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Sample records for arthritis juvenile rheumatoid

  1. JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I N Sartika

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA is the most common rheumatic condition in children. JRA is defined as persistent arthritis in 1 or more joints for at least 6 weeks, with the onset before age 16 years. The etiology of JRA is unknown. Antigen activated CD4+ T cell stimulate monocytes, macrophages, and synovial fibroblasts to produce the cytokines Interleukin-1 (IL-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF-? and to secrete matrix metalloproteinases, which lead to chronic inflammation due to infiltration of inflammatory cell, angiogenesis, destruction of cartilage and bone with pannus formation. The 3 major subtypes of JRA are based on the symptoms at disease onset and are designated systemic onset, pauciarticular onset, and polyarticular onset. For all patients, the goals of therapy are to decrease chronic joint pain and suppress the inflammatory process. Poor prognostic have been observed in patients with polyarticular onset, rheumatoid factor, persistent morning stiffness, tenosynovitis, involvement of the small joints, rapid appearance of erosions, active late onset childhood, subcutaneous nodules, or antinuclear antibody.

  2. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the spectrum of clinical presentation, laboratory parameters and drug therapy in patients with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA). Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: The Children's Hospital and The Institute of Child Health, Lahore, from October 2008 to October 2011. Methodology: All patients who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for JRA were enrolled. Their clinical features, investigations done and treatment received for JRA were noted. Statistical analysis of data was done on SPSS version 16.0 for obtaining descriptive statistics. Results: Out of 185 patients, 50.3% (n = 93) were females; 54% (n = 100) were between 10 - 15 years of age. Polyarthritis was found in 71.9% (n = 133) followed by oligoarthritis (22.7%, n = 42) and systemic onset disease (5.4%, n = 10). Morning stiffness (78%) and fever (68%) were the most common clinical presentations. All patients with systemic onset disease had fever (n = 10) followed by skin rash, hepatosplenomegaly and lymphadenopathy. Uveitis was found in 2 patients, and both belonged to the oligoarticular group. Rheumatoid factor was found in 10.27% (n = 19) of all patients. All patients were given non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Disease modifying agents (methotrexate) were given to 43.8% (n = 81). Steroids were used in 61% (n = 113) of patients either with NSAIDs alone or NSAIDs plus methotrexate. Conclusion: Disease profile of JRA at the study centre showed that polyarthritis is the commonest type. Recognition of subtypes will help in planning the management of these patients. (author)

  3. GANGGUAN PERTUMBUHAN MANDIBULA PADA JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Ria Puspitawati

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is a systemic disease on childhood, which has chronic arthritis as its most prominent manifestation. One very common complication of JRA is growth disturbance. JRA involving temporomandibular joint usually result in mandibular growth retardation which eventually can lead to micrognathia, retrognathia, malocclusion and other mandibulofacial developmental aberrations. Factors considered to be the cause of these growth and developmental disturbances are: conge...

  4. GANGGUAN PERTUMBUHAN MANDIBULA PADA JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Puspitawati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA is a systemic disease on childhood, which has chronic arthritis as its most prominent manifestation. One very common complication of JRA is growth disturbance. JRA involving temporomandibular joint usually result in mandibular growth retardation which eventually can lead to micrognathia, retrognathia, malocclusion and other mandibulofacial developmental aberrations. Factors considered to be the cause of these growth and developmental disturbances are: congenital, the disease's direct effect on the condyle, functional deficiency of the temporomandibular joint, duration, age of disease onset and type of the JRA and corticosteroid therapy. However, the mechanism for the mandibulofacial growth and developmental aberrations due to JRA are not fully understood. This literature review will discuss the hypotheses concerning mechanisms of those growth and developmental disturbances, especially based on clinical and radiographic studies on JRA cases.

  5. Home Care Guide on Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (For Parents).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesecke, Linda L.; And Others

    The booklet, written by the medical staff of a children's hospital, provides information for parents of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). Arthritis is a swelling of the joint(s) in children and lasts for over 6 weeks (sometimes many years). Aspirin is the main medicine given for JRA, and it works not only to control pain but also,…

  6. Periodontal and hematological characteristics associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Westergaard, Jytte; Stoltze, Kaj;

    2006-01-01

    Periodontitis shares several clinical and pathogenic characteristics with chronic arthritis, and there is some degree of coexistence. The aims of this study were to elucidate whether patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP), juvenile...... idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) share periodontal and hematological characteristics distinguishing them from individuals free of diseases....

  7. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It ... illness . This means the body attacks and destroys healthy body ...

  8. Cytokine profiles in peripheral blood and whole blood cell cultures associated with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Sørensen, Lars Korsbaek; Stoltze, Kaj; Bendtzen, Klaus; Holmstrup, Palle

    2005-01-01

    Cytokines play a key role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. An obvious question is whether patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, or rheumatoid arthritis share blood cytokine profiles distinguishing them from individuals free of disease....

  9. Total elbow arthroplasty in patients who have juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, P M; Morrey, B F

    1998-05-01

    Patients who have juvenile rheumatoid arthritis often are seen at a very young age because of severe stiffness and pain in several joints. While total elbow replacement may be indicated in these patients, this procedure is difficult to perform because of contracture of the soft tissues and the extremely small bones and intramedullary cavities in these patients. As there is little information in the literature regarding this procedure, we attempted to learn about the long-term results by evaluating nineteen patients (twenty-four elbows) with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis who had been managed with total elbow arthroplasty. At an average of 7.4 years (range, two to fourteen years) after the operation, there was an improvement in the average Mayo elbow performance score from 31 points (range, 5 to 55 points) preoperatively to 90 points (range, 55 to 100 points). Twenty-two (96 per cent) of the twenty-three elbows available at the most recent follow-up evaluation caused little or no pain, but the improvement in the range of motion was not as reliable. The average arc of flexion improved from only 63 degrees preoperatively to 90 degrees postoperatively; the average postoperative arc of flexion began at 35 degrees, with additional flexion to 125 degrees. Examination of the four elbows that had been ankylosed before the procedure revealed an average arc of 73 degrees after the operation, and evaluation of the twenty ipsilateral wrists that were not limited by disease revealed that pronation and supination had been maintained. The average functional score improved from 9 points (range, 0 to 25 points) preoperatively to 23 points (range, 15 to 25 points) postoperatively (p olecranon, subluxation of the prosthesis, stiffness of the elbow, and problems with wound-healing, led to an additional operative procedure but did not adversely affect the long-term outcome after appropriate diagnosis and treatment. Late complications (aseptic loosening, instability, and worn bushings

  10. Anti-chromatin antibodies in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

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    V. Gerloni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of anti-chromatin antibodies (Abs in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA. Methods: IgG anti-chromatin Abs were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, in sera of 94 children with JRA (10 children with systemic, 38 with polyarticular and 46 with oligoarticular disease onset. As control group, 33 age- and-sex-matched healthy children (HC were also examined. Results: Abs to chromatin were detected in 24/94 (25,5% of children suffering from JRA. Particularly, the higher prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in children with oligoarticular (30,4% and polyarticular (23,7% onset JRA. In these groups Abs titers were significantly higher compared to systemic JRA and HC (p=0.003. Anti-chromatin Abs were observed more frequently in patients with oligoarticular disease and chronic uveitis (21,7%. Furthermore, higher levels of anti-chromatin Abs has been found in all the patients treated with anti-TNFα therapy (p<0.0001. Conclusions: our results confirm previous data about the prevalence of anti-chromatin Abs in JRA. These Abs were significantly higher in the group of patients with oligoarticular onset with past or present hystory of ocular involvement and in the group with polyarticular JRA treated with biologic therapy. A long-term follow-up study could be useful to evaluate the potential utility of these autoantibodies.

  11. Family Health and Characteristics in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Emotional Disorders of Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Luiza; Garralda, M. Elena; Jeffs, Jim; Rose, Gillian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare family health and characteristics in children with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), and emotional disorders. Method: Parents of 28 children and adolescents aged 11 to 18 years with CFS, 30 with JRA, and 27 with emotional disorders (i.e., anxiety and/or depressive disorders) were…

  12. Do You Have a Child with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis in Your Class?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Jean; Fujishige, Carole

    The booklet provides information to help teachers understand juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). JRA is a chronic disease involving one or more joint(s); its cause is unknown. The five types of JRA are monarticular, pauciarticular of young girls, pauciarticular of boys, polyarticular, and systemic. Aspirin is the main treatment medication and…

  13. Radiographic abnormalities of the wrist in adult-onset still disease: Comparison with juvenile chronic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pericapitate involvement of the wrist has been described as characteristic of adult-onset Still disease, a relatively rare disorder that is often diagnosed by exclusion after extensive and frequently invasive tests. To evaluate the diagnostic value of carpal radiography in cases of adult-onset Still disease, a retrospective blinded analysis of 48 patients, 16 each with adult-onset Still disease, juvenile chronic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis, was performed. Pericapitate articular alterations without radiocarpal involvement were found to be frequent in the setting of adult-onset Still disease but distinctly unusual among patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In juvenile chronic arthritis, severe pericapitate involvement was frequent, but generally occurred in conjunction with radiocarpal joint abnormalities

  14. A report on clinical application of 99Tc-MDP treatment in patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To asses clinical application of the Yunke therapy and observe the early curative effect in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: 9 patients of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis were enrolled. The age ranged 4.5-16 years old with medical history ranged 3-12 months. All patients had been treated using Yunke therapy. A high dose of 100 mg or 200 mg was given by intravenous infusion in alternative day for 2 to 3 times during the first course of treatment. Then a small dose of 5 mg alternate day was given by intravenous injection for 10-15 times during the second course and the treatment phase continue for 2-3 courses. Results: Significance curative effect was observed in all cases. Conclusion: Early clinical effect of the Yunke therapy was obvious in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. It was necessary that a specific dose be used for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

  15. Kre-Celazine(®) as a viable treatment for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis/juvenile idiopathic arthritis - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golini, Jeff; Jones, Wendy Lou

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether an oral, non-prescription, nutritional supplement compound composed of a proprietary alkali-buffered creatine monohydrate and cetylated fatty acids mixture (Kre-Celazine(®)) was efficacious in reducing or eliminating refractory pain and inflammation, without untoward effects, in Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA), which is also called Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). JRA/JIA is a patho-physiologically complex, chronic childhood autoimmune inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. Numerous studies have unsuccessfully attempted to pinpoint a possible common initiation event. Officially considered an affliction of children below the age of 16 years, an initial diagnosis has been confirmed in infants less than 1 year old, to individuals older then 17 years. In this study, sixteen juveniles, ages 7 through 16 years, experiencing long-standing, unremitting pain and inflammation despite previous use of prescription anti-inflammatory drugs and NSAIDs, were enrolled in a 30-day, open-label clinical study and treated with Kre-Celazine. Efficacy of this nutritional supplement was determined by the juvenile's personal physician and based on observations of the following: (1) significant reduction or elimination of palpable signs of inflammation; (2) renormalization of range of motion; (3) reduction or absence of perceived pain as reported to the physician by the patient; (4) renormalization of C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) values. In addition, the individual's previous steroid or non-steroidal anti-inflamatory medication(s) were reduced or eliminated in a stepwise progressive fashion during the study. PMID:24896807

  16. Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  17. Devastating Effect of Uncontrolled Corticosteroid Usage: Severe Growth Retardation in Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Aydın

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A 22-year-old male patient was admitted to the hospital with complaints of retardation in physical and sexual development. He had been diagnosed with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis 15 years previously and treated with salicylazosulfapyridine 2x2 g and 30 mg prednisolone daily since diagnosis. His height was 109 cm (less than 3rd percentile, and his weight was 24 kg (less than 3rd percentile. He had no beard, mustache, axillary, or pubic hair, and had a cushingoid appearence. He had neither erection nor ejaculation. Growth retardation has been shown in patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. This undesired effect may be due to both severe chronic inflammation and to long-term usage of corticosteroids. Corticosteroids can cause inhibition of pubertal and sexual development by affecting directly or indirectly all components of brain-pituitary-gonad axis. We report this patient to emphasize that although corticosteroids are effective in the treatment of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, they may have devastating effects on the physical, sexual, and psychological development when used in high doses.Turk Jem 2008; 12: 57-9

  18. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  19. Radiographic temporomandibular joint abnormality in adults with micrognathia and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographic findings of the upper and lower jaw bone of 20 adult patients with micrognathia, bird face, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis are reported. In all patients a symmetrically underdeveloped mandible with the chin posteriorly positioned was found at cephalometry. Arthritic lesion of the temporomandibular joint, mostly symmetric, with limitation of movement and secondary arthrosis, was observed in all patients. Complete absence of the mandibular head was frequent (75%). The fossa was generally flat, probably due to growth disturbance of the tubercle. Abnormal anterior position of the mandibular head occurred in almost half of the patients. The degree of mandibular growth disturbance seemed to be correlated to the severity of the arthritis, indicating the arthritis to be a causal mechanism of micrognathia. (Auth.)

  20. Radiographic temporomandibular joint abnormality in adults with micrognathia and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larheim, T.A.; Haanaes, H.R.; Dale, K. (Oslo Univ. (Norway))

    1981-01-01

    Radiographic findings of the upper and lower jaw bone of 20 adult patients with micrognathia, bird face, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis are reported. In all patients a symmetrically underdeveloped mandible with the chin posteriorly positioned was found at cephalometry. Arthritic lesion of the temporomandibular joint, mostly symmetric, with limitation of movement and secondary arthrosis, was observed in all patients. Complete absence of the mandibular head was frequent (75%). The fossa was generally flat, probably due to growth disturbance of the tubercle. Abnormal anterior position of the mandibular head occurred in almost half of the patients. The degree of mandibular growth disturbance seemed to be correlated to the severity of the arthritis, indicating the arthritis to be a causal mechanism of micrognathia.

  1. Devastating Effect of Uncontrolled Corticosteroid Usage: Severe Growth Retardation in Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Yusuf Aydın1; Dilek Berker; İhsan Üstün; Halil Kutlu Erol; Kamile Gül; Mustafa Ünal; Tuncay Delibaşı; Serdar Güler

    2008-01-01

    A 22-year-old male patient was admitted to the hospital with complaints of retardation in physical and sexual development. He had been diagnosed with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis 15 years previously and treated with salicylazosulfapyridine 2x2 g and 30 mg prednisolone daily since diagnosis. His height was 109 cm (less than 3rd percentile), and his weight was 24 kg (less than 3rd percentile). He had no beard, mustache, axillary, or pubic hair, and had a cushingoid appearence. He had neither e...

  2. Quality of Life After TKA for Patients With Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoch, Earl R.

    2008-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty frequently is required during early adulthood in patients with advanced juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. We queried patients on issues of importance to them, asked whether they were satisfied with surgical outcomes, and ascertained their postoperative status. We retrospectively reviewed 14 adult patients (22 knees) with severe juvenile rheumatoid arthritis who were treated with primary total knee arthroplasty between 1989 and 2001. All patients were evaluated by pain and stiffness visual analog scales, range of motion, the Patient-Specific Index, Hospital for Special Surgery knee score, WOMAC Osteoarthritis Index, EuroQuol in five dimensions, and SF-36 Health Survey. Preoperative scores were assessed by recall. Patients had a minimum followup of 2 years (mean, 8 years; range, 2–13 years). Quality of life improved after TKA as measured by the Patient-Specific Index. Eighteen of 22 patients rated themselves satisfied with the functional outcome of their surgery; all patients were satisfied with pain relief. Final SF-36, EuroQuol in five dimensions, and WOMAC scores were low compared with age-matched population norms. A mean postoperative flexion arc of 77° (range, 30°–130°) was observed. Total knee arthroplasty had a major positive impact on quality of life as reported by patients. Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18196390

  3. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arthritis Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Rheumatoid Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: ... 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  4. A 21-Year-Old Man with Systemic-Onset Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Cough and Progressive Dyspnea

    OpenAIRE

    A Leber; Carette, S; KR Chapman; DM Hwang; LG Singer; TK Marras

    2010-01-01

    Primary or nonobstructive, endogenous lipoid pneumonia is a rare clinical entity usually associated with an underlying systemic disease. The present report describes a case involving a 21-year-old man with systemic-onset juvenile rheumatoid arthritis who developed primary endogenous lipoid pneumonia. Multiple treatment regimens were attempted; however, definitive management was only achieved through double-lung transplantation.

  5. A 21-Year-Old Man with Systemic-Onset Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Cough and Progressive Dyspnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Leber

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary or nonobstructive, endogenous lipoid pneumonia is a rare clinical entity usually associated with an underlying systemic disease. The present report describes a case involving a 21-year-old man with systemic-onset juvenile rheumatoid arthritis who developed primary endogenous lipoid pneumonia. Multiple treatment regimens were attempted; however, definitive management was only achieved through double-lung transplantation.

  6. A 21-year-old man with systemic-onset juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, cough and progressive dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leber, A; Carette, S; Chapman, K R; Hwang, D M; Singer, L G; Marras, T K

    2010-01-01

    Primary or nonobstructive, endogenous lipoid pneumonia is a rare clinical entity usually associated with an underlying systemic disease. The present report describes a case involving a 21-year-old man with systemic-onset juvenile rheumatoid arthritis who developed primary endogenous lipoid pneumonia. Multiple treatment regimens were attempted; however, definitive management was only achieved through double-lung transplantation. PMID:20617213

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid ...

  10. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in velo-cardio-facial syndrome: Coincidence of unusual complication?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, S.A.; Williams, C.A.; Gray, B.A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-06

    We report on two patients with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA). The first, a 9-year-old girl, presented with microcephaly, characteristic face, congenital heart disease, and velopharyngeal insufficiency. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) study showed deletion of D22S75 (N25), confirming the diagnosis of VCFS. At age 7, she developed joint pain, and polyarticular JRA was diagnosed. Awareness of this case led to the subsequent diagnosis of VCFS (also confirmed by FISH) in another, unrelated 12-year-old girl with characteristic face, hypernasal speech, and obesity. JRA was first diagnosed in this case at age 5 years, and she subsequently developed severe polyarticular disease. Neither patient had clinical or laboratory evidence of immunodeficiency. This observation represents the first report of the association of JRA with VCFS and raises the question of whether this is a coincidental association or a rare complication of this condition. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Rheumatic patients at work : a study of labour force participations and its determinants in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and juvenile chronic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Chorus, A.M.J.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis at the University of Maastricht, defended at May 7, 2004, yields several important and new findings with regard to work related quality of life, participation in the labour force and its determinants of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) in the Netherlands. The four research questions were: 1. What is the importance of paid work for the quality of life of patients with rheumatic diseases; 2. To what extent do p...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression in Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of ...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Corner / Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of ...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). You will learn how the diagnosis of RA is made, what happens to your ... Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? ...

  17. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... causes pressure on the nearby nerve. How Rheumatoid Arthritis is Diagnosed The diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Print All Open All Close All Description Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that causes chronic abnormal inflammation, ...

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

  20. Inter- and intrareader variability in the interpretation of two radiographic classification systems for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the inter- and intrareader variability for interpretation of a modified Larsen's radiographic classification system for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) focused on osteochondral lesions and a conventional Larsen's classification system, compared to a reference MR scoring system of corresponding images. Seventy-five radiographs of 60 children with JRA, performed within a short interval of time from the MR examinations, were independently evaluated by three experienced radiologists, three diagnostic imaging residents and three rheumatologists, in two separate sessions, according to the two different classification methods, blinded to the corresponding MR images. The inter- and intrareader concordance rates between the two radiographic classification systems and the MR-related radiographs were respectively poor and poor/moderate. The interobserver range of weighted kappa values for the conventional and the modified Larsen's system respectively was 0.25-0.37 vs 0.19-0.39 for radiologists, 0.25-0.37 vs 0.18-0.30 for residents and 0.19-0.51 vs 0.17-0.29 for rheumatologists. The intrareader rate ranged from 0.17-0.55 for radiologists, 0.2-0.56 for residents, and 0.14-0.59 for rheumatologists. Although the proposal of a new radiographic classification system for JRA focused on osteochondral abnormalities sounds promising, the low inter- and intrareader concordance rates with an MR-related radiographic system makes the clinical applicability of such a radiographic system less suitable. (orig.)

  1. Inter- and intrareader variability in the interpretation of two radiographic classification systems for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Andrea S.; Castro, Claudio C. de; Sernik, Renato A.; Vitule, Luis F.; Arantes, Paula R.; Lucato, Leandro; Germano, Marco A.N.; Cerri, Giovanni G. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Heart Institute (InCor) and Radiology Institute (InRad), Hospital das Clinicas da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Kiss, Maria Helena B. [Division of Rheumatology, Children' s Institute, Hospital das Clinicas da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Silva, Carlos H.M. [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade Federal de Uberlandia MG, Uberlandia (Brazil); Zerbini, Cristiano A.F. [Division of Rheumatology, Hospital Heliopolis, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate the inter- and intrareader variability for interpretation of a modified Larsen's radiographic classification system for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) focused on osteochondral lesions and a conventional Larsen's classification system, compared to a reference MR scoring system of corresponding images. Seventy-five radiographs of 60 children with JRA, performed within a short interval of time from the MR examinations, were independently evaluated by three experienced radiologists, three diagnostic imaging residents and three rheumatologists, in two separate sessions, according to the two different classification methods, blinded to the corresponding MR images. The inter- and intrareader concordance rates between the two radiographic classification systems and the MR-related radiographs were respectively poor and poor/moderate. The interobserver range of weighted kappa values for the conventional and the modified Larsen's system respectively was 0.25-0.37 vs 0.19-0.39 for radiologists, 0.25-0.37 vs 0.18-0.30 for residents and 0.19-0.51 vs 0.17-0.29 for rheumatologists. The intrareader rate ranged from 0.17-0.55 for radiologists, 0.2-0.56 for residents, and 0.14-0.59 for rheumatologists. Although the proposal of a new radiographic classification system for JRA focused on osteochondral abnormalities sounds promising, the low inter- and intrareader concordance rates with an MR-related radiographic system makes the clinical applicability of such a radiographic system less suitable. (orig.)

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

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    Full Text Available ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Webcasts / Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos ... member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain and Depression ...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Institutes Office of the Director 27 Institutes and Centers that make up the NIH About Mission The NIH ... arthritis is an inflammatory disease affecting about 1.3 million adults, and causes pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function in the joints. Several ...

  5. Lack of hidden complement fixing IgM rheumatoid factor in adult seronegative rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Robbins, D L; Moore, T L

    1980-01-01

    IgM rheumatoid factors capable of complement fixation and activation are commonly present in the sera of adults with rheumatoid arthritis. Hidden complement fixing IgM rheumatoid factor has been demonstrated in the majority of patients with juvenile RA and hidden agglutinating IgM rheumatoid factors have been demonstrated in the serum of adults with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis. We studied 27 adults with seronegative rheumatoid arthritis and were unable to demonstrate hidden complement f...

  6. The significance of elevated serologic markers of celiac disease in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Mayouf Sulaiman

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of celiac disease (CD in a group of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA and determine the correlation between the presence of the serologic markers and the histological diagnosis of CD. Patients and Methods : Forty-two children (24 females with JRA, aged between 5-15 years underwent study of serologic markers for CD (gliadin-IgA, gliadin-IgG, reticulin and endomysium-IgA antibodies. Endoscopic intestinal biopsy was performed in patients who had positive serologic markers for CD. The diagnosis of CD was based on the classic finding of villous atrophy and crypt hypertrophy. Results: Eighteen patients (42.8% had serologic markers for CD; ten of them with a systemic form, five with a polyarticular form and three with a pauciarticular form of JRA. Levels of AGA -IgG were high in 14 patients (77.8%, four patients (22.2% had high levels of AGA-IgA and seven patients (38.9% had anti-endomysium antibodies (AEA. One patient had anti-reticulin antibodies (ARA 5.5%. Sixteen patients underwent intestinal biopsy; in only one patient with AEA antibodies (2.38%, biopsy revealed typical finding of CD. The patient with CD showed improvement in both growth parameter as well as articular symptoms after starting gluten-free diet Conclusion: Our study shows that the screening for silent CD among children with JRA may be useful. Those patients with AEA need further follow up since these antibodies are quite sensitive and specific for CD

  7. Bone mineral density in children with systemic lupus erythematosus and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although there is increasing interest in bone metabolism in patients with rheumatic disorders, few data exist on bone mineral density (BMD) in children with rheumatic disorders or on the association of BMD with disease-related variables. We determined BMD in Iranian children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) to evaluate the relationship between disease related variables and BMD. Twenty patients (13 girls and 7 boys) with SLE (n=5) and JRA (n=5) with a mean age of 13.10+-3.29 years (range, 6-17 years), attending a pediatric rheumatology clinic and 20 healthy controls (matched for age and sex with each patient) were enrolled in a cross-sectional study between 2001 and 2003. BMD (g/cm) of the femoral neck (BMD-F) and lumbar vertebrae (BMD-L) were measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). The correlation between BMD and cumulative dose of steroids, daily dose of steroid, disease duration, disease activity, height, weight and age was investigated. BMD in the patients (BMD-F=0.72+-0.15, BMD-L=0.70+-0.19) was significantly lower than controls (BMD-F=0.95+-0.17, BMD-L=0.98+-0.20, P<0.001). The severity of decreased BMD was more prominent in lumbar vertebrae than the femoral neck (P=0.04). None of the variables were consistently related to decrease in BMD. BMD was significantly lower in patients compared with controls. It was more prominent in lumbar vertebrae (trabecular bone). Although cumulative doses of steroids and disease duration appeared to have some influence on BMD, none were independently correlated with BMD. (author)

  8. Biologic therapy of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanov Nemanja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and juvenile idiopathic/rheumatoid arthritis (JIA are chronic, inflammatory, systemic, auto-immune diseases characterized by chronic arthritis leading to progressive joint erosions. The individual functional and social impact of rheumatoid arthritis is of great importance. Disability and joint damage occur rapidly and early in the course of the disease. The remarkably improved outcomes have been achieved initiating biologic therapy with close monitoring of disease progression. Biologic agents are drugs, usually proteins, which can influence chronic immune dysregulation resulting in chronic arthritis. According to the mechanism of action these drugs include: 1 anti-TNF drugs (etanercept, infiximab, adalimumab; 2 IL-1 blocking drugs (anakinra; 3 IL-6 blocking drugs (tocilizumab; 4 agents blocking selective co-stimulation modulation (abatacept; 5 CD 20 blocking drugs (rituximab. Biologics targeting TNF-alpha with methotrexate have revolutionized the treatment of RA, producing significant improvement in clinical, radiographic, and functional outcomes not seen previously. The new concept of rheumatoid arthritis treatment defines early diagnosis, early aggressive therapy with optimal doses of disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs and, if no improvement has been achieved during six months, early introduction of biologic drugs. The three-year experience of biologic therapy in Serbia has shown a positive effect on disease outcome.

  9. Biologic therapies for juvenile arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, N; Jackson, G.; Gardner-Medwin, J.

    2003-01-01

    A group of therapies with exciting potential has emerged for children and young people with severe juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) uncontrolled by conventional disease modifying drugs. Theoretical understanding from molecular biologic research has identified specific targets within pathophysiological pathways that control rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and JIA. This review identifies the pathways of autoimmunity to begin to show how biologic agents have been produced to replicate, mimic, or bl...

  10. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are available, what is happening in the immune system and what other conditions are associated with RA. ... Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Immune System Don’t have SilverLight? Get it here. Updated: ...

  11. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of RA is made, what happens to your joints, what treatments are available, what is happening in ... Diagnosis Rheumatoid Arthritis: What is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist ...

  12. Occupational therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Schaardenburg, D.J. van; Kuyk, M.A.H. Van; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    Background: For persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the physical, personal, familial, social and vocational consequences are extensive. Occupational therapy (OT), with the aim to facilitate task performance and to decrease the consequences of rheumatoid arthritis for daily life activities, is considered to be a cornerstone in the management of rheumatoid arthritis. Till now the efficacy of occupational therapy for patients with rheumatoid arthritis on functional performance and social part...

  13. Overview of the radiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plain films remain the basic tool for diagnosis and follow-up evaluation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In this paper, we review the new classification of JIA: systemic arthritis, oligoarthritis (persistent), oligoarthritis (extended), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor negative), polyarticular arthritis (rheumatoid factor positive), enthesitis related arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and unclassified arthritis. We will also review regional abnormalities of three stages: an early stage, an intermediate stage, a late stage, as well as the differential diagnosis

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic Arthritis 101 ... Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of ...

  15. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult Patients with Arthritis Complementary and Alternative Medicine for ... Patient Update Transitioning the JRA Patient to an Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information ...

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ... Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Johns Hopkins ...

  17. Septic arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Ahaideb Abdulaziz

    2008-01-01

    Abstract There is an increasing number of rheumatoid patients who get septic arthritis. Chronic use of steroids is one of the important predisposing factors. The clinical picture of septic arthritis is different in immunocompromised patients like patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The diagnosis and management are discussed in this review article.

  18. Elevated rheumatoid factor and long term risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sune F; Bojesen, Stig E; Schnohr, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis.......To test whether elevated concentration of rheumatoid factor is associated with long term development of rheumatoid arthritis....

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis and Complementary Health Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... T U V W X Y Z Rheumatoid Arthritis: In Depth Share: On This Page Key Points ... help ensure coordinated and safe care. About Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory autoimmune disease—a ...

  20. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and small joints of the legs and arms, as well as the jaw and neck. Pauciarticular JIA involves 4 or less ...

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... any advice you receive from your rheumatologist. Click A Link Below To Play Rheumatoid Arthritis: Symptoms and ... About Victoria Ruffing, RN Ms. Ruffing has been a member of the Arthritis Center since 2000, currently ...

  2. Clotrimazole in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Wojtulewski, J. A.; Gow, P J; Walter, J; Grahame, R; Gibson, T.; Panayi, G S; Mason, J.

    1980-01-01

    Forty-seven patients with active rheumatoid arthritis took part in an 8-week controlled study in which clotrimazole was compared with a standard nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent, ketoprofen. Although clotrimazole was shown to be effective in the treatment of the disease and superior to ketoprofen in certain measurements, if was also responsible for a high incidence of adverse effects. Improvement with clotrimazole took place more slowly but was more sustained than with ketoprofen. A signi...

  3. Etanercept In the treatment of AA-amyloidosis in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Mihels

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study effect of etanercept, an antagonist of serum A amyloid production in the AA amyloidosis treatment in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA. Material and methods. Etanercept was administered to all pts with AA amyloidosis admitted to Garmisch-Paterkirchen pediatric rheumatological clinic beginning with 2000. C-reactive protein (CRP, degree of proteinuria and serum creatinin were used as preliminary outcome measures. Results. 11 pts with seronegative JIA (6 boys and 5 girls were included in the study. Mean follow up duration was l,9±l.01 years. 8 children had systemic, 2 - olygoarticular and one - polyarticular disease onset. Before the study all pts had CRP level elevation (1,03-8,29 mg/dl, mean 4,53 mg/dl. 8 from 11 had marked proteinuria (364-7400 mg/24 hours, mean 1186 mg/24 hours. 2 from 11 had serum creatinin elevation. During etanercept treatment CRP level normalized in 2 and significantly decreased in 4 pts. Proteinuria decreased in 4 from 8 pts. Significant change of creatinin level was not achieved. One girl who did not have improvement during etanercept treatment showed CRP normalization and decrease of proteinuria when the drug was changed to infliximab. Conclusion. Treatment with etanercept provided improvement in almost 2/3 from 11 pts with JIA and AA amyloidosis. Etanercept may be the drug of choice in pts with normal creatinine level in the absence of proteinuria. When it fails another tumor necrosis factor antagonist such as infliximab should be used. It is necessary to extend volume and duration of the study to get more reliable data on etanercept efficacy in JIA pts with AA amyloidosis.

  4. Current Treatments for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    AlbertoMartini

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) differs markedly from adult rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is not a single disease, but an exclusion diagnosis that gather together all forms of arthritis that begin before the age of 16 years, persist for more than 6 weeks, and are of unknown origin. The advent of the new biological treatments has dramatically changed both the observed responses to treatment and the expectations of therapies. The implementation of an adequate legislation as well as the ...

  5. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Definition and classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslandre, C

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of diseases defined by the presence of arthritis of more than 6weeks duration in patients aged less than 16years and with unknown etiology. The international classification based on clinical and biological criteria define each type of JIA: systemic, oligoarticular, polyarticular with and without rheumatoid factor, enthesitis-related arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. However, some discussions persist concerning systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, whose clinical symptoms and pathogenic mechanisms are quite similar to those observed in autoinflammatory diseases, arthritis with antinuclear factors (poly- and oligoarticular) that could be considered as a homogenous group, and a family history of psoriasis that frequently led to unclassified arthritis. Better knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms should improve the initial clinical classification with more homogeneous groups of patients and reduce the number of unclassified cases of arthritis. PMID:26968301

  6. Occupational therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steultjens, E.M.J.; Dekker, J.; Bouter, L.M.; Schaardenburg, D.J. van; Kuyk, M.A.H. van; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    Background: For persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the physical, personal, familial, social and vocational consequences are extensive. Occupational therapy (OT), with the aim to facilitate task performance and to decrease the consequences of rheumatoid arthritis for daily life activities, is con

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    OpenAIRE

    Jiří Kaas; Valérie Tóthová; Lukáš Martinek

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustio...

  8. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit this page to Yahoo! Buzz '); document.write(' Rank this page on Digg '); document.write(' Bookmark this ... her normal activities. What Are Researchers Trying to Learn About Juvenile Arthritis? Scientists are looking for the ...

  9. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND PREGNANCY

    OpenAIRE

    N M Kosheleva; E. V. Matyanova

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) generally starts at the age when many women have already become mothers; however, it may occur in childhood or adolescence. Furthermore, there has been recently a women’s tendency to plan pregnacy for a more mature age, which necessitates a discussion about gestation in this disease. Investigation of mechanisms pregnancy can influence the development of RA both in the gestation and long-term periods is of important theoretical and practical value. The results of thes...

  10. A case with Trico-rhino-phalangeal syndrome type 1 case with a preliminary diagnosis of Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Cevit

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Thrico-rhino-falangeal syndrome is a rare disease characterized by a bulbous nose, sparse hairs, a long flat philtrum, and epiphyseal coning. We describe here in a 15 year old girl with Thrico-rhino-falangeal syndrome type 1 (TRPS I. Physical examination demonstrated bulbous nose, hair abnormalities, deformity of the phalanges and winged scapulae. Genetic study and radiologic findings confirmed the diagnosis. Thrico-rhino-falangeal syndrome is characterized by musculoskeletal deformities that at the first view may simulate juvenile idiopathic arthritis. These musculoskeletal deformities could imply the differential diagnosis with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (4: 441-442

  11. Ulnar variance in children - standard measurements for evaluation of ulnar shortening in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, hereditary multiple exostosis and other bone or joint disorders in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements for radioulnar variance in adults cannot be used in children because the epiphyses are not fully ossified. We describe a method of determining ulnar variance in children by using the distance from the distal metaphysis of the radius to the distal metaphysis of the ulna. Standards for this measurement are presented for ages 1.5 to 15.5 years in boys and girls. These measurements change little with age and may be helpful in establishing shortening of the ulna which may be seen in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, hereditary multiple exostosis, or other bone and joint diseases with childhood onset. (orig.)

  12. Onset of polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis with both anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies and rheumatoid factor in a 3-year-old girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasui Kozo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report describes 3 year old girl with the unusual presentation of polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA with anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP antibodies and a positive rheumatoid factor (RF. She was initially treated with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID; ibuprofen followed by methotrexate (MTX, 10 mg/m2/week and prednisolone (0.25 mg/kg/day, but these treatments were ineffective. Administration of tocilizumab, a humanized antihuman interleukin-6 receptor monoclonal antibody, promptly improved her clinical manifestations, and she has been in complete remission (DAS28

  13. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Andrew D; Fischer, Philip R; Reed, Ann M; Wylam, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. PMID:26171269

  14. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Andrew D.; Fischer, Philip R.; Reed, Ann M.; Wylam, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  15. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  16. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed to help you learn more ... Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical Activity Role of Body Weight in ...

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take the place of any advice you receive ... Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Rehabilitation of Older Adult ...

  18. Handout on Health: Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of, and surgery for, bone and joint diseases. Physical therapists: Health professionals who work with patients to improve ... heart. Pericarditis can be caused by rheumatoid arthritis. Physical therapist. A health professional who works with patients to ...

  19. Complementary medicine in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    F. Atzeni; P Sarzi- Puttini; Lubrano, E

    2011-01-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for chronic conditions has increased in recent years. CAM is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions and patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) frequently try CAM. This review summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massag...

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis and bacterial infections

    OpenAIRE

    N L Prokopjeva; N N Vesikova; I M Marusenko; V A Ryabkov

    2008-01-01

    To study features of bacterial infections course in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and changes of laboratory measures after focus of infection sanation. Material and methods. 46 pts with definite rheumatoid arthritis were examined at the time of comorbid infection (Cl) detection and after infection focus sanation. Bacteriological test with evaluation of flora sensitivity to antibiotics by disco-diffusion method was performed at baseline and after the course of antibacterial therapy to ass...

  1. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Chang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper.

  2. Smoking and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kathleen; Yang, So Min; Kim, Seong Heon; Han, Kyoung Hee; Park, Se Jin; Shin, Jae Il

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Smoking has been implicated as one of the most important extrinsic risk factors for its development and severity. Recent developments have shed light on the pathophysiology of RA in smokers, including oxidative stress, inflammation, autoantibody formation and epigenetic changes. The association of smoking and the development of RA have been demonstrated through epidemiologic studies, as well as through in vivo and animal models of RA. With increased use of biological agents in addition to standard disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), there has been interest in how smoking affects drug response in RA treatment. Recent evidence suggests the response and drug survival in people treated with anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy is poorer in heavy smokers, and possible immunological mechanisms for this effect are presented in the current paper. PMID:25479074

  3. Early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sarzi-Puttini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic disease characterized by chronic inflammation of the synovial joints damage and loss of the function. The ultimate goal in managing RA is to prevent joint damage and to maintain functional ability. Consequently, early diagnosis and treatment is important, but predictive markers for RA are still confined to auto- antibodies and also magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and sonography do not appear to sufficiently distinguish between early RA and non RA. Evidence shows that substantial and irreversible joint damage already occurs within the first 2 years after disease onset. This “window of opportunity” hypothesis for therapeutic intervention in RA is based on the existence of a time frame within which there is a potential for a greater response to therapy, resulting in sustained benefits or, perhaps most important, a chance of cure. There is increasing evidence for beneficial effects of early DMARDs (disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs therapy over delayed treatment in patients who present with arthritis of recent onset. However, no universal consensus exists concerning the choice of initial drug or whether single drug or combination should be given as initial treatments. Most studies demonstrated superiority of aggressive over conventional approaches. Because the tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α inhibitors have proved to stop joint damage progression in severe progressive RA, the achievement of these agents in early RA are currently of great interest.

  4. Responsiveness in Rheumatoid Arthritis. A Report from the OMERACT 11 Ultrasound Workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iagnocco, Annamaria; Naredo, Esperanza; Wakefield, Richard;

    2014-01-01

    To summarize the work performed by the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Ultrasound (US) Task Force on the validity of different US measures in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) presented during the OMERACT 11 Workshop....

  5. Early identification of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nies, Jessica Annemarie Bernadette van

    2016-01-01

    The first part is focused on early recognition of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Two large early arthritis recognition clinics were started in Leiden and Groningen. The results showed that this initiative reduces the GP-delay significantly. Secondly, it was investigated whether an association between sh

  6. Radiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An introductory summary of the imaging-diagnosis will be given. The necessity of acquiring a catalogue of application to particular imaging methods is emphasized. Discussion of step by step diagnosis regarding rheumatologic questions is given on example of the hand. Technically insufficient radiographs and bad habits during diagnostic analysis are pointed out. Radiologic problems in differentiating arthritis/osteoarthrosis will be mentioned. The discussion of these points is followed by outlining the radiology of rheumatoid arthritis and the complexity of this disease. Introduction of a new stage classification. Finally twelve basic radiologic types of rheumatoid arthritis will be presented. (orig.)

  7. Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158076.html Experimental Drug for Rheumatoid Arthritis Shows Promise Baricitinib helped patients who failed other ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug to treat rheumatoid arthritis showed promise in a new six-month trial. ...

  8. Microcirculation of the juvenile knee in chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bünger, Cody; Bülow, J; Tøndevold, E;

    1986-01-01

    In order to investigate pathogenetic factors in growth abnormalities of the knee in hemophilic arthropathy and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, the hemodynamic changes of the knee following chronic synovial inflammation and elevated joint pressure were studied in puppies. Unilateral arthritis was....... The growth plates formed borders for the extension of these changes. The increased permeability and surface area between blood and bone in arthritis may accelerate the resorption and subsequent destruction of subchondral bone in chronic arthropathies of the juvenile knee....

  9. Prostaglandins and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Fattahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, autoimmune, and complex inflammatory disease leading to bone and cartilage destruction, whose cause remains obscure. Accumulation of genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, and dysregulated immune responses are necessary for mounting this self-reacting disease. Inflamed joints are infiltrated by a heterogeneous population of cellular and soluble mediators of the immune system, such as T cells, B cells, macrophages, cytokines, and prostaglandins (PGs. Prostaglandins are lipid inflammatory mediators derived from the arachidonic acid by multienzymatic reactions. They both sustain homeostatic mechanisms and mediate pathogenic processes, including the inflammatory reaction. They play both beneficial and harmful roles during inflammation, according to their site of action and the etiology of the inflammatory response. With respect to the role of PGs in inflammation, they can be effective mediators in the pathophysiology of RA. Thus the use of agonists or antagonists of PG receptors may be considered as a new therapeutic protocol in RA. In this paper, we try to elucidate the role of PGs in the immunopathology of RA.

  10. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Kosheleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA generally starts at the age when many women have already become mothers; however, it may occur in childhood or adolescence. Furthermore, there has been recently a women’s tendency to plan pregnacy for a more mature age, which necessitates a discussion about gestation in this disease. Investigation of mechanisms pregnancy can influence the development of RA both in the gestation and long-term periods is of important theoretical and practical value. The results of these investigations may be used to develop new treatments for RA and management tactics for patients during pregnancy and lactation. The  aper gives the data available in the literature on fertility in RA, impact of pregnancy on its activity and that of RA on the course and outcomes of gestation, as well as current ideas on lactation and use of oral contraceptives in RA. Particular attention is given to drug therapy in pregnant and breastfeeding women with RA: groups of anti-rheumatic drugs are considered in detail in relation to the safety of or a potential risk from their use. A therapeutic algorithm and recommendations for pregnancy planning and a follow-up of patients with RA during gestation are proposed.

  11. Successful Treatment of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis after Kidney Transplantation with Plasma Exchange and Abatacept in a Patient with Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannelore Sprenger-Mähr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS after renal transplantation is difficult to treat. Recently a series of four patients unresponsive to plasma exchange (PE and rituximab, who were successfully treated with abatacept, has been reported. We present a 26-year-old Caucasian patient who suffered from juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and developed severe proteinuria eleven days after transplantation. An allograft biopsy was suggestive of recurrent focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. He did not respond to PE therapy. A first dose of abatacept produced partial remission. Four weeks later proteinuria again increased and a second biopsy showed progression of disease. After another ineffective course of PE he was given a second dose of abatacept, which was followed by rapid, complete, and sustained resolution of proteinuria. This treatment caused a significant increase in BK and JC viremia. Whether abatacept ameliorated proteinuria via an effect on podocytes or on the patient’s primary disease remains speculative.

  12. Dietary intervention in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Jamison, Jennifer R.

    1987-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a disabling disease prevalent in modern society. Dietary prevention may be possible in a subgroup of individuals who appear to suffer food intolerance; dietary intervention, as an adjunct to other management strategies, may be useful in modifying the inflammatory response. The former suggestion is supported by anecdotal evidence; the latter by some in vitro experimentation which implicates arachidonic acid metabolism in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid tissue inflammatio...

  13. Dietetic recommendations in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Rosa Alhambra-Expósito

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic autoimmune disease that has a significant effect on patients’ physical, emotional, and social functioning. For decades, patients have used different diets to try to improve the symptoms of RA. The possible benefits of dietary therapy for rheumatoid arthritis are reviewed in this article. Nutritional objectives for RA, are to halt the loss of bone mass, promote healing of bone fractures and improving bone-associated inflammatory disorders and joints. In general, diets low in saturated fat, rich in polyunsaturated fats: omega 3 and omega 6, rich in complex carbohydrates and fiber are recommended.

  14. Pyogenic infection and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, I. F.; Deans, A. C.; Keat, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    Ten episodes of severe pyogenic infection occurring in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. There was a wide range of presenting features including pyoarthrosis in 7 episodes. Three cases presented with meningitis, bacterial endocarditis and probable multiple abscesses respectively. Infection was caused by Staphylococcus aureus in 7 episodes and by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and beta-haemolytic Streptococcus in each of one episode. Three infective episodes were fatal. Pyogenic, especially staphylococcal, infection should be considered in patients with rheumatoid arthritis with unexplained illness with or without sudden deterioration in joint symptoms. It is important to recognize and treat infection rapidly. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:3671222

  15. [Pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzberger-ten Cate, R; Fiselier, T

    1991-10-01

    On basis of clinical and immunogenetic factors most children with pauciarticular juvenile chronic arthritis can be included in one of the subtypes: type 1 and type 2 pauciarticular JCA. Type 1 occurs in young children, mainly girls, with involvement of knees, ankles or elbows. In the majority of children antinuclear antibodies can be detected. The presence of these autoantibodies is associated with chronic anterior uveitis. Type 2 or the juvenile spondylarthropathies include morbus Bechterew, the reactive arthritides and arthritis associated with psoriasis and inflammatory bowel diseases. Large joints of the lower extremities are involved, back pain is unusual at onset, but enthesitis is frequently present. There is a strong association with HLA-B27. Treatment of both subsets consists of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, application of intra-articular steroids, physio- and hydrotherapy and splinting. In children with a polyarticular course of type 1, or a prolonged course of type 2 disease modifying drugs are often needed. PMID:1957301

  16. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions juvenile idiopathic arthritis juvenile idiopathic arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Open All Close All Description Juvenile idiopathic arthritis refers to a group of conditions involving joint ...

  17. Shoulder arthography in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoulder arthrography in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis is performed to differentiate between a rheumatoid flare and limitation of motion secondary to tear in the rotator cuff. Accurate diagnosis is important because of the therapeutic implications. The arthrographic findings characteristic of rheumatoid involvement of the shoulder joint are nodular filling defects of the joint, the subacromial and subdeltoideal bursa in case of rotator cuff tear, irregular capsular attachment, contracted joint space and visualized lymphatic drainage. A dilatation of the biceps tendon sheath has not been shown. (orig.)

  18. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; Bijlsma, Johannes W J;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aiming at therapeutic targets has reduced the risk of organ failure in many diseases such as diabetes or hypertension. Such targets have not been defined for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). OBJECTIVE: /st> To develop recommendations for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes in RA. METHODS...

  19. Diagnostic Delay in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbaek, Karen; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Primdahl, Jette

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To prevent joint damage among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is a need to minimize delays from the onset of symptoms until the initiation of appropriate therapy. The present study explored the factors that have an impact on the time it takes for Danish patients with RA...

  20. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards this...

  1. Zinc sulphate in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Mattingly, P. C.; Mowat, A G

    1982-01-01

    To assess the antirheumatic activity of zinc sulphate, 27 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis took part in a 6-month, randomised, double-blind, between-group trial of oral zinc sulphate versus placebo. Twelve patients on zinc and 9 on placebo completed the trial, but no significant antirheumatic activity of zinc sulphate was demonstrated.

  2. BIOBEHAVIORAL THERAPY OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shabanova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the study is connected with need to expand the arsenal of treatment methods patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study examined the efficacy of biobehavioral therapy in a comprehensive program of treatment patients with rheumatoid arthritis (medical therapy in combination with biobehavioral therapy. It has been shown when compared with the control group (isolated drug therapy maintaining  clinical  response  in  short-term  follow-up  study  in  the  intervention  group.  Statistically    significant relationship the volitional control of the alpha rhythm of EEG (increased power of the alpha rhythm with a reduction in pain intensity in the in neurofeedback program and positive dynamics of the main characteristics of the alpha rhythm have been drmonstrated. Inclusion in the treatment program of arthritis biobehavioral approach has reduced the dose of pain medication, so reducing aggression of pharmacotherapy.

  3. Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Are Biologic Drugs Right for You? What is rheumatoid arthritis (RA)? Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a serious condition. The body’s immune system attacks the lining of ...

  4. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients. PMID:26063174

  5. Rehabilitation in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Evaggelos Giavasopoulos; Paraskevi Gourni

    2008-01-01

    Rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis aims to the management of the consequences of disease. It is widely accepted that, no drug therapy at present leads to long‐term orremission f everyone with rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.). Consequently, patients experience physical, psychological, functional, social and role negative effects of the disease. AIM : The am of the present article was to evaluate the role of rehabilitation to patients with rheumatoid arthritis sMethod and material:...

  6. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self-servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, "Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL-100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL-100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and can

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis as psychic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kaas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issue of psychic problems of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, inflammatory motor system disease with comprehensive impact on the patient's life. The disease is often considered an exclusively physical disease. But such approach is insufficient because the disease is accompanied by motor limitations of different intensities, by pain and by fatigue that cause considerable exhaustion to the patient. The patients often must give up their hobbies and in some cases even their jobs. In most serious cases, even common daily activities including self–servicing actions become an obstacle to the patient. It is therefore logical that the psyche of a patient with such disease is considerably strained. One of the partial goals of the study consisted in mapping the subjectively perceived quality of life of rheumatoid arthritis patients in facet 8, "negative feelings", and in ascertaining whether there is statistically significant relation to facets 1, "pain and discomfort", and 2, "energy and fatigue". Another goal consisted in comparing the subjectively perceived quality of life between men and women with rheumatoid arthritis, as well as between population of rheumatoid arthritis patients and control healthy population. The study was implemented within the research project of the Grant Agency of the University of South Bohemia in České Budějovice number 120/2012/S, „Reflection of quality of life in nursing", under use of two standardized questionnaires, WHOQOL–100 and HAQ. This article presents exclusively the data acquired based on the WHOQOL–100 questionnaire. The research set consisted of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis from all over the Czech Republic. The size of the set was determined by a statistician at 200 individuals suffering from the disease, in a ratio of 150 women and 50 men. The selection set was derived from the basic set of rheumatoid arthritis patients and

  8. Tyrosine kinases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobayashi Akiko

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory, polyarticular joint disease. A number of cellular responses are involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, including activation of inflammatory cells and cytokine expression. The cellular responses involved in each of these processes depends on the specific signaling pathways that are activated; many of which include protein tyrosine kinases. These pathways include the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, Janus kinases/signal transducers and activators transcription pathway, spleen tyrosine kinase signaling, and the nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathway. Many drugs are in development to target tyrosine kinases for the treatment of RA. Based on the number of recently published studies, this manuscript reviews the role of tyrosine kinases in the pathogenesis of RA and the potential role of kinase inhibitors as new therapeutic strategies of RA.

  9. Pyogenic infection and rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rowe, I F; Deans, A. C.; Keat, A C

    1987-01-01

    Ten episodes of severe pyogenic infection occurring in nine patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. There was a wide range of presenting features including pyoarthrosis in 7 episodes. Three cases presented with meningitis, bacterial endocarditis and probable multiple abscesses respectively. Infection was caused by Staphylococcus aureus in 7 episodes and by Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and beta-haemolytic Streptococcus in each of one episode. Three infective ep...

  10. Socioeconomic status and risk of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line Merete Blak; Jacobsen, Søren; Klarlund, Mette;

    2006-01-01

    To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association.......To examine whether markers of socioeconomic status (SES) are associated with risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and if so, whether selected lifestyle-related factors could explain this association....

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis and bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N L Prokopjeva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To study features of bacterial infections course in pts with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and changes of laboratory measures after focus of infection sanation. Material and methods. 46 pts with definite rheumatoid arthritis were examined at the time of comorbid infection (Cl detection and after infection focus sanation. Bacteriological test with evaluation of flora sensitivity to antibiotics by disco-diffusion method was performed at baseline and after the course of antibacterial therapy to assess its efficacy. Hemogram, serum fibrinogen, rheumatoid factor, circulating immune complexes (CIC, C-reactive protein levels were assessed. Serum interleukin (IL 1(3, IL6 and neopterin concentrations were examined by immune-enzyme assay in a part of pts. Typical clinical features of Cl were present in only 28 (60,9% pts. 13 (28,3% pts had fever, 12 (26,0% — leukocytosis, 15 (32,6% — changes of leucocyte populations. Some laboratory measures (thrombocytes, fibrinogen, CIC, neopterin levels significantly decreased (p<0,05 after infection focus sanation without correction of disease modifying therapy. Cl quite often develop as asymptomatic processes most often in pts with high activity and can induce disturbances promoting appearance of endothelial dysfunction, atherothrombosis and reduction of life duration. So timely detection and proper sanation of infection focuses should be performed in pts with RA

  12. Natural history of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In quantitative studies the authors found significant correlations between radiographic scores and physical and functional status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The authors review data as it applies to the natural history of RA, with attention to the pathophysiology of specific radiographic features. Cross-sectional analysis in 200 patients demonstrated significant correlations between radiographic scores and duration of disease; longitudinal studies of serial films in 52 patients revealed progression of disease in 92%. The findings of substantial radiographic abnormality and rapid progression early in the disease may provide a rationale for early aggressive therapy of RA

  13. Identifying flares in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Bingham, Clifton O; Choy, Ernest H;

    2016-01-01

    ). RESULTS: The 849 patients were 75% female, 81% white, 42% were in remission/low disease activity (R/LDA), and 16-32% were flaring at the second visit. Agreement of flare status was low-strong (κ's 0.17-0.88) and inversely related to RA disease activity level. Flare domains correlated highly (r's≥0...... prior to flare, with escalation planned in 61%. CONCLUSIONS: Flares are common in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and are often preceded by treatment reductions. Patient/MD/DAS agreement of flare status is highest in patients worsening from R/LDA. OMERACT RA flare questions can discriminate between patients...

  14. Clinimetric criteria of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Galasso

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease, mainly poli-artycular, among wide-spread chronic inflammatory diseases, that cause pain, functional limitation, damage and joints deformations, and disability. It is characterized by turns of active inflammation and remission phases. Inflammation degree and persistence are associated to a bad functional prognosis and progressive joint disability. These patients management require a continuous valuation of inflammatory activity index of disease both therapeutic management and to prevent disablement process. We focus on many valuation index of joint disability and functional damage. Very important are both the scales of auto-values concerning the pain and the joint swelling and clinical data get by physician to valuate activity index of disease as defined by DAS28. Significant data come by health-related quality of life, disability and by AIMS2 (Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale.

  15. Complementary medicine in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Atzeni

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM for chronic conditions has increased in recent years. CAM is immensely popular for musculoskeletal conditions and patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA frequently try CAM. This review summarises the trial data for or against CAM as a symptomatic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Collectively the evidence demonstrates that some CAM modalities show significant promise, e.g. acupuncture, diets, herbal medicine, homoeopathy, massage, supplements. However, for the great majority of these therapies no evidencebased (clinical randomized trials results are available. CAM is usually used in addition to, and not as a substitute for conventional therapies. The motivation of patients to try CAM is complex; the willingness to take control of their healthcare, the desire to try everything available, the mass-media pressure and the erroneous notion that CAM is without risks. In fact, none of these treatments is totally devoid of risks. While the use of complementary and alternative modalities for the treatment of RA continues to increase, rigorous clinical trials examining their efficacy are needed before definitive recommendations regarding the application of these modalities can be made.

  16. New Treatments Helping Kids with Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 159984.html New Treatments Helping Kids With Juvenile Arthritis Several biologics have been approved by the FDA ... 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- New treatments for juvenile arthritis offer hope to children with the chronic autoimmune ...

  17. Polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis – epidemiology and management approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Oberle EJ; Harris JG; Verbsky JW

    2014-01-01

    Edward J Oberle, Julia G Harris, James W VerbskyDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Rheumatology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USAAbstract: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of disorders characterized by arthritis persisting for at least 6 weeks with onset before the age of 16 years. Within this cluster of conditions, the polyarticular form (involving more than four joints within the first 6 months) is further divided based on the presence of rheumatoid factor. ...

  18. Polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis – epidemiology and management approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Verbsky, James

    2014-01-01

    Edward J Oberle, Julia G Harris, James W VerbskyDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Rheumatology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USAAbstract: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of disorders characterized by arthritis persisting for at least 6 weeks with onset before the age of 16 years. Within this cluster of conditions, the polyarticular form (involving more than four joints within the first 6 months) is further divided based on the presence of rheumatoid factor. ...

  19. Etanercept: therapeutic use in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Garrison, L.; N. McDonnell

    1999-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) plays a central part in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). TNF initiates signal transduction by interacting with surface bound TNF receptors. Soluble tumour necrosis factor receptors (sTNFRs) act as natural inhibitors of TNF activity. Etanercept, recombinant p75 sTNFR:Fc fusion protein, has received approval from the US Food and Drug Administration for patients with RA and juvenile RA (JRA) who have failed treatment with at least one other drug. Eta...

  20. Tracheomegaly in association with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herein we present a case of tracheomegaly seen in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis. To the authors' knowledge, and from a review of the literature, this combination has not been previously described. (orig.)

  1. Update on Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, A. Caroline

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis consists of use of drugs, physical measures, social work interventions, education and reconstructive surgery. The physician plays a co-ordinating role, since most patients with significant rheumatoid arthritis will require treatment by more than one member of the health-care team. Our drug armamentarium, including anti-inflammatory agents, disease suppressants, analgesics, rarely steroids, and even more rarely immunosuppressants, can be used to good effect in...

  2. Monocyte activation in early onset rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, I.; Shingu, M; Nobunaga, M.

    1990-01-01

    Monocytes from peripheral blood and synovial fluid of patients with definite and classic rheumatoid arthritis spontaneously produced significantly greater amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leukotriene B4 (LTB4), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) than samples of peripheral blood from normal controls. Peripheral blood monocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis produced significantly greater amounts of PGE2 than control samples when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. There were no sig...

  3. Radiological manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheumatoid arthritis preferrably becomes manifest at the synovial joints of the limbs, especially at the small joints of the hands and feet, at bursae and synovial sheathes. The pathologic lesions are less frequently found at cartilaginous joints or entheses. The lesions very often are symmetrically distributed and are characterized by the following: 1. A periarticular, spindle-shaped opacity with a density similar to soft-tissue, induced by an inflammatory hypertrophy of the synovia, a serosynovitis, or an edematous impregnation of the periarticular tissue. 2. A juxta-articular osteoporosis, most probably caused by a neighbouring synovialitis accompanied by hyperemia. 3. A diffuse joint cavity narrowing due to a destruction of the articular cartilage by the pannus, a fibrovascular resorptive tissue. 4. Central as well as marginal erosions, caused by destruction of ossous material by the pannus. 5. Subchondral signal cysts, likewise unduced by the pannus. (Orig./AJ)

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Sodhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  5. Rehabilitation in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaggelos Giavasopoulos

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis aims to the management of the consequences of disease. It is widely accepted that, no drug therapy at present leads to long‐term orremission f everyone with rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.. Consequently, patients experience physical, psychological, functional, social and role negative effects of the disease. AIM : The am of the present article was to evaluate the role of rehabilitation to patients with rheumatoid arthritis sMethod and material: The methodology followed included reviewof tudies which were related to rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis Results :The majority of the studies claims that rehabilitation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, is a matter of primary importance. The importance of early provision of specialist rheumatologycare, patient education and promotion of self‐ management; and the evidence for the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions and multidisciplinary care. Conclusions : Individuals who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis can derive significant benefits from rehabilitation programmes. To provide best care, rehabilitation standards and services should be based on the best available evidence.

  6. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Arthritis Yoga Poses for Arthritis Patients from Johns Hopkins Stategies to Increase your Level of Physical ... Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Johns Hopkins Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease ...

  7. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worsen, it's known as a "flare" or a "flare-up." JIA often causes only minor problems, but in ... was possible a few years ago. For arthritis flare-ups, doctors may also use medicines called corticosteroids (like ...

  8. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... providers, including the primary care physician, rheumatologist, and physical therapist, will work together to develop the best method ... the management of any type of arthritis. A physical therapist will explain the importance of certain activities and ...

  9. Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis Two types of antibody molecules act in concert to stimulate inflammation in people with rheumatoid arthritis, according to research funded in part by the ...

  10. Risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2012-01-01

    To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke.......To determine if patients with rheumatoid arthritis have increased risk of atrial fibrillation and stroke....

  11. Common Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Common Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis Reduces Risk of Death Taking methotrexate—a commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory medication—may reduce the risk of death among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to ...

  12. Arthritis Mechanisms May Vary by Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids Become Lifelong Learners Featured Website: GeneEd: Genetics, Education, Discovery Links Rheumatoid Arthritis Osteoarthritis Gout Rheumatoid Arthritis Juvenile Arthritis Feeling Out of Joint: The Aches of Arthritis CONTACT ...

  13. Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Matuszewska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies. RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%. New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33. Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  14. Kidney involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lazzarini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a widespread disease and its renal involvement, relatively common, is clinically significant because worsens course and mortality of the primary disease. There is still no agreement on the prevalence of renal disorders in RA: data analysis originates from different sources, as death certificates, autopsies, clinical and laboratory findings and kidney biopsies, each with its limitations. Histoimmunological studies on bioptical specimens of patients with RA and kidney damage, led to clarify prevalent pathologies. In order of frequency: glomerulonephritis and amyloidosis (60-65% and 20-30% respectively, followed by acute or chronic interstitial nephritis. Kidney injury during RA includes secondary renal amyloidosis, nephrotoxic effects of antirheumatic drugs and nephropathies as extra-articular manifestations (rheumatoid nephropathy. Amyloidosis affects survival, increases morbidity and is the main cause of end stage renal disease in patients with RA and nephropathy. Strong association between RA activity and amyloidosis needs the use of immunosuppressive and combined therapies, to prevent this complication and reduce risk of dialysis. Long-lasting and combined RA pharmacotherapy involves various renal side effects. In this review we describe NSAIDs and DMARDs (Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs nephrotoxicity, particularly by gold compounds, D-penicillamine, cyclosporine A and methotrexate. Rare cases of IgA glomerulonephritis during immunomodulating therapy with leflunomide and TNF blocking receptor (etanercept are reported; real clinical significance of this drug-related nephropathy will be established by development of RA treatment. In RA nephropathies, mesangial glomerulonephritis is the most frequent histological lesion (35-60 % out of biopsies from patients with urinary abnormalities and/or kidney impairment, followed by minimal change glomerulopathy (3-14% and p-ANCA positive necrotizing crescentic

  15. Pleural and pulmonary alterations caused by rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary complications caused by rheumatoid arthritis are a clinically relevant aspect of this chronic arthropathy. This article reviews pulmonary abnormalities induced by rheumatoid arthritis and their clinical and radiological findings. In addition, the role of different imaging modalities in the diagnostic work-up of pulmonary complications caused by rheumatoid arthritis is discussed. (orig./MG)

  16. Clinical Study of Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis in 90 Children%幼年类风湿性关节炎90例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋敏; 农光民; 王观娇

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical characteristics, diagnosis and therapies of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and provide information for diagnosis and therapy. Methods Based on the data collected from 90 cases of JRA, who were admitted to the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University from Dec. 2002 to Nov. 2008, the clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, therapies and follow - up data were retrospectively analyzed. Results 1. Among 90 children with JRA, there were 65 male and 25 female; and their ages ranged from 9 months to 14 years,among the 90 patients,13 cases were below 3 years old,23 cases were between 3-7 years old and 54 cases were between 7-14 years old. 2. Subtypes of JRA cases included 59 cases(65.6% ) with systemic arthritis,17 cases( 18.9% ) with polyarthritis, 14 cases(15.5% ) with oligoarthritis. The subtype cases in 0-3 years old children were 10 cases,2 cases and 1 case respectively;in 3 -7 years old children,they were 18 cases,3 cases,and 1 case respectively;in 7-14 years old children,they were 31 cases, 12 cases and 11 cases respectively. There was no significant difference among different age groups and different subtypes(Ps>0.05).3.The clinical manifestations of JRA varied,in terms of systemic symptoms,joint symptoms,as well as extra - articular symptoms. Fever,arthritis,lymphadenopathy and rash were the most common manifestations of these patients. Uveitis was not observed in these patients but 6 cases of 59 patients with systemic arthritis were complicated by serous effusion and 4 cases with pulmonary lesions. 4. The positive rates of rheumatoid factor,antinuclear antibody, and human leukocyte antigen B27 were 7.8% ,8. 9% and 24.4% respectively. The results of blood routine,sedimentation rate( ESR) ,C -reactive protein(CRP),immunoglobulin and T lymphocyte subset tests turned out to be abnormal.5. As to treatment,18 cases only received non-steroidal anti -inflammatory drugs(NSAIDs) ,72 cases were treated with NSAIDs

  17. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arthritis Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  18. Rheumatoid disease without arthritis; clinical case of pulmonary fibrosis, rheumatoid nodulosis and positive rheumatoid factor without arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reported a case of a patient suffering pulmonary fibrosis rapidly progressive and a positive rheumatoid factor test with the presence of HLA DR11 y HLADR17, without arthritis, We discuss how rare is this clinical appearance, and remark the concept that rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic disease, with a wide clinical presentation, that some authors with a right criteria have called rheumatoid disease

  19. Biologic interventions for fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Celia; Choy, Ernest H S; Hewlett, Sarah;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fatigue is a common and potentially distressing symptom for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with no accepted evidence-based management guidelines. Evidence suggests that biologic interventions improve symptoms and signs in RA as well as reducing joint damage. OBJECTIVES: To...... evaluate the effect of biologic interventions on fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following electronic databases up to 1 April 2014: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Current Controlled Trials...... contacted key authors. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials if they evaluated a biologic intervention in people with rheumatoid arthritis and had self reported fatigue as an outcome measure. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two reviewers selected relevant trials, assessed methodological...

  20. Benefits of Exercise in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Cooney, Jennifer K.; Rebecca-Jane Law; Verena Matschke; Lemmey, Andrew B.; Moore, Jonathan P.; Yasmeen Ahmad; Jeremy G. Jones; Peter Maddison; Thom, Jeanette M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to highlight the importance of exercise in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to demonstrate the multitude of beneficial effects that properly designed exercise training has in this population. RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune disease characterised by decrements to joint health including joint pain and inflammation, fatigue, increased incidence and progression of cardiovascular disease, and accelerated loss of muscle mass, that is, “rheumatoid cachexia”. These fa...

  1. Therapy of rheumatoid arthritis by radiosynovectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiosynovectomy is a therapeutic modality for local treatment of inflammatory point diseases. It is performed by intraarticular instillation of beta-emitting radionuclides. Its effectiveness is based upon the anti-inflammatory action of beta-radiation. Accordingly, the indication of radiosynovectomy is based upon the evidence of the inflammatory etiology of disease. The principle of its therapeutic action makes radiosynovectomy a valuable device for successful treatment of florid rheumatoid arthritis. It can be performed as an alternative to surgical synovectomy or in combination with it. The following article describes the therapeutic management of rheumatoid arthritis by radiosynovectomy including patient preparation, performance, and follow-up. (orig.)

  2. Is Hearing Impairment Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Bjoerndal, Kristine; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, inflammatory disease that affects 1% of the population. The auditory system may be involved during the course of disease; however the association of RA and hearing impairment has not been clearly defined. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review......, hearing test, audiometry, auditory dysfunction and rheumatoid arthritis. CONCLUSION: Based on our review it can be postulated that patients with RA are at higher risk of hearing impairment compared to healthy subjects in their course of the disease. The hearing impairment in RA seems to be a...

  3. Connective tissue markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, H J

    1998-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common systemic autoimmune disorder of unknown aetiology. The most common outcome of RA is a progressive development of joint destruction and deformity. Early introduction of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs seems important for prevention of the long term...... rheumatoid factor contributes to the classification of arthritis as RA, and acute phase reactants are useful for quantifying and comparing the level of inflammatory activity in the course of a given patient. There is, however, a lack of sensitive and specific biochemical markers for RA, and frontline...

  4. Main Ocular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Saray Quignon Santana

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is considered an autoimmune disease in which articular and extra articular manifestations are produced and contribute to alter the functional capacity of the individual. This study consists on performing a bibliographical review showing the main ocular manifestations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It is our purpose to give you our experiences to the students as well as the internal medicine, ophthalmology and rheumatologist residents about this topic. The ophthalmological consultation of sick patients contributes to the prevention of ocular illnesses which are characteristic of the base disease and improve the ocular health.

  5. SECONDARY OSTEOARTHRITIS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Starodubtseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the problems of comorbidities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Two or more RA-related conditions were diagnosed according to the results of the QUEST-RA program implemented in 34 countries. Osteoarthritis along with hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and osteoporosis was detected among the most commonly diseases. Owing to expanded diagnostic capabilities, the recognition and treatment of the comorbidities have recently received much attention, as embodied in the draft Association of Rheumatologists of Russia Guidelines for RA management (2014; Part 1. The concept and major characteristics of secondary osteoarthritis in RA are analyzed. It is precisely the inflammatory process and underlying disease-related risk factors, including treatment, that have impact on the development of secondary osteoarthritis and patients’ quality of life as a whole. All this allows an inference about the mechanisms closely intertwined with the underlying disease for the development of secondary osteoarthritis, which initiates cartilage damage and further remodeling. Primary and secondary osteoarthritis was comparatively analyzed. Particular emphasis is placed on current cartilage biomarkers, their diagnostic value and role in monitoring the efficiency of treatment in clinical trials. The paper provides a comparative analysis of detectable serum and urine biomarkers according to the results of the complex analysis made by the National Institutes of Health. Particular attention is given to cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP. Foreign authors’ investigations suggest that there is a relationship between serum COMP levels and disease severity and joint X-ray changes. There is evidence for the efficacy of hyaluronic acid used in the treatment of secondary osteoarthritis in patients with RA. 

  6. Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Fiona M

    2013-08-01

    Imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has undergone extraordinary change in recent years and new techniques are now available to help the clinician diagnose and manage patients much more effectively than previously. While established modalities such as plain radiography (X-Ray) remain important, especially for detection of erosions and determining the progression of joint damage, there are many instances where ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scanning provide added information. MRI and US are now used regularly by clinicians to help diagnose RA in the pre-radiographic stage as they offer improved visualisation of joint erosions. They also have the potential to provide prognostic information as MRI bone oedema/osteitis is linked to the later development of erosions and power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS) joint positivity is also a predictor of joint damage. Nuclear imaging techniques such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are also highly sensitive for detecting joint change in early RA and pre-RA but not yet used clinically mainly because of accessibility and radiation exposure. MRI, US, scintigraphy, SPECT and PET have all been shown to detect sub-clinical joint inflammation in patients in clinical remission, a state that is now the goal of most treat-to-target management strategies. Thus, imaging may be used to direct therapeutic decision making and MRI is also now being used in clinical trials to determine the impact of disease-suppressing therapy on the course of synovitis and osteitis. As is the case for all tests, it would be unwise to rely completely on any one imaging result, as false positives and negatives can occur for all modalities. Thus, the clinician needs to choose the most relevant and reliable imaging test, while also striving to minimise patient discomfort, radiation burden and economic impact. PMID:24315051

  7. Cervical myelopathy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijers, K A; Cats, A; Kremer, H P; Luyendijk, W; Onvlee, G J; Thomeer, R T

    1984-01-01

    Results obtained in 43 Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with cervical myelopathy are described; all patients showed several alarm signs together with neurological disturbances. Thirty-four cases were operable; nine patients were not operated upon for various reasons (refusal, and general condition). In the surgically treated patients, the changes were localized in the C1-C2 area (n = 20), in the area below C2 (n = 5), or in both (n = 9). The patients were put on skull traction pre- and post-operatively and nursed on a circo-electric bed. Pre-operatively, the duration of traction varied from a few days to weeks (mean 3 weeks). Post-operatively, the patients were given continuous skull traction for 2 1/2-3 months. This procedure yielded neurological improvement and a stable graft in all but two patients. On follow-up, recurrence of neurological complaints was seen in nine patients, in four due to a new slip at a lower level. Three of these cases were reoperated with good results. Twenty-three patients have died: four 'early' (one pre-operatively and three within 6 weeks post-operatively) and 19 'late'. The mean duration of follow-up was 4.5 years. In those who died 'late', the cause of death was due to the effects of an unstable graft in two cases and in the others the causes were not related to changes in the cervical spine. In the 10 patients who are still alive the mean duration of follow-up is 5 years. The nine patients who were not operated upon all died within a year, 4 of them due to consequences of cord compression. If cervical spondylodesis is feasible in an RA patient with myelopathy, the procedure is advocated. PMID:6529877

  8. Group Education for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Taal, Erik; Riemsma, Rob P.; Brus, Herman L.M.; Seydel, Erwin R; Rasker, Johannes J.; Wiegman, Oene

    1993-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis must learn to adjust their exercise, rest and medication to the varying activity of the disease. Patient education can help patients in making the right decisions about adjustments in their treatment regimen and in attaining ¿self-management¿ behaviors. We developed a group education program based on social learning theory and the `Arthritis Self Management Course¿ developed in the USA by Lorig. Goal of the program is the strengthening of self-efficacy, outc...

  9. Estudo comparativo de testes diagnósticos para olho seco entre crianças saudáveis e portadoras de artrite reumatóide juvenil Comparative study of diagnostic tests for dry eye disease between healthy and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayter Silva de Paula

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar achados diagnósticos de olho seco em crianças normais e com artrite reumatóide juvenil. MÉTODOS: Neste estudo transversal, 30 olhos de 15 pacientes com artrite reumatóide juvenil (grupo 1 e 22 olhos de 11 crianças-controle (grupo 2 foram examinados clinicamente e submetidos a testes para ceratoconjuntivite seca: Schirmer tipo 1, tempo de quebra do filme lacrimal e coloração com rosa bengala. RESULTADOS: Seis crianças com artrite reumatóide juvenil apresentaram um ou mais sintomas de ceratoconjuntivite seca (40% e cinco destas (83,3% mostravam meibomite ou outros sinais dessa afecção. Nenhuma criança do grupo 2 apresentou sinais ou sintomas de ceratoconjuntivite seca. No teste de Schirmer não se observou diferença significativa entre os grupos 1 e 2 (p=0,156. Entretanto, o tempo de quebra do filme lacrimal foi significativamente menor no grupo 1 (p=0,0005 e de maneira semelhante, o escore do teste de rosa bengala foi significativamente maior no grupo 1 (p=0,0038. Cinco das 15 crianças estudadas do grupo 1 apresentaram um ou mais testes alterados e tiveram diagnóstico definitivo de ceratoconjuntivite seca, ao passo que quatro (26% tiveram o diagnóstico de provável ceratoconjuntivite seca. No grupo 2, nenhuma criança apresentou mais de um teste positivo. CONCLUSÕES: Sinais e sintomas de ceratoconjuntivite seca constituem achados comuns em crianças com artrite reumatóide juvenil. Embora apenas o tempo de quebra do filme lacrimal e a marcação com rosa bengala tenham tido diferença significativa entre os grupos, parece haver tendência a resultados piores nos testes de olho seco realizados em crianças com artrite reumatóide juvenil.PURPOSE: To compare dry eye diagnostic findings in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients and normal children. METHODS: For this transversal study, 30 eyes of 15 patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (group 1 and 22 eyes of 11 normal controls (group 2 were examined

  10. Identification of Urinary Peptide Biomarkers Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Stalmach, Angelique; Johnsson, Hanna; McInnes, Iain B.; Husi, Holger; Klein, Julie; Dakna, Mohammed; Mullen, William; Mischak, Harald; Porter, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis are associated with improved outcomes but current diagnostic tools such as rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated protein antibodies have shown limited sensitivity. In this pilot study we set out to establish a panel of urinary biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis using capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. We compared the urinary proteome of 33 participants of the Scottish Early Rheumatoid Arthritis inception...

  11. Profiling anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Tebo Anne E; Jaskowski Troy; Davis K.; Whiting April; Clifford Bronte; Zeft Andrew; McNally Bernadette; Hill Harry R; Bohnsack John; Prahalad Sampath

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Anti-citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (ACPA), have high specificity for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Some children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), phenotypically resemble RA and test positive for rheumatoid factor (RF) a characteristic biomarker of RA. We investigated the prevalence of ACPA and its relationship to other serologic markers associated with RA in a well-characterized JIA cohort. Methods Cases were 334 children with JIA, 30 of whom had RF + poly...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center since 2000, currently serving as the Nurse Manager. She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing Chronic Pain ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adult Rheumatologist Drug Information for Patients Arthritis Drug Information Sheets Benefits and Risks of Opioids in Arthritis Management How to Give a Subcutaneous Injection Johns Hopkins ...

  14. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to take a more active role in your care. The information in these videos should not take ... She is a critical member of our patient care team. Managing Your Arthritis Managing Your Arthritis Managing ...

  15. Pancytopenia related to azathioprine in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Jeurissen, M E; Boerbooms, A M; van de Putte, L B

    1988-01-01

    Two patients with rheumatoid arthritis developed pancytopenia during treatment with azathioprine 100 mg daily. In one patient this side effect occurred after three weeks, in the other after eight weeks of treatment. Rapid fall of platelets in one patient necessitated platelet transfusion. In the other patient additional treatment with allopurinol was probably responsible for the toxic effect. Haematological side effects of azathioprine are discussed.

  16. Adherence to methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bliddal, Henning; Eriksen, Stine A; Christensen, Robin;

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To study adherence to methotrexate (MTX) and factors of importance thereof in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Patients with a hospital diagnosis of RA (ICD10 codes M05.X or M06.X) after January 1, 1997, and aged ≥18 years at the date of first diagnosis/contact, with at...

  17. On the origin of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anders J; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Houen, Gunnar;

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease with a complex origin. Previous studies have reported heritability estimates on RA at about 60%. Only 16% of the genetic background of the disease has been disclosed so far. The purpose of the present investigation was to provide an optimized...

  18. Penicillamin-induced neuropathy in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, P B; Hogenhaven, H

    1990-01-01

    A case of penicillamin-induced severe polyradiculopathy in rheumatoid arthritis is presented. The neuropathy was of demyelinating type, purely motor, proximal and clinically fully reversible when the drug ceased. In case of a progressive neuropathy, during penicillamin treatment, this adverse...

  19. [Biopharmaceuticals in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baslund, B.; Bendtzen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The current status on the use of biopharmaceuticals in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is reviewed. Blocking of TNF-alpha, co-stimulation of CD28+ T-cells and depletion of CD20+ B-cells are all effective ways to diminish inflammation and joint damage. However, not all patients react to these...

  20. Relation Between Rheumatoid Arthritis and Hearing Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Doosti

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some of the studies have shown that RA (Rheumatoid Arthritis may cause hearing disorders. These disorders can result in problems later in life, so survey of correlation between rheumatoid arthritis and hearing disorders is important . Methods: This was a case-control study which has done from December 2004 to August 2006 at Shaheed Sadoughi hospital in Yazd. In this study, 50 Rheumatoid arthritis patients as case group (100 ears with 50 persons as control group who were of the same age, sex and job (100 ears were compared. Results: Patients were 21-67 years old and the mean age was 47.58 years(It was the same as the control group.From 50 cases (controls 42 were women and 8 were men . Audiometric tests in different frequencies showed that hearing loss in high frequencies, especially in 8000 Hz was significantly different in the two groups. Also, acoustic reflex was absent in case group and this too was significantly different.The evaluation of sensory neural hearing loss showed that this hearing loss was sensory, not neural . Conclusion: In Rheumatoid arthritis, middle and inner ear disorders have been shown. But some patients aren't aware of their hearing loss and they have no clinical complains, so frequent evaluation of audiometric tests is recommended. Hearing disorders can be controlled by therapeutic and rehabilitation procedures in these patients.

  1. Rheumatoid Arthritis, infiltrated pulmonary, and sharp dyspnoea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of a patient (50 year-old) feminine sex, is made with antecedents of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the last 10 years in treatment with steroids, hypothyroidism and arterial hypertension who consults for square of dyspnoea of small efforts, dry cough and fever. An evolution of the illness is made and the topic is analyzed

  2. Clinical and Biochemical Characteristics of Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the clinical and biochemical characteristics of children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) at a tertiary care centre in Karachi, Pakistan. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Paediatric Rheumatology Clinic of The Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi, from January 2008 to December 2011. Methodology: Clinical and laboratory profile and outcome of children less than 15 years of age attending the Paediatric Rheumatology Clinic of the Aga Khan University, Karachi with the diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis according to International League against Rheumatism were studied. These children were classified into different types of JIA; their clinical and laboratory characteristics, response to therapy and outcome was evaluated. Results: Sixty eight patients satisfying the criteria of International League against Rheumatism (ILAR) for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis were enrolled during the study period of four consecutive years, their age ranged from 9 months to 15 years. Mean age at onset was 6.45 +- 4.03 years while mean age at diagnosis was 7.60 +- 3.93 years. Polyarticular was the most predominant subtype with 37 (54%) patients, out of these, 9 (24%) were rheumatoid factor positive. An almost equal gender predisposition was observed. Fever and arthritis were the most common presenting symptoms, with only 2 patients presenting with uveitis. Conclusion: The clinico-biochemical characteristics of JIA at the study centre showed a pattern distinct with early onset of disease, high frequency of polyarticular type and a higher rheumatoid factor (QRA) and ANA positivity in girls. (author)

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatology Arthritis Center Lupus Center Lyme Disease Clinical Research ... Center website is intended for educational purposes only. Physicians and other health care professionals ...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past ... prone to fracture). Source: NIAMS Who Gets Rheumatoid Arthritis? The disease occurs in all racial and ethnic ...

  5. HOW TO LIVE WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS???

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parle Milind

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA is a chronic auto-immune disease characterized by painful inflammation of the joints and surrounding tissues, leading to long term disability. Rheumatoid arthritis can begin at any age but has its peak between 35 to 55 years of age. RA shows hereditary linkage. Women and smokers are most often affected. The patient doesn’t feel any symptoms during inactive state of the disease. RA progresses in a symmetrical pattern involving both the sides of the body. Once rheumatoid arthritis is confirmed by diagnosis, treatment should start as early as possible. The treatment for rheumatoid arthritis focuses initially on reducing the joint inflammation and pain with the use of analgesics and anti-inflammatory agents. In the next stage, joint function is restored by administering Disease Modifying Anti-rheumatic Drugs (DMARDs thus preventing joint deformity. Treatment is generally based on the degree of severity of RA. Patients with mild RA are advised to take rest and are prescribed analgesics and anti-inflammatory medicines, which include fast acting drugs like NSAIDs. Slow acting drugs like (DMARDs such as methotrexate, sulfasalazine, lelflunomide etc., and Body’s reaction modifiers (BRMs such as rituximab, anankinra, infliximab etc., are reserved for patients suffering from moderate to severe RA. The patient is advised to undertake regular exercises like walking, stretching, swimming or cycling, which are aimed at reducing body weight. The patient suffering from arthritis can carry out his normal day-to-day activities with the help of proper medication and regular exercise.

  6. Is yoga a suitable treatment for rheumatoid arthritis: current opinion

    OpenAIRE

    Telles S; Singh N

    2012-01-01

    Shirley Telles, Nilkamal SinghPatanjali Research Foundation, Haridwar, IndiaAbstract: We reviewed published literature regarding the use of yoga for managing rheumatoid arthritis to determine whether adequate evidence exists to suggest its usefulness as a therapy. A search for previous studies involving yoga and rheumatoid arthritis in PubMed yielded eight reports. These studies reported the benefits of yoga in the physical and mental health of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), suggest...

  7. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Assayag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease affecting about 1% of the population. Interstitial lung disease is a serious and frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD is characterized by several histopathologic subtypes. This article reviews the proposed pathogenesis and risk factors for RA-ILD. We also outline the important steps involved in the work-up of RA-ILD and review the evidence for treatment and prognosis.

  8. Lumbar radiculopathy caused by foraminal stenosis in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Koakutsu, Tomoaki; Morozumi, Naoki; Koizumi, Yutaka; Ishii, Yushin

    2011-01-01

    Study design Case-series study. Objective To describe the clinical presentation, characteristic findings of imaging studies, and treatment of lumbar radiculopathy caused by foraminal stenosis in rheumatoid arthritis. Background Lumbar lesions in rheumatoid arthritis are relatively rare, with a limited number of systemic reports. Methods Six patients with lumbar radiculopathy caused by foraminal stenosis in rheumatoid arthritis were treated. The patients were all women with a mean age of 69 ye...

  9. Sedentary behaviour in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Tanja; Beyer, Nina; Aadahl, Mette;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite increasing interest in investigating sedentary behaviour (SB) in the general population and in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is little documentation of the subjective experiences of SB in patients with RA. This study aimed to examine how patients with RA...... modification of physical activity level causing increase in SB, especially during periods of disease flare. Prioritizing and planning of SB also functioned as part of self-management strategies. 3) It has nothing to do with my arthritis; for some patients, SB was not related to RA, but simply reflected a way...

  10. Radiosynoviorthese in the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiosynoviorthese, a new method for the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, was developed. Altogether 260 patients with rheumatoid arthritis were treated. The therapeutic activity of radioactive colloid Au was administered intraarticularly to all the patients. Indications and contraindications for radiation therapy of rheumatoid arthritis were developed. Good short- and long-term results were noted in most of the patients after radiation therapy. Radiosynoviorthese as a method of local active therapy of affected joints with colloid Au in the multiple modality treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is effective; its prolonged stable therapeutic effect in patients is observed

  11. The cystic form of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nonerosive form of rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.) was found in 62 patients out of 660 patients with R.A.. These 62 patients exhibit slowly progressive cystic changes in about the same joints in which usually erosions develop in classic R.A.. The E.S.R. is often low, half of the patients remained seronegative and there are 35 males and 27 females in the group. A smaller group of 15 out of these patients could be followed from a stage wherein the radiographs were normal to a stage of extensive cystic changes, over a period of at least 6 years. An attempt is made to delineate this group within the rheumatoid arthritis disease entity. (orig.)

  12. Analysis of Rheumatoid Arthritis through Image Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Mittal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common inflammatory arthropathy worldwide, but may be less prevalent in Asian populations causing pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function in joints. The spectrum of magnetic resonance imaging findings encountered in the musculoskeletal system in this disease but these images often found non-productive due to noise present in the image and creates troublesome situation for analysis point of view. The role of image processing in rheumatoid arthritis lies, not in diagnosis, but in evaluation of the integrity of structures affected by the disease process. Since Magnetic resonance imaging is more sensitive to synovial changes than any radiography tech, and may permit quantification of changes in disease activity, as well as evaluation of the effects of drug therapy, and of complications of the disease and its treatment. So analyzing the Magnetic resonance images through image processing tool of Matlab provides easy going approach for diagnosis of the disease.

  13. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  14. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripa Akter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated.

  15. Rheumatoid arthritis as a modifier of periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda, Letícia Algarves

    2007-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic tissue-destructive condition in which the tooth-supporting collagen fibers of ligament and bone are broken down mainly by the host s overreactive immune inflammatory response. The relation between periodontitis and other chronic inflammatory destructive diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has been dealt with in some studies because, in spite of their different etiologies, similar mechanisms of tissue destruction have been described in thes...

  16. Large granular lymphocytosis associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Samanta, A; GRANT, I.; Nichol, F E; Pringle, J H; Wood, J. K.; Campbell, A. C.

    1988-01-01

    A 74 year old woman with rheumatoid arthritis, hepatosplenomegaly, neutropenia, and peripheral blood lymphocytosis is described. The lymphocytes had a large granular morphology and expressed a CD3+ CD8+ Leu7+ surface antigen phenotype. They did not have natural killer cell function. Southern analysis of the lymphocyte DNA using two restriction enzymes showed a rearranged pattern for the T cell receptor beta chain gene, indicating a monoclonal lymphoproliferation. Large granular lymphocytosis ...

  17. Group education for rheumatoid arthritis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Taal, Erik; Rasker, Johannes J.; Wiegman, Oene

    1997-01-01

    This article reviews the effectiveness of group education programs in improving the knowledge, behavior, and health status of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and evaluates to what extent various programs fulfill certain criteria for educational self-management programs. Thirty-one studies are reviewed: in 12, patients with various rheumatic diseases including RA were included, and in 19, only RA patients were studied. Group education increased the knowledge of the participants, which ...

  18. Intermittent cyclophosphamide in refractory rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Beyer, Jannie M; Helin, Pekka

    1983-01-01

    Three patients with refractory rheumatoid arthritis were treated with oral cyclophosphamide; in two cases this was supplemented with pulse treatment with methylprednisolone. Long term remission was induced in all three patients and was sustained until follow up at least nine months after the methylprednisolone was stopped. Leucopenia occurred but resolved when cyclophosphamide was reduced from daily to intermittent dosing. Intermittent treatment with cyclophosphamide, possibly in conjunction ...

  19. [Regaining quality of life despite rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Madame

    2016-01-01

    A patient aged 32 who had been living with her partner for a few years, is diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. They both needed to understand and adapt. The caregivers had a frontline role in the multidisciplinary care but addressing the impact on the patient's sexual quality of life remains difficult. The patient describes her experience and how harmony and desire were re-established. PMID:27317820

  20. Morphological substrates in Rheumatoid Arthritis pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Van Zwieten, Koos Jaap; Lambrichts, Ivo; DE BAKKER, Bernadette; Kosten, Lauren; De Munter, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    In the PIP joint capsule of the finger, neurofilaments and lamellated corpuscules are observed, comparable with those present in human facet joints. Our study demonstrated these corpuscules in the PIP Proper Collateral Ligament for the first time. Supposedly acting as mechanoreceptors, they may also produce cytokines and substance P, a neuropeptide involved in pain. As the PIP joints of fingers in particular show symptoms of Rheumatoid Arthritis at very early stages, these organs may therefor...

  1. Fibromyalgia Complicating Disease Management in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate frequency of fibromyalgia in rheumatoid arthritis and its effect on disease activity score. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The Indus Hospital, Karachi, from December 2010 to May 2011. Methodology: All adult patients of either gender diagnosed as rheumatoid arthritis on the basis of clinical, laboratory and X-ray criteria were included in the study. The sample data was separated into two groups depending on presence or absence of fibromyalgia and 28 joint disease activity score (DAS-28) value was evaluated. Results: There were 31 (25.83%) patients with rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia (RAFM) out of the total 120. The median (IQR) age of patients was 40 (32 - 51) years. All were females. The overall female frequency was 79 (88.8%). The median (IQR) DAS-28 score in RA group was 4.9 (3.66 - 5.71), while the median (IQR) DAS-28 score in RAFM was 7.04 (6.62 - 7.64) [p < 0.0001]. The number of patient getting combination therapy of DMARD in RAFM group was 61.3% while in RA group was 42.7%. Conclusion: DAS-28 was found to be significantly higher in RAFM patients probably because of higher perception of pain. (author)

  2. Identification of urinary peptide biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelique Stalmach

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis and treatment of rheumatoid arthritis are associated with improved outcomes but current diagnostic tools such as rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated protein antibodies have shown limited sensitivity. In this pilot study we set out to establish a panel of urinary biomarkers associated with rheumatoid arthritis using capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. We compared the urinary proteome of 33 participants of the Scottish Early Rheumatoid Arthritis inception cohort study with 30 healthy controls and identified 292 potential rheumatoid arthritis-specific peptides. Amongst them, 39 were used to create a classifier model using support vector machine algorithms. Specific peptidic fragments were differentially excreted between groups; fragments of protein S100-A9 and gelsolin were less abundant in rheumatoid arthritis while fragments of uromodulin, complement C3 and fibrinogen were all increasingly excreted. The model generated was subsequently tested in an independent test-set of 31 samples. The classifier demonstrated a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 93% in diagnosing the condition, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.93 (p<0.0001. These preliminary results suggest that urinary biomarkers could be useful in the early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Further studies are currently being undertaken in larger cohorts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other athridities to assess the potential of the urinary peptide based classifier in the early detection of rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Prognostic laboratory markers of joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindqvist, E; Henriksen, Karen Eberhardt; Bendtzen, K;

    2005-01-01

    To investigate whether determination of a set of laboratory markers at baseline provides prognostic information on joint damage in hands and feet in rheumatoid arthritis.......To investigate whether determination of a set of laboratory markers at baseline provides prognostic information on joint damage in hands and feet in rheumatoid arthritis....

  4. Anti-IL-1alpha autoantibodies in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslind, K; Svensson, Birte; Svenson, M;

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the potential predictive value of autoantibodies against IL1-alpha (anti-IL-1alpha) in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  5. Paleopathologic evidence for the evolution of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepinger, L L

    1978-01-01

    A human skeleton recovered from a Sicilian archaeological site and dating from the Hellenistic period (330-210 B.C.) presents a pathological pattern suggesting a transition between ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis, providing evidence in support of the hypothesis that rheumatoid arthritis may have recently evolved out of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:367177

  6. Serum histidine in rheumatoid arthritis: a family study

    OpenAIRE

    J Kirkham; Lowe, J.; Bird, H. A.; Wright, V

    1981-01-01

    We have compared free serum histidine in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, their blood relatives, and their non-blood relatives. The hypohistidinaemia of rheumatoid arthritis is acquired with the disease and does not provide a biochemical marker of those at risk.

  7. Biologics for rheumatoid arthritis: an overview of Cochrane reviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Christensen, Robin; Wells, George A;

    2010-01-01

    the biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are very effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), however there is a lack of head-to-head comparison studies.......the biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are very effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), however there is a lack of head-to-head comparison studies....

  8. The impact of smoking on the activity of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Dusa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Smoking is the environmental factor involved in rheumatoid arthritis etiopathology. The data from the literature show that the smoking influence both the appearance and the development of rheumatoid arthritis. The study aims to analyzes how smoking affects disease activity.

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis: Clinical, SPECT and MRI investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To demonstrate psychometric test and neuroimaging technic capacity in subclinical conditions of cerebral affection in patients with rheumatoid arthritis; to demonstrate agreement between topographic cerebral site and morphological signs in neuroimaging study; to evaluate agreement between cognitive deficits and rheumatoid severity. Material and Method: We have enrolled 20 patients, 17 pts. (85%) showed low score evocative for executive function limitation; 6 pts. (33%) showed attention anomaly, movement organization and verbal fluency. SPECT acquisition shows frontal lobe uptake in 95% (19/20 pts.) extended to parietal lobs in 42% (8/19pts.); 1 pt. Shows normal uptake and very high score. RMN study shows a specific sign of leukoencephalopaty in 35% (7/20pts.) and liquoral spaces increased in 25% (5/20 pts.). Conclusions: Frequent cognitive functions alteration during rheumatoid arthritis; very high topographic agreement between cognitive deficits and cerebral perfusion uptake showed by SPECT study; significant correlation between severity index and disease activity and cognitive deterioration; necessity of further longitudinal study for greater number of patient; pathogenetic disconnect mechanism cortical-subcortical by vasculitic reason or deafferentation jointed to negative interaction between motor limit and cognitive deficit

  10. Early rheumatoid arthritis and its differentiation from other joint abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs has created new demands on imaging to early identify patients with rheumatoid arthritis and opened new prospects in therapeutic management of patients with aggressive disease. Therefore, new imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have developed during the past few years in this field. In some cases, both magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound may be also useful in making the distinction between early rheumatoid arthritis and other joints abnormalities, including early psoriatic arthritis. This article will review key aspects of important advances in imaging in rheumatoid arthritis, particularly focusing on magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound.

  11. Total lymphoid irradiation of intractable rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven patients with intractable rheumatoid arthritis were treated with fractionated total lymphoid irradiation, (total dose 20 Gy). Lasting improvement in clinical symptoms was found in four patients during treatment and the remaining patients experienced similar benefit within 2 months of irradiation. There was marked reduction in exacerbations and number of joints involved. Morning stiffness, joint swelling and tenderness decreased. Complications included severe fatigue during treatment and acute bacterial arthritis in multiple joints in one patient. Four patients have since died, one of renal failure, another of cardiogenic shock following surgery 3 and 24 months after total lymphoid irradiation. Both had generalised amyloidosis. The third patient developed joint empyema and died of toxic cardiac failure. The fourth died 3 months after resection of a Kaposi's sarcoma complicated by wound infection which responded to treatment. Immunologically, total lymphoid irradiation resulted in suppression of the absolute lymphocyte count and reduction in T-helper cells, the number of T-suppressor cells remaining unchanged. These data provide evidence of T-cell involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Total lymphoid irradiation can induce sustained improvement in clinical disease activity, but severe, possibly fatal, side-effects cannot be ignored. (author)

  12. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis: GWAS and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McAllister KM

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Kate McAllister, Stephen Eyre, Gisela OrozcoArthritis Research United Kingdom Epidemiology Unit, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, UKAbstract: The study of complex genetics in autoimmune diseases has progressed at a tremendous pace over the last 4 years, as a direct result of the enormous gains made by genome wide association studies (GWAS. Novel genetic findings are continuously being reported alongside the rapid development of genetic technologies, sophisticated statistical analysis, and larger sample collections. It is now becoming clear that multiple genes contribute to disease risk in many complex genetic disorders including rheumatoid arthritis (RA and that there are common genetic risk factors that underlie a spectrum of autoimmune diseases. This review details the current genetic landscape of RA, and describes what GWAS has taught us in terms of missing heritability, subsets of disease, existence of genetic heterogeneity, and shared autoimmune risk loci. Finally, this review addresses the initial challenges faced in translating the wealth of genetic findings into determining the biological mechanisms that contribute to the relationship between genotype and phenotype. Unraveling the mechanism of how genes directly influence the cause of RA will lead to a better understanding of the disease and will ultimately have a direct clinical impact, informing the development of new therapies that can be utilized in the treatment of RA.Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, GWAS, fine mapping, immunochip, bioinformatics

  13. Clinical evaluation of joint scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pertechnetate (sup(99m)TcO4-) joint scintigraphy was performed on 45 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 3 with nonspecific arthritis and 6 normal subjects. 1) The sites of radioisotopic accumulation were generally in agreement with those of clinical involvement in rheumatoid arthritis. 2) By analysis of build-up curves in the wrist joint, tracer was found to be concentrated more rapidly in rheumatoid arthritis (T 1/2 = 0.67 min.) than in nonspecific arthritis (T 1/2 = 2.66 min.) 3) The degree of radioisotopic accumulation correlated well with the value of CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. It could be cosidered that pertechnetate joint scintigraphy is useful for clinical evaluation of rheumatoid arthritis. (author)

  14. Benefits of Exercise in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K. Cooney

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to highlight the importance of exercise in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and to demonstrate the multitude of beneficial effects that properly designed exercise training has in this population. RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune disease characterised by decrements to joint health including joint pain and inflammation, fatigue, increased incidence and progression of cardiovascular disease, and accelerated loss of muscle mass, that is, “rheumatoid cachexia”. These factors contribute to functional limitation, disability, comorbidities, and reduced quality of life. Exercise training for RA patients has been shown to be efficacious in reversing cachexia and substantially improving function without exacerbating disease activity and is likely to reduce cardiovascular risk. Thus, all RA patients should be encouraged to include aerobic and resistance exercise training as part of routine care. Understanding the perceptions of RA patients and health professionals to exercise is key to patients initiating and adhering to effective exercise training.

  15. The first national clinical audit for rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Firth, J.; Snowden, N.; Ledingham, J; Rivett, A.; Galloway, J; Dennison, E. M.; MacPhie, E.; Ide, Z.; Rowe, I.; Kandala, N.; Jameson, K

    2016-01-01

    The first national audit for rheumatoid and early inflammatory arthritis has benchmarked care for the first 3 months of follow-up activity from first presentation to a rheumatology service. Access to care, management of early rheumatoid arthritis and support for self care were measured against National Institute for Health and Care Excellence quality standards; impact of early arthritis and experience of care were measured using patient-reported outcome and experience measures. The results de...

  16. [New assessment method in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Shintaro; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2016-06-01

    To assess disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), several composite measures have been used. However, more objective indices have been desired due to subjectivity in conventional indices. The Multi-Biomarker Disease Activity(MBDA) score is a novel serum testing based disease activity score ranging 1-100, derived from pre-specified algorithms in combination with 12 biomarkers. The MBDA score not only reflects disease activity in RA, but also is predictive for radiographic progression and risk of flare after drug reduction. Here we review usefulness of the MBDA score in RA. PMID:27311181

  17. Advances in TCM Symptomatology of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梢

    2002-01-01

    @@ In view of the rich experiences and new advances in TCM treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, it is very promising to find a further breakthough in the field of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Treating the disease by means of differentiation of symptoms and signs is a distinctive feature of TCM, however the difficult and also the major point would be the research of mechanism of its symptomatology. The following is a summary of the advances in the study of symptomatology, especially its epidemiology, the role of immune system and blood rheology made since 1987 when the ARA criteria1 was published.

  18. Role of oxidant stress in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    GS, Lekshmi; BR, Suchit Roy; K., Parvathy; K., Geetha Damodaran

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen derived free radicals have been implicated in the causation of Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) [1].In this study, evidence of free radical injury and oxidative stress in patients with RA is compared with healthy subjects by estimating superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, which are anti-oxidant enzymes in RBCs, Glucose 6 Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) in RBCs and serum Malon-di-aldehyde (MDA) levels. Serum MDA levels in RA could be used as a biochemical marker of disease activity and for ...

  19. The rehabilitative approach in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Pappone

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The rehabilitative approach for the patient with rheumatoid arthritis should be early, global and complementary to an early pharmacological therapy, in the context of a multidisciplinary approach, that should include physicians with different specialties and other health professionals. Evaluation scales assessing disability and quality of life are necessary for the rehabilitative approach. These can be classified in 2 groups: specific tools and generic tools, each evaluating different components of the health status. After the evaluation and the definition of the aims of the rehabilitation, a rehabilitative project, potentially including physical therapies, therapeutic exercises, occupational therapy and orthosis should be defined.

  20. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: LABORATORY MODELS OF THE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Orlovskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The  establishment and  application of animal  models  represent effective  tools  for  research  in rheumatoid arthritis (RA pathogenesis. Animal models that replicate various mechanisms reflecting all aspects of RA, including early RA pathology, have provided important insights into studying etiology and pathogenetic mechanisms of RA in humans. This review article was compiled in order to give an introduction to the current state of RA models.  Application of these  experimental disorders  for testing  potential therapeutic approaches will help to make better predictions for drug efficiency in human RA

  1. RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS: LABORATORY MODELS OF THE DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    I. A. Orlovskaya; D. D. Tsyrendorzhiev; S. N. Shchelkunov

    2015-01-01

    The  establishment and  application of animal  models  represent effective  tools  for  research  in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis. Animal models that replicate various mechanisms reflecting all aspects of RA, including early RA pathology, have provided important insights into studying etiology and pathogenetic mechanisms of RA in humans. This review article was compiled in order to give an introduction to the current state of RA models.  Application of these  experimental disorders ...

  2. Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis When Your Immune System Attacks Your Body Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... disease, which means the arthritis results from your immune system attacking your body's own tissues. The course of ...

  3. Symptoms of periodontitis and antibody responses to Porphyromonas gingivalis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lange, Lauren; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; McCracken, Courtney; Wang, Gabriel; Ponder, Lori A.; Angeles-Han, Sheila T.; Rouster-Stevens, Kelly A; Hersh, Aimee O; Vogler, Larry B.; Bohnsack, John F.; Abramowicz, Shelly; Mikuls, Ted R; Prahalad, Sampath

    2016-01-01

    Background The association between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis is well established. Some children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) phenotypically resemble adults with RA, characterized by the presence of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies. We sought to investigate an association between CCP-positive JIA and symptoms of periodontitis and antibodies to oral microbiota. Methods Antibodies to oral pathogens Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, a...

  4. Seroprevalence of parvovirus B19 IgG in children affected by juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Weissbrich, Benedikt; Süß-Fröhlich, Yvonne; Girschick, Hermann J.

    2007-01-01

    Parvovirus (PV) B19 is the causative agent of the childhood disease erythema infectiosum. An association of PV B19 with chronic arthropathies, sometimes resembling rheumatoid arthritis or juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), has repeatedly been described. Other studies, however, have failed to identify any such relationship. In order to study further whether there is a link between PV B19 and JIA, we determined the prevalence of PV B19 specific IgG antibodies in serum samples from children wi...

  5. New agents for scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiopharmaceuticals have been used as investigative tools for the detection and treatment of arthritis activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) since the 1950s. Against the background of the pathophysiology of RA, the current status of joint scintigraphy and possible future developments are reviewed. Both non-specific (radiolabelled leucocytes and technetium-99m labelled human immunoglobulin) and specific targeting radiopharmaceuticals (including radiolabelled antibodies) are considered. The use of radiopharmaceuticals in the detection of arthritis activity has the advantages of allowing direct imaging of joints by means of whole-body scintigraphy and of joints that are difficult to assess clinically or radiographically. Promising results have been obtained with radiolabelled anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibodies and with somatostatin receptor imaging, but more data are available regarding 99mTc-IgG scintigraphy, which differentiates between the various degrees of arthritis activity and thus facilitates the choice of antirheumatic drug. Newer promising approaches to the imaging of RA include the use of radiolabelled J001 and cytokines, though studies on these are limited at present. (orig.)

  6. DRD1-DRD5 EXPRESSION PROFILES IN ARTHRITIS RHEUMATOID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.T. SADEGHI KOUPAEI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesThe cause of rheumatoid arthritis (RA as a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease is still unknown. It appears that both genetic and environmental factors play a role in its pathogenesis. Recent studies reveal that in addition to the CNS, immune cells synthesis neurotransmitters so that these catecholamines can regulate immune functions. The aim of this study is to evaluate the dopamine receptor gene expression profiles on peripheral blood mononuclear cells of rheumatoid arthritis patients in comparison with normal individuals.Material & MethodsIn the present study, we investigated dopamine receptor gene expression in PBMCs of 40 RA patients and 40 healthy individuals using Real Time-PCR.The specificities of the obtained Real time PCR products for the respective dopamine receptors fragments were confirmed by sequenced analysis capillary systemResultsWe found that DRD1-DRD5 types of dopamine receptors genes expression profiles of rheumatoid arthritis patients differ compared to healthy individuals. Moreover, a significant difference of DR2 and DR4 gene expression was seen in rheumatoid arthritis patients.ConclusionThis study showed that some types of dopamine receptors genes expression profiles alter in rheumatoid arthritis patients with comparison to healthy individuals Moreover, this alteration possibly could result in dysfunction of dopaminergic system in immune cells and finally lead to rheumatoid arthritis.Keywords: Rheumatoid arthritis, Dopamine receptor, Gene expression, Human peripheral blood lymphocytes, Real Time- Polymerase Chain Reaction

  7. Interstitial lung involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vladimirovich Bestaev

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease of unknown etiology, characterized by chronic erosive arthritis and extraarticular manifestations. Pulmonary involvement is one of the common extraarticular manifestations of RA and may show itself as bronchial tree lesions, rheumatoid nodules, Caplan's syndrome, and lesions in the pleura or pulmonary interstitium (interstitial lung involvement (ILI. High-resolution computed tomography allows the diagnosis of ILI in RA in nearly 70% of cases although the incidence of ILI may be lower (4 to 30% depending on diagnostic methods and patient selection criteria. There are several histopathological types of ILI, the differential diagnosis of which can be troublesome. Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia are major types of RA-associated ILI. UIP-pattern ILI has a more severe course than ILI with other histological patterns. The clinical presentation of ILI may be complicated by the likely toxic effect of a number of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs used to treat RA, such as methotrexate and leflunomide, and biological agents (BAs, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors. The pathogenesis of pulmonary involvement in RA and the role of synthetic DMARDs and BAs in the development of ILI call for further investigations.An extraarticular manifestation, such as ILI, affects the choice of treatment policy in patients with RA.The relevance of a study of ILI is beyond question. The paper discusses the state-of-the-art of investigations in this area.

  8. TREATMENT OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS BY A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Sai Mrudula,

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The immune system is a complex organization of cells and antibodies designed normally to seek and destroy invaders of the body particularly infections. Rheumatoid arthritis is an auto immune disease that mistakenly attacks our own immune system and damage tissues around joints, tendons, ligaments and muscles by means of T-cell differentiation. Dendritic cells are main important APC’s .These cells on maturation combines with MHC molecules and co-receptors like CD-80, CD-40 activates T-cells and B-cells. This main action is regulated by IL-12gene in dendritic cells. Tolerogenic vaccination signifies exotic tool that is launched in to humans or domestic animals with an intention to enroot immunity and to generate immunological tolerance that is condition marked by stolidity to a specific antigen. Here in this critique we have cited applicability of RNA modified DC in treatment of Rheumatoid arthritis. By using the method of RNA interference using siRNAIL12 treated DC we can treat RA by decreasing T-cell responses towards our own cells.

  9. Interstitial lung involvement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vladimirovich Bestaev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic autoimmune rheumatic disease of unknown etiology, characterized by chronic erosive arthritis and extraarticular manifestations. Pulmonary involvement is one of the common extraarticular manifestations of RA and may show itself as bronchial tree lesions, rheumatoid nodules, Caplan's syndrome, and lesions in the pleura or pulmonary interstitium (interstitial lung involvement (ILI. High-resolution computed tomography allows the diagnosis of ILI in RA in nearly 70% of cases although the incidence of ILI may be lower (4 to 30% depending on diagnostic methods and patient selection criteria. There are several histopathological types of ILI, the differential diagnosis of which can be troublesome. Usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia are major types of RA-associated ILI. UIP-pattern ILI has a more severe course than ILI with other histological patterns. The clinical presentation of ILI may be complicated by the likely toxic effect of a number of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs used to treat RA, such as methotrexate and leflunomide, and biological agents (BAs, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α inhibitors. The pathogenesis of pulmonary involvement in RA and the role of synthetic DMARDs and BAs in the development of ILI call for further investigations.An extraarticular manifestation, such as ILI, affects the choice of treatment policy in patients with RA.The relevance of a study of ILI is beyond question. The paper discusses the state-of-the-art of investigations in this area.

  10. MicroRNAs in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Eisa; Eftekhari, Rahil; Oraei, Mona; Gharib, Alvand; Bidad, Katayoon

    2015-04-01

    The role of genetic and epigenetic factors in the development of rheumatic diseases has been an interesting field of research over the past decades all around the world. Research on the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been active and ongoing, and investigations have attempted to use miRNAs as biomarkers in disease diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. This review focuses on experimental researches in the field of miRNAs and RA to present the data available up to this date and includes researches searched by keywords "microRNA" and "rheumatoid arthritis" in PubMed from 2008 to January 2015. All references were also searched for related papers. miRNAs are shown to act as proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory agents in diverse cell types, and their role seems to be regulatory in most instances. Researchers have evaluated miRNAs in patients compared to controls or have investigated their role by overexpressing or silencing them. Multiple targets have been identified in vivo, in vitro, or in silico, and the researches still continue to show their efficacy in clinical settings. PMID:25736037

  11. Laser transillumination for diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, E.; Podbielska, H.; Bauer, J.; Dmochowska, L.; Dziewięcka, M.

    2006-02-01

    In this work, the special portable apparatus was constructed for performing the transillumination examination on interphalangeal joints of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. It consisted of He-Ne laser with optics for collimated illumination, special holder for placing the finger (perpendicular to optical axis, dorsal site towards camera), and CCD camera with memory stick. The captured images in JPEG format with 1152x864 resolution were converted into the gray level pictures and analyzed by means of image processing program from OPTIMAS. 35 ill patients and 11 healthy volunteers were examined. The histograms and 35 luminances were calculated. The average function was applied in order to calculate the mean gray level values in images of corresponding fingers of healthy subjects. These values were compared with values calculated for ill persons. We proved that that transillumination images may have a diagnostic value. For RA suffering patients the corresponding transillumination images represented the lower gray level values than the average value of finger of health volunteers. For II finger of left hand 96% images of ill persons have lower gray level and in case of right hand it was 93%. This proves that basing in transillumination one can diagnose with high probability the patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Trace element analysis in rheumatoid arthritis under chrysotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis is used to measure trace element concentrations in blood serum from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Initially trace element contaminations in blood-collecting and storing devices are determined. Then mean values and nyctemeral cycles are measured both in normal subjects and patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other similar pathologies. Abnormal concentrations of Cu and Zn and anomalies in the nyctemeral cycle are found in the patients. In the second phase of the project, the special case of chrysotherapeutically treated (gold salt treatment) rheumatoid arthritis patients is studied for extended periods of time (up to 53 weeks). (orig.)

  13. Screening for uveitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kanski, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    Three hundred and fifteen patients with anterior uveitis associated with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) were studied in order to identify the various risk factors for uveitis. Girls were more susceptible to uveitis than boys by a ratio of 3:1. In 94% of cases the uveitis was diagnosed after the development of arthritis. The risk of uveitis was small after seven or more years had elapsed from the onset of arthritis. Patients with pauciarticular onset JCA had the highest risk of uveitis and s...

  14. Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sathish

    2016-04-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is an inflammatory condition characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, arthritis, rash and serositis. In sJIA, systemic inflammation has been associated with dysregulation of the innate immune system, suggesting that it is an autoinflammatory disorder. IL-1 and IL-6 play a major role in the pathogenesis of sJIA and treatment with IL-1 and IL-6 inhibitors has shown to be highly effective. Recent data suggests that early cytokine blockage might abrogate chronic, destructive, therapy resistant arthritis phase, reflecting a potential "window of opportunity" in the care of children with sJIA. PMID:26916892

  15. Efficacy of Fish Oil in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Heidari

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Ingestion of fish oil fatty acids (omega - 3 fatty acids inhibits the formation of arachidonic acid - derived cytokines and leads to production of compounds with diminished biological activity. Beneficial effects of dietary supplementation with fish oil in rheumatoid arthritis have been shown in many controlled trials."nMethods : 43 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis entered in a prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial to recieve either lOgr fish oil daily (treatment group or corn oil (placebo group. Baseline drugs and usual diet were continued without any changes. Disease variables were evaluated at baseline and after completion of study period."nThe changes in disease variables were compared by paired t-tesl in each group. Comparison of the two groups was done by t-test. Functional capacity was compared by Wilcoxon ranks test."nResults : 19 patients in treatment group and 20 patients in placebo group completed the study which lasted eight weeks . In the treatment group, joint pain index decreased from 30±11 at baseline, to 18±11 at the end of study period (P < 0.01. Joint swelling index decreased from 8 ± 4 to 2 ± 4, (P< 0.01, morning stiffness from 87 ± 41 to 24±16 minutes (P < 0.01. In the placebo group the above variable changes were from 19±14 to 25±14 ; 8±8 to 7±6 and 80±71 to 76±75 minutes respectively, which were not significant . The differences between the treatment and placebo groups were significant in joint swelling index (P < 0.05, morning stiffness (P<0.01 and functioal capacity (p< 0.005, the differences in joint pain index and grip strenght did not quite achieve statstical significance. During study period there were no adverese effects with fish oil consumption."nConclusion : Fish oil supplemention has anti-inflamatory effects in rheumatoid arthritis. Further studies are needed to recommend its long - term usage concomittant with other drugs in all patients

  16. Effect of Combination Therapy on Joint Destruction in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, N.; Hubeck-Graudal, T.; Tarp, S.;

    2014-01-01

    progression of radiographic joint erosions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods and Findings: The following combination drug therapies compared versus single DMARD were investigated: Double DMARD: 2 DMARDs (methotrexate, sulfasalazine, leflunomide, injectable gold, cyclosporine, chloroquine...

  17. [Genetics and genomics in rheumatoid arthritis (RA): An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Elías, Ana Karen; Maldonado-Murillo, Karina; López-Mendoza, Luis Fernando; Ramírez-Bello, Julián

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that affects approximately 0.5-1% of the general population and leads to chronic synovial inflammation, destruction of cartilage and bone, and disability. The heritability of rheumatoid arthritis has been estimated to be about 60%, while the contribution of HLA to heritability has been estimated to be 11-37%. Other genes, such as PTPN22, STAT4, CTLA4, TRAF1, PADI4, IRF5, FCRL3, TNFIP3, TNF-α, miRNAs, CD28, CD40, TYK2, etc., have been associated with susceptibility, severity, activity, and treatment response of rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this review is to describe the role of gene variants located in immune system genes associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27160622

  18. The lung in rheumatoid arthritis, cause or consequence? Erratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The name of the one of the first authors is spelt incorrectly in the article, 'The lung in rheumatoid arthritis, cause or consequence? The correct spelling is Aikaterini Chatzidionysiou. PMID:26855334

  19. Biological Therapies for Rheumatoid Arthritis : Progress to Date

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malviya, Gaurav; Salemi, Simonetta; Lagana, Bruno; Diamanti, Andrea Picchianti; D'Amelio, Raffaele; Signore, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Biologic drugs for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have revolutionized the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies, which include murine, chimeric, humanized, fully human antibodies and fusion proteins. These biologics bind to their targets w

  20. DIAGNOSIS OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS USING AN ENSEMBLE LEARNING APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shiezadeh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the diseases that its cause is unknown yet; exploring the field of medical data mining can be helpful in early diagnosis and treatment of the disease. In this study, a predictive model is suggested that diagnoses rheumatoid arthritis. The rheumatoid arthritis dataset was collected from 2,564 patients referred to rheumatology clinic. For each patient a record consists of several clinical and demographic features is saved. After data analysis and pre-processing operations, three different methods are combined to choose proper features among all the features. Various data classification algorithms were applied on these features. Among these algorithms Adaboost had the highest precision. In this paper, we proposed a new classification algorithm entitled CS-Boost that employs Cuckoo search algorithm for optimizing the performance of Adaboost algorithm. Experimental results show that the CS-Boost algorithm enhance the accuracy of Adaboost in predicting of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

  1. Retrocalcaneal bursitis in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldenstein-Schainberg, C; Homsi, C; Rodrigues Pereira, R M; Cossermelli, W

    1992-01-01

    Retrocalcaneal bursitis has been described in various adult rheumatic diseases and septic bursitis unrelated to previous bursal disease has been reported in children. The case is reported here of a girl with juvenile chronic arthritis who developed non-septic retrocalcaneal bursitis; the diagnosis was suggested by a combination of clinical and radiographic studies and was confirmed by ultrasonography.

  2. Outcome of second line therapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, D.R.; McInnes, I.; Hunter, J.; Capell, H A

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To study the functional outcome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who tolerate second line drug therapy for five years. METHODS--We enrolled into prospective controlled trials, 190 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who tolerated 'disease modifying' antirheumatic drug therapy for five years. Demographic data were recorded. Disease activity was measured every six months for two years and annually thereafter, using clinical and laboratory variables. Patient function was mea...

  3. Development of folate-targeted liposomes for rheumatoid arthritis therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nogueira, Eugénia Sofia Costa

    2015-01-01

    Tese de Doutoramento em Biologia Molecular e Ambiental (área de especialização em Biologia Celular e Saúde). Rheumatoid arthritis is a common, chronic inflammatory and destructive arthropathy with considerable personal, social and economic implications. Although the etiology of rheumatoid arthritis remains controversial, the hallmark of the disease is characterized by symmetrical inflammation of the synovial membrane of freely moveable joints, massive synovial proliferation and influx of i...

  4. Autoimmunity to citrullinated type II collagen in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Mamoru; TSUJI, Michiko; Kurosaka, Daitaro; Kurosaka, Daisaburo; Yasuda, Jun; Ito, Yoshitaka; Nishizawa, Tetsuro; Yamada, Akio

    2006-01-01

    The production of autoantibodies to citrullinated type II collagen and the citrullination of type II collagen were analyzed in rheumatoid arthritis. Autoantibodies to citrullinated type II collagen were detected in 78.5% of serum samples from 130 rheumatoid arthritis patients. Autoantibodies to native noncitrullinated type II collagen were detected in 14.6% of serum samples, all of which were positive for anti-citrullinated type II collagen antibodies. Serum samples were also positive for ant...

  5. Orofacial pain, jaw function, and temporomandibular disorders in adult women with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis or persistent juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, M.; Zak, M.; Jensen, B.L.;

    2001-01-01

    Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis......Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis...

  6. [Tofacitinib for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2016-06-01

    The combined use of synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (sDMARDs) such as methotrexate and biological DMARDs (bDMARDs) has revolutionized treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Remission is now realistic targets, achieved by a large proportion of RA patients. However, bDMARDs are limited to intravenous or subcutaneous uses and orally available small but strong products have been developed. Oral administration of tofacitinib targeting the Janus kinase (JAK) is significantly effective than placebo in active RA patients with sDMARD-naïve, inadequately responsive to sDMARDs or TNF-inhibitors. The efficacy was rapid and as strong as adalimumab, a TNF-inhibitor. The common adverse events were related to infection, hematologic and hepatic disorders and association of tofacitinib with carcinogenicity and infections remains debated. PMID:27311188

  7. Therapeutic gene transfer for rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Boissier

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a common and severe disease. Its prevalence in adults is about 0.5%. It not only causes joint pain and severe disability but also increases mortality. RA is an inflammatory autoimmune disease whose the inciting stimulus is unknown, but the cascade of immunological and inflammatory reactions has been elucidated. These reactions produce inflammatory synovitis promptly followed by irreversible joint and bone destruction (1. Available treatments for RA fail to provide long-lasting control of the symptoms or disease progression. The beneficial effects of conventional second-line therapy are incomplete and usually short-lived, despite the progress brought by the introduction of methotrexate in the 1980s....

  8. Cardiovascular disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naranjo, Antonio; Sokka, Tuulikki; Descalzo, Miguel;

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: We analyzed the prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and its association with traditional CV risk factors, clinical features of RA, and the use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in a multinational cross...... by patients. The clinical assessment included a review of clinical features of RA and exposure to DMARDs over the course of RA. Comorbidities were recorded; CV morbidity included myocardial infarction, angina, coronary disease, coronary bypass surgery, and stroke. Traditional risk factors recorded were...... any CV event and age and male gender and between extra-articular disease and myocardial infarction. Prolonged exposure to methotrexate (HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.81 to 0.89), leflunomide (HR 0.59; 95% CI 0.43 to 0.79), sulfasalazine (HR 0.92; 95% CI 0.87 to 0.98), glucocorticoids (HR 0.95; 95% CI 0.92 to 0...

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis in the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates the potential value of MR imaging in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Thirty patients with RA were examined with MR imaging before synoverctomy. Nonenhanced T2-Weighted (T1W) and T2W spin-echo (SE) images were obtained in all 30 cases, T2W gradient echo (GRE) images in 13 cases, and gadolinium-enhanced T1W images in six cases. These images were compared with each other to evaluate the detectability of articular disorders. The MR findings of synovial hypertrophy were compared with the pathologic findings of resected synovium. Articular effusion could be identified on all images, but it was impossible to distinguish between synovial hypertrophy and articular effusion on nonenhanced T1W and GRE images

  10. Role of ultrasound in managing rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Hilde Berner; Terslev, Lene

    2012-01-01

    are better tolerated and have increased efficacy, as compared with palpation guidance, and should thus be included in rheumatologic practice. Different methods such as three-dimensional US, contrast-enhanced US and fusion imaging methods are all possible US approaches that may be used in treatment of......Ultrasound (US) is a valid and reliable imaging tool for evaluation of joint and tendon inflammation as well as cartilage and erosions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Synovitis is usually scored semiquantitatively for both gray scale synovitis and power Doppler activity, and use of an...... atlas for US scoring has shown excellent reliability. Several scores are shown to be responsive to medical treatment, but the optimal joint/tendon score is to be explored. Doppler activity may be quantified by use of pixel counts and flow may be examined by use of resistive index. US-guided injections...

  11. Pain in rheumatoid arthritis: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sarzi-Puttini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA are frequently afflicted by pain, which may be caused by joint inflammation (leading to structural joint damage or secondary osteoarthritis, and may be increased by central sensitisation. Non-inflammatory pain may also confuse the assessment of disease activity, and so the aim of treatment is not only to combat inflammatory disease, but also relieve painful symptoms. In order to ensure effective treatment stratification, it is necessary to record a patients medical history in detail, perform a physical examination, and objectively assess synovitis and joint damage. The management of pain requires various approaches that include pharmacological analgesia and biological and non-biological treatments. Although joint replacement surgery can significantly improve RA-related pain, it may only be available to patients with the most severe advanced disease.

  12. Antibiotics for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogrendik M

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesut OgrendikDivision Physical Therapy and Rheumatology, Nazilli State Hospital, Nazilli, TurkeyAbstract: Antibiotic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA commenced in the 1930s with the use of sulfasalazine. Later, tetracyclines were successfully used for the treatment of RA. In double-blind and randomized studies, levofloxacin and macrolide antibiotics (including clarithromycin and roxithromycin were also shown to be effective in the treatment of RA. There have been several reports in the literature indicating that periodontal pathogens are a possible cause of RA. Oral bacteria are one possible cause of RA. In this review, we aimed to investigate the effects of different antibiotics in RA treatment.Keywords: oral bacteria, treatment, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, periodontitis

  13. Rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown KK

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Joshua J Solomon, Kevin K BrownAutoimmune Lung Center and Interstitial Lung Disease Program, National Jewish Health, Denver, CO, USAAbstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting 1% of the US population. Patients can have extra-articular manifestations of their disease and the lungs are commonly involved. RA can affect any compartment of the respiratory system and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT of the lung is abnormal in over half of these patients. Interstitial lung disease is a dreaded complication of RA. It is more prevalent in smokers, males, and those with high antibody titers. The pathogenesis is unknown but data suggest an environmental insult in the setting of a genetic predisposition. Smoking may play a role in the pathogenesis of disease through citrullination of protein in the lung leading to the development of autoimmunity. Patients usually present in middle age with cough and dyspnea. Pulmonary function testing most commonly shows reduced diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide and HRCT reveals a combination of reticulation and ground glass abnormalities. The most common pattern on HRCT and histopathology is usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP, with nonspecific interstitial pneumonia seen less frequently. There are no large-scale well-controlled treatment trials. In severe or progressive cases, treatment usually consists of corticosteroids with or without a cytotoxic agent for 6 months or longer. RA interstitial lung disease is progressive; over half of patients show radiographic progression within 2 years. Patients with a UIP pattern on biopsy have a survival similar to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, interstitial lung disease, nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, usual interstitial pneumonia, anti-CCP

  14. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis using infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frize, Monique; Adéa, Cynthia; Payeur, Pierre; Di Primio, Gina; Karsh, Jacob; Ogungbemile, Abiola

    2011-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory disease causing pain, swelling, stiffness, and loss of function in joints; it is difficult to diagnose in early stages. An early diagnosis and treatment can delay the onset of severe disability. Infrared (IR) imaging offers a potential approach to detect changes in degree of inflammation. In 18 normal subjects and 13 patients diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), thermal images were collected from joints of hands, wrists, palms, and knees. Regions of interest (ROIs) were manually selected from all subjects and all parts imaged. For each subject, values were calculated from the temperature measurements: Mode/Max, Median/Max, Min/Max, Variance, Max-Min, (Mode-Mean), and Mean/Min. The data sets did not have a normal distribution, therefore non parametric tests (Kruskal-Wallis and Ranksum) were applied to assess if the data from the control group and the patient group were significantly different. Results indicate that: (i) thermal images can be detected on patients with the disease; (ii) the best joints to image are the metacarpophalangeal joints of the 2nd and 3rd fingers and the knees; the difference between the two groups was significant at the 0.05 level; (iii) the best calculations to differentiate between normal subjects and patients with RA are the Mode/Max, Variance, and Max-Min. We concluded that it is possible to reliably detect RA in patients using IR imaging. Future work will include a prospective study of normal subjects and patients that will compare IR results with Magnetic Resonance (MR) analysis.

  15. Adherence to Methotrexate therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Nasim; Ahmad, Nighat Mir; Saeed, Muhammad Ahmed; Khan, Saira; Batool, Shabnam; Farman, Sumaira

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine adherence to methotrexate (MTX) therapy in patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and to identify factors that promote either adherence or non adherence. Methods: One hundred Rheumatoid Arthritis patients on MTX for at least two months were enrolled. Questionnaire was completed by direct interview. Details recorded were, demographics (age, sex, education, monthly income), disease duration, duration on MTX and current dose. Disease Activity Score on 28 joint counts (DAS 28) at the current visit, concomitant drugs taken and number of doses of MTX missed in the previous 8 weeks were noted. Non adherence was defined as omission of any three or more prescribed doses of MTX in previous 8 week. Patients were asked for the factors that motivated their adherence to MTX as well as factors for non adherence. Presence of side effects due to MTX was also recorded. Result: Non adherence was found among 23% of cases. Patients of low socioeconomic group (p <0.0001) and on MTX for longer duration (p <0.001) had higher non adherence. Non adherent patients had significantly higher disease activity as measured by DAS 28 (p<0.001). Good counseling and education by the doctor was a strong predictor of adherence (p <0.001). Lack of affordability (p <0.001); lack of availability at local pharmacy (p <0.001); lack of family support (p <0.001) and lack of awareness regarding need and importance of MTX (p < 0.001were found as significant factors for non adherence. Conclusion: MTX non adherence in RA is noted in about one fourth of study group. Various economical and social issues lead to non adherence but good patient education and counseling by doctor could promote adherence in this study group.

  16. Relationship between Periodontitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis: Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Vilana Maria Adriano Araújo; Iracema Matos Melo; Vilma Lima

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis (PD) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are immunoinflammatory diseases where leukocyte infiltration and inflammatory mediators induce alveolar bone loss, synovitis, and joint destruction, respectively. Thus, we reviewed the relationship between both diseases considering epidemiological aspects, mechanical periodontal treatment, inflammatory mediators, oral microbiota, and antibodies, using the keywords “periodontitis” and “rheumatoid arthritis” in PubMed database between January 201...

  17. Renal findings in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical aspects of 132 necropsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boers, M; Croonen, A M; Dijkmans, B A; Breedveld, F C; Eulderink, F; Cats, A; Weening, J J

    1987-09-01

    Renal abnormalities in 132 necropsied patients with rheumatoid arthritis were studied. Clinical findings before death included extra-articular manifestations of the disease (86% of patients), systemic vasculitis (6%), and uraemia (23%). Necropsy findings included nephrosclerosis (90%), systemic vasculitis (14%) with kidney involvement in 8%, amyloidosis (11%), membranous glomerulopathy (8%), and focal glomerular disease (8%). Association with clinical data suggests that both rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid disease may play a part in the cause of these abnormalities. PMID:3675007

  18. Parental rheumatoid arthritis and long-term child morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom, Ane Lilleøre; Wu, Chun Sen; Olsen, Jørn;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the influence of parental rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on child morbidity. DESIGN: Nationwide cohort study. SETTING: Individual linkage to nationwide Danish registries. PARTICIPANTS: All singletons born in Denmark during 1977-2008 (n=1 917 723) were followed for an average of 16...... diseases with up to three times increased risk of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (HR, 95% CI 3.30, 2.71 to 4.03 and 2.97, 2.20 to 4.01) and increased risk of up to 40% of diabetes mellitus type 1 (HR, 95% CI 1.37, 1.12 to 1.66 and 1.44, 1.09 to 1.90) and up to 30% increased HR of asthma (HR, 95% CI 1.28, 1.......20 to 1.36 and 1.15, 1.04 to 1.26). Conclusions were roughly similar for children exposed to maternal clinical RA and for children only followed up to 16 years of age. CONCLUSION: Children of parents with RA had consistent excess morbidity. If the associations reflect biological mechanisms, genetic...

  19. Recurrent new-onset uveitis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis during anti-TNFα treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Leonetti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation involving the uveal tract of the eye, termed uveitis, is frequently associated with various rheumatic disease, including seronegative spondylarthropathies, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease and Behçet’s disease. Scleritis and keratitis may be associated with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic vasculitides such as Wegener’s granulomatosis. Immune-mediated uveitis can have a chronic relapsing course and produce numerous possible complications, many of which can result in permanent vision loss. Treatment typically includes topical or systemic corticosteroids with cycloplegic-mydriatic drugs and/or noncorticosteroid immunosuppressants, but often there is an insufficient clinical effectiveness. Anti-TNFα therapy is promising in the treatment of sight threatening uveitis, particularly in patients with Behçet’s disease. However, there have been also reports of new-onset uveitis during treatment of joint disease with TNFα inhibitors. We describe a case of new-onset uveitis in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis during therapy with etanercept at first and infliximab at last. Although we cannot exclude uveitis as linked to rheumatoid arthritis, it is unlike that the uveitis arises when the joint disease is well controlled. The hypothetical paradoxical effect of anti-TNF is here discussed.

  20. Consensus statement on blocking the effects of interleukin-6 and in particular by interleukin-6 receptor inhibition in rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolen, Josef S; Schoels, Monika M; Nishimoto, Norihiro;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since approval of tocilizumab (TCZ) for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), interleukin 6 (IL-6) pathway inhibition was evaluated in trials of TCZ and other agents targeting the IL-6 receptor and ligand in various RA populations and other in...

  1. Biological therapies for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Lessons from the adult and pediatric experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Stoll

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Matthew L Stoll, Alisa C GotteDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Rheumatology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USAAbstract: Biologics have advanced the therapy of adult and pediatric arthritis. They have been linked to rare serious adverse outcomes, but the actual risk of these events is controversial in adults, and largely unknown in pediatrics. Because of the paucity of safety and efficacy data in children, pediatric rheumatologists often rely on the adult literature. Herein, we reviewed the adult and pediatric literature on five classes of medicines: Tumor necrosis factor (TNF inhibitors, anakinra, rituximab, abatacept, and tocilizumab. For efficacy, we reviewed randomized controlled studies in adults, but did include lesser qualities of evidence for pediatrics. For safety, we utilized prospective and retrospective studies, rarely including reports from other inflammatory conditions. The review included studies on rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis, as well as juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Overall, we found that the TNF inhibitors have generally been found safe and effective in adult and pediatric use, although risks of infections and other adverse events are discussed. Anakinra, rituximab, abatacept, and tocilizumab have also shown positive results in adult trials, but there is minimal pediatric data published with the exception of small studies involving the subgroup of children with systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, in whom anakinra and tocilizumab may be effective therapies.Keywords: juvenile idiopathic arthritis, biologics, rheumatoid arthritis

  2. Bone edema on magnetic resonance imaging is an independent predictor of rheumatoid arthritis development in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer-Jensen, Anne; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Hetland, Merete Lund;

    2011-01-01

    To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis (UA).......To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a tool for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in patients with early undifferentiated arthritis (UA)....

  3. Rheumatoid Arthritis Treatment and Causes | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  4. The ability of synovitis to predict structural damage in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dougados, Maxime; Devauchelle-Pensec, Valérie; Ferlet, Jean François;

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate synovitis (clinical vs ultrasound (US)) to predict structural progression in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To evaluate synovitis (clinical vs ultrasound (US)) to predict structural progression in rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  5. Study: Smoking Hikes Chances of Early Death for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Rheumatoid Arthritis Smoking Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Rheumatoid Arthritis Smoking About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  6. Lower limb joint replacement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Nicholas D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There is limited literature regarding the peri-operative and surgical management of patients with rheumatoid disease undergoing lower limb arthroplasty. This review article summarises factors involved in the peri-operative management of major lower limb arthroplasty surgery for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods We performed a search of the medical literature, using the PubMed search engine (http://www.pubmed.gov. We used the following terms: ‘rheumatoid’ ‘replacement’ ‘arthroplasty’ and ‘outcome’. Findings The patient should be optimised pre-operatively using a multidisciplinary approach. The continued use of methotrexate does not increase infection risk, and aids recovery. Biologic agents should be stopped pre-operatively due the increased infection rate. Patients should be made aware of the increased risk of infection and periprosthetic fracture rates associated with their disease. The surgical sequence is commonly hip, knee and then ankle. Cemented total hip replacement (THR and total knee replacement (TKR have superior survival rates over uncemented components. The evidence is not clear regarding a cruciate sacrificing versus retaining in TKR, but a cruciate sacrificing component limits the risk early instability and potential revision. Patella resurfacing as part of a TKR is associated with improved outcomes. The results of total ankle replacement remain inferior to THR and TKR. RA patients achieve equivalent pain relief, but their rehabilitation is slower and their functional outcome is not as good. However, the key to managing these complicated patients is to work as part of a multidisciplinary team to optimise their outcome.

  7. The joints in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Ording Muller, Lil-Sofie; Humphries, Paul; Rosendahl, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common rheumatic entity in childhood. Imaging has become an important supplement to the clinical assessment of children with JIA. Radiographs still play an important role in the workup, and long-term follow-up in children with JIA, but are not sensitive to findings in the early disease stage. Both ultrasound and MRI are more sensitive to inflammatory changes than clinical assessment alone. However, the differentiation between normal findings ...

  8. Roentgenographic study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis 30 patients were selected who were diagnosis as rheumatoid arthritis through the clinical, radiographic examination and laboratory finding. Temporoman dibular joint involvement was evaluated through the clinical, radiographic examination. The results were as follows; 1. TMJ was involved in 15 patients of 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (50% involvement). 2. Duration of rheumatoid arthritis was more longer in patients with TMJ involvement than in patients without TMJ involvement. 3. Osseous changes in TMJ were in order of frequency erosion, flattening, osteophyte, sclerosis, deformity, and most common involved site was mandibular condyle. 4. Most common positional change of condyle was forward position in centric occlusion, and restricted movement of condyle in 1 inch mouth opening. 5. TMJ involvement of rheumatoid arthritis was almost bilateral. 6. Main symptoms of TMJ were pain, stiffness, tenderness, limitation of mouth opening, crepitation. 7. There was not the case of ankylosis. 8. There was statistically insignificant correlation between mandibular deviation and TMJ involvement, but some cases showed severe deviation on mouth opening.

  9. Roentgenographic study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Ho Jung; You, Dong Soo [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-11-15

    For the study of the temporomandibular joint in rheumatoid arthritis 30 patients were selected who were diagnosis as rheumatoid arthritis through the clinical, radiographic examination and laboratory finding. Temporoman dibular joint involvement was evaluated through the clinical, radiographic examination. The results were as follows; 1. TMJ was involved in 15 patients of 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (50% involvement). 2. Duration of rheumatoid arthritis was more longer in patients with TMJ involvement than in patients without TMJ involvement. 3. Osseous changes in TMJ were in order of frequency erosion, flattening, osteophyte, sclerosis, deformity, and most common involved site was mandibular condyle. 4. Most common positional change of condyle was forward position in centric occlusion, and restricted movement of condyle in 1 inch mouth opening. 5. TMJ involvement of rheumatoid arthritis was almost bilateral. 6. Main symptoms of TMJ were pain, stiffness, tenderness, limitation of mouth opening, crepitation. 7. There was not the case of ankylosis. 8. There was statistically insignificant correlation between mandibular deviation and TMJ involvement, but some cases showed severe deviation on mouth opening.

  10. Janus kinase inhibitors for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Kunihiro

    2016-06-01

    Treatment of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has advanced substantially over the past decade with the development of biologics targeting inflammatory cytokines. Recent progress in treating RA has been achieved with janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors (Jakinibs), an orally available disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug targeting the intracellular kinase JAK and with similar efficacy to biologics. The first Jakinib approved for RA was tofacitinib, which exerted superiority to methotrexate and non-inferiority to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors. In recent years, the Jakinib baricitinib has demonstrated superiority to both methotrexate and a TNF inhibitor, adalimumab. Given these promising findings, Jakinibs are expected to represent the next generation compounds for treating RA, and a number of Jakinibs are currently in clinical trials. Jakinibs can differ substantially in their selectivity against JAKs; tofacitinib and baricitinib target multiple JAKs, whereas the most recently developed Jakinibs target only a single JAK. The influence of Jakinib selectivity on efficacy and side effects is of great interest, requiring further careful observation. PMID:26994322

  11. [Colonic microbial biocenosis in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul'neva, M Iu; Noskov, S M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the work was to study colonic microbial biocenosis and colonizing ability of opportunistic bacteria in 32 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 30 healthy subjects. RA was diagnosed based on the American Rheumatism Association criteria (1987). Qualitative and quantitative composition of the microflora was detected by a bacteriological method. StatSoft Statistics 6.0 was used to treat the data obtained. RA was associated with significant modification of the intestinal flora, viz. decrease in lactobacteria and significant increase of enterococci, clostridia, colibacteria showing reduced enzymatic activity, and opportunistic species. Also, symbiotic relationships between microorganisms altered. The fraction of bifidobacteria, bacteroids, and lactopositive colibacteria reduced while the abundance of opportunistic enterobacteria and staphylococci was elevated. Opportunistic Enterobacteriaceae were present in urine and nasal mucosa which suggested their translocation from the intestines. It is concluded that changes in intestinal microflora and colonization by opportunistic bacteria enhance the risk of development of co-morbid conditions in patients with RA. PMID:21932563

  12. Serum Trace Element Concentrations in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebari, Maryam; Ayati, Razie; Mirzaei, Hamed; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Hejazi, Sepideh; Saghafi, Massoud; Saadati, Nayyereh; Ferns, Gordon A; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a condition that is associated with oxidative stress. Serum trace elements and their related transport proteins, e.g., albumin and ceruloplasmin, play an important role in the antioxidant defense. Trace element status may therefore be involved in the pathogenesis of RA or be affected by the disease activity of this chronic inflammatory condition. The study participants were 110 patients with RA and 100 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. Serum concentrations of albumin, ceruloplasmin, selenium, zinc, copper, and zinc/copper ratio were measured in all subjects. The relationship between these parameters and disease activity score was also assessed. Lower concentrations of serum Alb, Zn, and Se were independently related to disease activity index. High concentrations of serum copper were associated with the presence of RA. Serum Cu concentrations were positively related to disease activity as assessed by the disease activity score. Low serum concentrations of Zn and Se, and high serum Cu concentrations may be associated with the presence of RA or be a consequence of this condition. Of the trace elements that were investigated in the present study, only serum Cu was positively correlated with disease activity. PMID:26450515

  13. Sarilumab for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Simon

    2016-03-01

    Simon Cooper is interviewed by Ellen Clarke, Commissioning Editor Simon Cooper has >18 years of global experience in the pharmaceutical industry. He joined Sanofi in July 2014 as the Vice President, Global Project Head. In his current position at Sanofi, Dr Cooper is responsible for the clinical development of sarilumab and the worldwide submission in rheumatoid arthritis. He joined Sanofi after serving as the Global Program Medical Director at Novartis since 2012. In this role, Dr Cooper acted as the clinical lead for secukinumab psoriasis submission. Prior to Novartis, Dr Cooper held various posts at Human Genome Sciences, USA, including Executive Director of Clinical Research, Senior Director of Clinical Research and Director of Clinical Research. During his tenure at Human Genome Sciences, USA, Dr Cooper was involved in the submission of belimumab leading to its approval for SLE, and was responsible for its subsequent clinical development program. Dr Cooper has also previously held positions at MedImmune Ltd, UK, Roche, Napp Pharmaceutical Research Ltd, Wyeth Research and Medeval Ltd. In these roles, his responsibilities ranged from medical oversight of clinical trials to medical support for commercial, medical affairs and business development. He received a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery from University of Newcastle upon Tyne Medical School. PMID:26860742

  14. Neutrophil gene expression in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Andrew; Bakstad, Denise; Allen, John C; Thomas, Luke; Moots, Robert J; Edwards, Steven W

    2005-10-01

    There is now a growing awareness that infiltrating neutrophils play an important role in the molecular pathology of rheumatoid arthritis. In part, this arises from the fact that neutrophils have potent cytotoxic activity, but additionally from the fact that inflammatory neutrophils can generate a number of cytokines and chemokines that can have a direct influence on the progress of an inflammatory episode. Furthermore, the molecular properties of inflammatory neutrophils are quite different from those normally found in the circulation. For example, inflammatory neutrophils, but not blood neutrophils, can express cell surface receptors (such as MHC Class II molecules and FcgammaRI) that dramatically alter the way in which these cells can interact with ligands to modulate immune function. Cytokine/chemokine expression and surface expression of these novel cell surface receptors is dependent upon the neutrophil responding to local environmental factors to selectively up-regulate the expression of key cellular components via signalling pathways coupled to transcriptional activation. However, major changes in the expression levels of some proteins are also regulated by post-translational modifications that alter rates of proteolysis, and hence changes in the steady-state levels of these molecules. PMID:16112850

  15. Preclinical lung disease in early rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Perez, Alejandro; Luburich, Patricio; Rodriguez-Sanchon, Benigno; Dorca, Jordi; Nolla, Joan Miquel; Molina-Molina, Maria; Narvaez-Garcia, Javier

    2016-02-01

    Early detection and treatment of lung disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may ameliorate disease progression. The objectives of this study were to investigate the frequency of asymptomatic lung abnormalities in early RA patients and the potential association of positive RA blood reactive biomolecules with lung involvement. A prospective observational study was performed in a cohort of patients with early RA (joint symptoms < 2 years) without respiratory symptoms, who were included in a screening program for lung disease with a baseline chest radiograph (CR) and complete pulmonary function tests (PFTs). In those patients with lung abnormalities on the CR or PFTs, a high-resolution chest computed tomography scan (HRCT) was performed. We included 40 patients (30 women). Altered PFTs were detected in 18 (45%) of these patients. These cases had a diffusion lung transfer capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO) of <80% of predicted, without a significant reduction in the forced vital capacity. The HRCT detected abnormalities in 11 of the 18 patients. Diffuse bronchiectasis was the main finding. An inverse correlation between the anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA) levels and DLCO was found. Asymptomatic lung disease is present in up to 45% of early RA patients and can be determined by PFTs and ACPA levels. PMID:26846584

  16. PERIOPERATIVE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Amirdzhanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the joint management of rheumatoid arthritis patients needing endoprosthetic replacement of the large joints of the lower extremities by rheumatologists and orthopedic traumatologists.Due to the fact that there are no conventional standards or guidelines for the perioperative management of patients with rheumatic diseases, adopted by international rheumatology associations, the authors generalize their experience in managing the patients in terms of international approaches and guidelines from different countries. The medical assessment and reduction of cardiovascular risks, the prevention of infectious complications, hemorrhages, and lower extremity deep vein thrombosis, and the specific features of management of patients with osteoporosis are under consideration. The authors' experience in managing the patients receiving antirheumatic therapy with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, such as methotrexate, leflunomide, sulfasalazine, and hydroxychloroquine, is detailed. Recommendations for managing patients taking glucocorticoids and biologic agents (tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, anti-B-cell therapy, and interleukin-6 receptor inhibitors in the preoperative andpostoperative periods are given.

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis of the knee - radiological evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, multisystemic disease. The characteristic feature is persistent inflammatory synovitis. The knee joint is commonly involved with synovial hypertrophy, chronic effusion, and frequently ligamentous laxity. Pain and swelling behind the knee may be caused by extension of inflamed synovium into the popliteal space (Baker's cyst). Plain radiographs of the knee joint remain the basic radiological procedure, although early in the disease they might not provide significant changes. Sonography sufficiently reveals synovial fluid and Baker cysts, but cannot be recommended for evaluation of synovial proliferations or pannus formation. Computer tomography has only limited indications and may be used for the evaluation of subtle erosive lesions or the quantitation of osteoporotic changes. Magnetic resonance imaging has shown excellent visualization of cartilage, fluid, synovium and soft tissues and is the method of choice for the demonstration of early affection and the evaluation of panus activity and therapy control. With daministration of contrast agents (gadolinium), dynamic studies may demonstrate inflammatory activity. Modern MR sequences, such as T1 SE 'fat sat' or magnetization transfer, further improve the discrimination of cartilage, pannus and synovial fluid. (orig.)

  18. [GWAS of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Drug Discovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Koichiro

    2015-04-01

    We have conducted genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We previously found that myelin basic protein (MBP) is associated with RA. One of the MBP isoforms (Golli-MBP) is expressed not only in nerve cells, but also in hematopoietic cells, and may negatively regulate T-cell receptor signaling. We expanded the GWAS level by collaborating with laboratories in Japan and then throughout the world. Meta-analysis of GWAS data resulted in the identification of -100 genomic loci associated with RA development. The -100 genomic loci contain -400 candidate genes, and it is not easy to find out which genes actually play important roles in RA. By incorporating available public databases, we succeeded in narrowing down the susceptibility genes from 377 to 98. We also showed that regulatory T cells are associated with RA based on the combination of the histone methylation database and our mega-GWAS results. Protein-protein interaction and drug discovery databases gave us information that some of the drugs have already been developed as therapeutic medicines for RA, and some of them were used for diseases other than RA. These drugs may be used for RA in the near future (drug repurposing). The combination of biological databases and GWAS results may be a novel method to identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:26536782

  19. Prevention of Stroke in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Alicia M; Di Napoli, Mario; Behrouz, Réza

    2015-12-01

    The risk of cerebrovascular disease is increased among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and remains an underserved area of medical need. Only a minor proportion of RA patients achieve suitable stroke prevention. Classical cardiovascular risk factors appear to be under-diagnosed and undertreated among patients with RA. Reducing the inflammatory burden is also necessary to lower the cardiovascular risk. An adequate control of disease activity and cerebrovascular risk assessment using national guidelines should be recommended for all patients with RA. For patients with a documented history of cerebrovascular or cardiovascular risk factors, smoking cessation and corticosteroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs at the lowest dose possible are crucial. Risk score models should be adapted for patients with RA by introducing a 1.5 multiplication factor, and their results interpreted to appropriately direct clinical care. Statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and angiotensin-II receptor blockers are preferred treatment options. Biologic and non-biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs should be initiated early to mitigate the necessity of symptom control drugs and to achieve early alleviation of the inflammatory state. Early control can improve vascular compliance, decrease atherosclerosis, improve overall lipid and metabolic profiles, and reduce the incidence of heart disease that may lead to atrial fibrillation. In patients with significant cervical spine involvement, early intervention and improved disease control are necessary and may prevent further mechanical vascular injury. PMID:26486791

  20. DNA typing for HLA-DPB1*02 and -DPB1*04 in multiple sclerosis and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Ryder, L P; Morling, N;

    1990-01-01

    arthritis (PJRA), and in 38 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Increased frequencies of the cellularly defined HLA-DPw2 in PJRA and of HLA-DPw4 in MS have previously been reported. In the patient groups, the frequencies of the DPB1*02 and DPB1*04 variants did not differ significantly from those expected...... based on the cellularly defined HLA-DP types of the patients and the frequencies of the DPB1*02 and DPB1*04 variants among healthy Danes.......DP gene typing using in vitro DNA amplification combined with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (SSOP) has recently been reported. The amplification step may be specific for the HLA-DPB locus, or it may be specific for one or a group of HLA-DPB alleles, thus increasing the discriminatory...

  1. The radiographic features of rheumatoid arthritis in HLA-B27-positive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundback, J.H. (Dept. of Radiology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)); Rosenberg, Z.S. (Dept. of Radiology, Hospital for Joint Diseases, Orthopaedic Inst., New York, NY (United States)); Solomon, G. (Dept. of Rheumatology, Hospital for Joint Diseases, Orthopaedic Institute, New York, NY (United States))

    1993-05-01

    Radiographs were reviewed in a group of nine patients with classical seropositive rheumatoid arthritis who on tissue typing were found to express the class I HLA-B27 allele. Radiographs were analyzed with regard to whether or not they demonstrated radiographic features of (1) classical rheumatoid arthritis, (2) seronegative arthritis, or (3) mixed features of rheumatoid and seronegative arthritis. Five patients (55%) displayed radiographic features consistent with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, two patients (22%) showed radiographic features of seronegative disorder (periostitis and sacroiliitis), and two patients (22%) showed a mixed picture with evidence of both rheumatoid arthritis and a seronegative disorder. Thus, the HLA-B27 allele contributed to the radiographic features in 44% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and associated HLA-B27. Thus, the wide range of findings in our population indicates that the radiographic attributes are not specific enough to constitute a unique subpopulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  2. The radiographic features of rheumatoid arthritis in HLA-B27-positive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographs were reviewed in a group of nine patients with classical seropositive rheumatoid arthritis who on tissue typing were found to express the class I HLA-B27 allele. Radiographs were analyzed with regard to whether or not they demonstrated radiographic features of (1) classical rheumatoid arthritis, (2) seronegative arthritis, or (3) mixed features of rheumatoid and seronegative arthritis. Five patients (55%) displayed radiographic features consistent with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, two patients (22%) showed radiographic features of seronegative disorder (periostitis and sacroiliitis), and two patients (22%) showed a mixed picture with evidence of both rheumatoid arthritis and a seronegative disorder. Thus, the HLA-B27 allele contributed to the radiographic features in 44% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and associated HLA-B27. Thus, the wide range of findings in our population indicates that the radiographic attributes are not specific enough to constitute a unique subpopulation of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  3. Network analysis identifies protein clusters of functional importance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Adam; Meyer, Stefan; Hanson, Daniel; Clayton, Peter; Donn, Rachelle

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Our objective was to utilise network analysis to identify protein clusters of greatest potential functional relevance in the pathogenesis of oligoarticular and rheumatoid factor negative (RF-ve) polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods JIA genetic association data were used to build an interactome network model in BioGRID 3.2.99. The top 10% of this protein:protein JIA Interactome was used to generate a minimal essential network (MEN). Reactome FI Cytoscape 2.83...

  4. Incidence of rheumatoid arthritis from 1995 to 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens; Kjær, Niels; Svendsen, Anders; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the mean incidence rate of rheumatoid arthritis over a 7-year period from 1995 to 2001 in a population in the southern part of Denmark, using the data from several sources. Cases fulfilling the 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria for rheumatoid...... from general practice and referral centres, the estimated incidence was 35/100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval 32-38). We suggest that the estimated rate should be viewed as a plausible upper limit for the incidence of rheumatoid arthritis in the southern part of Denmark....... arthritis were identified at hospitals and private practising rheumatologists (referral centres), and in general practice. The observed incidence was 32/100,000 person-years (95% confidence interval 29-35). Using the ratio between the number of cases known only from general practice and the number known...

  5. PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGICAL AND IMMUNE STATUS IN THE PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Y. Abramova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of this study was to elucidate a role of brain hemispheres in formation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The parameters of higher nervous activity, autonomous and immune systems in these patients that were characterized by domination of the left or right hemispheres of a brain, were defined in present work. The results of this work allow of justifying the following items: a relative increase in functional activity of right brain hemisphere in woman may represent a factor that either contributes to triggering of rheumatoid arthritis, or predisposes for its development; b formation of rheumatoid arthritis in females is accompanied by complex changes in psychophysiological and immune parameters, that exhibit significant features depending on functional asymmetry of the hemispheres; c a pronounced dependence is revealed between clinical course of disease and functional asymmetry of hemispheres.

  6. JUVENILE CHRONIC ARTHRITIS WITH EYE LESION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S O Salugina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A bstract. Objective, to describe a series of pts with JRA/JCA and uveitis. Material and methods. The study included 81 pts with JRA and uveitis. There were 68 girls-84%, 13 boys-16%. We studied the clinical manifestations, the antinuclear antibodies (ANA using HEP-2 cells for the 33 pts with uveitis and 46 pts without uveitis, HLA status was determined for 36 pts. Results. 85,2% of the children had arthritis before uveitis. The mean age at onset of arthritis was 3,5 year (range: 1-10 yrs, the mean age at onset of uveitis was 6 year (range: 2-15 yrs. The mean interval between the onset of arthritis and uveitis was 3,02 years (range: 3,5 yrs before arthritis onset to 12,5 yrs after. In 68,1% pts the diagnosis of uveitis was made within 5 yrs after onset of arthritis. 93% of pts had mono-oligoarticular onset, but 50% had poliarticular course. 23,5% of pts had functional disability 3-4 classes. Ocular complications were developed in 53.1%: cataracts-38,3%, band keratopathy-11,1%, glaucoma-2,5%. 93,9% of 33 studied children with arthritis and uveitis were ANA positive, 9,1% were RF positive. 18,1 % had HLA-DR8 (p<0,001, 83,3% - HLA-A2 (p<0,00l, HLA-B27 - 30,6 % (p<0,00l. Conclusion. Clinical and laboratory data of our pts suggest that: lthe combination of arthritis and uveitis would be named JCA with uveitis; 2 according our opinion JCA with uveitis is separate nosological form among the juvenile arthritides.

  7. Newer Nutritional basis in the management of Rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Sharat Agarwal

    2010-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorder culminating in joint destruction with functional impairment & deformities. This disease is associated with poor nutritional status in relation to various nutrients due to not only because of increased requirements & reduction in their absorption but also due to disease modifying anti-rheumatoid drugs (DMARD’s), Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAID’s) & corticosteroids prescribed to alleviate symptoms of this disea...

  8. Renal findings in rheumatoid arthritis: clinical aspects of 132 necropsies.

    OpenAIRE

    Boers, M.; Croonen, A M; Dijkmans, B A; Breedveld, F C; Eulderink, F.; Cats, A.; Weening, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Renal abnormalities in 132 necropsied patients with rheumatoid arthritis were studied. Clinical findings before death included extra-articular manifestations of the disease (86% of patients), systemic vasculitis (6%), and uraemia (23%). Necropsy findings included nephrosclerosis (90%), systemic vasculitis (14%) with kidney involvement in 8%, amyloidosis (11%), membranous glomerulopathy (8%), and focal glomerular disease (8%). Association with clinical data suggests that both rheumatoid and no...

  9. Intestinal Amyloidosis in Common Variable Immunodeficiency and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Meira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of reactive amyloidosis that developed secondary to common variable immunodeficiency and rheumatoid arthritis. A 66-year-old woman, with prior history of common variable immunodeficiency and rheumatoid arthritis, was referred to our clinic for chronic diarrhea investigation. The patient was submitted to colonoscopy with ileoscopy, which did not show relevant endoscopic alterations. However, undertaken biopsies revealed amyloid deposition. Since amyloidosis with GI involvement is a rare cause of chronic diarrhea, this pathology should be considered in etiologic investigation, especially when associated with chronic inflammatory diseases.

  10. Role of ultrasound in assessment of early rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews imaging methods used for diagnosis and monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis, with emphasis on the role of ultrasonography. Traditionally, conventional radiography has been useful in detecting and monitoring the extent of joint destruction in rheumatic disease. However, it is particularly difficult to detect pathological joint changes in the early stages. Magnetic resonance imaging is able to detect inflammation of the synovial membrane and erosions but is limited by cost and availability. Ultrasound has recently emerged as a useful and potentially reliable method for assessing the degree of joint inflammation and erosion in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis: Radiological changes in the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective was to describe the radiographic cervical spine changes in rheumatoid arthritis patients.Forty-nine patients (37 females and 12 males ) diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between June 1998 and December 2000, were studied for their radiographic cervical spine changes . Their mean age at disease onset was 41.4+ 13.4 years (range of 18-73)and mean duration of disease was 9.1+-6.28 years (range of 2-34). Their demographic data including rheumatoid factor status was obtained. Standard conventional radiographs cervical spine were obtained to study the cervical spine changes. Cervical radiographic changes were found in 34 patients (27 females and 7 males) 10 had subluxation (7 with atlanto-axial subluxation,2 with sub-axial subluxation,and one with lateral subluxation ). No vertical impaction was seen. Erosion of odontoid process was seen in one patient .All were rheumatoid seropositive Cervical spine changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are common, in particular subluxation in the upper cervical spine. Our study showed somewhat lesser prevalence of these changes. These were clinically correlated with disease duration, female sex, and rheumatoid factor, but were not clinically significant. (author)

  12. Why golimumab in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rossini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Golimumab is an anti-TNF monoclonal antibody administred subcutaneously once a month and produced with an innovative technology that minimizes immunogenicity. This paper reviews and updates the main studies on the efficacy, safety and pharmacoeconomic aspects of treatment with golimumab of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. Comprehensive assessment of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility loci in a large psoriatic arthritis cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bowes, John

    2012-08-01

    A number of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility genes have been identified in recent years. Given the overlap in phenotypic expression of synovial joint inflammation between RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA), the authors explored whether RA susceptibility genes are also associated with PsA.

  14. New Advances in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Long Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA comprises a group ofheterogeneous disorders of chronic arthritis in childhood withno apparent etiology. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the mostcommon pediatric rheumatic disease and is associated withsignificant long-term morbidity and mortality. There have beenmajor advances in recent years in our understanding of thepathogenesis of JIA, the definition of disease control, and biological treatments for JIA. Multiple environmental and geneticfactors have been linked with the onset and / or the exacerbation of JIA, including perinatal factors, viral and bacterialinfections, epigenetic factors, and malnutrition. However, nosingle causative factor has been identified to date. As ourunderstanding of the complex network of immune cells andinflammatory cytokines has improved, biologics have beendeveloped to modulate the inflammatory processes. Indeed, anumber of such biologics have been demonstrated effective for the treatment of JIA.Although biologic agents may alleviate the inflammation associated with JIA and preventdisability caused by joint destruction, continued and comprehensive observation is requiredto determine the long-term outcomes associated with such treatment

  15. Is there a relationship between periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Bhalgat Ranade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Growth of scientific evidence suggests an exquisite association between oral infection and systemic diseases. Though etiologies of periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA are separate, their underlying pathological processes are sufficient to warrant consideration of hypothesis that individuals at risk of developing RA may also be at the risk of developing periodontitis and vice versa. Materials and Methods: To test their relationship, a study was carried out on 80 individuals. Part A: Forty subjects having rheumatoid arthritis (RA group were compared to 40 controls without arthritis (NRA group. Their periodontal indices rheumatoid arthritis clinical laboratory parameters were also correlated with periodontitis in group. Part B: Omplete periodontal treatment was done for 10 patients of group suffering from periodontitis. All parameters of periodontal indices were measured pre-operatively and weeks after completion of periodontal treatment. Results: (1 There was high prevalence of mild (12.5% to moderate (75% periodontitis in group. (2 Extent severity of periodontal disease rheumatoid arthritis were positively correlated. (3 Statistically significant differences were present in periodontal parameters of RA group compared to NRA group. (4 There was statistically, significant reduction in parameters postoperatively with concomitant decrease in periodontal parameters in RA group. Conclusion: Thus, an association exists between periodontal disease with an underlying dysregulation of the molecular pathways in the inflammatory response. Also, there are significant management implications in the future as new host modifying medications are developed.

  16. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity

  17. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zordo, Tobias de; Mlekusch, Sabine P.; Feuchtner, Gudrun M. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mur, Erich [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Schirmer, Michael [Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital of the Elisabethines Klagenfurt, Voelkermarkter Strasse 15-19, 9020 Klagenfurt (Austria); Klauser, Andrea S. [Department of Radiology II, Medical University Innsbruck, Anichstrasse 35, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria)], E-mail: andrea.klauser@i-med.ac.at

    2007-11-15

    The purpose of this review is to describe the spectrum of sonographic findings in rheumatic diseases with respect to the diagnostic potential using US contrast media which prove activity or inactivity in synovial tissue where new treatment regimes target. Synovial activity can be found in non-erosive and erosive forms of primary and secondary osteoarthritis, and in inflammatory forms of joint diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and peripheral manifestations of spondyloarthritis including, ankylosing spondylitis, Reiter's syndrome, psoriatic arthritis and enteropathic arthritis. It can also be present in metabolic and endocrine forms of arthritis, in connective tissue arthropathies like systemic lupus erythematosus or scleroderma and in infectious arthritis. Ultrasound should be used as first-line imaging modality in suspected early cases of RA and other forms of arthritis, whereas contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can further enable for sensitive assessment of vascularity which correlates with disease activity.

  18. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan;

    2009-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity in patients with...

  19. The interleukin-20 receptor axis in early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Nielsen, Morten Aagaard;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is often characterized by the presence of rheumatoid factor, anti-citrullinated protein antibodies, and bone erosions. Current therapies can compromise immunity, leading to risk of infection. The interleukin-20 receptor (IL-20R) axis comprising IL-19, IL-20...... RA synovial fluid compared with monocytes from both RA and healthy control peripheral blood. The plasma concentrations of IL-20 and IL-24 were increased in rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated protein antibody positive compared with negative early RA patients (all P < 0.0001). Immune complexes...

  20. Rheumatoid arthritis patients' experience of climate care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaks, Katrin; Sjöström, Rita

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand and examine how patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience climate care and its effects. A qualitative approach was chosen for the study. Two men and six women were interviewed according to a semistructured interview guide. The text was analyzed using a manifest content analysis. The analysis resulted in four categories and 10 subcategories. The interviewees experienced climate care positively. The training was perceived increasing gradually. The patients felt that they performed to a maximum capacity during training and were impressed by the staff's enthusiasm and encouragement. The patients felt that they were involved in the goal setting and the choice of treatment, and the staff noticed individual needs. There was a feeling among the patients of being acknowledged by the staff. Information about the disease was perceived as individualized. The climate and beautiful surroundings were viewed as encouraging physical activity and a feeling of well-being. Patients made new friends, had fun together and also shared experiences about their disease. Furthermore, the patients described a sense of belonging to a group as well as a feeling of not being the only one that was sick among the healthy. Not having to do everyday tasks and having time to themselves were perceived positively. Several factors contributed to the positive experiences of climate care; climate, environment, physical activity, social context, staff involvement, and information about the disease were described as interacting together and resulting in a sense of well-being. A proposal for future research would be to examine if/how the various factors might interact and affect the RA patients' illness and quality of life. PMID:26730385

  1. Glucocorticoids and chronotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutolo, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    It is evident that the morning symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are linked to the circadian abnormal increase in night inflammation, favoured by inadequate cortisol secretion under conditions of active disease. Therefore, exogenous glucocorticoid treatment is recommended in RA at low doses since it may partially act like a 'replacement therapy'. The prevention/treatment of the night upregulation of the immune/inflammatory reaction (and related flare of cytokine synthesis) has been shown to be more effective when exogenous glucocorticoid administration is obtained with a night-time-release formulation. Large-scale trials documented that modified-release prednisone has greater efficacy then morning prednisone for long-term low-dose glucocorticoid treatment in patients with RA, showing at least a more significant reduction in morning joint stiffness. Interestingly, despite a considerably higher cost than conventional prednisone, chronotherapy with night-time-release prednisone was recognised as a cost-effective option for patients with RA not on glucocorticoids who are eligible for therapy with biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Moreover, since different cell populations involved in the inflammatory process are particularly activated during the night, other therapeutical approaches used in RA, for example, conventional DMARDs and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), should follow the same concepts of glucocorticoid chronotherapy. Indeed, bedtime methotrexate chronotherapy was found to improve RA symptoms compared to the current standard dosing methods, and several available NSAIDs (ie, indomethacin, aceclofenac, ketoprofen, flurbiporfen, lornoxicam) have been very recently modified in their formulation, in order to obtain chronotherapeutical effects in RA. PMID:27042335

  2. Thyroid Gland in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B T Turumhambetova

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our study was to investigate the main parameters of thyroid status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, as well as particularities of course of this disease depending on of thyroid gland function disorder. Materials and methods. 52 women with RA were examined. The first group consisted of 11 women with subclinical and manifestive hypothyroidism the second one 41 women without thyroid gland function disorder. The group comparison was conducted on main indexes of thyroid gland condition the hormon level, AT-TPO, ultrasonic data, as well as clinical and laboratory RA data. Results. In women with hypothyroidism the systemic manifestations of RA were more often truely diagnosed; DAS28 indexes, ESR, the number ot swollen joints were higher. The high level ot AT-TPO was diagnosed in 54,55% – I group and in 31,7% – II group TTG level was really less in patients receiving synthetic glycocorticoids. Small thyroid gland volume was diagnosed in 23,07% of examined patients. The thyroid gland status indexes in them did not differ from patients with normal thyroid gland volume. Reliable increasing of the peripheral resistance index was revealed in lower thyroid artery according to the ultrasonic study data under the reduced thyroid gland size. Conclusions. High incidence of hypothyroidism and AT-TPO carriage in RA was revealed. Hypothyroidism development is accompanied by high clinic-laboratory RA activity. The reduction of the thyroid gland volumes in RA is possibly stipulated not only by autoimmunal pathology, but also chronic ischemia of the organ in the conditions of immune-complex vasculitis and early atherosclerosis. The TTG level in patients with RA is defined not only by pathology of the thyroid gland, but glycocorticoid therapy as well.

  3. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis: rare cutaneous manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronez, Isis Suga; Dantas, Fernando Luiz; Valente, Neusa Yuriko; Kakizaki, Priscila; Yasuda, Thaís Helena; Cunha, Thaís do Amaral

    2015-01-01

    Besides being an uncommon clinicopathological entity, interstitial granulomatous dermatitis, also described as interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis (IGDA), has shown a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, such as linear and erythematous lesions, papules, plaques and nodules. Histological features include dense dermal histiocytic infiltrate, usually in a palisade configuration, and scattered neutrophils and eosinophils. We describe a middle aged woman with rheumatoid arthritis of difficult management and cutaneous lesions compatible with IGDA. PMID:26131871

  4. Declining needs for total joint replacements for rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Nasim A; Sokka, Tuulikki

    2011-01-01

    This millennium brings new views to rheumatology. Total joint replacement surgery is needed less often as active treatment strategies combined with availability of new medications has led to more effective rheumatoid arthritis control. This was beautifully shown in a recent issue of Arthritis Research & Therapy by a Swedish study that uses data from national registers and compares incidence rates for total hip and knee arthroplasties before and after the establishment of biologic agents use f...

  5. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: the paediatric perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Alison [Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Department of Adolescent Rheumatology, Birmingham (United Kingdom); McDonagh, Janet E. [Birmingham Children' s Hospital, Institute of Child Health, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    Paediatric rheumatology is a relatively new specialty that has developed rapidly over the last 30 years. There have been major advances, which have included improvements in the classification and management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The former has led to enhanced international collaboration with disease registries, multicentre research and the development of new therapeutic agents. This has resulted in improved disease control and remission induction in many. There is, however, still significant morbidity associated with JIA during childhood, adolescence and adulthood, and challenges for the future include early identification of those with a poorer prognosis, appropriate administration of safe therapies and optimizing outcomes as young people move through adolescence into adulthood. (orig.)

  6. Lyme disease in the differential diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Karadağ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinically, there are some differences between rheumatoid arthritis (RA and Lyme disease. Although Lyme arthritis exhibits marked differences from RA, it can cause erosion at joint due to chronic proliferative synovitis as similar to RA. In the literature, a case was reported where both entities were seen together. In this manuscript, we aimed to present a case with symmetric arthritis at small hand joints and arthralgia at wrist that mimicked RA but diagnosed as Lyme disease by history, clinical presentation and laboratory findings, and successfully treated.

  7. Imaging in rheumatoid arthritis using liposomes labelled with technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are presented of a preliminary study showing that technetium-labelled liposomes are accumulated in clinically affected joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Typical scintigraph scans are presented. This method offers an opportunity of determining the extent and activity of macrophages within synovial tissue. (UK)

  8. Epitope hunting in rheumatoid arthritis : towards antigen specific immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, H.

    2013-01-01

    Current treatment options in rheumatoid arthritis aim to dampen the immune response a-specifically. In the last decennia new strategies have emerged that have fewer side effects due to more specificity by focussing on those cells of the immune system that deal with regulation. Epitope specific immun

  9. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis in humans by fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Bernd; Dziekan, Thomas; Weissbach, Carmen; Mahler, Marianne; Schirner, Michael; Berliner, Birgitt; Bauer, Daniel; Voigt, Jan; Berliner, Michael; Bahner, Malte L.; Macdonald, Rainer

    2010-02-01

    The blood pool agent indo-cyanine green (ICG) has been investigated in a prospective clinical study for detection of rheumatoid arthritis using fluorescence imaging. Temporal behavior as well as spatial distribution of fluorescence intensity are suited to differentiate healthy and inflamed finger joints after i.v. injection of an ICG bolus.

  10. Monitoring patients with rheumatoid arthritis in routine care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund; Jensen, Dorte Vendelbo; Krogh, Niels Steen

    , little is known about the feasibility of a T2T strategy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated in routine care. The aim of the present study was to (i) present the annual number of patients included in DANBIO between 2006 and 2013 and their disease characteristics and (ii) estimate coverage...

  11. Left ventricular function in treatment-naive early rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løgstrup, Brian B; Deibjerg, Lone K; Hedemann-Andersen, Agnete;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of inflammation and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains unclear. Previous studies have suggested that both disease activity and disease duration are associated with...

  12. Non-pharmacological interventions for fatigue in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramp, Fiona; Hewlett, Sarah; Almeida, Celia;

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue is a common and potentially distressing symptom for people with rheumatoid arthritis with no accepted evidence based management guidelines. Non-pharmacological interventions, such as physical activity and psychosocial interventions, have been shown to help people with a range of other long...

  13. Establishing a core domain set to measure rheumatoid arthritis flares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Lie, Elisabeth; Bartlett, Susan J;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The OMERACT Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Flare Group (FG) is developing a data-driven, patient-inclusive, consensus-based RA flare definition for use in clinical trials, longterm observational studies, and clinical practice. At OMERACT 11, we sought endorsement of a proposed core domain set...

  14. Early and late synovectomy of the knee in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, C M; Poulsen, S; Ostergren, M;

    1991-01-01

    The results after open knee synovectomy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis were investigated in a retrospective study including 44 patients with 55 knees. Median observation time was 73 months. Early synovectomy showed significant pain-relief and improvement of knee function, effusion was...

  15. MRI quantification of rheumatoid arthritis: current knowledge and future perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Mikael; Østergaard, Mikkel; Cimmino, Marco A;

    2009-01-01

    The international consensus on treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) involves early initiation of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) for which a reliable identification of early disease is mandatory. Conventional radiography of the joints is considered the standard method for...

  16. Wrist and finger joint MR imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, Mette; Østergaard, Mikkel; Gideon, P;

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To elaborate the best MR imaging protocol for studies in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to evaluate the sensitivity and interobserver agreement with respect to detection of bone erosions (MR and radiography) and grading of synovial membrane hypertrophy (MR imaging only). MATERIAL AND...

  17. Physical activity maintenance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeppenthin, K; Esbensen, Bente Appel; Østergaard, Mikkel;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the experience of physical activity maintenance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. DESIGN: A qualitative salutogenic-oriented interview study. SETTING: A rheumatology outpatient clinic. SUBJECTS: A purposive sample of 16 physically active patients (mean age 50, range 37...

  18. Identifying core domains to assess flare in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, Susan J; Hewlett, Sarah; Bingham, Clifton O;

    2012-01-01

    For rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is no consensus on how to define and assess flare. Variability in flare definitions impairs understanding of findings across studies and limits ability to pool results. The OMERACT RA Flare Group sought to identify domains to define RA flares from patient and...

  19. Cognitive Distortion in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Relation to Depression and Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined the relation between cognitive distortion, as measured by the Cognitive Error Questionnaire, and both self-reported and interview-rated depression and disability in 92 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Found cognitive distortion significantly associated with depression, and also related to physical disability. Discusses the results,…

  20. Newborn infant characteristics and risk of future rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anders J; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Houen, Gunnar;

    2014-01-01

    Low birth weight has been proposed as a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The twin-control study design provides an opportunity to investigate the significance of potential prenatal determinants for adult morbidity by accounting for maternal characteristics and early environmental and ge...

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis advances and research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, FM; Bird, P;

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now been used extensively in cross-sectional and observational studies as well as in controlled clinical trials to assess disease activity and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MRI measurements or scores for erosions, bone edema, and synovitis have been...

  2. Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis to Target : multinational recommendations assessment questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haraoui, Boulos; Smolen, Josef S.; Aletaha, Daniel; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Burmester, Gerd; Codreanu, Catalin; Da Silva, Jose Pereira; de Wit, Maarten; Dougados, Maxime; Durez, Patrick; Emery, Paul; Fonseca, Joao Eurico; Gibofsky, Allan; Gomez-Reino, Juan; Graninger, Winfried; Hamuryudan, Vedat; Jannaut Pena, Maria Jose; Kalden, Joachim; Kvien, Tore K.; Laurindo, Ieda; Martin-Mola, Emilio; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Santos Moreno, Pedro; Pavelka, Karel; Poor, Gyula; Cardiel, Mario H.; Stanislawska-Biernat, Ewa; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; van der Heijde, Desiree

    2011-01-01

    Aim To measure the level of agreement and application of 10 international recommendations for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to a target of remission/low disease activity. Methods A 10-point Likert scale (1=fully disagree, 10=fully agree) measured the level of agreement with each of 10 recommend

  3. Heart Rate Variability in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawser Jahan, Noorzahan Begum, Sultana Ferdousi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Altered cardiovascular autonomic nerve function with impaired sympathovagal balance is found in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Heart Rate Variability (HRV analysis is an important tool for assessment of autonomic nerve activity.Objective: To assess cardiac autonomic nerve function status in patients with Rheumatoid arthritis (RA by time domain measures of HRV.Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in the Department of Physiology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU, Dhaka from January to December 2010. Sixty female RA patients, age range 18-50 years were constituted study group enrolled from the Out- patient Rheumatology Wing, Department of Medicine, BSMMU. Age matched thirty apparently healthy females were studied as control. Time domain measures of Heart Rate Variability (HRV such as Mean RR intervals, Mean HR, SDNN, RMSSD, NN50% and PNN 50% were recorded for 5 minutes by a Polygraph machine to observe cardiac autonomic nerve function activity. Data were analyzed by independent sample t test.Results: Mean R-R interval, SDNN, RMSSD, PNN50%, NN50% were significantly lower (p<0.001 but heart rate was significantly (P<0.001 higher in rheumatoid arthritis patients.Conclusion: Cardiac autonomic nerve function is impaired and characterized by reduced resting parasympathetic activity in female Rheumatoid Arthritis patients.

  4. Anti-carbamylated protein antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shi, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic autoimmune disease that principally affects synovial joints. RA is present in 0,5% to 1% of the global population. The incidence of RA is higher in women than in men and increases with age (1). RA can affect any joint but preferably small joints in ha

  5. Polymorphisms within the IL-1 gene cluster: effects on cytokine profiles in peripheral blood and whole blood cell cultures of patients with aggressive periodontitis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Anne Havemose; Sørensen, Lars Korsbaek; Bendtzen, Klaus; Holmstrup, Palle

    2007-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of cytokines have been associated with the susceptibility, severity, and clinical outcome of inflammatory diseases, such as periodontitis and chronic arthritis. An important question to address is how interleukin (IL)-1 polymorphisms affect the cytokine profiles of patients...... with such diseases....

  6. Subtype specific genetic associations for juvenile idiopathic arthritis: ERAP1 with the enthesitis related arthritis subtype and IL23R with juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Hinks, Anne; Martin, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Eyre, Steve; Packham, Jon; Barton, Anne; Worthington, Jane; Thomson, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an umbrella term for all chronic childhood arthropathies and can be divided into seven subtypes. It includes the enthesitis related arthritis (ERA) subtype which displays symptoms similar to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and juvenile-onset psoriatic arthritis which has similarities to psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and psoriasis (Ps). We, therefore, hypothesized that two well-established susceptibility loci for AS and Ps, ERAP1 and IL23R, could als...

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone." | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Rheumatoid Arthritis: "You Are Not Alone." Past Issues / Summer 2014 ... Contents Members of the America 2 Anywhere 4 Arthritis (A2A4A) running group after finishing a marathon. Through ...

  8. Biologicals and switch in rheumatoid arthritis throughout time - are we being more aggressive? Biologicals and switch in rheumatoid arthritis throughout time - are we being more aggressive?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Ramiro; R. Roque; F. Vinagre; A. Cordeiro; V. Tavares; A. van Tubergen; J. Silva; R. Landewé; M.J. Santos

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the switches performed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis under biolo-gical therapy and specifically comparing the swi-tches from earlier days with more recent switches. Patients and methods: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis under biological therapy followed at Hospi-

  9. MR imaging of arthropathies of juvenile arthritis and hemophilia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arthropathies of juvenile arthritis and hemophilia have in common abnormal hyperplastic synovium leading to marginal bone erosion, articular cartilage destruction, subchondral bone exposure, and dissolution and ultimately collapse of the affected joint. The authors examined children and young adults with juvenile arthritis and hemophilia by MR imaging and found that they could identify hyperplastic synovium, articular cartilage lesions, bone erosions, and joint effusions. This has therapeutic implications since identification of progressive synovial hyperplasia and/or early cartilage or marginal bone erosion may lead to earlier synovectomy in patients with hemophilia or switch to second line drugs in patients with juvenile arthritis, in an attempt to prevent progressive joint destruction

  10. Clinical and Epidemiological Characterization of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Alina González Otero

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease, it has varied clinical manifestations and cause different degrees of discomfort and disability. Objective: to conduct a clinical and epidemiological characterization of all rheumatoid arthritis patients admitted to the clinical services of the Arnaldo Milián Castro Provincial University Hospital. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted in the clinical services of the Arnaldo Milián Castro University Hospital from 2009 through 2013. The universe consisted of 280 patients hospitalized due to rheumatoid arthritis. The following variables were studied: age, sex, skin color, past medical history, clinical manifestations, complications, affected organs, time of diagnosis and treatment. Chi square and prevalence ratio with a 95% confidence interval were calculated. Results: arthritis was found in 2 men every 5 women. White middle-aged patients predominated. Hypertension was the major illness described in the past medical history. Arthralgia and movement limitations prevailed. No family history of rheumatic disease was found. The time of diagnosis was less than six months and infection was among the most frequent complications. The most common treatment was the combination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids, especially in seropositive patients. Conclusions: rheumatoid arthritis was more common in females and white middle-aged patients. Hypertension was the major illness found in the past medical history. Patients with two target organs affected predominated. Arthralgia and movement limitations prevailed in the clinical picture. The most common treatment was the combination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and steroids.

  11. Antiperinuclear factor, a marker autoantibody for rheumatoid arthritis: colocalisation of the perinuclear factor and profilaggrin.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoet, R M; Boerbooms, A M; Arends, M.; Ruiter, D J; van Venrooij, W J

    1991-01-01

    The antiperinuclear factor, an autoantibody specific for rheumatoid arthritis, was found in 51/63 (81%) patients with rheumatoid arthritis by indirect immunofluorescence on human buccal mucosa cells. The sensitivity of the antiperinuclear factor test was increased by pretreating the buccal mucosa cells with 0.5% Triton-X100. The specificity of the test for rheumatoid arthritis as compared with control serum samples was maintained. The localisation of the perinuclear factor in the keratohyalin...

  12. An open study of pentoxyfylline and thalidomide as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Huizinga, T. W.; Dijkmans, B A; van der Velde, E A; van de Pouw Kraan, T C; Verweij, C.L.; Breedveld, F C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Dysregulation of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) production is thought to be important in rheumatoid arthritis. Since pentoxifylline and thalidomide inhibit endotoxin induced TNF production in vitro, these drugs were tested in an open study in rheumatoid arthritis patients to assess toxicity, the effect on TNF production, and the antiarthritic effects. METHODS: 12 patients with active rheumatoid arthritis were treated with 1200 mg pentoxifylline and 100 mg thalidomide a da...

  13. A population-based study on the association between rheumatoid arthritis and voice problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, J Hun; An, Soo-Youn; Sim, Songyong; Kim, So Young; Oh, Dong Jun; Park, Bumjung; Kim, Sung-Gyun; Choi, Hyo Geun

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether rheumatoid arthritis increases the frequency of organic laryngeal lesions and the subjective voice complaint rate in those with no organic laryngeal lesion. We performed a cross-sectional study using the data from 19,368 participants (418 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 18,950 controls) of the 2008-2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The associations between rheumatoid arthritis and organic laryngeal lesions/subjective voice complaints were analyzed using simple/multiple logistic regression analysis with complex sample adjusting for confounding factors, including age, sex, smoking status, stress level, and body mass index, which could provoke voice problems. Vocal nodules, vocal polyp, and vocal palsy were not associated with rheumatoid arthritis in a multiple regression analysis, and only laryngitis showed a positive association (adjusted odds ratio, 1.59; 95 % confidence interval, 1.01-2.52; P = 0.047). Rheumatoid arthritis was associated with subjective voice discomfort in a simple regression analysis, but not in a multiple regression analysis. Participants with rheumatoid arthritis were older, more often female, and had higher stress levels than those without rheumatoid arthritis. These factors were associated with subjective voice complaints in both simple and multiple regression analyses. Rheumatoid arthritis was not associated with organic laryngeal diseases except laryngitis. Rheumatoid arthritis did not increase the odds ratio for subjective voice complaints. Voice problems in participants with rheumatoid arthritis originated from the characteristics of the rheumatoid arthritis group (higher mean age, female sex, and stress level) rather than rheumatoid arthritis itself. PMID:26758436

  14. Cicatricial Pemphigoid in Accompany with Rheumatoid Arthritis: a Case Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di Wu; Li-ming Zhang; Ying Jiang

    2010-01-01

    @@ CICATRICIAL pemphigoid (CP, also known as benign mucous membrane pemphigoid) is a rare chronic autoimmune subepithelial blister-ing disease, with an incidence of 1 per million, characterized by erosive lesions of mucous membranes and skin that result in scarring.1,2 Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a symmetric inflammatory arthritis that mainly affects the small joints of hands and feet, with a prevalence of 0.3% in China. In this case report we described the diagnosis of and treatment for a patient developing CP 18 years after the onset of RA, a combination rarely en-countered or reported so far.

  15. Human parvovirus B19 and rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is single stranded DNA virus, that causes erythema infectinosum in infantand/or acute onset polyarthritis in adult. We present the evidence showing the role of B19 on the etiopathogy ofrheumatoid arthritis( RA).( 1) B19 DNA could be frequently amplifi ed in the samples from rheumatoid joints. Thedetection B19 RNA and B19 protein VP1 was specific for RA, and positive at T cells, B cells, macrophages andfollicular dendritic cells in rheumatoid synovium. ( 2) B19 infec...

  16. Rheumatoid cachexia revisited: a metabolic co-morbidity in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo eMasuko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease in which pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha, play a crucial role. The chronic inflammation, combined with reduced physical activity, leads to muscle wasting whereas fat mass would be maintained; the resulting abnormal metabolic state is described as rheumatoid cachexia. Since the loss of muscle volume would be compensated by the increased fat mass, body mass index (BMI is reported not to reflect the nutritional status in RA patients. The implication of rheumatoid cachexia for cardiovascular risk and clinical prognosis is not clearly understood, however, adequate control of disease activity in combination with appropriate physical exercise could be the most important strategy to control rheumatoid cachexia and related metabolic problems.

  17. MR imaging of hands in early rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on different MR imaging techniques (T1-, proton density-, and T2-weighted with and without fat suppression, spoiled GRASS with fat suppression before and after intravenous administration of GD-DTPA) that were analyzed in 15 patients to evaluate the use of MR imaging in demonstrating early rheumatoid arthritis pathology. Erosions were best seen on T1-weighted images without fat suppression. Inflammation was best seen on spoiled GRASS images with fat suppression after intravenous administration of Gd-DTPA. Cartilage could be best visualized on unenhanced spoiled GRASS or T1-weighted images with fat suppression, although increased resolution is needed for imaging cartilage destruction in hands with rheumatoid arthritis

  18. MRI of the cranio-cervical region in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    16 patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and suspected compressive cervical myelopathy were studied with a 0.5 T superconducting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. MRI findings were compared with those of plain radiography and myelography. Subluxation was detected equally well by MRI and radiography. MRI was able to detect the presence, level and origin of cord compression. MRI was superior in diagnosing the extent of cord compression. Cord distortion detected by MRI correlated better with clinical evidence of myelopathy than did the radiographically established extent of the subluxation. MRI correctly diagnosed the level and cause of cord compression in six patients who were subsequently operated upon because of progressive neurological signs. These findings suggest that MRI has potential in the diagnosis and management of patients with rheumatoid arthritis suspected of compressive cervical myelopathy. 20 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 table

  19. Importance of scintiscanning of joints in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scintigrams of 7 large and 2 small joints were taken in 46 patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. The examination was carried out 2 hours after the iv. administration of sup(99m)Tc-pyrophosphate (12-16 mCi) and the results were given on the basis of subjective evaluation. Analyzing the data of all the examined joints it is concluded that in the first stage of rheumatoid arthritis scintigraphy revealed significantly more pathologic processes than either X-radiography or physical examinations. In the later stages disorders were diagnosed more frequently and more specifically by X-radiography than by scintigraphy, however, the latter can reveal the activity of the process. (L.E.)

  20. Treatment of intractable rheumatoid arthritis with lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subdiaphragmatic lymphoid radiation was used as an alternative to cytotoxic drug therapy to treat six patients with progressive erosive rheumatoid arthritis. All were previously unresponsive to conventional therapy. Radiation (4,000 rad) was given to subdiaphragmatic lymphoid tissues in fractionated doses of 150 to 250 rad each. Three of the six patients demonstrated long-lasting clinical improvement with a decrease in synovitis and morning stiffness and an increase in joint function. All six patients showed a profound depression in the peripheral blood lymphocyte count which persisted for at least six months. The irradiation was well tolerated; there have been no serious complications due to radiotherapy with follow-up ranging from 13 to 36 months. The substantial efficacy in some patients and the lack of severe toxicity in all suggests that radiotherapy deserves further study as an alternative to cytotoxic drugs in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

  1. Unstable pelvic insufficiency fracture in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Yuichi; Doita, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Masaho; Hirayama, Kenichi; Sha, Norihide; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    The occurrence of pelvic insufficiency fractures in patients with rheumatoid arthritis has not previously been well emphasized. These fractures are difficult to detect clinically, and appropriate radiological investigation is necessary for diagnosis. A 72-year-old woman with rheumatoid arthritis presented with severe left groin pain. Pelvic radiographs showed parasymphyseal fractures, and marked instability of these fractures was observed at the follow-up 2 weeks later. Computed tomographic scan of the sacrum showed a widened linear fracture gap in the left sacral ala. Because the patient's pain was so severe that she could not change position, external fixation was performed to achieve rapid pain relief and early mobilization. Although most patients with these fractures respond well to simple conservative treatments, parasymphyseal fractures combined with sacral fractures may cause disruption of the pelvic ring and occasionally need operative management. PMID:12748811

  2. Challenges in the management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis with etanercept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare E Pain

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clare E Pain, Liza J McCannAlder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust, Eaton Road, Liverpool, UKAbstract: Biologic agents have been designed with the help of immunological studies to target particular areas of the immune system which are thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of disease. Etanercept is a soluble anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α agent licensed for the treatment of active poly-articular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA in children aged 4 to 17 years who have failed to respond to methotrexate alone, or who have been intolerant of methotrexate. The safety and efficacy of etanercept in this patient group has been established by one randomized controlled trial and several longitudinal studies. This, together with the fact that until recently etanercept was the only anti-TNF licensed in JIA, has made it the most common first choice biologic for many clinicians. However, there are still many unanswered questions about etanercept, including its efficacy and safety in different subtypes of JIA, in children under 4 years of age and in those with uveitis. There are still concerns about the long term safety of TNF antagonists in the pediatric age group and unanswered questions about increased risks of malignancy and infection. Although adult studies are useful to improve understanding of these risks, they are not a substitute for good quality pediatric research and follow-up studies. Adult trials often include greater numbers of patients. However, they evaluate a different population and drug behavior may vary in children due to differences in metabolism, growth and impact on a developing immune system. In addition, rheumatoid arthritis is a different disease than JIA. Clinicians need to carefully weigh up the risk benefit ratio of anti-TNF use in children with JIA and push for robust clinical trials to address the questions that remain unanswered. This article summarizes the evidence available for use of etanercept in children

  3. Administration costs of intravenous biologic drugs for rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Soini, Erkki J.; Leussu, Miina; Hallinen, Taru

    2013-01-01

    Background Cost-effectiveness studies explicitly reporting infusion times, drug-specific administration costs for infusions or real-payer intravenous drug cost are few in number. Yet, administration costs for infusions are needed in the health economic evaluations assessing intravenously-administered drugs. Objectives To estimate the drug-specific administration and total cost of biologic intravenous rheumatoid arthritis (RA) drugs in the adult population and to compare the obtained costs wit...

  4. Systemic immune markers characterizing early stages of rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Chalan, Paulina Luiza

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disease occurring in ~1% of the world population. The main feature of the disease is ongoing joint inflammation, caused by immune cells and their soluble factors, leading to irreversible bone erosions and cartilage damage. Early treatment can halt progression of the disease and development of irreversible damage. Early recognition is therefore very important. Present research is geared at recognizing development of RA as early as possible by identi...

  5. Dietary recommendations for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Vitetta L; Coulson S; Schloss J; Beck SL; Allen R; Sali A

    2012-01-01

    Luis Vitetta,1 Samantha Coulson,1 Janet Schloss,1 Shoshannah L Beck,1 Robert Allen,2 Avni Sali21Centre for Integrative Clinical and Molecular Medicine, The University of Queensland School of Medicine, Brisbane, 2National Institute of Integrative Medicine, Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: Dietary interventions can assist with the management of disease symptoms that accompany rheumatoid arthritis (RA), such as pain, tender swollen joints, stiffness, and associated disability and disease progressio...

  6. Genetic Markers of Cardiovascular Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Luis Rodríguez-Rodríguez; Raquel López-Mejías; Mercedes García-Bermúdez; Carlos González-Juanatey; Miguel A. González-Gay; Javier Martín

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) disease is the most common cause of premature mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It is the result of an accelerated atherosclerotic process. Both RA and atherosclerosis are complex polygenic diseases. Besides traditional CV risk factors and chronic inflammation, a number of studies have confirmed the role of genetic factors in the development of the atherogenesis observed in RA. In this regard, besides a strong association between the HLA-DRB1∗04 shared ...

  7. Is there a relationship between periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis?

    OpenAIRE

    Sarika Bhalgat Ranade; Satish Doiphode

    2012-01-01

    Background: Growth of scientific evidence suggests an exquisite association between oral infection and systemic diseases. Though etiologies of periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are separate, their underlying pathological processes are sufficient to warrant consideration of hypothesis that individuals at risk of developing RA may also be at the risk of developing periodontitis and vice versa. Materials and Methods: To test their relationship, a study was carried out on 80 individuals...

  8. Folate-targeted nanoparticles for rheumatoid arthritis therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nogueira, Eugénia Sofia Costa; Gomes, Andreia C.; Preto, Ana; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common inflammatory rheumatic disease, affecting almost 1% of the world population. Although the cause of RA remains unknown, the complex interaction between immune mediators (cytokines and effector cells) is responsible for the joint damage that begins at the synovial membrane. Activated macrophages are critical in the pathogenesis of RA and have been shown to specifically express a receptor for the vitamin folic acid (FA), folate receptor (FR). This pa...

  9. Labour force participation among patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Chorus, A; Miedema, H.; Wevers, C; Linden, S.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess work history and labour force participation among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in the Netherlands.
METHODS—A random sample of 1056 patients with RA aged 16-59 years from 17 rheumatology practices in the Netherlands was examined. Data on disease status and outcome were obtained by a questionnaire including standardised instruments, such as the Rapid Assessment of Disease Activity in Rheumatology (RADAR) and RAND-36 questionnaires. Labour force participation was ...

  10. Depression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: description, causes and mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Margaretten, Mary; Julian, Laura; Katz, Patricia; Yelin, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Two sets of contributory factors to depression among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are generally examined – the social context of the individual and the biologic disease state of that person’s RA. This article will review the evidence for both. RA affects patients both physically and psychologically. Comorbid depression is common with RA and leads to worse health outcomes. Low socioeconomic status, gender, age, race/ethnicity, functional limitation, pain and poor clinical status hav...

  11. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Henriksson, A E; Blomquist, L; Nord, C E; Midtvedt, T.; A. Uribe

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine the microflora of the upper small intestine in patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using a combination of microbial cultivation and tests for microbial metabolic activity. METHODS--Twenty five patients with seropositive RA, 12 achlorhydric control subjects, and 11 control subjects with normal gastric acid secretion were investigated. Disease activity was evaluated in the patients with RA by three different indices. Eight (32%) of the patients with RA ha...

  12. Quantitative microfocal radiography accurately detects joint changes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Buckland-Wright, J C; Carmichael, I.; Walker, S R

    1986-01-01

    Microfocal radiography, producing x5 magnified images of the wrist and hands with a high spacial resolution (25 microns) in the film, permitted direct measurement of erosion area and joint space width in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The magnitude of errors relating to direct measurement, repositioning the wrist and hand on successive x ray visits, repeated identification of erosions and their area calculation were assessed. The coefficients of variation for length and area measurements...

  13. Molecular Insight into Gut Microbiota and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaohao Wu; Bing He; Jin Liu; Hui Feng; Yinghui Ma; Defang Li; Baosheng Guo; Chao Liang; Lei Dang; Luyao Wang; Jing Tian; Hailong Zhu; Lianbo Xiao; Cheng Lu; Aiping Lu

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, inflammatory, and autoimmune disorder. Gut microbiota play an important role in the etiology of RA. With the considerable progress made in next-generation sequencing techniques, the identified gut microbiota difference between RA patients and healthy individuals provides an updated overview of the association between gut microbiota and RA. We reviewed the reported correlation and underlying molecular mechanisms among gut microbiota, the immune system, ...

  14. Demographic Features of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis in Kosovo

    OpenAIRE

    Bajraktari, Ismet H.; Teuta, Backa-Çiço; Vjollca, Sahatçiu-Meka; Bajraktari, Halit; Saiti, Valton; Krasniqi, Blerim; Muslimi, Fikret

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory illness characterized by polyarthritis of small and large joints which in the course of time may progress to disability. Material and methods: In our prospective study were included 951 patients (females 730, and males 221 respectively) with an average age 51.3 year old, diagnosed with RA in accordance with ACR-EULAR/2010 criteria. The purpose of the paper is to investigate gender, age, group age by gender, level of ...

  15. Bee venom acupuncture for rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ju Ah; Son, Mi Ju; Choi, Jiae; Yun, Kyung-Jin; Jun, Ji Hee; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This systematic review aims to analyse the trial data on the effects of bee venom acupuncture (BVA) for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods and analysis The following 14 databases will be searched from their inception to March 2014: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), AMED, CINAHL, six Korean medical databases (OASIS, Korean Traditional Knowledge Portal, Korean Studies Information Service System, KoreaMed, Korean Medical Database and DBPIA) a...

  16. Rituximab for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Mok CC

    2013-01-01

    Chi Chiu MokDepartment of Medicine, Tuen Mun Hospital, Hong Kong, Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that targets the CD20 molecule expressed on the surface of B cells. It was first used in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and later approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that does not respond adequately to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, including the anti-tumor-nec...

  17. In-vitro studies of ineffective erythropoiesis in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, R A; Samson, Diana; Tikerpae, J.; Crowne, Helen; Gumpel, J M

    1982-01-01

    Ineffective erythropoiesis was assessed in a series of 32 patients with rheumatoid arthritis by means of a new in-vitro method which measures the release of haem from a labelled cohort of erythroblasts in culture. Haem release was significantly increased in patients with the anaemia of chronic disorders but was normal in those who were not anaemic or who had an iron-deficiency anaemia. In 2 patients with anaemia of chronic disorders haem release returned to normal after successful antirheumat...

  18. Pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis: evaluation by radiography and spirometry *

    OpenAIRE

    Kawassaki, Alexandre de Melo; Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Uliana Kay, Fernando; Laurindo, Ieda Maria Magalhães; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To determine whether simple diagnostic methods can yield relevant disease information in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods: Patients with RA were randomly selected for inclusion in a cross-sectional study involving clinical evaluation of pulmonary function, including pulse oximetry (determination of SpO2, at rest), chest X-ray, and spirometry. Results: A total of 246 RA patients underwent complete assessments. Half of the patients in our sample reported a hi...

  19. Pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis: evaluation by radiography and spirometry

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre de Melo Kawassaki; Daniel Antunes Silva Pereira; Fernando Uliana Kay; Ieda Maria Magalhães Laurindo; Carlos Roberto Ribeiro de Carvalho; Ronaldo Adib Kairalla

    2015-01-01

    AbstractObjective: To determine whether simple diagnostic methods can yield relevant disease information in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).Methods: Patients with RA were randomly selected for inclusion in a cross-sectional study involving clinical evaluation of pulmonary function, including pulse oximetry (determination of SpO2, at rest), chest X-ray, and spirometry.Results: A total of 246 RA patients underwent complete assessments. Half of the patients in our sample reported a histo...

  20. Exposure to Traffic Pollution and Increased Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Puett, Robin C.; Hart, Jaime Elizabeth; Laden, Francine; Costenbader, Karen Harte; Karlson, Elizabeth Wood

    2009-01-01

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease that affects approximately 1% of the adult population, and to date, genetic factors explain < 50% of the risk. Particulate air pollution, especially of traffic origin, has been linked to systemic inflammation in many studies. Objectives: We examined the association of distance to road, a marker of traffic pollution exposure, and incidence of RA in a prospective cohort study.Methods We studied 90,297 U.S. women in...

  1. Psychological variables and physical exercise in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Amabile Borges Dario; Wladymir Külkamp; Henrique Cabral Faraco; Monique da Silva Gevaerd; Susana Cristina Domenech

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACTThe purpose of this study was to provide a literature review aiming to clarify the most prevalent psychological changes present in individuals suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the impact of exercise on such changes, and the exercise protocols commonly adopted to improve these individuals' mental health. The few studies available report anxiety disorders and depression as most prevalent and physical exercise as a significant therapeutic strategy for this population. There is s...

  2. Canadian Pregnancy Outcomes in Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Cheryl Barnabe; Faris, Peter D; Hude Quan

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To describe obstetrical and neonatal outcomes in Canadian women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods. An administrative database of hospitalizations for neonatal delivery (1998–2009) from Calgary, Alberta was searched to identify women with RA (38 pregnancies) or SLE (95 pregnancies), and women from the general population matched on maternal age and year of delivery (150 and 375 pregnancies, resp.). Conditional logistic regression was used t...

  3. The determination and measurement of functional disability in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfe, Frederick

    2002-01-01

    Although functional outcome is frequently discussed and written about, it is often not clear what functional outcome is and how it can be measured. This paper introduces the concept of latent and observed measures of functional disability, and distinguishes between disability as a process measure and disability as an outcome measure. Using the Health Assessment Questionnaire as the main functional outcome measure in rheumatoid arthritis, we propose and discuss several methods for determining ...

  4. Rheumatoid Arthritis, Kartagener's Syndrome, and Hyperprolactinemia: Who Started It?

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein Halabi; Israa Mulla

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of an 18-year-old girl who presented to our hospital with history of recurrent respiratory infections, amenorrhea, and symmetric polyarthritis. She was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Kartagener’s syndrome (KS), and hyperprolactinemia. There have been very few case reports in the literature of RA occurring in the setting of KS, theoretically proposed to be due to chronic stimulation of the immune system by recurrent infections. Furthermore, hyperprolactinemia has be...

  5. Ultrasound versus high field magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, York Kiat; Østergaard, Mikkel; Bird, Paul;

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade there have been significant advances in the field of musculoskeletal imaging, especially in the application of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both modalities offer significant advantages over the previous...... standards of clinical examination and radiography, and allow direct visualisation of both joint inflammation and structural damage. Although measuring similar pathology, each of these imaging tools has its own benefits and limitations; understanding these will help researchers and clinicians to determine...

  6. Effect of biologic agents on radiographic progression of rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Devauchelle, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Gabriel J Tobón1, Alain Saraux1,2, Valérie Devauchelle-Pensec1,21Immunology Laboratory, Morvan Hospital, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France; 2Rheumatology Unit, Hôpital de la Cavale Blanche, CHU Brest, FranceAbstract: The treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has benefited over the last few years from the introduction of biologic agents whose development was based on new insights into the immunological factors involved in the pathogen...

  7. Bone Effects of Biologic Drugs in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Addolorata Corrado; Anna Neve; Nicola Maruotti; Francesco Paolo Cantatore

    2013-01-01

    Biologic agents used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are able to reduce both disease activity and radiographic progression of joint disease. These drugs are directed against several proinflammatory cytokines (TNFα, IL-6, and IL-1) which are involved both in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation and progression of joint structural damage and in systemic and local bone loss typically observed in RA. However, the role of biologic drugs in preventing bone loss in clinical pract...

  8. Dynamic exercise therapy in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review.

    OpenAIRE

    Ende, C.H.M. van den; Vliet Vlieland, T. P. M.; Munneke, M.; Hazes, J.M.W.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of dynamic exercixe therapy in improving joint mobility, muscle strength, aerobic capacity and daily functioning in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In addition, possible unwanted effects such as an increase in pain, disease activity and radiological progression were studied. A computer-aided search of the MEDLINE , Embase and SCISEARCH databases was performed to identifiy controlled trials on the effect of exercise ...

  9. Effective rheumatoid arthritis treatment requires comprehensive management strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Boomershine, Chad S

    2009-01-01

    Work by Lee and colleagues has shown that decreased sleep quality and increased psychiatric distress increase pain sensitivity at both articular and nonarticular sites in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. This work is consistent with prior studies showing that factors independent of RA disease activity can influence RA outcome measures. Owing to increasing pressure on rheumatologists to use outcome measures to inform treatment decisions, the work by Lee and colleagues highlights the need fo...

  10. Anti-collagen antibodies in sera from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Beard, H K; Ryvar, R; Skingle, J; Greenbury, C. L.

    1980-01-01

    Anti-cartilage antibodies, demonstrable by immunofluorescence, were found in 3.3% of rheumatoid arthritis patients. In most of these patients antibodies to type II collagen were detected. In specificity studies on these anti-collagen antibodies, they appeared to be type specific, showing no reaction with collagen types I and III. Denatured type II collagen reacted much less well than native type II, but isolated peptides from different regions of the collagen molecule were differentiated by i...

  11. PSYCHOPHYSIOLOGICAL AND IMMUNE STATUS IN THE PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    T. Y. Abramova; I. G. Solov'eva; A E Sizikov; O. A. Gerzog; A. E. Sulut'jan; L. P. Konenkova; I. V. Shishkova; S. V. Abramov; V. S. Kozhevnikov; V. V. Abramov

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The aim of this study was to elucidate a role of brain hemispheres in formation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The parameters of higher nervous activity, autonomous and immune systems in these patients that were characterized by domination of the left or right hemispheres of a brain, were defined in present work. The results of this work allow of justifying the following items: a) relative increase in functional activity of right brain hemisphere in woman may represent a factor that ...

  12. Bone metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis compared with postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    OpenAIRE

    van Soesbergen, R M; Lips, P.; van den Ende, A; van der Korst, J K

    1986-01-01

    Calcium and bone metabolism in 29 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients were compared with those in 27 postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. Signs of vitamin D deficiency were found in 20 RA patients, including 12 who took recommended amounts of vitamin D in their diets and were exposed to sufficient sunlight, and in none of the osteoporotic patients. There were no signs of malabsorption. In six out of 15 patients we found increased liver enzyme activity, which may have a role in vitamin D metab...

  13. Monitoring patients with rheumatoid arthritis in routine care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund; Jensen, Dorte Vendelbo; Krogh, Niels Steen

    2014-01-01

    , little is known about the feasibility of a T2T strategy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated in routine care. The aim of the present study was to (i) present the annual number of patients included in DANBIO between 2006 and 2013 and their disease characteristics and (ii) estimate coverage......-time feedback to the physician is feasible, although the goal of treat-to-target is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients in routine care....

  14. Etanercept: A Pharmacoeconomic Review of its Use in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A.; Greg L. Plosker

    2004-01-01

    Etanercept (Enbrel(R)), which inhibits the activity of tumour necrosis factor-alpha, is indicated in the treatment of patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A lifetime cost-utility analysis in patients with severe disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD)-resistant RA in the UK suggested that etanercept is associated with acceptable cost-utility ratios relative to traditional nonbiological DMARDs. In a 12-month cost-utility study in Spain, etanercept was predicted to be dominant o...

  15. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory potential of ayurvedic formulation Rheumacure in animal model of rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Vinit D. Patel; Namrata A. Desai; Praboth V Shah; Patel, Snehal S

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rheumacure (RC) is a herbomineral preparation recommended by Ayurvedic medical practitioners for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of oral treatment with the herbomineral formulation in animal model of Freunds adjuvant induced arthritis to develop scientific evidence to the efficacious claim of the use of ayurvedic proprietary medicine in the management of rheumatoid arthritis in folklore medicine. Methods: Arthritis was in...

  16. From undifferentiated arthritis to rheumatoid arthritis : epidemiology, immunology and early intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillet-van Dongen, Henrike

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis clinical and immunological studies in patients with undifferentiated (UA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are described. Depending on the study population 6-55% of the patients who presented with UA actually fulfilled the criteria for RA as defined by the ACR in 1987 over time. In the f

  17. Radiographic changes in the os calcis in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plain films of the calcanea of 768 patients with confirmed rheumatoid arthritis were examined retrospectively with reference to inflammatory rheumatic changes. 42 patients (5.5%) showed an erosion of the posterior upper calcaneal margin related to an Achilles bursitis. In three patients there were additional plantar erosions. The Achilles bursitis was bilateral in 50% of cases, particularly in patients in stages 2 and 3 according to Steinbrocker. In the majority of bilateral cases (62%) the size or shape of the lesions was asymmetrical. Our observations indicate that involvement of the os calcis is not uncommon in rheumatoid arthritis; routine examination of this bone would appear to be indicated even in patients without symptoms. Since the defect is unilateral in half the patients, unilateral occurrence of an erosive lesion cannot be regarded as a criterion for a bacterial-inflammatory bursitis. Contrary to the symmetrical involvement of joints in the hands in rheumatoid arthritis, defects in the calcanea are often unilateral or asymmetrical. (orig.)

  18. Advanced imaging in rheumatoid arthritis. Part 1: Synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disorder primarily affecting the synovium. We now recognise that conventional radiographic images show changes of rheumatoid arthritis long after irreversible joint damage has occured. With the advent of powerful disease-modifying drugs, there is a need for early demonstration of rheumatoid arthritis and a need to monitor progress of the disease and response to therapy. Advanced imaging techniques such as ultrasound and MRI have focussed on the demonstration and quantification of synovitis and erosions and allow early diagnosis of RA. The technology to quantify synovitis and erosions is developing rapidly and now allows change in disease activity to be assessed. However, problems undoubtedly exist in quantification techniques, and this review serves to highlight them. Much of the literature on advanced imaging in RA appears in rheumatological journals and may not be familiar to radiologists. This review article aims to increase the awareness of radiologists about this field and to encourage them to participate and contribute to the ongoing development of these modalities. Without this collaboration, it is unlikely that these modalities will reach their full potential in the field of rheumatological imaging. This review is in two parts. The first part addresses synovitis imaging. The second part will look at advanced imaging of erosions in RA. (orig.)

  19. Advanced imaging in rheumatoid arthritis. Part 2: Erosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disorder primarily affecting the synovium. We now recognise that conventional radiographic images show changes of rheumatoid arthritis late after irreversible joint damage has occured. With the advent of powerful disease-modifying drugs there is a need for early demonstration of rheumatoid arthritis and to monitor progress of the disease and response to therapy. Advanced imaging techniques such as ultrasound and MRI have focussed on the demonstration and quanitification of synovitis and erosions and allow early diagnosis of RA. The technology to quantify synovitis and erosions is developing rapidly and now allows change in disease activity to be assessed. However, problems undoubtedly exist in quantification techniques and this review serves to highlight them. Much of the literature on advanced imaging in RA appears in rheumatological journals and may not be familiar to radiologists. This review article aims to increase the awareness of radiologists to this field and to encourage them to participate and contribute to the ongoing development of these modalities. Without this collaboration it is unlikely that these modalities will reach their full potential in the field of rheumatological imaging. This review is in two parts. This first part addresses synovitis imaging. The second part will look at advanced imaging of erosions in RA. (orig.)

  20. Exploratory analyses of the association of MRI with clinical, laboratory and radiographic findings in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emery, Paul; van der Heijde, Désirée; Østergaard, Mikkel;

    2011-01-01

    Evaluate relationships between MRI and clinical/laboratory/radiographic findings in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......Evaluate relationships between MRI and clinical/laboratory/radiographic findings in rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  1. Smoking and overweight determine the likelihood of developing rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hair, Maria J H; Landewé, Robert B M; van de Sande, Marleen G H; van Schaardenburg, Dirkjan; van Baarsen, Lisa G M; Gerlag, Danielle M; Tak, Paul P

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a prototypic chronic inflammatory disease with a debilitating course if untreated. A genetic predisposition for RA is known, and its occurrence is associated with the presence of autoantibodies in the serum and with environmental factors. It is unknown if smoking and overweight are contributory factors for developing RA in individuals with RA-specific autoantibodies in the serum. Methods Fifty-five individuals at risk for developing RA, based on the presence of RA-specific autoantibodies in the serum, who never had any evidence of arthritis upon physical examination, were followed over time. Smoking was assessed as being never or ever smoker and body mass index as <25 (normal) or ≥25 kg/m2 (overweight). Clinical endpoint was the occurrence of arthritis. Proportional hazard regression analysis was performed to investigate the potential of (combinations of) variables in predicting the onset of arthritis over time. Results After a median follow up time of 13 (IQR 6–27) months, 15 individuals (27%) developed arthritis. Smoking was associated with the development of arthritis (HR (95% CI): 9.6 (1.3 to 73.0); p=0.029). Overweight was, independently of smoking, associated with arthritis (HR (95% CI): 5.6 (1.3 to 25.0); p=0.023). The overall arthritis risk of 28% after a median of 27 months follow up increased to 60% in individuals with a smoking history combined with overweight. Conclusions This is the first prospective study showing that smoking and overweight increase the risk of development of arthritis in a cohort of autoantibody-positive individuals at risk for developing RA. These results show the importance of life style factors in development of RA and should be critically evaluated in future clinical research aimed at disease prevention. PMID:23104761

  2. The Etiology of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigante, Donato; Bosco, Annalisa; Esposito, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    Over the years, the commonly used term to describe juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has changed. By definition, JIA includes all types of arthritis with no apparent cause, lasting more than 6 weeks, in patients aged less than 16 years at onset. JIA pathogenesis is still poorly understood: the interaction between environmental factors and multiple genes has been proposed as the most relevant working mechanism to the development of JIA. The concept that various microbes that colonize or infect not only the mucosal surfaces, like the oral cavity, but also the airways and gut might trigger autoimmune processes, resulting in chronic arthritides, and JIA was first drafted at the outset of last century. JIA development might be initiated and sustained by the exposure to environmental factors, including infectious agents which affect people at a young age, depending on the underlying genetic predisposition to synovial inflammation. Many data from patients with JIA suggest a scenario in which different external antigens incite multiple antigen-specific pathways, cytotoxic T cell responses, activation of classical complement cascade, and production of proinflammatory cytokines. In this review, emphasis is paid not only to the potential role of parvovirus B19 and Epstein-Barr virus in primis but also to the general involvement of different bacteria as Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Campylobacter spp., Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Bartonella henselae, and Streptococcus pyogenes for the development of immune-mediated arthritides during childhood. No unequivocal evidence favoring or refuting these associations has been clearly proved, and today, the strict definition of JIA etiology remains unknown. The infection can represent a random event in a susceptible individual, or it can be a necessary factor in JIA development, always in combination with a peculiar genetic background. Further studies are needed in order to address the unsolved questions

  3. Treatment of arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, with radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioactive composition is described for the treatment of arthritis comprising, in combination, a ferric hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide aggregate suspension having a particle size of 3 to 20 microns, wherein a radionuclide is entrapped, the radionuclide being /sup 166/Holmium

  4. Integrated care for patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoef, John

    2007-01-01

    This thesis describes an example of optimization of the traditional multidisciplinary team care model and evolving arthritis care models with emphasis on the question how theoretical models of the system theory and communication can be used to analyse, evaluate, and optimize care delivery. With respect to the team care model we used a rehabilitation tool, for which we developed an accompanying computer application. This thesis contributes to the use of theoretical models, measurement instrume...

  5. Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis: GWAS and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    McAllister KM; Eyre S; Orozco G

    2011-01-01

    Kate McAllister, Stephen Eyre, Gisela OrozcoArthritis Research United Kingdom Epidemiology Unit, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, UKAbstract: The study of complex genetics in autoimmune diseases has progressed at a tremendous pace over the last 4 years, as a direct result of the enormous gains made by genome wide association studies (GWAS). Novel genetic findings are continuously being reported alongside the rapid development of genetic technologies, sophis...

  6. Arthroplasty of the elbow in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, C; Vainio, K

    1976-05-21

    The study consists of 208 elbow arthroplasties performed on rheumatoid arthritic patients. A straight resection of the joint was used in 53 cases and a modified Hass arthroplasty with skin interposition in 155 cases. The average postoperative range of motion in these groups was 100 degrees and 96 degrees respectively. Postoperatively the joint was painless in 81 and 67% of the elbows respectively. The Hass arthroplasty gave a better stability and extension power. The most common complications were paresthesias in the region of the ulnar nerve and bone resorption in the region of the ulnar nerve and bone resorption in the region of the olecranon fossa. PMID:779734

  7. Characterization of Rheumatoid Arthritis Subtypes Using Symptom Profiles, Clinical Chemistry and Metabolomics Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wietmarschen, H.A. van; Dai, W.; Kooij, A.J. van der; Reijmers, T.H.; Schroën, Y.; Wang, M.; Xu, Z.; Wang, X.; Kong, H.; Xu, G.; Hankemeier, T.; Meulman, J.J.; Greef, J. van der

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim is to characterize subgroups or phenotypes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients using a systems biology approach. The discovery of subtypes of rheumatoid arthritis patients is an essential research area for the improvement of response to therapy and the development of personalize

  8. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging in early rheumatoid arthritis: recent advances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Døhn, Uffe M; Ejbjerg, Bo J;

    2006-01-01

    Efficient methods for diagnosis, monitoring, and prognostication are essential in early rheumatoid arthritis. Data on the value of ultrasonography and MRI are accumulating rapidly, fueling their increasing use in early rheumatoid arthritis. This review focuses on recent advances in the clinical...

  9. Periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis : A search for causality and role of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Smit, Menke

    2015-01-01

    There is currently much attention for early detection of rheumatoid arthritis, as early recognition enables timely treatment with a chance of remission of the disease before irreversible damage has occurred. In this respect, important questions are: who will develop rheumatoid arthritis, when and wh

  10. Autoantibodies against interleukin 1alpha in rheumatoid arthritis: association with long term radiographic outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, N A; Svenson, M; Tarp, Ulrik; Garred, P; Jurik, Anne Grethe; Bendtzen, K

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the possible association of interleukin 1alpha autoantibodies (IL1alpha aAb) with the long term course of joint erosion in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To investigate the possible association of interleukin 1alpha autoantibodies (IL1alpha aAb) with the long term course of joint erosion in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  11. An introduction to the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Edmonds, J; McQueen, F;

    2005-01-01

    This article gives a short overview of the development and characteristics of the OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI scoring system (RAMRIS), followed by an introduction to the use of the EULAR-OMERACT rheumatoid arthritis MRI reference image atlas. With this atlas, MRIs of wrist and...

  12. Effect of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs on the C-reactive protein level in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Simon; Bartels, Else M.; Bliddal, Henning;

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, with a prespecified focus on the different NSAIDs.......To evaluate the effects of oral nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, with a prespecified focus on the different NSAIDs....

  13. Gender, body mass index and rheumatoid arthritis disease activity: results from the QUEST-RA Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jawaheer, D; Olsen, J; Lahiff, M;

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether body mass index (BMI), as a proxy for body fat, influences rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity in a gender-specific manner.......To investigate whether body mass index (BMI), as a proxy for body fat, influences rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity in a gender-specific manner....

  14. Technetium scintigraphy in experimental hyperergic arthritis and by rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinea pigs showed an increased uptake of 99m-TC-04 in the inflamed joints during the first days of experimental arthritis. Tc-04 was found in the joint fluid and inflamed synovia. The uptake of Tc-04 and Tc-MDP was reduced by therapy in 13 patients with RA. Classical RA showed an increased uptake of Tc-MDP compared with probable RA. Scintigraphy offers the possibility of early diagnosis and study of progression. (orig.)

  15. Coexisting ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis: A case report with literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Ying-ying; YANG Li-li; CUI Hua-dong; ZHAO Shuai; ZHANG Ning

    2011-01-01

    A 30-year-old female patient with coexisting ankylosing spondylitis and rheumatoid arthritis was diagnosed and treated.The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 is a predisposing factor of ankylosing spondylitis and HLA-DR4 is a predisposing factor of rheumatoid arthritis.This patient was HLA-B27 and HLA-DR4 positive,and ankylosing spondylitis manifested before rheumatoid arthritis.After disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs successfully arrested ankylosing spondylitis activity the patient conceived and delivered a healthy baby.One year later,she developed peripheral polyarthritis and was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis.We hypothesized that pregnancy may be one of the environmental factors that can activate rheumatoid arthritis,and that disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs play an important role in keeping the disease under control.

  16. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Women with Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Brief Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Agh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low bone mass is a serious health problem mostly seen in postmeno-pausal women with rheumatoid arthritis. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of osteoporosis and some related risk factors in postmenopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis.Methods: The data for this descriptive analytical study was extracted from the medical records of 98 postmenopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis who had attended the 5th of Azar Teaching Hospital affiliated to Gorgan University of Medical Sciences, in Iran, in 2009.Results: The mean durations of menopause and rheumatoid arthritis were 9.39 and 5.13 years, respectively. The overall prevalence of osteoporosis was 13.3%. We found a significant correlation between age, disease duration, and duration of menopause with bone mineral density (P<0.05.Conclusion: Our results indicate a high prevalence of osteoporosis at the lumbar spine of postmenopausal women with rheumatoid arthritis.

  17. Adjuvant auricular electroacupuncture and autogenic training in rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized controlled trial. Auricular acupuncture and autogenic training in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernateck, M; Becker, M; Schwake, C;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In contrast to psychological interventions the usefulness of acupuncture as an adjuvant therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not yet been demonstrated. OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of auricular electroacupuncture (EA) was directly compared with autogenic training (AT). METHODS: Patients...

  18. The comparison between monotherapy and combination therapy in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalvat A

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory condition. The condition can affected many tissues throught out the body, but the joints are usually most severely affected. The high incidence of RA, the conventional treatments and the experimental observation have shown by combination therapy, the disease symptoms of the patients reduce. To compare the efficacy and tolerability of single-agent Hydroxychloroquin (HCQ with combination therapies composed of (HCQ and Methotrexate (MTX and (HCQ, (MTX and Sulfasalazin (SSZ in active rheumatoid arthritis patients with additive arthritis. Methods: One hundred and twenty RA patients with active arthritis (male/female: 30/90 who were treated in rheumatology clinic between 2003 and 2005 were enrolled in this trial. Patients treated with (HCQ alone(200 mg/daywere include in group (I, patients treated with combination of (HCQ (200 mg/dayand (MTX (7.5mg/weekin group (II,and patents treated with combination of (HCQ (200mg/day,(MTX (7.5mg/weekand (SSZ(1 gr/dayin group (III, Forty patients (male/female:10/30 in group (I,(II and (IIIwere eligible for statistical analysis at the end of study. Changes in variable were compared by the T-test. Results: The combination of (MTX, (HCQand (SSZ and the combination of (MTX and (HCQ were more effective regarding the clinical and laboratory parameters than (HCQ alone (P<0.05. Moreover the combination of (MTX, (HCQ and (SSZ was more effective than the combination of (MTX and (HCQ (P<0.05. Combination therapies seem to be more effective and no more toxic than monotherapy in RA patients with additive arthritis. Conclusion: Combination therapy with methotrexate, hydroxychloroquin and sulfasalazin is more effective than hydroxychloroquin alone or a combination of methotrexate and hydroxychloroquin in RA. We suggest starting combination therapy for the patients with early RA, when the diagnosis has been established.

  19. Long-term treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with adalimumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murdaca G

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Murdaca, Francesca Spanò, Francesco PuppoDepartment of Internal Medicine, Clinical Immunology Unit, University of Genoa, Genoa, ItalyAbstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease that is associated with joint damage and progressive disability, an increased risk of morbidity related to comorbid conditions and substantial socioeconomic costs. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α is a proinflammatory cytokine known to have a central role in the initial host response to infection and in the pathogenesis of various immune-mediated diseases, such as RA, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis and/or psoriatic arthritis, Crohn’s disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Five TNF-α inhibitors are available for the clinical use: infliximab; adalimumab; etanercept; golimumab; and certolizumab pegol. Infliximab is a chimeric human/murine IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb; adalimumab, and golimumab are human mAbs; certolizumab pegol is composed of the fragment antigen-binding anti-binding domain of a humanized anti-TNF-α mAb, combined with polyethylene glycol to increase its half-life in the body; etanercept is a fusion protein that acts as a “decoy receptor” for TNF-α. In this paper, we will briefly review the current data on efficacy and safety of adalimumab in patients with RA, its potential beneficial effects upon comorbid conditions, such as endothelial dysfunction and accelerated atherosclerosis in RA, and the immunogenicity.Keywords: adalimumab, efficacy, safety, rheumatoid arthritis, VEGF, immunogenicity, infections

  20. New aspects of the X-ray pathology of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intraosseal pseudocyst(s) were observed in 16 cases out of 205 patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. The pseudocysts were localized most frequently in the bones of the proximal joints of the hands; their occurence in the tarsal bones was extremely rare. All cases exhibited positive rheumatoid factor. On the basis of the radio-morphological characteristics demonstrated on the radiograms the term ''poliarthritis chronica progressiva granularis-pseudocystica'' is suggested for this special form of rheumatoid arthritis. (L.E.)

  1. Two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis of human leukocyte proteins from patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, K.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Thorsrud, A.K.; Munthe, E.; Jellum, E.

    1982-04-01

    Human leukocyte proteins from more than 150 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, together with age- and sex-matched controls, were analyzed by use of the ISO-DALT technique of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis, polymyalgia rheumatica, psoriatic arthritis, calcium tendinitis, post-infectious arthritis, and asymmetrical seronegative arthritis were also included as positive controls. Synthesis of several proteins, referred to by number as members of the Rheuma set, is shown to increase in the leukocyte preparations from patients with classical rheumatoid arthritis. Several of these proteins are specific to monocytes or granulocytes; others are of unknown cellular origin, but appear to be unique to rheumatoid arthritis. The Rheuma proteins appear to be indicators of disease activity, because their increased synthesis can be correlated with sedimentation rate and other clinical indices of rheumatoid disease activity.

  2. Biological therapies for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Lessons from the adult and pediatric experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Matthew L; Gotte, Alisa C

    2008-06-01

    Biologics have advanced the therapy of adult and pediatric arthritis. They have been linked to rare serious adverse outcomes, but the actual risk of these events is controversial in adults, and largely unknown in pediatrics. Because of the paucity of safety and efficacy data in children, pediatric rheumatologists often rely on the adult literature. Herein, we reviewed the adult and pediatric literature on five classes of medicines: Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors, anakinra, rituximab, abatacept, and tocilizumab. For efficacy, we reviewed randomized controlled studies in adults, but did include lesser qualities of evidence for pediatrics. For safety, we utilized prospective and retrospective studies, rarely including reports from other inflammatory conditions. The review included studies on rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis, as well as juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Overall, we found that the TNF inhibitors have generally been found safe and effective in adult and pediatric use, although risks of infections and other adverse events are discussed. Anakinra, rituximab, abatacept, and tocilizumab have also shown positive results in adult trials, but there is minimal pediatric data published with the exception of small studies involving the subgroup of children with systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, in whom anakinra and tocilizumab may be effective therapies. PMID:19707357

  3. Isotypes of Epstein-Barr virus antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Marie Wulff; Draborg, Anette Holck; Troelsen, Lone;

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the humoral immune response against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to compare it with the two major autoantibody types in RA, plasma samples from 77 RA patients, 28 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and 28 healthy controls...... percentages of positives of IgG/IgA/IgM against the early lytic EBV antigen diffuse (EAD) were also found in RA patients compared to HCs but were highest in SLE patients. Furthermore, associations between the elevated EBNA-1 IgA and EBNA-1 IgM levels and the presence of IgM and IgA rheumatoid factors (RFs...

  4. Case report: rheumatoid arthritis and large granular lymphocytes syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Bonara

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Felty’s syndrome (FS is a rare complication (less than 1% of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, with the clinical feature of splenomegaly and neutropenia. Approximately 10-40% of FS patients have an expansion of peripheral blood large granular lymphocytes (LGL. This cell population mainly consists of two subsets: cytotoxic T cells (CD8+, CD57+ and natural killer cells (CD3-,CD8-,CD56+. It has been hypothesised that LGL expansion could be responsible for neutropenia by suppressing neutrophil precursors in the bone marrow, but various mechanisms have been proposed to explain this association. We report a case of a 60-year-old woman with rheumatoid factor positive RA who developed LGL expansion responsible for splenomegaly, but without neutropenia. In conclusion, LGL expansion is an uncommon complication of RA and may be responsible for both FS and clinical pictures resembling FS.

  5. Diagnostic delay in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jan; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Early diagnosis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases is important in order to improve long-term outcome. We studied whether delay in diagnosis (time between onset of symptoms and establishment of diagnosis) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PSA) and......). Sensitivity analyses including patients who were included after 2005, patients who had received biological treatment or had symptom onset less than 2 and 5 years prior to first entry into DANBIO showed similar results. CONCLUSION: Since the year 2000, a significant reduction in diagnostic delay was observed...

  6. HLA-DQw alloantigens and pulmonary dysfunction in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, R A; Wigley, F M; Scott, T E; Hochberg, M C

    1988-09-01

    HLA-DR4 and keratoconjunctivitis sicca (secondary Sjögren's syndrome) are associated with abnormal pulmonary function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Since recent investigations have found that much of the genomic polymorphism of the HLA-DR4 haplotype comes from the closely linked DQw allele, we reanalyzed this set of data to evaluate the relationship between the DQw allotypes and pulmonary function in rheumatoid arthritis. Using a step-wise regression analysis, we found that the presence of DQw1 was a stronger predictor of an abnormal forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (D) than the presence of DR4, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, smoking status, or any other clinical parameter. DQw1-positive patients had a mean (+/- SD) percent of predicted FEV1, FVC, and D of 84.2 (+/- 19.8), 88.0 (+/- 17.9) and 85.6 (+/- 20.9) percent, respectively, all significantly lower than DQw-1 negative patients (p = 0.02, 0.02, and 0.03). Smokers with the heterozygous phenotype, DQw1/DQw3, tended to have obstructive disease of the airways, with a mean (+/- SD) FEV1 of 80.1 +/- 24.4 percent of predicted, compared to 95.7 +/- 12.1 percent of predicted in DQw1/DQw3-negative individuals (p = 0.03). Patients who had a DQw2 allele were more likely to have normal pulmonary function. We conclude that the HLA-DQw1 allotype is a strong predictor of abnormal pulmonary function and that it may identify smoking subjects with rheumatoid arthritis subjects who are prone to develop obstruction of airflow. PMID:3409744

  7. Significance of bone marrow edema in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessing the pathology of the synovium, its thickening and increased vascularity through ultrasound and magnetic resonance examinations (more often an ultrasound study alone) is still considered a sensitive parameter in the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis and in monitoring of treatment efficacy. Magnetic resonance studies showed that, aside from the joint pannus, the subchondral bone tissue constitutes an essential element in the development of rheumatoid arthritis. Bone marrow edema correlates with inflammation severity, joint destruction, clinical signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, and thus is considered a predictor of rapid radiological progression of the disease. The newest studies reveal that bone marrow edema may be a more sensitive indicator of the response to therapy than appearance of the synovium. Bone marrow edema presents with increased signal in T2-weighted images, being most visible in fat saturation or IR sequences (STIR, TIRM). On the other hand, it is hypointense and less evident in T1-weighted images. It becomes enhanced (hyperintense) after contrast administration. Histopathological studies confirmed that it is a result of bone inflammation (osteitis/osteomyelitis), i.e. replacememt of bone marrow fat by inflammatory infiltrates containing macrophages, T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, plasma cells and osteoclasts. Bone marrow edema appears after a few weeks from occurrence of symptoms and therefore is considered an early marker of inflammation. It correlates with clinical assessment of disease activity and elevated markers of acute inflammatory phase, i.e. ESR and CRP. It is a reversible phenomenon and may become attenuated due to biological treatment. It is considered a “herald” of erosions, as the risk of their formation is 6-fold higher in sites where BME was previously noted

  8. Multiple Intracerebral Hemorrhages in an Old Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Ştefănescu, V; Traşcă, Daniela; Şerban-Pereţeanu, Adelina; Chicoş, B; Cojocaru, M

    2015-01-01

    A 78-year-old Caucasian man was admitted in the Department of Neurology for visual disturbances, started two days before. The next day the patient experienced headache, fever and gait disturbances. He had hypertension, diabetes mellitus, an ischemic stroke 13 years ago, longstanding seronegative rheumatoid arthritis (17 years), polynodular goiter, right ischio-pubian fracture and right femoral vein thrombosis a year ago due to a car accident, since he is treated with oral anticoagulants associated to antiaggregant, hypotensors, statin and oral antidiabetics. The neurologic examination had evidenced nuchal rigidity, left homonymous hemianopsia, left central facial palsy, ataxia of the inferior limbs with wide-based gait, achilean reflexes abolished bilaterally, bilaterally abolished plantar reflexes, ideomotor apraxia, dysarthria, hypoprosexia, and preserved consciousness patient. A non-contrast cerebral CT scan had shown right temporal and parieto-occipital intraparenchymatous hemorrhages, a right frontal sequelar lesion, multiple old lacunar infarets, cortical atrophy. Laboratory findings included an inflammatory syndrome, absence of rheumatoid arthritis positive serology, normal coagulogram, an elevated proteinuria. The cerebral IRM performed on the seventh day of hospitalisation was suggestive for subacute right parietal hemorrhage, old cerebral infarction in the right anterior cerebral artery area, old lacunar infarcts and cerebral atrophy. The anticoagulant and antiaggregant treatment was stopped after a generalized tonic-clonic seizure occurred. Antiedematous, hypotensor, anticonvulsivant, beta-blocker, and symptomatic treatment was started, while the antidiabetic treatment was continued. All symptoms remitted. Arguments for amyloid angiopathy in our patient are previous non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke and a chronic inflammatory disease- rheumatoid arthritis in his personal medical history. PMID:26939215

  9. Effective rheumatoid arthritis treatment requires comprehensive management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomershine, Chad S

    2009-01-01

    Work by Lee and colleagues has shown that decreased sleep quality and increased psychiatric distress increase pain sensitivity at both articular and nonarticular sites in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. This work is consistent with prior studies showing that factors independent of RA disease activity can influence RA outcome measures. Owing to increasing pressure on rheumatologists to use outcome measures to inform treatment decisions, the work by Lee and colleagues highlights the need for comprehensive RA management strategies to understand and address the human factors that influence outcomes measures. Such strategies will ensure appropriate use of increasingly expensive therapies while maximizing patient satisfaction and reimbursement. PMID:20067592

  10. Biologic agents for rheumatoid arthritis: 2008 and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweiss, Nadera J; Hushaw, Linda L

    2009-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease with a complex underlying pathology and varied presentation in patients. Several novel biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs have become available for the treatment of RA. Agents in late-stage clinical trials include golimumab and certolizumab, which are anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha agents; ocrelizumab, an anti-CD20 agent; and tocilizumab, an inhibitor of interleukin-6. As treatment options for RA expand, nursing care will play an increasingly important role in empowering patients through interventions such as patient education and adverse effect management. PMID:19142153

  11. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis by Xinfeng capsule: an efficacy observation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄传兵

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the curative effect of Xinfeng Capsule(XC)in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis(RA).Methods Recruited were 80 active RA patients,who were randomly assigned to the normal control group and the treatment group,40 in each group.All patients received the same routine anti-rheumatic treatment:Methotrexate 10 mg per week;Diclofenac 50 mg when painwas obvious,twice daily.Patients in the treatment group took XC 3 tablets each time,thrice daily.All treatment lasted for 12

  12. CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL FEATURES OF PANCREAS STATE IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. O. Basieva

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: complex pancreas study in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Material and methods: 120 RA pts were examined clinically Pancreas US-and biochemical study (level of a-amylase and lipase of blood serum by kinetic-calorimetric method was performed in this grouh. Results: 50.8% of pts demonstrated increase of pancreas echo, in 23.3%- widened Wirsung s duct, in 45%- single small focal indurations, more often in the body and cauda pancreatis. Decrease of lipolitic and amylolytic pancreas activity is characteristic for RA, especially in systemic process and long-term disease. Clinical and functional disturbances are connected with morphological changes.

  13. Effect of dietary restrictions on disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Beri, D; Malaviya, A N; Shandilya, R; Singh, R R

    1988-01-01

    Additions in five steps were made, as a possible therapeutic measure, to the diet of 27 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) after a period of two weeks of a basal isocaloric diet free from pulses, cereals, milk, and non-vegetarian protein foods. Fourteen patients finally took part in the trial, 10 (71%) of whom showed significant clinical improvement. Only three patients (11%) adhered to the diet for a period of 10 months. The others discontinued the diet and were then treated with conven...

  14. Psychological variables and physical exercise in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amabile Borges Dario

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to provide a literature review aiming to clarify the most prevalent psychological changes present in individuals suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA, the impact of exercise on such changes, and the exercise protocols commonly adopted to improve these individuals' mental health. The few studies available report anxiety disorders and depression as most prevalent and physical exercise as a significant therapeutic strategy for this population. There is some evidence of the beneficial effects of exercise on those psychological variables providing RA patients with more effective treatments.

  15. [Rheumatoid arthritis: problems and significance of personalized medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The last decade is prominent for significant progress in research in the field of mechanisms underlying development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) opening new prospects in pathogenetic treatment of this disease. A great success of RA pharmacotherapy during the last 10 year period is design of novel genetically engineered biological medicines. Achievements of molecular biology, pharmacological genetics and biological infornmation science promote an individual approach to treatment of RA patients within a new conception of individual medicine which considers personal aspects of genomic and proteomic sciences. This novel approach to treatment of RA patients can improve RA outcomes and noticeably reduce cost of the treatmnent. PMID:22830204

  16. Clinical analysis of leg ulcers and gangrene in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Michiko; Nagai, Yayoi; Sogabe, Yoko; Hattori, Tomoyasu; Inoue, Chizuru; Okada, Etsuko; Tago, Osamu; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2013-12-01

    Leg ulcers are often complicated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), however, the etiology is multifactorial. We examined the cases of leg ulceration or gangrene in seven RA patients who were hospitalized over the past 3 years. One patient was diagnosed as having pyoderma gangrenosum. Although vasculitis was suspected in three patients, no histological evidence was obtained from the skin specimens. In these patients, angiography revealed the stenosis or occlusion of digital arteries. In the remaining three patients, leg ulcers were considered to be due to venous insufficiency. Treatment should be chosen depending on the causes of leg ulcers. PMID:24304368

  17. THE PROBLEM OF OSTEOPOROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Mikhailovna Marusenko; O. Yu. Barysheva; N N Vezikova

    2009-01-01

    Objective. To estimate the frequency and degree of osteopenia and osteoporosis (OP) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) versus those in patients with osteoarthrosis (OA). Subjects and methods. The study included 150 patients aged above 18 years with the valid diagnosis of RA or OA, in whom the risk factors of OP were assessed. Bone mineral density (BMD) (the relative units were T test) of the lumbar spine in the frontal projection (LII-LIV) and the proximal femur (head, neck, WardXs...

  18. Decreased serum cell-free DNA levels in rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Dunaeva, Marina; Buddingh’, Bastiaan C.; René E M Toes; Luime, Jolanda J.; Lubberts, Erik; Pruijn, Ger J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have demonstrated that serum/plasma DNA and RNA molecules in addition to proteins can serve as biomarkers. Elevated levels of these nucleic acids have been found not only in acute, but also in chronic conditions, including autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to assess cell-free DNA (cfDNA) levels in sera of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients compared to controls. Methods cfDNA was extracted from sera of patients with early and established RA, relapsing-remitt...

  19. Fractalkine in rheumatoid arthritis: a review to date.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, G

    2012-02-03

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by the expansion of the synovium, with infiltration of pro-inflammatory cells, neovascularization and an abundance of pro-inflammatory cytokines resulting in tissue destruction and bone erosion. Fractalkine (FKN), a recently described chemokine, possesses chemotactic, angiogenic and adhesive functions that associates it with all of these destructive processes. In this review, we describe the research to date, which implicates FKN and its receptor in the pathogenesis of RA and propose that this molecule may represent a future therapeutic target for RA.

  20. RITUXIMAB: NEW POTENTIALITIES OF THERAPY FOR RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D E Karateev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Some patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA are unresponsive or intolerant to both synthetic first-line anti-inflammatory drugs (FLAID and tumor necrosis factor (TNF а inhibitors already included into all the treatment standards . Along with the conventional methods for overcoming drug resistance - switching to another FLAID or another TNF а blocker, the use of biologicals with another mechanism of action rather than suppression of TNF а gives a good account of itself. Prominent among these agents is the anti-B-cell drug rituximab. The new possibilities of the therapy, which open up the use of rituximab in patients with RA, are discussed.

  1. MR imaging assessment of clinical problems in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narvaez, Jose A.; Roca, Yolanda; Aguilera, Carlos [Department of CT and MR Imaging, Hospital Duran i Reynals, Universitaria de Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain); Narvaez, Javier [Department of Medicine, Delfos Medical Center, Barcelona (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    Although MR imaging has been increasingly recognized as a useful tool in the diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the assessment of disease activity, these applications have not yet been usually included in the routine management of this condition. Our goal is to review the current role of MRI in the everyday clinical management of patients with RA. The usefulness of MRI in the evaluation of articular and para-articular changes in specific locations, mainly the craniocervical region and the temporomandibular joint, are reviewed. Clinical problems derived from local extra-articular involvement, such as tenosynovitis, ''rice-bodies'' bursitis, and Baker's cyst rupture, are also described. Finally, we also review the value of MRI in evaluation of some complications of RA such as tendinous rupture, osteonecrosis, stress fracture, and septic arthritis/osteomyelitis. (orig.)

  2. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonism and its role in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nam Trung; Nakahama, Taisuke; Nguyen, Chi Hung; Tran, Trang Thu; Le, Van Son; Chu, Hoang Ha; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Although rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common autoimmune disease, affecting approximately 1% of the population worldwide, its pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. Tobacco smoke, an environmental risk factor for RA, contains several ligands of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr), also known as dioxin receptor. Ahr plays critical roles in the immune system. We previously demonstrated that Ahr in helper T-cells contributes to development of collagen-induced arthritis, a mouse model of RA. Other studies have shown that cigarette smoke condensate and pure Ahr ligands exacerbate RA by altering bone metabolism and inducing proinflammatory responses in fibroblast-like synoviocytes. Consistent with these findings, several Ahr antagonists such as α-naphthoflavone, resveratrol, and GNF351 reverse the effect of Ahr ligands in RA pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of Ahr function in the immune system and the potential clinical benefits of Ahr antagonism in treating RA.

  3. Anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) in rheumatoid arthritis : linking genetic predisposition to clinical outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woude, Diane van der

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disease characterized by arthritis of mainly the small joints of the hands and feet, which is thought to be the result of an autoimmune response. It is the most common inflammatory arthritis with a prevalence of 0.5-1.0% in European and North-American populations 1. Th

  4. Genes and environmental factors associated with the severity of progression of rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooy, Diederik Pieter Constantijn de

    2014-01-01

    Part I of this thesis starts with a description of the Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic, followed by chapters on predicting the progression from Undifferentiated Arthritis to Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and predicting the severity of RA by clinical information available early in the disease stage. In par

  5. Extra-Articular Manifestations of Rheumatoid Arthritis, Now

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Vela

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease, characterised by polyarthritis and extra-articular organ disease, including rheumatoid nodules, ophthalmologic manifestations, cardiopulmonary disease, vasculitis, neuropathy, glomerulonephritis, Felty’s syndrome, and amyloidosis. Extra-articular manifestations of RA (ExRA occur in 17.8–40.9% of RA patients, 1.5–21.5% of them presenting as severe forms and usually associated with increased morbidity and mortality. They can develop at any time during the course of the disease, even in the early stages, and are associated with certain predisposing factors, such as the presence of rheumatoid factor, smoking, and long-standing severe disease. Rheumatoid nodules, the most common ExRA, have been found to be associated with the development of severe features, such as vasculitis, rheumatoid lung disease, pericarditis, and pleuritis, especially in those patients who develop them within 2 years from RA diagnosis. There is no uniformity in the definition of the term ExRA, which limits comparability between different studies. Several recent surveys suggest a lower frequency, probably due to a better control of disease activity. Diagnosis of ExRA is a challenge for clinicians, given its variable and complex presentation, and the lack of specific diagnostic tests; it must be based on clinical recognition and exclusion of other causes of the signs and symptoms. Furthermore, management continues to be difficult with a bad prognosis in many conditions. This article reviews the clinical aspects of major ExRA, focusing on incidence, clinical features, and therapeutic approaches, and how modern immunosuppressive therapy can change the outcome.

  6. Characteristics of Rheumatoid Arthritis relative to HLA-DR in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective was to determine the clinical characteristics of rheumatoid arthritis in Saudi Arabia in relation to human leukocyte antigen type. A group of 91 rheumatoid arthritis patients, 72 females and 19 males were studied for the various clinical, laboratory and radiological parameters along with human leukocyte antigen-DR phenotypes. Since human leukocyte antigen-DR10 was most commonly associated with rheumatoid arthritis in our population, we compared those patients with human leukocyte antigen-DR10 to those without. The comparison yielded differences in the presence of rheumatoid nodules, erosions, corticosteroid treatment, and joint involvement at presentation, hemoglobin levels, and white cell count. Only the last 3 parameters showed a statistical significance. Human leukocyte antigen type of Saudi patients with rheumatoid arthritis influenced the course of the disease but only to a limited extent. (author)

  7. Cardiovascular risk factors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in combination with hypertension depending on body weight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sіrenko O.Yu.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to evaluate the frequency of cardiovascular risk factors and hypertension in patients with rheumatoid arthritis depending on body weight. The study involved 100 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and stably selected therapy for more than 6 months at the age from 45 to 65 years (mean age 53,19 ± 5,40 years. Traditional cardiovascular risk was assessed, taking into account risk factors by SCORE scale and amended for patients with RA. The levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, serum creatinine, body mass index, body area index were determined. Arterial hypertension was diagnosed in 41 (41% patients with rheuma¬toid arthritis and was associated with traditional risk factors (age, obesity, rheumatoid factor, hyperuricemia and the duration of glucocorticoid therapy. Obesity and excess body mass occurred in the majority of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, herewith the highest level of inflammation indicators and risk of cardiovascular events was in overweight patients. Obesity was associated with duration of rheumatoid arthritis, the activity of the inflammatory process, the duration of glucocorticoids taking. It is found that the traditional SCORE scale does not fully reflect the risk of cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis. Identification of hypertension and obesity increases the information content of the risk assessment of cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Animal Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis (I): Pristane-Induced Arthritis in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncel, Jonatan; Haag, Sabrina; Hoffmann, Markus H.; Yau, Anthony C. Y.; Hultqvist, Malin; Olofsson, Peter; Bäcklund, Johan; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Weidner, Daniela; Fischer, Anita; Leichsenring, Anna; Lange, Franziska; Haase, Claus; Lu, Shemin; Gulko, Percio S.; Steiner, Günter; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2016-01-01

    Background To facilitate the development of therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the Innovative Medicines Initiative BTCure has combined the experience from several laboratories worldwide to establish a series of protocols for different animal models of arthritis that reflect the pathogenesis of RA. Here, we describe chronic pristane-induced arthritis (PIA) model in DA rats, and provide detailed instructions to set up and evaluate the model and for reporting data. Methods We optimized dose of pristane and immunization procedures and determined the effect of age, gender, and housing conditions. We further assessed cage-effects, reproducibility, and frequency of chronic arthritis, disease markers, and efficacy of standard and novel therapies. Results Out of 271 rats, 99.6% developed arthritis after pristane-administration. Mean values for day of onset, day of maximum arthritis severity and maximum clinical scores were 11.8±2.0 days, 20.3±5.1 days and 34.2±11 points on a 60-point scale, respectively. The mean frequency of chronic arthritis was 86% but approached 100% in long-term experiments over 110 days. Pristane was arthritogenic even at 5 microliters dose but needed to be administrated intradermally to induce robust disease with minimal variation. The development of arthritis was age-dependent but independent of gender and whether the rats were housed in conventional or barrier facilities. PIA correlated well with weight loss and acute phase reactants, and was ameliorated by etanercept, dexamethasone, cyclosporine A and fingolimod treatment. Conclusions PIA has high incidence and excellent reproducibility. The chronic relapsing-remitting disease and limited systemic manifestations make it more suitable than adjuvant arthritis for long-term studies of joint-inflammation and screening and validation of new therapeutics. PMID:27227821

  9. Vascular Function and Handgrip Strength in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

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    Mahmoud A. Alomari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To examine the relationship of handgrip strength with forearm blood flow (BF and vascular resistance (VR in rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients. Methods. Forearm BF at rest (RBF and after upper arm occlusion (RHBF, and handgrip strength were examined in 78 individuals (RA=42 and controls (CT=36. Subsequently, VR at rest (RVR and after occlusion (RHVR were calculated. Results. The patients’ RBF (P=0.02 and RHBF (P=0.0001 were less, whereas RVR (P=0.002 and RHVR (P=0.0001 were greater as compared to the CTs. Similarly, handgrip strength was lower in the RAs (P=0.0001. Finally, handgrip strength was directly associated with RBF (r=0.43; P=0.0001, and RHBF (r=0.5; P=0.0001, and inversely related to RVR (r=-0.3; P=0.009 and RHVR (r=-0.3; P=0.007. Conclusion. The present study uniquely identifies an association between regional measures of forearm blood flow and handgrip strength in patients and healthy control. In addition, this study confirms the presence of vascular and muscle dysfunction in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, as evidenced by lower forearm blood flow indices, at rest and following occlusion, and lower handgrip strength as compared to healthy individuals.

  10. Safety of etanercept in elderly subjects with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredomaria Lurati

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Alfredomaria Lurati, Mariagrazia Marrazza, Katia Angela, Magda ScarpelliniFornaroli Hospital, Rheumatology Unit, Magenta, ItalyObjective: To report side effects seen in a clinical cohort of patients aged >65 years with rheumatoid arthritis (RA treated with the tumor necrosis factor-α TNF-α blocker etanercept and to compare the side effects rate with patients aged ≤65 years.Methods: All patients with RA that started etanercept and who were referred to our rheumatology unit from November 2005 to March 2009 were included in this study and prospectively followed to collect side effects related to therapy.Results: One hundred three patients were enrolled: 41 (37 females, 4 males aged >65 years and 62 (40 females, 22 males aged <65 years. In the patients aged >65 years, the safety profile (defined as rate of side effects of etanercept was similar to that in patients aged ≤65 years (P > 0.05 and the survival curves between the groups were similar (P > 0.05.Conclusions: In our three-year experience, the anti-TNFα agent etanercept has been well tolerated and safe in elderly patients. The risk of side effects in these patients was no greater than in subjects aged ≤65 years. However, such inhibitors are associated with various and numerous side effects and elderly patients with RA should be carefully monitored to limit the risk of side effects during anti-TNFα therapy as much as possible.Keywords: anti-TNF therapy, rheumatoid arthritis, elderly

  11. Application of Liposomes in Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis: Quo Vadis

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    Bhupinder Kapoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common treatments for rheumatoid arthritis include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, corticosteroids, disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs, and some biological agents. However, none of the treatments available is able to achieve the ultimate goal of treatment, that is, drug-free remission. This limitation has shifted the focus of treatment to delivery strategies with an ability to deliver the drugs into the synovial cavity in the proper dosage while mitigating side effects to other tissues. A number of approaches like microemulsions, microspheres, liposomes, microballoons, cocrystals, nanoemulsions, dendrimers, microsponges, and so forth, have been used for intrasynovial delivery of these drugs. Amongst these, liposomes have proven to be very effective for retaining the drug in the synovial cavity by virtue of their size and chemical composition. The fast clearance of intra-synovially administered drugs can be overcome by use of liposomes leading to increased uptake of drugs by the target synovial cells, which in turn reduces the exposure of nontarget sites and eliminates most of the undesirable effects associated with therapy. This review focuses on the use of liposomes in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes data relating to the liposome formulations of various drugs. It also discusses emerging trends of this promising technology.

  12. Application of liposomes in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: quo vadis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Bhupinder; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Gulati, Monica; Gupta, Reena; Vaidya, Yogyata

    2014-01-01

    The most common treatments for rheumatoid arthritis include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), and some biological agents. However, none of the treatments available is able to achieve the ultimate goal of treatment, that is, drug-free remission. This limitation has shifted the focus of treatment to delivery strategies with an ability to deliver the drugs into the synovial cavity in the proper dosage while mitigating side effects to other tissues. A number of approaches like microemulsions, microspheres, liposomes, microballoons, cocrystals, nanoemulsions, dendrimers, microsponges, and so forth, have been used for intrasynovial delivery of these drugs. Amongst these, liposomes have proven to be very effective for retaining the drug in the synovial cavity by virtue of their size and chemical composition. The fast clearance of intra-synovially administered drugs can be overcome by use of liposomes leading to increased uptake of drugs by the target synovial cells, which in turn reduces the exposure of nontarget sites and eliminates most of the undesirable effects associated with therapy. This review focuses on the use of liposomes in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes data relating to the liposome formulations of various drugs. It also discusses emerging trends of this promising technology. PMID:24688450

  13. Pain Sensitisation in Women with Active Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vladimirova, Nora; Jespersen, Anders; Bartels, Else Marie;

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. In some rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, joint pain persists without signs of inflammation. This indicates that central pain sensitisation may play a role in the generation of chronic pain in a subgroup of RA. Our aim was to assess the degree of peripheral and central pain sensitis......Objectives. In some rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, joint pain persists without signs of inflammation. This indicates that central pain sensitisation may play a role in the generation of chronic pain in a subgroup of RA. Our aim was to assess the degree of peripheral and central pain...... sensitisation in women with active RA compared to healthy controls (HC). Methods. 38 women with active RA (DAS28 > 2.6) and 38 female HC were included in, and completed, the study. Exclusion criteria were polyneuropathy, pregnancy, and no Danish language. Cuff Pressure Algometry measurements were carried out on...... the dominant lower leg. Pain threshold, pain tolerance, and pain sensitivity during tonic painful stimulation were recorded. Results. Women with active RA had significantly lower pain threshold (p < 0.01) and pain tolerance (p < 0.01) than HC. The mean temporal summation- (TS-) index in RA patients...

  14. Dietary recommendations for patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a review

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    Vitetta L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Luis Vitetta,1 Samantha Coulson,1 Janet Schloss,1 Shoshannah L Beck,1 Robert Allen,2 Avni Sali21Centre for Integrative Clinical and Molecular Medicine, The University of Queensland School of Medicine, Brisbane, 2National Institute of Integrative Medicine, Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: Dietary interventions can assist with the management of disease symptoms that accompany rheumatoid arthritis (RA, such as pain, tender swollen joints, stiffness, and associated disability and disease progression. Dietary interventions have gained widespread appeal for both clinicians and RA patients. Interventions that promote self-help through education can have significant benefits for patients as they negotiate pain and musculoskeletal disability. There is substantial scientific evidence that demonstrates patients diagnosed with RA may benefit from dietary interventions; however, recent systematic reviews remain uncertain about the therapeutic efficacy of dietary manipulation for RA due to clinical trials with a high risk of bias. However, dietary interventions with plausible therapeutic activity may be indicated for reducing RA-associated symptoms, including elimination of foods that may trigger an allergic or intolerant response, introduction of known anti-inflammatory dietary compounds and correction of food, or drug-induced gastrointestinal tract microbiota abnormalities and permeability.Keywords: diet, rheumatoid arthritis, vegetarian, vegan, Mediterranean, fish oils, probiotics

  15. Effect of biologic agents on radiographic progression of rheumatoid arthritis

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    Gabriel J Tobón

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel J Tobón1, Alain Saraux1,2, Valérie Devauchelle-Pensec1,21Immunology Laboratory, Morvan Hospital, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest, France; 2Rheumatology Unit, Hôpital de la Cavale Blanche, CHU Brest, FranceAbstract: The treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA has benefited over the last few years from the introduction of biologic agents whose development was based on new insights into the immunological factors involved in the pathogenesis of RA and the development of joint damage. These biological agents have been proven effective in RA patients with inadequate responses to synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs. Preventing joint damage is now the primary goal of RA treatment, and guidelines exist for the follow-up of joint abnormalities. Most biologic agents produced high clinical and radiological response rates in patients with established or recent-onset RA. Thus, for the first time, obtaining a remission is a reasonable treatment goal in RA patients. Factors that are crucial to joint damage control are: early initiation of DMARDs, use of intensive treatments including biological agents, and close monitoring of clinical disease activity and radiographic progression. However, some patients remain unresponsive to all available treatments and continue to experience joint damage progression. A major objective now is to identify patients at high risk for severe joint damage, in order to tailor the treatment regimen to their specific needs.Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, radiographic progression, biologics

  16. Management of rheumatoid arthritis during pregnancy: challenges and solutions

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    Krause ML

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Megan L Krause, Ashima Makol Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, MN, USA Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis, a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease with significant physical disability, affects women three times more frequently than men, often in their childbearing years. Parenthood decisions can be challenging, often affected by perceptions of their disease state, health care needs, and complex pharmacological treatments. Many women struggle to find adequate information to guide them on pregnancy planning, lactation, and early parenting in relation to their chronic condition. The expanded availability and choice of pharmacotherapies have supported optimal disease control prior to conception and enhanced physical capabilities for women to successfully overcome the challenges of raising children but require a detailed understanding of their risks and safety in the setting of pregnancy and breastfeeding. This review outlines the various situational challenges faced by rheumatologists in providing care to men and women in the reproductive age group interested in starting a family. Up to date evidence-based solutions particularly focusing on the safe use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologic response modifiers to assist rheumatologists in the care of pregnant and lactating women with RA are reviewed. Keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, pregnancy, biologics, DMARDs

  17. MRI findings of juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Edward Y.; Kleinman, Paul K. [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States); Sundel, Robert P.; Kim, Susan [Harvard Medical School, Rheumatology Program, Division of Immunology and the Department of Pediatrics, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States); Zurakowski, David [Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JpsA) in children in order to facilitate early diagnosis and proper management. Two pediatric radiologists retrospectively reviewed in consensus a total of 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients (nine boys, 22 girls; age range 1-17 years; mean age 9.4 years) who had a definite diagnosis of JpsA and underwent MRI. Each MRI was evaluated for synovium abnormality (thickening and enhancement), joint effusion (small, moderate, and large), bone marrow abnormality (edema, enhancement, and location of abnormality), soft tissue abnormality (edema, enhancement, atrophy, and fatty infiltration), tendon abnormality (thickening, edema, tendon sheath fluid, and enhancement), and articular abnormality (joint space narrowing and erosion). The distribution of abnormal MRI findings among the six categories for the 37 MRI examinations was evaluated. The number of abnormal MRI findings for each MRI examination was assessed. Age at MRI examination and all six categories of abnormal MRI findings according to gender were evaluated. There were a total 96 abnormal MRI findings noted on 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients. The 37 abnormal MRI examinations included MRI of the hand (n=8), knee (n = 8), ankle (n = 5), pelvis (n = 5), temporomandibular joint (n = 4), wrist (n = 3), foot (n = 2), elbow (n = 1), and shoulder (n = 1). Twenty-eight diffuse synovial thickening and/or enhancement were the most common MRI abnormality (29.2%). Joint effusion comprised 22 abnormal MRI findings (22.9%). There were 16 abnormal MRI bone marrow edema and/or enhancement findings (16.7%), and in seven (7.3%) the edema involved non-articular sites. Soft tissue abnormality manifested as edema and/or enhancement constituted 14 abnormal MRI findings (14.5%). There were ten MRI abnormalities (10.4%) involving tendons. Articular abnormality seen as joint space

  18. MRI findings of juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of juvenile psoriatic arthritis (JpsA) in children in order to facilitate early diagnosis and proper management. Two pediatric radiologists retrospectively reviewed in consensus a total of 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients (nine boys, 22 girls; age range 1-17 years; mean age 9.4 years) who had a definite diagnosis of JpsA and underwent MRI. Each MRI was evaluated for synovium abnormality (thickening and enhancement), joint effusion (small, moderate, and large), bone marrow abnormality (edema, enhancement, and location of abnormality), soft tissue abnormality (edema, enhancement, atrophy, and fatty infiltration), tendon abnormality (thickening, edema, tendon sheath fluid, and enhancement), and articular abnormality (joint space narrowing and erosion). The distribution of abnormal MRI findings among the six categories for the 37 MRI examinations was evaluated. The number of abnormal MRI findings for each MRI examination was assessed. Age at MRI examination and all six categories of abnormal MRI findings according to gender were evaluated. There were a total 96 abnormal MRI findings noted on 37 abnormal MRI examinations from 31 pediatric patients. The 37 abnormal MRI examinations included MRI of the hand (n=8), knee (n = 8), ankle (n = 5), pelvis (n = 5), temporomandibular joint (n = 4), wrist (n = 3), foot (n = 2), elbow (n = 1), and shoulder (n = 1). Twenty-eight diffuse synovial thickening and/or enhancement were the most common MRI abnormality (29.2%). Joint effusion comprised 22 abnormal MRI findings (22.9%). There were 16 abnormal MRI bone marrow edema and/or enhancement findings (16.7%), and in seven (7.3%) the edema involved non-articular sites. Soft tissue abnormality manifested as edema and/or enhancement constituted 14 abnormal MRI findings (14.5%). There were ten MRI abnormalities (10.4%) involving tendons. Articular abnormality seen as joint space

  19. People Getting a Grip on Arthritis: A Knowledge Transfer Strategy to Empower Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lucie; Lineker, Sydney; Bell, Mary; Wells, George; Casimiro, Lynn; Egan, Mary; Cranney, Ann; Tugwell, Peter; Wilson, Keith G.; De Angelis, Gino; Loew, Laurianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was twofold. First, to help people with arthritis become aware of and utilize Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and Osteoarthritis (OA) Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) as they relate to self-management strategies. Second, to evaluate the impact of specific Knowledge Translation (KT) activities on CPG uptake. More…

  20. Autoantibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides predict progression to rheumatoid arthritis in patients with undifferentiated arthritis - A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaalen, F.A. van; Linn-Rasker, S.P.; Venrooij, W.J.W. van; Jong, B.A. de; Breedveld, F.C.; Verweij, C.L.; Toes, R.E.M.; Huizinga, T.W.J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common, severe, chronic inflammatory joint disease. Since the disease may initially be indistinguishable from other forms of arthritis, early diagnosis can be difficult. Autoantibodies seen in RA can be detected years before clinical symptoms develop. In an

  1. Newer Nutritional basis in the management of Rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharat Agarwal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorder culminating in joint destruction with functional impairment & deformities. This disease is associated with poor nutritional status in relation to various nutrients due to not only because of increased requirements & reduction in their absorption but also due to disease modifying anti-rheumatoid drugs (DMARD’s, Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs (NSAID’s & corticosteroids prescribed to alleviate symptoms of this disease. This results in associated side effects like gastrointestinal bleeding & bone loss (osteoporosis. Supplementation with long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA has constantly demonstrated an improvement in symptoms & reduction in dosages of NSAID’s. Such a supplementation can be provided with the use of fish oils which have an anti-inflammatory potential. Vitamin C (ascorbic acid use has been found to augment the anti-oxidant defenses, so also the use of Vitamin E (tocopherol which has got antiinflammatory action. Beneficial effects of Vitamin B6 (pyridoxal 5-phosphate used in conjunction with folate & Vitamin B12 have been documented in those group of RA patients with high homocysteine metabolism, there by reducing the cardiovascular risk in these patients. In addition role of Selenium, Iron, Zinc, Calcium, and Vitamin D has been discussed in this review article. Besides adding certain nutrients in food, elimination of certain foods like red meat, dairy products, cereals & wheat gluten have shown improvement in progression of this disease. This article emphasizes the need for dietary supervision in the hands of expert dietician, of the Rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  2. Wrist ultrasound analysis of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Mendonça

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we evaluated 42 wrists using the semi-quantitative scales power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS and gray scale ultrasound (GSUS with scores ranging from 0 to 3 and correlated the results with clinical, laboratory and radiographic data. Twenty-one patients (17 women and 4 men with rheumatoid arthritis according to criteria of the American College of Rheumatology were enrolled in the study from September 2008 to July 2009 at Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP. The average disease duration was 14 months. The patients were 66.6% Caucasians and 33.3% non-Caucasians, with a mean age of 42 and 41 years, respectively. A dorsal longitudinal scan was performed by ultrasound on the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints using GE LOGIQ XP-linear ultrasound and a high frequency (8-10 MHz transducer. All patients were X-rayed, and the Larsen score was determined for the joints, with grades ranging from 0 to V. This study showed significant correlations between clinical, sonographic and laboratory data: GSUS and swollen right wrist (r = 0.546, GSUS of right wrist and swelling of left wrist (r = 0.511, PDUS of right wrist and pain in left wrist (r = 0.436, PDUS of right wrist and C-reactive protein (r = 0.466. Ultrasound can be considered a useful tool in the diagnosis of synovitis in early rheumatoid arthritis mainly when the anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide and rheumatoid factor are negative, and can lead to an early change in the therapeutic decision.

  3. Role of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated fatty acids in Inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Asif

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Reviewing the relationships between polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs with inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis disorders, the PUFAs containing ω-3, ω-6 and ω-9, these ω-3FAs levels were correlated with ω-6: ω-3 ratios including arachidonic acid (AA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. Based on previously-reports, the levels of ω-3 FAs considered being as a 'lower risk' category for inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis. Certain PUFAs ratios may aid in inflammation and rheumatoid arthritis-related risk assessment. PUFA are the most effective for the production of oil with high concentration of DHA and EPA content significantly.

  4. Radio-synoviorthesis with yttrium 90 in the knee-joint in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radio-synoviorthesis with yttrium 90 in the knee-joint in rheumatoid arthritis was performed and controlled in 106 knees of patients with rheumatoid arthritis over a span of time between 6 and 49 months. The results are similar to those of other authors. As compared to synovectomy radio-synoviorthesis seems less successful as far as long-term results are concerned. As local treatment radio-synoviorthesis seems a good supplementory element in the therapeutic plan of rheumatoid arthritis. The indication to alternative procedures has been considered carefully for each individual case and joint. (orig.)

  5. SUBCLINICAL INTERSTITIAL PULMONARY INJURY IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

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    D. V. Bestaev

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Subjects and methods. The study enrolled 61 inpatients diagnosed with RA (according to the 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria who were treated at the V.A. Nasonova Research Institute of Rheumatology; in so doing, high-resolution computed tomography revealed lung changes as a ground glass pattern in 15 patients, reticular striation, traction bronchoectases, and lung tissue changes as honeycomb ones in 25 patients; no lung abnormalities were found in 21 patients. DAS28 was applied to determine the inflammatory activity of RA. The RA patients underwent X-ray studies of the hand, foot, and chest, by using accordingly X-Ray unit and spiral computed tomography scanner (section thickness, 0.65 mm. External respiration function (ERF indicators were studied with plethysmograph. IgM rheumatoid factor was measured using an immune nephelometer. Serum anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were assayed by immunochemiluminescence technique on a Cobas e411 analyzer. The xMAP technology using a BioPlex200 analyzer was employed to determine the serum concentrations of 27 cytokines in 15 patients with subclinical IPI and in 25 with clinical IPI. Results and discussion. The major respiratory signs in patients with IPI proved to be cough (24 %, expectoration (20 %, dyspnea (16 %, and crepitation (64 % on auscultation. Three patients with subclinical IPI were found to have crepitation on auscultation. Respiratory symptoms were absent in the RA patients without IPI. It should be noted that there are a larger number of RA patients with a high smoking index among the RA patients with IPI than among those without IPI (p < 0.05. Investigation of ERF indicators revealed a statistically significantly lower lung diffusing capacity (LDC in the RA patients with subclinical IPI than in those without IPI (p < 0.05. Other ERF indicators showed no significant deviations of the reference values. LDC and total lung capacity appeared to be statistically

  6. Radiosynovectomy for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis of the elbow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the efficiacy of radiosynovectomy (RSO) in patients with rheumatoid elbow arthritis. Patients and Methods: 40 joints of 31 patients were evaluated. At the time of therapy, patients had been suffering from elbow arthritis for 17.5 months (2-72 months). 95% of the joints (n = 38) had severe daily pain or continuous pain, 97.5% (n = 39) had moderate to severe limitation of the mobility and 10% (n = 4) had severe swelling. RSO was performed by intraarticulaer injection of 74 MBq colloidal rhenium-186 and 15 mg triamcinolonehexacetonide. Before and six to 26 months after therapy (median follow-up 14.7 months) severity of the patients pain, mobility and swelling (transferred to a scoring system) were determined with a standardised questionaire. A clinical re-evaluation, along with an arthrosonographical follow-up was performed in 28 joints. Results: A ''good to very good'' overall long-term response was achieved in 80% (n = 32) of the treated joints and a temporary response in 10% (n = 4). Only 10% (n = 4) had a non-satisfactory response due to advanced articular destruction. The range of motion for flexion-extension increased from 103.8 ± 20.0 degrees to 144.0 ± 12.8 degrees (p <0.001). The respective scores for articular pain, impaired mobility and swelling decreased significantly (pain from 3.15 to 0.82, impaired mobility from 3.15 to 0.82, swelling from 2.40 to 0.65; p <0.001). No deterioration or complication occurred. The effects lasted throughout the entire follow-up time for 36 joints (90%). Conclusion: For patients with rheumatoid involvement of the elbow joint, radiosynovectomy results in a significant decrease of articular pain and improvement of objective parameter, i.e. joint mobility. Thus, radiosynovectomy represents a feasible and effective therapeutic option for elbow arthritis. (orig.)

  7. Ultrasonography and color Doppler in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell, Louise; Court-Payen, Michel; Nielsen, Susan; Zak, Marek; Fasth, Anders

    2012-01-01

    The wrist region is one of the most complex joints of the human body. It is prone to deformity and functional impairment in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and is difficult to examine clinically. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of ultrasonography (US) with Doppler in diagnosis...

  8. THERAPY OF R EFRACTOR Y JUVENILE CHRONIC ARTHRITIS

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    H Michels

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary Up-to-date aspects of treatment of refractory form of juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA is presented. JCA therapy by high doses of parenteral Methotrexate, tactics of combined using of disease modifying drugs, efficacy of «new» cytotoxic drugs, intravenous immunoglobulin and anticytokine therapy and autologous stem cel! transplantation were presented.

  9. Exercise testing and fitness training in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh-Grewal, D.

    2010-01-01

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis is the commonest rheumatic disease of childhood affecting 1:1000 children under the age of 16 years. Children with JIA have long been sidelined from physical activity due to active disease or irrational concerns that activity may in some way worsen disease. Children wit

  10. Innovating imaging in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: an ongoing quest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Nusman

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focusses on the ongoing quest of imaging in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The innovations within the field of imaging in JIA are discussed, in order to increase the added value of imaging in the evaluation of disease activity and the management of patients with JIA. The thesis is

  11. THERAPEUTIC ACTIVITY OF BEE-STINGS THERAPY IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS CAUSES INFLAMMATION AND OXIDATIVE STRESS IN FEMALE PATIENTS

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    Abdel-Rahman M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Here the present study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic activity of bee venom acupuncture in rheumatoid arthritis (RA which causes inflammation and oxidative stress in female patients. 75 female patients were divided into 5 groups as control, bee venom acupuncture, rheumatoid arthritis, treated rheumatoid arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis stung with bee venom groups. Serum rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, prostaglandins E2 and F2α, lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, glutathione and total antioxidant capacity levels were determined in all groups. Rheumatoid arthritis in female patients was resulted in a significant elevation in serum rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, prostaglandins E2 and F2α, lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide levels (p < 0.05 compared to control group. In addition, rheumatoid arthritis caused a significant reduction in serum glutathione and total antioxidant capacity levels. On the other hand, bee venom stings alleviated rheumatoid arthritis inflammation and oxidative stress effects, where all investigated parameters were statistically significant compared to rheumatoid arthritis group. Moreover, bee venom therapy was more potent than the routine treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in patients treated group. Bee venom acupuncture in RA patient may have therapeutic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities.

  12. Altered composition of gut microbiota in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yuichi; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

      Manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can be attributed to both genetic and environmental factors. Some researchers have been focusing on intestinal microbiota which is thought to be one of the environmental factors that may enhance the development of RA. The advancement of culture-independent, high throughput microbial DNA sequencing had enabled us to understand the interplay between intestinal microbiota and host immune systems. In this study, we have reviewed the previous findings in animal and human studies with respect to the role of intestinal microbiota in RA. Mouse models of arthritis have demonstrated that gut microbiota plays a critical role in the disease development. K/BxN and IL-1 receptor-antagonist knock-out mice did not develop disease in germ free condition, however, colonization of particular intestinal bacteria was sufficient to induce arthritis. Moreover, the dysbiosis was observed in the human RA patients from United States, China and Finland. Thus, we believe that endeavors to improve the dysbiosis would serve as a novel therapeutic or preventive strategy in RA patients. PMID:27181236

  13. Data Of Daily Blood Pressure Monitoring In Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Rebrov

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present work is to study the frequency of hypertension and the peculiarity of 24-hour blood pressure monitoring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. We studied 584 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Daily blood pressure monitoring was carried out in 46 patients with arthritis and 18 patients with essential hypertension. Frequency of hypertension was higher in patients with arthritis then in general population. Elevation of systolic blood pressure, heart rate and arterial blood pressure adequate decrease at night were developed to associate with advance of the disease.

  14. Malignancy incidence in 5294 patients with juvenile arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi Niaki, Omid; Clarke, Ann E; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Yeung, Rae; Hayward, Kristen; Oen, Kiem; Duffy, Ciarán M; Rosenberg, Alan; O'Neil, Kathleen M; von Scheven, Emily; Schanberg, Laura; Labrecque, Jeremy; Tse, Shirley M L; Hasija, Rachana; Lee, Jennifer L F; Bernatsky, Sasha

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine cancer incidence in a large clinical juvenile-onset arthritis population. Methods We combined data from 6 existing North American juvenile-onset arthritis cohorts. Patients with juvenile-onset arthritis were linked to regional cancer registries to detect incident cancers after cohort entry, defined as first date seen in the paediatric rheumatology clinic. The expected number of malignancies was obtained by multiplying the person-years observed (defined from cohort entry to end of follow-up) by the geographically matched age, sex and calendar year-specific cancer rates. The standardised incidence ratios (SIR; ratio of cancers observed to expected) were generated, with 95% CIs. Results The 6 juvenile arthritis registries provided a total of 5294 patients. The mean age at cohort entry was 8.9 (SD 5.0) years and 68% of participants were female. The mean duration of follow-up was 6.8 years with a total of 36 063 person-years spanning 1978–2012. During follow-up, 9 invasive cancers occurred, compared with 10.9 expected (SIR 0.82, 95% CI 0.38 to 1.5). 3 of these were haematological (Hodgkin's, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and leukaemia). 6 of the patients with cancer were exposed to disease-modifying drugs; 5 of these had also been exposed to biological agents. Conclusions We did not clearly demonstrate an increase in overall malignancy risk in patients with juvenile-onset arthritis followed for an average of almost 7 years. 3 of the 9 observed cancers were haematological. 5 of the cancers arose in children exposed to biological agents. Longer follow-up of this population is warranted, with further study of drug effects. PMID:27175293

  15. Therapeutic effect of Captopril on rheumatoid arthritis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Mei Liu; Kai-Jie Wang

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the therapeutic effect of the intervention treatment with different doses ofCaptopril onTNF-αcontents in serum of rheumatoid arthritis(RA) rats, and to provide the theoretical proofs for clinical application ofCaptopril in treatments of rheumatoid diseases. Methods:FiftyWistar rats were randomly divided into5 groups, namely,GroupA,GroupB, GroupC,GroupD,GroupE with10 ratsin each group.Injection ofFreund’s complete adjuvant was employed to establish adjuvant-induced arthritis model in rats.GroupA was model group; after model establishment, rats were treated with20 mL normal saline as placebo(ip.).Rats inGroupB were treated with8 mg/kg cyclophosphamide(ip.).Rats inGroupC,D andE were intraperitoneally injected with30 mg/kg,100 mg/kg and300 mg/kgCaptopril respectively.Rats in each group were subjected to continuous treatment for3 weeks, and then sacrificed.Eyeballs of rats were excised and blood was collected.TNF-αcontent in serum were detected usingELISA; each group rats were compared for the hind legs arthrocele.Right ankle tissues of rats were collected to prepare section, and microscopic observation of pathological changes was performed. Results:TNF-αcontent in serum ofGroupA rats was significantly higher than that of rats in other4 groups(P0.05).FromDay8, ankle arthrocele of rats inGroupsB,C,D andE was obviously relieved compared with that ofGroupA rats; the anti-inflammatory effects were gradually enhanced with the extension of medication time.Treatments ofGroupsC,D andE showed significant activities against tardive arthrocele; the degree of ankle arthrocele in rats of these three groups was lower than that ofGroupA rats(P<0.01).Histological observation showed that large amount of inflammatory cells and plasmocyte infiltration was found in ankle synovial tissues ofGroupA rats.Relief of hyperaemia and edema of right ankle synovial tissues as well as significant decrease in synoviocyte layer hyperplasia, intra-articular inflammatory

  16. Better efficacy of methotrexate given by intramuscular injection than orally in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    J. Wegrzyn; ADELEINE,P; Miossec, P

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical efficacy of methotrexate and tolerance to the drug in patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were switched from intramuscular to oral administration because of a shortage of the intramuscular preparation.

  17. Reliability of ultrasonography in detecting shoulder disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bruyn, G A W

    2009-03-01

    To assess the intra and interobserver reproducibility of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (US) among rheumatologists in detecting destructive and inflammatory shoulder abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to determine the overall agreement between US and MRI.

  18. Value of dynamic sonography in the management of shoulder pain in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevien El-Liethy

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Dynamic ultrasound examination for the diagnosis of shoulder impingement in Rheumatoid arthritis should be done in addition to the clinical and static ultrasound examination to improve the management plan.

  19. Reliability of ultrasonography in detecting shoulder disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, G. A. W.; Naredo, E.; Moeller, I.; Moragues, C.; Garrido, J.; de Bock, G. H.; d'Agostino, M-A; Filippucci, E.; Iagnocco, A.; Backhaus, M.; Swen, W. A. A.; Balint, P.; Pineda, C.; Milutinovic, S.; Kane, D.; Kaeley, G.; Narvaez, F. J.; Wakefield, R. J.; Narvaez, J. A.; de Augustin, J.; Schmidt, W. A.; Moller, I.; Swen, N.; de Agustin, J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the intra and interobserver reproducibility of musculoskeletal ultrasonography ( US) among rheumatologists in detecting destructive and inflammatory shoulder abnormalities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis ( RA) and to determine the overall agreement between US and MRI. Meth

  20. Interstitial Lung Disease of the UIP Variant as the Only Presenting Symptom of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Abhinav; Thyagarajan, Braghadheeswar; Ceniza, Sidney; Hasan Yusuf, Syed

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease primarily manifesting with symptoms of joint pain. It also involves multiple organ systems in the body, including the lungs. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the most common form of pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Without the typical symptoms such as chronic joint pain, establishing the diagnosis of RA could be quite challenging and a high index of suspicion is thereby required to diagnose ILD in patients with RA, thereby delaying treatment and increasing morbidity and mortality. We report a case of a 67-year-old Hispanic male with no previous history of rheumatoid arthritis or symptoms of typical joint pain who comes to the hospital only with the chief complaints of progressive worsening of shortness of breath for a duration of 6 months and was eventually diagnosed with ILD of the usual interstitial pneumonia variant with serologies positive for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26137341

  1. Interstitial Lung Disease of the UIP Variant as the Only Presenting Symptom of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Agrawal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease primarily manifesting with symptoms of joint pain. It also involves multiple organ systems in the body, including the lungs. Interstitial lung disease (ILD is the most common form of pulmonary involvement in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Without the typical symptoms such as chronic joint pain, establishing the diagnosis of RA could be quite challenging and a high index of suspicion is thereby required to diagnose ILD in patients with RA, thereby delaying treatment and increasing morbidity and mortality. We report a case of a 67-year-old Hispanic male with no previous history of rheumatoid arthritis or symptoms of typical joint pain who comes to the hospital only with the chief complaints of progressive worsening of shortness of breath for a duration of 6 months and was eventually diagnosed with ILD of the usual interstitial pneumonia variant with serologies positive for rheumatoid arthritis.

  2. Case report 504: Unusual bilateral calcified giant cysts (geodes) in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An unusual case of calcified, giant geodes in a patient with longstanding rheumatoid arthritis affecting the knee joints is presented. The cause of the calcification remains unknown. Radiological and pathological findings have been described. (orig./GDG)

  3. The number needed to treat for second-generation biologics when treating established rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L. E.; Jakobsen, A. K.; Bartels, E. M.;

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the number needed to treat (NNT) and the number needed to harm (NNH) of the second-generation biologics abatacept, certolizumab, golimumab, rituximab, and tocilizumab in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) taking concomitant methotrexate (MTX)....

  4. Successful reintroduction of methotrexate after pneumonitis in two patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, N J; Carroll, G J

    1992-01-01

    Two patients are described with severe and progressive rheumatoid arthritis in whom methotrexate was reintroduced despite previous methotrexate related pneumonitis. In both patients a marked improvement in disease control occurred without a recurrence of the pneumonitis.

  5. Compliance with drug therapy in rheumatoid arthritis. A longitudinal European study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viller, F; Guillemin, F; Briancon, S; Moum, T; Suurmeijer, T; van den Heuvel, W

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To delineate compliance with drug therapy in rheumatoid arthritis parents, determine specific characteristics of compliant and noncompliant patients, and took for changes in compliance over time. Patients and methods. A prospective European cohort study (EURIDISS) recruited 556 patients i

  6. Effectiveness of a measurement feedback system on outcome in rheumatoid arthritis: a controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Fransen, J.; Stucki, G.; Twisk, J.; Chamot, A; Gerster, J; Langenegger, T; Seitz, M; Michel, B.; m the,

    2003-01-01

    Background: With the help of a measurement feedback system, the treatment strategy for individual patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can be adjusted to achieve optimal control of disease activity.

  7. Adjuvant auricular electroacupuncture and autogenic training in rheumatoid arthritis: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernateck, M.; Becker, M.; Schwacke, C.;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In contrast to psychological interventions the usefulness of acupuncture as an adjuvant therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not yet been demonstrated. OBJECTIVE: The efficacy of auricular electroacupuncture (EA) was directly compared with autogenic training (AT). METHODS: Patient...

  8. MRI identifies plantar plate pathology in the forefoot of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Siddle, Heidi J; Hodgson, Richard J.; Redmond, Anthony C.; Grainger, Andrew J.; Wakefield, Richard J; Pickles, David A.; Hensor, Elizabeth M A; Helliwell, Philip S.

    2011-01-01

    Previous cadaveric studies have suggested that forefoot deformities at the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) might result from the failure of the ligamentous system and displacement of the plantar plates. This study aimed to examine the relationship between plantar plate pathology and the rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging score (RAMRIS) of the lesser (second to fifth) MTP joints in patients with RA using high-resolution 3 T magnetic reso...

  9. Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis: two case reports and review of literature

    OpenAIRE

    Spoerl David; Pers Yves-Marie; Jorgensen Christian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies are typically detected in anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody associated vasculitis, but are also present in a number of chronic inflammatory non-vasculitic conditions like rheumatoid arthritis. Rare cases of granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener’s granulomatosis, a vasculitic disorder frequently associated with the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis have be...

  10. The number needed to treat for second-generation biologics when treating established rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L E; Jakobsen, A K; Bartels, E M;

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the number needed to treat (NNT) and the number needed to harm (NNH) of the second-generation biologics abatacept, certolizumab, golimumab, rituximab, and tocilizumab in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) taking concomitant methotrexate (MTX).......To evaluate the number needed to treat (NNT) and the number needed to harm (NNH) of the second-generation biologics abatacept, certolizumab, golimumab, rituximab, and tocilizumab in patients with established rheumatoid arthritis (RA) taking concomitant methotrexate (MTX)....

  11. Characterization of Rheumatoid Arthritis Subtypes Using Symptom Profiles, Clinical Chemistry and Metabolomics Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    van Wietmarschen, Herman A.; Weidong Dai; van der Kooij, Anita J.; Theo H Reijmers; Yan Schroën; Mei Wang; Zhiliang Xu; Xinchang Wang; Hongwei Kong; Guowang Xu; Thomas Hankemeier; Meulman, Jacqueline J.; Jan van der Greef

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim is to characterize subgroups or phenotypes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients using a systems biology approach. The discovery of subtypes of rheumatoid arthritis patients is an essential research area for the improvement of response to therapy and the development of personalized medicine strategies. Methods: In this study, 39 RA patients are phenotyped using clinical chemistry measurements, urine and plasma metabolomics analysis and symptom profiles. In addition, a Chine...

  12. MICROBIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF BIFIFORM USE IN PATIENT WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS AND COLON DISBIOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Malyarchuk AR; Klymnyuk SI; Kuchmak OB

    2012-01-01

    The article presents the results of research clinical features of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, a determined degree of dysbiosis colon analyzed corrective action Bifiform probiotics on the microflora of the colon treated with different types of pathogenetic treatment of the underlying disease. In the process we used the following methods: a list of complaints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the gastrointestinal tract, conducted bacteriological research content oral microbiota o...

  13. Wirksamkeit von körperlichem Training und Phytotherapie auf Schmerzen bei Patienten mit rheumatoider Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lovric, Sanja; Z’Brun Schnyder, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Problembeschreibung: Rheumatoide Arthritis ist die häufigste Erkrankung in der Kategorie der entzündlichen Erkrankungen. Der Schmerz ist das Hauptsymptom. Die Ursachen sind ungeklärt. Die Wirksamkeit von körperlichem Training und Phytotherapie ist bei rheumatoider Arthritis noch nicht abschliessend belegt. Körperliches Training ist in der Nursing Intervention Classification (NIC) als Pflegeintervention aufgeführt. Bis Ende 2017 muss nachgewiesen werden, dass die Phytotherapie wirksam, zweckmä...

  14. Relationship between Sleep Disorders, Pain and Quality of Life in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Majid Purabdollah; Sima Lakdizaji; Azad Rahmani; Mehrzad Hajalilu; Khalil Ansarin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis as one of the most common autoimmune diseases is known to be one of the leading causes of disability. Sleep disorders have direct influence on patient’s life. According to studies, sleep problems are known to have negative impact on well-being and functioning, but the exact nature of relationship between sleep disorders and Rheumatoid arthritis is not completely understood. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between sleep disorders, pain and qu...

  15. The Effect of Acupressure on Severity of Pain in Arthritis Rheumatoid Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Seyed Mahmoud Latifi5; Karim Mowla; Firozeh Karimipour; Sadigeh Fayazi

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective: Rheumatoid arthritis patients have identified pain as a distressing symptom that interfere their ability to enjoy life and to take care of themselves. The purpose of the study was to assess the effect of acupressure on pain intensity in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Subjects and Methods: This is a clinical trial study. The data were collected from the clinic of rheumatology of Golestan hospital in Ahvaz, physician’s private surgery and patient’s home. Regarding the ...

  16. Effect of Acupressure on Severity of Pain in Arthritis Rheumatoid Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Firozeh Karimipour; Sadigeh Fayazi; Karim Mowla; Seyed Mahmoud Latifi5

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective: Rheumatoid arthritis patients have identified pain as a distressing symptom that interfere their ability to enjoy life and to take care of themselves. The purpose of the study was to assess the effect of acupressure on pain intensity in rheumatoid arthritis patients.Subjects and Methods: This is a clinical trial study. The data were collected from the clinic of rheumatology of Golestan hospital in Ahvaz, physician’s private surgery and patient’s home. Regarding the o...

  17. Serum total sialic acid, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione reductase levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, Surapaneni Krishna; PRIYAV, Vishnu

    2010-01-01

    The changes in the serum sialic acid levels, total lipid peroxidation products (MDA), and glutathione reductase activity were estimated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Serum Sialic acid is known as a parameter of inflammation. This work was undertaken to assess the potential role of sialic acid as well as oxidative stress and antioxidant status in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Materials and methods: The levels of these parameters in serum were studied in 52 subjects with rheuma...

  18. Features of diagnosis and treatment of anemic syndrome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    N V Koryakova; N N Vesikova; I M Marusenko

    2009-01-01

    Features of diagnostics and course of anemic syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis patients Objective. To study features of anemic syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pts, to estimate influence of disease modifying anti – rheumatic drug therapy efficacy on the course of anemic syndrome. Material and methods. 62 pts with definite RA and level of hemoglobin less than 130g\\l for men and less than 120g\\l for women were examined. Research of hemoglobin, red cells count, mean corpuscular volume (MCV),...

  19. The incidence of malignant disease in patients receiving cytotoxic therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirsner, A B; Farber, S. J.; Sheon, R P; Finkel, R I

    1982-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-six patients with definite or classical rheumatoid arthritis admitted to hospital between 1965 and 1974 for cytotoxic therapy were studied for the presence and type of malignant disease. Each of the cytotoxic treated patients was age and sex matched to a rheumatoid arthritis patient admitted to hospital during the same years but who did not receive cytotoxic therapy. There was no increase in malignancy in the cytotoxic treated group over the control group.

  20. Effect Of Fasting And Vegetarian Diet On The Improvement Of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Khalvat A; Rostamian A

    2005-01-01

    Background: The high incidence of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), the conventional treatments and the experimental observations have shown that by taking particular foods or omitting some foods form ordinary diet, the disease symptoms of the patients reduce. The interesting point is that fasting lowers the objective and subjective indexes of disease activities in most patients who suffer from rheumatoid arthritis. The effects of a short-time fast and subsequent vegetarian diets for one year, on th...

  1. Inflammation after cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuo, T; Fujiwara, M.; Matsuo, N

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--The purpose of this study was to examine whether preoperative activity of rheumatoid arthritis influences the extent of anterior chamber inflammation after cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. METHODS--The medical records of 23 consecutive patients (33 eyes) with rheumatoid arthritis, who underwent cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation, were reviewed during a 4 year period from April 1990 to March 1994. RESULTS--Eleven patients who still showed a 1+ le...

  2. The role of traditional cardiovascular risk factors among patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brady, Sharmayne R E; de Courten, Barbora; Reid, Christopher M; Cicuttini, Flavia M; de Courten, Maximilian; Liew, Danny

    2009-01-01

    People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population. We investigated the relative contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk factors to this elevated risk.......People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population. We investigated the relative contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk factors to this elevated risk....

  3. Efficacy of treatment intensification with adalimumab, etanercept and infliximab in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eng, Grith; Stoltenberg, Michael B; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Bouchelouche, Pierre N; Christensen, Robin; Bliddal, Henning; Marie Bartels, Else

    2013-01-01

    To summarize the empirical evidence regarding the effect of treatment intensification on clinical outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with one of the TNF-α-inhibitors, adalimumab, etanercept or infliximab.......To summarize the empirical evidence regarding the effect of treatment intensification on clinical outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with one of the TNF-α-inhibitors, adalimumab, etanercept or infliximab....

  4. A Survey of Relationship between Rheumatoid Arthritis and Hearing Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Baradaranfar

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "nRA (rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic multisystem disease with a variety of systemic manifestations. One of these manifestations, is hearing disorder, so study of the relation between RA and hearing disorders is seem important. This was a case-control study which has done from December 2004 to August 2006. This study compared 50 patients with RA, with age, sex and job-matched as control. Audiometric tests in different frequencies show that hearing threshold in high frequencies specially in 8000 Hz had a significant difference between two groups, also acoustic reflexes were absent in case groups and had significant difference between two groups too. The evaluation of sensory neural hearing loss showed that this hearing loss is sensory not neural. Based on this study, frequent evaluation of audiometric tests is recommended for controlling hearing disorders by therapeutic and rehabilitation procedures in RA patients.

  5. A Survey of Relationship between Rheumatoid Arthritis and Hearing Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Baradaranfar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available RA (rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic multisystem disease with a variety of systemic manifestations. One of these manifestations, is hearing disorder, so study of the relation between RA and hearing disorders is seem important. This was a case-control study which has done from December 2004 to August 2006. This study compared 50 patients with RA, with age, sex and job-matched as control. Audiometric tests in different frequencies show that hearing threshold in high frequencies specially in 8000 Hz had a significant difference between two groups, also acoustic reflexes were absent in case groups and had significant difference between two groups too. The evaluation of sensory neural hearing loss showed that this hearing loss is sensory not neural. Based on this study, frequent evaluation of audiometric tests is recommended for controlling hearing disorders by therapeutic and rehabilitation procedures in RA patients.

  6. New and emerging therapies for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Feely

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael G FeelyDivision of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USAAbstract: The introduction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF inhibitors in the late 1990s ­significantly changed the therapeutic approach for rheumatoid arthritis (RA. With the approval of subsequent TNF inhibitors as well as other biologic agents effective in the management of RA, the treatment paradigm has become increasingly complex. This review examines the current literature regarding the efficacy and toxicity of these and other new anti-rheumatic therapies and discusses effective therapeutic strategies for their use.Keywords: biologics, tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, DMARDs, infliximab, etancercept, adalimumab, golimumab, certolizumab, abatacept, rituximab, tocilizumab

  7. Monitoring anti-TNFalpha treatment in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haavardsholm, E A; Østergaard, Mikkel; Hammer, H B;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the responsiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US) compared with conventional measures of disease activity and structural damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during the first year of treatment with anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha...... (TNFalpha). METHODS: A cohort of patients with RA (N = 36, median age 53 years, disease duration 7.6 years and disease activity score (DAS28) 5.7) was evaluated by core measures of disease activity, US (one wrist), MRI (one wrist) and conventional radiography (CR, both hands and wrists) at initiation of...... treatment with anti-TNFalpha agents and after 3, 6 and 12 months. Responsiveness was assessed by standardised response means (SRM). Accepted thresholds were applied to classify responsiveness as trivial, low, moderate or good. RESULTS: MRI synovitis (SRM between -0.79 and -0.92) and the MRI total...

  8. Innovative treatment approaches for rheumatoid arthritis. Combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borigini, M J; Paulus, H E

    1995-11-01

    It is accepted that combination DMARD therapy is a useful tool in current rheumatological practice. However, well-designed, large, long-term, controlled clinical trials are needed to determine which combinations, dosage schedules, and sequences of administration are most beneficial and least toxic. Until we develop treatment regimens that reliably induce and sustain acceptable control of disease manifestations in all patients for the rest of their natural lifespan, daily oral prednisone will continue to be a troublesome component of 'bridge' therapy, as it becomes the sole surviving constant in complex regimens whose other components are eventually discontinued because of toxicity, lack of efficacy, or non-compliance. We have often seen patients in whom the replacement of a well-tolerated but presumable ineffective DMARD with another DMARD has led to worsening of disease, when the modest benefits of the discontinued DMARD were lost before the hoped for onset of benefit from its replacement became evident. Since the toxicity of combinations of DMARDs has not appeared to be excessive, one can reasonably add the second DMARD to the first, while carefully monitoring for adverse effects and planning ton continue the combination until increased benefit occurs. Subsequently, if the second DMARD is not tolerated, the partial benefit from the first has not been given up, and a longer duration of treatment with the initial DMARD is sometimes associated with satisfactory improvement. If better control of rheumatoid arthritis is evident after 3-6 months of treatment with the combination of DMARDs, one must still decide whether to stop the first DMARD, stop the second, or continue with the combination. In the absence of major toxicity, we are most likely to choose to continue the combination if the patient has had a good response, thus inadvertently embarking on prolonged combined DMARD therapy (Paulus, 1990). Of course, other drugs besides those discussed above are available

  9. Resurfacing shoulder arthroplasty for the treatment of severe rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voorde, Pia C Ten; Rasmussen, Jeppe V; Olsen, Bo S; Brorson, Stig

    2015-01-01

    outcome was obtained 1-year postoperatively using the Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder index (WOOS), and rates of revision were calculated by checking revisions reported until December 2011. The patient-reported outcome of RHA was compared to that of SHA using regression analysis with......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: There is no consensus on which type of shoulder prosthesis should be used in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We describe patients with RA who were treated with shoulder replacement, regarding patient-reported outcome, prosthesis survival, and causes of revision, and...... we compare outcome after resurfacing hemi-arthroplasty (RHA) and stemmed hemi-arthroplasty (SHA). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used data from the national Danish Shoulder Arthroplasty Registry and included patients with RA who underwent shoulder arthroplasty in Denmark between 2006 and 2010. Patient-reported...

  10. A rheumatoid arthritis study by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Carolina S.; Silva, Ana Carla A.; Santos, Tatiano J. P. S.; Martin, Airton A.; dos Santos Fernandes, Ana Célia; Andrade, Luís E.; Raniero, Leandro

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic inflammatory disease of unknown causes and a new methods to identify it in early stages are needed. The main purpose of this work is the biochemical differentiation of sera between normal and RA patients, through the establishment of a statistical method that can be appropriately used for serological analysis. The human sera from 39 healthy donors and 39 rheumatics donors were collected and analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. The results show significant spectral variations with p<0.05 in regions corresponding to protein, lipids and immunoglobulins. The technique of latex particles, coated with human IgG and monoclonal anti-CRP by indirect agglutination known as FR and CRP, was performed to confirm possible false-negative results within the groups, facilitating the statistical interpretation and validation of the technique.

  11. Optical monitoring of rheumatoid arthritis: Monte Carlo generated reconstruction kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minet, O.; Beuthan, J.; Hielscher, A. H.; Zabarylo, U.

    2008-06-01

    Optical imaging in biomedicine is governed by the light absorption and scattering interaction on microscopic and macroscopic constituents in the medium. Therefore, light scattering characteristics of human tissue correlate with the stage of some diseases. In the near infrared range the scattering event with the coefficient approximately two orders of magnitude greater than absorption plays a dominant role. When measuring the optical parameters variations were discovered that correlate with the rheumatoid arthritis of a small joint. The potential of an experimental setup for transillumination the finger joint with a laser diode and the pattern of the stray light detection are demonstrated. The scattering caused by skin contains no useful information and it can be removed by a deconvolution technique to enhance the diagnostic value of this non-invasive optical method. Monte Carlo simulations ensure both the construction of the corresponding point spread function and both the theoretical verification of the stray light picture in rather complex geometry.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis advances and research priorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; McQueen, FM; Bird, P;

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has now been used extensively in cross-sectional and observational studies as well as in controlled clinical trials to assess disease activity and joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). MRI measurements or scores for erosions, bone edema, and synovitis have been...... developed and validated by several groups. The OMERACT criteria require that outcome measures demonstrate adequate validity, discriminative power, and feasibility if they are to be useful in clinical trials. Specific performance targets for these criteria depend on the scientific, regulatory, logistical......, and financial context of the study in question. We review the extent to which MRI assessments of joint erosion, bone edema, and synovitis fulfil these criteria, particularly as they relate to proof-of-concept RA clinical trials....

  13. TELOMERE SHORTENING IN MONOCYTES OF THE PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Borisov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Present study deals with size measurements of telomeric DNA from the human peripheral mononuclear immune cells in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. A method for measuring the relative telomere length by in situ hybridization followed by flow cytometric analysis (flow-FISH was used. Relative telomere length (RTL in monocytes was estimated as mean fluorescence intensity (MFI of test cells divided by MFI values of internal control cells. Hybridization conditions for analysis of telomere length in monocytes have been optimized in advance. It has been shown that RTL of monocytes was significantly lower in RA patients compared to donors. Significant differences in telomere length of monocytes between RA patients and donors were revealed for the young persons under 30 years old. The findings obtained may be considered as an additional argument confirming the hypothesis on genetic defects of hematopoietic stem cells determining RA development.

  14. A radiological study on the cervical spine in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taketomi, Eiji; Sakoh, Takashi; Sunahara, Nobuhiko [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-03-01

    The cervical spine was examined with the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the conventional roentgenograms in 95 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The MRI findings of upper cervical disorders were compared with various values determined in roentgenograms: the atlanto-dental interval (ADI), the space available for the spinal cord (SAC), and the Ranawat and Redlund-Johnell values. In patients with vertical setting (VS), MRI showed medullary compression in all those with abnormal Redlund-Johnell values and Ranawat values of 7 mm or less. In patients with anterior atlanto-axial subluxation, compression of the upper cervical cord was observed in all patients with SAC of 13 mm or less. In subaxial lesion of the cervical spine, MRI was found to be as good as roentgenograms in evaluating plate erosion and disc space narrowing and MRI showed extradural pannus. (author).

  15. Interleukin-23 in early disease development in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Hvid, M; Johansen, C; Stengaard-Pedersen, K; Hetland, M L; Hørslev-Petersen, K; Junker, P; Østergaard, M; Deleuran, B

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the levels of interleukin (IL)-23 in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (eRA) and the effect of anti-tumour necrosis factor (anti-TNF)-α treatment on IL-23 levels. METHOD: Treatment-naïve eRA patients from the OPERA cohort were included (n = 151). Patients were...... Disease Activity Index (CDAI) and the Simplified Disease Activity Index (SDAI), visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain/fatigue/physician global and total Sharp/van der Heijde score (TSS). IL-23 was measured at each time point. RESULTS: IL-23 levels decreased significantly in the ADA group from 20.6 pg...... in the treatment groups. Baseline IL-23 correlated inversely with changes in TSS and symptom duration before diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show increased baseline levels and a significant decrease in IL-23 levels in eRA patients treated with anti-TNF-α. The inverse correlation with duration of...

  16. Gout Initially Mimicking Rheumatoid Arthritis and Later Cervical Spine Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Araújo Santana Nunes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gout is clinically characterized by episodes of monoarthritis, but if not treated properly, it can lead to a chronic polyarthritis, which may eventually mimic rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We present the case of a 59-year-old man, with a history of symmetrical polyarthritis of the large and small joints with later development of subcutaneous nodules, which was initially misdiagnosed as RA, being treated with prednisone and methotrexate for a long period of time. He complained of occipital pain and paresthesia in his left upper limb, and computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed the presence of an expansive formation in the cervical spine with compression of the medulla. He was admitted for spinal decompressive surgery and the biopsy specimen demonstrated a gouty tophus. Chronic gout can mimic RA and rarely involves the axial skeleton, and thus its correct diagnosis and the implementation of adequate therapy can halt the development of such damaging complications.

  17. No rheumatoid arthritis in ancient Egypt: a reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Rothschild, Bruce M

    2016-06-01

    Antiquity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains controversial, and its origins in Americas or in the Old World are disputed. Proponents of the latter frequently refer to RA in ancient Egypt, but validity of those claims has never been examined. Review of all reported RA cases from ancient Egypt revealed that none of them represent real RA, instead being either examples of changing naming conventions or of imprecise diagnostic criteria. Most cases represented osteoarthritis or spondyloarthropathies. Also review of preserved ancient Egyptian medical writings revealed many descriptions of musculoskeletal disorders, but none of them resembled RA. This suggests that RA was absent in ancient Egypt and supports the hypothesis of the New World origin of RA and its subsequent global spread in the last several centuries. PMID:26650735

  18. Restless Legs Syndrome as a Comorbidity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Gjevre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a multisystem disease with a complex immunologic pathophysiology. Likewise, sleep disorders can involve a complicated interplay between the neurologic pathways, immune system, and respiratory system. Recent studies have shown an elevated prevalence of sleep abnormalities in connective tissue disorders compared to the general population. Restless legs syndrome (RLS may be present in up to 30% of RA patients. These findings may be related to cytokine release and other immunomodulatory responses. TNF-α levels relate to sleep physiology and anti-TNF-α therapy may improve sleep patterns. Most of the patients with this disorder can distinguish their RLS sensations from their arthritic symptoms. RLS is a common comorbidity seen with RA, and prompt recognition and treatment can improve patient quality of life.

  19. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Light scattering study of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuthan, J.; Netz, U.; Minet, O.; Klose, Annerose D.; Hielscher, A. H.; Scheel, A.; Henniger, J.; Müller, G.

    2002-11-01

    The distribution of light scattered by finger joints is studied in the near-IR region. It is shown that variations in the optical parameters of the tissue (scattering coefficient μs, absorption coefficient μa, and anisotropy factor g) depend on the presence of the rheumatoid arthritis (RA). At the first stage, the distribution of scattered light was measured in diaphanoscopic experiments. The convolution of a Gaussian error function with the scattering phase function proved to be a good approximation of the data obtained. Then, a new method was developed for the reconstruction of distribution of optical parameters in the finger cross section. Model tests of the quality of this reconstruction method show good results.

  20. How does Chinese medicine target cytokine imbalance in rheumatoid arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Sun, Yue

    2013-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) manifests as an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Cytokine imbalance is suggested to play critical roles in the development of RA. Currently, various treatments for RA, including biological agents such as antibodies against inflammation mediators, or Chinese herbal medicines, intervene the disease by restoring the balance of cytokines. Chinese medicine (CM) can not only suppress the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but also induce the expression of cytokines with anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Thus, Chinese medicine can effectively reduce inflammatory cell infiltration into synovial tissue, pannus formation, and degradation of the extracellular matrix surrounding cartilage cells, thereby reducing subchondral bone damage. This paper reviews the changes of cytokine profiling during development of RA and discuss the mechanisms by which Chinese medicine restores the cytokine balance. PMID:24170633

  1. Biological therapies for rheumatoid arthritis: progress to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malviya, Gaurav; Salemi, Simonetta; Laganà, Bruno; Diamanti, Andrea Picchianti; D'Amelio, Raffaele; Signore, Alberto

    2013-08-01

    Biologic drugs for the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have revolutionized the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies, which include murine, chimeric, humanized, fully human antibodies and fusion proteins. These biologics bind to their targets with high affinity and specificity. Since 1998, nine different biologics have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) for the treatment of RA, and several others are in different stages of clinical trials. This field is in continuous evolution and new biologics are tested every year. Therefore a precise analysis is required in order to have a detailed and updated state of the art of this field. In this review, our main aim is to analyse all available biological therapies that are FDA and EMA approved for the treatment of RA and also those that are in clinical trials for the management of RA patients. PMID:23558378

  2. Utilization of nanoparticle technology in rheumatoid arthritis treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolati, Sanam; Sadreddini, Sanam; Rostamzadeh, Davoud; Ahmadi, Majid; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2016-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the common and severe autoimmune diseases related to joints. This chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease, leads to functional limitation and reduced quality of life, since as there is bone and cartilage destruction, joint swelling and pain. Current advances and new treatment approaches have considerably postponed disease progression and improved the quality of life for many patients. In spite of major advances in therapeutic options, restrictions on the routes of administration and the necessity for frequent and long-term dosing often result in systemic adverse effects and patient non-compliance. Unlike usual drugs, nanoparticle systems are planned to deliver therapeutic agents especially to inflamed synovium, so avoiding systemic and unpleasant effects. The present review discusses about some of the most successful drugs in RA therapy and their side effects and also focuses on key design parameters of RA-targeted nanotechnology-based strategies for improving RA therapies. PMID:27133037

  3. Biosimilars for the management of rheumatoid arthritis: economic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulácsi, László; Brodszky, Valentin; Baji, Petra; Kim, HoUng; Kim, Su Yeon; Cho, Yu Young; Péntek, Márta

    2015-01-01

    Biologic drugs have proved highly effective for the treatment of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). These drugs are often considered cost-effective for well-defined RA patient populations not responding adequately to conventional treatment, but are used first-line relatively rarely, partly due to high costs. Furthermore, not all clinically eligible patients can access biologics even as second-line therapy. Recently, there has been a rise in interest in 'biosimilar' drugs that are highly comparable to the 'reference medicinal product' (RMP) in terms of efficacy and safety but may generally be lower in price. This review summarizes the cost burden of RA and considers the potential role of biosimilars in reducing drug costs and increasing patient access to biologics. PMID:26395836

  4. Negative social perception of hypothetical workers with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuade, Debra V

    2002-06-01

    In the present study, 340 college subjects evaluated the job performance of hypothetical workers of varying health status, to test the hypothesis that workers with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are more negatively perceived than other workers (paraplegic, healthy) despite equivalence in age, sex, education, job history, and time off from work for medical reasons. Results indicated that workers with RA are perceived as having significantly poorer interpersonal job skills and are deserving of significantly poorer scores for overall job performance, although no differences were obtained in the ratings of their job commitment or job expertise. The suggestion is made that an unfavorable social reaction to RA patients in the workplace is one factor that impairs the development of social support for these patients at work and contributes to their inflated disability rate. PMID:12055773

  5. Pattern recognition of transillumination images for diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Joanna; Boerner, Ewa; Podbielska, Halina; Suchwalko, Artur

    2005-09-01

    In this work the statistical pattern recognition methods were applied for evaluation of transillumination images of interphalangeal joints of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis. Special portable apparatus was constructed for performing the transillumination examination. It consisted of He-Ne laser with optics for collimated illumination, special holder for placing the finger (perpendicular to optical axis, dorsal site towards camera), and CCD camera with memory stick. 20 ill patients and 20 healthy volunteers were examined. The captured images with 1152x864 resolution were converted into the gray level pictures and analyzed by means of statistical pattern recognition method. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis by use of 1-NN method (1 Nearest Neighbour) were applied for classification. The recognition system was able to differentiate correctly between healthy and ill subjects with 72.35% accuracy in case the data base composed of 40 persons.

  6. Restless legs syndrome as a comorbidity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjevre, John A; Taylor Gjevre, Regina M

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multisystem disease with a complex immunologic pathophysiology. Likewise, sleep disorders can involve a complicated interplay between the neurologic pathways, immune system, and respiratory system. Recent studies have shown an elevated prevalence of sleep abnormalities in connective tissue disorders compared to the general population. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) may be present in up to 30% of RA patients. These findings may be related to cytokine release and other immunomodulatory responses. TNF- α levels relate to sleep physiology and anti-TNF- α therapy may improve sleep patterns. Most of the patients with this disorder can distinguish their RLS sensations from their arthritic symptoms. RLS is a common comorbidity seen with RA, and prompt recognition and treatment can improve patient quality of life. PMID:23840943

  7. MRI quantification of rheumatoid arthritis: Current knowledge and future perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boesen, Mikael [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)], E-mail: parker@frh.regionh.dk; Ostergaard, Mikkel [Department of Rheumatology, Hvidovre and Herlev University Hospitals, Copenhagen (Denmark); Cimmino, Marco A. [Department of Rheumatology, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Kubassova, Olga [Image Analysis LTD, Leeds (United Kingdom); Jensen, Karl Erik [Department of Radiology, MR section, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bliddal, Henning [Parker Institute, Frederiksberg University Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2009-08-15

    The international consensus on treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) involves early initiation of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) for which a reliable identification of early disease is mandatory. Conventional radiography of the joints is considered the standard method for detecting and quantifying joint damage in RA. However, radiographs only show late disease manifestations as joint space narrowing and bone erosions, whereas it cannot detect synovitis and bone marrow oedema, i.e., inflammation in the synovium or the bone, which may be visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) months to years before erosions develop. Furthermore, MRI allows earlier visualization of bone erosions than radiography. In order to allow early treatment initiation and optimal guidance of the therapeutic strategy, there is a need for methods which are capable of early detection of inflammatory joint changes. In this review, we will discuss available data, advantages, limitations and potential future of MRI in RA.

  8. CLINICAL-PATHOGENIC IMPORTANCE OF CORRELATION BETWEEN HISTOCHEMICAL INDICES OF BLOOD SYSTEM AND RHEUMATOID FACTOR IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    A B Zborovsky; B V Zavodovsky; A V Rvacliev; Bykova, O.V.; T V Serdiukova; Pankratova TA

    2001-01-01

    Summary Relation between rheumatoid factor (RF) and levels of Myeloperoxidase (MPO), Na*-K +-A TPh- ase (ATPh-ase), 5'-Nucleotidase (5 ’-NT), Succinate dehydrogenase (SDG) in cells of peripheral blood of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients was investigated. 83 RA patients were observed. The activities of MPO, ATP-ase, 5’NT, SDG in blood cells were determined by hystochemical methods. In patients having increasing MPO activity in monocytes, normal level of SDG in lymphocytes an...

  9. MRI findings of the knee in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies were done to know in what extent MRI can image the pannus invasion and cysts in the subcartilagious tissues which are not revealed by the scout roentgenogram and how the synovial membrane can be enhanced by gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA). Twenty five knees in rheumatoid arthritis of 21 patients, mean age of 57.8 years, were subjected to the studies. Thirteen knees were in Larsen grade 0, 3 in grade I, 4 in grade II, 2 in grade III and 3 in grade IV, whose osteolytic degree were small. MRI system was 0.5 Tesla superconducting Toshiba MRT50A. Imaging was performed by the field echo method with 4 mm-thick slice of T1, T2 weighted images of sagittal and frontal sections, and 5 min after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA, of T1 weighted images of frontal and sagittal sections. Subcartilagious cysts not detectable on the scout roentgenogram were found in 13 knees (52%) on the MRI image. MRI after Gd-DTPA gave the enhanced images of surroundings of joint capsule in 15 cases, of dotted or reticular synovial membrane in 2 and of joint capsule surroundings with dotted membrane in 2. One case showed no enhancement. MRI was thus found useful for detection of cysts and pannus in the early knee rheumatoid arthritis with insignificant osteolysis. MRI after Gd-DTPA enhanced the surroundings of joint capsule in most cases, and in some cases, the synovial membrane in a dotted or reticular manner, which was considered to show the dilated blood vessels or necrotic coagulations of synovial villi. (H.O.)

  10. Effects of estrogen peripheral metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cutolo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the immune reactivity is modulated by gender. In fact, women show a more effective immune response as well as a more frequent development of autoimmune diseases. In particular, 17b-estradiol (E2 in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases leads to an higher production of IgG and IgM in peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC and the secretion of metalloproteinases and IL-6 by synovial fibroblasts. The effect of E2 seems to be partially related to its concentration. In fact, at the physiological concentration, E2 seems to exert a pro-inflammatory effect, while at pharmacological concentrations shows anti-inflammatory effects. Steroid hormones can be converted in downstream hormones along defined pathways. The conversion of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA in peripheral macrophages leads to the androgen production. Subsequently the enzyme aromatase converts androgens in estrogens, and its activity is increased by some inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1b, IL-6 and TNF-a. In the synovial fluids of rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients the levels of estrogens result significantly increased compared with controls, showing the consequence of this unbalanced steroid metabolism. Furthermore, the metabolism of estrogens leads to some downstream hydroxylated metabolites, that are not waste products, but still active molecules in the inflammatory response. In fact, it has been found that synovial fluids of RA patients present a different ratio of 16-hydroxylated estrogen metabolites/ 2-hydroxylated metabolites, confirming that also the unbalanced metabolism of estrogens and not only the estrogen concentration seems to be related to the development and worsening of rheumatoid arthritis.

  11. Effect of intermittent aerobic exercise on sleep quality and sleep disturbances in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løppenthin, Katrine; Esbensen, Bente Appel; Jennum, Poul;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Poor sleep is prevalent in patients with systemic inflammatory disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, and, in addition to fatigue, pain, depression and inflammation, is associated with an increased risk of co-morbidity and all-cause mortality. Whereas non-pharmacological intervent......BACKGROUND: Poor sleep is prevalent in patients with systemic inflammatory disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, and, in addition to fatigue, pain, depression and inflammation, is associated with an increased risk of co-morbidity and all-cause mortality. Whereas non......-pharmacological interventions in patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been shown to reduce pain and fatigue, no randomized controlled trials have examined the effect of non-pharmacological interventions on improvement of sleep in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy of an...... intermittent aerobic exercise intervention on sleep, assessed both objectively and subjectively in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS/DESIGN: A randomized controlled trial including 44 patients with rheumatoid arthritis randomly assigned to an exercise training intervention or to a control group. The...

  12. Clinical misdiagnosis of Morton's Neuroma: a case of early rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, C. J.; Otter, S.J.; Bowen, C.J.

    2003-01-01

    A fit and apparently healthy male patient presents with symptoms and clinical signs consistent with a Morton's neuroma. Following excisional surgery, histopathology confirms the lesion as a rheumatoid nodule; this proves to be the presenting feature of rheumatoid arthritis in this patient. This is a very unusual differential diagnosis, which should be considered during the assessment process and is, therefore, highly pertinent to clinicians.

  13. Diagnostic delay in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jan; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Early diagnosis of inflammatory rheumatic diseases is important in order to improve long-term outcome. We studied whether delay in diagnosis (time between onset of symptoms and establishment of diagnosis) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PSA) and...... ankylosing spondylitis (AS) changed from year 2000 to 2011. METHODS: Month and year of initial symptoms and diagnosis, gender, hospital, year of birth and date of first data entry were obtained for 13 721 patients with RA, PSA or AS who had been registered in the DANBIO registry. Time between symptom onset...... and diagnosis was modelled using generalised linear regression to predict the average duration for each calendar year of initial symptoms with adjustments for gender, year of birth and date of DANBIO entry. RESULTS: Patients with valid data (RA: 10 416 (73%); PSA: 1970 (68%); AS: 1335 (65%)) did not...

  14. Sustained improvement of intractable rheumatoid arthritis after total lymphoid irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) was administered to 11 patients who had intractable rheumatoid arthritis that was unresponsive to conventional medical therapy, including aspirin, multiple nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, gold salts, and D-penicillamine. Total lymphoid irradiation was given as an alternative to cytotoxic drugs such as azathioprine and cyclophosphamide. After radiotherapy, 9 of the 11 patients showed a marked improvement in clinical disease activity as measured by morning stiffness, joint tenderness, joint swelling, and overall functional abilities. The mean improvement of disease activity in all patients ranged from 40-70 percent and has persisted throughout a 13-28 month followup period. This improvement permitted the mean daily steroid dose to be reduced by 54%. Complications included severe fatigue and other constitutional symptoms during radiotherapy, development of Felty's syndrome in 1 patient, and an exacerbation of rheumatoid lung disease in another. After therapy, all patients exhibited a profound T lymphocytopenia, and a reversal in their T suppressor/cytotoxic cell to helper cell ratio. The proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and allogeneic leukocytes (mixed leukocyte reaction) were markedly reduced, as was in vitro immunoglobulin synthesis after stimulation with pokeweed mitogen. Alterations in T cell numbers and function persisted during the entire followup period, except that the mixed leukocyte reaction showed a tendency to return to normal values

  15. The Multifaceted Aspects of Interstitial Lung Disease in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Cavagna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung disease (ILD is a relevant extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA that may occur either in early stages or as a complication of long-standing disease. RA related ILD (RA-ILD significantly influences the quoad vitam prognosis of these patients. Several histopathological patterns of RA-ILD have been described: usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP is the most frequent one, followed by nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP; other patterns are less commonly observed. Several factors have been associated with an increased risk of developing RA-ILD. The genetic background plays a fundamental but not sufficient role; smoking is an independent predictor of ILD, and a correlation with the presence of rheumatoid factor and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies has also been reported. Moreover, both exnovo occurrence and progression of ILD have been related to drug therapies that are commonly prescribed in RA, such as methotrexate, leflunomide, anti-TNF alpha agents, and rituximab. A greater understanding of the disease process is necessary in order to improve the therapeutic approach to ILD and RA itself and to reduce the burden of this severe extra-articular manifestation.

  16. Sustained improvement of intractable rheumatoid arthritis after total lymphoid irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, E.H.; Strober, S.; Hoppe, R.T.; Calin, A.; Engleman, E.G.; Kotzin, B.L.; Tanay, A.S.; Calin, H.J.; Terrell, C.P.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1983-08-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) was administered to 11 patients who had intractable rheumatoid arthritis that was unresponsive to conventional medical therapy, including aspirin, multiple nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, gold salts, and D-penicillamine. Total lymphoid irradiation was given as an alternative to cytotoxic drugs such as azathioprine and cyclophosphamide. After radiotherapy, 9 of the 11 patients showed a marked improvement in clinical disease activity as measured by morning stiffness, joint tenderness, joint swelling, and overall functional abilities. The mean improvement of disease activity in all patients ranged from 40-70 percent and has persisted throughout a 13-28 month followup period. This improvement permitted the mean daily steroid dose to be reduced by 54%. Complications included severe fatigue and other constitutional symptoms during radiotherapy, development of Felty's syndrome in 1 patient, and an exacerbation of rheumatoid lung disease in another. After therapy, all patients exhibited a profound T lymphocytopenia, and a reversal in their T suppressor/cytotoxic cell to helper cell ratio. The proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and allogeneic leukocytes (mixed leukocyte reaction) were markedly reduced, as was in vitro immunoglobulin synthesis after stimulation with pokeweed mitogen. Alterations in T cell numbers and function persisted during the entire followup period, except that the mixed leukocyte reaction showed a tendency to return to normal values.

  17. The Effect of Cigarette Smoking on Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raouf Rahim Mirza

    2014-08-01

    Materials and Methods: This case control study which is carried out in the rheumatology division of Suliamaniya teaching hospital and clinic from 15th August 2009 to 15th June 2010, Ninety_ two patients 73(79% females and 19(21% males who fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology diagnostic criteria for diagnosis of adult rheumatoid arthritis were included compared to 92 controls. Detail history of smoking taken and disease activity assessed according to DAS28j(Disease activity score of 28 joints. Results: All forty six smoker patients had active disease , 38(82.6% had highly active disease according to DAS28j,these results are statistically significant (P-value =0.04, and 42(91.3% of them had rheumatoid factor which means the positive relation between smoking and seropositivity also (P-value =0.000. Conclusion: Majority of smokers demonstrated highly active disease according to DAS28j measurement for disease activity , and the relation of smoking with seropositivity found to be positive. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(4.000: 736-742

  18. Measurement of the Common Carotid Arteries Intima-Media Thickness by Ultrasonography in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Raouf Rahim Merza; Salah Muhammed Fateh; Hawar Ali Ehsan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disabling disease affecting articular and extra articular organs and one of these important organs is cardiovascular system which its involvement is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality of Rheumatoid arthritis patients ; it is important to look for the relation of Rheumatoid arthritis and the extent of cardiovascular involvement among those patients by Ultrasound (US ) which is feasible, simple and low cost investigation and so...

  19. Tuberculous arthritis and monoarticular rheumatoid arthritis in the knee : differential diagnosis using MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the extent to which magnetic resonance(MR) imaging findings can help differentiate between tuberculous arthritis (TA) and rheumatoid arthritis(RA). This study involved sixteen patients with pathologically proven arthritis of the knee. In eight patients(mean age, 29.6 years; M:F=4:4) this was of the tuberculous variety, while eight (mean age, 47.5 years; M:F=2:6) suffered from the rheumatoid variety, which was monoarticular. For 14 patients, contrast enhancement studies were available. We retrospectively analyzed MR findings according to the demonstrated pattern of synovial thickening (regular and even, or irregular and nodular), bone erosion or abscess, bone marrow(BM) edema, the sites at which bursae were present, para-articular mass formation, and lymphadenopathy. In five of eight TA cases (62.5%), irregular and nodular enhanced synovial thickening was present, while in six of eight RA cases (75%), thickening was regular and even. Bone erosions or subarticular abscesses were found in six TA cases (75%) and small erosions in three cases (37.5%) of RA. BM edema surrounding the erosion was found in four cases of TA (50%) and two of RA (25%). In TA, edema was more extensive. In both TA and RA, all suprapatella bursae were distended while popliteal bursae were present in two cases of TA (25%) and four of RA (50%). Para-articular masses with rim like enhancement were found in six cases of TA (75%) and in one case of RA (12.5%). In particular, para-articular lymphadenopathy was seen in six cases of TA (75%), but not in RA. MR findings of irregular and nodular synovial thickening, extensive bone erosion, extensive BM edema, particular, para-articular abscess formation and lymphadenopathy, may help differentiate tuberculous arthritis of the knee from the rhumatoid variety

  20. Profiling anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tebo Anne E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (ACPA, have high specificity for rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Some children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, phenotypically resemble RA and test positive for rheumatoid factor (RF a characteristic biomarker of RA. We investigated the prevalence of ACPA and its relationship to other serologic markers associated with RA in a well-characterized JIA cohort. Methods Cases were 334 children with JIA, 30 of whom had RF + polyarticular JIA. Sera from all cases and 50 healthy pediatric controls were investigated by ELISA at a single time point for anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP IgG, RF IgM, IgA and IgG, anti-RA33 IgG, and antinuclear antibodies (ANA. Comparisons between cases and controls were made using Chi-square or Fisher exact tests and T-tests. Results The prevalence of RF was 8% among controls, and 12% among cases (ns. The prevalence of ACPA was 2% in controls and 14.3% in cases (OR 8.2, p Conclusions ACPAs are detectable in 14% of children with JIA. Children with positive ACPA but negative RF are frequent, and may define a distinct subset of children with JIA. ACPA testing should be included in the classification of JIA.