e. at least 5 times greater than the figures found for patients without psoriasis (3-7.

  20. Genetics of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rielly, Darren D; Rahman, Proton

    2014-10-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) represents a group of inflammatory rheumatic diseases that cluster within families and possess overlapping clinical features. The pathogenesis of SpA encompasses a complex array of genetic, immunological and environmental factors. In this article, we will briefly review the genetics of PsA, and then focus on the genes that may be potentially linked either directly or indirectly to the immunopathology of the Th-17 pathway. The most consistent and dominant genetic effect of PsV and PsA is located on chromosome 6p21.3 within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, which accounts for approximately one-third of the genetic contribution of PsV and PsA. To date, 36 genes have reached genome-wide significance, accounting for approximately 22% of psoriasis (PsV) heritability. Prominent genes identified via GWAS include HLA-Cw6, IL12B, IL23R, IL23A, TNIP1, TNFAIP3, LCE3B-LCE3C, TRAF3IP2, NFkBIA, FBXL19, TYK2, IFIH1, REL, and ERAP1. Genes identified in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has largely echoed those in PsV and include HLA-B/C, HLA-B, IL-12B, IL-23R, TNIP1, TRAF3IP2, FBXL19, and REL. The lack of identified genetic susceptibility loci is largely attributed to the much smaller number of PsA patients and the greater clinical heterogeneity of PsA. Searching for different types of genetic variants such as small CNVs and/or insertions/deletions has also led to the identification of several genes with a function relative to PsV in particular including DEFB4, LCE3C_LCE3B, and IL-22 gene (exon 1). The candidate genes identified in PsV/PsA have highlighted pathways of critical importance to psoriatic disease including distinct signaling pathways comprised of barrier integrity, innate immune response and adaptive immune response, mediated primarily by Th-17 and Th-1 signalling. While GWAS studies have yielded great insights into the genes that contribute to the pathogenesis of PsV and PsA, replication in large cohorts, fine-mapping and resequencing

  1. Which Psoriasis Patients Develop Psoriatic Arthritis?

    OpenAIRE

    Busse, Kristine; Liao, Wilson

    2010-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a major comorbidity of psoriasis that significantly impairs quality of life and physical function. Because skin lesions classically precede joint symptoms, dermatologists are in a unique position to identify patients at risk for psoriatic arthritis before irreversible joint damage occurs. Here we review the literature to identify the clinical and genetic factors most highly associated with development of psoriatic arthritis, with the goal of assisting dermatologists in ...

  2. Psoriatic arthritis: from pathogenesis to therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, Oliver

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a multigenic autoimmune disease that involves synovial tissue, entheseal sites and skin, and that may result in significant joint damage. Although there are no diagnostic tests for psoriatic arthritis, research has identified consistent features that help to distinguish the condition from other common rheumatic diseases. Comparison of HLA-B and HLA-C regions in psoriatic arthritis with those in psoriasis without joint involvement demonstrates significant differences, such that psoriatic arthritis cannot be viewed simply as a subset of genetically homogeneous psoriasis. T-cell receptor phenotypic studies have failed to identify antigen-driven clones, and an alternative hypothesis for CD8 stimulation involving innate immune signals is proposed. Finally, imaging studies have highlighted entheseal involvement in psoriatic arthritis, and it is possible that entheseal-derived antigens may trigger an immune response that is critically involved in disease pathogenesis.

  3. Diagnosing Psoriatic Arthritis from the Dermatologist’s View

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory arthropathy associated with skin psoriasis. It is considered a unique arthropathy with distinct clinical and radiologic features. Up to 40% of patients with psoriasis may develop psoriatic arthritis. Psoriasis usually precedes psoriatic arthritis, so dermatologists are in a critical position for screening patients of psoriatic arthritis early in the disease course. Psoriatic arthritis may be challenging to diagnose, especially for dermatologists, ...

  4. Innovative medicines for treatment of psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Levitan A.l.; Reshetko O.V.

    2015-01-01

    The problem of effective treatment of psoriatic arthritis has not been solved yet. The search for new therapeutic options is very active in many directions. At the stage of clinical trials are drugs that block interleukin-17-a (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), drugs that suppress interleukin-12 and interleukin-23 (ustekinumab). To modern means to ensure psoriatic arthritis include drugs that are inhibitors of small molecules orkinase pathways (apremilast, tofacitinib).

  5. Innovative medicines for treatment of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levitan A.l.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The problem of effective treatment of psoriatic arthritis has not been solved yet. The search for new therapeutic options is very active in many directions. At the stage of clinical trials are drugs that block interleukin-17-a (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab, drugs that suppress interleukin-12 and interleukin-23 (ustekinumab. To modern means to ensure psoriatic arthritis include drugs that are inhibitors of small molecules orkinase pathways (apremilast, tofacitinib.

  6. GENETICS OF PSORIASIS AND PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ibba

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are linked diseases characterised by (distinct ? immune-mediated pathogenetic mechanisms and by a genetic background interacting with environmental factors. Some candidate susceptibility genes have been studied extensively; they include HLA genes, genes within the HLA region and genes outside the HLA region; among them corneodesmosin and other genes of PSORS1 region, MICA and TNF-a polymorphisms. The main findings in the literature are discussed. Key words: Genetics, psosriasis, psoriatic arthritis

  7. Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menter, Alan

    2016-06-01

    Over the past several years, an increased understanding of the pathophysiology of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has led to the development of several new biologic therapies. Appropriate treatment selection and timing may slow, and even halt, the progression of psoriasis and PsA; as a result, it can decrease the economic burden. As treatment options vary based on individual disease characteristics and patient preferences, reviewing the patient's complete clinical picture is imperative. An updated treatment algorithm, based on patients' most severe disease domain, is now available to guide the selection of optimal therapy. Special care should be given to patients with both psoriasis and PsA who experience multiple disease domains, a heavy symptom burden, and an increased risk of comorbidities. PMID:27356194

  8. Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menter, Alan

    2016-06-01

    Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are chronic immune-mediated diseases that primarily affect the skin and joints, respectively; these diseases are also associated with high rates of cardiovascular and other comorbidities. Despite over 40 genes proven to be related to the disease, the exact causes of psoriasis and PsA are still to be determined. Recent insights into the underlying pathophysiology of these diseases have revealed novel therapeutic targets. Effective management requires timely diagnosis and initiation of treatment. Yet, both psoriasis and PsA remain underrecognized and undertreated in current clinical practice. Recognizing the true physical, social, and emotional burden of psoriasis and PsA, as well as their associated comorbidities, is the first step to improving the prognosis for affected patients. PMID:27356193

  9. [Imaging modalities in psoriatic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, K-G A; Ohrndorf, S; Werner, S G; Finzel, S; Backhaus, M

    2013-10-01

    This review presents an overview of the range of imaging modalities used in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Conventional radiography is used to detect structural changes of the joints and tendon attachments. These changes occur late in the course of PsA hence conventional radiography contributes little to the early detection of PsA; however, the detection of periosteal proliferations on radiographs allows a relatively specific diagnosis of PsA. Skeletal scintigraphy and computed tomography are rarely used in PsA. Arthrosonography (ultrasound of the joints) is gaining increasing importance in the early identification of inflammatory soft tissue signs of PsA in the peripheral joints. Sonography enables early detection of synovitis and tenosynovitis as well as superficial erosions and also inflammatory processes of the tendon attachments. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is indispensable for identifying possible involvement of the axial skeleton. Moreover, it allows good visualization of periostitis and arthritis. High resolution microcomputed tomography is an interesting novel diagnostic tool which allows highly sensitive evaluation of the bone structure and can detect very tiny bone lesions where typical signs of PsA are omega-shaped erosions and small corona-like spikes. Another interesting new diagnostic technique is fluorescence optical imaging (FOI) with the Xiralite system which is highly sensitive for detecting inflammatory processes of the hands. PMID:24085530

  10. HLA antigens in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Woodrow, J. C.; Ilchysyn, A

    1985-01-01

    HLA phenotypes were determined in 50 patients with psoriasis alone and in 50 patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Positive associations were found in both groups with B13, B17, B37, Cw6, and DR7, and in addition with C4A6. Higher relative risks were found in respect to the patients with psoriasis alone compared with those with arthritis, and this suggests the involvement of additional genetic factors predisposing to peripheral arthritis. In patients with psoriasis only, the presen...

  11. The occurrence of psoriatic arthritis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Birger Vesterager; Svendsen, Anders Jørgen; Ejstrup, Leif;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To apply and compare different classification criteria on a representative nationwide sample of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) twins and to estimate the prevalence and incidence of PsA. METHODS: The study comprised three Danish nationwide twin cohorts. In 1994 37,388 Danish twin individuals...

  12. The radiographic features of psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psoriatic arthritis is a separate and distinct articular disorder with specific radiographic manifestations occurring in a specific distribution. It manifests a severe erosive element, as well as a bone productive element. The erosive changes help to distinguish it from ankylosing spondylitis, and the bone productive changes, from rheumatoid arthritis. The distribution of the changes, that is, preferential involvement of the hands, will help to distinguish it from Reiter's syndrome. In some patients, it is knowledge of the radiographic changes and distribution of these changes that establishes the correct diagnosis of psoriasis

  13. Psoriatic arthritis: treatment strategies using biologic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Palazzi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The traditional management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA includes NSAIDs, corticosteroids and DMARDs. Advancement in the knowledge of the immunopathogenesis of PsA has been associated with the development of biologic agents which have revolutionized the management of the disease. Among biologics drugs, there are the 4 currently availablee anti-TNFα blocking agents (etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab and golimumab which are more effective than traditional DMARDs on symptoms/signs of inflammation, quality of life, function, and in inhibiting the progression of the structural joint damage. Despite of the high cost, TNF inhibitors are costeffective on both the musculoskeletal and skin manifestations of psoriatic disease.

  14. Altered Bone Biology in Psoriatic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimi, Homaira; Ritchlin, Christopher T.

    2012-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is characterized by focal bone erosions mediated by osteoclasts at the bone–pannus junction. The bulk of research over the past decade has centered on mechanisms that underlie osteoclastogenesis along with new insights into osteoimmunology; however, recent advances that focus on steps that lead to new bone formation are beginning to emerge. New revelations about bone formation may have direct relevance to PsA given the presence of enthesophytes, syndesmophytes, and b...

  15. GENETICS OF PSORIASIS AND PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Chandran Vinod

    2010-01-01

    It is well established that psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) have a strong genetic component. Recent advances in genetics have confirmed previous associations and new loci have been discovered. However, these loci do not fully account for the high heritability of psoriasis and PsA and therefore many genetic as well as environmental factors remain to be identified. This paper reviews the current status of genetic studies in psoriasis and PsA.

  16. Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: Topical issues

    OpenAIRE

    Yulia Leonidovna Korsakova

    2012-01-01

    The topical issues of the diagnosis and treatment of psoriasis (Ps) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are discussed. The characteristics and treatments of Ps and the methods for the diagnosis of PsA in Ps are presented; the extraarticular manifestations of PsA, its radiological signs, criteria for a treatment response, the current principles of therapy, and prognosis in these patients are described.

  17. Current concepts in psoriatic arthritis: pathogenesis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vlam, Kurt; Gottlieb, Alice B; Mease, Philip J

    2014-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis occurs in a subset of psoriasis patients and is therefore commonly encountered in dermatology practice. Although its exact pathogenesis is unknown, psoriatic arthritis is thought to share common mechanisms with psoriatic skin symptoms. Innate and adaptive immune responses are abnormally activated in psoriasis and may acquire the ability to attack peripheral joints and other sites following an environmental trigger (e.g. mechanical stress, trauma, infection) in genetically susceptible patients. The increased cardiovascular risk inherent in psoriasis appears further enhanced in psoriatic arthritis, likely reflecting the overall burden of systemic inflammation contributing to atherogenic processes. Basic research and clinical trials have suggested that tumour necrosis factor is important in psoriatic arthritis pathophysiology, and accumulating evidence suggests that Th17 cells and interleukin-17A may also be important. Basic research and clinical trials inform our understanding of psoriatic arthritis pathophysiology and, in turn, help dermatologists to make better treatment decisions. PMID:24573106

  18. Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Y. Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis. In addition to skin and joint involvement, there is increasing evidence suggesting that patients with PsA also have an increase in risk of clinical and subclinical cardiovascular diseases, mostly due to accelerating atherosclerosis. Both conventional and nonconventional cardiovascular risk factors contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk in PsA. Chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in PsA, acting independently and/or synergistically with the conventional risk factors. In this paper, we discuss the current literature indicating that patients with PsA are at risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Psoriatic arthritis management update - biotherapeutic options.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saber, Tajvur P

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a seronegative spondyloarthropathy (SpA) occurring in up to 30% of patients with psoriasis. It has a wide variation of annual incidence (median 6.4, range 0.1-3.1 per 10(5) people), based on analysis of 13 incidence and prevalence reviews published between 1987 and December 2006. Conventional treatments with antiinflammatory and disease modifying or antirheumatic drugs are not efficacious in all patients, in particular those with axial disease. This review examines new pharmacological developments in the treatment of PsA with a focus on biologic therapies.

  20. [Systemic treatments for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, S; Kokolakis, G; Sabat, R

    2016-06-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common chronic dermatoses. More than 25 % of the affected individuals require effective systemic treatment because of severe symptoms and/or the significantly restricted quality of life. Thanks to intensive research and successful cooperation between academia and the pharmaceutical industry, the options for treating psoriasis have dramatically increased in recent years. Especially targeted therapies give us the opportunity for personalized regimen. This review describes the spectrum of the systemic treatments for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and discusses the efficacy, safety, and particular features of the individual substances. PMID:27240668

  1. Psoriatic arthritis as a distinct disease entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leung Y

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease characterized by joint inflammation associated with cutaneous psoriasis. For many years, the amount of attention directed to PsA had been less than that for various other arthropathies. With the advances in understanding its pathogensis, it is now recognized as a distinct disease entity with characteristic features. Psoriatic arthritis has a greater tendency towards asymmetric oligoarticular involvement, distal interphalangeal involvement and spondylitis. Associated features such as enthesitis and dactylitis are more common. Specific radiological features include ankylosis and bone resorption. With the availability of potent new therapeutic agents for psoriasis and PsA, interest in research and clinical care for these conditions has been reinvigorated. Anti-TNF therapy has achieved encouraging efficacy in both the joints and skin disease, improving function and quality of life and inhibiting radiological progression measured in patients with PsA and psoriasis. Biologic agents may have the potential in addressing the unmet medical need in patients with PsA.

  2. IMMUNE PATHOGENESIS OF PSORIASIS AND PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Smirnova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Significance of psoriasis (PS research is determined by increasing incidence of this disorder, higher frequency of severe clinical forms, e.g., psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Clinical course and outcomes of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis depend on degree of immunological disturbances and imbalance of cytokine regulation of intercellular interactions. The leading immune disorders involved in pathogenesis of psoriasis and PsA are those characterized by alterations of Th1-type cytokine profile (TNFα, IL-2, IFNγ, etc.. We have analyzed publications that reveal some features of PS and PsA immunopathogenesis associated with nature of the diseases. The review draws attention to relatively new and scarcely studied data concerning the role of cytokines produced by Th17- and Th22-cells (IL-17, IL-22, IL-23, IL-26, IL-19 subfamily (IL-19, IL-20, IL-24 in development of psoriasis and PsA. Search for the immunological markers predisposing for risk of psoriasis and PsA is an important step in personalized approach to their prediction and planning of preventive measures, in order to prevent progression of this pathology.

  3. A sonographic spectrum of psoriatic arthritis: "the five targets".

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gutierrez, Marwin

    2010-02-01

    Ultrasound is a rapidly evolving technique that is gaining an increasing success in the assessment of psoriatic arthritis. Most of the studies have been aimed at investigating its ability in the assessment of joints, tendons, and entheses in psoriatic arthritis patients. Less attention has been paid to demonstrate the potential of ultrasound in the evaluation of skin and nail. The aim of this pictorial essay was to show the main high-frequency grayscale and power Doppler ultrasound findings in patients with psoriatic arthritis at joint, tendon, enthesis, skin, and nail level.

  4. Ustekinumab for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Davari P; Leo MS; Kamangar F; Fazel N

    2014-01-01

    Parastoo Davari, Michael S Leo, Faranak Kamangar, Nasim Fazel Department of Dermatology, University of California, Davis, CA, USA Abstract: Psoriatic arthritis occurs in 30% of psoriasis patients, and the treatment can be challenging in some patients. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration approved ustekinumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody, for the management of psoriatic arthritis. In this article, we review large-scale randomized clinical trials addressing the efficacy and safe...

  5. Prevalence of eye disease in Brazilian patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda B. F. de Lima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to report the type and frequency of ocular manifestations in Brazilian psoriatic arthritis patients. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in a Brazilian tertiary hospital. The test group included 40 patients who had psoriatic arthritis according to the Classification Criteria for Psoriatic Arthritis. A control group of 40 individuals was matched for age and gender. All of the patients underwent ophthalmic evaluation, which included best-corrected visual acuity, slit lamp and fundus examinations, and dry eye diagnostic tests (Schirmer I, tear breakup time and rose bengal. Demographic parameters were also evaluated. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 53.9±13.1 years; the mean disease duration was 8±10.5 years. Most of the patients were women (60%, and the majority had polyarticular disease (57.5%. Several ocular abnormalities were found, including punctate keratitis, pinguecula, blepharitis, pterygium, cataract, glaucoma, uveitis, and retinal microvascular abnormalities. There were no significant differences in the rates of these abnormalities compared with the control group, however. The Keratoconjunctivitis sicca and dry eye diagnostic tests were more often positive in the patients with psoriatic arthritis than in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, keratoconjunctivitis sicca was the most common ocular finding related to psoriatic arthritis. Therefore, we recommend early ophthalmologic evaluations for all psoriatic arthritis patients who complain of eye symptoms.

  6. How effective is ustekinumab in controlling psoriatic arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifati, Claudio; Graceffa, Dario

    2016-05-01

    Recently ustekinumab has been approved for the therapy of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Some case series have been published reporting new onset of inflammatory arthritis in psoriasis patients treated with ustekinumab. In addition, flare of joint inflammation in PsA patients has also been reported. We describe a case series of seven patients affected by PsA who experienced either a worsening or a flare of inflammatory arthritis during treatment with ustekinumab. PMID:26626908

  7. Psoriatic arthritis treatment: biological response modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mease, P J; Antoni, C E

    2005-03-01

    In recent years there has been a surge of interest in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders as a result of the development and application of targeted biological therapies. The elucidation of the overlapping cellular and cytokine immunopathology of such diverse conditions as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Crohn's disease, and psoriasis points to specific targets for bioengineered proteins or small molecules. Similar to clinical trials in RA, trials in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) have shown excellent clinical results with the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blockers, etanercept, infliximab, and adalimumab in a variety of domains including the joints, quality of life, function, and slowing of disease progress as evidenced radiologically. In addition, these agents have shown benefit in domains more unique to PsA, such as the skin lesions of psoriasis, enthesitis, and dactylitis, pointing out the similar pathogenesis of the disease in the skin, the tendons, and the synovial membrane. This therapy has been generally safe and well tolerated in clinical trials of PsA. Other logical candidates for targeted therapy in development include other anti-TNF agents, costimulatory blockade agents that affect T cell function, blockers of other cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1, 6, 12, 15, or 18, and B cell modulatory medicines. Also, it will be useful to learn more about the effects of combining traditional disease modifying drugs and the newer biologicals. PMID:15708944

  8. [Psoriatic arthritis : Overview of drug therapy options and administration characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, F; Thaçi, D; Wollenhaupt, J; Krüger, K

    2016-06-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the musculoskeletal system with association to skin psoriasis and is characterized by variable clinical symptoms with very heterogeneous degrees of disease suffering for patients. Clinical manifestations essentially include alterations to the skin and nails, peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis and/or spinal involvement. This variability necessitates an individualized therapy of patients with different therapy targets. Apart from international guidelines no therapy recommendations are available in Germany for treatment of psoriatic arthritis. For this reason this article summarizes the established points, characteristics and aspects to be considered in the therapy of psoriatic arthritis in Germany, taking the various main forms of the disease into consideration. PMID:27259913

  9. Why golimumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rossini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Golimumab is an anti-TNF monoclonal antibody administred subcutaneously once a month and produced with an innovative technology that minimizes immunogenicity. This paper reviews and updates the main studies on the efficacy, safety and pharmacoeconomic aspects of treatment with golimumab of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Comprehensive assessment of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci in a large psoriatic arthritis cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2012-08-01

    A number of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility genes have been identified in recent years. Given the overlap in phenotypic expression of synovial joint inflammation between RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), the authors explored whether RA susceptibility genes are also associated with PsA.

  11. Interplay between environmental factors, articular involvement, and HLA-B27 in patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Scarpa, R.; DEL PUENTE A; di Girolamo, C; Della Valle, G.; E. Lubrano; Oriente, P

    1992-01-01

    Medical records of 138 patients with psoriatic arthritis and 138 with rheumatoid arthritis were reviewed for the occurrence of an environmental factor triggering arthritis. Twelve (9%) of the patients with psoriatic arthritis had had an acute disorder immediately preceding onset of arthritis (an operation in four cases, articular trauma in three, abortion in two, myocardial infarction, thrombophlebitis, and phosphoric ester intoxication in one case each). Peripheral arthritis occurred in all ...

  12. Fragility Fractures in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Puente, Antonio; Esposito, Antonella; Costa, Luisa; Benigno, Carla; Del Puente, Aurora; Foglia, Francesca; Oriente, Alfonso; Bottiglieri, Paolo; Caso, Francesco; Scarpa, Raffaele

    2015-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) can have peculiar effects on bone, including mechanisms of bone loss such as erosions, but also of bone formation, such as ankylosis or periostitis. The aim of the present study was to describe the prevalence of fractures in patients with PsA as compared to healthy controls and to investigate determinants of fractures among cases. For both cases and controls, radiographs were read to identify vertebral fractures (VF), and the presence of femoral neck or other nonvertebral fractures was obtained from patients' medical history. The prevalence of fragility fractures on radiographic readings did not differ between cases and controls. The number of subjects showing a VF was 33 (36%) among PsA patients and 36 (36%) among controls, with a prevalence of severe VF of 8% among cases and 4% among controls. Controlling for covariates in a logistic model, the only variables showing a significant correlation with the presence of nonvertebral fractures (NVF) were disease duration (p=0.02), age (p=0.03), and bone mineral density at femoral neck (inverse correlation, p=0.04). Fractures should be carefully considered when evaluating the global picture of the patient with PsA for their contribution to the "fragility" profile. PMID:26523054

  13. Golimumab for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Epstein, D; Bojke, L; Craig, D; Light, K; Bruce, I; Sculpher, M; Woolacott, N

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a summary of the evidence review group (ERG) report into the use of golimumab for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The main clinical effectiveness data were derived from a single phase III randomised controlled trial (RCT: GO-REVEAL) that compared golimumab with placebo for treating patients with active and progressive PsA who were symptomatic despite the use of previous disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The 14-week data showed that, compared with placebo, golimumab 50 mg significantly improved joint disease response as measured by American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20 [relative risk (RR) 5.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.24 to 10.56] and Psoriatic Arthritis Response Criteria (PsARC) (RR 3.45, 95% CI 2.49 to 4.87), and skin disease response as measured by the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) 75 (RR 15.95, 95% CI 4.62 to 59.11). The 24-week absolute data showed that these treatment benefits were maintained. There was a significant improvement in patients' functional status as measured by the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) change from baseline at 24 weeks (-0.33, p patient crossover at week 16. The manufacturer conducted a mixed treatment comparison (MTC) analysis. The ERG considered the assumption of exchangeability between the trials for the purpose of the MTC analysis to be acceptable, and the statistical approach in the MTC analysis to be reliable. Regarding the safety evaluation of golimumab, the manufacturer failed to provide longer-term data or to consider adverse event data of golimumab from controlled studies in other conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. Although the adverse effect profile of golimumab appears similar to other anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) agents, the longer-term safety profile of golimumab remains uncertain. The manufacturer's submission presented a decision model to compare etanercept, infliximab, golimumab

  14. Treating psoriatic arthritis: how effective are TNF antagonists?

    OpenAIRE

    Gottlieb, Alice B.; Antoni, Christian E

    2004-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a seronegative spondyloarthropathy that commonly appears after the onset of the characteristic cutaneous lesions. This complication affects about 40% of patients with moderate to severe cutaneous disease. Analysis of synovial fluid and tissue in patients with PsA demonstrates a profile of high levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) plus other cytokines similar to those seen in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In the past, medical management of patients with...

  15. MRI findings of juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward Y.; Kleinman, Paul K. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States); Sundel, Robert P.; Kim, Susan [Harvard Medical School, Rheumatology Program, Division of Immunology and the Department of Pediatrics, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, David [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JpsA) in children in order to facilitate early diagnosis and proper management. Two pediatric radiologists retrospectively reviewed in consensus a total of 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients (nine boys, 22 girls; age range 1-17 years; mean age 9.4 years) who had a definite diagnosis of JpsA and underwent MRI. Each MRI was evaluated for synovium abnormality (thickening and enhancement), joint effusion (small, moderate, and large), bone marrow abnormality (edema, enhancement, and location of abnormality), soft tissue abnormality (edema, enhancement, atrophy, and fatty infiltration), tendon abnormality (thickening, edema, tendon sheath fluid, and enhancement), and articular abnormality (joint space narrowing and erosion). The distribution of abnormal MRI findings among the six categories for the 37 MRI examinations was evaluated. The number of abnormal MRI findings for each MRI examination was assessed. Age at MRI examination and all six categories of abnormal MRI findings according to gender were evaluated. There were a total 96 abnormal MRI findings noted on 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients. The 37 abnormal MRI examinations included MRI of the hand (n=8), knee (n = 8), ankle (n = 5), pelvis (n = 5), temporomandibular joint (n = 4), wrist (n = 3), foot (n = 2), elbow (n = 1), and shoulder (n = 1). Twenty-eight diffuse synovial thickening and/or enhancement were the most common MRI abnormality (29.2%). Joint effusion comprised 22 abnormal MRI findings (22.9%). There were 16 abnormal MRI bone marrow edema and/or enhancement findings (16.7%), and in seven (7.3%) the edema involved non-articular sites. Soft tissue abnormality manifested as edema and/or enhancement constituted 14 abnormal MRI findings (14.5%). There were ten MRI abnormalities (10.4%) involving tendons. Articular abnormality seen as joint space

  16. MRI findings of juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JpsA) in children in order to facilitate early diagnosis and proper management. Two pediatric radiologists retrospectively reviewed in consensus a total of 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients (nine boys, 22 girls; age range 1-17 years; mean age 9.4 years) who had a definite diagnosis of JpsA and underwent MRI. Each MRI was evaluated for synovium abnormality (thickening and enhancement), joint effusion (small, moderate, and large), bone marrow abnormality (edema, enhancement, and location of abnormality), soft tissue abnormality (edema, enhancement, atrophy, and fatty infiltration), tendon abnormality (thickening, edema, tendon sheath fluid, and enhancement), and articular abnormality (joint space narrowing and erosion). The distribution of abnormal MRI findings among the six categories for the 37 MRI examinations was evaluated. The number of abnormal MRI findings for each MRI examination was assessed. Age at MRI examination and all six categories of abnormal MRI findings according to gender were evaluated. There were a total 96 abnormal MRI findings noted on 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients. The 37 abnormal MRI examinations included MRI of the hand (n=8), knee (n = 8), ankle (n = 5), pelvis (n = 5), temporomandibular joint (n = 4), wrist (n = 3), foot (n = 2), elbow (n = 1), and shoulder (n = 1). Twenty-eight diffuse synovial thickening and/or enhancement were the most common MRI abnormality (29.2%). Joint effusion comprised 22 abnormal MRI findings (22.9%). There were 16 abnormal MRI bone marrow edema and/or enhancement findings (16.7%), and in seven (7.3%) the edema involved non-articular sites. Soft tissue abnormality manifested as edema and/or enhancement constituted 14 abnormal MRI findings (14.5%). There were ten MRI abnormalities (10.4%) involving tendons. Articular abnormality seen as joint space

  17. Subtype specific genetic associations for juvenile idiopathic arthritis: ERAP1 with the enthesitis related arthritis subtype and IL23R with juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Hinks, Anne; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Eyre, Steve; Packham, Jon; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an umbrella term for all chronic childhood arthropathies and can be divided into seven subtypes. It includes the enthesitis related arthritis (ERA) subtype which displays symptoms similar to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and juvenile-onset psoriatic arthritis which has similarities to psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and psoriasis (Ps). We, therefore, hypothesized that two well-established susceptibility loci for AS and Ps, ERAP1 and IL23R, could als...

  18. Osteoscintigraphy in the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors presented the results of clinical, X-ray and osteoscintigraphic investigations of 133 psoriasic arthritis patients and 72 patients with common psoriasis. Osteoscintigraphy was performed using a routine method with 99mTc-pyrophos (USSR) and 99mTc-phosphone (Hungary) on gamma-camera LFOV (Nuclear-Chicago, USA). X-ray signs of the involvement of the osteoarticular system were noted in 69 (51%) patients with psoriasic arthritis and in 16 (22%) patients with common psoriasis. The method permitted the detection of the foci of RP hyperfixation in 129 (97%) potients with psoriasic arthritis and in 51 (70.8%) patients with common psoriasis. They were observed mostly in large and small limb joints, less frequently-in the vertebral column, cranial bones, thorax, and ribs. Thus, osteoscintigraphy is a highly sensitive method for the detection of active inflammatory foci of the osteoarticular system in psoriasis at all stages of arthritis development. It makes it possible to detect the spreading of arthritis and its preclinical forms

  19. Psoriatic arthritis: A retrospective study of 162 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlica Ljiljana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of psoriatic arthritis in the patients with psoriasis and to analyze retrospectively the results of a 34-year multidisciplinary management of the patients with psoriatic arthritis. Methods. The study included 162 out of 183 treated patients with psoriatic arthritis, aged 48 ± 15 years. All the patients satisfied the current diagnostic criteria for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis according to the American College of Rheumatology. Results. Psoriatic arthritis developed in 183 (9.3% out of 1976 patients with psoriasis. Time interval for establishing the diagnosis was 4 years. A positive family history of the disease had 15.0% of the studied patients. Its onset was most often at 42 years of age in 70.4% of the cases, and 2 months to 59 years after the appearance of psoriasis. Psoriatic arthritis without psoriasis appeared in 1.8% of the patients. A severe form of arthritis had 64.2% of the patients, mainly the patients with scalp psoriasis (χ2=3.2; p<0.05. Nail changes had 35% of the patients. Distal interphalangeal joints were involved in 63.6%, axial skeleton in 36.4%, oligoarthritis in 45.0%, polyarthritis in 55.0%, and mutilating form in 6.8% of the patients. Elevated Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate was reveald in 61.7% of the patients. Immunoglobulin M (IgM rheumatoid factor was altered in 4.3% of the patients. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA typing in the 28 patients were: A2 32.0%, A3 18.0%, Al and A9 14.0%, A28 and A29 3.5%, B8 and B16 14.0%, B5 and B12 11.0%, B13,B15, B18, B27 and B35 7.0%. Radiologic changes were most often in hand and foot joints, less frequently in the knees and quite infrequently in hips and shoulders joints. Sacroiliitis was found in 46.4% of the patients. Psoriasis was treated with topical corticosteroids and salicylic ointments in all the patients, ultraviolet (PUVA therapy in 5.6% and retinoids in 4.3% of them. Artrithis was treated with nonsteroidal anti

  20. Characterisation of uveitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Paiva, E.; Macaluso, D.; Edwards, A.; ROSENBAUM, J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study is to describe the clinical characteristics of uveitis related to psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and also to compare the uveitis in PsA to the uveitis in spondyloarthropathy (SA).
METHODS—Sixteen patients with uveitis and PsA were evaluated in a tertiary care uveitis clinic. These patients were compared retrospectively to a series of 89 patients with uveitis and SA.
RESULTS—Eight (50%) of the 16 patients with uveitis had strictly peripheral arthritis, while two...

  1. HLA-B27 frequency in a group of patients with psoriatic arthritis *

    OpenAIRE

    Danilo Garcia Ruiz; Mário Newton Leitão de Azevedo; Omar Lupi

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HLA-B27 is associated with spondyloarthritis, a group of diseases that includes psoriatic arthritis. OBJECTIVES: To describe the HLA-B27 frequency in a group of Brazilian patients with psoriatic arthritis and correlate its presence or absence with their clinical manifestations. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 44 psoriatic arthritis patients of a Rheumatology clinic. Demographic and social data were recorded, as were skin and joints clinical examination. HLA-B27 was tested. All...

  2. High prevalence of psoriatic arthritis in patients with severe psoriasis with suboptimal performance of screening questionnaires.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Haroon, Muhammad

    2013-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) assess the prevalence of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) among Psoriasis (Ps) patients attending dermatology clinics; (2) identify clinical predictors of the development of PsA; and (3) compare the performance of three PsA screening questionnaires: Psoriatic Arthritis Screening and Evaluation (PASE), Psoriasis Epidemiology Screening Tool (PEST) and Toronto Psoriatic Arthritis Screening (ToPAS).

  3. Diagnosis and management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in adults : summary of SIGN guidance

    OpenAIRE

    Burden, A. D.; Boon, M. Hilton; Leman, J.; Wilson, H; Richmond, R; Ormerod, A D; Guideline Dev Grp; Ozakinci, Gozde

    2010-01-01

    No funding was received for writing this summary. The degree of disability and negative impact on quality of life caused by psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are comparable to those of ischaemic heart disease, diabetes, depression, and cancer.1 Severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are associated with an increased risk of conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and depression.2 3 4 5 Psoriatic arthritis is underdiagnosed; about a fifth of patients with psoriasis also have p...

  4. HLA associations reveal genetic heterogeneity in psoriatic arthritis and in the psoriasis phenotype.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Winchester, Robert

    2012-04-01

    Rigorously ascertained cases of psoriatic arthritis in subjects presenting to a rheumatology unit were compared with cases of psoriasis in subjects presenting to a dermatology unit, where subjects with musculoskeletal features were excluded, to address 1) the extent to which the contribution of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) to psoriatic arthritis susceptibility resembles that in psoriasis, and 2) whether MHC genes determine quantitative traits within the psoriatic arthritis phenotype.

  5. PSORIASIS AND PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: CHARACTERISTICS AND RISK FACTORS AMONG ADULT PATIENTS IN EGYPT

    OpenAIRE

    Essam A. El-Moselhy, Ibrahim Saad Nada, Hamed O. Khalifa,

    2012-01-01

    Background: Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are common, chronic, immune mediated disease of the skin and joints. Interaction between genes and environment are important in disease causation. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to determine the socioemographic and clinical characters of adult patients with psoriasis and those with psoriatic arthritis, to define psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis etiological risk factors, and to define the relationship between psoriasis severity and t...

  6. Psoriatic arthritis and temporomandibular joint involvement – literature review with a reported case

    OpenAIRE

    Badel, Tomislav; Savić Pavičin, Ivana; Krapac, Ladislav; Zadravec, Dijana; Rosić, Davorka

    2014-01-01

    In addition to psoriasis, between 5% and 24% of patients will develop psoriatic arthritis simultaneously after or even prior to skin manifestations. Psoriatic arthritis belongs to the group of seronegative spondyloarthritis. Collaboration between a dermatologist and a rheumatologist plays a more important role in cases where there is a complete absence of clinical signs of psoriasis. Since rheumatic diseases may also involve the temporomandibular joints (TMJ), psoriatic arthritis can cause pr...

  7. Risk factors and predictors of psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis *

    OpenAIRE

    Azevedo, Valderilio Feijó; Buiar, Pedro Grachinski

    2013-01-01

    Given the potential consequences of joint damage for patients with psoriatic arthritis, we believe that the optimization of screening methods and the investigation of arthritis in patients with psoriasis are a medical priority. It is very useful to identify predictors of arthritis in patients with psoriasis. In fact, there is a consensus among doctors that the large gap between the diagnosis of psoriasis and that of psoriatic arthritis should be narrowed. In order to better manage patients wi...

  8. Metabolomics in psoriatic disease: pilot study reveals metabolite differences in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, April W.; Julie Wu; Mary Ann Johnson; Dmitry Grapov; Baktazh Azizi; Jaskaran Dhillon; Oliver Fiehn

    2014-01-01

    Importance: While “omics” studies have advanced our understanding of inflammatory skin diseases, metabolomics is mostly an unexplored field in dermatology. Objective: We sought to elucidate the pathogenesis of psoriatic diseases by determining the differences in metabolomic profiles among psoriasis patients with or without psoriatic arthritis and healthy controls. Design: We employed a global metabolomics approach to compare circulating metabolites from patients with psoriasis, psoriasis and ...

  9. Golimumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis: efficacy and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Viktorovna Korotaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α holds a central position in the pathogenesis of autoimmune inflammatory diseases of the locomotor apparatus. A separate class of drugs, namely, TNF-α inhibitors, that are effective against multicomponent diseases, such as psoriatic arthritis (PsA, is now available to physicians. The paper reviews the results of clinical trials of the TNF-α inhibitor golimumab, a human TNF-α monoclonal antibody. Golimumab exerts a positive effect on all manifestations of PsA: arthritis, psoriatic skin and nail lesions, dactylitis, enthesitis, and quality of life. The drug is noted for its convenient route of administration – its standard dose is 50 mg injected subcutaneously once a month and for its low molecular immunogenicity. Recent data suggest that golimumab is an effective drug with a safety profile similar to that of the entire class of TNF-α inhibitors.

  10. Diagnostic delay in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jan; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Early diagnosis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases is important in order to improve long-term outcome. We studied whether delay in diagnosis (time between onset of symptoms and establishment of diagnosis) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PSA) and......). Sensitivity analyses including patients who were included after 2005, patients who had received biological treatment or had symptom onset less than 2 and 5 years prior to first entry into DANBIO showed similar results. CONCLUSION: Since the year 2000, a significant reduction in diagnostic delay was observed...

  11. Sensitivity and specificity of plain radiographic features of peripheral enthesopathy at major sites in psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helliwell, P.S. [University of Leeds, Academic Unit of Musculoskeletal and Rehabilitation Medicine, Leeds (United Kingdom); Porter, G. [Airedale Hospital NHS Trust, Keighley, West Yorkshire (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    It has been proposed that the defining difference between rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthropathy (including psoriatic arthritis) is the initial pathological lesion where the emphasis in psoriatic arthritis is on the enthesis and in rheumatoid arthritis on the synovium. Classical radiological descriptions of seronegative spondyloarthropathy include enthesopathy at major entheseal insertions characterised by erosions and exuberant new bone formation. In this study, the plain radiographic features of spondyloarthropathy are compared between psoriatic arthritis, other spondyloarthropathies and rheumatoid arthritis. The CASPAR study collected clinical, radiological and laboratory data on 588 patients with physician diagnosed psoriatic arthritis and 525 controls with other inflammatory arthritis, 70% of which had rheumatoid arthritis. Plain radiographs of the pelvis and heels were part of the study protocol, although radiographs of other potential entheseal sites such as the knee, elbow and shoulder, were interpreted if available. All radiographs were read blind by two observers working in tandem. Significant differences in entheseal erosion and entheseal new bone formation were found between psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy, rheumatoid arthritis and other diagnoses (entheseal erosion, chi-squared 20.8, p = 0.008; entheseal new bone formation, chi-squared 24.5, p = 0.001). These differences were mainly due to a higher proportion of these features in ankylosing spondylitis. No differences in the plain radiographic features of enthesopathy were found between psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis except in the case of entheseal new bone formation at sites of attachment of inguinal ligament, sartorius and rectus femoris muscles to the ilium (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.13-8.02). Very few subjects with symptomatic heel involvement had radiographic changes and minimal differences were found between those with and without

  12. Sensitivity and specificity of plain radiographic features of peripheral enthesopathy at major sites in psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been proposed that the defining difference between rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthropathy (including psoriatic arthritis) is the initial pathological lesion where the emphasis in psoriatic arthritis is on the enthesis and in rheumatoid arthritis on the synovium. Classical radiological descriptions of seronegative spondyloarthropathy include enthesopathy at major entheseal insertions characterised by erosions and exuberant new bone formation. In this study, the plain radiographic features of spondyloarthropathy are compared between psoriatic arthritis, other spondyloarthropathies and rheumatoid arthritis. The CASPAR study collected clinical, radiological and laboratory data on 588 patients with physician diagnosed psoriatic arthritis and 525 controls with other inflammatory arthritis, 70% of which had rheumatoid arthritis. Plain radiographs of the pelvis and heels were part of the study protocol, although radiographs of other potential entheseal sites such as the knee, elbow and shoulder, were interpreted if available. All radiographs were read blind by two observers working in tandem. Significant differences in entheseal erosion and entheseal new bone formation were found between psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy, rheumatoid arthritis and other diagnoses (entheseal erosion, chi-squared 20.8, p = 0.008; entheseal new bone formation, chi-squared 24.5, p = 0.001). These differences were mainly due to a higher proportion of these features in ankylosing spondylitis. No differences in the plain radiographic features of enthesopathy were found between psoriatic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis except in the case of entheseal new bone formation at sites of attachment of inguinal ligament, sartorius and rectus femoris muscles to the ilium (OR 3.01, 95% CI 1.13-8.02). Very few subjects with symptomatic heel involvement had radiographic changes and minimal differences were found between those with and without

  13. Long term efficacy and safety of etanercept in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kivelevitch D

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Dario Kivelevitch, Bobbak Mansouri, Alan Menter Department of Dermatology, Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA Abstract: Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease affecting both the skin and joints. Approximately 20% of patients suffer a moderate to severe form of skin disease and up to 30% have joint involvement. Standard therapies for psoriasis include topical medications, phototherapy, and both oral systemic and biological therapies whereas therapies for psoriatic arthritis include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs followed by disease modifying antirheumatic drugs and/or tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α inhibitors and interleukin-12/23p40 inhibitors. Treatment of both diseases is typically driven by disease severity. In the past decade, major advances in the understanding of the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis have led to the development of numerous biological therapies, which have revolutionized the treatment for moderate to severe plaque psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Anti-TNF-α agents are currently considered as first line biological therapies for the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Currently approved anti-TNF-α agents include etanercept, adalimumab, and infliximab for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis as well as golimumab and certolizumab for psoriatic arthritis. In this article, we aim to evaluate the long term safety and efficacy of etanercept in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Keywords: psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, etanercept, biological therapy, tumor necrosis factor, safety

  14. T cell responses in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diani, Marco; Altomare, Gianfranco; Reali, Eva

    2015-04-01

    According to the current view the histological features of psoriasis arise as a consequence of the interplay between T cells, dendritic cells and keratinocytes giving rise to a self-perpetuating loop that amplifies and sustains inflammation in lesional skin. In particular, myeloid dendritic cell secretion of IL-23 and IL-12 activates IL-17-producing T cells, Th22 and Th1 cells, leading to the production of inflammatory cytokines such as IL-17, IFN-γ, TNF and IL-22. These cytokines mediate effects on keratinocytes thus establishing the inflammatory loop. Unlike psoriasis the immunopathogenic features of psoriatic arthritis are poorly characterized and there is a gap in the knowledge of the pathogenic link between inflammatory T cell responses arising in the skin and the development of joint inflammation. Here we review the knowledge accumulated over the years from the early evidence of autoreactive CD8 T cells that was studied mainly in the years 1990s and 2000s to the recent findings of the role of Th17, Tc17 cells and γδ T cells in psoriatic disease pathogenesis. The review will also focus on common and distinguishing features of T cell responses in psoriatic plaques and in synovial fluid of patients with psoriatic arthritis. The integration of this information could help to distinguish the role played by T cells in the initiation phase of the disease from the role of T cells as downstream effectors sustaining inflammation in psoriatic plaques and potentially leading to disease manifestation in distant joints. PMID:25445403

  15. [Update on current care guidelines: psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated, inflammatory disorder of the skin and joints. Moderate-to-severe cases are associated with an independent risk of comorbidity (cardiovascular diseases and diabetes) even after adjusting for risk factors, known to be more prevalent in psoriatics compared to normal population. The underlying systemic inflammation, analogous to that observed in rheumatoid arthritis, calls for a long-term effective treatment. Screening and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors is highly recommended. The biologic drug arsenal has new additions. Long term treatment data from clinical study extensions and independent registries are reviewed. PMID:22970613

  16. Current views on the pharmacotherapy of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Taradin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The review deals with current pharmacological approaches to treating psoriatic arthritis (PsA. It gives data on the prevalence of psoriasis and psoriatic joint injury that is a common cause of early patient disability. Approaches to evaluating the efficacy of drugs are given on the basis of developed and used criteria with regard to the standardized assessment of the dynamics of joint injury in rheumatic diseases and PSA in particular. The review gives brief information on the mechanism of drug actions and the results of clinical trials evaluating the efficacy and safety of different medicaments in PsA. It also covers the experience in using nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, glucocorticoids, synthetic diseasemodifying antirheumatic drugs (methotrexate, cyclosporine, leflunomide, sulfasalazine, and also a promising group of biologicals. Particular emphasis is placed on the results of using tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (etanercept, infliximab, golimumab, certolizumab pegol, adalimumab, interleukin inhibitors (ustekinumab, brodalumab, and phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors (apremilast.

  17. Inflammatory Polyarthritis in a Patient with Psoriasis: Is It Psoriatic Arthritis or Rheumatoid Arthrirtis?

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Son, Myoung-Kyun; Ha, You-Jung; Choi, Sang-Tae; Lee, Sang-Won; Park, Yong-Beom; Lee, Soo-Kon

    2010-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis. There are no generally accepted diagnostic criteria for PsA. Indeed, the diagnosis of this inflammatory arthritis is made by exclusion of other possible diseases and based upon immunologic, radiologic, and clinical features which are consistent with the diagnosis. Inflammatory arthritis in a patient with psoriasis can be an important clue for the diagnosis of PsA, but the possibility for diagnosis of other infla...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the peripheral joints in psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Cimmino

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been widely used for the evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, with only a minority of studies considering other types of arthritis. This review is concerned with an evaluation of the MRI appearance of peripheral joints in psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Methods: A Medline search was performed to identify all publications from the years 1985 to 2006 concerning MRI of the peripheral joints and PsA. Additional papers were retrieved by scanning the references to the Medline-listed articles. Articles written in English, French, German, and Italian were included. Results: Most papers studied the hand and wrist, and only few of them were concerned with the knee, foot, temporomandibular joint, and elbow. Patients with PsA showed often, but not always, a pattern of joint inflammation which extended beyond the capsule into the extraarticular tissue. Bone oedema and erosions were less frequent than in RA. In particular, bone oedema at the entheseal junction was seen, especially in the knee. The degree of synovitis, assessed by dynamic MRI, was similar in PsA and RA. Discussion: Data on MRI of the peripheral joints in PsA are scanty. Only few studies were specifically designed to evaluate the pattern of arthritis in PsA, with most information deriving from papers where different types of arthritis were considered together. An enthesis-related origin of PsA has been proposed in contrast to the primarily synovial inflammation of RA. This pathogenic interpretation is likely to be true, but does not explain all cases of PsA, and needs to be confirmed by further studies.

  19. Diagnostic delay in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jan; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Early diagnosis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases is important in order to improve long-term outcome. We studied whether delay in diagnosis (time between onset of symptoms and establishment of diagnosis) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PSA) and...... ankylosing spondylitis (AS) changed from year 2000 to 2011. METHODS: Month and year of initial symptoms and diagnosis, gender, hospital, year of birth and date of first data entry were obtained for 13 721 patients with RA, PSA or AS who had been registered in the DANBIO registry. Time between symptom onset...... and diagnosis was modelled using generalised linear regression to predict the average duration for each calendar year of initial symptoms with adjustments for gender, year of birth and date of DANBIO entry. RESULTS: Patients with valid data (RA: 10 416 (73%); PSA: 1970 (68%); AS: 1335 (65%)) did not...

  20. Radiographic development during three decades in a patient with psoriatic arthritis mutilans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laasonen, Leena; Gudbjornsson, Björn; Ejstrup, Leif; Iversen, Lars; Ternowitz, Thomas; Ståhle, Mona; Lindqvist, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) is the most severe and rare form of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We describe radiological development in a typical case of PAM covering three decades in order to elucidate the need for early diagnosis of PAM. Radiographs of hands and feet, taken from 1981 to 2010......, were evaluated using the Psoriatic Arthritis Ratingen Score (PARS). When PsA was diagnosed, in 1981, gross deformity was observed in the second PIP joint of the left foot. Several pencil-in-cup deformities and gross osteolysis were present in the feet in the first decade of the disease. Over 10 years...

  1. Role of golimumab, a TNF-alpha inhibitor, in the treatment of the psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Michelon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Melissa A Michelon1, Alice B Gottlieb1,21Tufts University School of Medicine, 2Department of Dermatology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is an inflammatory arthritis that affects many psoriasis patients and can often have a debilitating disease progression. Golimumab is a new tumor necrosis factor (TNF antagonist recently approved by the FDA for controlling signs and symptoms of psoriatic arthritis. In a Phase III clinical trial in patients with PsA, patients receiving golimumab showed significant improvement in the signs and symptoms of disease. It was usually well tolerated, but adverse events generally occurred more in patients receiving golimumab compared to placebo. Golimumab has also recently shown efficacy in slowing structural damage in PsA. This new biologic therapy provides physicians with another option in the treatment of this inflammatory arthritis while offering patients certain advantages over other TNF antagonists.Keywords: golimumab, psoriatic arthritis, TNF-alpha inhibitor

  2. Remission in psoriatic arthritis: is it possible and how can it be predicted?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saber, Tajvur P

    2010-01-01

    Since remission is now possible in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) we wished to examine remission rates in PsA patients following anti tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) therapy and to examine possible predictors of response.

  3. The pharmacokinetic effect of coadministration of apremilast and methotrexate in individuals with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yong; Zhou, Simon; Nissel, James; Wu, Anfan; Lau, Henry; Palmisano, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Apremilast is a novel agent for the treatment of inflammatory based autoimmune disorders. The objective of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetic effects of co administration of apremilast and methotrexate on both agents. This was an open-label, multi-center, 3-treatment period, sequential study conducted in otherwise healthy subjects with psoriatic arthritis or rheumatoid arthritis who were receiving a stable oral dose of methotrexate between 7.5 to 20 mg once weekly. Subjects received...

  4. Nail Assessment in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (NAPPA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustin, M; Blome, C; Costanzo, A;

    2013-01-01

    assessing quality of life (NAPPA-QoL), a two-part questionnaire assessing patient-relevant treatment benefits (the Patient Benefit Index, NAPPA-PBI) and a psoriasis Clinical Assessment of Severity (NAPPA-CLIN). METHODS: Development of the questionnaires involved multiple steps: (i) collection of items about......BACKGROUND: Existing tools for nail psoriasis are complex and may not adequately measure outcomes that are important to patients. OBJECTIVES: We have developed and validated a new tool, the Nail Assessment in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (NAPPA), with three components: a questionnaire...... nail psoriasis-related impairments and treatment goals; (ii) selection of 48 items by an expert panel, including patients; (iii) translation into eight languages; (iv) feasibility testing and (v) longitudinal validation in six countries. RESULTS: Patients found the questionnaires clear (84%) and...

  5. Biomarkers in psoriatic arthritis: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generali, Elena; Scirè, Carlo A; Favalli, Ennio G; Selmi, Carlo

    2016-06-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is characterized by chronic inflammation of peripheral joints and axial skeleton, associated with a strong genetic background. Clinics include enthesitis or dactylitis and extra-articular involvement as uveitis or inflammatory bowel disease, while treatment options range from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to biologics, targeting TNF α or Th17. No serum autoantibody is associated with PsA, while other biomarkers have been proposed for early diagnosis or to predict treatment response. To better discuss this area of growing interest we performed a systematic review of the literature on biomarkers in PsA. Our research retrieved 408 papers, and 38 were included in the analysis. Based on the available literature, we draw some recommendations for the use of biomarkers in the management of patients with PsA. PMID:26821681

  6. Apremilast (Otezla). No progress in plaque psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    When PUVA therapy and immunosuppressants such as methotrexate are ineffective, TNF alpha antagonists are an option for patients with severe plaque psoriasis, in the absence of a better alternative. This is also the case for patients with psoriatic arthritis after failure of a "disease-modifying" antirheumatic drug. Apremilast, an oral immunosuppressant that inhibits phosphodiesterase type 4, has been authorised in the European Union for use in these settings. In patients with plaque psoriasis, oral apremilast was compared with subcutaneous etanercept, aTNF alpha antagonist, in a randomised, doubleblind, placebo-controlled trial lasting 16 weeks and involving 250 patients in whom other treatments had failed or were inappropriate. This trial failed to show that apremilast was more effective than etanercept. And about one-quarter more patients experienced symptom relief compared with placebo. In patients with psoriatic arthritis, there are no clinical trials comparing apremilast with TNF alpha antagonists, and no interpretable trials of apremilast after failure of a TNF alpha antagonist. In three randomised, double-blind trials including a total of 1493 patients treated for 16 weeks, at least a modest improvement in joint status was reported in about 35% of patients treated with apremilast versus 19% with placebo. This would suggest that apremilast is less effective than a TNF alpha antagonist. In the trial versus etanercept, serious adverse events occurred in 3.6% of patients treated with apremilast versus 1.2% of those treated with the TNF alpha antagonist. The main adverse effects of apremilast are diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting, headache, sometimes marked weight loss, and infections. A risk of depression and cardiac arrhythmia must also be taken into account. A risk of cancer in the long-term is likely, given the immunosuppressive action of apremilast. Apremilast is a substrate of cytochrome P450 isoenzyme 3A4 and accumulates in patients with renal failure. This

  7. MRI of the hand in psoriatic and rheumatical arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hand in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PA) was evaluated and compared with MRI of the hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both MRI and X-ray examinations of the hands were performed in 28 PA patients and 18 RA patients. The MRI showed a PA pattern characterized by a more pronounced soft tissue swelling as compared with RA patients. Diffuse and pronounced periarticular oedema that spread to the subcutis was evident in 24 (85.7 %) PA patients. Subchondral changes were characteristic of PA patients, and were observed in 12 of 28 PA patients (42.8 %). In these cases, conventional X-ray examination failed to show any bone change. These two changes were not seen in RA patients. Our preliminary results indicate that MRI might play a role in differential diagnosis between PA and RA especially in the early phase of the disease in which conventional radiological examination is negative. (orig.). With 5 figs., 2 tabs

  8. Erosive osteoarthritis, psoriatic arthritis and pseudogout; a casual association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxha, Ariela; Ruffatti, Amelia; Alberioli, Enrico; Lorenzin, Mariagrazia; Oliviero, Francesca; Mattia, Elena; Punzi, Leonardo; Ramonda, Roberta

    2016-07-01

    According to recent hypothesis, the inflammation has a pivotal role in the onset and progression of erosive hand osteoarthritis (EHOA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and chondrocalcinosis (CC)/pseudogout. Albeit, it has been recognised for years as an association between EHOA and radiographic evidence of CC, but there are few reports of coexistence of microcrystalline arthritis and PsA. This is the first report that described a clinical experience concerning two consecutive cases of patients presented with EHOA, PsA and pseudogout. Two Caucasian women of 71 and 85 years old with a history of OA and mild psoriasis are presented with tenderness and swelling of first interphalangeal (IP) and wrist joint, respectively. Arthrocentesis performed at the first IP and wrist joint, respectively, showed an inflammatory synovial fluid with presence of calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate crystals. X-rays of hands, feet and knees showed characteristic features of EHOA, PsA and CC. Furthermore, HLA typing evinces the presence of HLA C*06; DRB*01 07 and HLA C*07; DRB*01 *11 alleles, respectively, predisposing factors of these inflammatory diseases. The relationship between these aggressive rheumatic diseases along with their clinical, radiographic, laboratory and genetic features is discussed. PMID:25833145

  9. MRI of the hand in psoriatic and rheumatical arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovagnoni, A. [Department of Radiology and NMR Center, Univ. of Ancona (Italy); Grassi, W. [Department of Rheumatology, Univ. of Ancona (Italy); Terilli, F. [Department of Radiology and NMR Center, Univ. of Ancona (Italy); Blasetti, P. [Department of Rheumatology, Univ. of Ancona (Italy); Paci, E. [Department of Radiology and NMR Center, Univ. of Ancona (Italy); Ercolani, P. [Department of Radiology and NMR Center, Univ. of Ancona (Italy); Cervini, C. [Department of Rheumatology, Univ. of Ancona (Italy)

    1995-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hand in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PA) was evaluated and compared with MRI of the hand in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both MRI and X-ray examinations of the hands were performed in 28 PA patients and 18 RA patients. The MRI showed a PA pattern characterized by a more pronounced soft tissue swelling as compared with RA patients. Diffuse and pronounced periarticular oedema that spread to the subcutis was evident in 24 (85.7 %) PA patients. Subchondral changes were characteristic of PA patients, and were observed in 12 of 28 PA patients (42.8 %). In these cases, conventional X-ray examination failed to show any bone change. These two changes were not seen in RA patients. Our preliminary results indicate that MRI might play a role in differential diagnosis between PA and RA especially in the early phase of the disease in which conventional radiological examination is negative. (orig.). With 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. A comparison of disease burden in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Michelsen

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to compare disease burden in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, psoriatic arthritis (PsA and axial spondyloarthritis (ax-SpA.In this cross-sectional study, all the RA (1093, PsA (365 and ax-SpA (333 patients who visited the out-patient clinic of the Hospital of Southern Norway Trust during the year 2013 were included; the RA patients all had a RA diagnosis verified by the treating rheumatologist, the PsA patients all fulfilled the ClASsification for Psoriatic ARthritis (CASPAR criteria and the ax-SpA patients all fulfilled the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS classification criteria for ax-SpA. Patient-reported health status, demographic variables, medications, and composite scores of disease activity were assessed. The main analyses were performed using General Linear Models adjusted for age, sex and multiple comparisons. Correlation analyses were performed using Spearman's rho.The reported pain, joint pain, patient's global assessment and fatigue were similar in PsA and ax-SpA, but significantly lower in RA. The 28-joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28 (0.3±0.1, p = 0.003, Clinical Disease Activity Index (CDAI (1.0±0.4, p = 0.028 and Routine Assessment of Patient Index Data 3 (RAPID3 (0.4±0.1, p = 0.004 were all significantly higher in PsA vs. RA. RAPID3 showed moderate to high correlation with DAS28 (rho = 0.521, p<0.001 and CDAI (rho = 0.768, p<0.001 in RA and PsA, and with Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI (rho = 0.902, p<0.001 and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI (0.865, p<0.001 in ax-SpA and PsA.In conclusion, patient- reported outcome measures were similar in our population of PsA and ax-SpA patients, but significantly lower for the RA patients. Composite disease activity measures were lower in RA than in PsA and ax-SpA, but the magnitude of these differences was small and probably not of clinical significance. Our study indicates that

  11. X-ray diagnosis of mutilating arthritis in patients with psoriatic arthritis Smirnov A.V.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Smirnov

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The typical X-ray symptoms of psoriatic arthritis (PsA in joints of hands and distal sections of feet (asymmetric lesions; isolated lesion of distal interphalangeal joints (DIJ of hands with no changes in other small joints of hands; axial lesion of three joints in a single finger; transverse lesion of joints of the hand at the same level; destruction of distal phalanges; narrowing of the distal epiphysis of hand finger phalanges and metacarpal bones; cup-shaped deformity of the proximal portion of hand finger phalanges and narrowing of distal epiphysis; osseous ankyloses; multiple osteolytic lesions and destruction of bone epiphysis and joint deformities; inflammatory changes in the sacroiliac joints; and typical degenerative changes in the spine are described. It is especially important to know X-ray manifestations of PsA when there are no typical cutaneous manifestations of psoriasis. 

  12. Discriminant validity, responsiveness and reliability of the arthritis-specific Work Productivity Survey assessing workplace and household productivity in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Osterhaus, Jane T; Purcaru, Oana

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The novel arthritis-specific Work Productivity Survey (WPS) was developed to estimate patient productivity limitations associated with arthritis within and outside the home, which is an unmet need in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The WPS has been validated in rheumatoid arthritis. This report assesses the discriminant validity, responsiveness and reliability of the WPS in adult-onset PsA. Methods Psychometric properties were assessed using data from the RAPID-PsA trial (NCT01087788)...

  13. AUTONOMIC CARDIOVASCULAR REGULATION DISORDERS IN PATIENTS WITH PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Rebrov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim – to identify disorders of autonomic regulation of cardiac activity in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA by determining the heart rate variability (HRV, and also establish the relationship of HRV with systemic inflammation and traditional cardiovascular risk factors.Materials and methods. The study included 53 patients with PsA (mean age 43.64 ± 12.1 years, including 48.2 % men, mean disease durationwas 10.32 ± 10.2 years. The control group included 25 healthy volunteers (average age 46.7 ± 12.45 years, 49.1 % – men. Time andfrequency measures of HRV were analyzed. Active PsA was determined by an index DAS4, rate erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, levels of C-reactive protein (CRP and fibrinogen. Patients with clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease, and patients with symptomsof carotid atherosclerosis, detected by duplex study were excluded.Results. Deterioration of HRV in patients with PsA compared with those in patients of the control group, the availability of statistically significant reverse relationship of temporal and spectral parameters of HRV with PsA activity (ESR, CRP, entezit score, DAS4, duration of arthritis, the classical factors of cardiovascular risk were established.Conclusion. Patients with PsA had noted a violation of autonomic regulation of cardiac activity in the form of reduced HRV and activation of the sympathetic part of it. Identified changes were associated with activity of systemic inflammation and classical factors of cardiovascular risk.

  14. Novel Oral Therapies for Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Zenas Z N; Warren, Richard B

    2016-06-01

    Several classes of new oral therapy are in use or in development for the treatment of psoriasis. Despite the high efficacy of biologics, new oral therapies remain important as patients generally prefer this mode of administration and they offer an alternative risk-benefit profile. In this review, we discuss the novel modes of action of these drugs, including modulation of cellular pathways involving diverse targets such as Janus kinase, phosphodiesterase 4, sphingosine 1-phosphate, A3 adenosine receptor and rho-associated kinase 2. We review the available evidence around licensed drugs (apremilast) and drugs that are advanced (tofacitinib) or early (ponesimod, baricitinib, peficitinib, INCB039110, CF101, KD025) in the development pipeline. The key limitations of these oral therapies are their modest efficacy profile (apremilast, ponesimod) and the limitations of their safety profile (tofacitinib, ponesimod), while the evidence for the early pipeline drugs are at phase II level only. Potential niches of current unmet needs include apremilast for patients with concomitant psoriatic arthritis, as combination treatments with biologic therapies, and/or for patients in whom multiple biologic therapies have failed due to immunogenicity and secondary inefficacy. The present knowledge gap regarding these novel drugs includes the need for longer clinical trials or observational studies to evaluate safety, and randomised phase III trials for the early pipeline drugs. We conclude that further research and data are necessary to conclusively establish the role of these agents in the current psoriasis treatment paradigm. PMID:26923915

  15. IFN-αα induced psoriatic arthritis and HCV-related liver cirrhosis. Therapeutic options and patient’s opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Piga

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in the setting of Psoriatic Arthritis is an additional variable to be considered in the therapeutic approach to the disease because of the complications of an immunosuppressive treatment in the course of a chronic infection and the possible hepatotoxicity of many drugs conventionally used to treat psoriatic arthritis. The case reported explores the therapeutic options in a patient with IFN-α induced psoriatic arthritis, characterised by severe arthritis and psoriasis but also the concomitant presence of HCV chronic hepatitis, in light of the patient’s concerns

  16. Update on the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis – role of apremilast

    OpenAIRE

    Forchhammer S; Ghoreschi K

    2015-01-01

    Stephan Forchhammer, Kamran GhoreschiDepartment of Dermatology, University Medical Center, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Tübingen, GermanyAbstract: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis (PsO). The treatment of PsA can be challenging and includes non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs, and biologicals. One novel oral compound that has been recently established for the treatment of PsO ...

  17. Use of Ultrasound for Diagnosis and Follow-Up of Psoriatic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Rusmir Husic; Anja Ficjan; Christina Duftner; Christian Dejaco

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound (US) is increasingly used as a bedside tool for diagnostic and monitoring purposes in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The sonographic differentiation between PsA and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may be challenging because the morphological appearance of synovitis is similar in both conditions. In contrast, perisynovial inflammation is a specific finding of early PsA, and enthesitis is more frequently detected in PsA than in RA. After initiation of effective th...

  18. Temporomandibular Disorders in Psoriasis Patients with and without Psoriatic Arthritis: An Observational Study

    OpenAIRE

    Crincoli, Vito; Di Comite, Mariasevera; Di Bisceglie, Maria Beatrice; Fatone, Laura; Favia, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Psoriasis is a chronic, remitting and relapsing inflammatory disorder, involving the skin, nails, scalp and mucous membranes, that impairs patients' quality of life to varying degrees. Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic seronegative, inflammatory arthritis, usually preceded by psoriasis. Temporomandibular disorders is a generic term referred to clinical conditions involving the jaw muscles and temporomandibular joint. The aim of this study was to assess symptoms and signs of temporomandib...

  19. Frequency of HLA antigens in patients with psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    McKendry, R. J.; Sengar, D P; DesGroseilliers, J. P.; Dunne, J V

    1984-01-01

    A study of 138 patients with psoriasis--74 with psoriasis alone and 64 with psoriatic arthritis--revealed a significantly increased frequency of the HLA antigens A1, A28, B13, DR7 and MT3 in those with psoriasis alone and of Bw39 in those with psoriatic arthritis. The frequency of B17 was higher in both patient groups than in a control group of healthy individuals. The frequency of DRw6 was slightly higher in the patients with psoriasis alone (17.8%) than in the controls (4.7%), and that of D...

  20. The involvement of the spine in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraliakos, Xenofon; Coates, Laura C; Braun, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Although different classification criteria have been developed for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA), a clear distinction is still not always possible in daily practice. In addition, clinical examination of patients initially diagnosed as PsA due to peripheral symptoms and skin lesions may also show inflammation in the axial skeleton causing inflammatory back pain, stiffness and changes on imaging including sacroiliitis, spondylitis and syndesmophyte formation, similar to what is known from ankylosing spondylitis (AS), the prototype of SpA. However, and in contrast to patients with AS, the long-term radiographic progression of patients with axial disease in PsA seems to be rather independent from spinal mobility. If axial symptoms predominate, diagnosis and classification can be made as axSpA - with or without psoriasis. Furthermore, also the role of HLA-B27 appears to be different in patients with PsA. Overall, the most data about axial involvement in SpA come from AS and axSpA studies, while data about the axial involvement in PsA is limited. Finally, there are no approved therapies for treatment of axial PsA at present, despite significant clinical morbidity. In recent years, anti-TNF therapies have revolutionised the management of ax-SpA. The new GRAPPA treatment recommendations have given specific management advice for patients with axial involvement based on literature from AS and axial SpA. This review aims to give an overview of the existing evidence, the clinical and imaging presentation, and therapeutic consequences of axial involvement in patients with PsA. PMID:26471338

  1. Geoepidemiology and environmental factors of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Vinod; Raychaudhuri, Siba P

    2010-05-01

    Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) are chronic inflammatory diseases that have a major impact on health. The prevalence and incidence estimates of these two closely related diseases show ethnic and geographic variations, being generally more common in the colder north than in the tropics. In Europe the prevalence of psoriasis varies anywhere from 0.6 to 6.5%. In the USA, the estimated prevalence of diagnosed psoriasis is 3.15%. The prevalence in Africa varies depending on geographic location, being lowest in West Africa. Psoriasis is less prevalent in China and Japan than in Europe, and is entirely absent in natives of the Andean region of South America. There are fewer reports on the incidence of psoriasis, but a recent study from Rochester, USA showed an increasing trend over the last 2 decades. The prevalence of PsA also shows similar variation, being highest in people of European descent and lowest in the Japanese. Although, study methodology and case definition may explain some of the variations, genetic and environmental factors are important. Genetic epidemiologic studies have shown that both diseases have a strong genetic component. The strongest association is with HLA-Cw*06. Associations with a number of genes including IL12B and IL23R have recently been confirmed. Environmental risk factors including streptococcal pharyngitis, stressful life events, low humidity, drugs, HIV infection, trauma, smoking and obesity have been associated with psoriasis and PsA. Here we have reviewed the current literature on the epidemiology and genetics of psoriasis and PsA. PMID:20034760

  2. Concepts of pathogenesis in psoriatic arthritis: genotype determines clinical phenotype.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Oliver

    2015-05-07

    This review focuses on the genetic features of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and their relationship to phenotypic heterogeneity in the disease, and addresses three questions: what do the recent studies on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) tell us about the genetic relationship between cutaneous psoriasis (PsO) and PsA - that is, is PsO a unitary phenotype; is PsA a genetically heterogeneous or homogeneous entity; and do the genetic factors implicated in determining susceptibility to PsA predict clinical phenotype? We first discuss the results from comparing the HLA typing of two PsO cohorts: one cohort providing the dermatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsO without evidence of arthritic disease; and the second cohort providing the rheumatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsA. We show that these two cohorts differ considerably in their predominant HLA alleles, indicating the heterogeneity of the overall PsO phenotype. Moreover, the genotype of patients in the PsA cohort was shown to be heterogeneous with significant elevations in the frequency of haplotypes containing HLA-B*08, HLA-C*06:02, HLA-B*27, HLA-B*38 and HLA-B*39. Because different genetic susceptibility genes imply different disease mechanisms, and possibly different clinical courses and therapeutic responses, we then review the evidence for a phenotypic difference among patients with PsA who have inherited different HLA alleles. We provide evidence that different alleles and, more importantly, different haplotypes implicated in determining PsA susceptibility are associated with different phenotypic characteristics that appear to be subphenotypes. The implication of these findings for the overall pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in PsA is discussed with specific reference to their bearing on the discussion of whether PsA is conceptualised as an autoimmune process or one that is based on entheseal responses.

  3. Long-term survival of methotrexate in psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Battafarano

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term survival rate of Methotrexate (MTX in the peripheral joint involvement of psoriatic arthritis (PsA in a setting of everyday clinical practice. Methods. This was an observational restrospective study performed using the data from a dermatological-rheumatological PsA clinic. All of the patients evaluated at this clinic from March 1997 to December 2007 who were started on MTX alone, had a three-year follow-up time or had discontinued the therapy were included into the survey. Results. Of the 174 evaluable patients, 104 (59.8% were still taking MTX after three years of treament. The reasons of therapy discontinuation in the remaining 70 (40.2% patients were: 34 (19.5% lost-to-follow-up, 18 (10.3% adverse events, 14 (8% inefficacies, and 4 (2.3% deaths (none related to the therapy. MTX was effective in controlling joint inflammation but not in preventing their deterioration. Overall, adverse events were recorded in 43 patients (36.4% of the 114 patients with a three-year follow-up. No serious side effect occurred in the study population. Conclusions. The results of this study showed that, in a setting of clinical pratice, MTX had a good three-year performance in patients with peripheral PsA. Almost 60% of them were still taking this drug at the end of the study period and the toxicity was more than acceptable. In our opinion, MTX might be considered the non-biological DMARD of choice for the treatment of this condition. However it should be used earlier and at higher doses.

  4. The Role of p38 MAPK in the Aetiopathogenesis of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Mavropoulos, Athanasios; Eirini I. Rigopoulou; Liaskos, Christos; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.; Sakkas, Lazaros I.

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for the induction of immune-mediated disorders, such as psoriasis, remain not well characterized. Molecular signaling pathways are not well described in psoriasis, as well as psoriatic arthritis, which is seen in up to 40% of patients with psoriasis. Signaling pathway defects have long been hypothesized to participate in the pathology of psoriasis, yet their implication in the altered psoriatic gene expression still remains unclear. Emerging data sugges...

  5. Proposal for levels of evidence schema for validation of a soluble biomarker reflecting damage endpoints in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis, and recommendations for study design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksymowych, W.P.; Fitzgerald, O.; Wells, G.A.; Gladman, D.D.; Landewe, R.; Østergaard, Mikkel; Taylor, W.J.; Christensen, R.; Tak, P.P.; Boers, M.; Syversen, S.W.; Bathon, J.M.; Ritchlin, C.J.; Mease, P.J.; Bykerk, V.P.; Garnero, P.; Geusens, P.; El-Gabalawy, H.; Aletaha, D.; Inman, R.D.; Kraus, V.B.; Kvien, T.K.; der, Heijde D. van

    2009-01-01

    arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We also aimed to generate consensus on minimum standards for the design of longitudinal studies aimed at validating biomarkers. METHODS: Before the meeting, the Soluble Biomarker Working Group prepared a preliminary framework and...

  6. Developing a magnetic resonance imaging scoring system for peripheral psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McQueen, Fiona; Lassere, Marissa; Bird, Paul;

    2007-01-01

    We describe the first steps in developing an OMERACT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scoring system for peripheral psoriatic arthritis (PsA). A preexisting MRI dataset (finger joints) from 10 patients with PsA was scored by 4 readers for bone erosion, bone edema, synovitis, tendinopathy, and...

  7. Brief report: Enrichment of activated group 3 innate lymphoid cells in psoriatic arthritis synovial fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijten, Emmerik F A; van Kempen, Tessa S.; Boes, Marianne; Michels-van Amelsfort, Jocea M R; Hijnen, Dirkjan; Hartgring, Sarita A Y; van Roon, Joel A G; Wenink, Mark H.; Radstake, Timothy R D J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently discovered group of cells that are essential to epithelial homeostasis and are implicated in psoriasis pathogenesis, yet they have never been reported in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: ILC classes and subsets were characterized in the perip

  8. EFFICACY OF UNDERWATER INTERFERENTIAL CURRENT ON HAND FUNCTION IN PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Fathy Samhan. PhD PT

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psoriatic arthritis is an entity of inflammatory joint disease associated with psoriasis. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of underwater interferential current therapy on hand function in psoriatic arthritis of both hands. Method: Thirty patients (18 females and 12 males had psoriatic arthritis of hands, aged 42 to 50 years with 45.77 ± 3.52 mean, were assigned randomly into two groups of equal number: study group received 20 minutes underwater interferential current for one month, 3 times per week (12 sessions and control group received placebo interferential current. Visual analogue scale for patient-reported pain, the Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire score, and hand function (grip force in Pound of dominant hand were assessed pretreatment and post-treatment. Results: showed significant improvement in the 3 outcomes in study group (p 0.005. Visual analogue scale had a strong positive correlation (p < 0.001 with the disability score and a strong negative correlation (p < 0.001 with the grip force. Conclusion: Using underwater interferential current therapy in patient with psoriatic arthritis of hands was effective in improvement of hand function and quality of life.

  9. Confirmation of TNIP1 and IL23A as susceptibility loci for psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2011-09-01

    To investigate a shared genetic aetiology for skin involvement in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) by genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), reported to be associated in genome-wide association studies of psoriasis, in patients with PsA.

  10. PSORIASIS AND PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS: CHARACTERISTICS AND RISK FACTORS AMONG ADULT PATIENTS IN EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam A. El-Moselhy, Ibrahim Saad Nada, Hamed O. Khalifa,

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis are common, chronic, immune mediated disease of the skin and joints. Interaction between genes and environment are important in disease causation. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to determine the socioemographic and clinical characters of adult patients with psoriasis and those with psoriatic arthritis, to define psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis etiological risk factors, and to define the relationship between psoriasis severity and these items. Subjects and methods: This study was conducted at Dermatology Clinic, Al-Hussein University Hospital. A case-control study design was chosen to perform this research. The study was conducted on 100 adult patients with psoriasis and an equal number of free adults as controls. Criteria for diagnosis of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis were used. A comprehensive questionnaire was used to survey the studied groups. Body surface area of the affected patients was used as a marker of disease severity.Results: The study showed that 44.0% of the cases had psoriasis age of onset; 22-45 years. Stress was the most common etiological risk factor, 67.0%. While, the most important risk factors were family history of psoriasis, recurrent pharyngitis, smoking ≥20 cigarettes/ day and higher level of education, odds ratio (OR=7.58, 5.94, 2.78 and 2.69, respectively. Also, 32.0% of the patients had psoriatic arthritis. Psoriatic arthritis comes after psoriasis and had mild severity in 65.6% and 68.7% of the cases, respectively. The most important etiological risk factors were severe psoriasis, smoking ≥20 cigarettes/day and early onset of psoriasis, OR=9.64, 3.06 and 2.72, respectively.Conclusions and recommendations: The epidemiology of psoriasis is not well defined in Egypt. The heredity and environmental factors are the most important risk factors. Also, psoriatic arthritis is an important associated disease. The fact that it has no cure has important

  11. Composite Measures in Psoriatic Arthritis: a report from the GRAPPA 2009 annual meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliwell, Philip S; Fitzgerald, Oliver; Strand, C Vibeke; Mease, Philip J

    2011-03-01

    A composite measure is one way of incorporating an assessment of all relevant clinical outcomes into one single measure. By definition it incorporates several dimensions of disease status often by combining these different domains into a single score. Such instruments are well established in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and these RA-specific measures have successfully been adopted for use in clinical trials involving patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). However, the need for a more PsA-specific composite measure has led to a number of proposals, which, for the large part, incorporate only peripheral articular disease activity. New indices that combine the diverse clinical manifestations of PsA are now under development. These issues were discussed at the 2009 annual meeting of GRAPPA (Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis) in Stockholm, Sweden, and are summarized here. PMID:21362782

  12. Occurrence of Psoriatic Arthritis during Interferon Beta 1a Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Toussirot

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferon beta (IFN-β is the first line therapy of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. IFN-β is a cytokine that can contribute to the development of systemic autoimmune disease including psoriasis. The development or the exacerbation of psoriasis during IFN-β treatment has been previously observed. We report the occurrence of arthritis and dactylitis in a multiple sclerosis patient with preexisting psoriasis diagnosed as a psoriatic arthritis. The IL-23/Th17 pathway is involved in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and it has been suggested that IFN-β therapy in patients with Th17-mediated disease may be detrimental. Together with previous similar reports, our case suggests that IFN-β should certainly be used with caution in patients with concomitant systemic autoimmune disease with IL-23/Th17 involvement.

  13. The Role of p38 MAPK in the Aetiopathogenesis of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Mavropoulos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for the induction of immune-mediated disorders, such as psoriasis, remain not well characterized. Molecular signaling pathways are not well described in psoriasis, as well as psoriatic arthritis, which is seen in up to 40% of patients with psoriasis. Signaling pathway defects have long been hypothesized to participate in the pathology of psoriasis, yet their implication in the altered psoriatic gene expression still remains unclear. Emerging data suggest a potential pathogenic role for mitogen activated protein kinases p38 (p38 MAPK extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK in the development of psoriasis. The data are still limited, though, for psoriatic arthritis. This review discusses the current data suggesting a crucial role for p38 MAPK in the pathogenesis of these disorders.

  14. Value of Entheseal Ultrasonography and Serum Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein in the Preclinical Diagnosis of Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moataz Mohammed Samy Elbeblawy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the utility of entheseal ultrasonography and serum COMP in the preclinical diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. Methods: 60 psoriatic patients were divided into: 30 patients with psoriasis (group I and 30 patients with psoriatic arthritis as control (group II. They underwent independent clinical and ultrasonographic examination of both lower limbs at the calcaneal insertions of Achilles tendons. Psoriatic arthritis disease activity and severity was assessed by modified DAS28 and Steinbrockers scores. Serum levels of COMP were measured for all patients by ELISA. Results: On clinical examination, no entheseal abnormalities were detected in group I while they were present in 23.3% of group II with statistically significant difference between them (P 0.05. Serum COMP were significantly elevated in group I and II with no statistically significant difference between them (mean ± SD 5.9 ± 3 and 6.8 ± 12 respectively, P > 0.05. Entheseal ultrasound was more specific (67% while serum COMP was more sensitive (87% in the preclinical diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. Serum COMP levels were significantly correlated with CRP in both groups and with DAS28 and Steinbrockers scores in group II (P < 0.01. Conclusion: Entheseal ultrasonography and serum COMP levels may be used complementary to each other for preclinical diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. Serum COMP seems to be promising prognostic marker for psoriatic arthritis patients.

  15. Is the HLA B27 genotype a risc faktor for psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis vulgaris?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zerrin Öğretmen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Backround and Design: Psoriasis is a common inflammatory dermatological disease which may be complicated with joint involvement. It has been suggested that there is an association between HLA-B27 positivity and early onset psoriasis. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the incidence of HLA-B27 positivity in psoriasis patients with arthritis. Materials and Methods: In a total of 96 patients with psoriasis, age of onset, family history, and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI values were recorded. The patients were evaluated with regard to physical examination (presence of arthritis, acute phase reactants, HLA-B27 positivity and joint radiographs. Control group comprised of 100 randomly selected healthy individuals. Results: Thirty (31.250% patients were with psoriasis alone, 66 (68.75% were with the findings of psoriasis and arthritis. Of the 66 patients, 17 (17.708% were symptomatic (clinical and radiologic findings and 49 (51.042% subjects were asymptomatic (radiologic findings only. Nine patients (6 with psoriasis only and 3 with psoriatic arthritis and 2 healthy controls were positive for HLA-B27. Conclusion: To carry HLA-B27 antigen increased the risk of psoriasis with an OR of 5.06, and clinically proven psoriatic arthritis with an OR of 10.5 compared to healthy controls. These results need confirmation in a larger group of patients with the inclusion of proper positive and healthy controls.

  16. Application of the GRAPPA psoriatic arthritis treatment recommendations in clinical practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mumtaz, Aizad

    2012-02-01

    Psoriatic disease presents with a complex array of clinical features, including peripheral synovitis and skin psoriasis, but there is also variable involvement of the nail, dactylitis, enthesitis, and spinal disease. Composite assessment of disease activity and response taking into account the impact of the disease as a whole on an individual\\'s health and quality of life is of vital importance. Following an extensive literature review, discussions, and consensus, the Group for Research in Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) published guidelines to help clinicians make treatment decisions. The utility of these guidelines in routine clinical practice is further enhanced by incorporating them into a Composite Psoriatic Disease Activity Index (CPDAI). The potential application of the CPDAI in typical psoriatic disease patients is presented and discussed. Validation and possible modification of a composite disease activity and responder index is currently being undertaken by GRAPPA.

  17. Adalimumab for long-term treatment of psoriatic arthritis: 2-year data from the Adalimumab Effectiveness in Psoriatic Arthritis Trial (ADEPT)

    OpenAIRE

    Mease, P J; Ory, P; Sharp, J T; Ritchlin, C T; Van den Bosch, F; Wellborne, F; Birbara, C.; Thomson, G T D; Perdok, R J; Medich, J; Wong, R L; Gladman, D D

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the long-term effectiveness and tolerability of adalimumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods: Patients with PsA who completed a 24-week, double-blind study of adalimumab versus placebo were eligible to enroll in an open-label extension study and receive adalimumab 40 mg subcutaneously every other week for up to an additional 120 weeks. At the time of this analysis, available efficacy evaluations throughout 2 years of treatment (n  =  245) included A...

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging in psoriatic arthritis -- update on current status and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Poggenborg, René Panduro

    2012-01-01

    Measures in Rheumatology) may contribute to facilitating research, identifying appropriate areas for use, and reaching consensus on the optimal examination technique. Accordingly, GRAPPA, a primary driver of international research in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), has focused on the current use......The potential of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for use in clinical practice and research has gained increasing interest over the last decade. International collaborative initiatives from GRAPPA (Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis) and/or OMERACT (Outcome...... and future development of MRI and other modern imaging modalities in PsA. This review, presented at the GRAPPA 2010 annual meeting, describes the current status of MRI in PsA, with a focus on its use in diagnosis, monitoring, and prediction of the disease course and treatment response. Important areas...

  19. Clinical and immunogenetic characteristics of psoriatic arthritis: a single-center experience from South India

    OpenAIRE

    CB Mithun; Paul T Antony; Christina M Mariaselvam; Vir S Negi

    2013-01-01

    AimThe aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and prevalence of HLA B27 in patients with psoriatic arthritis presenting to a tertiary care centre in South India. BackgroundAlthough the prevalence of psoriasis is high in India, there is paucity of data, especially on Ps A. Materials and methodsThis retrospective study included 141 patients satisfying the ClASsification criteria for Ps A (CASPAR). Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data of the patients were collected...

  20. Long term efficacy and safety of etanercept in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Kivelevitch, Dario; Mansouri, Bobbak; Menter, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated inflammatory disease affecting both the skin and joints. Approximately 20% of patients suffer a moderate to severe form of skin disease and up to 30% have joint involvement. Standard therapies for psoriasis include topical medications, phototherapy, and both oral systemic and biological therapies whereas therapies for psoriatic arthritis include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs followed by disease modifying antirheumatic drugs and/or tumor necrosis ...

  1. Pain mechanisms and ultrasonic inflammatory activity as prognostic factors in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Pil; Christensen, Robin; Dreyer, Lene;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Persistent pain is a major concern for patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Pain may be due to inflammatory activity or augmented central pain processing. Unawareness of the origin and mechanisms of pain can lead to misinterpretation of disease activity (by composite scores) and...... NCT02572700). Results will be disseminated through publication in international peer-reviewed journals. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT02572700, Pre-results....

  2. Pharmacoeconomic burden in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis: from systematic reviews to real clinical practice studies

    OpenAIRE

    Lubrano, Ennio; Spadaro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The economic assessment of treatment options in a chronic and severe disease like Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) is crucial to estimate the burden of costs. In particular, the impact of new costly medications such as biologic agents have been studied to figure this important aspect of a multifaceted disease. In a previous observational, longitudinal multicentre cost evaluation study, the results showed that biologic agents are cost-effective. This study was obtained from the real clinical practice...

  3. Yellow fever vaccine used in a psoriatic arthritis patient treated with methotrexate

    OpenAIRE

    Štuhec, Matej

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever vaccines on the market are contraindicated for immunocompromised and elderly patients. A case of yellow fever vaccine used in a 27-year-old Slovenian male with psoriatic arthritis during treatment with methotrexate is described. We demonstrate a positive case, since there were noadverse effects in concurrent administration of yellow fever vaccine and methotrexate. This patient did not show severe adverse reactions and did not contract yellow fever despite potential exposure. ...

  4. Yellow fever vaccine used in a psoriatic arthritis patient treated with methotrexate: a case report:

    OpenAIRE

    Štuhec, Matej

    2014-01-01

    The yellow fever vaccines on the market are contraindicated for immunocompromised and elderly patients. A case of yellow fever vaccine used in a 27-year-old Slovenian male with psoriatic arthritis during treatment with methotrexate is described. We demonstrate a positive case, since there were noadverse effects in concurrent administration of yellow fever vaccine and methotrexate. This patient did not show severe adverse reactions and did not contract yellow fever despite potential exposure. ...

  5. Depression and Insomnia in Patients With Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Taking Tumor Necrosis Factor Antagonists

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chun-Ying; Chang, Yun-Ting; Juan, Chao-Kuei; Shen, Jui-Lung; Lin, Yu-Pu; Shieh, Jeng-Jer; Liu, Han-Nan; Chen, Yi-Ju

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Psoriasis patients with moderate to severe disease often present with depression and insomnia. Treatment targeting both psoriasis and psychological comorbidities is needed to improve the quality of life of these patients. In this nationwide cohort study, a total of 980 patients with psoriatic arthritis or psoriasis who had received nonbiological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologics therapy between 2009 and 2012 were identified. The prevalence rates of patients taking m...

  6. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in a patient on etanercept for psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lahiff, C

    2007-12-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) is a rare form of pneumonia associated with immune-suppression. It is common in patients with AIDS and with a CD4 count of less than 200 cells\\/mm(3). We report a case of PCP secondary to immune-suppression in a 41-year-old man with psoriatic arthritis being treated with the immune-modulatory agent etanercept.

  7. New developments in the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: a focus on apremilast

    OpenAIRE

    Palfreeman AC; McNamee KE; McCann FE

    2013-01-01

    Andrew C Palfreeman, Kay E McNamee, Fiona E McCann The Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Nuffield Department of Orthopedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, London, UK Abstract: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, most commonly resulting in the occurrence of red and silver scaly plaques. About 30% of psoriasis sufferers develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a disorder that presents with additional joint inflammation and other clinical features. At ...

  8. Remission of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis During Bevacizumab Therapy for Renal Cell Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ananaya Datta-Mitra; Riar, Navdeep K; Raychaudhuri, Siba P

    2014-01-01

    Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), is employed for treatment of several cancers and retinopathies. Although previous reports of remission of psoriasis with bevacizumab do exist, but its current experience for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is still limited. In this report, we describe a patient with metastatic renal cell cancer, psoriasis and PsA, who experienced a complete remission of psoriasis and PsA during bevacizumab therapy without any othe...

  9. Diagnostic imaging of psoriatic arthritis. Part I: etiopathogenesis, classifications and radiographic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona; Matuszewska, Genowefa; Kwiatkowska, Brygida; Pracoń, Grzegorz

    2016-03-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is one of the spondyloarthritis. It is a disease of clinical heterogenicity, which may affect peripheral joints, as well as axial spine, with presence of inflammatory lesions in soft tissue, in a form of dactylitis and enthesopathy. Plain radiography remains the basic imaging modality for PsA diagnosis, although early inflammatory changes affecting soft tissue and bone marrow cannot be detected with its use, or the image is indistinctive. Typical radiographic features of PsA occur in an advanced disease, mainly within the synovial joints, but also in fibrocartilaginous joints, such as sacroiliac joints, and additionally in entheses of tendons and ligaments. Moll and Wright classified PsA into 5 subtypes: asymmetric oligoarthritis, symmetric polyarthritis, arthritis mutilans, distal interphalangeal arthritis of the hands and feet and spinal column involvement. In this part of the paper we discuss radiographic features of the disease. The next one will address magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography. PMID:27104004

  10. Radiographic development during three decades in a patient with psoriatic arthritis mutilans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) is the most severe and rare form of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We describe radiological development in a typical case of PAM covering three decades in order to elucidate the need for early diagnosis of PAM. Radiographs of hands and feet, taken from 1981 to 2010, were evaluated using the Psoriatic Arthritis Ratingen Score (PARS). When PsA was diagnosed, in 1981, gross deformity was observed in the second PIP joint of the left foot. Several pencil-in-cup deformities and gross osteolysis were present in the feet in the first decade of the disease. Over 10 years, many joints had reached maximum scores. During the follow-up, other joints became involved and the disease developed clinically. Reporting early signs suggestive of PAM, e.g. pencil-in cup deformities and gross osteolysis in any joint, should be mandatory and crucial. This would heighten our awareness of PAM, accelerate the diagnosis, and lead to improved effective treatment in order to minimize joint damages resulting in PAM

  11. Development of composite measures for psoriatic arthritis: a report from the GRAPPA 2010 annual meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliwell, Philip S; Fitzgerald, Oliver; Mease, Philip J

    2012-02-01

    Composite disease outcome measures have been used in rheumatology for some time, but a disease-specific composite measure for psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has not yet been validated. Currently, instruments developed for use in rheumatoid arthritis are employed in PsA and include the American College of Rheumatology response criteria (ACR20, 50, and 70) and the Disease Activity Score for 28 and 44 joints (DAS28 and DAS44); however, these instruments do not cover the full spectrum of psoriatic disease. A composite measure is one way of incorporating an assessment of all relevant clinical outcomes into one single measure. By definition, it incorporates several dimensions of disease status, often by combining these different domains into a single score, which in the case of PsA includes joints, skin, entheses, dactylitis, and axial disease. New indices that combine these diverse clinical manifestations of PsA are under development and, in some cases, in the validation phase. The Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) established the GRAPPA Composite Exercise (GRACE) project to compare existing and emerging composite measures and to develop a new index. At the GRAPPA 2010 meeting, initial results from this project were presented, and existing and new candidate measures were compared. PMID:22298265

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 ... Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

  14. Arthritis in psoriasis.

    OpenAIRE

    Green, L.; Meyers, O L; Gordon, W.; Briggs, B

    1981-01-01

    A group of 61 unselected patients with psoriasis attending a dermatology clinic were studied to determine the prevalence of psoriatic arthritis. On defined criteria arthritis was present in 41.6%. Peripheral arthritis was present in 15.5%, and sacroiliitis in 43%. A strong association of distal interphalangeal arthritis with psoriasis and nail dystrophy was confirmed. Tissue typing showed a strong association of B23, 17, in Caucasoid psoriatics, while the haplotype A1/B8 was increased in mixe...

  15. Proposal for levels of evidence schema for validation of a soluble biomarker reflecting damage endpoints in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis, and recommendations for study design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maksymowych, Walter P; Fitzgerald, Oliver; Wells, George A;

    2009-01-01

    arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We also aimed to generate consensus on minimum standards for the design of longitudinal studies aimed at validating biomarkers. METHODS: Before the meeting, the Soluble Biomarker Working Group prepared a preliminary framework and...... discussed various models for association and prediction related to the statistical strength domain. In addition, 3 Delphi exercises addressing longitudinal study design for RA, PsA, and AS were conducted within the working group and members of the Assessments in SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS...

  16. TNF-α in a molecularly targeted therapy of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wcisło-Dziadecka, Dominika; Zbiciak-Nylec, Martyna; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia; Mazurek, Urszula

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic immunological skin disease and patients with this disorder typically experience a significant decrease in their quality of life. The disease is traditionally managed with topical and systemic agents (retinoids, ciclosporin A, methotrexate), but these treatment options are often long-term and their effects can be inconsistent and not ideal. The use of biological drugs in dermatological treatment is relatively new and began in the early 2000s. It should be noted that, in most countries, in order for biological treatment to be administered, specific criteria must be met. The current treatment options for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis include tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) blockers, interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-23 inhibitors, T cell inhibitors and B cell inhibitors. These classes of biological drugs are characterised by protein structure as well as high molecular weight and their effectiveness is evaluated based on the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), Body Surface Area (BSA) and the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). TNF-α antagonists are one such class of biological drugs which includes infliximad, etanercept and adalimumab. Infliximab is a chimeric protein that is administered via intravenous infusions as a monotherapy in psoriasis vulgaris. Etanercept is indicated for use in both psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis and it is the only drug that can be used as a treatment for children under the age of 8 with psoriasis. The drug is administered subcutaneously. Finally, adalimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that neutralises both free and membrane-bound TNF-α and is used in the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis. This article reviews the latest research in the use of TNF-α for the treatment of moderate to severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. The results of research in this field are promising and confirm the effectiveness and safety of biological drugs as dermatological treatments

  17. Termination of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis and in psoriatic arthritis. A comparative study of 270 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujfalussy, I; Koó, E; Seszták, M; Gergely, P

    2003-04-01

    102 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 104 psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients' records were analysed according to a standardised protocol. Using Cox regression, life-table analysis and log rank test, the effectiveness and toxicity of, and duration of disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) treatment were compared in RA and PsA. RA patients were treated with gold sodium thiomalate (GST), methotrexate (MTX) and sulphasalazine (SSZ) for a median duration of 35, 72 and 12 months respectively, whereas PsA patients were treated for 12, 12 and 17 months. The differences for GST and MTX were statistically significant (p=0.0043 and 0.0447). Drug toxicity was more frequently seen among patients with PsA (p=0.0023). No difference in efficacy could be proved. Results suggest that there is a significant difference between RA and PsA patients in terms of toxicity of these agents. Therefore, separate treatment strategies are needed, and earlier results with RA may not be directly applicable to PsA. PMID:12721703

  18. Arthritis Advice

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Connected Home » Arthritis Advice Heath and Aging Arthritis Advice Common Kinds of Arthritis Warning Signs Treating ... cause damage to your joints. Common Kinds of Arthritis Arthritis is one of the most common diseases ...

  19. Arthritis - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  20. The efficacy and tolerability of leflunomide (Arava® in therapy for psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vasilyevich Badokin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data on differentiated disease-modifying anti-rheumatic therapy for psoriatic arthritis (PsA. When performing the therapy, account must be taken of the presence and magnitude of the major manifestations of this disease: the pattern of arthritis and spondylosis, the number of inflamed entheses, the number of swollen fingers or toes, the pattern of psoriasis in terms of its extent and stage, the presence and magnitude of systemic manifestations and the functional state of involved organs. There are data on the biological activity of leflunomide, its effect on the main manifestations of PsA with an analysis of its efficacy and tolerability, as well as the results of a comparative investigation of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs used for the therapy of this disease.

  1. Validity and Reliability of the Dutch Adaptation of the Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL) Questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Wink, Freke; Arends, Suzanne; McKenna, Stephen P; Houtman, Pieternella M.; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Spoorenberg, Anneke

    2013-01-01

    Objective The Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL) questionnaire is a disease- specific instrument developed to measure quality of life (QoL) in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The aim of this study was to translate the measure into Dutch and to determine its psychometric properties. Method Translation of the original English PsAQoL into Dutch was performed by bilingual and lay panel. Ten field-test interviews with PsA patients were performed to assess face and content validi...

  2. Profile of ustekinumab and its potential in the treatment of active psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montepaone M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Monica Montepaone,1 Ennio Lubrano,2 Alessia Carboni,1 Antonio Spadaro1 1Unità Operativa Complessa di Reumatologia, Dipartimento di Medicina Interna e Specialità Mediche, Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, 2Academic Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy Abstract: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is a chronic inflammatory arthritis and considered to be a less severe condition than rheumatoid arthritis. PsA patients have been treated for a long time with a number of different agents, from non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to one or more disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. In the last decade, recognition of the central role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα in the immunopathogenesis of many rheumatic diseases, including PsA, has led to the development of TNFα blockers. In PsA, these agents are uniquely efficacious in the treatment of different patterns of the disease, as well as slowing progression of erosive damage in the peripheral joints. However, a significant number of patients withdraw from therapy because of failure or poor tolerability. Among the novel therapeutic targets, interleukin (IL-23/IL-12 has been investigated for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease. In particular, ustekinumab is a human monoclonal antibody that prevents human IL-12 and IL-23 from binding to the IL-12Rβ1 receptor chain of IL-12 (IL-12Rβ1/β2 and IL-23 (IL-12Rβ1/23R receptor complexes on the surface of natural killer cells and T-cells. Ustekinumab has been approved only for treatment of chronic plaque psoriasis, but also represents an interesting agent for treatment of PsA. Keywords: ustekinumab, psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis, interleukin-12, interleukin-23

  3. Prevalence and clinical patterns of psoriatic arthritis in Indian patients with psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence and clinical patterns of psoriatic arthritis (PsA varies in different parts of the world and there is little clinical and epidemiological data from the Indian subcontinent. Aims: Our study was designed to evaluate the prevalence and clinical patterns of PsA in Indian patients. Methods: This was a non-interventional, cross-sectional study, in which 1149 consecutive psoriasis patients seen over 1 year were screened for PsA according to classification of psoriatic arthritis (CASPAR criteria. Demographic and disease parameters were recorded including Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI, Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (NAPSI, and number of swollen and tender joints. Results: Among 1149 patients with psoriasis, 100 (8.7% patients had PsA, of which 83% were newly diagnosed. The most common pattern was symmetrical polyarthritis (58%, followed by spondyloarthropathy 49%, asymmetric oligoarthritis (21%, isolated spondyloarthropathy (5%, predominant distal interphalangeal arthritis (3%, and arthritis mutilans (1%. Enthesitis and dactylitis were present in 67% and 26% of cases, respectively. The mean number of swollen and tender joints were 3.63 ± 3.59 (range, 0-22 and 7.76 ± 6.03 (range, 1-26, respectively. Nail changes were present in 87% of the cases. The median PASI and NAPSI of the subjects with PsA was 3.6 and 20, respectively. There was no significant correlation of number of swollen/tender joints with PASI or NAPSI. Conclusion: There is a relatively low prevalence of PsA among Indian psoriasis patients presenting to dermatologists. No correlation was found between the severity of skin and nail involvement and articular disease.

  4. Genetics of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis: A Report from the GRAPPA 2010 Annual Meeting

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Proton; Elder, James T.

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are inter-related disorders, with PsA representing a disease within a disease. From an epidemiological perspective, the genetic contributions of PsV and PsA are now well documented. HLA-C is firmly established as a PsV/PsA gene, with HLA-Cw*0602 as a major risk allele. Fine mapping studies within the MHC region in PsV and PsA have identified novel loci that are independent of the HLA-Cw6 allele. Recent genome-wide association scans have l...

  5. The use of TNF-α blockers in psoriatic arthritis patients with latent tuberculosis infection

    OpenAIRE

    Atteno, Mariangela; Costa, Luisa; Matarese, Alessandro; Caso, Francesco; Del Puente, Antonio; Cantarini, Luca; Bocchino, Maria Luisa; Sanduzzi, Alessandro; Scarpa, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthropathy associated with skin and/or nail psoriasis. TNF-α is an essential cytokine for the host defense, and its depletion by treatment may facilitate the risk of infections or their reactivation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of TNF-α blockers in patients with PsA and concomitant latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) comparing their outcome with non-infected PsA patients. This is a retrospective study in 321 pati...

  6. Radiographic changes in the condyle of the temporomandibular joint in psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One hundred and ten patients with psoriatic arthritis (PA) and 100 matched control patients were examined by using orthopantomography to discover radiographic changes in the condyle of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). 31% of the PA patients and 13% of the control patients had radiographic changes in the condyle of the TMJ. The most common radiographic finding in PA patients was unilateral erosion of the condyle. Of the radiographic changes in the PA group, cortical erosions correlated negatively with age, whereas osteophytes correlated positively with the duration of PA. (orig.)

  7. Radiographic changes in the condyle of the temporomandibular joint in psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenoenen, M.

    One hundred and ten patients with psoriatic arthritis (PA) and 100 matched control patients were examined by using orthopantomography to discover radiographic changes in the condyle of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). 31% of the PA patients and 13% of the control patients had radiographic changes in the condyle of the TMJ. The most common radiographic finding in PA patients was unilateral erosion of the condyle. Of the radiographic changes in the PA group, cortical erosions correlated negatively with age, whereas osteophytes correlated positively with the duration of PA.

  8. CYCLOSPORIN A (SANDIMMUN NEORAL IN THERAPY FOR PSORIASIS AND PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Leonodovna Korsakova

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis (PA is noted to give grounds to use immunoactive compounds (disease- modifying agents - basic anti-inflammatory drugs -BAIDs, such as cyclosporin A (CsA, in this disease. The data available in the literature permit a high assessment of CsA as one of the BAIDs in the treatment of PA and psoriasis. CsA is stated to monitor the course of this disease, acts on inflamed peripheral joints, decreases the clinical and laboratory activity of PA, positively affects the PA-afflicted skin, and can induce remission of psoriasis.

  9. CYCLOSPORIN A (SANDIMMUN NEORAL) IN THERAPY FOR PSORIASIS AND PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The involvement of immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis (PA) is noted to give grounds to use immunoactive compounds (disease- modifying agents - basic anti-inflammatory drugs -BAIDs), such as cyclosporin A (CsA), in this disease. The data available in the literature permit a high assessment of CsA as one of the BAIDs in the treatment of PA and psoriasis. CsA is stated to monitor the course of this disease, acts on inflamed peripheral joints, decreases the clinical and ...

  10. Remission of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis during bevacizumab therapy for renal cell cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananaya Datta-Mitra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, is employed for treatment of several cancers and retinopathies. Although previous reports of remission of psoriasis with bevacizumab do exist, but its current experience for psoriatic arthritis (PsA is still limited. In this report, we describe a patient with metastatic renal cell cancer, psoriasis and PsA, who experienced a complete remission of psoriasis and PsA during bevacizumab therapy without any other management for psoriasis and PsA. We also found a flare up of his psoriatic disease after switching to other kinase inhibitors like sorafenib or sunitinib. This suggests that bevacizumab might have a promising future in the treatment of psoriasis and PsA.

  11. The prevalence of sacroilitis in psoriatic arthritis: new perspectives from a large, multicenter cohort. A Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis in a large population of patients with psoriatic arthritis. Patients and design. Patients were recruited from 15 clinical centers. This was part of a large, multicenter study of patients with an established diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, or reactive arthritis. For this cohort, an established diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis was required, with cutaneous manifestations and involvement of at least three appendicular joints. At entry, patients were not selected for the presence of axial involvement. Radiographs - one anteroposterior view of the pelvis and one oblique view of each sacroiliac joint - were graded using the New York classification scale by a musculoskeletal radiologist masked to the specific diagnosis and clinical symptoms. Re-evaluation of 10% of the films 3 years later quantified intraobserver variability. Results. Two hundred and two patients with psoriatic arthritis were studied. Duration of the disease averaged 12 years; all patients had psoriasis and peripheral arthritis. The prevalence of radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis (grade 2 or higher) was 78%; 71% of these had grade 3 disease. Conclusions. Previously reported prevalence of sacroiliitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis ranges from 30% to 50%. The prevalence of radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis in this large multicenter cohort of patients with appendicular psoriatic arthritis was substantially higher. (orig.)

  12. The prevalence of sacroilitis in psoriatic arthritis: new perspectives from a large, multicenter cohort. A Department of Veterans Affairs Cooperative Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battistone, M.J.; Clegg, D.O. [Division of Rheumatology, University of Utah Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)]|[Department of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Manaster, B.J. [Department of Radiology, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Medical College of Virginia/Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Reda, D.J. [Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center, VA Hospital, Hines, IL (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis in a large population of patients with psoriatic arthritis. Patients and design. Patients were recruited from 15 clinical centers. This was part of a large, multicenter study of patients with an established diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, or reactive arthritis. For this cohort, an established diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis was required, with cutaneous manifestations and involvement of at least three appendicular joints. At entry, patients were not selected for the presence of axial involvement. Radiographs - one anteroposterior view of the pelvis and one oblique view of each sacroiliac joint - were graded using the New York classification scale by a musculoskeletal radiologist masked to the specific diagnosis and clinical symptoms. Re-evaluation of 10% of the films 3 years later quantified intraobserver variability. Results. Two hundred and two patients with psoriatic arthritis were studied. Duration of the disease averaged 12 years; all patients had psoriasis and peripheral arthritis. The prevalence of radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis (grade 2 or higher) was 78%; 71% of these had grade 3 disease. Conclusions. Previously reported prevalence of sacroiliitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis ranges from 30% to 50%. The prevalence of radiographic evidence of sacroiliitis in this large multicenter cohort of patients with appendicular psoriatic arthritis was substantially higher. (orig.) With 3 figs., 4 tabs., 29 refs.

  13. Employment is maintained and sick days decreased in psoriasis/psoriatic arthritis patients with etanercept treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boggs, Robert L; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Li, Wenzhi;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) impair quality of life, including reduction in employment or job duties. The PRESTA (Psoriasis Randomized Etanercept STudy in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis) study, a randomized, double-blind, two-dose trial, examined the efficacy of etanerce...... disease and in reducing sick time. Effective treatment of psoriasis and PsA may reduce missed work days....... treatment in patients with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis and PsA and the main results have been presented previously. This analysis examined employment status, job duties and sick days, pre-defined endpoints in PRESTA, among this patient population. METHODS: Participants (N=752) were randomized to...... PsA decreased significantly from baseline to week 24 (17-23% to 5-8%; p<0.01). Similar results were seen with job responsibility changes due to psoriasis (11-14% to 4%; p<0.01). The number of monthly sick days also decreased from baseline to week 24 (2.4 days for both treatment groups to 0.7 (BIW...

  14. Clinical subgroups and HLA antigens in Italian patients with psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvarani, C; Macchioni, P L; Zizzi, F; Mantovani, W; Rossi, F; Baricchi, R; Ghirelli, L; Frizziero, L; Portioli, I

    1989-01-01

    The frequencies of HLA antigens were studied in 101 Italian patients with psoriatic arthritis. The total group showed a significant increase in frequency of A1 and B38, and a reduction of B5 when compared to healthy controls. No association between DR and/or DQw antigens and PA were demonstrated. The comparisons between the clinical subgroups and normal controls revealed a significant association of B38 with asymmetric peripheral arthritis, B27 and B39 with spondylitis (with or without peripheral involvement). When intergroup comparison were made, the patients with spondylitis had an increase in frequency of B27 and DQw3 as compared to those with symmetric and asymmetric peripheral disease. DR4 and DRw53 were associated with earlier age of onset of arthritis. There were also significant associations between DQw3 and severe disease, and between A9, B5 and presence of erosions and joint space narrowing. No association with DR4 was showed in a subgroup of patients with symmetric polyarthritis without DIP involvement. PMID:2591112

  15. Clinical and immunogenetic characteristics of psoriatic arthritis: a single-center experience from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CB Mithun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available AimThe aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and prevalence of HLA B27 in patients with psoriatic arthritis presenting to a tertiary care centre in South India. BackgroundAlthough the prevalence of psoriasis is high in India, there is paucity of data, especially on Ps A. Materials and methodsThis retrospective study included 141 patients satisfying the ClASsification criteria for Ps A (CASPAR. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data of the patients were collected through personal interviews, clinical examination, appropriate investigations, and analysis of case records. HLA-B27 typing by PCR method was done for all patients. ResultsAmong the 141 patients, 89 subjects were males and 52 were females, and the male to female ratio was 1.7:1. Polyarthritis (n=51, 36.2% was the most common Ps A subtype noted during the study, followed by oligoarthritis (n=48, 34%, spondyloarthropathy (n=29, 20.6%, distal interphalangeal (DIP predominant arthritis (n=25, 7.8%, and arthritis mutilans (n=2, 1.4%. Arthritis preceded skin involvement in 9.2% (n=13 of the cases. Dactylitis was seen in 24.1% (n=34 of the patients. Extra-articular features like enthesitis (n=16, 11.3% and eye involvement (n=1, 0.7% were also observed. Deformities were seen in 32.6% (n=46 of the subjects. The most common type of psoriatic skin lesion noted was psoriasis vulgaris (n=119, 84.4%. Nail involvement was seen in 17.7% (n=25 of the patients and it was observed in all subjects with DIP predominant arthritis (100%. Family history of psoriasis was present in 11.3% (n=16 of the patients. The number of patients positive for HLA B27 was 16 (11.3%. Additionally, the antigen positivity was noted in 35.7% (n=10 of the patients with spondyloarthropathy. ConclusionPs A was more common in males. Polyarthritis and oligoarthritis were the most prevalent subtypes. The prevalence of HLA-B27 in our study population was 11.3% and was found to be strongly associated with

  16. Profile of certolizumab and its potential in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chimenti MS

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Maria Sole Chimenti,1 Rosita Saraceno,2 Andrea Chiricozzi,2,3 Alessandro Giunta,2 Sergio Chimenti,2 Roberto Perricone11Unit of Rheumatology, Allergology, and Clinical Immunology, 2Unit of Dermatology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy; 3Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology, Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is a chronic inflammatory arthropathy associated with psoriasis (PsO. PsA could be considered an enthesal disease because of the link between mechanical stress (entheses and immunologically active tissue (synovium. Evidence of efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α is supported by reduction of histological vascularity and immune cell infiltrates in synovial tissue after treatment. Certolizumab pegol (CZP is a polyethylene glycolylated (PEGylated Fab′ fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody that binds and neutralizes human TNF-α. The PEG moiety of the Fab fragment, markedly increases the half-life of CZP and confers to the drug a unique structure that differs from the other anti-TNF-α agents tested for the treatment of Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, axial spondyloarthritis, nonradiographic spondyloarthritis, PsO, and PsA. In contrast to other anti-TNF-α agents, CZP did not mediate increased levels of apoptosis, suggesting that these mechanisms are not essential for the anti-TNF-α efficacy in Crohn’s disease. As CZP, infliximab, and adalimumab, but not etanercept, almost completely inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin-1 beta release from monocytes, this cytokine-production inhibition may be relevant for drug efficacy. Due to these characteristics, it has been demonstrated in clinical studies that CZP effectively improves signs and symptoms of arthritis and physical function and skin manifestations of PsO, with a safety profile similar to rheumatoid arthritis. This drug can be considered as a valid treatment in patients

  17. The OMERACT psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance imaging scoring system (PsAMRIS): definitions of key pathologies, suggested MRI sequences, and preliminary scoring system for PsA Hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, Fiona; Wiell, Charlotte;

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a preliminary OMERACT psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance image scoring system (PsAMRIS) for evaluation of inflammatory and destructive changes in PsA hands, which was developed by the international OMERACT MRI in inflammatory arthritis group. MRI definitions of importan...... pathologies in peripheral PsA and suggestions concerning appropriate MRI sequences for use in PsA hands are also provided.......This article describes a preliminary OMERACT psoriatic arthritis magnetic resonance image scoring system (PsAMRIS) for evaluation of inflammatory and destructive changes in PsA hands, which was developed by the international OMERACT MRI in inflammatory arthritis group. MRI definitions of important...

  18. Enteropathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Info For Teens Message Boards & Forums Donate Enteropathic Arthritis Learn About Spondylitis / Enteropathic Arthritis Overview For The ... Work and Spondylitis Spondylitis Awareness Month Overview: Enteropathic Arthritis Enteropathic (en-ter-o-path-ic) arthritis is ...

  19. Evidence to support IL-13 as a risk locus for psoriatic arthritis but not psoriasis vulgaris.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2011-06-01

    There is great interest in the identification of genetic factors that differentiate psoriatic arthritis (PsA) from psoriasis vulgaris (PsV), as such discoveries could lead to the identification of distinct underlying aetiological pathways. Recent studies identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the interleukin 13 (IL-13) gene region as risk factors for PsV. Further investigations in one of these studies found the effect to be primarily restricted to PsA, thus suggesting the discovery of a specific genetic risk factor for PsA. Given this intriguing evidence, association to this gene was investigated in large collections of PsA and PsV patients and healthy controls.

  20. Assessing disease activity in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: impact on management and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Vinod; Maharaj, Ajesh B

    2016-05-01

    The management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and psoriasis has undergone major advancements over the last decade. This has been made possible, in part, due to the introduction of new therapies for their management, as well as global collaboration in the development of outcome measures and "treat- to- target" paradigms. In this review article, we discuss how disease activity is measured and the outcome measures that have been recently developed for the management of PsA. The importance of assessing the individual domains as well as global assessments both from the physician and patient perspective, and the development of composite measures are discussed. The newer PsA specific measures are expected to be more commonly used in clinical trials as well as clinical practice. PMID:26807494

  1. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF THE SACROILIAC JOINT IN DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF EARLY POLYARTICULAR PSORIATIC AND RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (STUDY DATA REMARKA)

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Yu Loginova; T. V. Korotaeva; E L Luchihina; Smirnov, A. V.; A A Glazkov; D E Karateev

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of lesions of the spine and sacroiliac joints may be helpful in discrimination between early psoriatic arthritis (ePsA) and early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA).Objective. To assess the significance of inflammatory back pain (IBP), HLA-B27, and active sacroiliitis (ASI) confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for differential diagnosis of polyarticular ePsA and eRA.Materials and Methods. The study included 29 patients with ePsA (13 males and 16 females, mean age 36.52 ± 11.27 year...

  2. How early should psoriatic arthritis be treated with a TNF-blocker?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harty, Leonard

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is the second most commonly identified inflammatory arthropathy in early arthritis clinics. It is a complex multisystem disease involving the skin and joints, but may also present with inflammation of the spine - spondylitis, digits - dactylitis, eyes - uveitis and ligamentous insertions - enthesitis. The skin manifestations may be mild or patchy and often precede the joint inflammation. Joint erosions, however, may occur within the first 2 years in up to half of PsA patients and an erosion rate of 11% per annum has been reported suggesting it is not a benign disease as it was once regarded. RECENT FINDINGS: Therapy with mild anti-inflammatories is only beneficial in very mild or localized disease. In cases of more widespread joint involvement systemic therapy with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) such as methotrexate may be required and in the case of extra-articular or spinal disease, in which DMARDs have failed to show efficacy, biologic therapy may be highly effective. SUMMARY: The question of how early treatment should be instituted should be decided in a specialist rheumatology referral centre following appropriate assessment. Optimal therapy with combination DMARD and biologics may result in remission rates of up to 60%.

  3. Use of Ultrasound for Diagnosis and Follow-Up of Psoriatic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusmir Husic

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal ultrasound (US is increasingly used as a bedside tool for diagnostic and monitoring purposes in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA. The sonographic differentiation between PsA and rheumatoid arthritis (RA may be challenging because the morphological appearance of synovitis is similar in both conditions. In contrast, perisynovial inflammation is a specific finding of early PsA, and enthesitis is more frequently detected in PsA than in RA. After initiation of effective therapies, a reduction of US signs of synovitis and enthesitis can be seen along with clinical improvement. A numeric US score for regular monitoring of disease activity and damage in PsA patients has not been established yet. While sonographic findings can be discordant from clinical results, their relevance is unclear, although it is a concern that ongoing subclinical inflammation results in worse structural outcomes. Ongoing studies address the value of sonography as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in PsA, and we expect that these results will emphasise the role of diagnostic US for the routine evaluation of PsA patients.

  4. Plantar forefoot pressures in psoriatic arthritis-related dactylitis: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Richard A; Siddle, Heidi J; Redmond, Anthony C; Helliwell, Philip S

    2016-09-01

    Dactylitis is a common feature of psoriatic arthritis (PsA); local physical trauma has been identified as a possible contributing factor. The aim of this study was to explore differences in forefoot plantar pressures in patients with PsA with and without dactylitis and compare to healthy controls. Thirty-six participants were recruited into three groups: group A PsA plus a history of dactylitis; group B PsA, no dactylitis; group C control participants. Forefoot plantar pressures were measured barefoot and in-shoe at the left second and fourth toes and corresponding metatarsophalangeal joints. Temporal and spatial parameters were measured and data from the foot impact scale for rheumatoid arthritis (FIS-RA), EQ5D and health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) were collected. Pressure time integral peak plantar pressure, and contact time barefoot and in-shoe were not significantly different between groups. Temporal and spatial parameters reported no significant differences between groups. ANOVA analysis and subsequent post hoc testing using Games-Howell test yielded significance in FIS-RA scores between both PsA groups versus controls, A p ≤ 0.0001 and PsA group B p history of dactylitis does not appear to worsen patient reported outcomes. PMID:27225246

  5. Use of methotrexate in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Viktorovna Korotaeva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the results of using methotrexate (MT in the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Results. The mechanism of action of MT, the historical aspects of its use in the treatment of psoriasis and PsA, and the data of clinical trials of the efficacy and safety of the drug are considered. MT therapy is shown to cause a high rate of adverse reactions, which requires measures to prevent and treat adverse events. MT has been found to be frequently used in different combinations, including with other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (sulfasalazine, prednisolone, and biological agents, such as tumor necrosis factor inhibitors. In accordance with the European S3-guidelines S3 on the systemic treatment of psoriasis, MT (15-22.5 mg weekly should be recommended from the results of randomized clinical trials and the extensive clinical experience with this drug. In terms of the present-day views, the indications for immunosuppressive therapy for PsA may be expanded it should be initiated in the early stage of the disease, particularly in its severe forms, until there are destructive changes in the osteoarticular apparatus. Conclusion. MT is an effective drug to treat psoriasis and PsA. It is recommended for use in moderate and severe peripheral arthritis (Grade B and skin lesions (Grade A.

  6. Intra-articular therapy with infliximab in psoriatic arthritis: efficacy and safety in refractory monoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Minosi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate efficacy and safety of intra-articular therapy (IA with infliximab (IFX, in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA and refractory monoarthritis. Methods: Four male and 1 female aged from 25 to 71 years and disease duration from 1 to 25 years, affected by PsA (CASPAR criteria were observed . All patients were treated with immunomodulators (methotrexate, leflunomide, cyclosporin A, 3/5 with concomitant steroids, 4/5 with NSAID’s. Only 1 patient were treated with IFX 5 mg/kg IV every 6 weeks. Before the IFX injection an amount of synovial fluid was aspired from the inflamed site and the anti-TNF injection was echographic guided. Patients were evaluated at regular intervals through clinical and echographic examination and retreated in case of flare. Results: At follow-up visit after 7 days, in all patients treated with the first injection was detected total regression of the inflammation and no new inflamed synovial fluid was observed; power doppler examination shows reduction of local vascularization. Two patients experienced full remission after 6 months and only one injection, 1 patient (arthritis of the wrist was in remission after 2 injections (3 months of interval. In 2 patients with knee arthritis and important synovial hypertrophy good results obtained after the first injection were not maintained afterwards and second injection was ineffective: these patients were evaluated for surgical intervention. Conclusions: Local injections of IFX were safe and well tolerated in all patients. The efficacy in short term was observed in all cases; our supposition is that presence of synovial hypertrophy is cause of worsening.

  7. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and/or antitumor necrosis factor (TNF) agents may be needed to control the disease. 2 1 Warning: Side effects of NSAIDs include stomach problems; skin rashes; high blood pressure; fluid retention; and liver, ...

  8. Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RhMSUS FAQs RhMSUS Designees RhMSUS Volunteer Opportunities Publications & Communications Journals A&R Table of Contents AC&R Table ... by the American College of Rheumatology Committee on Communications and Marketing. This information is provided for general education only. ...

  9. MRI bone oedema scores are higher in the arthritis mutilans form of psoriatic arthritis and correlate with high radiographic scores for joint damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Yu M; Østergaard, Mikkel; Doyle, Anthony;

    2009-01-01

    sequences. Scans were scored separately by two readers for bone erosion, oedema and proliferation using a PsA MRI scoring system. X-rays were scored for erosions and joint space narrowing. RESULTS: On MRI, 1013 bones were scored by both readers. Reliability for scoring erosions and bone oedema was high......INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of bone disease in the arthritis mutilans (AM) form of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). METHODS: Twenty-eight patients with erosive PsA were enrolled (median disease duration of 14 years). Using x-rays of...... both hands and feet, 11 patients were classified as AM and 17 as non-AM (erosive psoriatic arthritis without bone lysis)by two observers. MRI scans (1.5T) of the dominant hand (wrist and fingers scanned separately) were obtained using standard contrast-enhanced T1-weighted and fat-saturated T2-weighted...

  10. Development of a preliminary composite disease activity index in psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mumtaz, Aizad

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop a preliminary composite psoriatic disease activity index (CPDAI) for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. METHODS: Five domains were assessed and specific instruments were employed for each domain to determine the extent of domain involvement and the effect of that involvement on quality of life\\/function. Disease activity for each domain was then graded from 0 to 3 giving a CPDAI range of 0-15. Patient and physician global disease activity measures were also recorded and an independent physician was asked to indicate if treatment change was required. Bivariate correlation analysis was performed. Factor, tree analysis and standardised response means were also calculated. RESULTS: Significant correlation was seen between CPDAI and both patient (r = 0.834) and physician (r = 0.825) global disease activity assessments (p = 0.01). Tree analysis revealed that 96.3% of patients had their treatment changed when CPDAI values were greater than 6; no patient had their treatment changed when CPDAI values were less than 5. CONCLUSION: CPDAI correlates well with patient and physician global disease activity assessments and is an effective tool that clearly distinguishes those who require a treatment change from those who do not.

  11. Systematic review, network meta-analysis and economic evaluation of biological therapy for the management of active psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Cawson, Matthew Richard; Mitchell, Stephen Andrew; Knight, Chris; Wildey, Henry; Spurden, Dean; Bird, Alex; Orme, Michelle Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Background An updated economic evaluation was conducted to compare the cost-effectiveness of the four tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors adalimumab, etanercept, golimumab and infliximab in active, progressive psoriatic arthritis (PsA) where response to standard treatment has been inadequate. Methods A systematic review was conducted to identify relevant, recently published studies and the new trial data were synthesised, via a Bayesian network meta-analysis (NMA), to estimate the relat...

  12. Effect of Vitamin D on Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Patients with Psoriasis Vulgaris and Psoriatic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Cubillos, Susana; Krieg, Nadine; Norgauer, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Background Psoriasis, a chronic skin disease with or without joint inflammation, has increased circulating proinflammatory cytokine levels. Vitamin D is involved in calcium homeostasis, bone formation, osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity, as well as regulation of immune response. We aimed to study osteoclast differentiation and cytokine secretion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis, in response to 1,25(OH)2D3. Meth...

  13. Enthesopathic reactions at the wrist in psoriatic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Results of low-kV radiographs in three views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-six sites of muscle and ligament attachment around the wrist were evaluated for enthesopathic proliferative bone changes in psoriatic arthritis (PA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). Proliferations were found to be most frequent, most irregular, and largest in PA, followed in declining order by RA and DISH. In PA only, the bony proliferations and the underlying bone often had the appearance of mineralized woven bone, though smooth proliferations with a regular bone structure do occur in PA as well as in RA. The entheses of the trapezium, scaphoid and the radial styloid process are most frequently affected, followed by the bases of the first and fifth metacarpals and the pisiform. It is exceptional for huge bony proliferations to be observed at the entheses in DISH. (orig.)

  14. Bioboosters in the treatment of rheumatic diseases: a comprehensive review of currently available biologics in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Cantini

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fabrizio Cantini, Carlotta Nannini, Laura NiccoliSecond Division of Medicine, Rheumatology Unit, Hospital of Prato, ItalyAbstract: Immunologic research has clarified many aspects of the pathogenesis of inflammatory rheumatic disorders. Biologic drugs acting on different steps of the immune response, including cytokines, B- and T-cell lymphocytes, have been marketed over the past 10 years for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, ankylosing spondylitis (AS, and psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs of anti-cytokine agents in RA (including the anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα drugs infliximab, etanercept, adalimumab, golimumab, certolizumab, anti-interleukin (IL-1 anakinra, and anti-IL-6 tocilizumab demonstrated a significant efficacy compared to traditional therapies, if combined with methotrexate (MTX, as measured by ACR 20, 50 and 70 response criteria. The new therapies have also been demonstrated to be superior to MTX in slowing or halting articular damage. RCTs have shown the efficacy of anti-TNFα in AS patients through significant improvement of symptoms and function. Trials of anti-TNFα in PsA patients showed marked improvement of articular symptoms for psoriasis and radiological disease progression. More recent studies have demonstrated the efficacy of B-cell depletion with rituximab, and T-cell inactivation with abatacept. All these drugs have a satisfactory safety profile. This paper reviews the different aspects of efficacy and tolerability of biologics in the therapy of RA, AS, and PsA.Keywords: anti-TNF, anti-cytokine agents, rituximab, abatacept, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis

  15. Viral arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infectious arthritis - viral ... Arthritis may be a symptom of many virus-related illnesses. It usually disappears on its own without ... the rubella vaccine, only a few people develop arthritis. No risk factors are known.

  16. Soluble P-selectin levels in synovial fluid and serum from patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Valesini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: P-selectin is an adhesion molecule expressed by activated endothelial cells and platelets favouring the leukocyte adherence to microvascular endothelium. A soluble form of this molecule has been described, whose serum levels were found to be elevated and correlate with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients. Aim of this study was to determine soluble P-selectin levels in synovial fluid (SF and serum from patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA, where it has never been investigated, to define its involvement in PsA synovial damage. Methods: we analysed, by ELISA, soluble P-selectin serum and SF levels in 100 patients presenting a knee joint effusion: 38 of them presented PsA, 40 RA and 22 osteoarthritis (OA. We examined the main clinical and laboratory parameters of these patients. Soluble P-selectin serum levels were also detected in 15 healthy subjects. Results: soluble P-selectin SF levels were significantly higher in PsA and RA patients respect to OA subjects. Soluble P-selectin SF levels were lower than those found in serum and the SF/serum ratio was higher in PsA and RA patients respect to OA. Soluble P-selectin serum levels were not significantly different among patients and controls. No correlation was found between SF and serum levels of soluble P-selectin and the main clinical parameters. Conclusions: our study of soluble P-selectin in PsA reveals a prominent local role of this molecule, with no differences respect to RA. Histological findings may be of help in understanding the role of this adhesion molecule in PsA.

  17. Interactions of the Immune System with Skin and Bone Tissue in Psoriatic Arthritis: A Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhov, Andrea; Adamopoulos, Iannis E; Maverakis, Emanual

    2016-08-01

    Cutaneous psoriasis (e.g., psoriasis vulgaris (PsV)) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) are complex heterogeneous diseases thought to have similar pathophysiology. The soluble and cellular mediators of these closely related diseases are being elucidated through genetic approaches such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS), as well as animal and molecular models. Novel therapeutics targeting these mediators (IL-12, IL-23, IL-17, IL-17 receptor, TNF) are effective in treating both the skin and joint manifestations of psoriasis, reaffirming the shared pathophysiology of PsV and PsA. However, the molecular and cellular interactions between skin and joint disease have not been well characterized. Clearly, PsV and PsA are highly variable in terms of their clinical manifestations, and this heterogeneity can partially be explained by differences in HLA-associations (HLA-Cw*0602 versus HLA-B*27, for example). In addition, there are numerous other genetic susceptibility loci (LCE3, CARD14, NOS2, NFKBIA, PSMA6, ERAP1, TRAF3IP2, IL12RB2, IL23R, IL12B, TNIP1, TNFAIP3, TYK2) and geoepidemiologic factors that contribute to the wide variability seen in psoriasis. Herein, we review the complex interplay between the genetic, cellular, ethnic, and geographic mediators of psoriasis, focusing on the shared mechanisms of PsV and PsA. PMID:26780035

  18. Cardiovascular disease and risk factors in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tobin, Anne-Marie

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) have an increased incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, hypertension, and metabolic syndrome compared to the normal population. Patients with psoriasis and PsA may also have increased risk from nonconventional risk factors such as raised levels of homocysteine and excessive alcohol consumption. We conducted a comprehensive review of the literature on CVD and all cardiovascular risk factors in patients with psoriasis and PsA. METHODS: Data sources: All studies identified from a Medline (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov) search pertaining to CVD, individual risk factors in psoriasis, and PsA were included. Study selection: Studies included a healthy reference population, were published between 1975 and 2009, and were written in English. RESULTS: Our search yielded 14 studies that documented rates of CVD in patients with psoriasis and PsA compared to controls. Substantial evidence points to elevated risk of CVD in patients with psoriasis and PsA. CONCLUSION: It remains difficult to conclude if risk factors are caused by psoriasis or share a common pathogenesis. Physicians treating patients with psoriasis and PsA must be aware of all potential cardiovascular risk factors in their patients.

  19. Association between tobacco smoking and response to tumour necrosis factor α inhibitor treatment in psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Pil; Glintborg, Bente; Hetland, Merete Lund;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between tobacco smoking and disease activity, treatment adherence and treatment responses among patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) initiating the first tumour necrosis factor α inhibitor therapy (TNFi) in routine care. METHODS: Observational cohort...... study based on the Danish nationwide DANBIO registry. Kaplan-Meier plots, logistic and Cox regression analyses by smoking status (current/previous/never smoker) were calculated for treatment adherence, ACR20/50/70-responses and EULAR-good-response. Additional stratified analyses were performed according...... Body Mass Index (27 kg/m(2) (23-30)/28 kg/m(2) (24-31)) (median (IQR)), shorter disease duration (3 years (1-8)/5 years (2-10)), lower swollen joint count (2 (0-5)/3 (1-6)), higher visual-analogue-scale (VAS) patient global (72 mm (54-87)/68 mm (50-80)), VAS fatigue (72 mm (51-86)/63 mm (40-77)) and...

  20. Detection of asymptomatic enthesitis in psoriasis patients: An onset of psoriatic arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Tomoya; Takahashi, Aya; Taniguchi, Yoshinori; Terada, Yoshio; Sano, Shigetoshi

    2016-06-01

    Presence of asymptomatic joint involvement is recognized in patients with psoriasis. However, it remains elusive whether such patients develop psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The aim of the present study was to examine the incidence of asymptomatic joint lesions, in particular, enthesitis in patients with psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) and to further assess the clinical features. Eighteen PsV and 28 PsA patients were enrolled for examination by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Any nail, scalp and intergluteal involvements were reported. Levels of serum C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell (WBC) counts and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) were examined. All of the PsA patients showed FDG accumulation in the affected joints. Notably, asymptomatic enthesitis was detected in six out of 18 PsV patients (33%), and they were diagnosed as having subclinical PsA. Incidences of scalp, intergluteal and nail psoriasis in subclinical PsA patients were 100%, 83% and 64%, respectively, which were higher than those in PsV patients (67%, 25% and 40%, respectively). CRP, WBC counts and ESR were invariable between PsV and subclinical PsA groups. PET/CT imaging could discover asymptomatic enthesitis. Our data suggested that the subpopulation of subclinical PsA was much higher than expected. Higher prevalence of nail, scalp and intergluteal psoriasis confirmed the risk of PsA as previously described. PMID:26666215

  1. Progress in understanding and utilizing TNF-α inhibition for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Francesco; Lubrano, Ennio; Del Puente, Antonio; Caso, Paolo; Peluso, Rosario; Foglia, Francesca; Benigno, Carolina; Girolimetto, Nicolò; Bottiglieri, Paolo; Scarpa, Raffaele; Costa, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    The improved recognition of pathogenetic molecular mechanisms has led to the use of drugs targeting cytokines in different inflammatory arthropathies as well psoriatic arthritis (PsA). In particular, the progress in knowledge on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in the pathogenesis of PsA has changed the therapeutic approach by use of direct and receptor cytokine antagonists. Currently, infliximab (IFX), adalimumab, etanercept, golimumab and certolizumab pegol represent the five anti-TNF-α available for the treatment of PsA. This review describes evidence on treatment aimed at neutralizing TNF-α in PsA patients, from the first study in 2000 until today, mainly derived from randomized clinical trials. In comparison with traditional therapies, anti-TNF-α agents have shown to have more efficacy both in treating clinical aspects, including enthesitis, dactylitis, joint pain and swelling, axial involvement, nail and skin lesions, and in reducing radiographic progression. Moreover, anti-TNF-α agents have been demonstrated to be reasonably safe in PsA, as confirmed by data derived by different registries. PMID:26558483

  2. Assessing the effectiveness of synthetic and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in psoriatic arthritis – a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsley GH

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gabrielle H Kingsley, David L Scott Rheumatology Unit, Kings College London, London, UK Background: Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory arthritis the primary manifestations of which are locomotor and skin disease. Although a number of guidelines have been published citing strategies for reducing disease progression, the evidence base for disease-modifying agents is unclear. This forms the focus of this systematic review. Methods: The systematic review was undertaken according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses 2009 checklist. We selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs that looked at the impact of interventions with disease-modifying agents, either synthetic drugs or biologics on musculoskeletal outcomes, notably American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders. Results were analyzed using Review Manager 5.1.6 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK. Whilst our primary focus was on published trials, we also looked at new trials presented in abstract form in 2013–2014 that were not yet published to avoid omitting important and up-to-date information on developing treatments. Results: Our in-depth analysis included 28 trials overall enrolling 5,177 patients published between the 1980s and now as well as limited analysis of some studies in abstract form as described earlier. The most frequently available locomotor outcome measure was the American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders. The risk ratio for achieving an American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders response was positive in favor of treatment (risk ratio 2.30; 95% confidence interval 1.78–2.96; however, there was evidence of considerable heterogeneity between trials. Overall randomized controlled trials of established synthetic disease-modifying agents were largely negative (methotrexate, ciclosporin and sulfasalazine though leflunomide showed a small positive effect. A new synthetic agent, apremilast, did show a

  3. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  4. PTPN22 is associated with susceptibility to psoriatic arthritis but not psoriasis: evidence for a further PsA-specific risk locus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2015-04-28

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis; it has a higher estimated genetic component than psoriasis alone, however most genetic susceptibility loci identified for PsA to date are also shared with psoriasis. Here we attempt to validate novel single nucleotide polymorphisms selected from our recent PsA Immunochip study and determine specificity to PsA.

  5. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE WITH USTEKINUMAB IN THE TREATMENT OF EARLY PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS USING TREAT-TO-TARGET STRATEGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Loginova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The new Treat-to-Target (T2T strategy in the treatment of early psoriatic arthritis (PsA is aimed at achieving remission or low disease activity. As of now, the new biological agent ustekinumb (UST, anti-interleukin (IL 12/23 monoclonal antibodies, was used to treat psoriasis and PsA. The paper presents clinical observations of the efficacy of UST in early PsA treated according T2T strategy. The described clinical cases demonstrate that use of UST 45 mg both alone and in combination with methotrexate for early PsA with moderate and high activity reduced manifestations of peripheral arthritis and psoriasis, promoting rapid achievement of remission or minimal disease activity. Overall, UST is well tolerated by the patients.

  6. Golimumab: A novel human anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Kay

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan Kay1, Mahboob U Rahman2,31Division of Rheumatology, UMass Memorial Medical Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Centocor Research and Development, inc., Malvern, PA, USA; 3University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USAIntroduction: The introduction of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors represented a significant advance in the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and other chronic inflammatory diseases. Although three TNF-α inhibitors have been approved for the treatment of RA by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA and the European Medicinal Products Evaluation Agency (EMEA, not all patients achieve a satisfactory clinical improvement with these therapeutic agents. The mode of administration of these medications is inconvenient for some patients.Aims: Golimumab is a novel anti-TNF-α monoclonal antibody that is in clinical development for the treatment of RA, psoriatic arthritis (PsA, and ankylosing spondylitis (AS, either as a first-line biologic therapy or an alternative after other TNF-α inhibitors have been discontinued. This review summarizes the development of, and clinical evidence achieved with, golimumab.Evidence review: Golimumab has demonstrated significant efficacy in randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials when administered subcutaneously once every four weeks. It has been generally well tolerated in clinical trials and demonstrates a safety profile comparable with currently available TNF-α inhibitors.Outcomes summary: Golimumab has been confirmed to be an effective treatment for patients with RA, PsA, and AS in phase III clinical trials as evaluated by traditional measures of disease activity, such as signs and symptoms, as well as measures of physical function, patient reported outcomes, and health economic measures. The efficacy and safety profile of golimumab in RA, PsA, and AS appears to be similar to other anti-TNF agents. However

  7. Variants in linkage disequilibrium with the late cornified envelope gene cluster deletion are associated with susceptibility to psoriatic arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2010-12-01

    A common deletion mapping to the psoriasis susceptibility locus 4 on chromosome 1q21, encompassing two genes of the late cornified envelope (LCE) gene cluster, has been associated with an increased risk of psoriasis vulgaris (PsV). One previous report found no association of the deletion with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), suggesting it may be a specific risk factor for PsV. Given the genetic overlap between PsA and PsV, a study was undertaken to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mapping to this locus are risk factors for PsA in a UK and Irish population.

  8. Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF drugs for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis: an indirect comparison meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorlund K

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Kristian Thorlund,1 Eric Druyts,2 J Antonio Aviña-Zubieta,3,4 Edward J Mills1,21Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; 2Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; 3Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; 4Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaObjective: To evaluate the comparative effectiveness of available tumor necrosis factor-a inhibitors (anti-TNFs for the management of psoriatic arthritis (PsA in patients with an inadequate response to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs.Methods: We used an exhaustive search strategy covering randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews and health technology assessments (HTA published on anti-TNFs for PsA. We performed indirect comparisons of the available anti-TNFs (adalimumab, etanercept, golimumab, and infliximab measuring relative risks (RR for the psoriatic arthritis response criteria (PsARC, mean differences (MDs for improvements from baseline for the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ by PsARC responders and non-responders, and MD for the improvements from baseline for the psoriasis area and severity index (PASI. When the reporting of data on intervention group response rates and improvements were incomplete, we used straightforward conversions based on the available data.Results: We retrieved data from 20 publications representing seven trials, as well as two HTAs. All anti-TNFs were significantly better than control, but the indirect comparison did not reveal any statistically significant difference between the anti-TNFs. For PsARC response, golimumab yielded the highest RR and etanercept the second highest; adalimumab and infliximab both yielded notably smaller RRs. For HAQ improvement, etanercept and infliximab yielded the largest MD among PsARC responders

  9. Self-reported health outcomes in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis randomized to two etanercept regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gniadecki, R; Robertson, David; Molta, C T;

    2012-01-01

    Background Moderate/severe psoriasis combined with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) impairs health-related quality of life (QoL). Etanercept, a fully human tumour necrosis factor-a receptor fusion protein, is approved for treatment of both diseases. Objective To compare patient-reported health outcomes...... additional weeks. PROs included: the EuroQOL-5D (EQ-5D), which measures general health status and consists of the utility index measuring five dimensions of health, and a visual analogue scale (VAS) allowing patients to assess health status; the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), which measures the...

  10. Disease activity, quality of life and indirect costs of psoriatic arthritis in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalec, Paweł; Malinowski, Krzysztof Piotr; Pilc, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the indirect costs, health-related quality of life and clinical characteristics of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), measured using a PsA disease activity index in Poland. Additionally, we aimed to investigate the association between the activity, utility of PsA-affected patients and productivity loss in a Polish setting. A questionnaire survey was conducted to assess disease activity, as well as productivity loss, and a paper version of the EuroQoly-5D-3L questionnaire was used to assess productivity loss and the quality of life. Indirect costs were assessed with the human capital approach employing the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, gross value added (GVA) and gross income (GI) per worker in 2014 in Poland and were expressed in Polish zlotys (PLN) as well as in euros. The correlation was presented using the Spearman correlation coefficient. Our analysis was performed on the basis of 50 full questionnaires collected. We observed a mean utility value of 0.6567. The mean number of days off work was 2.88 days per month, and mean on-the-job productivity loss was 24.1 %. Average monthly indirect costs per patient were €206.7 (864.01 PLN) calculated using the GDP; €484.56 (2025.46 PLN) calculated using the GVA; and €209.70 (876.56 PLN) calculated using the GI. PsA reduces the patients' quality of life as well as their productivity loss associated with both absenteeism and presenteeism. Total indirect costs were negatively correlated with utility. The greater the disease activity, the lower the utility and the greater the indirect costs. PMID:27339273

  11. Carotid plaque and bone density and microarchitecture in psoriatic arthritis: the correlation with soluble ST2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiayun; Shang, Qing; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Li, Edmund K; Kun, Emily W; Cheng, Isaac T; Li, Martin; Li, Tena K; Zhu, Tracy Y; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Qin, Ling; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients have increased risk of both atherosclerosis and osteoporosis. Previous studies revealed that IL-33/ST2 axis may be related to both conditions; however, these associations were never evaluated in a single patients' group. Here we explored the association among plasma levels of IL-33 and its decoy receptor soluble ST2 (sST2), carotid plaque determined by ultrasound, and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD)/microstructure of distal radius measured by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) in 80 PsA patients (55% male; 53.0 ± 10.1 years). Plasma sST2 levels were significantly higher in 33 (41%) patients with carotid plaques (11.2 ± 4.5 vs 7.7 ± 3.7 ng/ml, P independent explanatory variable associated with carotid plaques (OR = 1.296, 95% CI: [1.091,1.540]; P = 0.003). After adjustment for the osteoporotic risk factors, sST2 was significantly associated with higher cortical porosity (β = 0.184, [0.042,0.325]; P = 0.012) and cortical pore volume (2.247, [0.434,4.060]; P = 0.016); and had a trend to be associated with lower cortical vBMD (-2.918, [-6.111,0.275]; P = 0.073). IL-33 was not associated with carotid plaque or vBMD/microstructure. In conclusion, plasma sST2 levels were independently correlated with both carotid plaque and compromised cortical vBMD/microstructure in PsA patients. IL-33/ST2 axis may be a link between accelerated atherosclerosis and osteoporosis in PsA. PMID:27554830

  12. The pattern of psoriatic arthritis in Kashmir: A 6-year prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shagufta Rather

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence, clinical presentation, and patterns of psoriatic arthritis (PsA vary in different parts of the world. The scenario of PsA in west is different from that of Asia. Moreover, the oligoarticular type which was considered most prevalent earlier has been replaced by polyarticular type. Aim: The study was to the clinical profile of psoriasis patients associated with PsA in Kashmir valley of India. Materials and Methods: This was a noninterventional, observational, prospective, hospital-based study involving 150 successive patients of PsA over a span of 6 years. Severity of the skin and nail involvement was assessed by Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI and Nail Psoriasis Severity Index (NAPSI, respectively. PsA was diagnosed by classification criteria for PsA. The number and pattern of swollen and tender joints was counted and classified by Moll and Wright′s classification criteria. Results: Plaque-type psoriasis was the most common clinical type, observed in 122 (81.33% patients followed by erythrodermic psoriasis in 10 (6.66% patients and pustular psoriasis in eight (5.33% patients. PsA occurred between 30 and 40 years of age in 105 (70% patients. The cutaneous involvement occurred before joint involvement in 113 (75.33%, while they occurred simultaneously in 30 (20% cases and the PsA preceded the skin involvement in seven (4.66% cases. Symmetrical polyarthritis was the commonest clinical presentation and was seen in 90 (60% patients. Nail involvement due to psoriasis was present in 120 (80% patients. Commonest nail change found was pitting and seen in 60 (40% patients. Conclusion: The clinical pattern of PsA varies in different parts of the world. Knowledge of the clinical presentation of PsA in a given area is necessary for the successful management of this disease.

  13. Valuation of scleroderma and psoriatic arthritis health states by the general public

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hays Ron D

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Psoriatic arthritis (PsA and scleroderma (SSc are chronic rheumatic disorders with detrimental effects on health-related quality of life. Our objective was to assess health values (utilities from the general public for health states common to people with PsA and SSc for economic evaluations. Methods Adult subjects from the general population in a Midwestern city (N = 218 completed the SF-12 Health Survey and computer-assisted 0-100 rating scale (RS, time trade-off (TTO, range: 0.0-1.0 and standard gamble (SG, range: 0.0-1.0 utility assessments for several hypothetical PsA and SSc health states. Results Subjects included 135 (62% females, 143 (66% Caucasians, and 62 (28% African-Americans. The mean (SD scores for the SF-12 Physical Component Summary scale were 52.9 (8.3 and for the SF-12 Mental Component Summary scale were 49.0 (9.1, close to population norms. The mean RS, TTO, and SG scores for PsA health states varied with severity, ranging from 20.2 to 63.7 (14.4-20.3 for the RS 0.29 to 0.78 (0.24-0.31 for the TTO, and 0.48 to 0.82 (0.24-0.34 for the SG. The mean RS, TTO, and SG scores for SSc health states were 25.3-69.7 (15.2-16.3 for the RS, 0.36-0.80 (0.25-0.31 for the TTO, and 0.50-0.81 (0.26-0.32 for the SG, depending on disease severity. Conclusion Health utilities for PsA and SSc health states as assessed from the general public reflect the severity of the diseases. These descriptive findings could have implications regarding comparative effectiveness research for tests and treatments for PsA and SSc.

  14. Golimumab for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis: a NICE single technology appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huiqin; Craig, Dawn; Epstein, David; Bojke, Laura; Light, Kate; Bruce, Ian N; Sculpher, Mark; Woolacott, Nerys

    2012-04-01

    The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of golimumab (Schering-Plough/Centocor) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of this drug for the treatment of active and progressive psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in patients who have responded inadequately to previous disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and the Centre for Health Economics at the University of York were commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG) to critically appraise the evidence presented by the manufacturer. This article provides a description of the company submission, the ERG review and the resulting NICE guidance. The ERG critically reviewed the evidence presented in the manufacturer's submission and identified areas requiring clarification, for which the manufacturer provided additional evidence. The main clinical effectiveness data were derived from a single phase III randomized controlled trial (GO-REVEAL) that compared golimumab with placebo for the treatment of active and progressive patients who were symptomatic despite the use of previous DMARDs or NSAIDs. The 14-week data showed that, compared with placebo, golimumab 50 mg significantly improved joint disease response as measured by American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 20 (relative risk [RR] 5.73, 95% CI 3.24, 10.56) and Psoriatic Arthritis Response Criteria (PsARC) [RR 3.45, 95% CI 2.49, 4.87], and significantly improved skin disease response as measured by Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) 75 (RR 15.95, 95% CI 4.62, 59.11). The 24-week absolute data showed that these treatment benefits were maintained. There was a significant improvement in patients' functional status as measured by Health Assessment Questionnaire change from baseline at 24 weeks (-0.33; p patient crossover at week 16. It was also unclear if these results were generalizable to clinical practice. No randomized controlled trial

  15. Clinical experience in 115 patients with arthritis and/or enthesitis who met the classification criteria for psoriatic arthritis (CASPAR) within the last two years-Possible association with malignant disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Kiyofumi; Suyama, Yasuhiro; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2016-07-01

    Among about 400 patients with active arthritis and/or enthesitis who were referred to our department within the last two years, 140 of them were strongly suspected as having psoriatic arthritis by a comprehensive diagnostic procedure and after consulting specialists from dermatology, orthopedics, and radiodiagnostics at our institution and other institutions. Among them, 115 patients strictly met the classification criteria for psoriatic arthritis (CASPAR). Among the 115 patients, 19 patients (9 males and 10 females) had current psoriasis and 96 patients (22 males and 74 females) did not have current psoriasis. Nineteen (16.5%) of the 115 patients had developed malignant tumor before the onset of arthritis, and 4 (3.5%) developed malignant tumor after the onset of arthritis. Twenty-two of the 23 patients who developed malignancy were female and 10 patients developed breast cancer. Differential diagnoses in these 23 patients may include paraneoplastic syndrome. We consider that it is important to take into account the possibility of paraneoplastic syndrome in patients with arthritis and/or enthesitis who apparently meet the CASPAR criteria, and detailed screening and monitoring of malignant disease may be beneficial to the patients. PMID:26391911

  16. Fungal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and irritation (inflammation) of a joint by a fungal infection. It is also called mycotic arthritis. Causes Fungal ... symptoms of fungal arthritis. Prevention Thorough treatment of fungal infections elsewhere in the body may help prevent fungal ...

  17. Infectious Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most kinds of arthritis cause pain and swelling in your joints. Joints are places where two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Infectious arthritis is an infection in the joint. The infection ...

  18. Thumb Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Thumb Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... A joint is where bones connect and move. Arthritis is thinning of the cartilage, which is the ...

  19. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA) and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame) was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). ...

  20. Anti-inflammatory efficacy of low-dose cyclosporin A in psoriatic arthritis. A prospective multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrle, G; Schulze, H J; Bräutigam, M; Mischer, P; Schopf, R; Jung, E G; Weidinger, G; Färber, L

    1996-11-01

    Fifty-five patients with psoriatic arthritis were treated with a low dose of cyclosporin A (CyA) (mean dose 2.7 mg/kg per day) for a period of 6 months to investigate the efficacy of CyA on disease parameters. Significant improvement in the joint complaints and inflammation parameters was observed including a decrease in the number of painful (-46%) and swollen (-45%) joints, tenderness (Ritchie Index: -50%) and degree of swelling (-46%), patient's assessment of pain (-35%), the duration of morning joint stiffness (-37%), as well as a decrease in C-reactive protein (-52%). A 50% reduction of joint complaints required a total of 24 weeks, whereas a 50% reduction of skin involvement was achieved after 5-6 weeks of treatment. Four patients left the study due to adverse events: creatinine level increase in two patients, hypertension in one patient and gastroenteritis in the fourth patient. Joint scintigraphy in 18 patients indicated an improvement or stable condition in 61% of cases after a mean follow-up of approximately 8 months. The results of this prospective study show that low-dose CyA effectively improves not only skin lesions, but also joint complaints in psoriatic arthritis. PMID:8977676

  1. Demographics, clinical disease characteristics, and quality of life in a large cohort of psoriasis patients with and without psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truong B

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available B Truong,1,* N Rich-Garg,2,* BD Ehst,1 AA Deodhar,2 JH Ku,2 K Vakil-Gilani,2 A Danve,2 A Blauvelt,1,3 1Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health and Science University, 2Division of Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases, Oregon Health and Science University, 3Oregon Medical Research Center, Portland, OR, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Innovation: What is already known about the topic: psoriasis (PsO is a common skin disease with major impact on quality of life (QoL. Patient-reported data on QoL from large number of PsO patients with and without psoriatic arthritis (PsA are limited. What this study adds: In a large cohort referred to a university psoriasis center, patients with PsO and concomitant PsA (~30% in this group had greater degrees of skin and nail involvement and experienced greater negative impacts on QoL. Despite large numbers of patients with moderate-to-severe disease, use of systemic therapy by community practitioners was uncommon. Background: PsO and PsA are common diseases that have marked adverse impacts on QoL. The disease features and patient-reported QoL data comparing PsO and PsA patients are limited. Objective: To identify and compare demographics, clinical disease characteristics, and QoL scores in a large cohort of PsO patients with and without PsA. Methods: All PsO patients seen in a psoriasis specialty clinic, named the Center of Excellence for Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis, were enrolled in an observational cohort. Demographic, QoL, and clinical data were collected from patient-reported questionnaires and from physical examinations performed by Center of Excellence for Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis dermatologists and a rheumatologists. Cross sectional descriptive data were collected and comparisons between patients with PsO alone and those with concomitant PsA are presented. Results: A total of 568 patients were enrolled in the database. Mean age of PsO onset was 28 years and mean disease

  2. Validity and reliability of the Dutch adaptation of the Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL Questionnaire.

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    Freke Wink

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQoL questionnaire is a disease- specific instrument developed to measure quality of life (QoL in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA. The aim of this study was to translate the measure into Dutch and to determine its psychometric properties. METHOD: Translation of the original English PsAQoL into Dutch was performed by bilingual and lay panel. Ten field-test interviews with PsA patients were performed to assess face and content validity. In total, 211 PsA patients were included in a test-retest postal survey to investigate the reliability and construct validity of the Dutch adaptation of the PsAQoL. The PsAQoL, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ and Skindex-17 were administered on two different occasions approximately two weeks apart. RESULTS: The Dutch version of the PsAQoL was found to be relevant, understandable and easy to complete in only a few minutes. It correlated as expected with the HAQ (Spearman's ρ = 0.72 and the 2 subscales of the Skindex-17 (ρ = 0.40 for the psychosocial and ρ = 0.46 for the symptom scale. Furthermore, the measure had good internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.92 and test-retest reliability (ρ = 0.89. The PsAQoL was able to define groups of patients based on self-reported general health status, self-reported severity of PsA and flare of arthritis. Duration of PsA did not influence PsAQoL scores. CONCLUSIONS: The Dutch version of the PsAQoL is a valid and reliable questionnaire suitable for use in clinical or research settings to asses PsA-specific QoL.

  3. Arthritis in the buff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the significance of radiologic perturbations in articular diseases is facilitated by correlation with its representation in intact macerated skeletons (from the collections of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History). Classic skeletal involvement is illustrated grossly and radiographically for the following conditions: rheumatoid arthritis calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease, osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive (Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis) diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, and infectious arthritis. Distribution and lesion character is reviewed. Visualization of the gross bone lesion ''in the buff'' provides clear explanation of its radiologic appearance and facilitates the transition from x-ray image to the pathophysiology proposed in the interpretation

  4. A genome-wide association study of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis identifies new disease loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A genome-wide association study was performed to identify genetic factors involved in susceptibility to psoriasis (PS and psoriatic arthritis (PSA, inflammatory diseases of the skin and joints in humans. 223 PS cases (including 91 with PSA were genotyped with 311,398 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and results were compared with those from 519 Northern European controls. Replications were performed with an independent cohort of 577 PS cases and 737 controls from the U.S., and 576 PSA patients and 480 controls from the U.K.. Strongest associations were with the class I region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC. The most highly associated SNP was rs10484554, which lies 34.7 kb upstream from HLA-C (P = 7.8x10(-11, GWA scan; P = 1.8x10(-30, replication; P = 1.8x10(-39, combined; U.K. PSA: P = 6.9x10(-11. However, rs2395029 encoding the G2V polymorphism within the class I gene HCP5 (combined P = 2.13x10(-26 in U.S. cases yielded the highest ORs with both PS and PSA (4.1 and 3.2 respectively. This variant is associated with low viral set point following HIV infection and its effect is independent of rs10484554. We replicated the previously reported association with interleukin 23 receptor and interleukin 12B (IL12B polymorphisms in PS and PSA cohorts (IL23R: rs11209026, U.S. PS, P = 1.4x10(-4; U.K. PSA: P = 8.0x10(-4; IL12B:rs6887695, U.S. PS, P = 5x10(-5 and U.K. PSA, P = 1.3x10(-3 and detected an independent association in the IL23R region with a SNP 4 kb upstream from IL12RB2 (P = 0.001. Novel associations replicated in the U.S. PS cohort included the region harboring lipoma HMGIC fusion partner (LHFP and conserved oligomeric golgi complex component 6 (COG6 genes on chromosome 13q13 (combined P = 2x10(-6 for rs7993214; OR = 0.71, the late cornified envelope gene cluster (LCE from the Epidermal Differentiation Complex (PSORS4 (combined P = 6.2x10(-5 for rs6701216; OR 1.45 and a region of LD at 15q21 (combined P = 2.9x10(-5 for rs

  5. Psoriasis and psoriasic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The psoriasis is an skin inflammatory disease characterized by chronic and recurrent red skin covered with silver scales. In their pathogenesis, immunogenetic and environmental factors are conjugated. Psoriatic arthritis. That is a seronegative arthropathy. In the greater part of cases follow to a chronic course of cutaneous psoriasis. In this paper, we analyzed the most frequent forms of presentation of cutaneous psoriasis and we revised the psoriatic arthropathy, with some indications about its treatment

  6. Role of HLA class I antigens in the development of psoriatic arthritis and its clinical presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Aleksandrovna Troshkina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the association of HLA Class I antigens with the predisposition to psoriatic arthritis (PsA and the severity and types of articular syndrome in PsA. Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 99 patients (56 females and 43 males aged 43.5+13 years with PA with a median duration of 2 (range 0.8-10 years. An oligoarthritic type was observed in 28 patients, polyarthritic, distal, and spondyloarthritic types were present in 28, 39, and 10 patients, respectively. Two patient groups were formed according to the age at onset of psoriasis: 1 71 patients aged less than 40 years and 2 23 patients aged over 40 years. Results. As compared with the control group, the patients with PsA were found to have a higher frequency of HLA-B13 (odds ratio [OR] 2.72; p < 0.004, HLA-В16 (OR 3.95; p < 0.0001, and HLA-B27 (OR 3.2; p < 0.003. There was an association of the types of joint injury with HLA antigens: the distal type with HLA-B13 (OR 3.38; p < 0.02 and HLA-В16 (OR 3.95; p < 0.01, the polyarthritic type with HLA-В16 (OR 5.90; p < 0.0001 and HLA-B27 (OR 3.26; p < 0.01, and the spondyloarthritic type with HLA-B27 (OR 6.32; p < 0.001. The young onset of psoriasis was associated with HLA-B13 (OR 3.29; p < 0.001. The detection rate of the B38 antigen (the subtype of HLA-B16 was higher in all X-ray stages of PsA and was 16.4% in Stages I-IIA, 25% in Stage IIB, and 40.9% in Stages III-IV versus 8.7% in the control group, the magnitude of the association being increased with the higher degree of joint destruction. Conclusion. The detailed analysis of the investigation revealed that HLA system antigens were differently involved in the development of PsA and clinical types of articular syndrome.

  7. Detailed analysis of contrast-enhanced MRI of hands and wrists in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States); University of California Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences R-140, Orange, CA (United States); Ashikyan, Oganes; Anavim, Arash; Shin, John [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The objective was to perform detailed analysis of the involved soft tissues, tendons, joints, and bones in the hands and wrists of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We reviewed 23 contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (13 hands and 10 wrists) in 10 patients with the clinical diagnosis of PsA. We obtained clinical information from medical records and evaluated images for the presence of erosions, bone marrow edema, joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel, and soft tissue involvement. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed all images independently. Differences were resolved during a subsequent joint session. The average duration of disease was 71.3 months, ranging from 1 month to 25 years. Eight of the 10 wrists (80%) and 6 of the 13 hands demonstrated bone erosions. Bone marrow abnormalities were shown in 5 of the 10 wrists (50%) and 4 of the 14 hands (31%). Triangular fibrocartilage tears were seen in 6 of the 10 wrists (60%). Wrist and hand joint synovitis were present in all studies (67 wrist joints and 101 hand joints). Wrist soft tissue involvement was detected in 9 of the 10 wrists (90%) and hand soft tissue involvement was present in 12 of the 13 wrists (92%). Findings adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement included synovitis (4 wrists) and tenosynovitis (3 wrists). Bone marrow edema adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement was seen in one wrist. Bulge of the flexor retinaculum was seen in 4 of the 10 wrists (40%) and median nerve enhancement was seen in 8 of the 10 wrists (80%). Tenosynovitis was seen in all studies (all 10 of the hands and all 13 of the wrists). The 'rheumatoid' type of distribution of bony lesions was common in our study. Interobserver agreement for various findings ranged from 83% to 100%. Contrast-enhanced MRI unequivocally demonstrated bone marrow edema, erosions, tendon and soft-tissue disease, and median nerve involvement, with good interobserver reliability in patients with

  8. Rheological blood properties in psoriatic arthritis: relationship with inflammation and cardiovascular risk

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    T V Korotaeva

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study possibility of using blood rheological parameters as markers of inflammation and cardiovascular risk (CVR in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA. Material and methods. 130 pts (51 male and 79 female with PA aged from 39 to 48 years (mean age 43 years without clinical signs of coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke were included. Duration of PA varied from 2 months to 42 years (mean 7 years, duration of psoriasis (PS – from 5,5 to 26 years (mean 15 years. Main measures of erythrocyte aggregation (EA including Kt (c-1 – total speed of erythrocytes aggregates formation, T (c – time of linear erythrocytes aggregates formation, I2,5 [%] – parameter characterizing durability of most large erythrocytes aggregates, β (c-1 – hydrodynamic durability of erythrocytes aggregates were evaluated in erythroaggregometer by registration of intensity of inverse light scattering from blood sample. PA activity was measured with DAS4. CHD development risk score was determined considering traditional CVR factors – age, total cholesterol (TCH and high density lipoproteins (HDLP level, systolic blood pressure (SBP, presence of diabetes, smoking. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP and fibrinogen concentration was measured with standard methods. Correlation analysis was performed with Spearman range correlation coefficient (R, Mann-Whitney (U test was used for groups comparison and p<0,05 was considered as statistically significant level. Results. EA disturbances corresponding to 2nd stage of severity were present in all pts with PA. Significant correlation between EA parameters (T , Kt, I2,5, β and DAS4 (R=-0,32/0,32/0,33/0,25, p<0,001 as well as significant correlation of all EA parameters (T , Kt, I2,5, β with laboratory inflammation markers: CRP (R=-0,37/0,41/0,46/0,32, ESR (R=-0,34/0,35/0,42/0,26 and most strong – with fibrinogen (R=-0,55/0,55/0,49/0,32 were revealed. Significant correlations of all EA parameters and fibrinogen with CVR

  9. Carotid plaque and bone density and microarchitecture in psoriatic arthritis: the correlation with soluble ST2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiayun; Shang, Qing; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Li, Edmund K.; Kun, Emily W.; Cheng, Isaac T.; Li, Martin; Li, Tena K.; Zhu, Tracy Y.; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Qin, Ling; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients have increased risk of both atherosclerosis and osteoporosis. Previous studies revealed that IL-33/ST2 axis may be related to both conditions; however, these associations were never evaluated in a single patients’ group. Here we explored the association among plasma levels of IL-33 and its decoy receptor soluble ST2 (sST2), carotid plaque determined by ultrasound, and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD)/microstructure of distal radius measured by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) in 80 PsA patients (55% male; 53.0 ± 10.1 years). Plasma sST2 levels were significantly higher in 33 (41%) patients with carotid plaques (11.2 ± 4.5 vs 7.7 ± 3.7 ng/ml, P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, sST2 was an independent explanatory variable associated with carotid plaques (OR = 1.296, 95% CI: [1.091,1.540]; P = 0.003). After adjustment for the osteoporotic risk factors, sST2 was significantly associated with higher cortical porosity (β = 0.184, [0.042,0.325]; P = 0.012) and cortical pore volume (2.247, [0.434,4.060]; P = 0.016); and had a trend to be associated with lower cortical vBMD (−2.918, [−6.111,0.275]; P = 0.073). IL-33 was not associated with carotid plaque or vBMD/microstructure. In conclusion, plasma sST2 levels were independently correlated with both carotid plaque and compromised cortical vBMD/microstructure in PsA patients. IL-33/ST2 axis may be a link between accelerated atherosclerosis and osteoporosis in PsA. PMID:27554830

  10. Prologue: 2015 Annual Meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehncke, Wolf-Henning; Gladman, Dafna D; Helliwell, Philip S

    2016-05-01

    The 2015 Annual Meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) was held in Stockholm, Sweden, and attended by rheumatologists, dermatologists, and representatives of biopharmaceutical companies and patient groups. In this prologue, we introduce the articles that summarize that meeting. As in previous years, GRAPPA members held a Trainees Symposium, providing an opportunity for trainees to discuss their research in psoriatic disease with experts in the field. Two dermatology sessions were held: an update on the International Dermatology Outcome Measures group; and a description of a new tool, the Comprehensive Assessment of the Psoriasis Patient, to more accurately assess the full burden of plaque psoriasis and its subtypes. Four distinct plenary sessions were held to update members on the status of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) initiative. GRAPPA's patient research partners discussed their 2 years of involvement in GRAPPA activities and were active in several sessions before and during the 2015 annual meeting. New work was presented toward developing a patient-reported instrument to measure flare in psoriatic disease, and the status of GRAPPA's multiple research and continuing education programs in psoriasis and PsA was summarized. Finally, a Presidential Round Table was held in which the past, current, and incoming presidents reflected on GRAPPA's history and provided insights about its future. PMID:27134267

  11. Golimumab 3-year safety update: an analysis of pooled data from the long-term extensions of randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials conducted in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kay, Jonathan; Fleischmann, Roy; Keystone, Edward; Hsia, Elizabeth C.; Hsu, Benjamin; Mack, Michael; Goldstein, Neil; Braun, Jürgen; Kavanaugh, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess pooled golimumab safety up to year 3 of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) trials. Methods Golimumab 50 and 100 mg, administered subcutaneously (SC) every 4 weeks (q4wk), were assessed in patients with active RA (methotrexate-naïve, methotrexate-experienced and anti-TNF (tumour necrosis factor)-experienced), PsA or AS, despite conventional therapy. Placebo control continued up to week (wk) 24 (wk 52, methotrexate-naïve), wi...

  12. The health-related quality of life in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and psoriatic arthritis: a comparison with a selected sample of healthy people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intorcia Michele

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The health-related quality of life (HRQL is an important indicator of the burden of musculoskeletal disease. The Medical Outcome Study Short-Term 36 (SF-36 is the most used tool that evaluates HRQL as a subjective perception about psychological and physical limitations due to an underlying illness. The purpose of this study was to compare the HRQL scores among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, psoriatic arthritis (PsA and ankylosing spondylitis (AS and a selected sample of health people and determine their relationship with measures of clinical condition. Methods 799 patients (469 with RA, 164 with AS, 65 with axial PsA and 101 with peripheral PsA accepted the invitation to participate. 1579 healthy controls were used for the comparison. We calculated scores for the eight SF-36 subscales, the Physical Component Summary (PCS score, and the Mental Component Summary (MCS score, according to published algorithms. Disease-related characteristics included disease duration, comorbidity, a measure for disease activity and for radiographic damage. The presence of comorbidity was ascertained through patient's self-reports by the Self-Administered Comorbidity Questionnaire (SCQ. Comparison were performed with respect to sex and age, and s-scores were calculated for comparison with the norm. Multivariate analyses were used to assess the relationship between HRQL and radiographic damage, disease activity, and socio-demographic data. Results The four inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRD, compared to controls, significantly impaired all eight health concepts of the SF-36 (p Conclusion Chronic IRD have a clearly detrimental effect on the HRQL in both sex and in age groups, and physical domain is more impaired than mental and social ones.

  13. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  14. Arthritis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Arthritis Page Content Article Body Arthritis is an inflammation ... with antibiotics, even if arthritis develops. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has previously been ...

  15. Arthritis and IBD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IBD Help Center Home > Resources > Arthritis Go Back Arthritis Email Print + Share Arthritis, or inflammation of the ... joints and a reduction in flexibility. TYPES OF ARTHRITIS In IBD, arthritis may appear in three different ...

  16. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  17. Overview of the radiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plain films remain the basic tool for diagnosis and follow-up evaluation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this paper, we review the new classification of JIA: systemic arthritis, oligoarthritis (persistent), oligoarthritis (extended), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor negative), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor positive), enthesitis related arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and unclassified arthritis. We will also review regional abnormalities of three stages: an early stage, an intermediate stage, a late stage, as well as the differential diagnosis

  18. [Development of mesangial immunoglobulin IgA glomerulonephritis and p-ANCA positivity in a patient with psoriatic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzaro, Paola; Battaglia, Ruggiero; D'Altri, Christian; Marangi, Anna Lisa; Perniola, Mariantonietta; Rodio, Angela; De Padova, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors are widely used for the treatment of various rheumatic diseases. These agents may lead to development of systemic autoimmune diseases and renal complications. We report a patient with psoriatic arthritis and renal failure treated with two TNF inhibitors (Etanercept and then Adalimumab). After this treatment he developed proteinuria with nephrotic syndrome. A renal biopsy was performed highlighting GN with mesangial IgA deposits. Then he developed p-ANCA positivity. Following that, etanercept and adalimumab were stopped and a treatment by corticosteroids was initiated, but renal function decreased. Currently the patient is treated by haemodialysis. In our patient, the pathogenic role for anti-TNF therapy is suggested by the close temporal relationship with development of glomerular disease and by the improvement in proteinuria after drug withdrawal. However, the patient was treated once more with TNF agents, so he developed end stage renal disease. PMID:27067220

  19. Is the HLA B27 genotype a risc faktor for psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis vulgaris?

    OpenAIRE

    Zerrin Öğretmen; Merve Meliha Hız; Fatma Sılan; Şule Koşar; Öztürk Özdemir

    2014-01-01

    Backround and Design: Psoriasis is a common inflammatory dermatological disease which may be complicated with joint involvement. It has been suggested that there is an association between HLA-B27 positivity and early onset psoriasis. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the incidence of HLA-B27 positivity in psoriasis patients with arthritis. Materials and Methods: In a total of 96 patients with psoriasis, age of onset, family history, and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (...

  20. Golimumab therapy-induced indicators of X-ray inflammation progression and magnitude according to magnetic resonance imaging evidence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, or psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Viktorovich Smirnov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data on the progression of X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging changes in the hand and foot joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthropathy and in the axial skeleton of those with ankylosing spondylitis when golimumab is used. Golimumab therapy is shown to retard the progression of structural changes in the peripheral joints and vertebral column. There is a significant correlation between magnetic resonance imaging evidence and blood C-reactive protein concentrations.

  1. Arthritis mutilans: a report from the GRAPPA 2012 annual meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Vinod; Gladman, Dafna D; Helliwell, Philip S; Gudbjörnsson, Björn

    2013-08-01

    Arthritis mutilans is often described as the most severe form of psoriatic arthritis. However, a widely agreed on definition of the disease has not been developed. At the 2012 annual meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA), members hoped to agree on a definition of arthritis mutilans and thus facilitate clinical and molecular epidemiological research into the disease. Members discussed the clinical features of arthritis mutilans and definitions used by researchers to date; reviewed data from the ClASsification for Psoriatic ARthritis study, the Nordic psoriatic arthritis mutilans study, and the results of a premeeting survey; and participated in breakout group discussions. Through this exercise, GRAPPA members developed a broad consensus on the features of arthritis mutilans, which will help us develop a GRAPPA-endorsed definition of arthritis mutilans. PMID:23908536

  2. Novel approach to utilizing electronic health records for dermatologic research: developing a multi-institutional federated data network for clinical and translational research in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, April W; Reddy, Shalini B; Garg, Amit

    2012-05-01

    The implementation of Electronic Health Records (EHR) in the United States has created new opportunities for research using automated data extraction methods. A large amount of information from the EHR can be utilized for clinical and translational research. To date, a number of institutions have the capability of extracting clinical data from EHR to create local repositories of de-identified data amenable to research queries through the Informatics for Integrated Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) platform. Collaborations among institutions sharing a common i2b2 platform hold exciting opportunities for research in psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. With the automated extraction of patient-level data from multiple institutions, this novel informatics network has the ability to address high-priority research questions. With commitment to high-quality data through applied algorithms for cohort identification and validation of outcomes, the creation of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Integrated Research Data Network (PIONEER) will make a significant contribution to psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis research. PMID:22630572

  3. Reactive arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keat, A

    1999-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is one of the spondyloarthropathy family of clinical syndromes. The clinical features are those shared by other members of the spondyloarthritis family, though it is distinguished by a clear relationship with a precipitating infection. Susceptibility to reactive arthritis is closely linked with the class 1 HLA allele B27; it is likely that all sub-types pre-dispose to this condition. The link between HLA B27 and infection is mirrored by the development of arthritis in HLA B27-transgenic rats. In this model, arthritis does not develop in animals maintained in a germ-free environment. Infections of the gastrointestinal, genitourinary and respiratory tract appear to provoke reactive arthritis and a wide range of pathogens has now been implicated. Although mechanistic parallels may exist, reactive arthritis is distinguished from Lyme disease, rheumatic fever and Whipple's disease by virtue of the distinct clinical features and the link with HLA B27. As in these conditions both antigens and DNA of several micro-organisms have been detected in joint material from patients with reactive arthritis. The role of such disseminated microbial elements in the provocation or maintenance of arthritis remains unclear. HLA B27-restricted T-cell responses to microbial antigens have been demonstrated and these may be important in disease pathogenesis. The importance of dissemination of bacteria from sites of mucosal infection and their deposition in joints has yet to be fully understood. The role of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of reactive arthritis is being explored; in some circumstances, both the anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects of certain antibiotics appear to be valuable. The term reactive arthritis should be seen as a transitory one, reflecting a concept which may itself be on the verge of replacement, as our understanding of the condition develops. Nevertheless it appropriately describes arthritis that is associated with demonstrable

  4. Arthritis and the Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RSS Home » Learn About Feet » Foot Health Information Arthritis What is Arthritis? Arthritis, in general terms, is inflammation and swelling of ... an increase in the fluid in the joints. Arthritis has multiple causes; just as a sore throat ...

  5. The impact of physical therapy on the quality of life of patients with rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustur Dušan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This open, uncontrolled study examined the effects of physical therapy and rehabilitation on the quality of life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Material and methods: The study included a total of 109 patients (69 with RA and 40 with PsA. Patients came from Norway for a four-week rehabilitation period at the Institute of Physical Medicine, Rehabilitation & Rheumatology - Igalo from June till October, 2003. This was a self-controlled, pretest/posttest study. All patients had six days of physical therapy per week, during a four-week stay, which made a total of 24 therapy days. Basic therapy included mud packs/baths, kinesitherapy, hydrokinesitherapy and electrotherapy with analgesic effects. Quality of Life measurements were conducted two times (on admission and discharge using questionnaire EuroQoL (EQ-5D. The research also included evaluation of ACR improvement. Results: Pain/disability scale and the well being scale showed that quality of life in patients with PsA was significantly lower in comparison with RA patients. However, after 4 weeks, quality of life was much better in most dimensions of the EuroQoL questionnaire. Patients showed no improvement in self-care activities (in both groups and daily activities (in group with PsA. Significant improvement was measured also in ACR improvement criteria (around 30%. Conclusions: Physical therapy at the Igalo Institute and good climate conditions have significantly improved the Health-Related-Quality-of-Life in both groups of patients. ACR index showed great improvement after a four-week rehabilitation period.

  6. Estimation of the sensitivity and specificity of ASAS criteria for peripheral spondyloarthritis in patients with early psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Loginova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of ASAS (Assessment of Spondyloarthritis International Society criteria for peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA in patients with early psoriatic arthritis (ePsA.Subjects and methods. Examinations was made in 45 patients (17 men and 28 women with ePsA meeting the CASPAR (ClASsification criteria for Psoriatic ARthritis criteria (mean age, 37 years; disease duration, 1 year and in 20 patients (9 men and 11 women with signs of peripheral SpA meeting the ESSG (European Spondyloarthropathy Study Group criteria (mean age, 23 years; disease duration, 2.25 years; control group. The investigators estimated 78/76 tender/swollen joints and enthuses using MASES (Maastricht Ankylosing Spondylitis Enthesitis Score and assessed the presence of inflammatory spinal pain according to the ASAS criteria, psoriasis, uveitis, inflammatory bowel diseases, genitourinary and/or enteric infections, and a family history of SpA. They also performed X-ray studies of the hand and distal portions of the foot and pelvis and graded sacroilitis using the Kellgren scores. HLA-B27, C-reactive protein, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were determined. The sensitivity/specificity, likelihood ratios, and clinical value of criteria were calculated.Results. 41/4 and 31/14 patents with ePsA met/unmet Criteria Sets I and II. The sensitivity/specificity of Sets I and II was 91.1/10% and 68.8/95%, respectively. One patient with ePsA and two patients in the control group did not meet one of the sing sets. The total sensitivity/specificity was 97.8/10%. In the control group, the sensitivity/specificity of Sets I and II was 91.1/100% and 68.8/100%, respectively. For ePsA, the positive likelihood ratio proved to be high for Set II (13.78% and low for Set I (1.01.Conclusion. ASAS Criteria Set I for peripheral SpA is of low value in identifying ePsA and Sign Set II shows a high value in diagnosing ePsA as it includes the major clinical

  7. Arthritis Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bone Bash Dinners & Galas Healing Hands for Arthritis Bike Events Volunteer Search Events About Us Mission & Vision Leadership News Partners & Sponsors Careers Annual Report Financials Contact Us Privacy Policy Donate Make a Donation ...

  8. Enteropathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as well. Those who test positive for the HLA-B27 genetic marker are much more likely to have spinal involvement with enteropathic arthritis than those who test negative. Disease Course/Prognosis ...

  9. Gonococcal arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people who have gonorrhea caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae . Gonococcal arthritis affects women more often than men. ... Saunders; 2013:chap 109. Marrazzo JM, Apicella MA. Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonnorrhea). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, ...

  10. Viral arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-04-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of ...

  14. Involvement of the Inconstant Bursa of the Fifth Metatarsophalangeal Joint in Psoriatic Arthritis: A Clinical and Ultrasonographic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Ciancio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the involvement of the bursa located next to the head of the 5th metatarsal bone in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA in comparison with the other seronegative spondyloarthritis (SpA. Methods. All patients with PsA seen during a period of 24 months were enrolled. The control group included healthy subjects and patients with the other SpA. All subjects underwent clinical and ultrasound (US examination of the lateral surface of the 5th metatarsal. Results. 150 PsA patients (88 M; 62 F, 172 SpA (107 M; 65 F, and 95 healthy controls (58 M; 37 F were evaluated. Based on clinical and US evaluation, bursitis was diagnosed in 17/150 (11.3% PsA patients but in none of the SpA (P<0.0001 and healthy (P=0.0002 controls. In detecting bursitis, US was more sensitive than clinical examination, although the difference did not reach statistical significance (P=0.09. Conclusion. The bursa of the 5th metatarsophalangeal joint appears to be involved in PsA more frequently than by chance. If confirmed by other studies, this finding could be considered as a distinctive clinical sign of PsA, useful for differential diagnosis with the other SpA. In asymptomatic patients, US proved to be more sensitive in the detection of bursitis.

  15. Ultrasound and psoriatic arthritis – Review of the literature and general considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Solivetti, F.M.; Andreoli, G.M.; Bacaro, D.

    2007-01-01

    The authors review the recent literature on the use of ultrasonography in psoriatic arthropathy. The results are discussed in light of the authors' experience and with reference to technological advances and processes.

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and ...

  20. RHEUMATOID FACTOR AND ANTI-CYCLIC CITRULLINATED PEPTIDE ANTIBODIES IN PATIENTS WITH PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to define the clinical value of rheumatoid factor (RF and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP in early psori- atic arthritis (PA. Subjects and methods. Fifty-six patients (32 females and 24 males with early PA with a mean duration of 12±6.7 months were studied. The examinees' age ranged from 18 to 76 years (mean age 44±15.5 years. Mean psoriasis duration was 12.5±2.2 years. RF IgM was determined using a high-sensitive nephelometric method on a BN Pro-Spec analyzer (Siemens, Germany and serum anti-CCP concentra- tions were measured by immunochemiluminescence on a COBAS e411 analyzer (Roche, Switzerland. Group 1 included 10 patients with anti-CCP and/or RF (a study group; Group 2 comprised 46 patients without anti-CCP and RF (a control group. Results. There was anti-CCP in 7 (12.5% of the patients with early PA, RF in 8 (14.3%, both of them in 5 (9%. The study group had a severer course of PA accompanied by polyarthritis, inflamed distal interphalangeal joints, axial arthritis, dactylitis, enthesitis, and, in some cases spondylitis and sacroiliitis. In groups 1 and 2, the number of tender joints was 17.6±4 and 10±1.5, respectively (p = 0.04; that of swollen ones, 12.6±1.5 and 7.0±1.1 (p = 0.02; DAS28 index, 5.9±1.7 and 4.5±1.5 (p = 0.02; ESR, 34.5±5.9 and 22±2.3 (p = 0.04, high-sensitive C reactive protein, 70±25.3 and 24.9±5.0 (p = 0.06; and Sharp ratio, 68.7±14.3 and 21.3±3.8 (p < 0.004. Conclusion. In patients with early PA, anti-CCP and RF were encountered with an approximately equal frequency; at the same time, they were associated with polyarthritis, high disease activity, and an erosive process. 

  1. Infliximab plus methotrexate is superior to methotrexate alone in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis in methotrexate-naive patients: the RESPOND study

    OpenAIRE

    Baranauskaite, Asta; Raffayová, Helena; Kungurov, NV; Kubanova, Anna; Venalis, Algirdas; Helmle, Laszlo; Srinivasan, Shankar; Nasonov, Evgeny; Vastesaeger, Nathan; ,

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of treatment with infliximab plus methotrexate with methotrexate alone in methotrexate-naive patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods In this open-label study, patients 18 years and older with active PsA who were naive to methotrexate and not receiving disease-modifying therapy (N=115) were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either infliximab (5 mg/kg) at weeks 0, 2, 6 and 14 plus methotrexate (15 mg/week); or methotrexate (15 mg/wee...

  2. Validity of Diagnostic Codes and Prevalence of Physician-Diagnosed Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis in Southern Sweden – A Population-Based Register Study

    OpenAIRE

    Löfvendahl, Sofia; Theander, Elke; Svensson, Åke; Steen Carlsson, Katarina; Englund, Martin; Petersson, Ingemar

    2014-01-01

    Objective To validate diagnostic codes for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and estimate physician-diagnosed prevalence of psoriasis and PsA in the Skåne region, Sweden. Methods In the Skåne Healthcare Register (SHR), all healthcare consultations are continuously collected for all inhabitants in the Skåne region (population 1.2 million). During 2005–2010 we identified individuals with ≥1 physician-consultations consistent with psoriasis (ICD-10). Within this group we also identified th...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Institutes Office of the Director 27 Institutes and Centers that make up the NIH About Mission The NIH ... arthritis is an inflammatory disease affecting about 1.3 million adults, and causes pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function in the joints. Several ...

  4. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Definition and classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslandre, C

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of diseases defined by the presence of arthritis of more than 6weeks duration in patients aged less than 16years and with unknown etiology. The international classification based on clinical and biological criteria define each type of JIA: systemic, oligoarticular, polyarticular with and without rheumatoid factor, enthesitis-related arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. However, some discussions persist concerning systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, whose clinical symptoms and pathogenic mechanisms are quite similar to those observed in autoinflammatory diseases, arthritis with antinuclear factors (poly- and oligoarticular) that could be considered as a homogenous group, and a family history of psoriasis that frequently led to unclassified arthritis. Better knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms should improve the initial clinical classification with more homogeneous groups of patients and reduce the number of unclassified cases of arthritis. PMID:26968301

  5. Early treatment with addition of low dose prednisolone to methotrexate improves therapeutic outcome in severe psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram K Mahajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriatic arthritis (PsA is increasingly being recognized to cause progressive joint damage and disability. PsA unresponsive to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, the conventional first-line choice of treatment, is usually managed with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs especially methotrexate. An 18-year-old HIV-negative male had progressively severe PsA of 4-month duration that was nearly confining him to a wheel chair. He did not respond to multiple NSAIDs, alone or in combination with methotrexate (15 mg/week, given for 4 weeks. Addition of prednisolone (10 mg on alternate days controlled his symptoms within a week. The NSAIDs could be withdrawn after 4 weeks as the treatment progressed. The doses were tapered for methotrexate (5 mg/week and prednisolone (2.5 mg on alternate days every 8 weekly subsequently during 15 months of follow-up without recurrence/deformities or drug toxicity. For years, the use of corticosteroids in psoriasis has been criticized for their propensity to exacerbate the skin disease on withdrawal. However, monitored use of corticosteroids, even in low doses, combined with DMARDs may be a good therapeutic option in early stage of the PsA rather than ′steroid rescue′ later. This will help in early control of joint inflammation, prevent joint damage and maintain long-term good functional capacity and quality of life. This may be useful when the cost or availability of biologics precludes their use. However, we discourage the use of corticosteroids as monotherapy.

  6. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING OF THE SACROILIAC JOINT IN DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF EARLY POLYARTICULAR PSORIATIC AND RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS (STUDY DATA REMARKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Yu Loginova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of lesions of the spine and sacroiliac joints may be helpful in discrimination between early psoriatic arthritis (ePsA and early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA.Objective. To assess the significance of inflammatory back pain (IBP, HLA-B27, and active sacroiliitis (ASI confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for differential diagnosis of polyarticular ePsA and eRA.Materials and Methods. The study included 29 patients with ePsA (13 males and 16 females, mean age 36.52 ± 11.27 years, average duration of the disease 13.03 ± 9.77 months and 25 patients with eRA (7 males and 18 females, mean age 52.68 ± 14.7 years, average duration of the disease 4.0 ± 1.72 months. Presence of IBP (according to the ASAS criteria and HLA-B27 were assessed (in 27 patients with PsA and in 20 patients with RA; ASI signs were assessed based on the MRI data (bone marrow edema/osteitis. DAS, DAS28, M ± SD, Fisher's exact test, t-test, χ2, the Yule coefficients of association (Q: level from -1 to +1 and Phi were calculated; differences were considered to be statistically significant at p <0.05.Results. In patients with ePsA, ASI was detected by MRI significantly more frequently than in patients with eRA (41.4% and 12% of cases respectively, p < 0.016. No correlation between the presence of ASI and DAS28 was observed in both groups. In the ePsA group, IBP was detected in 17 patients (58.6%; it was long-term in 10 (58.8% of the patients and episodic – in 7 (41.2% patients. Back pain with mechanical rhythm was observed in 3 (12% patients with eRA. HLA-B27 was detected in 9 (33.3% of 27 patients with ePsA and in 3 (15% of 20 patients with eRA (p < 0.014. In patients with ePsA, a very high level of association between ASI and IBP (Q = 0.91, Phi = 0.56; p < 0.003 and a high level of association between ASI and HLA-B27 (Q = 0.75, Phi = 0.56; p < 0.039 were detected. MRI showed no association between the presence of HLA-B27 and ASI signs in patients with RA

  7. Can magnetic resonance imaging differentiate undifferentiated arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Duer, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, K

    2005-01-01

    A high sensitivity for the detection of inflammatory and destructive changes in inflammatory joint diseases makes magnetic resonance imaging potentially useful for assigning specific diagnoses, such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis in arthritides, that remain undifferentiated after...... conventional clinical, biochemical and radiographic examinations. With recent data as the starting point, the present paper describes the current knowledge on magnetic resonance imaging in the differential diagnosis of undifferentiated arthritis....

  8. Immunohistochemical markers for arthritis in psoriasis.

    OpenAIRE

    Veale, D J; Barnes, L.; Rogers, S.; FitzGerald, O

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine the immunohistological features in the involved skin of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PA) (n = 15), compared with those in involved skin from patients with psoriasis but no arthritis (n = 5), and with a group with normal skin (n = 4), to identify markers for arthritis in psoriasis. METHODS--Skin was obtained from patients by 6 mm punch biopsy and normal skin was provided by the department of plastic surgery. Samples were stained with monoclonal antibodies against T...

  9. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Rheumatoid Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: ... 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  10. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to complications from the flu? 1. What is arthritis? The word arthritis actually means joint inflammation, but ... for you. 2. Who is at risk for arthritis? Certain factors are associated with a greater risk ...

  11. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease; CPPD disease; Acute CPPD arthritis; Pseudogout ... Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis is caused by the collection of salt called calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD). The buildup ...

  12. Disease Activity in Psoriatic Arthritis: Comparison of the Discriminative Capacity and Construct Validity of Six Composite Indices in a Real World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Salaffi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare, “in a real world,” the performance of the most common composite activity indices in a cohort of PsA patients. Methods. A total of 171 PsA patients were involved. The following variables were evaluated: peripheral joint assessment, patient reported of pain, physician and patient assessments of disease activity, patient general health status, dactylitis digit count, Leeds Enthesitis Index, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ, physical and mental component summary score of the Medical Outcome Survey (SF-36, Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI, Dermatology Life Quality Index, C-reactive protein (CRP, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR. To measure the disease activity, the Disease Activity Score (DAS28-ESR and DAS28-CRP, Simple Disease Activity Index (SDAI, Composite Psoriatic Disease Activity Index (CPDAI, disease activity in psoriatic arthritis (DAPSA, and Psoriatic Arthritis Disease Activity Score (PASDAS have been calculated. The criteria for minimal disease activity (MDA and remission were applied as external criterion. Results. The ROC were similar in all the composite measures. Only the CPDAI showed less discriminative ability. There was a high degree of correlation between all the indices (P<0.0001. The highest correlations were between DAPSA and SDAI (rho = 0.996 and between DAPSA and DAS28-CRP (rho = 0.957. CPDAI, DAPSA, and PASDAS had the most stringent definitions of remission and MDA category. DAS28-ESR and DAS28-CRP had the highest proportions in remission and MDA. Conclusions. Although a good concurrent validity and discriminant capacity of six disease activity indices were observed, the proportions of patients classified in the disease activity levels differed. In particular, the rate of patients in remission was clearly different among the respective indices.

  13. Septic arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Ahaideb Abdulaziz

    2008-01-01

    Abstract There is an increasing number of rheumatoid patients who get septic arthritis. Chronic use of steroids is one of the important predisposing factors. The clinical picture of septic arthritis is different in immunocompromised patients like patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The diagnosis and management are discussed in this review article.

  14. Safety profiles and efficacy of infliximab therapy in Japanese patients with plaque psoriasis with or without psoriatic arthritis, pustular psoriasis or psoriatic erythroderma: Results from the prospective post-marketing surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Hideshi; Terui, Tadashi; Matsukawa, Miyuki; Takesaki, Kazumi; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro; Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2016-07-01

    A large-scale prospective post-marketing surveillance was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of infliximab in Japanese patients with plaque psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, pustular psoriasis and psoriatic erythroderma. This study was conducted in all psoriasis patients treated with infliximab after its Japanese regulatory approval. Infliximab was administrated at 5 mg/kg at weeks 0, 2 and 6, and every 8 weeks thereafter. Patients were serially enrolled and observed for 6 months to evaluate the safety and efficacy. The safety and efficacy were evaluated in 764 and 746 patients, respectively. Incidences of any and serious adverse drug reactions were 22.51% and 6.94%, respectively, and those of any and serious infusion reactions were 6.15% and 1.31%, respectively, which were comparable with the results in the post-marketing surveillance with 5000 rheumatoid arthritis patients in Japan. Major adverse drug reactions during the follow-up period were infections (5.10%) including pneumonia, cellulitis and herpes zoster, however, no tuberculosis was observed. The safety profiles were equivalent, regardless of the psoriasis types. No new safety problems were identified. The response rates on global improvement and median improvement rate of Psoriasis Area and Severity Index in all patients were 88.0% and 85.0%, respectively. Of note, the efficacy was equivalent for each psoriasis type as well as for each body region. Infliximab was also effective in pustular psoriasis symptoms, joint symptoms and nail psoriasis, as well as improvement of quality of life. Infliximab was confirmed to be highly effective and well tolerated in treating refractory psoriasis, including pustular psoriasis and psoriatic erythroderma. PMID:26704926

  15. Arthritis in cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Schidlow, D V; Goldsmith, D P; Palmer, J; Huang, N N

    1984-01-01

    We have confirmed previous observations of a transient, non-disabling recurrent arthritis in patients with cystic fibrosis. This arthritis differs from classic rheumatoid arthritis, is frequently associated with skin arthritis lesions, and its occurrence is unrelated to the severity of lung disease.

  16. A Patient with Psoriatic Arthritis Imaged with FDG PET/CT Demonstrated an Unusual Imaging Pattern with Muscle and Fascia Involvement: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bains, Sukharn; Khan, Sana; Aparici, Carina Mari [Univ. of California, San Francisco (United States); Win, Aung Zaw; Reimert, Matthew [San Fracisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco (United States)

    2012-06-15

    We describe the case of a patient with known history of psoriasis that presented with 1 year of unexplained fever, muscle weakness and marked weight loss, suspicious for B symptoms of a malignant origin. [{sup 18}F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) scans demonstrated an unusual serpiginous pattern of uptake in the fascia and muscles as well as lymph node activity. Multiple histological samples, including a final PET-probe guided lymph node surgical resection, excluded malignancy and confirmed the diagnosis of reactive inflammatory changes, with a plausible diagnosis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome with associated lymphadenitis, fasciitis and myositis, possibly mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. To our knowledge, there is no evidence of a previously reported FDG uptake pattern of fascia and muscle involvement in psoriatic arthritis.

  17. A Patient with Psoriatic Arthritis Imaged with FDG PET/CT Demonstrated an Unusual Imaging Pattern with Muscle and Fascia Involvement: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the case of a patient with known history of psoriasis that presented with 1 year of unexplained fever, muscle weakness and marked weight loss, suspicious for B symptoms of a malignant origin. [18F]-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) scans demonstrated an unusual serpiginous pattern of uptake in the fascia and muscles as well as lymph node activity. Multiple histological samples, including a final PET-probe guided lymph node surgical resection, excluded malignancy and confirmed the diagnosis of reactive inflammatory changes, with a plausible diagnosis of autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome with associated lymphadenitis, fasciitis and myositis, possibly mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor. To our knowledge, there is no evidence of a previously reported FDG uptake pattern of fascia and muscle involvement in psoriatic arthritis

  18. Association of IL1Β (-511 A/C) and IL6 (-174 G > C) polymorphisms with higher disease activity and clinical pattern of psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubino, N; Montilla, C; Usategui-Martín, R; Cieza-Borrela, C; Carranco, T; Calero-Paniagua, I; Quesada, A; Cañete, J D; Queiro, R; Sánchez, M D; Hidalgo, C; Martínez, O; Del Pino-Montes, J; Díaz-Álvarez, A; González-Sarmiento, R

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze whether IL1β (-511G > A) and IL6 (-174 G > C) polymorphisms are associated with inflammatory activity, radiographic damage or clinical pattern of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). One hundred twenty-five patients classified as PsA according to the Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis (CASPAR) criteria were included. Patients were stratified according to their clinical pattern at inclusion as peripheral, axial, or mixed involvement. Disease activity in peripheral or mixed forms was measured using the number of swollen and tender joints, pain analog visual scale, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and disease activity score 28 (DAS28). Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) was used for axial and mixed forms, as were pain visual analog scale, ESR and CRP. Radiographic damage was evaluated using a modified Sharp score and modified stoke ankylosing spondylitis spinal score (SASSSm). The polymorphisms for the promoter region of IL1β (-511 G/A) and IL-6 (-174 G/C) were analyzed. The G allele of IL1B (-511G/A) polymorphism was associated with higher peripheral joint disease activity (OR 3.13; p  C) polymorphism presented a strong trend to be associated with peripheral forms (70.86 %) (OR 1.89; p HLA-B27 (15.78 %) compared with C allele (28.57 %) (OR 0.469; p = 0.02; CI 95 % 0.238-0.923, p-corrected 0.03). This study suggests that the G allele polymorphism of IL1B (-511 A/C) is associated with higher peripheral joint disease activity. On the other hand, the IL6 (-174 G/C) polymorphism showed a strong trend to be associated with the peripheral pattern of PsA. PMID:27188858

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Arthritis Yoga Poses for Arthritis Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical ... Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease ...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  2. The Clinical and Cost Effectiveness of Ustekinumab for the Treatment of Psoriatic Arthritis: A Critique of the Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Joanne; Rice, Stephen; Smith, Alison; Rodgers, Mark; Lopez, Rocio Rodriguez; Craig, Dawn; Woolacott, Nerys

    2016-04-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of ustekinumab (Janssen) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of ustekinumab for the treatment of active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) as part of the Institute's single technology appraisal (STA) process. The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and the Centre for Health Economics Technology Appraisal Group at the University of York were commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). This article provides a description of the ERG review of the manufacturer's evidence submission, and summarises the NICE Appraisal Committee's final guidance (TA340) issued in June 2015. The manufacturer presented evidence on ustekinumab for two patient populations: (1) a tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα)-inhibitor-naïve population who had not previously received any TNFα inhibitors (biologics); and (2) a TNFα-inhibitor-exposed population who had previously received at least one TNFα inhibitor. The clinical evidence for ustekinumab was derived from two randomised controlled trials (PSUMMIT 1 and 2), in which a total of 927 patients who had not responded to previous disease-modifying antirheumatic drug therapies received ustekinumab 45 mg, ustekinumab 90 mg, or placebo. These data suggested that ustekinumab is more effective than placebo over 16-24 weeks in terms of both joint and skin response. In the absence of head-to-head comparisons between different biologics (ustekinumab, golimumab, etanercept, adalimumab and infliximab), the manufacturer conducted a network meta-analysis to estimate the relative efficacy of treatments for the TNFα-inhibitor-naïve population. Results of this analysis were marked as academic in confidence and are therefore not reported. For the TNFα-inhibitor-exposed population, the clinical analysis was limited to ustekinumab versus conventional management only, and was based on a subgroup of 180 patients from the PSUMMIT 2 trial

  3. Self-reported adherence to a home-based exercise program among patients affected by psoriatic arthritis with minimal disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenti, Maria Sole; Triggianese, Paola; Conigliaro, Paola; Santoro, Matteo; Lucchetti, Ramona; Perricone, Roberto

    2014-11-01

    More than half of all patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) exhibit progressive erosive arthritis, associated with severe functional impairment and psychosocial disability. Biologics have been suggested to be more effective in inducing minimal disease activity" (MDA) than disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Behavioral patient education appears to be more effective in encouraging patients to increase their physical activity (PA) levels. The aim of the study was to evaluate the benefits of home-based exercises program on disease activity and quality of life in MDA-PsA patients treated with an anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and DMARD therapy. We observed a self-reported adherence rate to home-based exercise of 76.6% and data showed the impact of the exercise program on self-reported health and mental assessment. A positive relationship between patient and therapist is crucial, influencing the quality of the performance, the emotional support, and increasing motivation in PsA patients. PMID:25381979

  4. Living with Psoriatic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on a biologic, to compensate for the biologic's lag time, and then transition you off the pain ... text: Please join us at one of our educational events designed for health care providers. Continuing Education ...

  5. Serum C-reactive protein levels in Japanese patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: Long-term differential effects of biologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahina, Akihiko; Umezawa, Yoshinori; Yanaba, Koichi; Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2016-07-01

    Psoriasis has been shown to accompany systemic inflammation. We aimed to examine serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in Japanese psoriatic patients, and to elucidate their long-term as well as short-term changes by treatment with different biologics. A retrospective study was conducted in those who initiated and successfully continued the treatment for up to 24 months with either infliximab, adalimumab or ustekinumab, at the psoriasis special clinic of Jikei University School of Medicine. A total of 212 patients were included, 171 with plaque-type psoriasis (PsV) and 41 with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). A statistically significant elevation of CRP values was found in the group with a Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) of 12 or more compared with the PASI of less than 12 for both PsV and PsA. The CRP-positive patients had a higher proportion of PsA compared with the CRP-negative patients, and they had significantly higher PASI scores. Serum CRP values declined as early as at 3 months after systemic treatment with biologics. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antagonists did lead to a notable and sustained CRP decline up to 24 months. Infliximab showed rapid decline, while CRP decline by adalimumab treatment was time-dependent. The interleukin-12/23 p40 antagonist, ustekinumab, appeared to be less potent than TNF-α antagonists in stabilizing CRP values at low levels despite good control of cutaneous lesions. In conclusion, serum CRP levels can be used to assess disease severity in Japanese psoriatic patients as a marker of systemic inflammation. TNF-α antagonists may be more beneficial than ustekinumab in this regard. PMID:26704718

  6. Forms of Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Forms of Arthritis Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents Today, ... of Linda Saisselin Osteoarthritis (OA) — the form of arthritis typically occurring during middle or old age, this ...

  7. MP Joint Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon MP Joint Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... in to name and customize your collection. DESCRIPTION Arthritis is the wearing away of the cartilage at ...

  8. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It ... illness . This means the body attacks and destroys healthy body ...

  9. Uso do abatacepte em uma paciente com artrite psoriásica Use of the abatacept in a patient with psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ewerton Maia Rodrigues

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Artrite psoriásica (AP é uma artrite inflamatória soronegativa de causa desconhecida. Classicamente, a AP apresenta cinco formas clínicas, sendo a oligoartrite assimétrica a mais comum. Descrevemos o caso de uma paciente com AP refratária às drogas modificadoras da doença, que evoluiu com hepatite medicamentosa após quimioprofilaxia com isoniazida, administrada previamente ao tratamento com anti-TNFα. Em virtude do risco de ativação de tuberculose (TB latente pela administração de anti-TNFα, da hepatotoxicidade decorrente do tratamento da TB, e baseado no fato de o tratamento da AP se assemelhar ao da artrite reumatoide, optou-se pelo tratamento empírico com abatacepte. Aproximadamente vinte dias após a segunda dose do biológico, a paciente evoluiu com importante melhora clínica, resolução da artrite, regressão das lesões de pele e melhora da anemia e das provas de atividade inflamatória.Psoriatic arthritis (PA is an inflammatory seronegative arthritis of unknown origin. Classically, PA has five clinical forms, and asymmetric oligoarthritis is the most common type. We describe the case of a patient with PA refractory to disease-modifying drugs, who developed drug-induced hepatitis after chemoprophylaxis with isoniazid, administered prior to the treatment with an anti-TNFα agent. Due to the risk of activating latent tuberculosis with the administration of anti-TNFα and hepatotoxicity onset caused by the TB treatment and based on the fact that the treatment of PA is similar to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, a decision was made to use the empirical treatment with abatacept. Approximately twenty days after the second infusion of the drug, the patient showed clinical improvement, resolution of the arthritis, almost complete disappearance of the skin lesions and improvement of anemia and inflammatory tests.

  10. When is arthritis reactive?

    OpenAIRE

    Hamdulay, S. S.; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and gen...

  11. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides. PMID:26970491

  12. Bone pathology inpsoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Badokin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study different variants of osteolysis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA and to reveal their relationship with other clinico-radiological features of joint damage. Material and methods. 370 pts with definite PA having different variants of joint damage were included. Radiological examination of bones and joints (in some cases large picture frame was performed. Morphological evaluation of synovial biopsies was done in 34 pts with PA and 10 pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Results. Different types of osteolysis were revealed in 80 (21,6% pts. Osteolytic variant of joint damage was present in 29 pts. 33 pts had acral, 48 — intra-articular osteolysis and 16 - true bone atrophy. Frequency and intensity of bone resorption were associated with severity of PA. Acral osteolysis correlated with arthritis of distal interphalangeal joints and onychodystrophy. Intra-articular osteolysis was most often present in distal interphalangeal joints of hands and metacarpophalangeal joints (39,6% and 41,7% respectively. Characteristic feature of PA was combination of prominent resorption with formation of bone ankylosis and periosteal reaction. Ankylosis was present in 33,3% of pts with intra-articular osteolysis and in 60% of pts with combination of different osteolysis variants. Systemic reaction of microcirculation in synovial biopsies was most prominent in osteolytic variant: marked thickening of capillary and venule basal membrane with high level of acid phosphatase, increased capillary and precapillary blood flow with stasis features, vascular lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration, productive vasculitis with annular wall thickening, thrombovasculitis and villi deep layer sclerosis. Conclusion. Different variants of osteolysis show bone involvement in PA. Acral and intra- articular osteolysis association with bone ankylosis and periostitis proves their common pathogenetic entity.

  13. Prevalence of acute and chronic viral seropositivity and characteristics of disease in patients with psoriatic arthritis treated with cyclosporine: a post hoc analysis from a sex point of view on the observational study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo D

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Delia Colombo,1 Sergio Chimenti,2 Paolo Antonio Grossi,3 Antonio Marchesoni,4 Federico Bardazzi,5 Fabio Ayala,6 Lucia Simoni,7 Donatella Vassellatti,1 Gilberto Bellia1 On behalf of SYNERGY Study Group 1Novartis Farma Italia, Origgio (VA, 2Tor Vergata Polyclinic Rome, 3Macchi Hospital and Foundation, Varese, 4Orthopaedic Institute Pini, Milan, 5S Orsola-Malpighi Polyclinic, Bologna, 6University Federico II Naples, 7MediData srl, Modena, Italy Background: Sex medicine studies have shown that there are sex differences with regard to disease characteristics in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, in immune response and susceptibility to viral infections. We performed a post hoc analysis of the Observational Study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis (SYNERGY study in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA treated with immunosuppressive regimens including cyclosporine, in order to evaluate potential between-sex differences in severity of disease and prevalence of viral infections.Methods: SYNERGY was an observational study conducted in 24 Italian dermatology clinics, which included 238 consecutively enrolled patients with PsA, under treatment with immunosuppressant regimens including cyclosporin A. In this post hoc analysis, patients' demographical data and clinical characteristics of psoriasis, severity and activity of PsA, prevalence of seropositivity for at least one viral infection, and treatments administered for PsA and infections were compared between sexes.Results: A total of 225 patients were evaluated in this post hoc analysis, and 121 (54% were males. Demographic characteristics and concomitant diseases were comparable between sexes. Statistically significant sex differences were observed at baseline in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (higher in males, mean number of painful joints, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, and the global activity of disease

  14. The Psoriatic Arthritis Impact of Disease 12-item questionnaire: equivalence, reliability, validity, and feasibility of the touch-screen administration versus the paper-and-pencil version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salaffi F

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fausto Salaffi,1 Marco Di Carlo,1 Marina Carotti,2 Sonia Farah,3 Marwin Gutierrez1,4 1Rheumatology Department, Polytechnic University of Marche, 2Radiology Department, Polytechnic University of Marche, 3DII, Department of Information Engineering, Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy; 4Musculoskeletal Department, National Rehabilitation Institute, Mexico City, Mexico Background: Over the last few years, there has been a shift toward a more patient-centered perspective of the disease by adopting patient-reported outcomes. Touch-screen formats are increasingly being used for data collection in routine care and research. Objectives: The aim of this study is to examine the equivalence, reliability, validity and respondent preference for a computerized touch-screen version of the Psoriatic Arthritis Impact of Disease 12-item (PsAID-12 questionnaire in comparison with the original paper-and-pencil version, in a cohort of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA. Methods: One hundred and fifty-nine patients with PsA completed both the touch screen- and the conventional paper-and-pencil administered PsAID-12 questionnaire. Agreement between formats was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients. Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient was used to test convergent validity of the touch screen format of PsAID-12, while receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to test discriminant validity. In order to assess the patient’s preference, the participants filled in an additional questionnaire. The time taken to complete both formats was measured. Results: A high concordance between the responses to the two modes of the PsAID-12 tested was found, with no significant mean differences. Intraclass correlation coefficients between data obtained for touch-screen and paper versions ranged from 0.801 to 0.962. There was a very high degree of correlation between the touch-screen format of PsAID-12 and composite disease activity

  15. The comparison of efficacy of different imaging techniques (conventional radiography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance) in assessment of wrist joints and metacarpophalangeal joints in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease which develops in patients with psoriasis. The rheumatoid factor is characteristically absent in the serum of PsA patients. Etiology of the disease is still unclear but a number of genetic associations have been identified. Inheritance of the disease is multilevel and the role of environmental factors is emphasized. Immunology of PsA is also quite complex. Inflammation is caused by immunological reactions leading to a release of kinins. Destructive changes in bones usually appear after a few months from the onset of clinical symptoms. PsA typically involves joints of the axial skeleton with an asymmetrical patern. The spectrum of symptoms includes inflammatory changes in attachments of articular capsules, tendons, and ligaments to bone surface. The disease can have a diverse clinical course but usually manifests as oligoarthritis. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of PsA. Classical radiography has been used for this purpose for over a hundred years. It allows to identify late stages of the disease, when bone tissue is affected. In the last 20 years however many new imaging modalities, such as ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR), have been developed and became important diagnostic tools for evaluating rheumatoid diseases. They enable the assessment and monitoring of early inflammatory changes. As a result, patients have earlier access to modern treatment and thus formation of destructive changes in joints can be markedly delayed or even avoided

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for ... Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information ...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Johns Hopkins ...

  20. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, what happens to your ... Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? ...

  1. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... causes pressure on the nearby nerve. How Rheumatoid Arthritis is Diagnosed The diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that causes chronic abnormal inflammation, ...

  3. When is arthritis reactive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-07-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra-articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA-B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised "trigger" infection. The identification and management of "sexually acquired" and "enteric" forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  4. Tailored treatment options for patients with psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis: review of established and new biologic and small molecule therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elyoussfi, Sarah; Thomas, Benjamin J; Ciurtin, Coziana

    2016-05-01

    The diverse clinical picture of PsA suggests the need to identify suitable therapies to address the different combinations of clinical manifestations. This review aimed to classify the available biologic agents and new small molecule inhibitors (licensed and nonlicensed) based on their proven efficacy in treating different clinical manifestations associated with psoriasis and PsA. This review presents the level of evidence of efficacy of different biologic treatments and small molecule inhibitors for certain clinical features of treatment of PsA and psoriasis, which was graded in categories I-IV. The literature searches were performed on the following classes of biologic agents and small molecules: TNF inhibitors (adalimumab, etanercept, infliximab, golimumab, certolizumab), anti-IL12/IL23 (ustekinumab), anti-IL17 (secukinumab, brodalumab, ixekizumab), anti-IL6 (tocilizumab), T cell modulators (alefacept, efalizumab, abatacept, itolizumab), B cell depletion therapy (rituximab), phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor (apremilast) and Janus kinase inhibitor (tofacitinib). A comprehensive table including 17 different biologic agents and small molecule inhibitors previously tested in psoriasis and PsA was generated, including the level of evidence of their efficacy for each of the clinical features included in our review (axial and peripheral arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and nail and skin disease). We also proposed a limited set of recommendations for a sequential biologic treatment algorithm for patients with PsA who failed the first anti-TNF therapy, based on the available literature data. There is good evidence that many of the biologic treatments initially tested in psoriasis are also effective in PsA. Further research into both prognostic biomarkers and patient stratification is required to allow clinicians the possibility to make better use of the various biologic treatment options available. This review showed that there are many potentially new treatments that are

  5. The OMERACT MRI inflammatory arthritis group: advances and future research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; Bird, Paul; McQueen, Fiona;

    2009-01-01

    The OMERACT magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in inflammatory arthritis group previously developed the rheumatoid arthritis MRI score (RAMRIS) for use in clinical studies, evaluated the use of extremity MRI, and initiated development of a psoriatic arthritis MRI score (PsAMRIS). At OMERACT 9...

  6. The OMERACT Magnetic Resonance Imaging Inflammatory Arthritis Group - advances and priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, Fiona; Bird, Paul; Peterfy, Charles; Haavardsholm, Espen; Ejbjerg, Bo; Lassere, Marissa; O'Connor, Philip; Emery, Paul; Edmonds, John; Genant, Harry; Conaghan, Philip G; NN, NN

    2007-01-01

    This article updates the work and research priorities of the OMERACT working group on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in inflammatory arthritis, as presented to the OMERACT 8 meeting in Malta in May 2006. This work focused on testing the reliability of dedicated extremity MRI in rheumatoid...... arthritis and on the initial steps in the development of an MRI score for peripheral psoriatic arthritis....

  7. Arthritis and Veterans

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-09

    One in three veterans has arthritis. This podcast provides information on how veterans can improve their quality of life with physical activity and other arthritis management strategies.  Created: 11/9/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 11/9/2015.

  8. Clinical efficacy, radiographic and safety findings through 2 years of golimumab treatment in patients with active psoriatic arthritis: results from a long-term extension of the randomised, placebo-controlled GO-REVEAL study

    OpenAIRE

    Kavanaugh, A.; McInnes, I B; Mease, P J; Krueger, G. G.; Gladman, D. D.; van der Heijde, D; Mudivarthy, S.; Xu, W; Mack, M.; Z. Xu; Beutler, A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess long-term golimumab efficacy/safety in patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods Adult PsA patients (≥3 swollen, ≥3 tender joints, active psoriasis) were randomly assigned to subcutaneous injections of placebo, golimumab 50 mg or 100 mg every 4 weeks (q4wks) through week 20. All patients received golimumab 50 or 100 mg beginning week 24. Findings through 2 years are reported. Efficacy evaluations included ≥20% improvement in American C...

  9. Radiographic manifestations of arthritis in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to familiarize the radiologist with a newly discovered association between arthritis and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiographic findings in 31 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection referred to their rheumatology clinic with musculoskeletal complaints. The patients carried a wide range of clinical diagnosis including Reiter syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, undifferentiated seronegative arthritis, isolated enthesopathies, rheumatoid arthritis and osteonecrosis. Radiographs were available in 24 of the 31 patients, and in 20 they showed radiographic features of arthritis, which included soft-tissue swelling periarticular osteoporosis, synovial effusions, sacroiliitis, periosteal reaction, joint space narrowing, marginal erosions, and osteonecrosis. Although the radiographic abnormalities were frequently mild, they were significant, given the short duration of disease in many of their patients (weeks to months) at the time radiographs were obtained. The range of radiographic findings in their series was varied and paralleled the wide range of clinical diagnoses. No findings were pathognomonic for HIV-associated arthritis. Nevertheless, HIV infection needs to be considered in any patient belonging to a recognized risk group who presents with musculoskeletal disease. This is particularly important since immunosupressive drugs used for the treatment of arthritis can be detrimental to patients with HIV infection

  10. Early rheumatoid arthritis and its differentiation from other joint abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs has created new demands on imaging to early identify patients with rheumatoid arthritis and opened new prospects in therapeutic management of patients with aggressive disease. Therefore, new imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have developed during the past few years in this field. In some cases, both magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound may be also useful in making the distinction between early rheumatoid arthritis and other joints abnormalities, including early psoriatic arthritis. This article will review key aspects of important advances in imaging in rheumatoid arthritis, particularly focusing on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound.

  11. Arthritis Mechanisms May Vary by Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids Become Lifelong Learners Featured Website: GeneEd: Genetics, Education, Discovery Links Rheumatoid Arthritis Osteoarthritis Gout Rheumatoid Arthritis Juvenile Arthritis Feeling Out of Joint: The Aches of Arthritis CONTACT ...

  12. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity

  13. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zordo, Tobias de; Mlekusch, Sabine P.; Feuchtner, Gudrun M. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mur, Erich [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Schirmer, Michael [Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital of the Elisabethines Klagenfurt, Voelkermarkter Strasse 15-19, 9020 Klagenfurt (Austria); Klauser, Andrea S. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: andrea.klauser@i-med.ac.at

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity.

  14. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and small joints of the legs and arms, as well as the jaw and neck. Pauciarticular JIA involves 4 or less ...

  15. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit this page to Yahoo! Buzz '); document.write(' Rank this page on Digg '); document.write(' Bookmark this ... her normal activities. What Are Researchers Trying to Learn About Juvenile Arthritis? Scientists are looking for the ...

  16. Arthritis of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of hand and wrist arthritis. (Note: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not test dietary supplements. These compounds may cause negative interactions with other medications. Always consult your doctor before taking dietary supplements.) ...

  17. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worsen, it's known as a "flare" or a "flare-up." JIA often causes only minor problems, but in ... was possible a few years ago. For arthritis flare-ups, doctors may also use medicines called corticosteroids (like ...

  18. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... providers, including the primary care physician, rheumatologist, and physical therapist, will work together to develop the best method ... the management of any type of arthritis. A physical therapist will explain the importance of certain activities and ...

  19. Cartilage collagen type II seromarker patterns in axial spondyloarthritis and psoriatic arthritis: associations with disease activity, smoking and HLA-B27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Heidi Lausten; Gudmann, Natasja Staehr; Christensen, Anne Friesgaard; Ejstrup, Leif; Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Loft, Anne Gitte; Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Siebuhr, Anne Sofie; Junker, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the possible association between type II collagen turnover seromarkers and disease profile in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Outpatients with axial SpA (n = 110) or PsA (n = 101) underwent clinical examination including disease activity measures and HLA-B27 typing. The procollagen IIA N-terminal peptide (PIIANP) and a matrix metalloproteinase-generated type II collagen fragment (C2M) were quantified in serum by ELISA. C2M was higher in SpA than in controls, 0.41 versus 0.36 ng/ml (p = 0.004), while PIIANP did not differ between patients and healthy subjects, 2252 versus 2142 ng/ml (p = 0.13). However, DMARD-naïve SpA patients had higher PIIANP, 2461 ng/ml (p = 0.01) and C2M, 0.44 ng/ml (p = 0.0007) levels than controls, and PIIANP correlated with CRP (ρ = 0.34). C2M was lower in SpA smokers, 0.36 ng/ml versus non-smokers, 0.43 ng/ml (p = 0.02), while PIIANP was higher in HLA-B27 positive, 2312 ng/ml versus negative patients, 2021 ng/ml (p = 0.03). In PsA, PIIANP and C2M did not differ between patients and controls, but PIIANP was elevated in patients not receiving DMARDs, 2726 ng/ml. In PsA, PIIANP and C2M did not differ according to smoking and HLA-B27. Cartilage degradation assessed by C2M is increased in SpA irrespective of treatment but not in PsA. Cartilage synthesis reflected by PIIANP is increased in untreated SpA and PsA. PIIANP correlates with CRP in SpA while not in PsA. In DMARD-naïve SpA but not in PsA, HLA-B27 positivity and smoking are associated with a chondro-proliferative metabolic pattern. PMID:26620690

  20. Validity of diagnostic codes and prevalence of physician-diagnosed psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis in southern Sweden--a population-based register study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Löfvendahl

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To validate diagnostic codes for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA and estimate physician-diagnosed prevalence of psoriasis and PsA in the Skåne region, Sweden. METHODS: In the Skåne Healthcare Register (SHR, all healthcare consultations are continuously collected for all inhabitants in the Skåne region (population 1.2 million. During 2005-2010 we identified individuals with ≥1 physician-consultations consistent with psoriasis (ICD-10. Within this group we also identified those diagnosed with PsA. We performed a validation by reviewing medical records in 100 randomly selected cases for psoriasis and psoriasis with PsA, respectively. Further, we estimated the pre- and post-validation point prevalence by December 31, 2010. RESULTS: We identified 16 171 individuals (psoriasis alone: n = 13 185, psoriasis with PsA n = 2 986. The proportion of ICD-10 codes that could be confirmed by review of medical records was 81% for psoriasis and 63% for psoriasis with PsA with highest percentage of confirmed codes for cases diagnosed ≥2 occasions in specialized care. For 19% and 29% of the cases respectively it was not possible to determine diagnosis due to insufficient information. Thus, the positive predicted value (PPV of one ICD-10 code for psoriasis and psoriasis with PsA ranged between 81-100% and 63-92%, respectively. Assuming the most conservative PPV, the post-validation prevalence was 1.23% (95% CI: 1.21-1.25 for psoriasis (with or without PsA, 1.02% (95% CI: 1.00-1.03 for psoriasis alone and 0.21% (95% CI: 0.20-0.22 for psoriasis with PsA. The post-validation prevalence of PsA in the psoriasis cohort was 17.3% (95% CI: 16.65-17.96. CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of diagnostic codes in SHR that could be verified varied with frequency of diagnostic codes and level of care highlighting the importance of sensitivity analyses using different case ascertainment criteria. The prevalence of physician-diagnosed psoriasis and Ps

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of RA is made, what happens to your joints, what treatments are available, what is happening in ... Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist ...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain ...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Johns Hopkins ...

  5. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any advice you receive from your rheumatologist. Click A Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and ... About Victoria Ruffing, RN Ms. Ruffing has been a member of the Arthritis Center since 2000, currently ...

  7. Occupational therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Schaardenburg, D.J. van; Kuyk, M.A.H. Van; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    Background: For persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the physical, personal, familial, social and vocational consequences are extensive. Occupational therapy (OT), with the aim to facilitate task performance and to decrease the consequences of rheumatoid arthritis for daily life activities, is considered to be a cornerstone in the management of rheumatoid arthritis. Till now the efficacy of occupational therapy for patients with rheumatoid arthritis on functional performance and social part...

  8. Update on the genetic pathogenesis and treatment of psoriatic arthritis%关节病性银屑病遗传学发病机制和治疗进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟丽; 王培光; 张学军

    2013-01-01

    关节病性银屑病是一种慢性炎症性关节病变,与该病发病显著相关的易感基因或易感位点有IL-23R、IL-12B、HLA-Cw6、TRAF3IP2、NO、FBXL19、PSMA6-NFKBIA附近区域,可能相关的易感基因有IL-23A、TNIP1、TNF*-857T、LCE3C-LCE3Bdel变异体、REL基因、IL-13.针对关节病性银屑病发病环节中的一些重要免疫分子或免疫细胞,多种靶向生物制剂包括细胞因子拮抗剂(英夫利西、益赛普、阿达木、戈利木、优斯它单抗)、磷酸二酯酶抑制剂、T细胞抑制剂(阿贝西普)和B淋巴细胞耗竭剂(利妥昔单抗)用于该病的治疗,疗效好,安全性较高.%Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder mainly affecting joints.Recent studies have revealed that the development of psoriatic arthritis is associa with many susceptible genes or loci,including interleukin-23 receptor (IL-23R),IL-12B,HLA-Cw6,TRAF3IP2,NO,FBXL19 and PSMA6-NFKBIA nearby,and likely associated with some genes or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs),such as IL-23A,TNIP1,tumor necrosis factor*-857T,LCE3C-LCE3Bdel variant,REL gene and IL-13.Multiple biological agents targeting some key immune molecules or cells in the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis have been used to its treatment with a favorable efficacy and safety,including cytokine inhibitors (infliximab,etanercept,adalimumab,golimumab,ustekinumab),phosphodiesterase inhibitors (apremilast),T-cell inhibitors (abatacept),and B lymphocyte-depleting agent (rituximab).

  9. EULAR evidence-based recommendations for cardiovascular risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other forms of inflammatory arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, M.J.L.; Symmons, D P M; McCarey, D; Dijkmans, B.A.C.; de Nicola, P.; Kvien, T K; McInnes, I B; Haentzschel, H.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Provan, S.; Semb, A.; Sidiropoulos, P.; Kitas, G; Smulders, Y.M.; Soubrier, M.

    2010-01-01

    Additional tables are published online only at http:// ard.bmj.com/content/vol69/ issue2 Objectives: To develop evidence-based EULAR recommendations for cardiovascular (CV) risk management in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods: A multidisciplinary expert committee was convened as a task force of the EULAR Standing Committee for Clinical Affairs (ESCCA), comprising 18 members including rhe...

  10. Change in CD3 positive T-cell expression in psoriatic arthritis synovium correlates with change in DAS28 and magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores following initiation of biologic therapy--a single centre, open-label study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pontifex, Eliza K

    2011-01-01

    With the development of increasing numbers of potential therapeutic agents in inflammatory disease comes the need for effective biomarkers to help screen for drug efficacy and optimal dosing regimens early in the clinical trial process. This need has been recognized by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) group, which has established guidelines for biomarker validation. To seek a candidate synovial biomarker of treatment response in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), we determined whether changes in immunohistochemical markers of synovial inflammation correlate with changes in disease activity scores assessing 28 joints (ΔDAS28) or magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores (ΔMRI) in patients with PsA treated with a biologic agent.

  11. Arthritis Pain Reliever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-12-27

    Learn more about the benefits of physical activity and the types and amounts of exercise helpful for people with arthritis.  Created: 12/27/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/27/2011.

  12. HLA-B27 frequency in a group of patients with psoriatic arthritis Freqüência de HLA-B27 em uma amostra de pacientes com artrite psoriática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Garcia Ruiz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HLA-B27 is associated with spondyloarthritis, a group of diseases that includes psoriatic arthritis. OBJECTIVES: To describe the HLA-B27 frequency in a group of Brazilian patients with psoriatic arthritis and correlate its presence or absence with their clinical manifestations. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with 44 psoriatic arthritis patients of a Rheumatology clinic. Demographic and social data were recorded, as were skin and joints clinical examination. HLA-B27 was tested. All data were processed descriptively and comparatively by appropriate software. Parametric and non parametric tests were used with 5% statistical significance. RESULTS: HLA-B27 was negative in 32 of the 44 patients (72,7%. Most of them were male, Caucasian, living in Rio de Janeiro, with plaque type psoriasis and average age of 52,9 years. There was statistical significant correlation between positive HLA-B27 and male gender (p=0,004. Negative HLA-B27 had a tendency to correlate with hands and wrists arthritis (p=0,07. There was an inverse significant correlation between HLA values and Schöber's test (p=0,02. CONCLUSION: Although HLA-B27 is negative in most of patients, it is significantly associated to male gender and inversely correlated with Schöber's test.FUNDAMENTOS: O HLA-B27 está associado às espondiloartrites, grupo de doenças que engloba, entre outras, a artrite psoriásica. OBJETIVOS: Descrever a freqüência de HLA-B27 em uma amostra de pacientes brasileiros com artrite psoriásica e correlacionar sua presença ou ausência com as manifestações clínicas dos mesmos. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal avaliando 44 pacientes com artrite psoriásica de um ambulatório de Reumatologia. A avaliação consistia em registro de informações demográficas e sociais, exame clínico da pele e das articulações e pesquisa de HLA-B27. Os dados gerados foram tratados por meio de estatística descritiva e comparativa em Software apropriado. Foram utilizados

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... T U V W X Y Z Rheumatoid Arthritis: In Depth Share: On This Page Key Points ... help ensure coordinated and safe care. About Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory autoimmune disease—a ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions juvenile idiopathic arthritis juvenile idiopathic arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Open All Close All Description Juvenile idiopathic arthritis refers to a group of conditions involving joint ...

  15. Reactive arthritis or post-infective arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keat, Andrew

    2002-09-01

    Infective mechanisms probably underlie a wide range of inflammatory arthropathies. There appears to be a spectrum of mechanisms ranging from the frankly septic, through low-grade infection with very small numbers of microorganisms in the joint to arthritides in which no hard evidence for an infective cause exists. In the midst of the spectrum lie 'post-infective' and 'reactive' arthritides, characterized clinically, genetically and by epidemiological links with infection. Identification of bacterial components within joint material from such patients suggested that the causes of the arthritis had been found. It is now clear that many bacteria are present in inflamed joints; establishing their significance will be of crucial importance, but not easy. PMID:12406424

  16. Arthritis Associated with Crohn's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    A controlled prospective study was undertaken to determine the incidence and characteristic features of peripheral arthritis, sacroiliitis, ankylosing spondylitis and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy in a group of patients with Crohn's disease, and to define the relationship of such arthritides with disease site, duration and activity. Peripheral arthritis occurred in 14.5% of the patients; it was not seen in the control group. This arthritis, which tended to be pauciarticular, was more common i...

  17. Staphylococcus aureus triggered reactive arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Siam, A R; M. Hammoudeh

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To report two patients who developed reactive arthritis in association with Staphylococcus aureus infection. METHODS--A review of the case notes of two patients. RESULTS--Two adult female patients have developed sterile arthritis in association with Staph aureus infection. The first patient has had two episodes of arthritis; the first followed olecranon bursitis, the second followed infection of a central venous catheter used for dialysis. The second patient developed sterile arth...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research ... Center website is intended for educational purposes only. Physicians and other health care professionals ...

  19. [Pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberger-ten Cate, R; Fiselier, T

    1991-10-01

    On basis of clinical and immunogenetic factors most children with pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis can be included in one of the subtypes: type 1 and type 2 pauciarticular JCA. Type 1 occurs in young children, mainly girls, with involvement of knees, ankles or elbows. In the majority of children antinuclear antibodies can be detected. The presence of these autoantibodies is associated with chronic anterior uveitis. Type 2 or the juvenile spondylarthropathies include morbus Bechterew, the reactive arthritides and arthritis associated with psoriasis and inflammatory bowel diseases. Large joints of the lower extremities are involved, back pain is unusual at onset, but enthesitis is frequently present. There is a strong association with HLA-B27. Treatment of both subsets consists of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, application of intra-articular steroids, physio- and hydrotherapy and splinting. In children with a polyarticular course of type 1, or a prolonged course of type 2 disease modifying drugs are often needed. PMID:1957301

  20. Clotrimazole in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wojtulewski, J. A.; Gow, P J; Walter, J; Grahame, R; Gibson, T.; Panayi, G S; Mason, J.

    1980-01-01

    Forty-seven patients with active rheumatoid arthritis took part in an 8-week controlled study in which clotrimazole was compared with a standard nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, ketoprofen. Although clotrimazole was shown to be effective in the treatment of the disease and superior to ketoprofen in certain measurements, if was also responsible for a high incidence of adverse effects. Improvement with clotrimazole took place more slowly but was more sustained than with ketoprofen. A signi...

  1. Association of Psoriatic Disease With Uveitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, Alexander; Khalid, Usman; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and uveitis are inflammatory disorders with significant overlap in their inflammatory pathways. Limited evidence is available about the relationship between psoriatic disease and uveitis. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the potential bidirectional relationship...... between psoriatic disease, including psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, and uveitis. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: We performed a nationwide cohort study of the Danish population from January 1, 1997, through December 31, 2011. We included 74,129 Danish patients with psoriasis who were 18 years or......, 2015. EXPOSURES: Diagnosis of mild or severe psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis for uveitis risk and diagnosis of uveitis for the risk for psoriasis or psoriatic arthritis. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Diagnosis of uveitis, mild psoriasis, severe psoriasis, or psoriatic arthritis. We calculated incidence...

  2. Occupational therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Schaardenburg, D.J. van; Kuyk, M.A.H. van; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    Background: For persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the physical, personal, familial, social and vocational consequences are extensive. Occupational therapy (OT), with the aim to facilitate task performance and to decrease the consequences of rheumatoid arthritis for daily life activities, is con

  3. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. PMID:26063174

  4. Early identification of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nies, Jessica Annemarie Bernadette van

    2016-01-01

    The first part is focused on early recognition of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Two large early arthritis recognition clinics were started in Leiden and Groningen. The results showed that this initiative reduces the GP-delay significantly. Secondly, it was investigated whether an association between sh

  5. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    OpenAIRE

    Jiří Kaas; Valérie Tóthová; Lukáš Martinek

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustio...

  6. [Novel immunodiagnostics for inflammatory arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahle, M; Kling, E

    2016-05-01

    Immunodiagnostics play an important role in the differential diagnostics of arthritis but the test results must be interpreted with respect to the clinical context. The detection of antibodies against citrullinated proteins has significantly improved the immunodiagnostics of arthritis, whereas the importance of testing for rheumatoid factor has decreased due to the low specificity. Antibodies against carbamylated or oxidized proteins will expand the immunodiagnostics of arthritis (especially rheumatoid arthritis) in the future. In contrast, the determination of cytokine concentrations in plasma or synovial fluid plays a subordinate role in the differential diagnostics of arthritis. Indirect immunofluorescence continues to be the gold standard in the detection of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and in the case of positive results further testing for antigen specificity should be carried out. The presence of ANA is not necessarily associated with autoimmune diseases. An example of a non-pathogenic ANA is anti-DFS70 antibodies. PMID:27142378

  7. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND PREGNANCY

    OpenAIRE

    N M Kosheleva; E. V. Matyanova

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) generally starts at the age when many women have already become mothers; however, it may occur in childhood or adolescence. Furthermore, there has been recently a women’s tendency to plan pregnacy for a more mature age, which necessitates a discussion about gestation in this disease. Investigation of mechanisms pregnancy can influence the development of RA both in the gestation and long-term periods is of important theoretical and practical value. The results of thes...

  8. Radiosynovectomy in the treatment of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiosynovectomy is a useful therapeutic option that involves radiopharmaceutical injections into joints, especially to treat rheumatoid arthritis. The indications included different kinds of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Bechterew's disease, hemophiliac arthritis, osteoarthritis, but also patients with joint prosthesis and synovial effusion. There are three commercial available radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment: yttrium-90 for the knee (185 to 250 MBq), rhenium-186 for larger joints (shoulder and hip with 111 MBq; elbow, wrist, ankle joint with can also rederbium-169 for smaller joints (acromioclavicular joint with 37 MBq, thumb base and MTP I with 30 MBq, MCP and MTP II-V with 22 MBq, PIP with 18.5 MBq, and DIP with 15 MBq, respectively). Decisive for the treatment is a positive sign for arthritis in the two-phase bone scan with 99mTc-HMDP (high uptake in the blood pool phase). Only for radiosynovecotmy in the knee an ultrasound with an evidence of effusion is sufficient. Side effects by the treatment are rare, such as temporary radiation or crystal synovitis, tissue necrosis (extra articular fraction or intra-articular), joint infection (1 of 35,000 joints) or effects due to the immobilisation (thrombosis, pulmonary embolism (immobilization of the knee), lymphoedema or loss of motion. In the treatment of the knee a prophylaxis with heparin is necessary to protect the patients for a pulmonary embolism. The clinical outcome is depending from the primary disease and the stage of arthrosis. Kresnik at al reported in 2190 treated joints an overall response rate of 73 ± 17%. A higher response rate was observed in patients with early stage of arthrosis (73 ± 12%) to patients with advance stage (52 ± 24%). The best results had patients with hemophiliac arthritis (91 ± 4%). In our hospital were treated up to 10.000 joints with a mean response rate of 70-80%. There was a higher response rate in larger joints with 81 ± 5

  9. Combination regimen of leflunomide plus methylprednisolone in a female patient with reactive arthritis and concomitant IgA nephropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yi-zhi; ZHAO Xue-zhi; WU Jun; MEI Chang-lin

    2010-01-01

    @@ Spondyloarthropathies (SpAs) include five categories: ankylosing spondylitis (AS),1 reactive arthritis (ReA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), enteropathic arthritis (EA) and undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy (USpA).~2 ReA is an aseptic arthritis occurring after extra-articular infections, particularly genitourinary (GU) or gastrointestinal (GI) tracts. When arthritis is accompanied by conjunctivitis and urethritis, the diagnosis of Reiter syndrome will be suitable for this clinical triad; however, the term "ReA" has been proposed to substitute for Reiter syndrome.

  10. Can imaging be used for inflammatory arthritis screening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    ), ankylosing spondylitis, spondyloarthritis (SpA), and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and they are generally part of the early examination program in arthritis.Computed tomography visualizes calcified tissue with high resolution but is rarely used unless radiography is unclear and MRI unavailable.MRI and...... ultrasonography (US) allow sensitive visualization and assessment of peripheral inflammatory and destructive joint and soft tissue involvement, and MRI is by far the best available method for detecting inflammation in the spine and sacroiliac joints in early SpA. Thus MRI/US can contribute to an earlier diagnosis...... particularly MRI are essential in establishing an early diagnosis of axial SpA....

  11. Pain and microcrystalline arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramonda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microcrystals are responsible for some of the most common and complex arthropathies which are often accompanied by intense, severe pain and inflammatory reactions. The main pathogens are crystals of monosodium urate (MSU, responsible for the gout, calcium pyrophosphate (CPP, which deposits also in various clinical forms of arthopathies, and basic calcium phosphate associated with osteoarthritis. In this context, the microcrystal arthritis is characterized by multiple, acute attacks followed by chronic pain, disability, impaired quality of life, and increased mortality. Given their chronic nature, they represent an ever more urgent public health problem. MSU and CPP crystals are also able to activate nociceptors. The pain in mycrocrystalline arthritis (MCA is an expression of the inflammatory process. In the course of these diseases there is an abundant release of inflammatory molecules, including prostaglandins 2 and kinins. Interleukin-1 represents the most important cytokine released during the crystal-induced inflammatory process. Therefore, clinically, pain is the most important component of MCA, which lead to functional impairment and disability in a large proportion of the population. It is fundamental to diagnose these diseases as early as possible, and to this aim, to identify appropriate and specific targets for a timely therapeutic intervention.

  12. JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I N Sartika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is the most common rheumatic condition in children. JRA is defined as persistent arthritis in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks, with the onset before age 16 years. The etiology of JRA is unknown. Antigen activated CD4+ T cell stimulate monocytes, macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts to produce the cytokines Interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-? and to secrete matrix metalloproteinases, which lead to chronic inflammation due to infiltration of inflammatory cell, angiogenesis, destruction of cartilage and bone with pannus formation. The 3 major subtypes of JRA are based on the symptoms at disease onset and are designated systemic onset, pauciarticular onset, and polyarticular onset. For all patients, the goals of therapy are to decrease chronic joint pain and suppress the inflammatory process. Poor prognostic have been observed in patients with polyarticular onset, rheumatoid factor, persistent morning stiffness, tenosynovitis, involvement of the small joints, rapid appearance of erosions, active late onset childhood, subcutaneous nodules, or antinuclear antibody.

  13. Early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sarzi-Puttini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the synovial joints damage and loss of the function. The ultimate goal in managing RA is to prevent joint damage and to maintain functional ability. Consequently, early diagnosis and treatment is important, but predictive markers for RA are still confined to auto- antibodies and also magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and sonography do not appear to sufficiently distinguish between early RA and non RA. Evidence shows that substantial and irreversible joint damage already occurs within the first 2 years after disease onset. This “window of opportunity” hypothesis for therapeutic intervention in RA is based on the existence of a time frame within which there is a potential for a greater response to therapy, resulting in sustained benefits or, perhaps most important, a chance of cure. There is increasing evidence for beneficial effects of early DMARDs (disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs therapy over delayed treatment in patients who present with arthritis of recent onset. However, no universal consensus exists concerning the choice of initial drug or whether single drug or combination should be given as initial treatments. Most studies demonstrated superiority of aggressive over conventional approaches. Because the tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α inhibitors have proved to stop joint damage progression in severe progressive RA, the achievement of these agents in early RA are currently of great interest.

  14. Non-tumor necrosis factor-based biologic therapies for rheumatoid arthritis: present, future, and insights into pathogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Paula FS; Delgado Alves J

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic options for patients suffering from the more severe forms of spondyloarthritis have been rather limited in the last decades. There is now accumulating evidence that antitumor necrosis factor therapy is highly effective in spondyloarthritis, especially in ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis. Based on the data recently published on more than 500 patients with ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis, this treatment seems to be even more effective than in rheumatoid ...

  15. Radiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An introductory summary of the imaging-diagnosis will be given. The necessity of acquiring a catalogue of application to particular imaging methods is emphasized. Discussion of step by step diagnosis regarding rheumatologic questions is given on example of the hand. Technically insufficient radiographs and bad habits during diagnostic analysis are pointed out. Radiologic problems in differentiating arthritis/osteoarthrosis will be mentioned. The discussion of these points is followed by outlining the radiology of rheumatoid arthritis and the complexity of this disease. Introduction of a new stage classification. Finally twelve basic radiologic types of rheumatoid arthritis will be presented. (orig.)

  16. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of human leukocyte proteins from patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, K.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Thorsrud, A.K.; Munthe, E.; Jellum, E.

    1982-04-01

    Human leukocyte proteins from more than 150 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, together with age- and sex-matched controls, were analyzed by use of the ISO-DALT technique of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis, polymyalgia rheumatica, psoriatic arthritis, calcium tendinitis, post-infectious arthritis, and asymmetrical seronegative arthritis were also included as positive controls. Synthesis of several proteins, referred to by number as members of the Rheuma set, is shown to increase in the leukocyte preparations from patients with classical rheumatoid arthritis. Several of these proteins are specific to monocytes or granulocytes; others are of unknown cellular origin, but appear to be unique to rheumatoid arthritis. The Rheuma proteins appear to be indicators of disease activity, because their increased synthesis can be correlated with sedimentation rate and other clinical indices of rheumatoid disease activity.

  17. MR imaging of tuberculous arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retrospectively, the MR imaging in 6 patients with tuberculous arthritis was reviewed to determine its MR characteristics. Tuberculous arthritis involved the hip (n=4), knee (n=1) and pubic symphysis (n=1). The affected thick synovial tissue was homogeneously hypointense on T1WI and had mixed signal intensity on T2WI. Enhanced T1WI showed irregular contrast enhancement of the abnormal synovium. MRI demonstrated clearly that the thick synovial tissue involved contiguously articular cartilage and subchondral bone. We could see free intraarticular cartilage and subchondral bone. We could see free intraarticular bodies as hypointense nodules on both T1 and T2WI within increased joint effusion. The MR appearances of tuberculous arthritis are not specific. However, MRI is useful in the diagnosis of tuberculous arthritis because it can provide added information about intraarticular abnormalities. (author)

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more ... Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical Activity Role of Body Weight in ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take the place of any advice you receive ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  20. Handout on Health: Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of, and surgery for, bone and joint diseases. Physical therapists: Health professionals who work with patients to improve ... heart. Pericarditis can be caused by rheumatoid arthritis. Physical therapist. A health professional who works with patients to ...

  1. Radiosynovectomy in the treatment of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radiosynovectomy is a useful therapeutic option that involves radiopharmaceutical injections into joints, especially to treat rheumatoid arthritis. The indications included different kinds of arthritis, such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Bechterew's disease, hemophiliac arthritis, osteoarthritis, but also patients with joint prosthesis and synovial effusion. There are three commercial available radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment: yttrium-90 for the knee (185 to 250 MBq), rhenium-186 for larger joints (shoulder and hip with 111 MBq; elbow, wrist, ankle joint with 74 MBq) and erbium- 169 for smaller joints (acromioclavicular joint with 37 MBq, thumb base and MTP I with 30 MBq, MCP and MTP II-V with 22 MBq, PIP with 18.5 MBq, and DIP with 15 MBq, respectively). Decisive for the treatment is a positive sign for arthritis in the two-phase bone scan with 99mTc- HMDP (high uptake in the blood pool phase). Only for radiosynovectomy in the knee an ultrasound with an evidence of effusion is sufficient. Side effects by the treatment are rare, such as temporary radiation or crystal synovitis, tissue necrosis (extra-articular fraction or intraarticular), joint infection (1 of 35,000 joints) or effects due to the immobilization (thrombosis, pulmonary embolism (immobilization of the knee), lymph edema or loss of motion. In the treatment of the knee, a prophylaxis with heparin is necessary to protect the patients for pulmonary embolism. The radiation absorbed dose to the patients are low because a low leakage rate from the treated joint (lymphogenic uptake of 1.8%ID (0.45 to 4.78). These leads to a radiation exposure to the testis of 0.1mSv (0.05 to 0.18) and to the ovary of 0.2 mSv (0.1 to 0.38). Significantly is the radiation exposure of the physician, here especially at the finger pulp. A high beta dose of 22.1 μSv/MBq for the forefinger was observed using only a syringe protection in treatments of knees (90Y), this resulted in a annual radiation

  2. Artritis Temprana Early Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hasta la década de los años ochenta se consideraba a la artritis reumatoide (AR como una enfermedad poco frecuente, de gravedad leve a moderada, que tenía una evolución lentamente, progresiva hacia el daño articular y la incapacidad. El aborde terapéutico convencional hasta ese momento, era el tratamiento clásico de la pirámide.Until the early the eighties was considered rheumatoid arthritis to (RA as a rare disease of mild to moderate severity, which had a slowly evolution towards joint damage and disability. The conventional therapeutic option until then, was the classic treatment of the pyramid.

  3. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper.

  4. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kathleen; Yang, So Min; Kim, Seong Heon; Han, Kyoung Hee; Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper. PMID:25479074

  5. Complementary medicine in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    F. Atzeni; P Sarzi- Puttini; Lubrano, E

    2011-01-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for chronic conditions has increased in recent years. CAM is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions and patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) frequently try CAM. This review summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massag...

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis and bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    N L Prokopjeva; N N Vesikova; I M Marusenko; V A Ryabkov

    2008-01-01

    To study features of bacterial infections course in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and changes of laboratory measures after focus of infection sanation. Material and methods. 46 pts with definite rheumatoid arthritis were examined at the time of comorbid infection (Cl) detection and after infection focus sanation. Bacteriological test with evaluation of flora sensitivity to antibiotics by disco-diffusion method was performed at baseline and after the course of antibacterial therapy to ass...

  7. Biologic therapies for juvenile arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, N; Jackson, G.; Gardner-Medwin, J.

    2003-01-01

    A group of therapies with exciting potential has emerged for children and young people with severe juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) uncontrolled by conventional disease modifying drugs. Theoretical understanding from molecular biologic research has identified specific targets within pathophysiological pathways that control rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and JIA. This review identifies the pathways of autoimmunity to begin to show how biologic agents have been produced to replicate, mimic, or bl...

  8. Biologic therapy of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanov Nemanja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and juvenile idiopathic/rheumatoid arthritis (JIA are chronic, inflammatory, systemic, auto-immune diseases characterized by chronic arthritis leading to progressive joint erosions. The individual functional and social impact of rheumatoid arthritis is of great importance. Disability and joint damage occur rapidly and early in the course of the disease. The remarkably improved outcomes have been achieved initiating biologic therapy with close monitoring of disease progression. Biologic agents are drugs, usually proteins, which can influence chronic immune dysregulation resulting in chronic arthritis. According to the mechanism of action these drugs include: 1 anti-TNF drugs (etanercept, infiximab, adalimumab; 2 IL-1 blocking drugs (anakinra; 3 IL-6 blocking drugs (tocilizumab; 4 agents blocking selective co-stimulation modulation (abatacept; 5 CD 20 blocking drugs (rituximab. Biologics targeting TNF-alpha with methotrexate have revolutionized the treatment of RA, producing significant improvement in clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes not seen previously. The new concept of rheumatoid arthritis treatment defines early diagnosis, early aggressive therapy with optimal doses of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and, if no improvement has been achieved during six months, early introduction of biologic drugs. The three-year experience of biologic therapy in Serbia has shown a positive effect on disease outcome.

  9. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of articular and extraarticular synovial structures of the hands in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimmino, Marco Amedeo; Barbieri, Francesca; Boesen, Mikael;

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), the quantification of enhancement within the synovial membrane and bone by extracting curves using fast T1-weighted sequences during intravenous administration of contrast agent, evaluates synovitis and bone marrow edema in psoriatic...

  10. Major cost savings associated with biologic dose reduction in patients with inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, C L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether patients with Inflammatory Arthritis (IA) (Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) or Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS)) would remain in remission following a reduction in biologic dosing frequency and to calculate the cost savings associated with dose reduction. This prospective non-blinded non-randomised study commenced in 2010. Patients with Inflammatory Arthritis being treated with a biologic agent were screened for disease activity. A cohort of those in remission according to standardized disease activity indices (DAS28 < 2.6, BASDAI < 4) was offered a reduction in dosing frequency of two commonly used biologic therapies (etanercept 50 mg once per fortnight instead of weekly, adalimumab 40 mg once per month instead of fortnightly). Patients were assessed for disease activity at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months following reduction in dosing frequency. Cost saving was calculated. 79 patients with inflammatory arthritis in remission were recruited. 57% had rheumatoid arthritis (n = 45), 13% psoriatic arthritis (n = 10) and 30% ankylosing spondylitis (n = 24). 57% (n = 45) were taking etanercept and 43% (n = 34) adalimumab. The percentage of patients in remission at 24 months was 56% (n = 44). This resulted in an actual saving to the state of approximately 600,000 euro over two years. This study demonstrates the reduction in biologic dosing frequency is feasible in Inflammatory Arthritis. There was a considerable cost saving at two years. The potential for major cost savings in biologic usage should be pursued further.

  11. Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158076.html Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise Baricitinib helped patients who failed other ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug to treat rheumatoid arthritis showed promise in a new six-month trial. ...

  12. New Treatments Helping Kids with Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 159984.html New Treatments Helping Kids With Juvenile Arthritis Several biologics have been approved by the FDA ... 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New treatments for juvenile arthritis offer hope to children with the chronic autoimmune ...

  13. Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arthritis URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arthritis.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  14. Psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis: evaluation of clinical and epidemiological features in 133 patients followed at the University Hospital of Brasília Artrite psoriásica em pacientes com psoríase: avaliação de características clínicas e epidemiológicas em 133 pacientes atendidos no Hospital Universitário de Brasília

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamille Nascimento Carneiro

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory arthritis associated with psoriasis. Its prevalence in patients with psoriasis varies from 7 to 42% but its exact prevalence is unknown. OBJECTIVES: Considering the lack of national data related to its diagnosis in patients with psoriasis, this study aims to describe the clinical, laboratorial and radiological manifestations of psoriatic arthritis in these patients. METHODS: We evaluated 133 patients with psoriasis, treated as outpatients. These patients were asked to fill in the forms with data about the disease and were submitted to a clinical evaluation by a dermatologist and a rheumatologist. Suspected cases of arthritis were referred for further investigation and were classified according to presence or absence of psoriatic arthritis according to CASPAR criteria. RESULTS: The number of patients with psoriatic arthritis was 47 (35%, 17 of them were new cases. There was no difference between the groups regarding the type of psoriasis, nail involvement, presence of scalp lesions and psoriatic arthritis. Patients with psoriatic arthritis had more enthesitis and dactylitis (46.7% than those without arthritis. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the high prevalence of arthritis found, we know that results from epidemiological studies are variable, which limits their use and interpretation. We conclude that more studies are needed to draw a profile of rheumatic manifestations in our population of psoriasis patients.FUNDAMENTOS: A artrite psoriásica é uma artrite inflamatória associada à psoríase. Sua prevalência nos pacientes com psoríase de 7 a 42% mas sua exata prevalência ainda é desconhecida. OBJETIVOS: Considerando a escassez de dados nacionais relacionados ao seu diagnóstico em pacientes com psoríase o presente estudo visa descrever o quadro clínico, laboratorial e radiológico da doença nesses pacientes. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 133 pacientes com diagnóstico de psoríase acompanhados no

  15. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  16. Prostaglandins and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Fattahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, autoimmune, and complex inflammatory disease leading to bone and cartilage destruction, whose cause remains obscure. Accumulation of genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, and dysregulated immune responses are necessary for mounting this self-reacting disease. Inflamed joints are infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of cellular and soluble mediators of the immune system, such as T cells, B cells, macrophages, cytokines, and prostaglandins (PGs. Prostaglandins are lipid inflammatory mediators derived from the arachidonic acid by multienzymatic reactions. They both sustain homeostatic mechanisms and mediate pathogenic processes, including the inflammatory reaction. They play both beneficial and harmful roles during inflammation, according to their site of action and the etiology of the inflammatory response. With respect to the role of PGs in inflammation, they can be effective mediators in the pathophysiology of RA. Thus the use of agonists or antagonists of PG receptors may be considered as a new therapeutic protocol in RA. In this paper, we try to elucidate the role of PGs in the immunopathology of RA.

  17. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Kosheleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA generally starts at the age when many women have already become mothers; however, it may occur in childhood or adolescence. Furthermore, there has been recently a women’s tendency to plan pregnacy for a more mature age, which necessitates a discussion about gestation in this disease. Investigation of mechanisms pregnancy can influence the development of RA both in the gestation and long-term periods is of important theoretical and practical value. The results of these investigations may be used to develop new treatments for RA and management tactics for patients during pregnancy and lactation. The  aper gives the data available in the literature on fertility in RA, impact of pregnancy on its activity and that of RA on the course and outcomes of gestation, as well as current ideas on lactation and use of oral contraceptives in RA. Particular attention is given to drug therapy in pregnant and breastfeeding women with RA: groups of anti-rheumatic drugs are considered in detail in relation to the safety of or a potential risk from their use. A therapeutic algorithm and recommendations for pregnancy planning and a follow-up of patients with RA during gestation are proposed.

  18. BIOBEHAVIORAL THERAPY OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shabanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the study is connected with need to expand the arsenal of treatment methods patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study examined the efficacy of biobehavioral therapy in a comprehensive program of treatment patients with rheumatoid arthritis (medical therapy in combination with biobehavioral therapy. It has been shown when compared with the control group (isolated drug therapy maintaining  clinical  response  in  short-term  follow-up  study  in  the  intervention  group.  Statistically    significant relationship the volitional control of the alpha rhythm of EEG (increased power of the alpha rhythm with a reduction in pain intensity in the in neurofeedback program and positive dynamics of the main characteristics of the alpha rhythm have been drmonstrated. Inclusion in the treatment program of arthritis biobehavioral approach has reduced the dose of pain medication, so reducing aggression of pharmacotherapy.

  19. Women and Psoriatic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and psoriatic arthritis. Email * Zipcode The National Psoriasis Foundation (NPF) is a non-profit organization with a mission to drive efforts to cure psoriatic disease and improve the lives of those affected. Copyright © 1996-2015 National Psoriasis Foundation/USA Bottom Menu About NPF About Us Annual ...

  20. Dietetic recommendations in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rosa Alhambra-Expósito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that has a significant effect on patients’ physical, emotional, and social functioning. For decades, patients have used different diets to try to improve the symptoms of RA. The possible benefits of dietary therapy for rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed in this article. Nutritional objectives for RA, are to halt the loss of bone mass, promote healing of bone fractures and improving bone-associated inflammatory disorders and joints. In general, diets low in saturated fat, rich in polyunsaturated fats: omega 3 and omega 6, rich in complex carbohydrates and fiber are recommended.

  1. Pyogenic infection and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, I. F.; Deans, A. C.; Keat, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Ten episodes of severe pyogenic infection occurring in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. There was a wide range of presenting features including pyoarthrosis in 7 episodes. Three cases presented with meningitis, bacterial endocarditis and probable multiple abscesses respectively. Infection was caused by Staphylococcus aureus in 7 episodes and by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and beta-haemolytic Streptococcus in each of one episode. Three infective episodes were fatal. Pyogenic, especially staphylococcal, infection should be considered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with unexplained illness with or without sudden deterioration in joint symptoms. It is important to recognize and treat infection rapidly. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3671222

  2. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the spectrum of clinical presentation, laboratory parameters and drug therapy in patients with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA). Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: The Children's Hospital and The Institute of Child Health, Lahore, from October 2008 to October 2011. Methodology: All patients who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for JRA were enrolled. Their clinical features, investigations done and treatment received for JRA were noted. Statistical analysis of data was done on SPSS version 16.0 for obtaining descriptive statistics. Results: Out of 185 patients, 50.3% (n = 93) were females; 54% (n = 100) were between 10 - 15 years of age. Polyarthritis was found in 71.9% (n = 133) followed by oligoarthritis (22.7%, n = 42) and systemic onset disease (5.4%, n = 10). Morning stiffness (78%) and fever (68%) were the most common clinical presentations. All patients with systemic onset disease had fever (n = 10) followed by skin rash, hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. Uveitis was found in 2 patients, and both belonged to the oligoarticular group. Rheumatoid factor was found in 10.27% (n = 19) of all patients. All patients were given non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Disease modifying agents (methotrexate) were given to 43.8% (n = 81). Steroids were used in 61% (n = 113) of patients either with NSAIDs alone or NSAIDs plus methotrexate. Conclusion: Disease profile of JRA at the study centre showed that polyarthritis is the commonest type. Recognition of subtypes will help in planning the management of these patients. (author)

  3. Treatment of arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, with radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioactive composition is described for the treatment of arthritis comprising, in combination, a ferric hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide aggregate suspension having a particle size of 3 to 20 microns, wherein a radionuclide is entrapped, the radionuclide being /sup 166/Holmium

  4. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; Bijlsma, Johannes W J;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aiming at therapeutic targets has reduced the risk of organ failure in many diseases such as diabetes or hypertension. Such targets have not been defined for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: /st> To develop recommendations for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes in RA. METHODS...

  5. Diagnostic Delay in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbaek, Karen; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Primdahl, Jette

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To prevent joint damage among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is a need to minimize delays from the onset of symptoms until the initiation of appropriate therapy. The present study explored the factors that have an impact on the time it takes for Danish patients with RA...

  6. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards this...

  7. Zinc sulphate in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Mattingly, P. C.; Mowat, A G

    1982-01-01

    To assess the antirheumatic activity of zinc sulphate, 27 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis took part in a 6-month, randomised, double-blind, between-group trial of oral zinc sulphate versus placebo. Twelve patients on zinc and 9 on placebo completed the trial, but no significant antirheumatic activity of zinc sulphate was demonstrated.

  8. Change in CD3 positive T-cell expression in psoriatic arthritis synovium correlates with change in DAS28 and magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores following initiation of biologic therapy - a single centre, open-label study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pontifex, Eliza K

    2011-01-27

    Abstract Introduction With the development of increasing numbers of potential therapeutic agents in inflammatory disease comes the need for effective biomarkers to help screen for drug efficacy and optimal dosing regimens early in the clinical trial process. This need has been recognized by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) group, which has established guidelines for biomarker validation. To seek a candidate synovial biomarker of treatment response in psoriatic arthritis (PsA), we determined whether changes in immunohistochemical markers of synovial inflammation correlate with changes in disease activity scores assessing 28 joints (ΔDAS28) or magnetic resonance imaging synovitis scores (ΔMRI) in patients with PsA treated with a biologic agent. Methods Twenty-five consecutive patients with PsA underwent arthroscopic synovial biopsies and MRI scans of an inflamed knee joint at baseline and 12 weeks after starting treatment with either anakinra (first 10 patients) or etanercept (subsequent 15 patients) in two sequential studies of identical design. DAS28 scores were measured at both time points. Immunohistochemical staining for CD3, CD68 and Factor VIII (FVIII) was performed on synovial samples and scored by digital image analysis (DIA). MRI scans performed at baseline and at 12 weeks were scored for synovitis semi-quantitatively. The ΔDAS28 of the European League Against Rheumatism good response definition (>1.2) was chosen to divide patients into responder and non-responder groups. Differences between groups (Mann Whitney U test) and correlations between ΔDAS28 with change in immunohistochemical and MRI synovitis scores (Spearman\\'s rho test) were calculated. Results Paired synovial samples and MRI scans were available for 21 patients (8 anakinra, 13 etanercept) and 23 patients (8 anakinra, 15 etanercept) respectively. Change in CD3 (ΔCD3) and CD68 expression in the synovial sublining layer (ΔCD68sl) was significantly greater in

  9. Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You? What is rheumatoid arthritis (RA)? Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious condition. The body’s immune system attacks the lining of ...

  10. Osteoporosis and Arthritis: Two Common but Different Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions Osteoporosis and Arthritis: Two Common but Different Conditions Publication available in: PDF (71 KB) Related Resources Alcoholism Anorexia Nervosa Arthritis Artritis (Arthritis) Asthma Bed Rest and Immobilization ...

  11. Technetium scintigraphy in experimental hyperergic arthritis and by rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinea pigs showed an increased uptake of 99m-TC-04 in the inflamed joints during the first days of experimental arthritis. Tc-04 was found in the joint fluid and inflamed synovia. The uptake of Tc-04 and Tc-MDP was reduced by therapy in 13 patients with RA. Classical RA showed an increased uptake of Tc-MDP compared with probable RA. Scintigraphy offers the possibility of early diagnosis and study of progression. (orig.)

  12. 来氟米特与甲氨蝶呤治疗银屑病关节炎关节病变的临床研究%A clinical study of leflunomide and methotrexate therapy in psoriatic arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张改连; 黄烽; 张江林; 李小峰

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of methotrexate (MTX), leflunomide (LEF) and low-dose MTX and LEF (MTX + LEF) combined treatment for psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods This was a 24 weeks, two-center, open-labeled, controlled trial All subjects fulfilled the moll and wright criteria for definite PsA. Subjects were given one of the 3 regimens, MTX, or LEF, or MTX + LEF. The primary end point was proportion of psoriatic arthritis response criteria(PsARC)response. The secondary end point was proportion of modified 20% improvement of American College of Rheumatolngy (ACR20) response. Results At week 24, the percent of patients achieving PsARC in MTX, LEF and MTX + LEF group were 75.0% ,68. 8% ,83.3% respectively, and the percent of patients achieving ACR20 were 66. 7% ,50. 0% ,83. 3% respectively. At week 24, tender joint counts, swollen joint counts, patient's assessment of pain, patient's global assessment (PGA), physician' s global assessment, health assessment questionnaire(HAQ)were significantly improved compared with base-line values(P <0. 05). At week 24, the improvement of patient's assessment of pain, HAQ, ESR were better in the MTX + LEF group compared with LEF group while the improvement of patient's assessment of pain, PGA, HAQ, ESR were better in the MTX group compared with LEF group (P < 0. 05). The incidence of treatment related adverse events was 38.5%, 38. 9% and 35% in MTX, LEF and MTX + LEF group respectively. There was no serious adverse reactions. Conclusion Low dose MTX + LEF regimen showed similar good efficacy and safety profde for PsA patients.%目的 评价来氟米特、甲氨蝶呤及甲氨蝶呤与来氟米特联用治疗银屑病关节炎(PsA)关节病变的疗效与安全性.方法 2个中心的开放性临床对照研究.选确诊的PsA患者,接受甲氨蝶呤(甲氨蝶呤组)、来氟米特(来氟米特组)、甲氨蝶呤+来氟米特(联合治疗组)中的任意一种治疗方案,治疗24周.以PsA

  13. Periodontal and hematological characteristics associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Westergaard, Jytte; Stoltze, Kaj;

    2006-01-01

    Periodontitis shares several clinical and pathogenic characteristics with chronic arthritis, and there is some degree of coexistence. The aims of this study were to elucidate whether patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), juvenile...... idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) share periodontal and hematological characteristics distinguishing them from individuals free of diseases....

  14. Improved early identification of arthritis : evaluating the efficacy of Early Arthritis Recognition Clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nies, Jessica A. B.; Brouwer, Elisabeth; van Gaalen, Floris A.; Allaart, Cornelia F.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Posthumus, Marcel D.; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Only 31% of Dutch rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-patients visit a rheumatologist within 12weeks after symptom onset; this is mainly due to delay at the level of the general practitioner (GP). In order to reduce delay of GPs in identifying early arthritis, we initiated an Early Arthritis Recogni

  15. Rehabilitation in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Evaggelos Giavasopoulos; Paraskevi Gourni

    2008-01-01

    Rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis aims to the management of the consequences of disease. It is widely accepted that, no drug therapy at present leads to long‐term orremission f everyone with rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.). Consequently, patients experience physical, psychological, functional, social and role negative effects of the disease. AIM : The am of the present article was to evaluate the role of rehabilitation to patients with rheumatoid arthritis sMethod and material:...

  16. Current Treatments for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    AlbertoMartini

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) differs markedly from adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is not a single disease, but an exclusion diagnosis that gather together all forms of arthritis that begin before the age of 16 years, persist for more than 6 weeks, and are of unknown origin. The advent of the new biological treatments has dramatically changed both the observed responses to treatment and the expectations of therapies. The implementation of an adequate legislation as well as the ...

  17. Can the weather influence arthritis symptoms?

    OpenAIRE

    Wai Chin Li; Ye Zhang

    2014-01-01

    By reviewing twelve previous studies on the relationship between the weather and arthritis symptoms, this article summarized the major findings on this controversial topic. It has been supported by most of the studies that arthritis symptoms are associated with weather conditions. Factors such as barometric pressure and temperature were generally believed to be related to arthritis symptoms. However, controversies arose at minor levels. Whether the weather-symptom relationship depends on the ...

  18. Ethanol prevents development of destructive arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Verdrengh, Margareta; Brisslert, Mikael; Lindblad, Sofia; Bokarewa, Maria; Islander, Ulrika; Carlsten, Hans; Ohlsson, Claes; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Holmdahl, Rikard; Tarkowski, Andrej

    2006-01-01

    Environmental factors are thought to play a major role in the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Because the use of ethanol is widespread, we assessed the role of ethanol intake on the propensity to develop chronic arthritis. Collagen type II-immunized mice were given water or water containing 10% (vol/vol) ethanol or its metabolite acetaldehyde. Their development of arthritis was assessed, as well as the impact of ethanol on leukocyte migration and activation of intracellular transcription...

  19. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  20. Clinimetric criteria of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Galasso

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease, mainly poli-artycular, among wide-spread chronic inflammatory diseases, that cause pain, functional limitation, damage and joints deformations, and disability. It is characterized by turns of active inflammation and remission phases. Inflammation degree and persistence are associated to a bad functional prognosis and progressive joint disability. These patients management require a continuous valuation of inflammatory activity index of disease both therapeutic management and to prevent disablement process. We focus on many valuation index of joint disability and functional damage. Very important are both the scales of auto-values concerning the pain and the joint swelling and clinical data get by physician to valuate activity index of disease as defined by DAS28. Significant data come by health-related quality of life, disability and by AIMS2 (Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale.

  1. Dietary intervention in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Jamison, Jennifer R.

    1987-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a disabling disease prevalent in modern society. Dietary prevention may be possible in a subgroup of individuals who appear to suffer food intolerance; dietary intervention, as an adjunct to other management strategies, may be useful in modifying the inflammatory response. The former suggestion is supported by anecdotal evidence; the latter by some in vitro experimentation which implicates arachidonic acid metabolism in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid tissue inflammatio...

  2. Pyogenic infection and rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rowe, I F; Deans, A. C.; Keat, A C

    1987-01-01

    Ten episodes of severe pyogenic infection occurring in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. There was a wide range of presenting features including pyoarthrosis in 7 episodes. Three cases presented with meningitis, bacterial endocarditis and probable multiple abscesses respectively. Infection was caused by Staphylococcus aureus in 7 episodes and by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and beta-haemolytic Streptococcus in each of one episode. Three infective ep...

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self-servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, "Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL-100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL-100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and can

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self–servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, „Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL–100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL–100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and

  5. Socioeconomic status and risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Merete Blak; Jacobsen, Søren; Klarlund, Mette;

    2006-01-01

    To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association.......To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association....

  6. Positive psychological qualities and adjustment to arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Sirois, F.M.

    2014-01-01

    Bisopsychosocial approaches to arthritis emphasize the importance of psychological and individual difference factors as predisposing, precipitating or perpetuating factor in arthritis through their interface with pain-related, inflammatory, and immunological responses. Rather than just focusing on understanding how loss is experienced, positive psychological approaches emphasize the importance of promoting and understanding how adjustment is experienced. In this narrative review, four positiv...

  7. Immune modulation by vaccination in chronic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonneveld - Huijssoon, E.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination in autoimmunity can have beneficial, but also detrimental effects. In this thesis, we tried to identify factors that contribute to a favourable or an unfavourable outcome of vaccination in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) and experimental arthritis. In the first part, we focused on th

  8. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  9. Identifying a novel locus for psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budu-Aggrey, Ashley; Bowes, John; Barton, Anne

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have identified genetic risk loci for PsA, the majority of which also confer risk for psoriasis. The stronger heritability of PsA in comparison with psoriasis suggests that there should be risk loci that are specific for PsA. Identifying such loci could potentially inform therapy development to provide more effective treatments for PsA patients, especially with a considerable proportion being non-responsive to current therapies. Evidence of a PsA-specific locus has been previously found at HLA-B27 within the MHC region. A recent study has provided evidence of non-HLA risk loci that are specific for PsA at IL23R, PTPN22 and on chromosome 5q31. Functional characterization of these loci will provide further understanding of the pathways underlying PsA, and enable us to apply genetic findings for patient benefit. PMID:26255310

  10. Food-induced (allergic) arthritis. Inflammatory arthritis exacerbated by milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panush, R S; Stroud, R M; Webster, E M

    1986-02-01

    Suggestive, but largely unproven, observations have associated arthritis with environmental antigens, including foods. We studied a patient with inflammatory arthritis in a prospective, "blinded," controlled fashion to determine whether her symptoms were associated with food sensitivities. This 52-year-old white woman with 11 years of class I, stage I, active disease, had symptomatic exacerbations allegedly associated with meat, milk, and beans. We observed an increase in symptoms following an unblinded food challenge and then studied her in our clinical research unit. On her normal diet for 6 days, she averaged 30 minutes of morning stiffness, 9 tender joints, 3 swollen joints, 87% subjective assessment (100% = best possible), and 89% examiner assessment. While she was fasting (3 days) or taking Vivonex (2 days), we noted no morning stiffness, tender joint score of 1, swollen joint score of 0, and assessments of 100% (P less than 0.05 versus normal diet). She was then nourished with Vivonex for 33 days without difficulty and challenged in a blinded fashion at mealtimes with lyophilized foods placed into opaque capsules. Four milk challenges (equivalent to greater than or equal to 8 ounces per meal) produced up to 30 minutes of morning stiffness, 14 tender joints, 4 swollen joints, subjective assessment of 85%, and objective assessment of 80% (P less than 0.05 versus fasting-Vivonex), peaking 24-48 hours postchallenge. Placebo and other foods (lettuce and carrots) were without effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3513771

  11. Two forms of reactive arthritis?

    OpenAIRE

    Toivanen, P; Toivanen, A

    1999-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritides developing after a distant infection have so far been called reactive or postinfectious, quite often depending on the microbial trigger and/or HLA-B27 status of the patient. For clarity, it is proposed that they all should be called reactive arthritis, which, according to the trigger, occurs as an HLA-B27 associated or non-associated form. In addition to the causative agents and HLA-B27, these two categories are also distinguished by other characteristics. Most import...

  12. Natural history of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In quantitative studies the authors found significant correlations between radiographic scores and physical and functional status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The authors review data as it applies to the natural history of RA, with attention to the pathophysiology of specific radiographic features. Cross-sectional analysis in 200 patients demonstrated significant correlations between radiographic scores and duration of disease; longitudinal studies of serial films in 52 patients revealed progression of disease in 92%. The findings of substantial radiographic abnormality and rapid progression early in the disease may provide a rationale for early aggressive therapy of RA

  13. Shoulder arthography in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoulder arthrography in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis is performed to differentiate between a rheumatoid flare and limitation of motion secondary to tear in the rotator cuff. Accurate diagnosis is important because of the therapeutic implications. The arthrographic findings characteristic of rheumatoid involvement of the shoulder joint are nodular filling defects of the joint, the subacromial and subdeltoideal bursa in case of rotator cuff tear, irregular capsular attachment, contracted joint space and visualized lymphatic drainage. A dilatation of the biceps tendon sheath has not been shown. (orig.)

  14. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H;

    2016-01-01

    ). RESULTS: The 849 patients were 75% female, 81% white, 42% were in remission/low disease activity (R/LDA), and 16-32% were flaring at the second visit. Agreement of flare status was low-strong (κ's 0.17-0.88) and inversely related to RA disease activity level. Flare domains correlated highly (r's≥0...... prior to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. CONCLUSIONS: Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients...

  15. Bone edema on magnetic resonance imaging is an independent predictor of rheumatoid arthritis development in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer-Jensen, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Hetland, Merete Lund;

    2011-01-01

    To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis (UA).......To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis (UA)....

  16. The OMERACT MRI in Arthritis Working Group - Update on Status and Future Research Priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Bird, Paul; Gandjbakhch, Frédérique; Eshed, Iris; Haugen, Ida K; Haavardsholm, Espen A; Lillegraven, Siri; Foltz, Violaine; Glinatsi, Daniel Erik; Peterfy, Charles; Ejbjerg, Bo; Bøyesen, Pernille; Mease, Philip J; Hermann, Kay-Geert; Emery, Paul; Genant, Harry K; Conaghan, Philip G

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update on the status and future research priorities of the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in arthritis working group. METHODS: A summary is provided of the activities of the group within rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic......-sectional interreader reliability, but variable reliability of change scores, were reported. Potential future research areas were identified at the MRI session at OMERACT 12 including assessment of tenosynovitis in RA and enthesitis in PsA and focusing on alternative MRI techniques. CONCLUSION: MRI has been further...

  17. Long-term treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with adalimumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murdaca G

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Murdaca, Francesca Spanò, Francesco PuppoDepartment of Internal Medicine, Clinical Immunology Unit, University of Genoa, Genoa, ItalyAbstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease that is associated with joint damage and progressive disability, an increased risk of morbidity related to comorbid conditions and substantial socioeconomic costs. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α is a proinflammatory cytokine known to have a central role in the initial host response to infection and in the pathogenesis of various immune-mediated diseases, such as RA, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis, Crohn’s disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Five TNF-α inhibitors are available for the clinical use: infliximab; adalimumab; etanercept; golimumab; and certolizumab pegol. Infliximab is a chimeric human/murine IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb; adalimumab, and golimumab are human mAbs; certolizumab pegol is composed of the fragment antigen-binding anti-binding domain of a humanized anti-TNF-α mAb, combined with polyethylene glycol to increase its half-life in the body; etanercept is a fusion protein that acts as a “decoy receptor” for TNF-α. In this paper, we will briefly review the current data on efficacy and safety of adalimumab in patients with RA, its potential beneficial effects upon comorbid conditions, such as endothelial dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis in RA, and the immunogenicity.Keywords: adalimumab, efficacy, safety, rheumatoid arthritis, VEGF, immunogenicity, infections

  18. Complementary medicine in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Atzeni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM for chronic conditions has increased in recent years. CAM is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions and patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA frequently try CAM. This review summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massage, supplements. However, for the great majority of these therapies no evidencebased (clinical randomized trials results are available. CAM is usually used in addition to, and not as a substitute for conventional therapies. The motivation of patients to try CAM is complex; the willingness to take control of their healthcare, the desire to try everything available, the mass-media pressure and the erroneous notion that CAM is without risks. In fact, none of these treatments is totally devoid of risks. While the use of complementary and alternative modalities for the treatment of RA continues to increase, rigorous clinical trials examining their efficacy are needed before definitive recommendations regarding the application of these modalities can be made.

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis and bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N L Prokopjeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To study features of bacterial infections course in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and changes of laboratory measures after focus of infection sanation. Material and methods. 46 pts with definite rheumatoid arthritis were examined at the time of comorbid infection (Cl detection and after infection focus sanation. Bacteriological test with evaluation of flora sensitivity to antibiotics by disco-diffusion method was performed at baseline and after the course of antibacterial therapy to assess its efficacy. Hemogram, serum fibrinogen, rheumatoid factor, circulating immune complexes (CIC, C-reactive protein levels were assessed. Serum interleukin (IL 1(3, IL6 and neopterin concentrations were examined by immune-enzyme assay in a part of pts. Typical clinical features of Cl were present in only 28 (60,9% pts. 13 (28,3% pts had fever, 12 (26,0% — leukocytosis, 15 (32,6% — changes of leucocyte populations. Some laboratory measures (thrombocytes, fibrinogen, CIC, neopterin levels significantly decreased (p<0,05 after infection focus sanation without correction of disease modifying therapy. Cl quite often develop as asymptomatic processes most often in pts with high activity and can induce disturbances promoting appearance of endothelial dysfunction, atherothrombosis and reduction of life duration. So timely detection and proper sanation of infection focuses should be performed in pts with RA

  20. Inhibition of inflammatory arthritis using fullerene nanomaterials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L Dellinger

    Full Text Available Inflammatory arthritis (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis; RA is a complex disease driven by the interplay of multiple cellular lineages. Fullerene derivatives have previously been shown to have anti-inflammatory capabilities mediated, in part, by their ability to prevent inflammatory mediator release by mast cells (MC. Recognizing that MC can serve as a cellular link between autoantibodies, soluble mediators, and other effector populations in inflammatory arthritis, it was hypothesized that fullerene derivatives might be used to target this inflammatory disease. A panel of fullerene derivatives was tested for their ability to affect the function of human skin-derived MC as well as other lineages implicated in arthritis, synovial fibroblasts and osteoclasts. It is shown that certain fullerene derivatives blocked FcγR- and TNF-α-induced mediator release from MC; TNF-α-induced mediator release from RA synovial fibroblasts; and maturation of human osteoclasts. MC inhibition by fullerene derivatives was mediated through the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential and FcγR-mediated increases in cellular reactive oxygen species and NF-κB activation. Based on these in vitro data, two fullerene derivatives (ALM and TGA were selected for in vivo studies using K/BxN serum transfer arthritis in C57BL/6 mice and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA in DBA/1 mice. Dye-conjugated fullerenes confirmed localization to affected joints in arthritic animals but not in healthy controls. In the K/BxN moldel, fullerenes attenuated arthritis, an effect accompanied by reduced histologic inflammation, cartilage/bone erosion, and serum levels of TNF-α. Fullerenes remained capable of attenuating K/BxN arthritis in mast cell-deficient mice Cre-Master mice, suggesting that lineages beyond the MC represent relevant targets in this system. These studies suggest that fullerene derivatives may hold promise both as an assessment tool and as anti-inflammatory therapy of arthritis.

  1. Synergy between adjuvant arthritis and collagen-induced arthritis in rats

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Adjuvant arthritis (AA) in rats is susceptible to cell-mediated passive transfer. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats is susceptible to passive transfer with antibody to type II collagen. We report here the development of strikingly severe arthritis in Lewis rats as the result of synergy between passively transferred antibody to type II collagen from rats with CIA and concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated lymph node or spleen cells from syngeneic rats with AA. Similar synergy was seen in rat...

  2. Screening for uveitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kanski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Three hundred and fifteen patients with anterior uveitis associated with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) were studied in order to identify the various risk factors for uveitis. Girls were more susceptible to uveitis than boys by a ratio of 3:1. In 94% of cases the uveitis was diagnosed after the development of arthritis. The risk of uveitis was small after seven or more years had elapsed from the onset of arthritis. Patients with pauciarticular onset JCA had the highest risk of uveitis and s...

  3. Arthritis: Conventional and Advanced Radiological Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adviye Ergun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arthritides are acute or chronic inflammation of one or more joints. The most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, but there are more than 100 different forms. Right and early diagnosis is extremely important for the prevention of eventual structural and functional disability of the affected joint. Imaging findings, especially those of advanced level imaging, play a major role in diagnosis and monitor the progression of arthritis or its response to therapy. The objective of the review is to discuss the findings of conventional and advanced radiological imaging of most common arthritides and to present a simplified approach for their radiological evaluation.

  4. Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sathish

    2016-04-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is an inflammatory condition characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, arthritis, rash and serositis. In sJIA, systemic inflammation has been associated with dysregulation of the innate immune system, suggesting that it is an autoinflammatory disorder. IL-1 and IL-6 play a major role in the pathogenesis of sJIA and treatment with IL-1 and IL-6 inhibitors has shown to be highly effective. Recent data suggests that early cytokine blockage might abrogate chronic, destructive, therapy resistant arthritis phase, reflecting a potential "window of opportunity" in the care of children with sJIA. PMID:26916892

  5. Septic and aseptic arthritis: a continuum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Robinson, D; Keat, A

    1999-03-01

    This chapter considers the likelihood that a wide spectrum of infection-provoked arthritis exists, ranging from overt sepsis to apparently aseptic chronic arthritis in which very small numbers of causal bacteria can be detected only by using highly sensitive techniques. It asks whether joints are, as conventionally held, normally devoid of micro-organisms and how to judge the significance of bacteria detected within apparently sterile joints. Through a consideration of known septic, probably infective and apparently aseptic forms of arthritis, a set of criteria for attributing causality to putative arthritogenic micro-organisms is proposed. PMID:10952856

  6. A Comparative Metabolomic Evaluation of Behcet's Disease with Arthritis and Seronegative Arthritis Using Synovial Fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joong Kyong Ahn

    Full Text Available Behcet's disease (BD with arthritis is often confused with seronegative arthritis (SNA because of shared clinical symptoms and the lack of definitive biomarkers for BD. To investigate possible metabolic patterns and potential biomarkers of BD with arthritis, metabolomic profiling of synovial fluid (SF from 6 patients with BD with arthritis and 18 patients with SNA was performed using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. A total of 123 metabolites were identified from samples. Orthogonal partial least square-discriminant analysis showed clear discrimination between BD with arthritis and SNA. A set of 11 metabolites were identified as potential biomarkers for BD using variable importance for projection values and the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Compared with SNA, BD with arthritis exhibited relatively high levels of glutamate, valine, citramalate, leucine, methionine sulfoxide, glycerate, phosphate, lysine, isoleucine, urea, and citrulline. There were two markers identified, elevated methionine sulfoxide and citrulline, that were associated with increased oxidative stress, providing a potential link to BD-associated neutrophil hyperactivity. Glutamate, citramalate, and valine were selected and validated as putative biomarkers for BD with arthritis (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 61.1%. This is the first report to present potential biomarkers from SF for discriminating BD with arthritis from SNA. The metabolomics of SF may be helpful in searching for potential biomarkers and elucidating the clinicopathogenesis of BD with arthritis.

  7. Muramyl dipeptide-induced adjuvant arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagao, S.; Tanaka, A.

    1980-01-01

    Muramyl dipeptide, N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine, induced adjuvant arthritis in WKA rats when injected in a water-in-oil emulsion prepared with Freund incomplete adjuvant (Difco), but not when emulsified with Drackeol and Arlacel A.

  8. Can the weather influence arthritis symptoms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Chin Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available By reviewing twelve previous studies on the relationship between the weather and arthritis symptoms, this article summarized the major findings on this controversial topic. It has been supported by most of the studies that arthritis symptoms are associated with weather conditions. Factors such as barometric pressure and temperature were generally believed to be related to arthritis symptoms. However, controversies arose at minor levels. Whether the weather-symptom relationship depends on the specific type of arthritis, weather variables, demographic and pathological heterogeneity of the patients is still a matter of debate. This article calls for standardization in future research design, and hope the mechanism underlying the weather-symptom association will be found.

  9. Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matters NIH Research Matters January 13, 2014 Arthritis Genetics Analysis Aids Drug Discovery An international research team ... may play a role in triggering the disease. Genetic factors are also thought to play a role. ...

  10. Tracheomegaly in association with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herein we present a case of tracheomegaly seen in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. To the authors' knowledge, and from a review of the literature, this combination has not been previously described. (orig.)

  11. Radiological manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheumatoid arthritis preferrably becomes manifest at the synovial joints of the limbs, especially at the small joints of the hands and feet, at bursae and synovial sheathes. The pathologic lesions are less frequently found at cartilaginous joints or entheses. The lesions very often are symmetrically distributed and are characterized by the following: 1. A periarticular, spindle-shaped opacity with a density similar to soft-tissue, induced by an inflammatory hypertrophy of the synovia, a serosynovitis, or an edematous impregnation of the periarticular tissue. 2. A juxta-articular osteoporosis, most probably caused by a neighbouring synovialitis accompanied by hyperemia. 3. A diffuse joint cavity narrowing due to a destruction of the articular cartilage by the pannus, a fibrovascular resorptive tissue. 4. Central as well as marginal erosions, caused by destruction of ossous material by the pannus. 5. Subchondral signal cysts, likewise unduced by the pannus. (Orig./AJ)

  12. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Sodhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  13. GANGGUAN PERTUMBUHAN MANDIBULA PADA JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Ria Puspitawati

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is a systemic disease on childhood, which has chronic arthritis as its most prominent manifestation. One very common complication of JRA is growth disturbance. JRA involving temporomandibular joint usually result in mandibular growth retardation which eventually can lead to micrognathia, retrognathia, malocclusion and other mandibulofacial developmental aberrations. Factors considered to be the cause of these growth and developmental disturbances are: conge...

  14. Septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Septic arthritis of the posterior lumbar joints is extremely rare. The clinical picture of the unusual site of infection can easily lead to confusion with spondylo-discitis which is more common. We report a case of a 50-year-old women with Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis of the left L5-S1 lumbar facet joint. CT scan was helpful to establish the diagnosis and to guide the percutaneous needle biopsy. (authors)

  15. Seronegative pauciarticular arthritis and HLA B27.

    OpenAIRE

    Eastmond, C J; Rajah, S M; D. Tovey; Wright, V.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-six patients with a pauciarticular arthritis have been studied clinically, radiologically and with histocompatibility typing. An increased frequency of HLA B27 was found (p = 1.87 x 10(-12)). Low back and buttock pain, Achilles tendinitis and dactylitis of the toes were more frequent in HLA-B27 positive patients. It is suggested that histocompatibility testing may be of some value in diagnosis and in the investigation of the possible 'reactive' nature of this type of arthritis.

  16. Long term prognosis of reactive salmonella arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Leirisalo-Repo, M; Helenius, P; Hannu, T; Lehtinen, A; Kreula, J; Taavitsainen, M; Koskimies, S

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Reactive joint complications triggered by salmonella gastroenteritis are increasingly reported, but the outcome and long term prognosis of the patients is incompletely known. This study looked at the prognosis of salmonella arthritis in patients hospitalised in 1970-1986.
METHODS—Hospital records from two hospitals in southern Finland were screened for patients with the discharge diagnosis of salmonellosis or reactive, postinfectious arthritis or Reiter's disease. For the patients ...

  17. Yoga for Arthritis: A Scoping Review

    OpenAIRE

    Haaz, Steffany; Bartlett, Susan J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article was to systematically review the existing literature on the use of yoga for persons with arthritis. We included peer-reviewed research from clinical trials (published from 1980-2010) that used yoga as an intervention for arthritis patients and reported quantitative findings. Eleven studies were identified, including four RCTs and four NRCTs. All trials were small and control groups varied. No adverse events were reported and attrition was comparable or better than typi...

  18. Update on Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, A. Caroline

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis consists of use of drugs, physical measures, social work interventions, education and reconstructive surgery. The physician plays a co-ordinating role, since most patients with significant rheumatoid arthritis will require treatment by more than one member of the health-care team. Our drug armamentarium, including anti-inflammatory agents, disease suppressants, analgesics, rarely steroids, and even more rarely immunosuppressants, can be used to good effect in...

  19. Monocyte activation in early onset rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, I.; Shingu, M; Nobunaga, M.

    1990-01-01

    Monocytes from peripheral blood and synovial fluid of patients with definite and classic rheumatoid arthritis spontaneously produced significantly greater amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leukotriene B4 (LTB4), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) than samples of peripheral blood from normal controls. Peripheral blood monocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis produced significantly greater amounts of PGE2 than control samples when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. There were no sig...

  20. Group Education for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Taal, Erik; Riemsma, Rob P.; Brus, Herman L.M.; Seydel, Erwin R; Rasker, Johannes J.; Wiegman, Oene

    1993-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis must learn to adjust their exercise, rest and medication to the varying activity of the disease. Patient education can help patients in making the right decisions about adjustments in their treatment regimen and in attaining ¿self-management¿ behaviors. We developed a group education program based on social learning theory and the `Arthritis Self Management Course¿ developed in the USA by Lorig. Goal of the program is the strengthening of self-efficacy, outc...

  1. Septic Arthritis in the Temporomandibular Joint

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare event that has only been reported a few dozen times worldwide. This case is remarkable for septic arthritis of the TMJ joint in an otherwise healthy male. Case Report: A 24-year-old male presented to the emergency department with periauricular swelling, erythema, fever, myalgia's and generalized joint pain. He had previously sought medical attention and was placed on ciprofloxacin. However, he developed facial swelling and a rash...

  2. Abnormal bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoch, Earl R.; Moran, Erica

    1998-01-01

    Osteopenia is responsible for substantial comorbidity in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and is an important factor in the surgical management of joint disease. In animal models of bone loss stimulated by inflammatory arthritis, increased bone remodelling and altered microstructure of bone have been documented. The subchondral bone plate near the joint surface is narrow and perforated by vascular inflammatory invasion, and in the shaft the thin cortices are weakened by giant resorption defects. Biomechanical tests and a mathematical model of bone strength suggest that cortical defects, much larger than those found in normal osteonal remodelling, are principally responsible for the experimentally observed loss of strength. Similarly, these defects may explain the increased femoral fracture risk in rheumatoid arthritis. The osteoclast, the cell resorbing bone, is demonstrated in increased number and activity in rheumatoid arthritis and in animal models. Bisphosphonates, drugs that inhibit osteoclast function, have been shown experimentally to reduce both focal and generalized osteopenia and to prevent loss of bone strength. Bisphosphonates also protect articular cartilage from damage characteristic of inflammatory arthritis. The mechanism of chondroprotection may be prevention of subchondral bone resorption by the osteoclast and also an altered distribution of bone marrow cells. Thus, bisphosphonates, currently in clinical use for other bone metabolic diseases, appear to have potential as prophylaxis and treatment for osteopenia and joint damage in inflammatory arthritis. PMID:9711159

  3. Rehabilitation in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaggelos Giavasopoulos

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis aims to the management of the consequences of disease. It is widely accepted that, no drug therapy at present leads to long‐term orremission f everyone with rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.. Consequently, patients experience physical, psychological, functional, social and role negative effects of the disease. AIM : The am of the present article was to evaluate the role of rehabilitation to patients with rheumatoid arthritis sMethod and material: The methodology followed included reviewof tudies which were related to rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis Results :The majority of the studies claims that rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, is a matter of primary importance. The importance of early provision of specialist rheumatologycare, patient education and promotion of self‐ management; and the evidence for the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions and multidisciplinary care. Conclusions : Individuals who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis can derive significant benefits from rehabilitation programmes. To provide best care, rehabilitation standards and services should be based on the best available evidence.

  4. Burden of childhood-onset arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassett Afton L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Juvenile arthritis comprises a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases causing erosive arthritis in children, often progressing to disability. These children experience functional impairment due to joint and back pain, heel pain, swelling of joints and morning stiffness, contractures, pain, and anterior uveitis leading to blindness. As children who have juvenile arthritis reach adulthood, they face possible continuing disease activity, medication-associated morbidity, and life-long disability and risk for emotional and social dysfunction. In this article we will review the burden of juvenile arthritis for the patient and society and focus on the following areas: patient disability; visual outcome; other medical complications; physical activity; impact on HRQOL; emotional impact; pain and coping; ambulatory visits, hospitalizations and mortality; economic impact; burden on caregivers; transition issues; educational occupational outcomes, and sexuality. The extent of impact on the various aspects of the patients', families' and society's functioning is clear from the existing literature. Juvenile arthritis imposes a significant burden on different spheres of the patients', caregivers' and family's life. In addition, it imposes a societal burden of significant health care costs and utilization. Juvenile arthritis affects health-related quality of life, physical function and visual outcome of children and impacts functioning in school and home. Effective, well-designed and appropriately tailored interventions are required to improve transitioning to adult care, encourage future vocation/occupation, enhance school function and minimize burden on costs.

  5. Arthritis due to synovial involvement by extramedullary haematopoiesis in myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Heinicke, M H; M.H Zarrabi; Gorevic, P. D.

    1983-01-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with polyarthralgias, a psoriasiform rash, and severe elbow pain. Peripheral blood smear and bone marrow biopsy established a diagnosis of myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia. Biopsy of the skin lesions revealed a nonspecific dermatitis. The clinical presentation was inconsistent with psoriatic arthritis, and there was no evidence for associated gout or collagen-vascular disease. Histological examination of tissue taken at the time of synovectomy indicated elbow ...

  6. JUVENILE CHRONIC ARTHRITIS WITH EYE LESION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S O Salugina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A bstract. Objective, to describe a series of pts with JRA/JCA and uveitis. Material and methods. The study included 81 pts with JRA and uveitis. There were 68 girls-84%, 13 boys-16%. We studied the clinical manifestations, the antinuclear antibodies (ANA using HEP-2 cells for the 33 pts with uveitis and 46 pts without uveitis, HLA status was determined for 36 pts. Results. 85,2% of the children had arthritis before uveitis. The mean age at onset of arthritis was 3,5 year (range: 1-10 yrs, the mean age at onset of uveitis was 6 year (range: 2-15 yrs. The mean interval between the onset of arthritis and uveitis was 3,02 years (range: 3,5 yrs before arthritis onset to 12,5 yrs after. In 68,1% pts the diagnosis of uveitis was made within 5 yrs after onset of arthritis. 93% of pts had mono-oligoarticular onset, but 50% had poliarticular course. 23,5% of pts had functional disability 3-4 classes. Ocular complications were developed in 53.1%: cataracts-38,3%, band keratopathy-11,1%, glaucoma-2,5%. 93,9% of 33 studied children with arthritis and uveitis were ANA positive, 9,1% were RF positive. 18,1 % had HLA-DR8 (p<0,001, 83,3% - HLA-A2 (p<0,00l, HLA-B27 - 30,6 % (p<0,00l. Conclusion. Clinical and laboratory data of our pts suggest that: lthe combination of arthritis and uveitis would be named JCA with uveitis; 2 according our opinion JCA with uveitis is separate nosological form among the juvenile arthritides.

  7. Gold in psoriatic arthopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, M B; Kinsella, P; Corbett, M

    1980-01-01

    It has been suggested that gold is not effective in psoriatic arthropathy. We did not agree and therefore did a retrospective study of 98 patients. Gold had been given to 27 and was effective in 22, 14 of whom are still receiving it. The incidence of side effects was low and comparable to those in rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis Two types of antibody molecules act in concert to stimulate inflammation in people with rheumatoid arthritis, according to research funded in part by the ...

  9. Elevated rheumatoid factor and long term risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Schnohr, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis.......To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis....

  10. Risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2012-01-01

    To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke.......To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke....

  11. Common Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death Taking methotrexate—a commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory medication—may reduce the risk of death among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to ...

  12. Pain Treatment in Arthritis-Related Pain: Beyond NSAIDs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, van de Mart A.F.J.; Pergolizzi Jr., Joseph V.; Mellinghoff, Hans-Ulrich; Merchante, Ignacio Morón; Nalamachu, Srinivas; O'Brien, Joanne; Perrot, Serge; Raffa, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Managing pain from chronic conditions, such as, but not limited to, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, requires the clinician to balance the need for effective analgesia against safety risks associated with analgesic agents. Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis pain is incompletely understo

  13. Arthritis Possible Side Effect of Certain Cancer Drugs: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159602.html Arthritis Possible Side Effect of Certain Cancer Drugs: Study ... increase risk for joint and tissue disease, including arthritis, new research suggests. "We keep having referrals coming ...

  14. Association between human parvovirus B19 infection and arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cassinotti, P; Bas, S; Siegl, G; Vischer, T L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To gain information concerning the association between parvovirus B19 infection and arthritis. METHODS--Blood or synovial fluid, or both, from a total of 77 adult patients with various arthropathies (rheumatoid arthritis 13; mechanical arthropathies 11; crystal induced arthritis 13; idiopathic mono/oligoarthritis 25; suspicion of viral arthritis 15) were tested for the presence of the viral genome and anti-B19 antibodies. B19 DNA in blood and synovial fluid was investigated by nest...

  15. Aortic incompetence in HLA B27-positive juvenile arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kean, W F; Anastassiades, T. P.; Ford, P M

    1980-01-01

    The early onset of isolated aortic incompetence in a male child with HLA B27 and peripheral arthritis is reported. Acute anterior uveitis and lone aortic incompetence occurred at 1 and 9 months respectively after the development of the acute inflammatory arthritis. The uveitis resolved with local therapy and the arthritis remitted 10 months after the onset. There has been no recurrence of the arthritis after 10 years of close follow-up but the aortic incompetence has persisted, though it rema...

  16. Peripheral arthritis in the elderly: a hospital study.

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkinson, M L; Bliss, M R; Brain, A T; Scott, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    One hundred consecutive patients admitted to an acute geriatric unit were examined for evidence of peripheral arthritis with recognised criteria used to define osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, pyrophosphate arthropathy, gout, and disorders of the shoulder joint. The presence of arthritis and its severity were related both to functional independence and to a recognition by the patient that joint problems were impairing independence. Seventy six patients had clinical peripheral arthritis; ...

  17. Pseudoseptic Arthritis: A Case Series and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Harrington; Cote, Jonida K.; Stephanie J. Morris; Oppermann, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Pseudoseptic arthritis is an acute inflammatory monoarthritis with a sterile synovial gram stain and culture. Pseudoseptic arthritis has been previously described in the literature in a variety of settings including rheumatoid arthritis and microcrystalline disease. Despite pseudoseptic arthritis being a described entity, there is little published data on this topic with no published reports since 1992. Methods. This paper was a retrospective chart review over a 20-year period that i...

  18. Cytokine profiles in peripheral blood and whole blood cell cultures associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Sørensen, Lars Korsbaek; Stoltze, Kaj; Bendtzen, Klaus; Holmstrup, Palle

    2005-01-01

    Cytokines play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. An obvious question is whether patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis share blood cytokine profiles distinguishing them from individuals free of disease....

  19. Pleural and pulmonary alterations caused by rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary complications caused by rheumatoid arthritis are a clinically relevant aspect of this chronic arthropathy. This article reviews pulmonary abnormalities induced by rheumatoid arthritis and their clinical and radiological findings. In addition, the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnostic work-up of pulmonary complications caused by rheumatoid arthritis is discussed. (orig./MG)

  20. Distinctive radiological features of small hand joints in rheumatoid arthritis and seronegative spondyloarthritis demonstrated by contrast-enhanced (Gd-DTPA) magnetic resnance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of patients with clinically early inflammatory joint disease due to rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and Reiter's syndrome were examined by plain film radiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The spin echo T1-weighted precontrast, T2-weighted, and, especially, T1-weighted postcontrast images demonstrated distinct differences in the distribution of inflamatory changes, both within and adjacent to involved small hand joints. Two major subtypes of inflammatory arthritis were shown, thus providing a specific differential diagnosis between rheumatoid arthritis and some patients with seronegative spondyloarthritis. In particular, all the patients with Reiter's syndrome who were studied, and half of those with psoriatic arthritis, had a distinctive pattern of extra-articular desease involvement. The need for a new classification of clinical subsets in psoriatic arthritis has been recently suggested. The present findings suggest that magnetic resonance imaging could be useful in such a reclassification of seronegative spondyloarthritis, as well as offering considerable potential for a reappraisal of pathogenesis and therapy. In this series, it was also noted that juxta-articular osteoporosis on plain film did not correlate with bone marrow oedema on MRI. Hence the aetiology of this common radiographic finding also merits further consideration. (orig.)

  1. A Comparative Metabolomic Evaluation of Behcet’s Disease with Arthritis and Seronegative Arthritis Using Synovial Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Joong Kyong Ahn; Sooah Kim; Jungyeon Kim; Jiwon Hwang; Kyoung Heon Kim; Hoon-Suk Cha

    2015-01-01

    Behcet's disease (BD) with arthritis is often confused with seronegative arthritis (SNA) because of shared clinical symptoms and the lack of definitive biomarkers for BD. To investigate possible metabolic patterns and potential biomarkers of BD with arthritis, metabolomic profiling of synovial fluid (SF) from 6 patients with BD with arthritis and 18 patients with SNA was performed using gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in conjunction with univariate and multivariate statist...

  2. Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis (I): Pristane-Induced Arthritis in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncel, Jonatan; Haag, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Markus H.; Yau, Anthony C. Y.; Hultqvist, Malin; Olofsson, Peter; Bäcklund, Johan; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Weidner, Daniela; Fischer, Anita; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Haase, Claus; Lu, Shemin; Gulko, Percio S.; Steiner, Günter; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2016-01-01

    Background To facilitate the development of therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the Innovative Medicines Initiative BTCure has combined the experience from several laboratories worldwide to establish a series of protocols for different animal models of arthritis that reflect the pathogenesis of RA. Here, we describe chronic pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) model in DA rats, and provide detailed instructions to set up and evaluate the model and for reporting data. Methods We optimized dose of pristane and immunization procedures and determined the effect of age, gender, and housing conditions. We further assessed cage-effects, reproducibility, and frequency of chronic arthritis, disease markers, and efficacy of standard and novel therapies. Results Out of 271 rats, 99.6% developed arthritis after pristane-administration. Mean values for day of onset, day of maximum arthritis severity and maximum clinical scores were 11.8±2.0 days, 20.3±5.1 days and 34.2±11 points on a 60-point scale, respectively. The mean frequency of chronic arthritis was 86% but approached 100% in long-term experiments over 110 days. Pristane was arthritogenic even at 5 microliters dose but needed to be administrated intradermally to induce robust disease with minimal variation. The development of arthritis was age-dependent but independent of gender and whether the rats were housed in conventional or barrier facilities. PIA correlated well with weight loss and acute phase reactants, and was ameliorated by etanercept, dexamethasone, cyclosporine A and fingolimod treatment. Conclusions PIA has high incidence and excellent reproducibility. The chronic relapsing-remitting disease and limited systemic manifestations make it more suitable than adjuvant arthritis for long-term studies of joint-inflammation and screening and validation of new therapeutics. PMID:27227821

  3. Technetium-99m human immunoglobulin scintigraphy in psoriatic arthropathy: first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary results of this study reveal that 99mTc human immunoglobulin (HIG) scintigraphy demonstrates a typical premature pattern of extradermal psoriatic disease in digits indicative of the early stage of psoriatic arthritis. This pattern was also found in a rare case of psoriatic arthropathy without skin lesions. 99mTc-HIG scintigraphy appears to reveal the initial inflammatory characteristics of later bone lesions. In the advanced stage of psoriatic arthritis, 99mTc-MDP and 99mTc-HIG scans were found to be equally sensitive in the detection of the affected joints. Thus 99mTc-HIG scintigraphy seems to be useful in the early detection of psoriatic arthropathy and also in advanced psoriatic arthritis, as well as for the detection of psoriatic arthropathy without skin lesions. (orig./MG)

  4. Technetium-99m human immunoglobulin scintigraphy in psoriatic arthropathy: first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoeger, A. (Dept. of Radiodiagnostics, Univ. Hospital, Innsbruck (Austria)); Mur, E. (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Univ. Hospital, Innsbruck (Austria)); Penz-Schneeweiss, D. (Dept. of Dermatology, Univ. Hospital, Innsbruck (Austria)); Moncayo, R. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital, Innsbruck (Austria)); Decristoforo, C. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital, Innsbruck (Austria)); Riccabona, G. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital, Innsbruck (Austria)); Fridrich, L. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital, Innsbruck (Austria))

    1994-04-01

    Preliminary results of this study reveal that [sup 99m]Tc human immunoglobulin (HIG) scintigraphy demonstrates a typical premature pattern of extradermal psoriatic disease in digits indicative of the early stage of psoriatic arthritis. This pattern was also found in a rare case of psoriatic arthropathy without skin lesions. [sup 99m]Tc-HIG scintigraphy appears to reveal the initial inflammatory characteristics of later bone lesions. In the advanced stage of psoriatic arthritis, [sup 99m]Tc-MDP and [sup 99m]Tc-HIG scans were found to be equally sensitive in the detection of the affected joints. Thus [sup 99m]Tc-HIG scintigraphy seems to be useful in the early detection of psoriatic arthropathy and also in advanced psoriatic arthritis, as well as for the detection of psoriatic arthropathy without skin lesions. (orig./MG)

  5. Arthritis and pain. Psychosocial aspects in the management of arthritis pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, Catherine L

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize psychosocial factors associated with arthritis pain and highlight recent evidence for psychosocial approaches to managing arthritis pain. By definition, psychosocial factors refer to two dimensions of experience: the psychological (cognitive, affective) and social (interacting with others, engaging in life activities). Psychosocial factors influence the perception of pain and the presence of pain influences psychological well-being and social participation. After discussing the impact of arthritis pain on participation in work, family life, and leisure, evidence for psychosocial interventions is summarized, emphasizing reviews and studies published from January 2000 to August 2006. PMID:17169138

  6. Biologic interventions for fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Celia; Choy, Ernest H S; Hewlett, Sarah;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fatigue is a common and potentially distressing symptom for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with no accepted evidence-based management guidelines. Evidence suggests that biologic interventions improve symptoms and signs in RA as well as reducing joint damage. OBJECTIVES: To...... evaluate the effect of biologic interventions on fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following electronic databases up to 1 April 2014: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Current Controlled Trials...... contacted key authors. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials if they evaluated a biologic intervention in people with rheumatoid arthritis and had self reported fatigue as an outcome measure. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers selected relevant trials, assessed methodological...

  7. Therapy of rheumatoid arthritis by radiosynovectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiosynovectomy is a therapeutic modality for local treatment of inflammatory point diseases. It is performed by intraarticular instillation of beta-emitting radionuclides. Its effectiveness is based upon the anti-inflammatory action of beta-radiation. Accordingly, the indication of radiosynovectomy is based upon the evidence of the inflammatory etiology of disease. The principle of its therapeutic action makes radiosynovectomy a valuable device for successful treatment of florid rheumatoid arthritis. It can be performed as an alternative to surgical synovectomy or in combination with it. The following article describes the therapeutic management of rheumatoid arthritis by radiosynovectomy including patient preparation, performance, and follow-up. (orig.)

  8. Is Hearing Impairment Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Bjoerndal, Kristine; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, inflammatory disease that affects 1% of the population. The auditory system may be involved during the course of disease; however the association of RA and hearing impairment has not been clearly defined. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review......, hearing test, audiometry, auditory dysfunction and rheumatoid arthritis. CONCLUSION: Based on our review it can be postulated that patients with RA are at higher risk of hearing impairment compared to healthy subjects in their course of the disease. The hearing impairment in RA seems to be a...

  9. Sedentary behaviour in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Tanja; Beyer, Nina; Aadahl, Mette;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite increasing interest in investigating sedentary behaviour (SB) in the general population and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is little documentation of the subjective experiences of SB in patients with RA. This study aimed to examine how patients with RA...... modification of physical activity level causing increase in SB, especially during periods of disease flare. Prioritizing and planning of SB also functioned as part of self-management strategies. 3) It has nothing to do with my arthritis; for some patients, SB was not related to RA, but simply reflected a way...

  10. Connective tissue markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H J

    1998-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic autoimmune disorder of unknown aetiology. The most common outcome of RA is a progressive development of joint destruction and deformity. Early introduction of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs seems important for prevention of the long term...... rheumatoid factor contributes to the classification of arthritis as RA, and acute phase reactants are useful for quantifying and comparing the level of inflammatory activity in the course of a given patient. There is, however, a lack of sensitive and specific biochemical markers for RA, and frontline...

  11. Main Ocular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Saray Quignon Santana

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is considered an autoimmune disease in which articular and extra articular manifestations are produced and contribute to alter the functional capacity of the individual. This study consists on performing a bibliographical review showing the main ocular manifestations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It is our purpose to give you our experiences to the students as well as the internal medicine, ophthalmology and rheumatologist residents about this topic. The ophthalmological consultation of sick patients contributes to the prevention of ocular illnesses which are characteristic of the base disease and improve the ocular health.

  12. Assessment of arthritis in rats with CIA:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasemian, Yousef

    computerized digital infrared thermal imaging, and its association with stages of clinical scores in a rat collagen induced arthritis model. Arthritis was induced with collagen immunization in eight Lewis rats.  Four of the animals were treated with dexamethasone as a negative control. Disease progression was...... monitored by paw edema and body weight. On the basis of paw edema a clinical score was given each paw of the animals involved in the study. The mean temperature of a region covering the metatarsal joint was compared with a reference area on the back of the same rat. The temperature ratios were compared with...

  13. SECONDARY OSTEOARTHRITIS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Starodubtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problems of comorbidities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Two or more RA-related conditions were diagnosed according to the results of the QUEST-RA program implemented in 34 countries. Osteoarthritis along with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and osteoporosis was detected among the most commonly diseases. Owing to expanded diagnostic capabilities, the recognition and treatment of the comorbidities have recently received much attention, as embodied in the draft Association of Rheumatologists of Russia Guidelines for RA management (2014; Part 1. The concept and major characteristics of secondary osteoarthritis in RA are analyzed. It is precisely the inflammatory process and underlying disease-related risk factors, including treatment, that have impact on the development of secondary osteoarthritis and patients’ quality of life as a whole. All this allows an inference about the mechanisms closely intertwined with the underlying disease for the development of secondary osteoarthritis, which initiates cartilage damage and further remodeling. Primary and secondary osteoarthritis was comparatively analyzed. Particular emphasis is placed on current cartilage biomarkers, their diagnostic value and role in monitoring the efficiency of treatment in clinical trials. The paper provides a comparative analysis of detectable serum and urine biomarkers according to the results of the complex analysis made by the National Institutes of Health. Particular attention is given to cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP. Foreign authors’ investigations suggest that there is a relationship between serum COMP levels and disease severity and joint X-ray changes. There is evidence for the efficacy of hyaluronic acid used in the treatment of secondary osteoarthritis in patients with RA. 

  14. Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Fiona M

    2013-08-01

    Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has undergone extraordinary change in recent years and new techniques are now available to help the clinician diagnose and manage patients much more effectively than previously. While established modalities such as plain radiography (X-Ray) remain important, especially for detection of erosions and determining the progression of joint damage, there are many instances where ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scanning provide added information. MRI and US are now used regularly by clinicians to help diagnose RA in the pre-radiographic stage as they offer improved visualisation of joint erosions. They also have the potential to provide prognostic information as MRI bone oedema/osteitis is linked to the later development of erosions and power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) joint positivity is also a predictor of joint damage. Nuclear imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are also highly sensitive for detecting joint change in early RA and pre-RA but not yet used clinically mainly because of accessibility and radiation exposure. MRI, US, scintigraphy, SPECT and PET have all been shown to detect sub-clinical joint inflammation in patients in clinical remission, a state that is now the goal of most treat-to-target management strategies. Thus, imaging may be used to direct therapeutic decision making and MRI is also now being used in clinical trials to determine the impact of disease-suppressing therapy on the course of synovitis and osteitis. As is the case for all tests, it would be unwise to rely completely on any one imaging result, as false positives and negatives can occur for all modalities. Thus, the clinician needs to choose the most relevant and reliable imaging test, while also striving to minimise patient discomfort, radiation burden and economic impact. PMID:24315051

  15. Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Matuszewska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies. RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%. New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33. Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  16. Kidney involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lazzarini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a widespread disease and its renal involvement, relatively common, is clinically significant because worsens course and mortality of the primary disease. There is still no agreement on the prevalence of renal disorders in RA: data analysis originates from different sources, as death certificates, autopsies, clinical and laboratory findings and kidney biopsies, each with its limitations. Histoimmunological studies on bioptical specimens of patients with RA and kidney damage, led to clarify prevalent pathologies. In order of frequency: glomerulonephritis and amyloidosis (60-65% and 20-30% respectively, followed by acute or chronic interstitial nephritis. Kidney injury during RA includes secondary renal amyloidosis, nephrotoxic effects of antirheumatic drugs and nephropathies as extra-articular manifestations (rheumatoid nephropathy. Amyloidosis affects survival, increases morbidity and is the main cause of end stage renal disease in patients with RA and nephropathy. Strong association between RA activity and amyloidosis needs the use of immunosuppressive and combined therapies, to prevent this complication and reduce risk of dialysis. Long-lasting and combined RA pharmacotherapy involves various renal side effects. In this review we describe NSAIDs and DMARDs (Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs nephrotoxicity, particularly by gold compounds, D-penicillamine, cyclosporine A and methotrexate. Rare cases of IgA glomerulonephritis during immunomodulating therapy with leflunomide and TNF blocking receptor (etanercept are reported; real clinical significance of this drug-related nephropathy will be established by development of RA treatment. In RA nephropathies, mesangial glomerulonephritis is the most frequent histological lesion (35-60 % out of biopsies from patients with urinary abnormalities and/or kidney impairment, followed by minimal change glomerulopathy (3-14% and p-ANCA positive necrotizing crescentic

  17. Cervical myelopathy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, K A; Cats, A; Kremer, H P; Luyendijk, W; Onvlee, G J; Thomeer, R T

    1984-01-01

    Results obtained in 43 Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with cervical myelopathy are described; all patients showed several alarm signs together with neurological disturbances. Thirty-four cases were operable; nine patients were not operated upon for various reasons (refusal, and general condition). In the surgically treated patients, the changes were localized in the C1-C2 area (n = 20), in the area below C2 (n = 5), or in both (n = 9). The patients were put on skull traction pre- and post-operatively and nursed on a circo-electric bed. Pre-operatively, the duration of traction varied from a few days to weeks (mean 3 weeks). Post-operatively, the patients were given continuous skull traction for 2 1/2-3 months. This procedure yielded neurological improvement and a stable graft in all but two patients. On follow-up, recurrence of neurological complaints was seen in nine patients, in four due to a new slip at a lower level. Three of these cases were reoperated with good results. Twenty-three patients have died: four 'early' (one pre-operatively and three within 6 weeks post-operatively) and 19 'late'. The mean duration of follow-up was 4.5 years. In those who died 'late', the cause of death was due to the effects of an unstable graft in two cases and in the others the causes were not related to changes in the cervical spine. In the 10 patients who are still alive the mean duration of follow-up is 5 years. The nine patients who were not operated upon all died within a year, 4 of them due to consequences of cord compression. If cervical spondylodesis is feasible in an RA patient with myelopathy, the procedure is advocated. PMID:6529877

  18. Orofacial pain, jaw function, and temporomandibular disorders in adult women with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis or persistent juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, M.; Zak, M.; Jensen, B.L.;

    2001-01-01

    Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis......Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis...

  19. Arthritis and pain. Psychosocial aspects in the management of arthritis pain

    OpenAIRE

    Backman, Catherine L

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize psychosocial factors associated with arthritis pain and highlight recent evidence for psychosocial approaches to managing arthritis pain. By definition, psychosocial factors refer to two dimensions of experience: the psychological (cognitive, affective) and social (interacting with others, engaging in life activities). Psychosocial factors influence the perception of pain and the presence of pain influences psychological well-being and social partici...

  20. Detection of Arthritis by Joint Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detection and identification of early arthritis is frequently difficult with routine methods. Several tracers, 131I human serum albumin (25 μCi/10 lb), 99mTc human serum albumin (1-3 mCi), 131I iodipamide (40 μCi/10 lb), and 99mTc pertechnetate (10 mCi), have been employed for joint scanning to detect synovitis produced by arthritis in joints of the extremities. When administered intravenously, the 25% increase in localization of these tracers in the synovial membrane, if there is active synovitis, can be demonstrated by scintillation scanning. This ability to detect synovitis at an early stage enables the joint scan to show areas of active synovitis not demonstrated on roentgenograms. The scan may objectively confirm or disprove questionable physical findings. From this standpoint the technique has been useful in determining whether joint pain is functional or due to arthritis as a negative localization tends to rule out active synovitis as the cause of the pain. The scan demonstration of a positive localization of the tracer in several joints when only one area is symptomatic is evidence that joint pain is due to systemic disease. The short half-life tracera permit serial studies to follow the course of an arthritis process. Use of 99mTc pertechnetate and an Anger camera have made joint scanning a practical technique for clinical use. A review of the accuracy of joint scanning in 130 cases as compared to roentgenograms is presented. (author)

  1. New agents for scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiopharmaceuticals have been used as investigative tools for the detection and treatment of arthritis activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) since the 1950s. Against the background of the pathophysiology of RA, the current status of joint scintigraphy and possible future developments are reviewed. Both non-specific (radiolabelled leucocytes and technetium-99m labelled human immunoglobulin) and specific targeting radiopharmaceuticals (including radiolabelled antibodies) are considered. The use of radiopharmaceuticals in the detection of arthritis activity has the advantages of allowing direct imaging of joints by means of whole-body scintigraphy and of joints that are difficult to assess clinically or radiographically. Promising results have been obtained with radiolabelled anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibodies and with somatostatin receptor imaging, but more data are available regarding 99mTc-IgG scintigraphy, which differentiates between the various degrees of arthritis activity and thus facilitates the choice of antirheumatic drug. Newer promising approaches to the imaging of RA include the use of radiolabelled J001 and cytokines, though studies on these are limited at present. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging in coccidioidal arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. The authors assessed the MRI findings of appendicular coccidioidal arthritis. Design. T1- and T2-weighted MR images of affected joints, both with and without intravenous gadopentetate dimeglumine, were performed in nine adult patients (ten studies) and evaluated by three masted readers, using a four-point certainty scale for: synovial abnormality, articular cartilage loss, subarticular bone loss, abnormal marrow signal, enhancement of osseous and articular structures, and assessment of disease activity. Findings were correlated with biopsy results or clinical course. Results. Eight patients had active and one had inactive arthritis, involving the knee (five patients), ankle (two patients), and elbow (one patient). Synovial complex was the most common finding in active arthritis (P<0.025). Cartilage and subarticular bone loss were seen 56% and 89% of patients with active disease, respectively. Abnormal marrow signal was uncommon (two patients). All cases showed synovial and/or osseus enhancement. Conclusions. MRI findings in coccidiodal arthritis are described. Enhancement of thickened synovium and erosions was seen after intravenous gadopentetate. (orig.). With 4 figs

  3. Retrocalcaneal bursitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldenstein-Schainberg, C; Homsi, C; Rodrigues Pereira, R M; Cossermelli, W

    1992-01-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis has been described in various adult rheumatic diseases and septic bursitis unrelated to previous bursal disease has been reported in children. The case is reported here of a girl with juvenile chronic arthritis who developed non-septic retrocalcaneal bursitis; the diagnosis was suggested by a combination of clinical and radiographic studies and was confirmed by ultrasonography.

  4. Pancytopenia related to azathioprine in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Jeurissen, M E; Boerbooms, A M; van de Putte, L B

    1988-01-01

    Two patients with rheumatoid arthritis developed pancytopenia during treatment with azathioprine 100 mg daily. In one patient this side effect occurred after three weeks, in the other after eight weeks of treatment. Rapid fall of platelets in one patient necessitated platelet transfusion. In the other patient additional treatment with allopurinol was probably responsible for the toxic effect. Haematological side effects of azathioprine are discussed.

  5. Adherence to methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Henning; Eriksen, Stine A; Christensen, Robin;

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To study adherence to methotrexate (MTX) and factors of importance thereof in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Patients with a hospital diagnosis of RA (ICD10 codes M05.X or M06.X) after January 1, 1997, and aged ≥18 years at the date of first diagnosis/contact, with at...

  6. On the origin of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anders J; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Houen, Gunnar;

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease with a complex origin. Previous studies have reported heritability estimates on RA at about 60%. Only 16% of the genetic background of the disease has been disclosed so far. The purpose of the present investigation was to provide an optimized...

  7. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse...

  8. [Biopharmaceuticals in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baslund, B.; Bendtzen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The current status on the use of biopharmaceuticals in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is reviewed. Blocking of TNF-alpha, co-stimulation of CD28+ T-cells and depletion of CD20+ B-cells are all effective ways to diminish inflammation and joint damage. However, not all patients react to these...

  9. Septic arthritis in the newborn and infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajdobranski Đorđe R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Septic arthritis represents an intra-articular infection caused by pyogenic bacteria. During the earliest childhood it is considered to be a systemic septic condition and demands early diagnosis and prompt surgical treatment. Material and methods This is a retrospective analysis of patients with septic arthritis treated at the Department of Orthopedics of the Pediatric Surgery Clinic in Novi Sad, over a 10-year period. We are also presenting a case of a 12-day-old newborn baby, with clear radiological signs of osteoarthritis of the right knee. Results A retrospective study included the period 1991-2000, and showed that 15 patients, aged 10 days - 12 months were treated for osteoarthritis. The most common localization was the hip, in 60% of cases. In 11 patients the causative agent was Staphylococcus aureus while in the 4 remaining patients the bacteriologic finding was negative. One patient died of generalized sepsis. Discussion In neonates and infants septic arthritis is characterized by atypical clinical picture, often causing delayed diagnosis. In the initial phases of the disease ultrasonographic findings were of greater use compared to radiological imaging, due to relatively late appearance of radiological signs of disease. Conclusions Due to possible development of serious and irreversible damage, even lethal outcome, septic arthritis requires early diagnosis, prompt administration of antibiotics and early surgical treatment. It is a quite unique area in Pediatric Orthopedics where missed or delayed diagnosis may have serious consequences.

  10. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Andrew D; Fischer, Philip R; Reed, Ann M; Wylam, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. PMID:26171269

  11. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Andrew D.; Fischer, Philip R.; Reed, Ann M.; Wylam, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  12. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  13. Relation Between Rheumatoid Arthritis and Hearing Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Doosti

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some of the studies have shown that RA (Rheumatoid Arthritis may cause hearing disorders. These disorders can result in problems later in life, so survey of correlation between rheumatoid arthritis and hearing disorders is important . Methods: This was a case-control study which has done from December 2004 to August 2006 at Shaheed Sadoughi hospital in Yazd. In this study, 50 Rheumatoid arthritis patients as case group (100 ears with 50 persons as control group who were of the same age, sex and job (100 ears were compared. Results: Patients were 21-67 years old and the mean age was 47.58 years(It was the same as the control group.From 50 cases (controls 42 were women and 8 were men . Audiometric tests in different frequencies showed that hearing loss in high frequencies, especially in 8000 Hz was significantly different in the two groups. Also, acoustic reflex was absent in case group and this too was significantly different.The evaluation of sensory neural hearing loss showed that this hearing loss was sensory, not neural . Conclusion: In Rheumatoid arthritis, middle and inner ear disorders have been shown. But some patients aren't aware of their hearing loss and they have no clinical complains, so frequent evaluation of audiometric tests is recommended. Hearing disorders can be controlled by therapeutic and rehabilitation procedures in these patients.

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis, infiltrated pulmonary, and sharp dyspnoea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of a patient (50 year-old) feminine sex, is made with antecedents of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the last 10 years in treatment with steroids, hypothyroidism and arterial hypertension who consults for square of dyspnoea of small efforts, dry cough and fever. An evolution of the illness is made and the topic is analyzed

  15. Histocompatibility antigens in psoriasis, psoriatic arthropathy, and ankylosing spondylitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, R D; Panayi, G. S.; Welsh, K I

    1983-01-01

    Patients with ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, and psoriasis alone were typed for HLA A, B, Cw, and DR antigens, and the antigen frequencies were compared with those in a normal control population and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with psoriasis had a significantly raised frequency of Cw6. Those with arthritis in addition to their psoriasis also had raised frequencies of B27 and DR7. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis were characterised by the expected high fre...

  16. HOW TO LIVE WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS???

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parle Milind

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a chronic auto-immune disease characterized by painful inflammation of the joints and surrounding tissues, leading to long term disability. Rheumatoid arthritis can begin at any age but has its peak between 35 to 55 years of age. RA shows hereditary linkage. Women and smokers are most often affected. The patient doesn’t feel any symptoms during inactive state of the disease. RA progresses in a symmetrical pattern involving both the sides of the body. Once rheumatoid arthritis is confirmed by diagnosis, treatment should start as early as possible. The treatment for rheumatoid arthritis focuses initially on reducing the joint inflammation and pain with the use of analgesics and anti-inflammatory agents. In the next stage, joint function is restored by administering Disease Modifying Anti-rheumatic Drugs (DMARDs thus preventing joint deformity. Treatment is generally based on the degree of severity of RA. Patients with mild RA are advised to take rest and are prescribed analgesics and anti-inflammatory medicines, which include fast acting drugs like NSAIDs. Slow acting drugs like (DMARDs such as methotrexate, sulfasalazine, lelflunomide etc., and Body’s reaction modifiers (BRMs such as rituximab, anankinra, infliximab etc., are reserved for patients suffering from moderate to severe RA. The patient is advised to undertake regular exercises like walking, stretching, swimming or cycling, which are aimed at reducing body weight. The patient suffering from arthritis can carry out his normal day-to-day activities with the help of proper medication and regular exercise.

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... disease, which means the arthritis results from your immune system attacking your body's own tissues. The course of ...

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past ... prone to fracture). Source: NIAMS Who Gets Rheumatoid Arthritis? The disease occurs in all racial and ethnic ...

  19. Development of simple clinical criteria for the definition of inflammatory arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis: a report from the GRAPPA 2012 annual meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mease, Philip J; Garg, Amit; Gladman, Dafna D; Helliwell, Philip S

    2013-08-01

    Dermatologist and primary care clinicians are in an ideal position to identify the emergence of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in patients with psoriasis. Yet these clinicians are not well trained to distinguish inflammatory musculoskeletal disease from other more common problems such as osteoarthritis, traumatic or degenerative tendonitis and back pain, or fibromyalgia. A simple set of clinical criteria to identify inflammatory disease would aid recognition of PsA. At its 2012 annual meeting, the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA) discussed development of evidence-based, practical, and reliable definitions of inflammatory arthritis, enthesitis, dactylitis, and spondylitis. This project will be a sequential process of expert clinician nominal-group technique, patient surveys and focus groups, and Delphi exercises to identify core features of inflammatory disease, testing these in a small group of patients with and without inflammatory disease, and finally validating these criteria in larger groups of patients. PMID:23908542

  20. Effect of radiosynovectomy in patients with inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Effect of radiosynovectomy (RS) should be evaluated both by subjective and objective parameters in patients with osteoarthritis and in patients with inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: A total of 98 joints in 61 patients were investigated. Patients were divided into two groups. The first group included 35 patients with therapy-resistant effusions caused by severe osteoarthritis (46 joints). The second group consisted of 26 patients (52 joints) with ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis, undifferentiated spondylarthropathy, psoriatic arthritis, pigmented villo-nodular synovitis, and recurrent synovitis following surgery. Effect of RS was evaluated by a standardized questionnaire and quantified by T/B-ratios derived from blood pool images prior to and after RS. Results: Within the first patient group suffering from osteoarthritis, 40% showed a good or excellent improvement of clinical symptoms, 51% were unchanged, and in 9% symptoms worsened. Similar results were found in the second patient group. The majority of unchanged results were small finger joints. In contrast, wrist and knee joints showed a better improvement. Good correlation between results of bone scan and patients subjective impression was found in 38% and 67% in the first and the second patient group, respectively. Conclusion: Radiosynovectomy might be an effective treatment in osteoarthritis and inflammatory joint disorders not caused by rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  1. Hand and wrist arthritis of Behcet disease: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Reports on arthritis in Behcet disease are relatively scarce, and imaging features vary. Purpose: To document the various imaging features of articular disorders of the hand and wrist in Behcet disease. Material and Methods: Four patients, four women aged 26 to 65 years, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Behcet disease, with imaging findings of hand and wrist arthritis, were seen in two institutions. Radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were studied to elucidate the pattern and distribution. Results: Both non-erosive arthritis and erosive arthritis of different features were noted: one with non-erosive synovitis of the wrist, one with wrist synovitis with minimal erosion, and two with erosive arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint. Conclusion: Imaging manifestations of arthritis of Behcet disease vary, and may be similar to other seronegative arthritides

  2. Clinical evaluation of joint scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertechnetate (sup(99m)TcO4-) joint scintigraphy was performed on 45 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 3 with nonspecific arthritis and 6 normal subjects. 1) The sites of radioisotopic accumulation were generally in agreement with those of clinical involvement in rheumatoid arthritis. 2) By analysis of build-up curves in the wrist joint, tracer was found to be concentrated more rapidly in rheumatoid arthritis (T 1/2 = 0.67 min.) than in nonspecific arthritis (T 1/2 = 2.66 min.) 3) The degree of radioisotopic accumulation correlated well with the value of CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. It could be cosidered that pertechnetate joint scintigraphy is useful for clinical evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis. (author)

  3. Th2 and eosinophil responses suppress inflammatory arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhu; Andreev, Darja; Oeser, Katharina; Krljanac, Branislav; Hueber, Axel; Kleyer, Arnd; Voehringer, David; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Th2-eosinophil immune responses are well known for mediating host defence against helminths. Herein we describe a function of Th2-eosinophil responses in counteracting the development of arthritis. In two independent models of arthritis, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection leads to Th2 and eosinophil accumulation in the joints associated with robust inhibition of arthritis and protection from bone loss. Mechanistically, this protective effect is dependent on IL-4/IL-13-induced STAT6 pathway. Furthermore, we show that eosinophils play a central role in the modulation of arthritis probably through the increase of anti-inflammatory macrophages into arthritic joints. The presence of these pathways in human disease is confirmed by detection of GATA3-positive cells and eosinophils in the joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Taken together, these results demonstrate that eosinophils and helminth-induced activation of the Th2 pathway axis effectively mitigate the course of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:27273006

  4. Is yoga a suitable treatment for rheumatoid arthritis: current opinion

    OpenAIRE

    Telles S; Singh N

    2012-01-01

    Shirley Telles, Nilkamal SinghPatanjali Research Foundation, Haridwar, IndiaAbstract: We reviewed published literature regarding the use of yoga for managing rheumatoid arthritis to determine whether adequate evidence exists to suggest its usefulness as a therapy. A search for previous studies involving yoga and rheumatoid arthritis in PubMed yielded eight reports. These studies reported the benefits of yoga in the physical and mental health of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), suggest...

  5. Colony variability under the spotlight in animal models of arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, John H.

    2009-01-01

    A recent article by Farkas and colleagues, published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, is from the laboratory of Dr Tibor Glant and his research team in Chicago, who have investigated in considerable depth the immunopathology of experimental arthritis induced by the major cartilage component proteoglycan aggrecan in an animal model that mimics many features of human rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis. This present report takes our understanding a significant step forward by questi...

  6. Autoantibody recognition of collagen type II in arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lindh, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Autoantibodies against collagen type II (CII), a protein localized in the joint cartilage, play a major role in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), one of the most commonly used animal models for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The studies included in this thesis were undertaken to elucidate structural and functional requirements for B and T cells to recognize native CII structures during experimental arthritis as well as in human RA. To reveal in detail how CII-specific autoantibodies recognize CII...

  7. Identification of Urinary Peptide Biomarkers Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Stalmach, Angelique; Johnsson, Hanna; McInnes, Iain B.; Husi, Holger; Klein, Julie; Dakna, Mohammed; Mullen, William; Mischak, Harald; Porter, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis are associated with improved outcomes but current diagnostic tools such as rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated protein antibodies have shown limited sensitivity. In this pilot study we set out to establish a panel of urinary biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis using capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. We compared the urinary proteome of 33 participants of the Scottish Early Rheumatoid Arthritis inception...

  8. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Assayag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease affecting about 1% of the population. Interstitial lung disease is a serious and frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD is characterized by several histopathologic subtypes. This article reviews the proposed pathogenesis and risk factors for RA-ILD. We also outline the important steps involved in the work-up of RA-ILD and review the evidence for treatment and prognosis.

  9. Lumbar radiculopathy caused by foraminal stenosis in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Koakutsu, Tomoaki; Morozumi, Naoki; Koizumi, Yutaka; Ishii, Yushin

    2011-01-01

    Study design Case-series study. Objective To describe the clinical presentation, characteristic findings of imaging studies, and treatment of lumbar radiculopathy caused by foraminal stenosis in rheumatoid arthritis. Background Lumbar lesions in rheumatoid arthritis are relatively rare, with a limited number of systemic reports. Methods Six patients with lumbar radiculopathy caused by foraminal stenosis in rheumatoid arthritis were treated. The patients were all women with a mean age of 69 ye...

  10. Pulsed radio frequency therapy of experimentally induced arthritis in ponies.

    OpenAIRE

    Crawford, W. H.; Houge, J C; Neirby, D T; Di Mino, A; Di Mino, A A

    1991-01-01

    The effect of pulsed radio frequency therapy (PRFT) was evaluated on seven ponies with no arthritis and in 28 ponies in which arthritis was created using intra-articular amphotericin B to induce synovitis in the right middle carpal joint. The ponies were divided into five treatment and two control groups. Two levels of arthritis were created and two dosage levels of PRFT were evaluated. The effect of PRFT on arthritic and nonarthritic joints was measured by comparing synovial fluid parameters...

  11. The first national clinical audit for rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Firth, J.; Snowden, N.; Ledingham, J; Rivett, A.; Galloway, J; Dennison, E. M.; MacPhie, E.; Ide, Z.; Rowe, I.; Kandala, N.; Jameson, K

    2016-01-01

    The first national audit for rheumatoid and early inflammatory arthritis has benchmarked care for the first 3 months of follow-up activity from first presentation to a rheumatology service. Access to care, management of early rheumatoid arthritis and support for self care were measured against National Institute for Health and Care Excellence quality standards; impact of early arthritis and experience of care were measured using patient-reported outcome and experience measures. The results de...

  12. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia presenting with arthritis in an adult patient

    OpenAIRE

    Usalan, C.; Ozarslan, E; Zengin, N.; Buyukayk, Y.; Gullu, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The earliest manifestations of leukaemia often include rheumatic signs and symptoms. Arthritis is a well recognised complication of leukaemia in children, but acute and chronic leukaemia may also cause arthritis in adults. Leukaemic arthritis may occur at any time during the course of leukaemia and may be the presenting manifestation. It should therefore be considered in the differential diagnosis of both childhood and adult rheumatic disease. We present an adult patient presenting with arthr...

  13. Reactive arthritis induced by recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Marr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile colitis is a common infection that can be difficult to resolve and may result in recurrent infections. Reactive arthritis is a rare presentation of this disease and its treatment is not well differentiated in the literature. We describe a case of reactive arthritis occurring in a patient with a history of recurrent Clostridium difficile colitis while currently receiving a taper of oral vancomycin. His arthritis symptoms resolved with corticosteroids and continued treatment with anticlostridial antibiotics.

  14. Microcirculation of the juvenile knee in chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bünger, Cody; Bülow, J; Tøndevold, E;

    1986-01-01

    In order to investigate pathogenetic factors in growth abnormalities of the knee in hemophilic arthropathy and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, the hemodynamic changes of the knee following chronic synovial inflammation and elevated joint pressure were studied in puppies. Unilateral arthritis was....... The growth plates formed borders for the extension of these changes. The increased permeability and surface area between blood and bone in arthritis may accelerate the resorption and subsequent destruction of subchondral bone in chronic arthropathies of the juvenile knee....

  15. Radiosynoviorthese in the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiosynoviorthese, a new method for the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, was developed. Altogether 260 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were treated. The therapeutic activity of radioactive colloid Au was administered intraarticularly to all the patients. Indications and contraindications for radiation therapy of rheumatoid arthritis were developed. Good short- and long-term results were noted in most of the patients after radiation therapy. Radiosynoviorthese as a method of local active therapy of affected joints with colloid Au in the multiple modality treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is effective; its prolonged stable therapeutic effect in patients is observed

  16. GANGGUAN PERTUMBUHAN MANDIBULA PADA JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Puspitawati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA is a systemic disease on childhood, which has chronic arthritis as its most prominent manifestation. One very common complication of JRA is growth disturbance. JRA involving temporomandibular joint usually result in mandibular growth retardation which eventually can lead to micrognathia, retrognathia, malocclusion and other mandibulofacial developmental aberrations. Factors considered to be the cause of these growth and developmental disturbances are: congenital, the disease's direct effect on the condyle, functional deficiency of the temporomandibular joint, duration, age of disease onset and type of the JRA and corticosteroid therapy. However, the mechanism for the mandibulofacial growth and developmental aberrations due to JRA are not fully understood. This literature review will discuss the hypotheses concerning mechanisms of those growth and developmental disturbances, especially based on clinical and radiographic studies on JRA cases.

  17. The cystic form of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nonerosive form of rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.) was found in 62 patients out of 660 patients with R.A.. These 62 patients exhibit slowly progressive cystic changes in about the same joints in which usually erosions develop in classic R.A.. The E.S.R. is often low, half of the patients remained seronegative and there are 35 males and 27 females in the group. A smaller group of 15 out of these patients could be followed from a stage wherein the radiographs were normal to a stage of extensive cystic changes, over a period of at least 6 years. An attempt is made to delineate this group within the rheumatoid arthritis disease entity. (orig.)

  18. Reactive arthritis: advances in diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Petricca

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Reactive Arthritis (ReA is an aseptic synovitis developing after a primary infection distant from the joint, mainly localized in the gastrointestinal (Enteroarthritis or genitourinary tract (Uroarthritis. Because of either the asymmetric joint involvement, the possibility of involvement of the spine and enthesis, and the HLA-B27 association ReA is considered one of the spondylarthropathies. Recently, bacterial components or viable bacteria were found in joints during ReA. For this reason, the limits between ReA itself and infectious arthritis are now less definite. Generally accepted diagnostic and classification criteria are still lacking but the improvement in techniques for detection of bacteria increase the possibility to identify the triggering agents. Several studies have examined the role of antimicrobial drugs in ameliorating the natural course of ReA, with some positive results for Uroarthritis only. However, more conventional treatments based on NSAIDs, Sulfasalazine and steroids are effective in many cases.

  19. Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis through Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Mittal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common inflammatory arthropathy worldwide, but may be less prevalent in Asian populations causing pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function in joints. The spectrum of magnetic resonance imaging findings encountered in the musculoskeletal system in this disease but these images often found non-productive due to noise present in the image and creates troublesome situation for analysis point of view. The role of image processing in rheumatoid arthritis lies, not in diagnosis, but in evaluation of the integrity of structures affected by the disease process. Since Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive to synovial changes than any radiography tech, and may permit quantification of changes in disease activity, as well as evaluation of the effects of drug therapy, and of complications of the disease and its treatment. So analyzing the Magnetic resonance images through image processing tool of Matlab provides easy going approach for diagnosis of the disease.

  20. Histopathology of Lyme arthritis in LSH hamsters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hejka, A.; Schmitz, J.L.; England, D.M.; Callister, S.M.; Schell, R.F.

    1989-05-01

    The authors studied the histopathologic evolution of arthritis in nonirradiated and irradiated hamsters infected with Borrelia burgdorferi. Nonirradiated hamsters injected in the hind paws with B. burgdorferi developed an acute inflammatory reaction involving the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and dermis. This acute inflammatory reaction was short-lived and was replaced by a mild chronic synovitis as the number of detectable spirochetes in the synovium, periarticular soft tissues, and perineurovascular areas diminished. Exposing hamsters to radiation before inoculation with B. burgdorferi exacerbated and prolonged the acute inflammatory phase. Spirochetes also persisted longer in the periarticular soft tissues. A major histopathologic finding was destructive and erosive bone changes of the hind paws, which resulted in deformation of the joints. These studies should be helpful in defining the immune mechanism participating in the onset, progression, and resolution of Lyme arthritis.