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  1. Isolation of Endothelial Cells and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from Internal Mammary Artery Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Stephanie C.; Bates, Michael; Parrino, Patrick E.; Woods, T. Cooper

    2007-01-01

    Analyses of vascular smooth muscle cell and endothelial cell function through tissue culture techniques are often employed to investigate the underlying mechanisms regulating cardiovascular disease. As diseases such as diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease increase a patient's risk of cardiovascular disease, the development of methods for examining the effects of these diseases on vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells is needed. Commercial sources of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells generally provide minimal donor information and are in limited supply. This study was designed to determine if vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells could be isolated from human internal mammary arteries obtained from donors undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. As coronary artery bypass graft surgery is a commonly performed procedure, this method would provide a new source for these cells that when combined with the donor's medical history will greatly enhance our studies of the effects of complicating diseases on vascular biology. Internal mammary artery tissue was obtained from patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Through a simple method employing two separate tissue digestions, vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells were isolated and characterized. The isolated vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells exhibited the expected morphology and were able to be passaged for further analysis. The vascular smooth muscle cells exhibited positive staining for α-smooth muscle actin and the endothelial cells exhibited positive staining for CD31. The overall purity of the isolations was > 95%. This method allows for the isolation of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells from internal mammary arteries, providing a new tool for investigations into the interplay of vascular diseases and complicating diseases such as diabetes and kidney disease. PMID:21603530

  2. 3D Reconstruction of Coronary Artery Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Luo

    Full Text Available The 3D geometry of individual vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, which are essential for understanding the mechanical function of blood vessels, are currently not available. This paper introduces a new 3D segmentation algorithm to determine VSMC morphology and orientation.A total of 112 VSMCs from six porcine coronary arteries were used in the analysis. A 3D semi-automatic segmentation method was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs from cell clumps as well as to extract the 3D geometry of VSMCs. A new edge blocking model was introduced to recognize cell boundary while an edge growing was developed for optimal interpolation and edge verification. The proposed methods were designed based on Region of Interest (ROI selected by user and interactive responses of limited key edges. Enhanced cell boundary features were used to construct the cell's initial boundary for further edge growing. A unified framework of morphological parameters (dimensions and orientations was proposed for the 3D volume data. Virtual phantom was designed to validate the tilt angle measurements, while other parameters extracted from 3D segmentations were compared with manual measurements to assess the accuracy of the algorithm. The length, width and thickness of VSMCs were 62.9±14.9 μm, 4.6±0.6 μm and 6.2±1.8 μm (mean±SD. In longitudinal-circumferential plane of blood vessel, VSMCs align off the circumferential direction with two mean angles of -19.4±9.3° and 10.9±4.7°, while an out-of-plane angle (i.e., radial tilt angle was found to be 8±7.6° with median as 5.7°.A 3D segmentation algorithm was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs of blood vessel walls based on optical image stacks. The results were validated by a virtual phantom and manual measurement. The obtained 3D geometries can be utilized in mathematical models and leads a better understanding of vascular mechanical properties and function.

  3. Arterial wall mechanics as a function of heart rate: role of vascular smooth muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvucci, Fernando Pablo; Schiavone, Jonathan; Craiem, Damian; Barra, Juan Gabriel [Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Favaloro Av. Belgrano 1723 - Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Vascular wall viscoelasticity can be evaluated using a first-order lumped model. This model consists of a spring with elastic constant E and a dashpot with viscous constant {eta}. More importantly, this viscoelastic model can be fitted in-vivo measuring arterial pressure and diameter. The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of heart rate over E and {eta}. In two anesthetized sheep, diameter in thoracic aorta and intravascular pressure has been registered. The right atrium was connected to a programmable stimulator through a pair of pace-maker wires to produce changes in stimulation heart rate (HR) from 80 to 160 bpm. Additionally, local activation of vascular smooth muscle was induced with phenylephrine. After converting pressure and diameter signals into stress and strain respectively, E y {eta} were calculated in control state and during muscle activation. The elastic modulus E did not present significant changes with heart rate. The viscous modulus {eta} decreased 49% with a two-fold acceleration in heart rate from 80 to 160 bpm. However, the product {eta} HR remained stable. The viscous modulus {eta} increased 39% with smooth muscle activation. No significant pressure changes were registered during the experiment. The contractile action of vascular smooth muscle could contribute to increasing arterial wall viscosity. The decrease of {eta} when HR increased might be related to smooth muscle relaxation mediated by endothelium activity, which was stimulated by flow increase. We conclude that HR can modulate arterial wall viscoelasticity through endothelium-dependent mechanisms.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by Thapsigargin in vascular smooth muscle cells of rat coronary artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-yan; DENG Chun-yu; JIANG Li

    2016-01-01

    AIM:To establish the endoplasmic reticulum stress ( ERS) cell model in vascular smooth muscle cells ( VSMCs) of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats.METHODS:Under sterile condition, the coronary arteries were isolated from SD rats .The primary VSMCs were cultured by tissue-sticking method , and observed the basic morphological characteristics under optical microscope .The marker proteins of VSMCs including α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain ( SM-MHC) were identified by immuno-fluorescence technique .VSMCs were treated with thapsigargin (0.5, 1 and 2 μmol/L) for 24 h, and the expression levels of binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and C/EBP homologus protein (CHOP), the marker molecules of ERS, were detected using Western blotting.RESULTS:VSMCs climbed out from coronary artery tissues after about six days , and the cells had a nice state and formed the VSMC-like typical "peak valley".The results of immunofluorescence technique show that the marker proteins of VSMCs ,α-SMA and SM-MHC were expressed significantly .The results of Western blotting show that the protein expression levels of BiP and CHOP were increased by thapsigargin in a dose-dependent manner .CONCLUSION:VSMCs can be successfully cultured by tissue-sticking method and built the ERS model induced by thapsigargin .

  5. Effect of L-Arginine on Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Apoptosis in Rats with Hypoxic Pulmonary Vascular Structural Remodeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ingrid Karmane SUMOU; Jun-Bao DU; Bing WEI; Chun-Yu ZHANG; Jian-Guang QI; Chao-Shu TANG

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of L-arginine (L-Arg) on the apoptosis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) in rats with hypoxic pulmonary vascular structural remodeling, and its mechanisms. Seventeen Wistar rats were randomly divided into a control group (n=5), a hypoxia group (n=7), and a hypoxia+L-Arg group (n=5). The morphologic changes of lung tissues were observed under optical microscope. Using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphatebiotin nick end labeling assay, the apoptosis of PASMC was examined. Fas expression in PASMC was examined using immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the percentage of muscularized artery in small pulmonary vessels, and the relative medial thickness and relative medial area of the small and median pulmonary muscularized arteries in the hypoxic group were all significantly increased. Pulmonary vascular structural remodeling developed after hypoxia. Apoptotic smooth muscle cells of the small and median pulmonary arteries in the hypoxia group were significantly less than those in the control group. After 14 d of hypoxia, Fas expression by smooth muscle cells of median and small pulmonary arteries was significantly inhibited. L-Arg significantly inhibited hypoxic pulmonary vascular structural remodeling in association with an augmentation of apoptosis of smooth muscle cells as well as Fas expression in PASMC. These results showed that L-Arg could play an important role in attenuating hypoxic pulmonary vascular structural remodeling by upregulating Fas expression in PASMC, thus promoting the apoptosis of PASMC.

  6. Proteomic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cells in physiological condition and in pulmonary arterial hypertension: Toward contractile versus synthetic phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régent, Alexis; Ly, Kim Heang; Lofek, Sébastien; Clary, Guilhem; Tamby, Mathieu; Tamas, Nicolas; Federici, Christian; Broussard, Cédric; Chafey, Philippe; Liaudet-Coopman, Emmanuelle; Humbert, Marc; Perros, Frédéric; Mouthon, Luc

    2016-10-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are highly specialized cells that regulate vascular tone and participate in vessel remodeling in physiological and pathological conditions. It is unclear why certain vascular pathologies involve one type of vessel and spare others. Our objective was to compare the proteomes of normal human VSMC from aorta (human aortic smooth muscle cells, HAoSMC), umbilical artery (human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells, HUASMC), pulmonary artery (HPASMC), or pulmonary artery VSMC from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH-SMC). Proteomes of VSMC were compared by 2D DIGE and MS. Only 19 proteins were differentially expressed between HAoSMC and HPASMC while 132 and 124 were differentially expressed between HUASMC and HAoSMC or HPASMC, respectively (fold change 1.5≤ or -1.5≥, p < 0.05). As much as 336 proteins were differentially expressed between HPASMC and PAH-SMC (fold change 1.5≤ or -1.5≥, p < 0.05). HUASMC expressed increased amount of α-smooth muscle actin compared to either HPASMC or HAoSMC (although not statistically significant). In addition, PAH-SMC expressed decreased amount of smooth muscle myosin heavy chain and proliferation rate was increased compared to HPASMC thus supporting that PAH-SMC have a more synthetic phenotype. Analysis with Ingenuity identified paxillin and (embryonic lethal, abnormal vision, drosophila) like 1 (ELAVL1) as molecules linked with a lot of proteins differentially expressed between HPASMC and PAH-SMC. There was a trend toward reduced proliferation of PAH-SMC with paxillin-si-RNA and increased proliferation with ELAVL1-siRNA. Thus, VSMCs have very diverse protein content depending on their origin and this is in link with phenotypic differentiation. Paxillin targeting may be a promising treatment of PAH. ELAVL1 also participate in the regulation of PAH-SMC proliferation.

  7. NF-kappaB signaling mediates vascular smooth muscle endothelin type B receptor expression in resistance arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Jian-Pu; Zhang, Yaping; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) endothelin type B (ET(B)) receptor upregulation results in strong vasoconstriction and reduction of local blood flow. We hypothesizes that the underlying molecular mechanisms involve transcriptional factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway. ET(B) receptor...... upregulation and activation of NF-kappaB were studied at functional contraction (in vitro myograph), mRNA (real-time PCR), and protein (Western blot and immunocytochemistry) levels during organ culture of rat mesenteric arteries. Organ culture of the artery segments induced a time-dependent strong contractile...... response to sarafotoxin 6c in parallel with enhanced expression of ET(B) receptor mRNA and protein in the SMC. Western blot experiments demonstrated that phosphorylation of NF-kappaB p65 was time-dependently induced during organ culture starting at 1h. In addition, cytoplasmic IkB degradation occurred...

  8. A method for three-dimensional quantification of vascular smooth muscle orientation: application in viable murine carotid arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronck, Bart; Megens, Remco T A; Reesink, Koen D; Delhaas, Tammo

    2016-04-01

    When studying in vivo arterial mechanical behaviour using constitutive models, smooth muscle cells (SMCs) should be considered, while they play an important role in regulating arterial vessel tone. Current constitutive models assume a strictly circumferential SMC orientation, without any dispersion. We hypothesised that SMC orientation would show considerable dispersion in three dimensions and that helical dispersion would be greater than transversal dispersion. To test these hypotheses, we developed a method to quantify the 3D orientation of arterial SMCs. Fluorescently labelled SMC nuclei of left and right carotid arteries of ten mice were imaged using two-photon laser scanning microscopy. Arteries were imaged at a range of luminal pressures. 3D image processing was used to identify individual nuclei and their orientations. SMCs showed to be arranged in two distinct layers. Orientations were quantified by fitting a Bingham distribution to the observed orientations. As hypothesised, orientation dispersion was much larger helically than transversally. With increasing luminal pressure, transversal dispersion decreased significantly, whereas helical dispersion remained unaltered. Additionally, SMC orientations showed a statistically significant (p < 0.05) mean right-handed helix angle in both left and right arteries and in both layers, which is a relevant finding from a developmental biology perspective. In conclusion, vascular SMC orientation (1) can be quantified in 3D; (2) shows considerable dispersion, predominantly in the helical direction; and (3) has a distinct right-handed helical component in both left and right carotid arteries. The obtained quantitative distribution data are instrumental for constitutive modelling of the artery wall and illustrate the merit of our method.

  9. Assays for in vitro monitoring of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, Elena A; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Migration of human pulmonary vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells contributes to vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis. Evidence also indicates that, in part, migration of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells may contribute to airway remodeling associated with asthma. Here we describe migration of VSM and ASM cells in vitro using Transwell or Boyden chamber assays. Because dissecting signaling mechanisms regulating cell migration requires molecular approaches, our protocol also describes how to assess migration of transfected VSM and ASM cells. Transwell or Boyden chamber assays can be completed in approximately 8 h and include plating of serum-deprived VSM or ASM cell suspension on membrane precoated with collagen, migration of cells toward chemotactic gradient and visual (Transwell) or digital (Boyden chamber) analysis of membrane. Although the Transwell assay is easy, the Boyden chamber assay requires hands-on experience; however, both assays are reliable cell-based approaches providing valuable information on how chemotactic and inflammatory factors modulate VSM and ASM migration.

  10. Composition of connective tissues and morphometry of vascular smooth muscle in arterial wall of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats - In relation with arterial remodeling.

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    Hayashi, Kozaburo; Shimizu, Emiko

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension (HT) was induced in Wistar rats aged 16 and 48 weeks by a deoxycortico-sterone acetate (DOCA)-salt procedure. Common carotid arteries were resected 16 weeks after, and their histological specimens were selectively stained for observations of collagen, elastin, and vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. Then, the fractions of collagen and elastin and their radial distributions, and the size and number of VSM cells were determined with an image analyzer. These results were compared with the results from age-matched, non-treated, normotensive (NT) animals and also with those from our previous biomechanical studies. In both age groups, there were no significant differences in the fractions of collagen and elastin, and the ratio of collagen to elastin content between HT and NT arteries. These results correspond well with our previous biomechanical results, which showed no significant difference in wall elasticity between HT and NT vessels. Moreover, in the innermost layer out of 4 layers bordered with thick elastic lamellae, the fraction of collagen was significantly greater in HT arteries than in NT ones, which is attributable to HT-related stress concentration in the layer. VSM cells were significantly hypertrophied and their content was increased by HT, although their total number in the media remained unchanged. The increased size and content of cells correspond to the enhancement of vascular tone and contractility in HT arteries.

  11. Oxygen-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Vascular Smooth Muscle and Their Possible Role in Hypoxic Arterial Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Obregon, A.; Urena, J.; Lopez-Barneo, J.

    1995-05-01

    We have investigated the modifications of cytosolic [Ca2+] and the activity of Ca2+ channels in freshly dispersed arterial myocytes to test whether lowering O_2 tension (PO_2) directly influences Ca2+ homeostasis in these cells. Unclamped cells loaded with fura-2 AM exhibit oscillations of cytosolic Ca2+ whose frequency depends on extracellular Ca2+ influx. Switching from a PO_2 of 150 to 20 mmHg leads to a reversible attenuation of the Ca2+ oscillations. In voltage-clamped cells, hypoxia reversibly reduces the influx of Ca2+ through voltage-dependent channels, which can account for the inhibition of the Ca2+ oscillations. Low PO_2 selectively inhibits L-type Ca2+ channel activity, whereas the current mediated by T-type channels is unaltered by hypoxia. The effect of low PO_2 on the L-type channels is markedly voltage dependent, being more apparent with moderate depolarizations. These findings demonstrate the existence of O_2-sensitive, voltage-dependent, Ca2+ channels in vascular smooth muscle that may critically contribute to the local regulation of circulation.

  12. NF-kappaB signaling mediates vascular smooth muscle endothelin type B receptor expression in resistance arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Jian-Pu; Zhang, Yaping; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) endothelin type B (ET(B)) receptor upregulation results in strong vasoconstriction and reduction of local blood flow. We hypothesizes that the underlying molecular mechanisms involve transcriptional factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway. ET(B) receptor...

  13. Notch Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

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    Baeten, J T; Lilly, B

    2017-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is a highly conserved pathway involved in cell fate determination in embryonic development and also functions in the regulation of physiological processes in several systems. It plays an especially important role in vascular development and physiology by influencing angiogenesis, vessel patterning, arterial/venous specification, and vascular smooth muscle biology. Aberrant or dysregulated Notch signaling is the cause of or a contributing factor to many vascular disorders, including inherited vascular diseases, such as cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, associated with degeneration of the smooth muscle layer in cerebral arteries. Like most signaling pathways, the Notch signaling axis is influenced by complex interactions with mediators of other signaling pathways. This complexity is also compounded by different members of the Notch family having both overlapping and unique functions. Thus, it is vital to fully understand the roles and interactions of each Notch family member in order to effectively and specifically target their exact contributions to vascular disease. In this chapter, we will review the Notch signaling pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells as it relates to vascular development and human disease.

  14. The contribution of vascular smooth muscle, elastin and collagen on the passive mechanics of porcine carotid arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochová, P; Kuncová, J; Svíglerová, J; Cimrman, R; Miklíková, M; Liška, V; Tonar, Z

    2012-08-01

    The main components responsible for the mechanical behavior of the arterial wall are collagen, elastin, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the medial layer. We determined the structural and mechanical changes in porcine carotid arteries after administration of Triton® X-100, elastase, and collagenase using the inflation-deflation test. The arteries were intraluminarly pressurized from 0 to 200 mmHg, and the outer diameter of the artery was measured. The pressure-strain elastic modulus was determined based on the pressure/diameter ratio. The intima-media thickness, wall thickness, thickness of the tunica adventitia layer, and the area fractions of SMCs, elastin, and collagen within the arterial wall (A(A)(SMC/elastin/collagen, wall)) were measured using stereological methods. The relative changes in the relevant components of the treated samples were as follows: the decrease in A(A)(SMC, wall) after administration of Triton® X-100 was 11% ± 7%, the decrease in A(A)(elastin, wall) after administration of elastase was 40% ± 22%, and the decrease in A(A)(collagen, wall) after the application of collagenase was 51% ± 22%. The Triton® X-100 treatment led to a decrease in the SMC content that was associated with enlargement of the arterial wall (outer diameter) for pressures up to 120 mmHg, and with mechanical stiffening of the arterial wall at higher pressures. Elastase led to a decrease in the elastin content that was associated with enlargement of the arterial wall, but not with stiffening or softening. Collagenase led to a decrease in collagen content that was associated with a change in the stiffness of the arterial wall, although the exact contribution of mechanical loading and the duration of treatment (enlargement) could not be quantified.

  15. Feline immunodeficiency virus and retrovirus-mediated adventitial ex vivo gene transfer to rabbit carotid artery using autologous vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankkonen, Hanna M; Turunen, Mikko P; Hiltunen, Mikko O; Lehtolainen, Pauliina; Koponen, Jonna; Leppänen, Pia; Turunen, Anna-Mari; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2004-03-01

    We have developed an ex vivo gene transfer technique to rabbit arterial wall using autologous smooth muscle cells (SMCs). SMCs were harvested from rabbit ear artery, transduced in vitro with vesicular stomatitis virus G-glycoprotein pseudotyped retrovirus or feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and returned to the adventitial surface of the carotid artery using a periadventitial silicone collar or collagen sheet placed around the artery. Beta-galactosidase (lacZ) and human apolipoprotein E3 (apoE3) cDNAs were used as transgenes. After retrovirus-mediated gene transfer of lacZ the selected cells implanted with high efficiency and expressed lacZ marker gene at a very high level 7 and 14 days after the operation. The level of lacZ expression decreased thereafter but was still detectable 12 weeks after the gene transfer, and was exclusively localized to the site of cell implantation inside the collar. Utilizing FIV vector expressing apoE3, low levels of apoE were measured from serum collected from a low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits 1 month after the gene transfer. The physiological effect of apoE expression was detected as transiently elevated serum cholesterol levels. The results indicate that the model can be used for high efficiency local gene transfer in arteries, e.g. during vascular surgery. The model is also valuable for studying expression, stability and safety of new gene transfer vectors and their expression products in vivo.

  16. LPS, but not Angiotensin ll, lnduces Direct Pro-lnflammatory Effects in Cultured Mouse Arteries and Human Endothelial and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Outzen, Emilie M; Zaki, Marina; Mehryar, Rahila;

    2016-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) might induce pro-inflammatory effects directly on the vascular wall independently of its hemodynamic effects. The aim of our study was to investigate the putative direct pro-inflammatory and vasomotor effects of Ang II and compare to those of LPS in mouse isolated mesenteric...... resistance-sized arteries (MRA) supported by experiments in cultured human primary endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells. Results showed that 24-hr organ culture of mouse MRA with 10 nM Ang II had, unlike 100 ng/mL LPS, no effects on IL-6 or MCP-1 secretion, VCAM1 mRNA expression or endothelial...... function, while Ang II significantly decreased maximal vasomotor responses to phenylephrine. In support, 24-hr organ culture of mouse MRA significantly suppressed Agtr1a mRNA and augmented Tlr4 mRNA along with attenuated vasomotor responses to Ang II. Moreover, contrary to LPS and TNFα, Ang II and [Sar1...

  17. Increased rhythmicity in hypertensive arterial smooth muscle is linked to transient receptor potential canonical channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiaoping; Yang, Dachun; Ma, Shuangtao

    2010-01-01

    Vasomotion describes oscillations of arterial vascular tone due to synchronized changes of intracellular calcium concentrations. Since increased calcium influx into vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) has been associated with variances of transient receptor...

  18. Effect of Nuclear Factor-kappa B on Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor mRNA Expression of Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells in Hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张焕萍; 徐永健; 张珍祥; 许淑云; 倪望; 陈士新

    2004-01-01

    Summary: In order to investigate the effect of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA expression of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs) in hypoxia, the cultured HPASMCs in vitro were stimulated with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), an inhibitor of NF-κB. The NF-κB p65 nuclei positive expression was detected by immunocytochemical technique. The IκBa protein expression was measured by Western blot.RT-PCR was used to detect the VEGF mRNA expression of HPASMCs. The results showed that no significant change was observed in the NF-κB p65 nuclei positive expression of cultured HPASMCs during 6 h-24 h in normoxia, but the levels of NF-κB p65 nuclei positive expression of cultured HPASMCs were significantly increased in hypoxia groups as compared with those in all normoxia groups (P<0.05). The IκBα protein expression of cultured HPASMCs showed no significant change during 6 h-24 h in normoxia, but significantly decreased in hypoxia as comapred with that in normoxia groups (P<0.05). PDTC (1 to 100 μmol/L) could inhibit the VEGF mRNA expression of HPASMCs in a concentration-dependent manner in hypoxia. In conclusion, NF-κB can be partly translocation activated from cytoplasm into nuclei in the cultured HPASMCs under hypoxia. The inhibition of NF-κB activation can decrease the VEGF mRNA expression. h is suggested that the activation of NF-κB is involved in the VEGFmRNA expression of HPASMCs under hypoxia.

  19. Caveolin-3 promotes a vascular smooth muscle contractile phenotype

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    Jorge L. Gutierrez-Pajares

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the importance of cardiovascular diseases in Western countries. Among the cell types associated with a dysfunctional vasculature, smooth muscle cells are believed to play an essential role in the development of these illnesses. Vascular smooth muscle cells are key regulators of the vascular tone and also have an important function in the development of atherosclerosis and restenosis. While in the normal vasculature contractile smooth muscle cells are predominant, in atherosclerotic vascular lesions, synthetic cells migrate toward the neointima, proliferate, and synthetize extracellular matrix proteins. In the present study, we have examined the role of caveolin-3 in the regulation of smooth muscle cell phenotype. Caveolin-3 is expressed in vivo in normal arterial smooth muscle cells, but its expression appears to be lost in cultured smooth muscle cells. Our data show that caveolin-3 expression in the A7r5 smooth muscle cell line is associated with increased expression of contractility markers such as smooth muscle  actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain but decreased expression of the synthetic phenotype markers such as p-Elk and Klf4. Moreover, we also show that caveolin-3 expression can reduce proliferation upon treatment with LDL or PDGF. Finally, we show that caveolin-3-expressing smooth muscle cells are less sensitive to apoptosis than control cells upon treatment with oxidized LDL. Taken together, our data suggest that caveolin-3 can regulate the phenotypic switch between contractile and synthetic smooth muscle cells. A better understanding of the factors regulating caveolin-3 expression and function in this cell type will permit the development of a better comprehension of the factors regulating smooth muscle function in atherosclerosis and restenosis.

  20. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area.

  1. Crk-associated substrate, vascular smooth muscle and hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dale D. TANG

    2008-01-01

    Hypertension is characterized by vascular smooth muscle constriction and vascular remodeling involving cell migration, hypertrophy and growth. Crk-associated substrate (CAS), the first discovered member of the adapter protein CAS family, has been shown to be a critical cellular component that regulates various smooth muscle functions. In this review, the molecular structure and protein interactions of the CAS family members are summarized. Evidence for the role of CAS in the regu-lation of vascular smooth muscle contractility is pre-sented. Contraction stimulation induces CAS phosphor-ylation on Tyr-410 in arterial smooth muscle, creating the binding site for the Src homology (SH) 2/SH3 protein Crkll, which activates neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syn-drome protein (N-WASP)-mediated actin assembly and force development. The functions of CAS in cell migra-tion, hypertrophy and growth are also summarized. Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl), c-Src, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2), pro-tein tyrosine phosphatase-proline, glutamate, serine and threonine sequence protein (PTP-PEST) and SHP-2 have been documented to coordinate the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of CAS. The downstream signaling partners of CAS in the context of cell motility, hyper-trophy, survival and growth are also discussed. These new findings establish the important role of CAS in the modulation of vascular smooth muscle functions. Furthermore, the upstream regulators of CAS may be new biologic targets for the development of more effective and specific treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension.

  2. Pasteur effect in vascular and intestinal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, G; Lundholm, L

    1985-01-01

    The increase in lactate production on changing from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, i.e. the Pasteur effect, has been reported to be small in vascular muscle and especially in aorta. It has been suggested that this may be an artefact caused by damage to the intimal endothelium. We have compared the Pasteur effect in different kinds of pig arteries, but also in rabbit colon. The aerobic lactate production in 60 min was 11-15 mumol/g in the aorta and the carotid artery, but 3 mumol/g in the mesenteric and renal arteries and 4 mumol/g in the rabbit colon. The increase in lactate production under anaerobic conditions was 12-20 mumol/g/60 min in the carotid artery, aorta and rabbit colon and 10 mumol/g/60 min in the mesenteric and renal arteries. When calculated in per cent, the Pasteur effect was greater in the mesenteric artery than in the aorta, but the actual rise in lactate production in mumol/g was higher in the aorta and carotid artery. The high aerobic lactate production of smooth muscle in vitro may be related to its low ability to oxidize glucose; some other substrates may be preferentially oxidized when present in vitro or in vivo.

  3. Increase of ADAM10 level in coronary artery in-stent restenosis segments in diabetic minipigs: high ADAM10 expression promoting growth and migration in human vascular smooth muscle cells via Notch 1 and 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study aimed to identify major proteins in the pathogenesis of coronary artery in-stent restenosis (ISR in diabetic minipigs with sirolimus-eluting stenting, and to investigate the roles of key candidate molecules, particularly ADAM10, in human arterial smooth muscle cells (HASMCs. METHODS AND RESULTS: The stents were implanted in the coronary arteries of 15 diabetic and 26 non-diabetic minipigs, and angiography was repeated at six months. The intima of one vascular segment with significant ISR and one with non-ISR in diabetic minipigs were isolated and cultured in conditioned medium (CM. The CM was analyzed by LC-MS/MS to uncover proteins whose levels were significantly increased (≥ 1.5-fold in ISR than in non-ISR tissues. After literature searching, we focused on the identified proteins, whose biological functions were most potentially related to ISR pathophysiology. Among them, ADAM10 was significantly increased in diabetic and non-diabetic ISR tissues as compared with non-ISR controls. In cell experiments, retrovirus-mediated overexpression of ADAM10 promoted growth and migration of HASMCs. The effects of ADAM10 were more remarkable in high-glucose culture than in low-glucose culture. Using shRNA and an inhibitor of γ-secretase (GSI, we found that the influences of ADAM10 were in part mediated by Notch1 and notch 3 pathway, which up-regulated Notch downstream genes and enhanced nuclear translocation of the small intracellular component of Notch1 and Notch3. CONCLUSIONS: This study has identified significantly increased expression of ADAM10 in the ISR versus non-ISR segment in diabetic minipigs and implicates ADAM10 in the enhanced neointimal formation observed in diabetes after vascular injury.

  4. Relationship Between Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells and Mechanism of Hypoxia-induced Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling%肺动脉平滑肌细胞与低氧性肺血管重塑形成机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凌云

    2013-01-01

    低氧条件下肺血管收缩、重塑,继而导致肺血管的持续对抗,其中以中膜增厚为主的肺血管重塑是导致低氧性肺动脉高压持续不可逆性病理改变的重要因素.肺动脉平滑肌细胞是肺动脉中膜的主要构成部分,慢性缺氧条件下由于各种活性介质及细胞生长因子稳态的失衡,肺动脉平滑肌细胞聚集、增殖、肥大及分泌胞外基质;另外,肺动脉平滑肌细胞通过各种信号通路与内膜的内皮细胞及外膜的成纤维细胞相互作用,在低氧性肺血管重塑过程中起着至关重要的作用,本文将对肺动脉平滑肌细胞与低氧性肺血管重塑形成机制的最新研究概况作一综述.%Under conditions of hypoxia generalized vasoconstriction and remodeling of the pulmonary vascular leads to pulmonary vascular persistent resistance. The medial thickening is the main reason of pulmonary vascular remodeling and hypoxic pulmonary artery hypertension, pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) are the principal structure of media, and chronic hypoxia induces the imbalance of vasoactive substances and growth factors. Under this condition, the main medial thickening is believed to be attributable to proliferation, hypertrophy and increased accumulation of PASMC as well as expression of extracellular matrix proteins. Moreover, PASMC has an interaction with endothelial cell of intima and fibroblast of adventitia through multiple signal pathways and plays a crucial role in the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling. The article will make a summary of latest research on PASMC and mechanism of hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling.

  5. The Smooth Muscle of the Artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    ruling out the oossibility that depolarization is a junction potential due to rnovement. The low resting potential shown is indicative of the degree of...which is embryologically Soditm Pump in the Con- and functionally related to vascular trol ot %tscle Contrac- smooth muscle, many of the electrical...consideration a 5-hydroxytryptamine as well as histamine as being the factor that we are studying. This does not rule out the posni- bility that either

  6. Adult Vascular Wall Resident Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells, Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Arterial Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Amato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidences have shown the presence of multipotent stem cells (SCs at sites of arterial aneurysms: they can differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMCs and are activated after residing in a quiescent state in the vascular wall. Recent studies have implicated the role of matrix metalloproteinases in the pathogenesis of arterial aneurysms: in fact the increased synthesis of MMPs by arterial SMCs is thought to be a pivotal mechanism in aneurysm formation. The factors and signaling pathways involved in regulating wall resident SC recruitment, survival, proliferation, growth factor production, and differentiation may be also related to selective expression of different MMPs. This review explores the relationship between adult vascular wall resident multipotent vascular SCs, MMPs, and arterial aneurysms.

  7. Biophysical induction of vascular smooth muscle cell podosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Young Kim

    Full Text Available Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC migration and matrix degradation occurs with intimal hyperplasia associated with atherosclerosis, vascular injury, and restenosis. One proposed mechanism by which VSMCs degrade matrix is through the use of podosomes, transient actin-based structures that are thought to play a role in extracellular matrix degradation by creating localized sites of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP secretion. To date, podosomes in VSMCs have largely been studied by stimulating cells with phorbol esters, such as phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu, however little is known about the physiological cues that drive podosome formation. We present the first evidence that physiological, physical stimuli mimicking cues present within the microenvironment of diseased arteries can induce podosome formation in VSMCs. Both microtopographical cues and imposed pressure mimicking stage II hypertension induce podosome formation in A7R5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Moreover, wounding using a scratch assay induces podosomes at the leading edge of VSMCs. Notably the effect of each of these biophysical stimuli on podosome stimulation can be inhibited using a Src inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that physical cues can induce podosome formation in VSMCs.

  8. 血管一氧化氮神经调控颈总动脉血管平滑肌增殖%Vascular nitric oxide nerves regulate smooth muscle cell proliferation of the common carotid artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅麟凤; 黄金玉; 朱倩; 刘艳梅; 王旻晨; 吴开云

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨血管交感神经的NO神经对血管平滑肌细胞(VSMC)增殖的影响.方法:用FeCl3诱导大鼠颈总动脉平滑肌增殖模型,实验分为假手术组,术后存活1d组、5d组,切除交感神经组和用抑制剂N-硝基-L精氨酸(LNNA)组,每组6只动物,采用荧光金(FG)逆向追踪和免疫组织化学显色标记技术,证实颈血管NO通路.H-E染色和免疫印迹检测血管平滑肌增殖变化.结果:通过FG示踪表明颈总动脉主要由颈上神经节支配,颈中、下神经节也有少量支配,NOS免疫组织化学标记证实交感神经中的NO神经支配颈血管,H-E染色可见血管损伤后有平滑肌增殖,抑制剂组和切除交感神经组增殖更明显;免疫印迹结果也显示5d组与假手术组相比细胞增殖核抗原(PCNA)表达明显上调,而LNNA组和神经切除组PCNA上调更明显.结论:支配颈总动脉的交感神经含NO神经,NO神经参与了VSMC增殖的调控.%Objective:To investigate the nitric oxide (NO) pathway involved in vascular sympathetic nerves and its effect on vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. Methods: VSMC proliferation of the common carotid artery was induced by FeCl3 in rats. Six groups were studied as follows: sham surgery, 1 day model, 5 day model, N_w-nitro-L-arginine (LNNA) and sympathectomy. The retrograde fluorogold tracing technique and nitric oxide synthase immunohistochemical staining were used to confirm the cervical vascular NO nerves. VSMC proliferation was determined by hematoxylin-eosin ( HE) staining and Western blotting. Results:The fluorogold tracing technique demonstrated that the common carotid artery was primarily innervated by the superior cervical ganglion and partially innervated by the middle and inferior cervical ganglia. Nitric oxide synthase histochemical staining confirmed the presence of the cervical vascular NO nerves. HE staining revealed that VSMC proliferation appeared after vascular injury and that proliferation was

  9. MFAP4 Promotes Vascular Smooth Muscle Migration, Proliferation and Accelerates Neointima Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlosser, Anders; Pilecki, Bartosz; Hemstra, Line E.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Arterial injury stimulates remodeling responses that, when excessive, lead to stenosis. These responses are influenced by integrin signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Microfibrillar-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) is an integrin ligand localized to extracellular matrix fibers...

  10. Characterisation of K+ Channels in Human Fetoplacental Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Brereton, Melissa F.; Mark Wareing; Rebecca L Jones; Greenwood, Susan L.

    2013-01-01

    Adequate blood flow through placental chorionic plate resistance arteries (CPAs) is necessary for oxygen and nutrient transfer to the fetus and a successful pregnancy. In non-placental vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), K(+) channels regulate contraction, vascular tone and blood flow. Previous studies showed that K(+) channel modulators alter CPA tone, but did not distinguish between effects on K(+) channels in endothelial cells and SMCs. In this study, we developed a preparation of freshly...

  11. Effects of platelet-derived growth factor on the function of smooth muscle cells from different orders of pulmonary artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    国桓

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the functional responses of normal rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells(PASMCs)from different orders of pulmonary artery to the platelet-derived growth factor(PDGF).Methods The pulmonary artery branches were gently isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats(250-350 g)and eventually cut into three groups according to the vascular grading:the

  12. Sympathetically evoked Ca2+ signaling in arterial smooth muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-jin ZANG; Joseph ZACHARIA; Christine LAMONT; Withrow Gil WIER

    2006-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system plays an essential role in the control of total peripheral vascular resistance and blood flow, by controlling the contraction of small arteries. Perivascular sympathetic nerves release ATP, norepinephrine (NE) and neuropeptide Y. This review summarizes our knowledge of the intracellular Ca2+ signals that are activated by ATP and NE, acting respectively on P2X1 and α1 adrenoceptors in arterial smooth muscle. Each neurotransmitter produces a unique type of post-synaptic Ca2+ signal and associated contraction. The neural release of ATP and NE is thought to vary markedly with the pattern of nerve activity, probably reflecting both pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms. Finally, we show that Ca2+ signaling during neurogenic contractions activated by trains of sympathetic nerve fiber action potentials are in fact significantly different from that elicited by simple bath application of exogenous neurotransmitters to isolated arteries (a common experimental technique), and end by identifying important questions remaining in our understanding of sympathetic neurotransmission and the physiological regulation of contraction of small arteries.

  13. Arterial Myogenic Activation through Smooth Muscle Filamin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Retailleau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the filamin A (FlnA gene are frequently associated with severe arterial abnormalities, although the physiological role for this cytoskeletal element remains poorly understood in vascular cells. We used a conditional mouse model to selectively delete FlnA in smooth muscle (sm cells at the adult stage, thus avoiding the developmental effects of the knockout. Basal blood pressure was significantly reduced in conscious smFlnA knockout mice. Remarkably, pressure-dependent tone of the resistance caudal artery was lost, whereas reactivity to vasoconstrictors was preserved. Impairment of the myogenic behavior was correlated with a lack of calcium influx in arterial myocytes upon an increase in intraluminal pressure. Notably, the stretch activation of CaV1.2 was blunted in the absence of smFlnA. In conclusion, FlnA is a critical upstream element of the signaling cascade underlying the myogenic tone. These findings allow a better understanding of the molecular basis of arterial autoregulation and associated disease states.

  14. Smooth Muscle Endothelin B Receptors Regulate Blood Pressure but Not Vascular Function or Neointimal Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eileen; Czopek, Alicja; Duthie, Karolina M; Kirkby, Nicholas S; van de Putte, Elisabeth E Fransen; Christen, Sibylle; Kimmitt, Robert A; Moorhouse, Rebecca; Castellan, Raphael F P; Kotelevtsev, Yuri V; Kuc, Rhoda E; Davenport, Anthony P; Dhaun, Neeraj; Webb, David J; Hadoke, Patrick W F

    2017-02-01

    The role of smooth muscle endothelinB (ETB) receptors in regulating vascular function, blood pressure (BP), and neointimal remodeling has not been established. Selective knockout mice were generated to address the hypothesis that loss of smooth muscle ETB receptors would reduce BP, alter vascular contractility, and inhibit neointimal remodeling. ETB receptors were selectively deleted from smooth muscle by crossing floxed ETB mice with those expressing cre-recombinase controlled by the transgelin promoter. Functional consequences of ETB deletion were assessed using myography. BP was measured by telemetry, and neointimal lesion formation induced by femoral artery injury. Lesion size and composition (day 28) were analyzed using optical projection tomography, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Selective deletion of ETB was confirmed by genotyping, autoradiography, polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. ETB-mediated contraction was reduced in trachea, but abolished from mesenteric veins, of knockout mice. Induction of ETB-mediated contraction in mesenteric arteries was also abolished in these mice. Femoral artery function was unaltered, and baseline BP modestly elevated in smooth muscle ETB knockout compared with controls (+4.2±0.2 mm Hg; P<0.0001), but salt-induced and ETB blockade-mediated hypertension were unaltered. Circulating endothelin-1 was not altered in knockout mice. ETB-mediated contraction was not induced in femoral arteries by incubation in culture medium or lesion formation, and lesion size was not altered in smooth muscle ETB knockout mice. In the absence of other pathology, ETB receptors in vascular smooth muscle make a small but significant contribution to ETB-dependent regulation of BP. These ETB receptors have no effect on vascular contraction or neointimal remodeling.

  15. Smooth muscle cell-extrinsic vascular spasm arises from cardiomyocyte degeneration in sarcoglycan-deficient cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Matthew T; Allikian, Michael J; Heydemann, Ahlke; Hadhazy, Michele; Zarnegar, Sara; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2004-03-01

    Vascular spasm is a poorly understood but critical biomedical process because it can acutely reduce blood supply and tissue oxygenation. Cardiomyopathy in mice lacking gamma-sarcoglycan or delta-sarcoglycan is characterized by focal damage. In the heart, sarcoglycan gene mutations produce regional defects in membrane permeability and focal degeneration, and it was hypothesized that vascular spasm was responsible for this focal necrosis. Supporting this notion, vascular spasm was noted in coronary arteries, and disruption of the sarcoglycan complex was observed in vascular smooth muscle providing a molecular mechanism for spasm. Using a transgene rescue strategy in the background of sarcoglycan-null mice, we replaced cardiomyocyte sarcoglycan expression. Cardiomyocyte-specific sarcoglycan expression was sufficient to correct cardiac focal degeneration. Intriguingly, successful restoration of the cardiomyocyte sarcoglycan complex also eliminated coronary artery vascular spasm, while restoration of smooth muscle sarcoglycan in the background of sarcoglycan-null alleles did not. This mechanism, whereby tissue damage leads to vascular spasm, can be partially corrected by NO synthase inhibitors. Therefore, we propose that cytokine release from damaged cardiomyocytes can feed back to produce vascular spasm. Moreover, vascular spasm feeds forward to produce additional cardiac damage.

  16. Disruption of TGF-β signaling in smooth muscle cell prevents flow-induced vascular remodeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fu [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China); Chambon, Pierre [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (CNRS UMR7104, INSERM U596, ULP, Collége de France) and Institut Clinique de la Souris, ILLKIRCH, Strasbourg (France); Tellides, George [Department of Surgery, Interdepartmental Program in Vascular Biology and Therapeutics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Kong, Wei [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Basic Medical College of Peking University, Beijing (China); Zhang, Xiaoming, E-mail: rmygxgwk@163.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China); Li, Wei [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • TGF-β signaling in SMC contributes to the flow-induced vascular remodeling. • Disruption of TGF-β signaling in SMC can prevent this process. • Targeting SM-specific Tgfbr2 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for vascular remodeling. - Abstract: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling has been prominently implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling, especially the initiation and progression of flow-induced vascular remodeling. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the principal resident cells in arterial wall and are critical for arterial remodeling. However, the role of TGF-β signaling in SMC for flow-induced vascular remodeling remains unknown. Therefore, the goal of our study was to determine the effect of TGF-β pathway in SMC for vascular remodeling, by using a genetical smooth muscle-specific (SM-specific) TGF-β type II receptor (Tgfbr2) deletion mice model. Mice deficient in the expression of Tgfbr2 (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup f/f}) and their corresponding wild-type background mice (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup WT/WT}) underwent partial ligation of left common carotid artery for 1, 2, or 4 weeks. Then the carotid arteries were harvested and indicated that the disruption of Tgfbr2 in SMC provided prominent inhibition of vascular remodeling. And the thickening of carotid media, proliferation of SMC, infiltration of macrophage, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) were all significantly attenuated in Tgfbr2 disruption mice. Our study demonstrated, for the first time, that the TGF-β signaling in SMC plays an essential role in flow-induced vascular remodeling and disruption can prevent this process.

  17. Identification of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) in Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells as Novel Therapeutic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    enhanced proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). The underlying idea of this project is that the currently limited...Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is associated with increased vascular resistance, sustained contraction, and enhanced proliferation of pulmonary... CRISPR /Cas9) to knock down receptor expression in cells of interest and then to assess the impact of receptor knock down on functional activity

  18. Effects of sodium selenite on vascular smooth muscle reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togna, G; Russo, P; Pierconti, F; Caprino, L

    2000-02-01

    The effects of sodium selenite (Na(2)SeO(3)) on the vascular smooth muscle reactivity of rabbit aorta were studied. In isolated rabbit aorta, Na(2)SeO(3) inhibited contractile response to phenylephrine and developed a lasting contracture in the vascular tissue. Relaxation in phenylephrine-precontracted aortic rings induced by sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo-guanosine 3':5'-cyclic-monophosphate was also inhibited. Preliminary data obtained with ascorbic acid suggested a partial involvement of an oxidative mechanism. Excluding the possibility that Se damages actin or modifies its distribution (immunohistochemical evaluation), results indicate that Se alters vascular smooth muscle reactivity by inhibiting both its contracting and relaxing properties. Calcium-dependent mechanisms appear to be primarily involved and an interference with calcium re-uptake by sarcoplasmic reticulum as a possible site of Se vascular action could be hypothesized.

  19. Cinematographic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cell interactions with extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, M; Baldor, L

    1991-01-01

    The interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells with growth modulators and extracellular matrix molecules may play a role in the proliferation and migration of these cells after vascular injury and during the development of atherosclerosis. Time-lapse cinematographic techniques have been used to study cell division and migration of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells in response to matrix molecules consisting of solubilized basement membrane (Matrigel) and type I collagen. When cells were grown adjacent to Matrigel, both migration and cell proliferation were increased and interdivision time was shortened. Cells grown in Matrigel or in type I collagen had markedly reduced migration rates but interdivision time was not altered. Further, diffusible components of the Matrigel were found to stimulate proliferation of the smooth muscle cells.

  20. Effects of One Resistance Exercise Session on Vascular Smooth Muscle of Hypertensive Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da; Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana, E-mail: marciorvsantos@bol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    Hypertension is a public health problem and increases the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. To evaluate the effects of a resistance exercise session on the contractile and relaxing mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle in mesenteric arteries of N{sup G}-nitro L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)-induced hypertensive rats. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (C), hypertensive (H), and exercised hypertensive (EH). Hypertension was induced by administration of 20 mg/kg of L-NAME for 7 days prior to experimental protocols. The resistance exercise protocol consisted of 10 sets of 10 repetitions and intensity of 40% of one repetition maximum. The reactivity of vascular smooth muscle was evaluated by concentration‑response curves to phenylephrine (PHEN), potassium chloride (KCl) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Rats treated with L-NAME showed an increase (p < 0.001) in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) compared to the initial period of induction. No difference in PHEN sensitivity was observed between groups H and EH. Acute resistance exercise reduced (p < 0.001) the contractile response induced by KCl at concentrations of 40 and 60 mM in group EH. Greater (p < 0.01) smooth muscle sensitivity to NPS was observed in group EH as compared to group H. One resistance exercise session reduces the contractile response induced by KCl in addition to increasing the sensitivity of smooth muscle to NO in mesenteric arteries of hypertensive rats.

  1. Maintenance of GLUT4 expression in smooth muscle prevents hypertension-induced changes in vascular reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Kevin B; Seki, Yoshinori; Saha, Jharna; Eichinger, Felix; Charron, Maureen J; Brosius, Frank C

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that expression of GLUT4 is decreased in arterial smooth muscle of hypertensive rats and mice and that total body overexpression of GLUT4 in mice prevents enhanced arterial reactivity in hypertension. To demonstrate that the effect of GLUT4 overexpression on vascular responses is dependent on vascular smooth muscle GLUT4 rather than on some systemic effect we developed and tested smooth-muscle-specific GLUT4 transgenic mice (SMG4). When made hypertensive with angiotensin II, both wild-type and SMG4 mice exhibited similarly increased systolic blood pressure. Responsiveness to phenylephrine, serotonin, and prostaglandin F2α was significantly increased in endothelium-intact aortic rings from hypertensive wild-type mice but not in aortae of SMG4 mice. Inhibition of Rho-kinase equally reduced serotonin-stimulated contractility in aortae of hypertensive wild-type and SMG4-mice. In addition, acetylcholine-stimulated relaxation was significantly decreased in aortic rings of hypertensive wild-type mice, but not in rings of SMG4 mice. Inhibition of either prostacylin receptors or cyclooxygenase-2 reduced relaxation in rings of hypertensive SMG4 mice. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 had no effect on relaxation in rings of hypertensive wild-type mice. Cyclooxygenase-2 protein expression was decreased in hypertensive wild-type aortae but not in hypertensive SMG4 aortae compared to nonhypertensive controls. Our results demonstrate that smooth muscle expression of GLUT4 exerts a major effect on smooth muscle contractile responses and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and that normal expression of GLUT4 in vascular smooth muscle is required for appropriate smooth muscle and endothelial responses.

  2. RhoA/ROCK信号系统对血管外膜炎症介导的大鼠颈动脉平滑肌细胞增殖和表型变化的影响%Effects of RhoA/ROCK Signaling Pathway on the Proliferation and Phenotypic Modulation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells in Perivascular Inflammatory Injured Rat Carotid Artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程木秋; 霍海洋; 张海山

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨RhoA/ROCK信号系统在血管外膜炎症介导的大鼠颈动脉平滑肌细胞(VSMC)增殖和表型变化中的作用机制.方法 将20只Wistar大鼠按随机数字表法均分为模型组(用硅胶管包裹大鼠颈动脉1周,造成血管外膜的慢性炎性损伤)和对照组,取材后HE染色,分别观察2组血管形态学变化,采用RT-PCR和Western blot检测血管组织中SM α-actin与ROCK2的表达.结果 与对照组相比,模型组颈动脉血管外膜增厚,炎性细胞浸润,中膜平滑肌细胞增生,排列紊乱,VSMC中SM α-actin mRNA水平和蛋白表达水平均增高,ROCK2 mRNA水平与对照组相比无显著差异,蛋白表达水平均明显增高.结论 RhoA/ROCK信号系统可能参与血管外膜炎症介导的大鼠颈动脉VSMC增殖和表型变化的调控.%Objective To investigate the role of RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway in the proliferation and phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells in peri vascular inflammatory injured rat carotid artery. Methods A total of 20 Wistar rats were randomly divided into 2 groups as model group and control group. Bilateral carotid artery model with chronic inflammatory injury was established by silicone collar which was positioned around the carotid artery adventitia of the rat. After operation,the rats were fed with standard food and free water for 7 days. Carotid artery specimens was obtained for HE staining to evaluate the vascular morphological changes. Western blot was used to detect the expression of vascular tissue SM a-actin and ROCK2 protein; RT-PCR method was applied to detect mRNA expression of vascular tissue SM a-actin and R0CK2. Results Compared with the carotid artery of control rats,the thicker adventitia and adventitial inflammation was observed in the model group;the intima smooth muscle cells significantly proliferated and arranged in disorder. Compared with control group,carotid artery vascular smooth muscle cell SM in model group had higher a

  3. Extracellular proteolysis and the migrating vascular smooth muscle cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, R.T.J. van

    1996-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMC) form the major cell type in the arterial blood vessels. In the undamaged vessel wall they remain in a contractile state characterized by the absence of cell division, a low metabolic activity and a high actin-myosin content. As a reaction to injury of the vessel wall they c

  4. Notch signal reception is required in vascular smooth muscle cells for ductus arteriosus closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Luke T; Norton, Christine R; Gridley, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The ductus arteriosus is an arterial vessel that shunts blood flow away from the lungs during fetal life, but normally occludes after birth to establish the adult circulation pattern. Failure of the ductus arteriosus to close after birth is termed patent ductus arteriosus, and is one of the most common congenital heart defects. Our previous work demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cell expression of the Jag1 gene, which encodes a ligand for Notch family receptors, is essential for postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice. However, it was not known what cell population was responsible for receiving the Jag1-mediated signal. Here we show, using smooth muscle cell-specific deletion of the Rbpj gene, which encodes a transcription factor that mediates all canonical Notch signaling, that Notch signal reception in the vascular smooth muscle cell compartment is required for ductus arteriosus closure. These data indicate that homotypic vascular smooth muscle cell interactions are required for proper contractile smooth muscle cell differentiation and postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice.

  5. Tobacco constituents are mitogenic for arterial smooth-muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, C.G.; Hajjar, D.P.; Hefton, J.M.

    1985-07-01

    Tobacco glycoprotein (TGP) purified from flue-cured tobacco leaves, tar-derived material (TAR), the water soluble, nondialyzable, delipidized extract of cigarette smoke condensate, rutin-bovine serum albumin conjugates, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid are mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells, but not adventitial fibroblasts. The mitogenicity appears to depend on polyphenol epitopes on carrier molecules. Ellagic acid, another plant polyphenol, inhibited arterial smooth-muscle proliferation. These results suggest that a number of ubiquitous, plant-derived substances may influence smooth-muscle cell proliferation in the arterial wall.

  6. Piezo1 in Smooth Muscle Cells Is Involved in Hypertension-Dependent Arterial Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retailleau, Kevin; Duprat, Fabrice; Arhatte, Malika; Ranade, Sanjeev Sumant; Peyronnet, Rémi; Martins, Joana Raquel; Jodar, Martine; Moro, Céline; Offermanns, Stefan; Feng, Yuanyi; Demolombe, Sophie; Patel, Amanda; Honoré, Eric

    2015-11-10

    The mechanically activated non-selective cation channel Piezo1 is a determinant of vascular architecture during early development. Piezo1-deficient embryos die at midgestation with disorganized blood vessels. However, the role of stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) in arterial smooth muscle cells in the adult remains unknown. Here, we show that Piezo1 is highly expressed in myocytes of small-diameter arteries and that smooth-muscle-specific Piezo1 deletion fully impairs SAC activity. While Piezo1 is dispensable for the arterial myogenic tone, it is involved in the structural remodeling of small arteries. Increased Piezo1 opening has a trophic effect on resistance arteries, influencing both diameter and wall thickness in hypertension. Piezo1 mediates a rise in cytosolic calcium and stimulates activity of transglutaminases, cross-linking enzymes required for the remodeling of small arteries. In conclusion, we have established the connection between an early mechanosensitive process, involving Piezo1 in smooth muscle cells, and a clinically relevant arterial remodeling.

  7. Caveolin-1 regulates contractility in differentiated vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, Hyun-Dong; Gallant, Cynthia; Leavis, Paul C; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2004-01-01

    Caveolin is a principal component of caveolar membranes. In the present study, we utilized a decoy peptide approach to define the degree of involvement of caveolin in PKC-dependent regulation of contractility of differentiated vascular smooth muscle. The primary isoform of caveolin in ferret aorta vascular smooth muscle is caveolin-1. Chemical loading of contractile vascular smooth muscle tissue with a synthetic caveolin-1 scaffolding domain peptide inhibited PKC-dependent increases in contractility induced by a phorbol ester or an alpha agonist. Peptide loading also resulted in a significant inhibition of phorbol ester-induced adducin Ser662 phosphorylation, an intracellular monitor of PKC kinase activity, ERK1/2 activation, and Ser789 phosphorylation of the actin binding protein caldesmon. alpha-Agonist-induced ERK1-1/2 activation was also inhibited by the caveolin-1 peptide. Scrambled peptide-loaded tissues or sham-loaded tissues were unaffected with respect to both contractility and signaling. Depolarization-induced activation of contraction was not affected by caveolin peptide loading. Similar results with respect to contractility and ERK1/2 activation during exposure to the phorbol ester or the alpha-agonist were obtained with the cholesterol-depleting agent methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. These results are consistent with a role for caveolin-1 in the coordination of signaling leading to the regulation of contractility of smooth muscle.

  8. Differential response of human fetal smooth muscle cells from arterial duct to retinoid acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-hui WU; Shao-jun XU; Jian-ying TENG; Wei WU; Du-yun YE; Xing-zhong WU

    2008-01-01

    Aim:The aim of the present study was to understand the role of retinoic acid (RA) in the development of isolated patent ductus arteriosus and the features of arterial duct-derived vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Methods:The VSMC were isolated, and the biological characteristics and the response to RA were investi-gated in the arterial duct, aorta, and pulmonary artery VSMC from 6 human embry-onic samples. Western blotting, immunostaining, and cell-based ELISA were em-ployed to analyze the proliferation regulation of VSMC. Results:The VSMC from the arterial duct expressed proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) at a signifi-cantly lower rate than those from the aorta and pulmonary artery, but expressed a higher level of Bax and Bcl-2. The expression level of PCNA or Bcl-2 was associ-ated with the embryonic age. The effects of RA on the VSMC from the arterial duct were quite different from those from the aorta and pulmonary artery. In arterial duct VSMC, RA stimulated PCNA expression, but such stimulation could be sup-pressed by CD2366, an antagonist of nuclear retinoid receptor activation. In aorta or pulmonary artery VSMC, the expression response of PCNA to RA was insignificant. The ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 decreased in arterial duct VSMC after RA treatment due to the significant inhibition of Bax expression. Conclusion:The VSMC from the arterial duct possessed distinct biological behaviors. RA might be important in the development of ductus arteriosus VSMC.

  9. Hypotension Due to Kir6.1 Gain‐of‐Function in Vascular Smooth Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Anlong; Knutsen, Russell H.; Zhang, Haixia; Osei‐Owusu, Patrick; Moreno‐Dominguez, Alex; Harter, Theresa M.; Uchida, Keita; Remedi, Maria S.; Dietrich, Hans H.; Bernal‐Mizrachi, Carlos; Blumer, Kendall J.; Mecham, Robert P.; Koster, Joseph C.; Nichols, Colin G.

    2013-01-01

    Background KATP channels, assembled from pore‐forming (Kir6.1 or Kir6.2) and regulatory (SUR1 or SUR2) subunits, link metabolism to excitability. Loss of Kir6.2 results in hypoglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, whereas loss of Kir6.1 causes Prinzmetal angina–like symptoms in mice. Conversely, overactivity of Kir6.2 induces neonatal diabetes in mice and humans, but consequences of Kir6.1 overactivity are unknown. Methods and Results We generated transgenic mice expressing wild‐type (WT), ATP‐insensitive Kir6.1 [Gly343Asp] (GD), and ATP‐insensitive Kir6.1 [Gly343Asp,Gln53Arg] (GD‐QR) subunits, under Cre‐recombinase control. Expression was induced in smooth muscle cells by crossing with smooth muscle myosin heavy chain promoter–driven tamoxifen‐inducible Cre‐recombinase (SMMHC‐Cre‐ER) mice. Three weeks after tamoxifen induction, we assessed blood pressure in anesthetized and conscious animals, as well as contractility of mesenteric artery smooth muscle and KATP currents in isolated mesenteric artery myocytes. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly reduced in GD and GD‐QR mice but normal in mice expressing the WT transgene and elevated in Kir6.1 knockout mice as well as in mice expressing dominant‐negative Kir6.1 [AAA] in smooth muscle. Contractile response of isolated GD‐QR mesenteric arteries was blunted relative to WT controls, but nitroprusside relaxation was unaffected. Basal KATP conductance and pinacidil‐activated conductance were elevated in GD but not in WT myocytes. Conclusions KATP overactivity in vascular muscle can lead directly to reduced vascular contractility and lower blood pressure. We predict that gain of vascular KATP function in humans would lead to a chronic vasodilatory phenotype, as indeed has recently been demonstrated in Cantu syndrome. PMID:23974906

  10. Healing arterial ulcers: Endothelial lining regeneration upon vascular denudation injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Austin I; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa

    2015-09-01

    Thrombosis and restenosis are the most prevalent late complications of coronary artery stenting. Current standards of clinical care focus on prevention of smooth muscle cell proliferation by the use of drug-eluting stents able to release anti-proliferative drugs. Unfortunately, these drugs also block endothelial cell proliferation and, in this manner, prevent recovery of endothelial cell coverage. Continued lack of endothelial repair leaves the root cause of thrombosis and restenosis unchanged, creating a vicious cycle where drug-mediated prevention of restenosis simultaneously implies promotion of thrombosis. In this issue of Vascular Pharmacology, Hussner and colleagues provide in vitro evidence and a mechanistic basis for the use of atorvastatin in stents as a way to bypass this roadblock. Here we review the pathological mechanisms and therapeutic approaches to restore flow in occluded arteries. We argue that rational design of drug eluting stents should focus on specific inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation with concurrent stimulation of endothelial regeneration. We comment on the current poor understanding of the cellular and molecular regulation of endothelial cell proliferation in the context of a functional artery, and on the pitfalls of extrapolating from the well-studied process of neovascularization by sprouting vessel formation.

  11. Smooth muscle cell-derived carbon monoxide is a regulator of vascular cGMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, T; Perrella, M A; Lee, M E; Kourembanas, S

    1995-02-28

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a product of the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO; EC 1.14.99.3). In vascular smooth muscle cells, exogenously administered CO increases cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), which is an important regulator of vessel tone. We report here that smooth muscle cells produce CO via HO and that it regulates cGMP levels in these cells. Hypoxia, which has profound effects on vessel tone, significantly increased the transcriptional rate of the HO-1 gene resulting in corresponding increases of its mRNA and HO enzymatic activity. In addition, under the same conditions, rat aortic and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells accumulated high levels of cGMP following a similar time course to that of HO-1 production. The increased accumulation of cGMP in smooth muscle cells required the enzymatic activity of HO, since it was abolished by a specific HO inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin. In contrast, N omega-nitro-L-arginine, a potent inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, had no effect on cGMP produced by smooth muscle cells, indicating that NO is not responsible for the activation of guanylyl cyclase in this setting. Furthermore, conditioned medium from hypoxic smooth muscle cells stimulated cGMP production in recipient cells and this stimulation was completely inhibited by tin protoporphyrin or hemoglobin, an inhibitor of CO production and a scavenger of CO, respectively. This report shows that HO-1 is expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells and that its product, CO, may regulate vascular tone under physiologic and pathophysiologic (such as hypoxic) conditions.

  12. [Arterial vascular injuries in fractures and dislocations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatek, S; Bürger, T; Halloul, Z; Westphal, T; Holmenschlager, F; Winckler, S

    2001-05-01

    We analyzed reasons, numbers and results of arterial lesions accompanying fractures (n = 21) and luxations (n = 6) in a 6-year-period (1993-1998) retrospectively. Traffic accidents were in nearly 50% responsible for the injuries. 8 patients had suffered multiple injuries. In 17 patients the lower, and in 10 patients the upper extremities were affected. The vascular wall was completely disrupted or severed in 74%. In 7 cases (26%), patients had suffered blunt or indirect arterial trauma with intima- and media-lacerations due to subcapital fracture of the humerus (n = 2), fractured femoral bone (n = 1), luxation of the knee joint (n = 3) or the elbow (n = 1). The mean preoperative time period was 6 hours and 20 minutes (2 to 16 hours) in patients with complete ischaemia. Vascular reconstruction was performed by interposition of an autologous vein graft or an autologous venous bypass (n = 20), by direct reconstruction and primary suturing (n = 2), by use of a venous patch plasty (n = 2) and, in a single case, by autologous bypass procedure. In one case, a crural artery was ligated, in another case with a Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) of 7 points a primary amputation of the lower leg was necessary. In 5 patients (19%) secondary amputations were performed. No patient died. The final outcome is mostly influenced by the preoperative period of ischaemia.

  13. Role of blood and vascular smooth muscle in the vasoactivity of nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J; Barcelo, Lisa; Bragg, Shannon L; Terry, Michael H; Wilson, Sean M; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2014-10-01

    Recent evidence from humans and rats indicates that nitrite is a vasodilator under hypoxic conditions by reacting with metal-containing proteins to produce nitric oxide (NO). We tested the hypothesis that near-physiological concentrations of nitrite would produce vasodilation in a hypoxia- and concentration-dependent manner in the hind limb of sheep. Anesthetized sheep were instrumented to measure arterial blood pressure and femoral blood flows continuously in both hind limbs. Nitrite was infused into one femoral artery to raise the nitrite concentration in the femoral vein by 10 to 15-fold while the sheep breathed 50%, 14% or 12% oxygen in inspired air. In contrast to reports in humans and rats, the nitrite infusion had no measurable effect on mean femoral blood flows or vascular conductances, regardless of inspired O2 levels. In vitro experiments showed no significant difference in the release of NO from nitrite in sheep and human red blood cells. Further experiments demonstrated nitrite is converted to NO in rat artery homogenates faster than sheep arteries, and that this source of NO production is attenuated in the presence of a heme oxidizer. Finally, western blots indicate that concentrations of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin, but not myoglobin, are markedly lower in sheep arteries compared with rats. Overall, the results demonstrate that nitrite is not a physiological vasodilator in sheep. This is likely due to a lack of conversion of nitrite to NO within the vascular smooth muscle, perhaps due to deficient amounts of the heme-containing protein cytoglobin.

  14. Lung irradiation induces pulmonary vascular remodelling resembling pulmonary arterial hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghobadi, G.; Bartelds, B.; van der Veen, S. J.; Dickinson, M. G.; Brandenburg, S.; Berger, R. M. F.; Langendijk, J. A.; Coppes, R. P.; van Luijk, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a commonly fatal pulmonary vascular disease that is often diagnosed late and is characterised by a progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance resulting from typical vascular remodelling. Recent data suggest that vascular damage plays an impo

  15. Smooth muscle cell proliferation in the occluded rat carotid artery: lack of requirement for luminal platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, J. R.; Karnovsky, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    The relationship of intimal smooth muscle cell proliferation in the permanently occluded rat carotid artery to the presence or absence of luminal platelets was examined. Blood was rinsed from the arterial lumen immediately after occlusion and was replaced by autologous, citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP, 6 to 20 X 10(5) platelets/microliter) or filtered platelet-poor plasma (PPP, less than 100 platelets/microliter). Occluded arteries were studied after 1 to 28 days by light and electron microscopy. Events occurring within the first 2 days included fibrin clot formation, endothelial degeneration and denudation, transmural migration of polymorphonucelar leukocytes and monocytes, and, in PRP-filled arteries, degranulation and disappearance of platelets. By 7 days a neointima was formed by macrophages and undifferentiated cells. The latter cells had some features of vascular smooth muscle cells and were apparently derived from medial cells which traversed the internal elastic lamina. After 14 days, identifiable smooth muscle cells emerged as the predominant cell type in a rapidly growing intimal plaque. No differences could be discerned between arteries originally filled with PRP or PPP. This experimental model is similar to atherosclerosis in dimensions of avascular area and in coexistence of degenerative, inflammatory, and proliferative processes. Cell proliferation deep within an atherosclerotic plaque could be initiated by factors other than platelets, perhaps by products of inflammatory cells. Images Figure 4 Figure 7 Figure 6 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 8 Figure 5 PMID:426040

  16. Effects of One Resistance Exercise Session on Vascular Smooth Muscle of Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Hypertension is a public health problem and increases the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Objective: To evaluate the effects of a resistance exercise session on the contractile and relaxing mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle in mesenteric arteries of NG-nitro L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME-induced hypertensive rats. Methods: Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (C, hypertensive (H, and exercised hypertensive (EH. Hypertension was induced by administration of 20 mg/kg of L-NAME for 7 days prior to experimental protocols. The resistance exercise protocol consisted of 10 sets of 10 repetitions and intensity of 40% of one repetition maximum. The reactivity of vascular smooth muscle was evaluated by concentration‑response curves to phenylephrine (PHEN, potassium chloride (KCl and sodium nitroprusside (SNP. Results: Rats treated with L-NAME showed an increase (p < 0.001 in systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP and mean arterial pressure (MAP compared to the initial period of induction. No difference in PHEN sensitivity was observed between groups H and EH. Acute resistance exercise reduced (p < 0.001 the contractile response induced by KCl at concentrations of 40 and 60 mM in group EH. Greater (p < 0.01 smooth muscle sensitivity to NPS was observed in group EH as compared to group H. Conclusion: One resistance exercise session reduces the contractile response induced by KCl in addition to increasing the sensitivity of smooth muscle to NO in mesenteric arteries of hypertensive rats.

  17. IP3 receptors regulate vascular smooth muscle contractility and hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qingsong; Zhao, Guiling; Fang, Xi; Peng, Xiaohong; Tang, Huayuan; Wang, Hong; Jing, Ran; Liu, Jie; Ouyang, Kunfu

    2016-01-01

    Inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate receptor–mediated (IP3R-mediated) calcium (Ca2+) release has been proposed to play an important role in regulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) contraction for decades. However, whether and how IP3R regulates blood pressure in vivo remains unclear. To address these questions, we have generated a smooth muscle–specific IP3R triple-knockout (smTKO) mouse model using a tamoxifen-inducible system. In this study, the role of IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in adult VSMCs on aortic vascular contractility and blood pressure was assessed following tamoxifen induction. We demonstrated that deletion of IP3Rs significantly reduced aortic contractile responses to vasoconstrictors, including phenylephrine, U46619, serotonin, and endothelin 1. Deletion of IP3Rs also dramatically reduced the phosphorylation of MLC20 and MYPT1 induced by U46619. Furthermore, although the basal blood pressure of smTKO mice remained similar to that of wild-type controls, the increase in systolic blood pressure upon chronic infusion of angiotensin II was significantly attenuated in smTKO mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate an important role for IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in VSMCs in regulating vascular contractility and hypertension.

  18. Vascular endothelial dysfunction in β-thalassemia occurs despite increased eNOS expression and preserved vascular smooth muscle cell reactivity to NO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekatherina Stoyanova

    Full Text Available AIMS: The hereditary β-thalassemia major condition requires regular lifelong blood transfusions. Transfusion-related iron overloading has been associated with the onset of cardiovascular complications, including cardiac dysfunction and vascular anomalies. By using an untransfused murine model of β-thalassemia major, we tested the hypothesis that vascular endothelial dysfunction, alterations of arterial structure and of its mechanical properties would occur despite the absence of treatments. METHODS AND RESULTS: Vascular function and structure were evaluated ex vivo. Compared to the controls, endothelium-dependent vasodilation with acetylcholine was blunted in mesenteric resistance arteries of β-thalassemic mice while the endothelium-independent vasodilator (sodium nitroprusside produced comparable vessel dilation, indicating endothelial cell impairment with preserved smooth muscle cell reactivity to nitric oxide (NO. While these findings suggest a decrease in NO bioavailability, Western blotting showed heightened expression of aortic endothelial NO synthase (eNOS in β-thalassemia. Vascular remodeling of the common carotid arteries revealed increased medial elastin content. Under isobaric conditions, the carotid arteries of β-thalassemic mice exhibited decreased wall stress and softening due to structural changes of the vessel wall. CONCLUSIONS: A complex vasculopathy was identified in untransfused β-thalassemic mice characterized by altered carotid artery structure and endothelial dysfunction of resistance arterioles, likely attributable to reduced NO bioavailability despite enhanced vascular eNOS expression.

  19. Diffuse and uncontrolled vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in rapidly progressing pediatric moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Amy J; Bhattacharjee, Meenakshi B; Regalado, Ellen S; Milewicz, Allen L; El-Hakam, Lisa M; Dauser, Robert C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2010-09-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare stroke syndrome of unknown etiology resulting from stenosis or occlusion of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) in association with an abnormal vascular network in the basal ganglia. Although the highest incidence of moyamoya disease is in pediatric patients, pathology reports have been primarily limited to adult samples and describe occlusive fibrocellular lesions in the intimae of affected arteries. We describe the case of a young girl with primary moyamoya disease who presented at 18 months of age with right hemiparesis following an ischemic stroke. Angiography showed stenosis of the distal left ICA, left middle cerebral artery, and right ICA. An emergent left-sided dural inversion was performed. Recurrent strokes and alternating hemiplegia necessitated a right dural inversion 6 months later. Nonetheless, her aggressive disease proved uniquely refractory to surgical revascularization, and she succumbed to recurrent strokes and neurological deterioration at 2.5 years of age. Pathological specimens revealed a striking bilateral occlusion of the anterior carotid circulation resulting from intimal proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Most strikingly, the ascending aorta and the superior mesenteric artery demonstrated similar intimal proliferation, along with SMC proliferation in the media. The systemic pathology involving multiple arteries in this extremely young child, the first case of its kind available for autopsy, suggests that globally uncontrolled SMC proliferation, in the absence of environmental risk factors and likely resulting from an underlying genetic alteration, may be a primary etiologic event leading to moyamoya disease.

  20. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide induces vascular relaxation and inhibits non-vascular smooth muscle activity in the rabbit female genital tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenstrup, B R; Ottesen, B; Jørgensen, M;

    1994-01-01

    In vitro effects of two bioactive forms of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP): PACAP-38 and PACAP-27 were studied on rabbit vascular and non-vascular smooth muscle. Segments of the ovarian artery and muscle strips from the fallopian tube were used. Two series of experiments...... with PACAP-38 (10(-7) M), PACAP-27 (10(-7) M) or VIP (10(-7) M). The effect of PACAP-38, PACAP-27 and VIP (10(-10)-10(-6) M) was investigated on spontaneously contracting smooth muscle of the fallopian tube. Longitudinally as well as transversally cut specimens were investigated. PACAP-38 produced...... in the low-dose interval was observed. The peptides caused a significant, dose-dependent inhibition of both frequency and amplitude on the fallopian tube smooth muscle activity. The effects of the three peptides on longitudinally as well as transversally cut specimens were alike....

  1. Propylthiouracil, independent of its antithyroid effect, promotes vascular smooth muscle cells differentiation via PTEN induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Jan; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Lin, Kwang-Huei; Lee, Dany-Young; Hsu, Lung-An; Kuo, Chi-Tai

    2010-01-01

    Propylthiouracil (PTU), independent of its antithyroid effect, is recently found to have an antiatherosclerotic effect. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of PTU on phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), as phenotypic modulation may contribute to the growth of atherosclerotic lesions and neointimal formation after arterial injury. Propylthiouracil reduced neointimal formation in balloon-injured rat carotid arteries. In vitro, PTU may convert VSMCs from a serum-induced dedifferentiation state to a differentiated state, as indicated by a spindle-shaped morphology and an increase in the expression of SMC differentiation marker contractile proteins, including calponin and smooth muscle (SM)-myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC). Transient transfection studies in VSMCs demonstrated that PTU induced the activity of SMC marker genes (calponin and SM-MHC) promoters, indicating that PTU up-regulates these genes expression predominantly at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, PTU enhanced the expression of PTEN and inhibition of PTEN by siRNA knockdown blocked PTU-induced activation of contractile proteins expression and promoter activity. In the rat carotid injury model, PTU reversed the down-regulation of contractile proteins and up-regulated PTEN in the neointima induced by balloon injury. Propylthiouracil promotes VSMC differentiation, at lest in part, via induction of the PTEN-mediated pathway. These findings suggest a possible mechanism by which PTU may contribute to its beneficial effects on atherogenesis and neointimal formation after arterial injury.

  2. Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine Modulates Molecular Arterial Homeostasis of Human Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Geng-Fan; Zhu, Shao-Wei; Zhu, Shu-Gan; Li, Feng; Wang, Yun-Yan

    2016-12-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is widely expressed in the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of human intracranial aneurysms (IAs), but the effect and underlying mechanism of SPARC on VSMCs during the formation and progression of IAs needs to be probed. Human umbilical arterial smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) were treated with a gradient concentrations of SPARC in vitro for different time. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, cell cycle, and cell apoptosis were used to investigate the effect of SPARC on HUASMCs. After exposure to 2 and 4 μg/ml SPARC, cell viability were 89.3 ± 2.00 %, and 87.57 ± 2.17 % (P IAs.

  3. Multiple vascular anomalies involving testicular, suprarenal arteries and lumbar veins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Jyothsna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Testicular arteries arise from the abdominal aorta and the inferior suprarenal artery from the renal artery. There are reports about variant origin and course of these arteries. Accessory testicular artery is also a common finding but its providing origin to inferior suprarenal artery is an important observation. During a routine dissection of abdomen of approximately 55-year-old male cadaver, unique vascular abnormality was observed. On the left side, a common arterial trunk originating from abdominal aorta immediately branched to give rise to superior testicular and inferior suprarenal arteries, the former after a short course hooked by the left suprarenal vein. In addition, the left suprarenal vein, second left lumbar vein, and left testicular vein joined to form a common trunk which drained into the left renal vein. A sound knowledge of vascular variations in relation to the kidney and suprarenal gland is important to surgeons dissecting the abdominal cavity.

  4. Arterial vascularization patterns of the splenium: An anatomical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahilogullari, G; Comert, A; Ozdemir, M; Brohi, R A; Ozgural, O; Esmer, A F; Egemen, N; Karahan, S T

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to provide detailed information about the arterial vascularization of the splenium of the corpus callosum (CC). The splenium is unique in that it is part of the largest commissural tract in the brain and a region in which pathologies are seen frequently. An exact description of the arterial vascularization of this part of the CC remains under debate. Thirty adult human brains (60 hemispheres) were obtained from routine autopsies. Cerebral arteries were separately cannulated and injected with colored latex. Then, the brains were fixed in formaldehyde, and dissections were performed using a surgical microscope. The diameter of the arterial branches supplying the splenium of the CC at their origin was investigated, and the vascularization patterns of these branches were observed. Vascular supply to the splenium was provided by the anterior pericallosal artery (40%) from the anterior circulation and by the posterior pericallosal artery (88%) and posterior accessory pericallosal artery (50%) from the posterior circulation. The vascularization pattern of the splenium differs in each hemisphere and is usually supplied by multiple branches. The arterial vascularization of the splenium of the CC was studied comprehensively considering the ongoing debate and the inadequacy of the studies on this issue currently available in the literature. This anatomical knowledge is essential during the treatment of pathologies in this region and especially for splenial arteriovenous malformations.

  5. G12-G13-LARG-mediated signaling in vascular smooth muscle is required for salt-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Angela; Benyó, Zoltán; Lukasova, Martina; Leutgeb, Barbara; Wettschureck, Nina; Gorbey, Stefan; Orsy, Petra; Horváth, Béla; Maser-Gluth, Christiane; Greiner, Erich; Lemmer, Björn; Schütz, Günther; Gutkind, J Silvio; Offermanns, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The tone of vascular smooth muscle cells is a primary determinant of the total peripheral vascular resistance and hence the arterial blood pressure. Most forms of hypertension ultimately result from an increased vascular tone that leads to an elevated total peripheral resistance. Regulation of vascular resistance under normotensive and hypertensive conditions involves multiple mediators, many of which act through G protein-coupled receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells. Receptors that mediate vasoconstriction couple with the G-proteins G(q)-G11 and G12-G13 to stimulate phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) via the Ca2+/MLC kinase- and Rho/Rho kinase-mediated signaling pathways, respectively. Using genetically altered mouse models that allow for the acute abrogation of both signaling pathways by inducible Cre/loxP-mediated mutagenesis in smooth muscle cells, we show that G(q)-G11-mediated signaling in smooth muscle cells is required for maintenance of basal blood pressure and for the development of salt-induced hypertension. In contrast, lack of G12-G13, as well as of their major effector, the leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG), did not alter normal blood pressure regulation but did block the development of salt-induced hypertension. This identifies the G12-G13-LARG-mediated signaling pathway as a new target for antihypertensive therapies that would be expected to leave normal blood pressure regulation unaffected.

  6. Opioid receptor antagonists increase [Ca2+]i in rat arterial smooth muscle cells in hemorrhagic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li KAI; Zhong-feng WANG; Yu-liang SHI; Liang-ming LIU; De-yao HU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of opioid receptor antagonists and norepinephrine on intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in mesenteric arterial (MA) smooth muscle cells (SMC) isolated from normal and hemorrhagic shocked rats in the vascular hyporesponse stage. METHODS: The rat model of hemorrhagic shock was made by withdrawing blood to decrease the artery mean blood pressure to 3.73-4.26 kPa and keeping at the level for 3 h.[Ca2+]i of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) were detected by the laser scan confocal microscopy. RESULTS:In the hyporesponse VMSC of rats in hemorrhagic shock, selective δ-, κ-, and μ-opioid receptor antagonists (naltrindole, nor-binaltorphimine, and β-funaltrexamine, 100 nmol/L) as well as norepinephrine 5 μmol/L significantly increased [Ca2+]i by 47 %±13 %, 37 %±14 %, 33 %±10 %, and 54 %±17 %, respectively, although their effects were lower than those in the normal rat cells (the increased values were 148 %±54 %, 130 %±44 %, 63 %±17 %and 110 %±38 %, respectively); and the norepinephrine-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was further augmented by three δ-, κ-, and μ-opioid receptor antagonists (50 nmol/L, respectively) application (from 52 %± 16 % to 99 %±29 %,146 %±54 % and 137 %±47 %, respectively). CONCLUSION: The disorder of [Ca2+]i regulation induced by hemorrhagic shock was mediated by opioid receptor and α-adrenoceptor, which may be partly responsible for the vascular hyporesponse, and the opioid receptor antagonists improved the response of resistance arteries to vascular stimulants in decompensatory stage of hemorrhagic shock.

  7. Structural properties of lipid reconstructs and lipid composition of normotensive and hypertensive rat vascular smooth muscle cell membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.R. Oliveira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple cell membrane alterations have been reported to be the cause of various forms of hypertension. The present study focuses on the lipid portion of the membranes, characterizing the microviscosity of membranes reconstituted with lipids extracted from the aorta and mesenteric arteries of spontaneously hypertensive (SHR and normotensive control rat strains (WKY and NWR. Membrane-incorporated phospholipid spin labels were used to monitor the bilayer structure at different depths. The packing of lipids extracted from both aorta and mesenteric arteries of normotensive and hypertensive rats was similar. Lipid extract analysis showed similar phospholipid composition for all membranes. However, cholesterol content was lower in SHR arteries than in normotensive animal arteries. These findings contrast with the fact that the SHR aorta is hyporeactive while the SHR mesenteric artery is hyperreactive to vasopressor agents when compared to the vessels of normotensive animal strains. Hence, factors other than microviscosity of bulk lipids contribute to the vascular smooth muscle reactivity and hypertension of SHR. The excess cholesterol in the arteries of normotensive animal strains apparently is not dissolved in bulk lipids and is not directly related to vascular reactivity since it is present in both the aorta and mesenteric arteries. The lower cholesterol concentrations in SHR arteries may in fact result from metabolic differences due to the hypertensive state or to genes that co-segregate with those that determine hypertension during the process of strain selection.

  8. Activity of sap from Croton lechleri on rat vascular and gastric smooth muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froldi, G; Zagotto, G; Filippini, R; Montopoli, M; Dorigo, P; Caparrotta, L

    2009-08-01

    The effects of red sap from Croton lechleri (SdD), Euphorbiaceae, on vascular and gastric smooth muscles were investigated. SdD, from 10 to 1000 microg/ml, induced concentration-dependent vasoconstriction in rat caudal arteries, which was endothelium-independent. In arterial preparations pre-constricted by phenylephrine (0.1 microM) or KCl (30 mM), SdD also produced concentration-dependent vasoconstriction. To study the mechanisms implicated in this effect we used selective inhibitors such as prazosin (0.1 microM), an antagonist of alpha(1)-adrenoceptors, atropine (0.1 microM), an antagonist of muscarinic receptors, and ritanserin (50 nM), a 5-HT(2A) antagonist; none of these influenced vasoconstriction caused by SdD. Likewise, nifedipine (50 nM), an inhibitor of L-type calcium channels, did not modify the action of SdD. Capsaicin (100 nM), an agonist of vanilloid receptors, also did not affect vasoconstriction by SdD. We also investigated the action of SdD (10-1000 microg/ml) on rat gastric fundus; per se the sap slightly increased contractile tension. When the gastric fundus was pre-treated with SdD (100 microg/ml) the contraction induced by carbachol (1 microM) was increased, whereas that by KCl (60mM) or capsaicin (100 nM) were unchanged. The data shows that SdD increased contractile tension in a concentration-dependent way, both on vascular and gastric smooth muscles. The vasoconstriction is unrelated to alpha(1), M, 5-HT(2A) and vanilloid receptors as well as L-type calcium channels. SdD increased also contraction by carbachol on rat gastric fundus. Thus for the first time, experimental data provides evidence that sap from C. lechleri owns constricting activity on smooth muscles.

  9. Differential effects of fatty acids on glycolysis and glycogen metabolism in vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, J T; Kopp, S J; Tow, J P; Parrillo, J E

    1991-07-10

    The effects of fatty acids of different chain lengths on aerobic glycolysis, lactic acid production, glycogen metabolism and contractile function of vascular smooth muscle were investigated. Porcine carotid artery segments were treated with 50 microM iodoacetate and perchloric acid tissue extracts were then analyzed by 31P-NMR spectroscopy to observe the accumulation of phosphorylated glycolytic intermediates so that the activity of the Embden-Myerhof pathway could be tracked under various experimental paradigms. Aerobic glycolysis and lactate production in resting arteries were almost completely inhibited with 0.5 mM octanoate, partially inhibited with 0.5 mM acetate and unaffected by 0.5 mM palmitate. Inhibition of glycolysis by octanoate was not attributable to inhibition of glucose uptake or glucose phosphorylation. Basal glycogen synthesis was unchanged with palmitate and acetate, but was inhibited by 52% with octanoate incubation. The characteristic glycogenolysis which occurs upon isometric contraction with 80 mM KCl in the absence of fatty acid in the medium was not demonstrable in the presence of any of the fatty acids tested. Glycogen sparing was also demonstrable in norepinephrine contractions with octanoate and acetate, but not with palmitate. Additionally, norepinephrine-stimulated isometric contraction was associated with enhanced synthesis of glycogen amounting to 6-times the basal rate in medium containing octanoate. Contractile responses to norepinephrine were attenuated by 20% in media containing fatty acids. Thus, fatty acids significantly alter metabolism and contractility of vascular smooth muscle. Fatty acids of different chain lengths affect smooth muscle differentially; the pattern of substrate utilization during contraction depends on the contractile agonist and the fatty acid present in the medium.

  10. Monocyte-expressed urokinase regulates human vascular smooth muscle cell migration in a coculture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusch, Angelika; Tkachuk, Sergey; Lutter, Steffen; Haller, Hermann; Dietz, Rainer; Lipp, Martin; Dumler, Inna

    2002-01-01

    Interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) with monocytes recruited to the arterial wall at a site of injury, with resultant modulation of VSMC growth and migration, are central to the development of vascular intimal thickening. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expressed by monocytes is a potent chemotactic factor for VSMC and might serve for the acceleration of vascular remodeling. In this report, we demonstrate that coculture of human VSMC with freshly isolated peripheral blood-derived human monocytes results in significant VSMC migration that increases during the coculture period. Accordingly, VSMC adhesion was inhibited with similar kinetics. VSMC proliferation, however, was not affected and remained at the same basal level during the whole period of coculture. The increase of VSMC migration in coculture was equivalent to the uPA-induced migration of monocultured VSMC and was blocked by addition into coculture of soluble uPAR (suPAR). Analysis of uPA and uPAR expression in cocultured cells demonstrated that monocytes are a major source of uPA, whose expression increases in coculture five-fold, whereas VSMC display an increased expression of cell surface-associated uPAR. These findings indicate that upregulated uPA production by monocytes following vascular injury acts most likely as an endogenous activator of VSMC migration contributing to the remodeling of vessel walls.

  11. Activation of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor induces endothelium-independent relaxation of coronary artery smooth muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuan; Ma, Handong; Barman, Scott A.; Liu, Alexander T.; Sellers, Minga; Stallone, John N.; Prossnitz, Eric R.; White, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogens can either relax or contract arteries via rapid, nongenomic mechanisms involving classic estrogen receptors (ER). In addition to ERα and ERβ, estrogen may also stimulate G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER) in nonvascular tissue; however, a potential role for GPER in coronary arteries is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine how GPER activity influenced coronary artery reactivity. In vitro isometric force recordings were performed on endothelium-denuded porcine arteries. These studies were augmented by RT-PCR and single-cell patch-clamp experiments. RT-PCR and immunoblot studies confirmed expression of GPER mRNA and protein, respectively, in smooth muscle from either porcine or human coronary arteries. G-1, a selective GPER agonist, produced a concentration-dependent relaxation of endothelium-denuded porcine coronary arteries in vitro. This response was attenuated by G15, a GPER-selective antagonist, or by inhibiting large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channels with iberiotoxin, but not by inhibiting NO signaling. Last, single-channel patch-clamp studies demonstrated that G-1 stimulates BKCa channel activity in intact smooth muscle cells from either porcine or human coronary arteries but had no effect on channels isolated in excised membrane patches. In summary, GPER activation relaxes coronary artery smooth muscle by increasing potassium efflux via BKCa channels and requires an intact cellular signaling mechanism. This novel action of estrogen-like compounds may help clarify some of the controversy surrounding the vascular effects of estrogens. PMID:21791623

  12. Vascular smooth muscle G(q) signaling is involved in high blood pressure in both induced renal and genetic vascular smooth muscle-derived models of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, David M; Cohn, Heather I; Pesant, Stéphanie; Zhou, Rui-Hai; Eckhart, Andrea D

    2007-11-01

    More than 30% of the US population has high blood pressure (BP), and less than a third of people treated for hypertension have it controlled. In addition, the etiology of most high BP is not known. Having a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying hypertension could potentially increase the effectiveness of treatment. Because G(q) signaling mediates vasoconstriction and vascular function can cause BP abnormalities, we were interested in determining the role of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) G(q) signaling in two divergent models of hypertension: a renovascular model of hypertension through renal artery stenosis and a genetic model of hypertension using mice with VSM-derived high BP. Inhibition of VSM G(q) signaling attenuated BP increases induced by renal artery stenosis to a similar extent as losartan, an ANG II receptor blocker and current antihypertensive therapy. Inhibition of G(q) signaling also attenuated high BP in our genetic VSM-derived hypertensive model. In contrast, BP remained elevated 25% following treatment with losartan, and prazosin, an alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, only decreased BP by 35%. Inhibition of G(q) signaling attenuated VSM reactivity to ANG II and resulted in a 2.4-fold rightward shift in EC(50). We also determined that inhibition of G(q) signaling was able to reverse VSM hypertrophy in the genetic VSM-derived hypertensive model. These results suggest that G(q) signaling is an important signaling pathway in two divergent models of hypertension and, perhaps, optimization of antihypertensive therapy could occur with the identification of particular G(q)-coupled receptors involved.

  13. Notch2 and Notch3 Function Together to Regulate Vascular Smooth Muscle Development

    OpenAIRE

    Qingqing Wang; Ning Zhao; Simone Kennard; Brenda Lilly

    2012-01-01

    Notch signaling has been implicated in the regulation of smooth muscle differentiation, but the precise role of Notch receptors is ill defined. Although Notch3 receptor expression is high in smooth muscle, Notch3 mutant mice are viable and display only mild defects in vascular patterning and smooth muscle differentiation. Notch2 is also expressed in smooth muscle and Notch2 mutant mice show cardiovascular abnormalities indicative of smooth muscle defects. Together, these findings infer that N...

  14. Advanced Glycation End-Products Induce Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells: A Mechanism for Vascular Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayo Koike

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification, especially medial artery calcification, is associated with cardiovascular death in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD. To determine the underlying mechanism of vascular calcification, we have demonstrated in our previous report that advanced glycation end-products (AGEs stimulated calcium deposition in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs through excessive oxidative stress and phenotypic transition into osteoblastic cells. Since AGEs can induce apoptosis, in this study we investigated its role on VSMC apoptosis, focusing mainly on the underlying mechanisms. A rat VSMC line (A7r5 was cultured, and treated with glycolaldehyde-derived AGE-bovine serum albumin (AGE3-BSA. Apoptotic cells were identified by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL staining. To quantify apoptosis, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for histone-complexed DNA fragments was employed. Real-time PCR was performed to determine the mRNA levels. Treatment of A7r5 cells with AGE3-BSA from 100 µg/mL concentration markedly increased apoptosis, which was suppressed by Nox inhibitors. AGE3-BSA significantly increased the mRNA expression of NAD(PH oxidase components including Nox4 and p22phox, and these findings were confirmed by protein levels using immunofluorescence. Dihydroethidisum assay showed that compared with cBSA, AGE3-BSA increased reactive oxygen species level in A7r5 cells. Furthermore, AGE3-induced apoptosis was significantly inhibited by siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nox4 or p22phox. Double knockdown of Nox4 and p22phox showed a similar inhibitory effect on apoptosis as single gene silencing. Thus, our results demonstrated that NAD(PH oxidase-derived oxidative stress are involved in AGEs-induced apoptosis of VSMCs. These findings might be important to understand the pathogenesis of vascular calcification in diabetes and CKD.

  15. Insulin induces PKC-dependent proliferation of mesenteric vascular smooth muscle cells from hypertensive patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xukai WANG; Yan WANG; Chenming YANG; Ying WAN; Xianwen JI

    2006-01-01

    Background and objectives Proliferation of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) induced by hyperinsulinemia is a very common clinical pathology. Extensive research has focused on PKC (Protein kinase C)-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)intracellular signal transduction and the phenotypic modulation accompanied by reorganization of intracellular F-actins in VSMCs.Methods DNA synthesis, signaling of ERK1/2 MAPKs, and changes in α-smooth muscle (SM) actin and F-actin were studied in hypertensive and normotensive human arterial VSMCs exposed to insulin and PMA with and without the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X.Results Differences among cell types in MAPK signaling, α-SM actin, and F-actin isoforms in VSMCs harvested from the arteries of patients with essential hypertension (EH) and normotension (NT) were identified in response to insulin treatment. Proliferation and activation of MAPK were more pronounced in EH VSMCs than in NEH VSMCs. Insulin exposure decreased expression of α-SM actin and was accompanied by rearrangement of intracellular F-actins in VSMCs, especially in the EH group. These effects were reversed by treatment with the PKC inhibitor. Conclusions Human mesenteric VSMCs of EH and NT patients differed in proliferation, MAPK signaling, and degree of changes in α-SM actin and F-actin isoforms immediately following insulin exposure in vitro.

  16. Influence of constriction, wall tension, smooth muscle activation and cellular deformation on rat resistance artery vasodilator reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, Ilsley; Mandalà, Maurizio; Morton, Jude; Davidge, Sandra T; Osol, George

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how vasoconstriction (tone), wall tension, smooth muscle activation, and vascular wall deformation influence resistance artery vasodilator reactivity. Resistance arteries, from two different regional circulations (splanchnic, uterine) and from pregnant and non-pregnant rats, were cannulated and pressurized, or mounted on a wire myograph under isometric conditions prior to being exposed to both endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) vasodilator agonists. A consistent pattern of reduced vasodilator sensitivity was noted as a function of extent of preconstriction for both agonists noted in pressurized arteries. A similar pattern regarding activation was noted in wire-mounted arteries in response to SNP but not ACh. Wall tension proved to be a major determinant of vascular smooth muscle vasodilator reactivity and its normalization reversed this pattern, as more constricted vessels were more sensitive to ACh relaxation without any change in SNP sensitivity, suggesting that endothelial deformation secondary to vasoconstriction augments its vasodilator output. To our knowledge, this is the first study to dissect out the complex interplay between biophysical forces impinging on VSM (pressure, wall tension), the ambient level of tone (vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell activation), and consequences of cellular (particularly endothelial) deformation secondary to constriction in determining resistance artery vasodilatory reactivity.

  17. Exploring Arterial Smooth Muscle Kv7 Potassium Channel Function using Patch Clamp Electrophysiology and Pressure Myography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueggemann, Lioubov I.; Mani, Bharath K.; Haick, Jennifer; Byron, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    Contraction or relaxation of smooth muscle cells within the walls of resistance arteries determines the artery diameter and thereby controls flow of blood through the vessel and contributes to systemic blood pressure. The contraction process is regulated primarily by cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]cyt), which is in turn controlled by a variety of ion transporters and channels. Ion channels are common intermediates in signal transduction pathways activated by vasoactive hormones to effect vasoconstriction or vasodilation. And ion channels are often targeted by therapeutic agents either intentionally (e.g. calcium channel blockers used to induce vasodilation and lower blood pressure) or unintentionally (e.g. to induce unwanted cardiovascular side effects). Kv7 (KCNQ) voltage-activated potassium channels have recently been implicated as important physiological and therapeutic targets for regulation of smooth muscle contraction. To elucidate the specific roles of Kv7 channels in both physiological signal transduction and in the actions of therapeutic agents, we need to study how their activity is modulated at the cellular level as well as evaluate their contribution in the context of the intact artery. The rat mesenteric arteries provide a useful model system. The arteries can be easily dissected, cleaned of connective tissue, and used to prepare isolated arterial myocytes for patch clamp electrophysiology, or cannulated and pressurized for measurements of vasoconstrictor/vasodilator responses under relatively physiological conditions. Here we describe the methods used for both types of measurements and provide some examples of how the experimental design can be integrated to provide a clearer understanding of the roles of these ion channels in the regulation of vascular tone. PMID:23007713

  18. Interaction between human monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells induces vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Maeda, Y; Takahashi, M; Takizawa, T; Okada, M; Funayama, H; Shimada, K

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether synthesis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a major mitogen for vascular endothelial cells, was induced by a cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human VSMCs and THP-1 cells (human monocytoid cell) were cocultured. VEGF levels in the coculture medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Northern blot analysis of VEGF mRNA was performed using a specific cDNA probe. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine which types of cell produce VEGF. Adding THP-1 cells to VSMCs for 24 h increased VEGF levels of the culture media, 8- and 10-fold relative to those of THP-1 cells and VSMCs alone, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that VEGF mRNA expression was induced in the cocultured cells and peaked after 12 h. Immunohistochemistry disclosed that both types of cell in the coculture produced VEGF. Separate coculture experiments revealed that both direct contact and a soluble factor(s) contributed to VEGF production. Neutralizing anti-interleukin (IL)-6 antibody inhibited VEGF production by the coculture of THP-1 cells and VSMCs. A cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and VSMCs induced VEGF synthesis in both types of cell. An IL-6 mediated mechanism is at least partially involved in VEGF production by the cocultures. Local VEGF production induced by a monocyte-VSMC interaction may play an important role in atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling.

  19. Anti-Proliferative Effect of an Aqueous Extract of Prunella vulgaris in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Mi Hwang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs in arterial walls is an important pathogenic factor of vascular disorders such as diabetic atherosclerosis. We have reported the anti-inflammatory effect of an aqueous extract from Prunella vulgaris (APV in vascular endothelial cell. In the present study, APV exhibited inhibitory effects on high glucose-stimulated VSMC proliferation, migration, and invasion activities, inducing G1 cell cycle arrest with downregulation of cyclins and CDKs and upregulation of the CKIs, p21waf1/cip1 and p27kip1. Furthermore, APV dose dependently suppressed the high glucose-induced matrix metalloproteinase activity. High glucose-induced phosphorylation of ERK, p38 MAPK, was decreased by the pretreatment of APV. NF-κB activation by high glucose was attenuated by APV, as an antioxidant. APV attenuated the high glucose-induced decrease of nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2 translocation and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 expression. Intracellular cGMP level was also increased by APV treatment. These results demonstrate that APV may inhibit VSMC proliferation via downregulating ROS/NF-κB /ERK/p38 MAPK pathways. In addition, APV has a beneficial effect by the interaction of Nrf2-mediated NO/cGMP with HO-1, suggesting that Prunella vulgaris may be useful in preventing diabetic atherosclerosis.

  20. Effects of ginsenosides on vascular reactivity in rat cerebral and renal arteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WONG Wing-tak; LEUNG Fung-ping; YUNG Lai-hang; TIAN Xiao-yu; WONG Ricky Ngok Shun; HUANG Yu

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate possible mechanisms underlying the antioxidant property (1) and the in vitro vasodilator effects (2) of the two ginsenosides, Rb1 and Rg1, in isolated rat renal and cerebral arteries. Methods Arterial rings were mounted in a multi-channel myograph for recording of isometric tension. To examine the antioxidant activity, some rings were exposed to a free radical-generating reaction (hypoxan-thine and xanthine oxidase) with and without pre-treatment with ginsenosides. The calcium antagonistic effects were tested on rings contracted by membrane depolarization in elevated extracellular potassium ions, a condition that promoted Ca2+ influx in vascular smooth muscle cells. Results Ginsenosides protected endothelial function (endothelial nitric oxide-dependent relaxation) against oxidative stress; (2) ginsenoside Rb1 reduced the high K+ -induced contractions of both renal and cerebral arteries while ginsenoside Rgl relaxed the rat cerebral artery but not the renal artery. Conclusions Ginsenosides are vaso-protective via (1) the antioxidant activity which protects endothelial cell function and (2) the inhibition of Ca2+ influx through voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels in vascular smooth muscle. The vasodilator effects may suggest the potential preventive or therapeutic values of ginsenosides against stroke and renal hypertension.

  1. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viitanen, Matti [Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Geriatrics, Turku City Hospital and University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Sundström, Erik [Division of Neurodegeneration, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Baumann, Marc [Protein Chemistry Unit, Institute of Biomedicine/Anatomy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Poyhonen, Minna [Department of Clinical Genetics, Helsinki University Hospital, HUSLAB, Helsinki (Finland); Tikka, Saara [Protein Chemistry Unit, Institute of Biomedicine/Anatomy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Behbahani, Homira, E-mail: homira.behbahani@ki.se [Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology. -- Highlights: ► CADASIL is an inherited disease of cerebral vascular cells. ► Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CADASIL. ► Lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC. ► Increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria and lower mitochondrial membrane potential in CADASIL VSMCs. ► Reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs.

  2. Kindlin-2 siRNA inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, migration and intimal hyperplasia via Wnt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaolin; Liu, Wenwei; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Jing; Wang, Jichun; Zhu, Rui; Li, Bin

    2016-02-01

    It is known that vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration leads to intimal hyperplasia in cases of atherosclerosis and restenosis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of kindlin-2 on VSMC proliferation, migration and intimal hyperplasia, and the underlying mechanisms. The left common carotid artery of Sprague‑Dawley rats were subjected to balloon injury in order to induce intimal hyperplasia, and then transfected with kindlin-2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) lentivirus or negative control siRNA lentivirus. We noted that the degree of intimal hyperplasia 4 weeks after balloon injury was significantly reduced in arteries transfected with kindlin-2 siRNA lentivirus (Phyperplasia via Wnt signaling. Therefore, blocking the activity of kindlin-2 represents a novel therapeutic strategy for vascular injury.

  3. Influence of Carbon Monoxide on Growth and Apoptosis of Human Umbilical Artery Smooth Muscle Cells and Vein Endothelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a vasoactive molecule that is generated by vascular cells as a byproduct of heme catabolism and it plays an important physiological role in circulation system. In order to investigate whether exogenous CO can mediate the growth and proliferation of vascular cells, in this study, we used 250 parts per million (ppm) of CO to treat human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell (hUASMC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HuVEC) and further evaluated the growth and apop...

  4. Calcification of human vascular smooth muscle cells: associations with osteoprotegerin expression and acceleration by high-dose insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Ping; Knudsen, Kirsten Quyen Nguyen; Wogensen, Lise

    2007-01-01

    Arterial medial calcifications occur often in diabetic individuals as part of the diabetic macroangiopathy. The pathogenesis is unknown, but the presence of calcifications predicts risk of cardiovascular events. We examined the effects of insulin on calcifying smooth muscle cells in vitro...... and measured the expression of the bone-related molecule osteoprotegerin (OPG). Human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were grown from aorta from kidney donors. Induction of calcification was performed with beta-glycerophosphate. The influence of insulin (200 microU/ml or 1,000 microU/ml) on calcification...... calcification in human smooth muscle cells from a series of donors after variable time in culture. Decreased OPG amounts were observed from the cells during the accelerated calcification phase. High dose of insulin (1,000 microU/ml) accelerated the calcification, whereas lower concentrations (200 microU/ml) did...

  5. Quantification of Adventitial Vasa Vasorum Vascularization in Double-injury Restenotic Arteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Ye; Bai-Gen Zhang; Lan Zhang; Hui Xie; Hao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Accumulating evidence indicates a potential role of adventitial vasa vasorum (VV) dysfunction in the pathophysiology of restenosis.However,characterization ofVV vascularization in restenotic arteries with primary lesions is still missing.In this study,we quantitatively evaluated the response of adventitial VV to vascular injury resulting from balloon angioplasty in diseased arteries.Methods:Primary atherosclerotic-like lesions were induced by the placement of an absorbable thread surrounding the carotid artery of New Zealand rabbits.Four weeks following double-injury induced that was induced by secondary balloon dilation,three-dimensional patterns of adventitial VV were reconstructed;the number,density,and endothelial surface of VV were quantified using micro-computed tomography.Histology and immunohistochemistry were performed in order to examine the development of intimal hyperplasia.Results:Results from our study suggest that double injured arteries have a greater number of VV,increased luminal surface,and an elevation in the intima/media ratio (I/M),along with an accumulation ofmacrophages and smooth muscle cells in the intima,as compared to sham or single injury arteries.I/M and the number of VV were positively correlated (R2 =0.82,P < 0.001).Conclusions:Extensive adventitial VV neovascularization occurs in injured arteries after balloon angioplasty,which is associated with intimal hyperplasia.Quantitative assessment of adventitial VV response may provide insight into the basic biological process of postangioplasty restenosis.

  6. [Arterial vascularization of the triceps sural muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairesse, J L; Mestdagh, H; Procyk, S; Depreux, R

    1984-01-01

    The triceps surae muscle, the dorsal and medial leg skin constitute a very important reserve of muscular and myocutaneous flaps. The material on which the study was carried out consisted of 20 legs from standard cadavers. The superficialis femoral artery was injected with terebenthene and minimum mixture. The medial head of gastrocnemius is 23.3 em long, 6.9 cm wide, 1.25 mm thick at distal third. Its dominant blood supply is carried by the medialis gastrocnemius artery. It rises from popliteal artery 1.2 cm above the femoral tibial articulation with 1.9 mm diameter. It runs 3 cm down before entering muscle where it provides 2 or 3 mean branches. These branches give musculocutaneous arteries to the skin of the dorsal leg. The same study was performed for the lateral head of gastrocnemius and soleus. We studied also arteries of dorsomedial leg skin. The characteristics of long saphenous and short saphenous arteries were described. These muscles and dorsomedial leg skin can be used as muscular or myocutaneous flap for covering defects between the lower leg and the lower thigh.

  7. Inhibition of Rho protein stimulates iNOS expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniyappa, R; Xu, R; Ram, J L; Sowers, J R

    2000-06-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is upregulated in arterial injury and plays a role in regulating VSMC proliferation and restenosis. Inflammatory cytokines [e.g., interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)] released during vascular injury induce iNOS. Small GTP-binding proteins of the Ras superfamily play a major role in IL-1beta-dependent signaling pathways. In this study, we examined the role of Rho GTPases in regulating iNOS expression in VSMCs. Treatment of VSMCs with mevastatin, which inhibits isoprenylation of Rho and other small GTP-binding proteins, produced significantly higher amounts of IL-1beta-evoked NO and iNOS protein compared with control. Similarly, bacterial toxins [Toxin B from Clostridium difficile and C3 ADP-ribosyl transferase (C3) toxin from Clostridium botulinium] that specifically inactivate Rho proteins increased NOS products (NO and citrulline) and iNOS expression. Toxin B increased the activity of iNOS promoter-reporter construct in VSMCs. Both toxins enhanced IL-1beta-stimulated iNOS expression and NO production. These data demonstrate for the first time that inhibition of Rho induces iNOS and suggest a role for Rho protein in IL-1beta-stimulated NO production in VSMCs.

  8. Transdifferentiation of endothelial cells to smooth muscle cells play an important role in vascular remodelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll-Bonfill, Núria; Musri, Melina Mara; Ivo, Victor; Barberà, Joan Albert; Tura-Ceide, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary artery remodelling it is a major feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). It is characterised by cellular and structural changes of the pulmonary arteries causing higher pulmonar vascular resistance and right ventricular failure. Abnormal deposition of smooth muscle-like (SM-like) cells in normally non-muscular, small diameter vessels and a deregulated control of endothelial cells are considered pathological features of PH. The origin of the SM-like cells and the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of this remodelling process are not understood. Endothelial cells within the intima may migrate from their organised layer of cells and transition to mesenchymal or SM-like phenotype in a process called endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EnMT). Traditionally, Waddington’s epigenetic landscape illustrates that fates of somatic cells are progressively determined to compulsorily follow a downhill differentiation pathway. EnMT induces the transformation of cells with stem cell traits, therefore contrasting Waddington’s theory and confirming that cell fate seems to be far more flexible than previously thought. The prospect of therapeutic inhibition of EnMT to delay or prevent PH may represent a promising new treatment modality. PMID:25973327

  9. Transdifferentiation of endothelial cells to smooth muscle cells play an important role in vascular remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll-Bonfill, Núria; Musri, Melina Mara; Ivo, Victor; Barberà, Joan Albert; Tura-Ceide, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary artery remodelling it is a major feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH). It is characterised by cellular and structural changes of the pulmonary arteries causing higher pulmonar vascular resistance and right ventricular failure. Abnormal deposition of smooth muscle-like (SM-like) cells in normally non-muscular, small diameter vessels and a deregulated control of endothelial cells are considered pathological features of PH. The origin of the SM-like cells and the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of this remodelling process are not understood. Endothelial cells within the intima may migrate from their organised layer of cells and transition to mesenchymal or SM-like phenotype in a process called endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EnMT). Traditionally, Waddington's epigenetic landscape illustrates that fates of somatic cells are progressively determined to compulsorily follow a downhill differentiation pathway. EnMT induces the transformation of cells with stem cell traits, therefore contrasting Waddington's theory and confirming that cell fate seems to be far more flexible than previously thought. The prospect of therapeutic inhibition of EnMT to delay or prevent PH may represent a promising new treatment modality.

  10. Relaxant Effect of Daurinoline on Vascular Smooth Muscle of Isolated Rabbit Basilar Artery%蝙蝠葛诺林碱对家兔体外基底动脉血管平滑肌舒张作用的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈密; 崔海东; 郝素芳; 卢云; 郭莲军

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of daurinoline on basilar artery vascular smooth muscle. Methods The tension of isolated basilar artery ring of rabbit was measured. The effects of daurinoline on the basilar artery contracted by methoxamine,5-hydroxytryptamine(5-HT),KCl and Histamine( His)were also examined. Dose-response curves of 5-HT and KCl were observed as well. Results Daurinoline exerted obvious relaxation effect on the basilar artery vascular ring contracted by methoxamine,5-HT,KCl and His in a concentration-dependent manner. IC50 of daurinoline in methoxamine,5-HT,KCl and His-treated rabbits was 8.67×10-5,1.78×10-6,6.79×10-7 and 4.98×10-4 mol·L-1,respectively. The change of concentration-response curves of methoxamine,5-HT,KCl and His showed that daurinoline was a non-competitive antagonist. Conclusion Daurinoline exerts marked relaxation effect on basilar artery of rabbits through non-competitive antagonism. The mechanism of relaxation action may be related to blockage of voltage-dependent or receptor-dependent calcium channels.%目的:探讨蝙蝠葛诺林碱对家兔基底动脉血管平滑肌的舒张作用。方法制备家兔基底动脉血管环,采用半对数摩尔浓度累积给药方法,观察给予蝙蝠葛诺林碱对家兔基底动脉血管平滑肌的舒张作用。结果蝙蝠葛诺林碱对甲氧胺、5-羟色胺、氯化钾和组胺所致的家兔基底动脉收缩均有明显的扩张作用,最大舒张50%( IC50)浓度分别为8.67×10-5,1.78×10-6,6.79×10-7,4.98×10-4 mol·L-1。同时对甲氧胺、5-羟色胺、氯化钾和组胺所致量效曲线的影响,均显示为非竞争性拮抗作用。结论蝙蝠葛诺林碱通过非竞争性拮抗作用,能有效舒张家兔基底动脉血管平滑肌,改善脑循环。

  11. Heme oxygenase activity modulates vascular endothelial growth factor synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulak, Jozef; Józkowicz, Alicja; Foresti, Roberta; Kasza, Aneta; Frick, Matthias; Huk, Ihor; Green, Colin J; Pachinger, Otmar; Weidinger, Franz; Motterlini, Roberto

    2002-04-01

    Hypoxia, cytokines, and nitric oxide (NO) stimulate the generation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and induce heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in vascular tissue. HO-1 degrades heme to carbon monoxide (CO), iron, and biliverdin, the latter being reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. In the present study, we investigated the role of HO-1 in the modulation of VEGF synthesis in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In VSMC stimulated with cytokines, inhibition of NO production significantly, but not completely, reduced VEGF release. In contrast, inhibition of HO activity by tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPPIX) totally prevented cytokine-induced increase in VEGF, despite an augmented synthesis of intracellular NO. Stimulation of HO-1 activity by hemin enhanced VEGF production; this effect was abrogated by blockade of the HO pathway. Similarly, VEGF synthesis induced by hypoxia was down-regulated by SnPPIX, but not by inhibitors of NO synthase. To elucidate further a direct involvement of HO-1 in the observed effects, we generated transfected cells that overexpressed the HO-1 gene. Notably, these cells synthesized significantly more VEGF protein than cells transfected with a control gene. Among the products of HO-1, biliverdin and bilirubin showed no effect, whereas iron ions inhibited VEGF synthesis. Exposure of cells to 1% CO resulted in a marked accumulation of VEGF (20-fold increase) over the basal level. Our data indicate that HO-1 activity influences the generation of VEGF in VSMC in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. As CO and iron, respectively the inducer and the inhibitor of VEGF synthesis, are concomitantly produced during the degradation of heme, these data indicate that HO by-products may differentially modulate VEGF production.

  12. Control of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Growth by Connexin 43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintamani eJoshi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Connexin 43 (Cx43, the principal gap junction protein in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, regulates movement of ions and other signaling molecules through gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC and plays important roles in maintaining normal vessel function; however, many of the signaling mechanisms controlling Cx43 in VSMCs are not clearly described. The goal of this study was to investigate mechanisms of Cx43 regulation with respect to VSMC proliferation. Treatment of rat primary VSMCs with the cAMP analog 8Br-cAMP, the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 (BAY, or the Cx inducer diallyl disulfide (DADS significantly reduced proliferation after 72 h compared to vehicle controls. Bromodeoxyuridine uptake revealed reduction (p<.001 in DNA synthesis after 6 h and flow cytometry showed reduced (40% S phase cell numbers after 16 h in DADS-treated cells compared to controls. Cx43 expression significantly increased after 270 min treatment with 8Br-cAMP, 8Br-cGMP, BAY or DADS. Inhibition of PKA, PKG or PKC reversed 8Br-cAMP-stimulated increases in Cx43 expression, whereas only PKG or PKC inhibition reversed 8Br-cGMP- and BAY-stimulated increases in total Cx43. Interestingly, stimulation of Cx43 expression by DADS was not dependent on PKA, PKG or PKC. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, only 8Br-cAMP or DADS increased GJIC with 8Br-cAMP mediated by PKC and DADS mediated by PKG. Further, DADS significantly increased phosphorylation at the MAPK-sensitive serine (Ser255 and Ser279, the cell cycle regulatory kinase-sensitive Ser262 and the PKC-sensitive Ser368 after 30 min while 8Br-cAMP significantly increased phosphorylation only at Ser279 compared to controls. This study demonstrates that 8Br-cAMP- and DADS-enhanced GJIC rather than Cx43 expression and/or phosphorylation plays an important role in regulation of VSMC proliferation and provides new insights into the growth-regulatory capacities of Cx43 in VSMCs.

  13. The effects of TSH on human vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田利民

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of thyroid-stimulating hormone(TSH)on human vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells and to explore the roles of TSH in the development of atherosclerosis.Methods Human vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells were cultured in vitro.MTT method was used to assay the effect of TSH on cell viability.Real-time PCR was used

  14. An In Vitro Murine Model of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelynack, Kristen J; Holt, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is seen ubiquitously in aging blood vessels and prematurely in disease states like renal failure. It is thought to be driven by a number of systemic and local factors that lead to extra-osseous deposition of mineral in the vascular wall and valves as a common endpoint. The response of resident vascular smooth muscle cell to these dystrophic signals appears to be important in this process. Whilst in vivo models allow the observation of global changes in a pro-calcific environment, identifying the specific cells and mechanisms involved has been largely garnered from in vitro experiments, which provide added benefits in terms of reproducibility, cost, and convenience. Here we describe a 7-21 day cell culture model of calcification developed using immortalized murine vascular smooth muscle cells (MOVAS-1). This model provides a method by which vascular smooth muscle cell involvement and manipulation within a mineralizing domain can be studied.

  15. Effects of chronic renal failure rat serum on histone acetyltransferase p300 and activation of activating transcription factor 4 of arterial smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张耀全

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of the rat serum with chronic renal failure(CRF)on ubiquitin-proteasome pathway,histone acetyltransferase p300 and activation of activating transcription factor 4(ATF4)of rat arterial vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMCs)cultured in vitro,and explore the possible mechanism.Methods Objective To establish the rat model of

  16. Nuclear envelope proteins modulate proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells during cyclic stretch application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ying-Xin; Yao, Qing-Ping; Huang, Kai; Shi, Qian; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Guo-Liang; Han, Yue; Bao, Han; Wang, Lu; Li, Hai-Peng; Shen, Bao-Rong; Wang, Yingxiao; Chien, Shu; Jiang, Zong-Lai

    2016-05-10

    Cyclic stretch is an important inducer of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which is crucial in vascular remodeling during hypertension. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. We studied the effects of emerin and lamin A/C, two important nuclear envelope proteins, on VSMC proliferation in hypertension and the underlying mechano-mechanisms. In common carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo and in cultured cells subjected to high (15%) cyclic stretch in vitro, VSMC proliferation was increased significantly, and the expression of emerin and lamin A/C was repressed compared with normotensive or normal (5%) cyclic stretch controls. Using targeted siRNA to mimic the repressed expression of emerin or lamin A/C induced by 15% stretch, we found that VSMC proliferation was enhanced under static and 5%-stretch conditions. Overexpression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed VSMC proliferation induced by 15% stretch. Hence, emerin and lamin A/C play critical roles in suppressing VSMC hyperproliferation induced by hyperstretch. ChIP-on-chip and MOTIF analyses showed that the DNAs binding with emerin contain three transcription factor motifs: CCNGGA, CCMGCC, and ABTTCCG; DNAs binding with lamin A/C contain the motifs CVGGAA, GCCGCYGC, and DAAGAAA. Protein/DNA array proved that altered emerin or lamin A/C expression modulated the activation of various transcription factors. Furthermore, accelerating local expression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed cell proliferation in the carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo. Our findings establish the pathogenetic role of emerin and lamin A/C repression in stretch-induced VSMC proliferation and suggest mechanobiological mechanism underlying this process that involves the sequence-specific binding of emerin and lamin A/C to specific transcription factor motifs.

  17. Magnolol inhibits migration of vascular smooth muscle cells via cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karki, Rajendra [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City (United States); Department of Oriental Medicine Resources, Mokpo National University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong-Bin [Jeollanamdo Development Institute for Korean Traditional Medicine, Jangheung gun, Jeollanamdo (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Wook, E-mail: dbkim@mokpo.ac.kr [Department of Oriental Medicine Resources, Mokpo National University (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-10

    Background: Increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contribute importantly to the formation of both atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of magnolol on VSMC migration. Methods: The proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) stimulated VSMCs was performed by gelatin zymography. VSMC migration was assessed by wound healing and Boyden chamber methods. Collagen induced VSMC adhesion was determined by spectrofluorimeter and stress fibers formation was evaluated by fluorescence microscope. The expression of signaling molecules involved in stress fibers formation was determined by western blot. The phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC20) was determined by urea-glycerol polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression of β1-integrin and collagen type I in the injured carotid arteries of rats on day 35 after vascular injury. Results: VSMC migration was strongly inhibited by magnolol without affecting MMPs expression. Also, magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, FAK phosphorylation and RhoA and Cdc42 activation to inhibit the collagen induced stress fibers formation. Moreover, magnolol inhibited the phosphorylation of MLC20. Our in vivo results showed that magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, collagen type I deposition and FAK phosphorylation in injured carotid arteries without affecting MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: Magnolol inhibited VSMC migration via inhibition of cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation. General significance: This study provides a rationale for further evaluation of magnolol for the management of atherosclerosis and restenosis. - Highlights: • Magnolol strongly inhibited migration of VSMCs. • Magnolol inhibited stress fibers formation. • MLC20 phosphorylation was also inhibited by magnolol. • Anti

  18. A pro-inflammatory role of deubiquitinating enzyme cylindromatosis (CYLD) in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shuai [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Lv, Jiaju [Department of Urology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Han, Liping; Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Wang, Wenjuan; Li, Siying [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Wang, Xing Li [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Tang, Dongqi, E-mail: tangdq@pathology.ufl.edu [Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32610-0275 (United States); Cui, Taixing, E-mail: taixing.cui@uscmed.sc.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyld deficiency suppresses pro-inflammatory phenotypic switch of VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyld deficiency inhibits MAPK rather than NF-kB activity in inflamed VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYLD is up-regulated in the coronary artery with neointimal hyperplasia. -- Abstract: CYLD, a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB), is a critical regulator of diverse cellular processes, ranging from proliferation and differentiation to inflammatory responses, via regulating multiple key signaling cascades such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. CYLD has been shown to inhibit vascular lesion formation presumably through suppressing NF-{kappa}B activity in vascular cells. However, herein we report a novel role of CYLD in mediating pro-inflammatory responses in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via a mechanism independent of NF-{kappa}B activity. Adenoviral knockdown of Cyld inhibited basal and the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha})-induced mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (Mcp-1), intercellular adhesion molecule (Icam-1) and interleukin-6 (Il-6) in rat adult aortic SMCs (RASMCs). The CYLD deficiency led to increases in the basal NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity in RASMCs; however, did not affect the TNF{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activity. Intriguingly, the TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B phosphorylation was enhanced in the CYLD deficient RASMCs. While knocking down of Cyld decreased slightly the basal expression levels of I{kappa}B{alpha} and I{kappa}B{beta} proteins, it did not alter the kinetics of TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B protein degradation in RASMCs. These results indicate that CYLD suppresses the basal NF-{kappa}B activity and TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B kinase activation without affecting TNF{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activity in VSMCs. In addition, knocking down of Cyld suppressed TNF{alpha}-induced activation of mitogen activated protein

  19. Attenuation of endothelin-1-induced calcium response by tyrosine kinase inhibitors in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C Y; Sturek, M

    1996-06-01

    Although tyrosine kinases play an important role in cell growth and have been implicated in regulation of smooth muscle contraction, their role in agonist-induced myoplasmic Ca2+ responses is unclear. We examined effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and methyl 2,5-dihydroxycinnamate (MDHC) on the endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced Ca2+ response and determined underlying mechanisms for the effects. Freshly isolated smooth muscle cells from porcine coronary arteries were loaded with fura 2 ester, and myoplasmic free Ca2+ (Ca2+ (m)) concentration was estimated with fura 2 microfluorometry. Both genistein and MDHC inhibited the initial transient Cam2+ response to ET by 54 and 81%, respectively (P latent period from ET-1 application to the beginning of the Cam2+ response being increased from 1.08 +/- 0.17 to 2.65 +/- 0.52 min (P < 0.05). In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, genistein inhibited the ET-1-induced Cam2+ response by 93% (P < 0.05). The Cam2+ responses to caffeine (5 mM) or inositol trisphosphate (IP3) applied intracellularly via a patch-clamp pipette were not affected by genistein. Both genistein and MDHC also abolished the sustained Cam2+ response to ET-1. However, the Cam2+ response to depolarization by 80 mM K+ was not inhibited by MDHC and only inhibited 22% by genistein (P < 0.05). These results indicate that 1) activation of tyrosine kinases is an important regulatory mechanism for the ET-1-induced Cam2+ response in vascular smooth muscle and 2) tyrosine kinases mediate ET-1-induced Ca2+ release with no direct effect on IP3-mediated Ca2+ release. Thus ET-1-mediated signaling upstream of IP3 interaction with the Ca2+ stores is regulated by tyrosine kinases.

  20. PPARα-Independent Arterial Smooth Muscle Relaxant Effects of PPARα Agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silswal, Neerupma; Parelkar, Nikhil K; Wacker, Michael J; Badr, Mostafa; Andresen, Jon

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine direct vascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) agonists using isolated mouse aortas and middle cerebral arteries (MCAs). The PPARα agonists GW7647, WY14643, and gemfibrozil acutely relaxed aortas held under isometric tension and dilated pressurized MCAs with the following order of potency: GW7647≫WY14643>gemfibrozil. Responses were endothelium-independent, and the use of PPARα deficient mice demonstrated that responses were also PPARα-independent. Pretreating arteries with high extracellular K(+) attenuated PPARα agonist-mediated relaxations in the aorta, but not in the MCA. In the aorta, the ATP sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channel blocker glibenclamide also impaired relaxations whereas the other K(+) channel inhibitors, 4-aminopyridine and Iberiotoxin, had no effect. In aortas, GW7647 and WY14643 elevated cGMP levels by stimulating soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), and inhibition of sGC with ODQ blunted relaxations to PPARα agonists. In the MCA, dilations were inhibited by the protein kinase C (PKC) activator, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, and also by ODQ. Our results demonstrated acute, nonreceptor-mediated relaxant effects of PPARα agonists on smooth muscle of mouse arteries. Responses to PPARα agonists in the aorta involved K(ATP) channels and sGC, whereas in the MCA the PKC and sGC pathways also appeared to contribute to the response.

  1. Arterial vascular properties in individuals with spina bifida.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, C.R.L.; Langen, H. van; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2003-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Observational cross-sectional study. OBJECTIVE: To assess the vascular characteristics of the arterial circulation in individuals with spina bifida (SB) in comparison with individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) and able-bodied controls (C). SETTING: University Medical Centre, Nijmeg

  2. MicroRNA-34a Induces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Senescence by SIRT1 Downregulation and Promotes the Expression of Age-Associated Pro-inflammatory Secretory Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badi, Ileana; Burba, Ilaria; Ruggeri, Clarissa; Zeni, Filippo; Bertolotti, Matteo; Scopece, Alessandro; Pompilio, Giulio; Raucci, Angela

    2015-11-01

    Arterial aging is a major risk factor for the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. The aged artery is characterized by endothelial dysfunction and vascular smooth muscle cells altered physiology together with low-grade chronic inflammation. MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) has been recently implicated in cardiac, endothelial, and endothelial progenitor cell senescence; however, its contribution to aging-associated vascular smooth muscle cells phenotype has not been explored so far. We found that miR-34a was highly expressed in aortas isolated from old mice. Moreover, its well-known target, the longevity-associated protein SIRT1, was significantly downregulated during aging in both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells. Increased miR-34a as well as decreased SIRT1 expression was also observed in replicative-senescent human aortic smooth muscle cells. miR-34a overexpression in proliferative human aortic smooth muscle cells caused cell cycle arrest along with enhanced p21 protein levels and evidence of cell senescence. Furthermore, miR-34a ectopic expression induced pro-inflammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype molecules. Finally, SIRT1 protein significantly decreased upon miR-34a overexpression and restoration of its levels rescued miR-34a-dependent human aortic smooth muscle cells senescence, but not senescence-associated secretory phenotype factors upregulation. Taken together, our findings suggest that aging-associated increase of miR-34a expression levels, by promoting vascular smooth muscle cells senescence and inflammation through SIRT1 downregulation and senescence-associated secretory phenotype factors induction, respectively, may lead to arterial dysfunctions.

  3. Vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation to an osteogenic phenotype involves matrix metalloproteinase-2 modulation by homocysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingjiao; Lin, Jinghan; Ju, Ting; Chu, Lei; Zhang, Liming

    2015-08-01

    Arterial calcification is common in vascular diseases and involves conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to an osteoblast phenotype. Clinical studies suggest that the development of atherosclerosis can be promoted by homocysteine (HCY), but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we determined whether increases in HCY levels lead to an increase in VSMC calcification and differentiation, and examined the role of an extracellular matrix remodeler, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Rat VSMCs were exposed to calcification medium in the absence or presence of HCY (10, 100 or 200 μmol/L) or an MMP-2 inhibitor (10(-6) or 10(-5) mol/L). MTT assays were performed to determine the cytotoxicity of the MMP-2 inhibitor in calcification medium containing 200 μmol/L HCY. Calcification was assessed by measurements of calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as well as von Kossa staining. Expression of osteocalcin, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, and osteopontin, and MMP-2 was determined by immunoblotting. Calcification medium induced osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs. HCY promoted calcification, increased osteocalcin and BMP-2 expression, and decreased expression of osteopontin. MMP-2 expression was increased by HCY in a dose-dependent manner in VSMCs exposed to both control and calcification medium. The MMP-2 inhibitor decreased the calcium content and ALP activity, and attenuated the osteoblastic phenotype of VSMCs. Vascular calcification and osteogenic differentiation of VSMCs were positively regulated by HCY through increased/restored MMP-2 expression, increased expression of calcification proteins, and decreased anti-calcification protein levels. In summary, MMP-2 inhibition may be a protective strategy against VSMC calcification.

  4. Multiple vascular anomalies involving renal, testicular and suprarenal arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of variations of blood vessels of the abdomen is important during operative, diagnostic and endovascular pro- cedures. During routine dissection of the abdominal cavity, we came across multiple vascular anomalies involving renal, suprarenal and testicular arteries. The left kidney was supplied by two renal arteries originating together from the abdomi- nal aorta, and the right kidney was supplied by two accessory renal arteries, one of which was arising from the right renal artery and the other one from the aorta (about 2 inches below the origin of the renal artery. Accessory renal veins were present on both sides. The right testicular artery was arising from the lower accessory renal artery. The left testicular artery was looping around the inferior tributary of the left renal vein, whereby forming a sharp kink. The left middle suprarenal artery was diving into three small branches; the upper two branches were supplying the left suprarenal gland, whereas the lower branch was supplying the left kidney. Furthermore, detailed literature and the clinical and surgical importance of the case are discussed. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(3.000: 168-171

  5. Regional specific modulation of the glycocalyx and smooth muscle cell contractile apparatus in conduit arteries of tail-suspended rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongyan; Fan, Yubo; Zhao, Ping; Ren, Changhui; Wang, Zhenze; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2016-03-01

    The glycocalyx is a key mechanosensor on the surfaces of vascular cells (endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells), and recently, we reported that the redistribution of the hemodynamic factors in tail-suspended (TS) hindlimb-unloaded rats induces the dimensional adaptation of the endothelial glycocalyx in a regional-dependent manner. In the present study, we investigated the coverage and gene expression of the glycocalyx and its possible relationship with smooth muscle contractility in the conduit arteries from the TS rats. The coverage of the glycocalyx, determined by the area analysis of the fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled wheat germ agglutinin (WGA-FITC) staining to the cryosections of rat vessels, showed a 27.2% increase in the common carotid artery, a 13.3 and 8.0% decrease in the corresponding abdominal aorta and the femoral artery after 3 wk of tail suspension. The relative mRNA levels of syndecan-2, 3, 4, glypican-1, smooth muscle protein 22 (SM22), smoothelin (SMTN), and calponin were enhanced to 1.40, 1.53, 1.70, 1.90, 2.93, 2.30, and 5.23-fold, respectively, in the common carotid artery of the TS rat. However, both glycocalyx-related genes and smooth muscle contractile apparatus were totally or partially downregulated in the abdominal aorta and femoral artery of the TS rat. A linear positive correlation between the normalized coverage of glycocalyx and normalized mRNA levels of SM22, SMTN, and calponin exists. These results suggest the regional-dependent adaptation of the glycocalyx in simulated microgravity condition, which may affect its mechanotransduction of shear stress to regulate the contractility of the smooth muscle, finally contributing to postspaceflight orthostatic intolerance.

  6. N-acetylcysteine improves arterial vascular reactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittstock, Antje; Burkert, Magdalena; Zidek, Walter;

    2009-01-01

    Patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease show increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality that are partly related to impaired arterial vascular reactivity. We investigated whether intravenous administration of the antioxidant acetylcysteine improves arterial vascular reactivity in these ......Patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease show increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality that are partly related to impaired arterial vascular reactivity. We investigated whether intravenous administration of the antioxidant acetylcysteine improves arterial vascular reactivity...

  7. Effect of calcium and the calcimimetic AMG 641 on matrix-Gla protein in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Francisco J; Martinez-Moreno, Julio; Almaden, Yolanda; Rodriguez-Ortiz, Maria E; Lopez, Ignacio; Estepa, Jose Carlos; Henley, Charles; Rodriguez, Mariano; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolastico

    2011-03-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is frequently observed in patients with chronic renal failure and appears to be an active process involving transdifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to osteoblast-like cells. Reports of VC prevention in uremic rodents by calcimimetics coupled with identification of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) in VSMCs led us to hypothesize that CaSR activation in arterial cells and VSMCs may elicit expression of an endogenous inhibitor of VC. Toward this end, we determined the effects of calcium and the calcimimetic AMG 641 on arterial wall and isolated VSMC expression of matrix-Gla protein (MGP). Bovine VSMCs were incubated with increasing calcium chloride or AMG 641 concentrations, while in vivo experiments were carried out on healthy and uremic rats. Both AMG 641 and hypercalcemia induced MGP expression in the arterial wall in healthy and uremic rats. The results obtained in vitro supported those from in vivo experiments. In conclusion, selective CaSR activation, either by extracellular calcium or AMG 641, increased MGP expression in vivo in the arterial wall and in vitro in bovine VSMCs. This local upregulation of MGP expression provides one potential mechanism by which calcimimetics prevent VC.

  8. Antagonism of Nav channels and α1-adrenergic receptors contributes to vascular smooth muscle effects of ranolazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virsolvy, Anne; Farah, Charlotte; Pertuit, Nolwenn; Kong, Lingyan; Lacampagne, Alain; Reboul, Cyril; Aimond, Franck; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-12-10

    Ranolazine is a recently developed drug used for the treatment of patients with chronic stable angina. It is a selective inhibitor of the persistent cardiac Na(+) current (INa), and is known to reduce the Na(+)-dependent Ca(2+) overload that occurs in cardiomyocytes during ischemia. Vascular effects of ranolazine, such as vasorelaxation,have been reported and may involve multiple pathways. As voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Nav) present in arteries play a role in contraction, we hypothesized that ranolazine could target these channels. We studied the effects of ranolazine in vitro on cultured aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) and ex vivo on rat aortas in conditions known to specifically activate or promote INa. We observed that in the presence of the Nav channel agonist veratridine, ranolazine inhibited INa and intracellular Ca(2+) calcium increase in SMC, and arterial vasoconstriction. In arterial SMC, ranolazine inhibited the activity of tetrodotoxin-sensitive voltage-gated Nav channels and thus antagonized contraction promoted by low KCl depolarization. Furthermore, the vasorelaxant effects of ranolazine, also observed in human arteries and independent of the endothelium, involved antagonization of the α1-adrenergic receptor. Combined α1-adrenergic antagonization and inhibition of SMCs Nav channels could be involved in the vascular effects of ranolazine.

  9. Lanthanum prevents high phosphate-induced vascular calcification by preserving vascular smooth muscle lineage markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciceri, Paola; Elli, Francesca; Brenna, Irene; Volpi, Elisa; Romagnoli, Solange; Tosi, Delfina; Braidotti, Paola; Brancaccio, Diego; Cozzolino, Mario

    2013-06-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) represents a major cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease patients. High phosphate (Pi) levels are strongly associated with VC in this population. Therefore, Pi binders are commonly used to control high Pi levels. The aim of this work was to study the mechanism of action of lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) on the progression of Pi-induced VC through its direct effect on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. High Pi induced VSCM Ca deposition. We evaluated the action of LaCl3, compared to gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), and found different effects on the modulation of VSMC lineage markers, such as α-actin and SM22α. In fact, only LaCl3 preserved the expression of both VSMC lineage markers compared to high Pi-treated cells. Interestingly, both LaCl3 and GdCl3 reduced the high Pi-induced elevations of bone morphogenic protein 2 mRNA expression, with no reduction of the high core binding factor-alpha 1 mRNA levels observed in calcified VSMCs. Furthermore, we also found that only LaCl3 completely prevented the matrix GLA protein mRNA levels and osteonectin protein expression elevations induced by high Pi compared to GdCl3. Finally, LaCl3, in contrast to GdCl3, prevented the high Pi-induced downregulation of Axl, a membrane tyrosine kinase receptor involved in apoptosis. Thus, our results suggest that LaCl3 prevents VC by preserving VSMC lineage markers and by decreasing high Pi-induced osteoblastic differentiation.

  10. Effects of Raloxifene on Caveolin-1 mRNA and Protein Expressions in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fa-Lin YANG; Hong HE; Xian-Xi LIU; Bing TU; Xian-Wei ZENG; Ji-Xin SU; Xin WANG; Qin HU

    2006-01-01

    Caveolin-1 is regulated by estrogen in vascular smooth muscle cells. Raloxifene, a selectiveestrogen receptor modulator that possibly has cardioprotective properties without an increased risk of c ancer or other side effects of estrogen, may be used in women with risk of coronary artery disease. However, the relationship between raloxifene and caveolin-1 is still unknown. Therefore, this study was designed to see whether raloxifene regulates caveolin- 1 expression and if so, whether such regulation is mediated by estrogen receptor. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells were cultured in the absence or presence of raloxifene (10-8 to 10-6 M) for 12 or 24 h. Both mRNA and protein levels of caveolin-1 were increased significantly after 24 h treatment with raloxifene. These increases were inhibited by estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780 (10-5 M). Results of this study suggest that raloxifene stimulates caveolin- 1 transcription and translation through estrogen receptor mediated mechanisms.

  11. An anti-NH2-terminal antibody localizes NBCn1 to heart endothelia and skeletal and vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkier, Helle Hasager; Nielsen, Søren; Prætorius, Jeppe

    2006-01-01

    plexus. The anti-NH2-terminal antibody localized NBCn1 to the plasma membrane domains of endothelia and smooth muscle cells in small mesenteric and renal arteries, as well as the capillaries of the heart ventricles, spleen, and salivary glands. NBCn1 was also detected in neuromuscular junctions...... the development of the NH2-terminal antibody allowed the localization of NBCn1 protein to major cardiovascular tissues where NBCn1 mRNA was previously detected. The NBCn1 is a likely candidate for mediating the reported electroneutral Na+-HCO3(-) cotransport in vascular smooth muscle.......The electroneutral sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCn1 or NBC3 was originally cloned from rat aorta and from human skeletal muscle. NBCn1 (or NBC3) has been localized to the basolateral membrane of various epithelia, but thus far it has been impossible to detect the protein in these tissues...

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  14. Arterial structure and function in vascular ageing: are you as old as your arteries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Carter, Sophie E; Green, Daniel J

    2016-04-15

    Advancing age may be the most potent independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, a relationship that is not fully explained by time-related changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Since some arteries exhibit differential susceptibility to atherosclerosis, generalisations regarding the impact of ageing in humans may be overly simplistic, whereas in vivo assessment of arterial function and health provide direct insight. Coronary and peripheral (conduit, resistance and skin) arteries demonstrate a gradual, age-related impairment in vascular function that is likely to be related to a reduction in endothelium-derived nitric oxide bioavailability and/or increased production of vasoconstrictors (e.g. endothelin-1). Increased exposure and impaired ability for defence mechanisms to resist oxidative stress and inflammation, but also cellular senescence processes, may contribute to age-related changes in vascular function and health. Arteries also undergo structural changes as they age. Gradual thickening of the arterial wall, changes in wall content (i.e. less elastin, advanced glycation end-products) and increase in conduit artery diameter are observed with older age and occur similarly in central and peripheral arteries. These changes in structure have important interactive effects on artery function, with increases in small and large arterial stiffness representing a characteristic change with older age. Importantly, direct measures of arterial function and structure predict future cardiovascular events, independent of age or other cardiovascular risk factors. Taken together, and given the differential susceptibility of arteries to atherosclerosis in humans, direct measurement of arterial function and health may help to distinguish between biological and chronological age-related change in arterial health in humans.

  15. Cocaine mediated apoptosis of vascular cells as a mechanism for carotid artery dissection leading to ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbouseh, Noura M; Ardelt, Agnieszka

    2011-08-01

    In arterial dissection, blood may enter the arterial wall through an intimal tear, splitting the arterial wall and activating the coagulation cascade at the site of endothelial damage. Dissection of extracranial and intracranial vessels may lead to ischemic stroke through thromboembolic or hemodynamic mechanisms. Major blunt trauma or rapid acceleration-deceleration may cause dissection, but in patients with inherent arterial wall weakness, dissection can occur spontaneously or as a result of minor neck movement. Cocaine use has been associated with dissection of the aortic arch and coronary and renal arteries through cocaine-mediated hypertension. Recent preclinical studies have suggested, however, that cocaine may cause apoptosis of cells in the vascular wall. In this article, we postulate that cocaine may cause apoptosis of vascular endothelial and/or smooth muscle cells, thus weakening the vascular wall and resulting in a dissection-prone state. We review the literature and propose a biological basis for vasculopathy, vascular dissection, and ischemic stroke in the setting of cocaine use. Further research studies on vascular cells, as well as focused analysis of human pathological material, will be important in providing evidence for or against our hypotheses.

  16. Clinical Application of Vascular Regenerative Therapy for Peripheral Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Suzuki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prognosis of peripheral artery disease (PAD, especially critical limb ischemia, is very poor despite the development of endovascular therapy and bypass surgery. Many patients result in leg amputation and, therefore, vascular regenerative therapy is expected in this field. Gene therapy using vascular endothelial growth factor is the first step of vascular regenerative therapy, but did not confirm effectiveness in a large-scale randomized comparative study. Based on animal experiments, bone marrow mononuclear cells (MNCs, peripheral blood MNCs were used as the cell source for regenerative therapy. Those cells were confirmed to be effective to decrease rest pain and ulcer size, but its effect was not fully satisfied. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are expected as an effective cell source for vascular regeneration and clinical studies are ongoing, because the cells are able to differentiate into various cell types and produce a significant amount of vascular growth factors. Of vascular regeneration therapy, peripheral MNCs and bone marrow MNCs were recognized as advanced medical technology but do not attain to the standard therapy. However, clinical use of MSCs have already started, and induced pluripotent stem cells are surely promising tool for vascular regeneration therapy although further basic studies are required for clinical application.

  17. Low levels of the reverse transactivator fail to induce target transgene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikenza Viceconte

    Full Text Available Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS is a genetic disease with multiple features that are suggestive of premature aging. Most patients with HGPS carry a mutation on one of their copies of the LMNA gene. The LMNA gene encodes the lamin A and lamin C proteins, which are the major proteins of the nuclear lamina. The organs of the cardiovascular system are amongst those that are most severely affected in HGPS, undergoing a progressive depletion of vascular smooth muscle cells, and most children with HGPS die in their early teens from cardio-vascular disease and other complications from atherosclerosis. In this study, we developed a transgenic mouse model based on the tet-ON system to increase the understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to the most lethal aspect of HGPS. To induce the expression of the most common HGPS mutation, LMNA c.1824C>T; p.G608G, in the vascular smooth muscle cells of the aortic arch and thoracic aorta, we used the previously described reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator, sm22α-rtTA. However, the expression of the reverse sm22α-transactivator was barely detectable in the arteries, and this low level of expression was not sufficient to induce the expression of the target human lamin A minigene. The results from this study are important because they suggest caution during the use of previously functional transgenic animal models and emphasize the importance of assessing transgene expression over time.

  18. Puerarin induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in hypoxic human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary vascular medial hypertrophy in hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is caused in part by decreased apoptosis in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs. Puerarin, an isoflavone purified from the Chinese medicinal herb kudzu, ameliorates chronic hypoxic PAH in animal models. Here we investigated the effects of puerarin on apoptosis of hypoxic human PASMCs (HPASMCs, and to determine the possible underlying mechanisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HPASMCs were cultured for 24 h in normoxia or hypoxia (5% O₂ conditions with and without puerarin. Cell number and viability were determined with a hemacytometer or a cell counting kit. Apoptosis was detected with a TUNEL test, rhodamine-123 (R-123 fluorescence, a colorimetric assay, western blots, immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR. Hypoxia inhibited mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and promoted HPASMC growth. In contrast, after puerarin (50 µM or more intervention, cell growth was inhibited and apoptosis was observed. Puerarin-induced apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs was accompanied by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, caspase-9 activation, and Bcl-2 down-regulation with concurrent Bax up-regulation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Puerarin promoted apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs by acting on the mitochondria-dependent pathway. These results suggest a new mechanism of puerarin relevant to the management of clinical hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

  19. Puerarin Induces Mitochondria-Dependent Apoptosis in Hypoxic Human Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chan; Chen, Chun; Wang, Zhiyi; Wang, Liangxing; Yang, Lehe; Ding, Minjiao; Ding, Cheng; Sun, Yu; Lin, Quan; Huang, Xiaoying; Du, Xiaohong; Zhao, Xiaowei; Wang, Chuangyi

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary vascular medial hypertrophy in hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is caused in part by decreased apoptosis in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Puerarin, an isoflavone purified from the Chinese medicinal herb kudzu, ameliorates chronic hypoxic PAH in animal models. Here we investigated the effects of puerarin on apoptosis of hypoxic human PASMCs (HPASMCs), and to determine the possible underlying mechanisms. Methodology/Principal Findings HPASMCs were cultured for 24 h in normoxia or hypoxia (5% O2) conditions with and without puerarin. Cell number and viability were determined with a hemacytometer or a cell counting kit. Apoptosis was detected with a TUNEL test, rhodamine-123 (R-123) fluorescence, a colorimetric assay, western blots, immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR. Hypoxia inhibited mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and promoted HPASMC growth. In contrast, after puerarin (50 µM or more) intervention, cell growth was inhibited and apoptosis was observed. Puerarin-induced apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs was accompanied by reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria, caspase-9 activation, and Bcl-2 down-regulation with concurrent Bax up-regulation. Conclusions/Significance Puerarin promoted apoptosis in hypoxic HPASMCs by acting on the mitochondria-dependent pathway. These results suggest a new mechanism of puerarin relevant to the management of clinical hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22457823

  20. Sphingosine induces phospholipase D and mitogen activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, M M; Abd-Elfattah, A S; Sholley, M M

    1998-12-01

    The enzymes phospholipase D and diacylglycerol kinase generate phosphatidic acid which is considered to be a mitogen. Here we report that sphingosine produced a significant amount of phosphatidic acid in vascular smooth muscle cells from the rat aorta. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59 949 partially depressed sphingosine induced phosphatidic acid formation, suggesting that activation of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase can not account for the bulk of phosphatidic acid produced and that additional pathways such as phospholipase D may contribute to this. Further, we have shown that phosphatidylethanol was produced by sphingosine when vascular smooth muscle cells were stimulated in the presence of ethanol. Finally, as previously shown for other cell types, sphingosine stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  1. Augmented vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and adhesion when hypertension is superimposed on aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgel, Nancy L; Sun, Zhe; Hong, Zhongkui; Hunter, William C; Hill, Michael A; Vatner, Dorothy E; Vatner, Stephen F; Meininger, Gerald A

    2015-02-01

    Hypertension and aging are both recognized to increase aortic stiffness, but their interactions are not completely understood. Most previous studies have attributed increased aortic stiffness to changes in extracellular matrix proteins that alter the mechanical properties of the vascular wall. Alternatively, we hypothesized that a significant component of increased vascular stiffness in hypertension is due to changes in the mechanical and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells, and that aging would augment the contribution from vascular smooth muscle cells when compared with the extracellular matrix. Accordingly, we studied aortic stiffness in young (16-week-old) and old (64-week-old) spontaneously hypertensive rats and Wistar-Kyoto wild-type controls. Systolic and pulse pressures were significantly increased in young spontaneously hypertensive rats when compared with young Wistar-Kyoto rats, and these continued to rise in old spontaneously hypertensive rats when compared with age-matched controls. Excised aortic ring segments exhibited significantly greater elastic moduli in both young and old spontaneously hypertensive rats versus Wistar-Kyoto rats. were isolated from the thoracic aorta, and stiffness and adhesion to fibronectin were measured by atomic force microscopy. Hypertension increased both vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion, and these increases were both augmented with aging. By contrast, hypertension did not affect histological measures of aortic collagen and elastin, which were predominantly changed by aging. These findings support the concept that stiffness and adhesive properties of vascular smooth muscle cells are novel mechanisms contributing to the increased aortic stiffness occurring with hypertension superimposed on aging.

  2. Myoedothelial connection, a relationship between spiral arrangement of smooth muscle cells and endothelium in resistance muscular arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arribas S.M,

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Purpose: Conventionally, the architecture of the artery wall is based upon the close-packed smooth muscle cells, endothelial and adventitial cells in both sides of internal elastic lamina (IEL. However, the adventitia and endothelium are now viewed as key players in vascular growth and repair. Recent work raises fundamental questions about the cellular heterogeneity of arteries, time course, triggering of normal and pathological re-modeling.Materials and Methods: Twelve wild type mice were employed. After killing with CO2 inhalation, dissected mesenteric arteries were removed and cleaned with adipose tissue. Arteries were mounted in the perfusion pressure myograph under normal pressure (70mmHg in Kreb’s solution, which bubbled with 95% O2 and 5% CO2 to pH 7.4, at 37°C. After staining with fluorescent ligands (Syto 13 for nuclei and (DIO 1µM for cytoplasm, arteries were scanned with the Laser Scanning Co focal Microscopy (LSCM under (488nm/515nm, (484nm/501nm and (543nm/580nm Argon-Helium ion laser wavelength.Results: Three dimensional images of computer observation suggest that there may be a close relationship between the helical organization of smooth muscle cells and the underlying pattern of endothelial cells (myoendothelial connection.Conclusion: Tight junctions between cells must be broken and remade during the remodeling process. This suggests a carefully controlled defensive structure for intra-cellular connections, that is capable of withstanding the acute stresses of normal function, but which must be capable of modification to adapt to a new state, when the bio-physical conditions dictate. Endothelial mosaicism related to spiral arrangements of underlying smooth muscle cells, are associated with the functional cell connections. Taken together, these issues provide an exciting new phase in understanding the physiological modeling of the vascular wall, producing a new view of the dynamic nature of vascular

  3. Integrin mobilizes intracellular Ca(2+) in renal vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, W L; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Yip, K P

    2001-01-01

    Peptides with the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif induce vasoconstriction in rat afferent arterioles by increasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). This finding suggests that occupancy of integrins on the plasma membrane of VSMC might affect...... vascular tone. The purpose of this study was to determine whether occupancy of integrins by exogenous RGD peptides initiates intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in cultured renal VSMC. When smooth muscle cells were exposed to 0.1 mM hexapeptide GRGDSP, [Ca(2+)](i) rapidly increased from 91 +/- 4 to 287 +/- 37 n...

  4. Cytoskeletal remodeling in differentiated vascular smooth muscle is actin isoform dependent and stimulus dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak Rim; Gallant, Cynthia; Leavis, Paul C; Gunst, Susan J; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2008-09-01

    Dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton plays an essential role in the migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. It has been suggested that actin remodeling may also play an important functional role in nonmigrating, nonproliferating differentiated vascular smooth muscle (dVSM). In the present study, we show that contractile agonists increase the net polymerization of actin in dVSM, as measured by the differential ultracentrifugation of vascular smooth muscle tissue and the costaining of single freshly dissociated cells with fluorescent probes specific for globular and filamentous actin. Furthermore, induced alterations of the actin polymerization state, as well as actin decoy peptides, inhibit contractility in a stimulus-dependent manner. Latrunculin pretreatment or actin decoy peptides significantly inhibit contractility induced by a phorbol ester or an alpha-agonist, but these procedures have no effect on contractions induced by KCl. Aorta dVSM expresses alpha-smooth muscle actin, beta-actin, nonmuscle gamma-actin, and smooth muscle gamma-actin. The incorporation of isoform-specific cell-permeant synthetic actin decoy peptides, as well as isoform-specific probing of cell fractions and two-dimensional gels, demonstrates that actin remodeling during alpha-agonist contractions involves the remodeling of primarily gamma-actin and, to a lesser extent, beta-actin. Taken together, these results show that net isoform- and agonist-dependent increases in actin polymerization regulate vascular contractility.

  5. Vascular nanomedicine: Site specific delivery of elastin stabilizing therapeutics to damaged arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Aditi

    Elastin, a structural protein in the extra-cellular matrix, plays a critical role in the normal functioning of blood vessels. Apart from performing its primary function of providing resilience to arteries, it also plays major role in regulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, response to injury, and morphogenesis. Medial arterial calcification (MAC) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are two diseases where the structural and functional integrity of elastin is severely compromised. Although the clinical presentation of MAC and AAA differ, they have one common underlying causative mechanism---pathological degradation of elastin. Hence prevention of elastin degradation in the early stages of MAC and AAA can mitigate, partially if not wholly, the fatal consequences of both the diseases. The work presented here is motivated by the overwhelming statistics of people afflicted by elastin associated cardiovascular diseases and the unavailability of cure for the same. Overall goal of our research is to understand role of elastin degradation in cardiovascular diseases and to develop a targeted vascular drug delivery system that is minimally invasive, biodegradable, and non-toxic, that prevents elastin from degradation. Our hope is that such treatment will also help regenerate elastin, thereby providing a multi-fold treatment option for elasto-degenerative vascular diseases. For this purpose, we have first confirmed the combined role of degraded elastin and hyperglycemia in the pathogenesis of MAC. We have shown that in the absence of degraded elastin and TGF-beta1 (abundantly present in diabetic arteries) vascular smooth muscle cells maintain their homeostatic state, regardless of environmental glucose concentrations. However simultaneous exposure to glucose, elastin peptides and TGF-beta1 causes the pathological transgenesis of vascular cells to osteoblast-like cells. We show that plant derived polyphenols bind to vascular elastin with great affinity resulting in

  6. Thrombospondin-1, -2 and -5 have differential effects on vascular smooth muscle cell physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helkin, Alex; Maier, Kristopher G. [SUNY Upstate Medical University, Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Services, Syracuse, NY (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs VA Healthcare Network Upstate New York at Syracuse, Syracuse, NY (United States); Gahtan, Vivian, E-mail: gahtanv@upstate.edu [SUNY Upstate Medical University, Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Services, Syracuse, NY (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs VA Healthcare Network Upstate New York at Syracuse, Syracuse, NY (United States)

    2015-09-04

    Introduction: The thrombospondins (TSPs) are matricellular proteins that exert multifunctional effects by binding cytokines, cell-surface receptors and other proteins. TSPs play important roles in vascular pathobiology and are all expressed in arterial lesions. The differential effects of TSP-1, -2, and -5 represent a gap in knowledge in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) physiology. Our objective is to determine if structural differences of the TSPs imparted different effects on VSMC functions critical to the formation of neointimal hyperplasia. We hypothesize that TSP-1 and -2 induce similar patterns of migration, proliferation and gene expression, while the effects of TSP-5 are different. Methods: Human aortic VSMC chemotaxis was tested for TSP-2 and TSP-5 (1–40 μg/mL), and compared to TSP-1 and serum-free media (SFM) using a modified Boyden chamber. Next, VSMCs were exposed to TSP-1, TSP-2 or TSP-5 (0.2–40 μg/mL). Proliferation was assessed by MTS assay. Finally, VSMCs were exposed to TSP-1, TSP-2, TSP-5 or SFM for 3, 6 or 24 h. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed on 96 genes using a microfluidic card. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA or t-test, with p < 0.05 being significant. Results: TSP-1, TSP-2 and TSP-5 at 20 μg/mL all induce chemotaxis 3.1 fold compared to serum-free media. TSP-1 and TSP-2 induced proliferation 53% and 54% respectively, whereas TSP-5 did not. In the gene analysis, overall, cardiovascular system development and function is the canonical pathway most influenced by TSP treatment, and includes multiple growth factors, cytokines and proteases implicated in cellular migration, proliferation, vasculogenesis, apoptosis and inflammation pathways. Conclusions and relevance: The results of this study indicate TSP-1, -2, and -5 play active roles in VSMC physiology and gene expression. Similarly to TSP-1, VSMC chemotaxis to TSP-2 and -5 is dose-dependent. TSP-1 and -2 induces VSMC proliferation, but TSP-5 does not, likely

  7. Oxygen mediates vascular smooth muscle relaxation in hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Dada

    Full Text Available The activation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC by nitric oxide (NO and other ligands has been extensively investigated for many years. In the present study we considered the effect of molecular oxygen (O2 on sGC both as a direct ligand and its affect on other ligands by measuring cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP production, as an index of activity, as well as investigating smooth muscle relaxation under hypoxic conditions. Our isolated enzyme studies confirm the function of sGC is impaired under hypoxic conditions and produces cGMP in the presence of O2, importantly in the absence of NO. We also show that while O2 could partially affect the magnitude of sGC stimulation by NO when the latter was present in excess, activation by the NO independent, haem-dependent sGC stimulator 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl-1-benzylindazole (YC-1 was unaffected. Our in vitro investigation of smooth muscle relaxation confirmed that O2 alone in the form of a buffer bolus (equilibrated at 95% O2/5% CO2 had the ability to dilate vessels under hypoxic conditions and that this was dependent upon sGC and independent of eNOS. Our studies confirm that O2 can be a direct and important mediator of vasodilation through an increase in cGMP production. In the wider context, these observations are key to understanding the relative roles of O2 versus NO-induced sGC activation.

  8. Vascular smooth muscle cell spreading onto fibrinogen is regulated by calpains and phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulhe, F; Bogyo, A; Chap, H; Perret, B; Racaud-Sultan, C

    2001-11-09

    Fibrinogen deposition and smooth muscle cell migration are important causes of atherosclerosis and angiogenesis. Involvement of calpains in vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion onto fibrinogen was investigated. Using calpain inhibitors, we showed that activation of calpains was required for smooth muscle cell spreading. An increase of (32)P-labeled phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate, respective products of phospholipase C and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activities, was measured in adherent cells. Addition of the calpain inhibitor calpeptin strongly decreased phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate. However, smooth muscle cell spreading was prevented by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, but poorly modified by phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002. Moreover, PLC was found to act upstream of the PI 3-kinase IA isoform. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that calpains are required for smooth muscle cell spreading. Further, phospholipase C activation is pointed as a key step of cell-spreading regulation by calpains.

  9. Effects of the dual TP receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor EV-077 on human endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petri, Marcelo H. [Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Tellier, Céline; Michiels, Carine [NARILIS, URBC, University of Namur, Namur (Belgium); Ellertsen, Ingvill [Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Dogné, Jean-Michel [Department of Pharmacy, Namur Thrombosis and Hemostasis Center, University of Namur, Namur (Belgium); Bäck, Magnus, E-mail: Magnus.Back@ki.se [Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •EV-077 reduced TNF-α induced inflammation in endothelial cells. •The thromboxane mimetic U69915 enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. •EV-077 inhibited smooth muscle cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The prothrombotic mediator thromboxane A{sub 2} is derived from arachidonic acid metabolism through the cyclooxygenase and thromboxane synthase pathways, and transduces its effect through the thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptor. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the TP receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor EV-077 on inflammatory markers in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and on human coronary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation. To this end, mRNA levels of different proinflammatory mediators were studied by real time quantitative PCR, supernatants were analyzed by enzyme immune assay, and cell proliferation was assessed using WST-1. EV-077 significantly decreased mRNA levels of ICAM-1 and PTX3 after TNFα incubation, whereas concentrations of 6-keto PGF1α in supernatants of endothelial cells incubated with TNFα were significantly increased after EV-077 treatment. Although U46619 did not alter coronary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation, this thromboxane mimetic enhanced the proliferation induced by serum, insulin and growth factors, which was significantly inhibited by EV-077. In conclusion, EV-077 inhibited TNFα-induced endothelial inflammation and reduced the enhancement of smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by a thromboxane mimetic, supporting that the thromboxane pathway may be associated with early atherosclerosis in terms of endothelial dysfunction and vascular hypertrophy.

  10. Fibulin-2 is present in murine vascular lesions and is important for smooth muscle cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ström, A.; Olin, A. I.; Aspberg, A.;

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) can affect smooth muscle cell (SMC) adhesion, migration and proliferation-events that are important during the atherosclerotic process. Fibulin-2 is a member of the ECM protein family of fibulins and has been found to cross-link versican/hyaluron...

  11. Bone morphogenetic proteins regulate osteoprotegerin and its ligands in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kirsten Quyen Nguyen; Olesen, Ping; Ledet, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    in the transformation of human vascular smooth muscle cells (HVSMC) to osteoblast-like cells. In this study, we evaluated the effect of BMP-2, BMP-7 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta1) on the secretion and mRNA expression of OPG and its ligands receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappabeta ligand (RANKL...

  12. Statins inhibited erythropoietin-induced proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Tae; Tsuruoka, Shuichi; Fujimura, Akio

    2010-12-15

    Erythropoietin (EPO) directly stimulates the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, and this is believed to be one of the mechanisms of vascular access failure of hemodialysis patients. However, precise mechanisms of the EPO-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells are not certain. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are primarily used to reduce cholesterol levels, but also exert other effects, including reno-protective effects. We evaluated the effect of several statins with various hydrophilicities on the EPO-induced proliferation of primary cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. EPO significantly and concentration-dependently increased DNA synthesis as assessed by [³H]thymidine incorporation, cell proliferation as assessed by WST-1 assay, and activation of the p44/42MAPK pathway. Therapeutic doses of statins (pravastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin and fluvastatin) in patients with hypercholesterolemia almost completely suppressed all of the EPO-induced effects in a concentration-dependent manner. Co-addition of mevalonic acid almost completely reversed the effects of statins. Statin alone did not affect the basal proliferation capacity of the cells. The effects were almost similar among the statins. We concluded that statins inhibited EPO-induced proliferation in rat VSMCs at least partly through their inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase activity. In the future, statins might prove useful for the treatment of EPO-induced hyperplasia of vascular access. Because the statins all showed comparable effects irrespective of their hydrophilicities, these effects might be a class effect.

  13. The nanostructure of myoendothelial junctions contributes to signal rectification between endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasen, Jens Christian; Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Micro-anatomical structures in tissues have potential physiological effects. In arteries and arterioles smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells are separated by the internal elastic lamina, but the two cell layers often make contact through micro protrusions called myoendothelial junctions. Cross...

  14. Decorin mimic inhibits vascular smooth muscle proliferation and migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Scott

    Full Text Available Over the past 10 years, the number of percutaneous coronary intervention procedures performed in the United States increased by 33%; however, restenosis, which inhibits complete functional recovery of the vessel wall, complicates this procedure. A wide range of anti-restenotic therapeutics have been developed, although many elicit non-specific effects that compromise vessel healing. Drawing inspiration from biologically-relevant molecules, our lab developed a mimic of the natural proteoglycan decorin, termed DS-SILY, which can mask exposed collagen and thereby effectively decrease platelet activation, thus contributing to suppression of vascular intimal hyperplasia. Here, we characterize the effects of DS-SILY on both proliferative and quiescent human SMCs to evaluate the potential impact of DS-SILY-SMC interaction on restenosis, and further characterize in vivo platelet interactions. DS-SILY decreased proliferative SMC proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in vitro in a concentration dependent manner as compared to untreated controls. The addition of DS-SILY to in vitro SMC cultures decreased SMC migration and protein synthesis by 95% and 37%, respectively. Furthermore, DS-SILY decreased platelet activation, as well as reduced neointimal hyperplasia by 60%, in vivo using Ossabaw swine. These results indicate that DS-SILY demonstrates multiple biological activities that may all synergistically contribute to an improved treatment paradigm for balloon angioplasty.

  15. MiR-21 inhibits c-Ski signaling to promote the proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Li; He, Xie; Yang, Ting; Yang, Kang

    2014-04-01

    Previously, we reported that the decrease of endogenous c-Ski expression is implicated in the progression of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation after arterial injury. However, the molecular mechanism of the down-regulation of c-Ski is not clear. In this study, a potential miR-21 recognition element was identified in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of rat c-Ski mRNA. A reporter assay revealed that miR-21 could recognize the miR-21 recognition element of c-Ski mRNA. In A10 rat aortic smooth muscle cells, overexpression of miR-21 significantly inhibited the expression of c-Ski protein and promoted cell proliferation, which could be blocked by inhibition of miR-21 or overexpression of c-Ski. Further investigation demonstrated that the effect of miR-21 on VSMC proliferation resulted from negative regulation of c-Ski to suppress p38-p21/p27 signaling, the downstream pathway of c-Ski in VSMCs. These results indicate that c-Ski is a target gene of miR-21. miR-21 specifically binds to the 3'-untranslated region of c-Ski and negatively regulates c-Ski expression to diminish the protective effects of c-Ski and stimulate VSMC proliferation in the progression of arterial injury.

  16. Microarray Analysis of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Responses to Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Minta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggest a causal role of bacterial and viral infections in atherogenesis. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS has been shown to stimulate resting vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC with the production of inflammatory cytokines and modulation of quiescent cells to the proliferative and synthetic phenotype. To comprehensively identify biologically important genes associated with LPS-induced SMC phenotype modulation, we compared the transcriptomes of quiescent human coronary artery SMC and cells treated with LPS for 4 and 22 h. The SMCs responded robustly to LPS treatment by the differential regulation of several genes involved in chromatin remodeling, transcription regulation, translation, signal transduction, metabolism, host defense, cell proliferation, apoptosis, matrix formation, adhesion and motility and suggest that the induction of clusters of genes involved in cell proliferation, migration and ECM production may be the main force that drives the LPS-induced phenotypic modulation of SMC rather than the differential expression of a single gene or a few genes. An interesting observation was the early and dramatic induction of four tightly clustered interferon-induced genes with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT1, 2, 4, 5. siRNA knock-down of IFIT1 in SMC was found to be associated with a remarkable up-regulation of TP53, CDKN1A and FOS, suggesting that IFIT1 may play a role in cell proliferation. Our data provide a comprehensive list of genes involved in LPS biology and underscore the important role of LPS in SMC activation and phenotype modulation which is a pivotal event in the onset of atherogenesis.

  17. Drug packaging and delivery using perfluorocarbon nanoparticles for targeted inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-xiong ZHOU; Bai-gen ZHANG; Hao ZHANG; Xiao-zhong HUANG; Ya-li HU; Li SUN; Xiao-min WANG; Ji-wei ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the in vitro release profile of drugs encapsulated within perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoparticles (NPs) and their ability to inhibit the activity of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs).Methods: Dexamethasone phosphate (DxP) or dexamethasone acetate (DxA) was encapsulated into PFC nanoparticles using a high-pressure homogenous method. The morphology and size of the NPs were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a laser particle size analyzer. Drug loading and in vitro release were assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The impact of NP capsules on SMC proliferation, migration and apoptosis in vitro was assessed using cell counting kit-8, transwell cell migration and flow cytometry assays.Results: The sizes of DxP-NPs and DxA-NPs were 224±6 nm and 236±9 nm, respectively. The encapsulation efficiency (EE) of DxP-NPs was 66.4%±1.0%, with an initial release rate of 77.2%, whereas the EE of DxA-NPs was 95.3%±1.3%, with an initial release rate of 23.6%. Both of the NP-coated drugs could be released over 7 d. Human umbilical artery SMCs were harvested and cultured for four to six passages. Compared to free DxP, SMCs treated with tissue factor (TF)-directed DxP-NPs showed significant differences in the inhibition of proliferation, migration and apoptosis (P<0.05).Conclusion: The results collectively suggest that PFC nanoparticles will be beneficial for targeted drug delivery because of the sustained drug release and effective inhibition of SMC proliferation and migration.

  18. Current Trends in Heparin Use During Arterial Vascular Interventional Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durran, Alexandra C., E-mail: durranjobs@hotmail.com [Peninsula Radiology Academy, Plymouth International Business Park (United Kingdom); Watts, Christopher, E-mail: Christopher.watts@salisbury.nhs.uk [Salisbury District Hospital (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess the current use of heparinized saline and bolus doses of heparin in non-neurological interventional radiology and to determine whether consensus could be reached to produce guidance for heparin use during arterial vascular intervention. Methods: An interactive electronic questionnaire was distributed to members of the British Society of Interventional Radiology regarding their current practice in the use, dosage, and timing of heparin boluses and heparinized flushing solutions.ResultsA total of 108 completed questionnaires were received. More than 80% of respondents used heparinized saline with varying concentrations; the most prevalent was 1,000 IU/l (international units of heparin per liter) and 5,000 IU/l. Fifty-one percent of interventionalists use 3,000 IU as their standard bolus dose; however, the respondents were split regarding the timing of bolus dose with {approx}60% administering it after arterial access is obtained and 40% after crossing the lesion. There was no consensus on altering dose according to body weight, and only 4% monitored clotting parameters. Conclusions: There seems to be some coherence among practicing interventionalists regarding heparin administration. We hypothesize that heparinized saline should be used at a recognized standard concentration of 1,000 IU/l as a flushing concentration in all arterial vascular interventions and that 3,000 IU bolus is considered the standard dose for straightforward therapeutic procedures and 5000 IU for complex, crural, and endovascular aneurysm repair work. The bolus should be given after arterial access is obtained to allow time for optimal anticoagulation to be achieved by the time of active intervention and stenting. Further research into clotting abnormalities following such interventional procedures would be an interesting quantifiable follow-up to this initial survey of opinions and practice.

  19. Azelnidipine inhibits Msx2-dependent osteogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takehisa; Tanaka, Toru; Iso, Tatsuya; Kawai-Kowase, Keiko; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active and regulated process that is similar to bone formation. While calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have been shown to improve outcomes in atherosclerotic vascular disease, it remains unknown whether CCBs have an effect on the process of vascular calcification. Here we investigated whether CCBs inhibit osteogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by Msx2, a key factor of vascular calcification. Human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) were transduced with adenovirus expressing MSX2 and were treated with 3 distinct CCBs. Azelnidipine, a dihydropyridine subclass of CCBs, significantly decreased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of Msx2-overexpressed HASMCs, whereas verapamil and diltiazem had no effect. Furthermore, azelnidipine, but not verapamil and diltiazem, significantly decreased matrix mineralization of Msx2-overexpressing HASMCs. Azelnidipine significantly attenuated the induction of ALP gene expression by Msx2, a key transcription factor in osteogenesis, while it did not reduce enzymatic activity of ALP. Furthermore, azelnidipine inhibited the ability of Msx2 to activate the ALP gene, but had no effect on Notch-induced Msx2 expression. Given that L-type calcium channels are equally blocked by these CCBs, our results suggest that azelnidipine inhibits the Msx2-dependent process of vascular calcification by mechanisms other than inhibition of calcium channel activity.

  20. Killing effect of coexpressing cytosine deaminase and thymidine kinase on rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹慧青; 孟宪敏; 刘冬青; 赵秀文; 丁金凤

    2004-01-01

    Background Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation following arterial injury plays a critical role in a variety of vascular proliferative disorders, such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after balloon angioplasty. Herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-TK)/ganciclovir (GCV) and E.coli cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-Fc) suicide gene systems have been successfully employed in cardiovascular gene therapy, respectively. We reasoned that coexpression of both HSV-TK with CD suicide genes would lead to increased cell killing. To test this imagine, the adenoviral vectors expressing TK and/or CD genes were developed and tested on vascular smooth muscle cells. Methods Adenoviral vectors, including Ad-EF1α-CD-cytomegolovirus (CMV)-TK coexpressing both CD and TK double suicide genes, Ad-EF1α-CD and Ad-CMV-TK expressing CD and TK respectively, and control vector Ad-CMV-LacZ, were constructed and prepared with homologous recombination in RecA+E.coli cells. Integration and expression of CD and/or TK gene were identified by PCR and Western blot. Primary cultured VSMCs were infected at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 20 with exposure to their matching prodrugs 5-Fc and GCV. Cell mortality was measured by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays. Flow cytometry analysis was used to detect cell death. Apoptotic cells were analyzed using Hoechst 33342 fluorescence dye as a DNA probe. Genomic DNA cleavage of apoptotic VSMCs was tested by agarose gel electrophoresis. Results Recombinant adenovirus expressing CD and/or TK suicide genes were successfully constructed. Both single and double suicide genes could be integrated into adenoviral genome and expressed. Cytotoxic effects of Ad-EF1α-CD-CMV-TK double suicide genes combined with 5-Fc and GCV were higher than those of Ad-CMV-TK and Ad-EF1α-CD single gene groups. The rate of cell survival was only (9±3)% in the Ad-EF1α-CD-CMV-TK group, but (37±3)% in the Ad-CMV-TK and (46±4)% in the Ad-EF1

  1. Vascular function and mild renal impairment in stable coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Harst, P; Smilde, TDJ; Buikema, H; Voors, AA; Navis, G; van Veldhuisen, DJ; van Gilst, WH

    2006-01-01

    Objective - In patients with coronary artery disease, the concomitant presence of renal function impairment is associated with decreased survival. We aimed to assess whether in coronary artery diseased patients renal function impairment is associated with systemic vascular function, functional param

  2. The Effect of Erigeron Breviscapus on Proliferation of Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells in Hypoxic Porcines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING; Yipeng; XU; Yongjian; ZHANG; Zhenxiang

    2001-01-01

    In order to study the effect of Erigeron Breviscapus (EB) on proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) in hypoxic porcines, immunohistochemical and MTT methods were employed to measure the proliferation of PASMC. It was found that the proliferation of PASMC in porcines was obvious, and the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)was significantly high within 48 h after exposure to hypoxia. The EB could inhibit the proliferation and the expression of PCNA in PASMC under hypoxia, but it had no effect on the proliferation and expression of PCNA in PASMC under normal condition. The EB could inhibit the proliferation and the expression of PCNA in PASMC induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), an agonist of PKC in normal and hypoxic conditions. It was concluded that the hypoxia could enhance the proliferation and expression of PCNA in PASMC. The EB can inhibit the proliferation and expression of PCNA in PASMC under hypoxia through PKC-signal way. The EB may be used in treating the pulmonary hypertension by inhibiting the proliferation of PASMC and the pulmonary vascular remodeling.

  3. HYPOXIA AND ENDOTHELIN-1 STIMULATE DNA SYNTHESIS OF PULMONARY ARTERY SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯晓东; 蔡英年

    1996-01-01

    Hypoxia and endothelin-1 (ET-1) are associated with constriction of pulmonary vasculature both in vivo and in vitro. However, the role of hypoxia and ET-1 in the vascular remodelling during the development of pulmonary, hypertension is unciear. This study demonstrated that ET-1 (0.1nmol/L to 100nmol./L)increased the 3H]thymldine uptake in a dose-dependent manner in cuhured bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells(PASMC), which was enhanced by exposing PASMC to hypoxia (2% O2, 93%N2,5%CO2). BQ123, the specific antagonist of endot helin receptor subtype A, eiLmLnated the ET-1 medicated proliferati0n of PASMC and the cooperative effect of hypoxia. Some dilatory drugs could inhibite the mitogenic effect of ET-1. We also observed that hypoxia significantiy increased [3H]thymldine uptake in PASMC without ET-1 and BQ123 could inhibite this effect. Radioimmunoassay suggested that there was an autocrine of ET-1 in cultured PASMC which was enhanced by hypoxia significantly.

  4. Regulation of CCL5 expression in smooth muscle cells following arterial injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Liu

    Full Text Available Chemokines play a crucial role in inflammation and in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis by recruiting inflammatory immune cells to the endothelium. Chemokine CCL5 has been shown to be involved in atherosclerosis progression. However, little is known about how CCL5 is regulated in vascular smooth muscle cells. In this study we report that CCL5 mRNA expression was induced and peaked in aorta at day 7 and then declined after balloon artery injury, whereas IP-10 and MCP-1 mRNA expression were induced and peaked at day 3 and then rapidly declined.The expression of CCL5 receptors (CCR1, 3 & 5 were also rapidly induced and then declined except CCR5 which expression was still relatively high at day 14 after balloon injury. In rat smooth muscle cells (SMCs, similar as in aorta CCL5 mRNA expression was induced and kept increasing after LPS plus IFN-gamma stimulation, whereas IP-10 mRNA expression was rapidly induced and then declined. Our data further indicate that induction of CCL5 expression in SMCs was mediated by IRF-1 via binding to the IRF-1 response element in CCL5 promoter. Moreover, p38 MAPK was involved in suppression of CCL5 and IP-10 expression in SMCs through common upstream molecule MKK3. The downstream molecule MK2 was required for p38-mediated CCL5 but not IP-10 inhibition. Our findings indicate that CCL5 induction in aorta and SMCs is mediated by IRF-1 while activation of p38 MAPK signaling inhibits CCL5 and IP-10 expression. Methods targeting MK2 expression could be used to selectively regulate CCL5 but not IP-10 expression in SMCs.

  5. Synergistic effects of matrix nanotopography and stiffness on vascular smooth muscle cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaterji, Somali; Kim, Peter; Choe, Seung H; Tsui, Jonathan H; Lam, Christoffer H; Ho, Derek S; Baker, Aaron B; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-08-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) retain the ability to undergo modulation in their phenotypic continuum, ranging from a mature contractile state to a proliferative, secretory state. vSMC differentiation is modulated by a complex array of microenvironmental cues, which include the biochemical milieu of the cells and the architecture and stiffness of the extracellular matrix. In this study, we demonstrate that by using UV-assisted capillary force lithography (CFL) to engineer a polyurethane substratum of defined nanotopography and stiffness, we can facilitate the differentiation of cultured vSMCs, reduce their inflammatory signature, and potentially promote the optimal functioning of the vSMC contractile and cytoskeletal machinery. Specifically, we found that the combination of medial tissue-like stiffness (11 MPa) and anisotropic nanotopography (ridge width_groove width_ridge height of 800_800_600 nm) resulted in significant upregulation of calponin, desmin, and smoothelin, in addition to the downregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, tissue factor, interleukin-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Further, our results allude to the mechanistic role of the RhoA/ROCK pathway and caveolin-1 in altered cellular mechanotransduction pathways via differential matrix nanotopography and stiffness. Notably, the nanopatterning of the stiffer substrata (1.1 GPa) resulted in the significant upregulation of RhoA, ROCK1, and ROCK2. This indicates that nanopatterning an 800_800_600 nm pattern on a stiff substratum may trigger the mechanical plasticity of vSMCs resulting in a hypercontractile vSMC phenotype, as observed in diabetes or hypertension. Given that matrix stiffness is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and that CFL can create different matrix nanotopographic patterns with high pattern fidelity, we are poised to create a combinatorial library of arterial test beds, whether they are healthy, diseased, injured, or aged. Such

  6. Phospholipase D signaling in serotonin-induced mitogenesis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Fanburg, B L

    2008-09-01

    We have previously reported the participation of mitogen-activated protein, Rho, and phosphoinositide-3 (PI3) kinases in separate pathways in serotonin (5-HT)-induced proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In this study, we investigated the possible participation of phospholipase D (PLD) and phosphatidic acid (PA) in this growth process. 5-HT stimulated a time-dependent increase in [(3)H]phosphatidylbutanol and PA generation. Exposure of SMCs to 1-butanol or overexpression of an inactive mutant of human PLD1R898R blocked 5-HT-induced proliferation. Furthermore, 1-butanol inhibited 5-HT activation of S6K1 and S6 protein, downstream effectors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), by 80 and 72%, respectively, and partially blocked activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by 30% but had no effect on other associated signaling pathways. Exogenous PA caused cellular proliferation and revitalized cyclin D1 expression by 5-HT of the 1-butanol-treated cells. PA also reproduced activations by 5-HT of mTOR, S6K1, and ERK. Transfection with inactive human PLD1 reduced 5-HT-induced activation of S6K1 by approximately 50%. Inhibition of 5-HT receptor 2A (R 2A) with ketaserin blocked PLD activation by 5-HT. Inhibition with PI3-kinase inhibitor failed to block either activation of PLD by 5-HT or PA-dependent S6K1 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that ligation of the 5-HTR 2A by 5-HT initiates PLD activation in SMCs, and that its product, PA, is an early signaling molecule in 5-HT-induced pulmonary artery SMC proliferation. Signaling by PA produces its downstream effects primarily through the mTOR/S6K1 pathway and to a lesser extent through the ERK pathway. Hydrolysis of cell membrane lipid may be important in vascular effects of 5-HT.

  7. The phytoestrogen ginsensoside Re activates potassium channels of vascular smooth muscle cells through PI3K/Akt and nitric oxide pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaya, Yutaka; Mawatari, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Akira; Harada, Nagakatsu; Hata, Akiko; Yasui, Sonoko

    2007-08-01

    In vascular smooth muscle cells, large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (K(Ca) channels) play a pivotal role in determining membrane potential, and thereby the vascular tone. Ginsenoside Re, a phytochemical from ginseng, is reported to activate this channel, but its precise mechanism is unsolved. Patch clamp studies showed that ginsenoside Re activates K(Ca) channels in the arterial smooth muscle cell line A10 in a dose-dependent manner. The channel-opening effect of ginsenoside Re was inhibited by 1 microM L-NIO, an inhibitor of eNOS, but not by 3 microM SMTC, an inhibitor of nNOS, indicating that ginsenoside Re activated K(Ca) channels through activation of eNOS. SH-6 (10 microM), an Akt inhibitor, and wortmannin, a PI3-kinase inhibitor, completely blocked activation of K(Ca) channels by ginsenoside Re, indicating that it activates eNOS via a c-Src/PI3-kinase/Akt-dependent mechanism. In addition, the ginsenoside Re-induced activation of eNOS and K(Ca) channel was blocked by 10 microM ICI 182, 780, an inhibitor of membrane estrogen receptor-alpha, suggesting that eNOS activation occurs via a non-genomic pathway of this receptor. In conclusion, ginsenoside Re releases NO via a membrane sex steroid receptors, resulting in K(Ca) channel activation in vascular smooth muscle cells, promoting vasodilation and preventing severe arterial contraction.

  8. Embryonic origins of human vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for in vitro modeling and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sanjay; Iyer, Dharini; Granata, Alessandra

    2014-06-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) arise from multiple origins during development, raising the possibility that differences in embryological origins between SMCs could contribute to site-specific localization of vascular diseases. In this review, we first examine the developmental pathways and embryological origins of vascular SMCs and then discuss in vitro strategies for deriving SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We then review in detail the potential for vascular disease modeling using iPSC-derived SMCs and consider the pathological implications of heterogeneous embryonic origins. Finally, we touch upon the role of human ESC-derived SMCs in therapeutic revascularization and the challenges remaining before regenerative medicine using ESC- or iPSC-derived cells comes of age.

  9. Mutations in Smooth Muscle Alpha-Actin (ACTA2) Cause Coronary Artery Disease, Stroke, and Moyamoya Disease, Along with Thoracic Aortic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dong-Chuan; Papke, Christina L.; Tran-Fadulu, Van; Regalado, Ellen S.; Avidan, Nili; Johnson, Ralph Jay; Kim, Dong H.; Pannu, Hariyadarshi; Willing, Marcia C.; Sparks, Elizabeth; Pyeritz, Reed E.; Singh, Michael N.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Grotta, James C.; Marian, Ali J.; Boerwinkle, Eric A.; Frazier, Lorraine Q.; LeMaire, Scott A.; Coselli, Joseph S.; Estrera, Anthony L.; Safi, Hazim J.; Veeraraghavan, Sudha; Muzny, Donna M.; Wheeler, David A.; Willerson, James T.; Yu, Robert K.; Shete, Sanjay S.; Scherer, Steven E.; Raman, C.S.; Buja, L. Maximilian; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2009-01-01

    The vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific isoform of α-actin (ACTA2) is a major component of the contractile apparatus in SMCs located throughout the arterial system. Heterozygous ACTA2 mutations cause familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD), but only half of mutation carriers have aortic disease. Linkage analysis and association studies of individuals in 20 families with ACTA2 mutations indicate that mutation carriers can have a diversity of vascular diseases, including premature onset of coronary artery disease (CAD) and premature ischemic strokes (including Moyamoya disease [MMD]), as well as previously defined TAAD. Sequencing of DNA from patients with nonfamilial TAAD and from premature-onset CAD patients independently identified ACTA2 mutations in these patients and premature onset strokes in family members with ACTA2 mutations. Vascular pathology and analysis of explanted SMCs and myofibroblasts from patients harboring ACTA2 suggested that increased proliferation of SMCs contributed to occlusive diseases. These results indicate that heterozygous ACTA2 mutations predispose patients to a variety of diffuse and diverse vascular diseases, including TAAD, premature CAD, ischemic strokes, and MMD. These data demonstrate that diffuse vascular diseases resulting from either occluded or enlarged arteries can be caused by mutations in a single gene and have direct implications for clinical management and research on familial vascular diseases. PMID:19409525

  10. UAP56 is an important mediator of Angiotensin II/platelet derived growth factor induced vascular smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahni, Abha [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Wang, Nadan [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Center for Translational Medicine, Department of Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Alexis, Jeffrey, E-mail: jeffrey_alexis@urmc.rochester.edu [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Knockdown of UAP56 inhibits Angiotensin II/PDGF induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. ► UAP56 is a positive regulator of E2F transcriptional activation. ► UAP56 is present in the vessel wall of low flow carotid arteries. -- Abstract: Angiotensin (Ang) II and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are important mediators of pathologic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. Identifying downstream mediators of Ang II and PDGF signaling may provide insights for therapies to improve vascular proliferative diseases. We have previously demonstrated that breakpoint cluster region (Bcr) is an important mediator of Ang II/PDGF signaling in VSMC. We have recently reported that the DExD/H box protein UAP56 is an interacting partner of Bcr in regulating VSMC DNA synthesis. We hypothesized that UAP56 itself is an important regulator of VSMC proliferation. In this report we demonstrate that knockdown of UAP56 inhibits Ang II/PDGF induced VSMC DNA synthesis and proliferation, and inhibits E2F transcriptional activity. In addition, we demonstrate that UAP56 is present in the vessel wall of low-flow carotid arteries. These findings suggest that UAP56 is a regulator of VSMC proliferation and identify UAP56 as a target for preventing vascular proliferative disease.

  11. Arterial vascularization of the brain of the agouti (Dasyprocta aguti Linnaeus, 1766

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Sávio Bessa da Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The agouti, a rodent that is geographically distributed throughout South America, is greatly valued for its meat. This paper describes the arterial vascularization of the base of the agouti’s brain, characterizing behavior, and arterial origin and distribution. Ten animals from the Center for the Multiplication of Wild Animals (CEMAS/UFERSA were used and the study was approved by SISBIO (report number 32413- 1 and the Ethics Committee on Animal Use (CEUA/UFERSA (protocol 02/2010. After euthanasia, the animals were incised in the thoracic cavity by an injection of red-stained Neoprene latex 650 and the skulls were subsequently opened. The brains were extracted from the skulls for ventral surface analysis and then fixed in an aqueous 10% formaldehyde solution. The agouti’s arterial vascularization of the brain has two main components, namely the carotid and vertebrobasilar systems. The agouti’s carotid system accounts for vascularization of almost the entire forebrain, while the vertebrobasilar system accounts for vascularization of almost the entire posterior brain (medulla oblongata, pyramid, trapezoid body, cerebellum, bridge, and part of the third caudal section of the forebrain through the caudal cerebral arteries originating from the terminal branches of the basilar artery. The main arteries on the brain surface include the basilar artery, which is unique, and the arterial pairs, specifically the vertebral arteries, cerebellar caudal arteries, trigeminal artery, rostral cerebellar artery, basilar terminal branch artery, cerebral caudal artery, communicating caudal branch of the cerebral carotid artery, cerebral carotid artery, communicating branch rostral cerebral carotid artery, choroidal rostral artery, medial branch of the communicating branch rostral artery, internal ophthalmic artery, middle cerebral artery, and rostral cerebral artery.

  12. Transmembrane Protein 184A Is a Receptor Required for Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Responses to Heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Raymond J; Slee, Joshua B; Farwell, Sara Lynn N; Li, Yaqiu; Barthol, Trista; Patton, Walter A; Lowe-Krentz, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Vascular cell responses to exogenous heparin have been documented to include decreased vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation following decreased ERK pathway signaling. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which heparin interacts with cells to induce those responses has remained unclear. Previously characterized monoclonal antibodies that block heparin binding to vascular cells have been found to mimic heparin effects. In this study, those antibodies were employed to isolate a heparin binding protein. MALDI mass spectrometry data provide evidence that the protein isolated is transmembrane protein 184A (TMEM184A). Commercial antibodies against three separate regions of the TMEM184A human protein were used to identify the TMEM184A protein in vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. A GFP-TMEM184A construct was employed to determine colocalization with heparin after endocytosis. Knockdown of TMEM184A eliminated the physiological responses to heparin, including effects on ERK pathway activity and BrdU incorporation. Isolated GFP-TMEM184A binds heparin, and overexpression results in additional heparin uptake. Together, these data support the identification of TMEM184A as a heparin receptor in vascular cells.

  13. Smooth muscle cell-derived carbon monoxide is a regulator of vascular cGMP.

    OpenAIRE

    Morita, T.; Perrella, M A; Lee, M E; Kourembanas, S

    1995-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a product of the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO; EC 1.14.99.3). In vascular smooth muscle cells, exogenously administered CO increases cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), which is an important regulator of vessel tone. We report here that smooth muscle cells produce CO via HO and that it regulates cGMP levels in these cells. Hypoxia, which has profound effects on vessel tone, significantly increased the transcriptional rate of the HO-1 gene resulting in correspondi...

  14. Expression and Suppressive Effects of Interleukin-19 on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Pathophysiology and Development of Intimal Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ying; Sommerville, Laura J.; Cuneo, Anthony; Kelemen, Sheri E.; Autieri, Michael V.

    2008-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory cytokines may play a protective role in the progression of vascular disease. The purpose of this study was to characterize interleukin (IL)-19 expression and function in the development of intimal hyperplasia, and discern a potential mechanism of its direct effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). IL-19 is an immunomodulatory cytokine, the expression of which is reported to be restricted to inflammatory cells. In the present study, we found that IL-19 is not expressed in quiescent VSMCs or normal arteries but is induced in human arteries by injury and in cultured human VSMCs by inflammatory cytokines. Recombinant IL-19 significantly reduced VSMC proliferation (37.1 ± 4.8 × 103 versus 72.2 ± 6.1 × 103 cells/cm2) in a dose-dependent manner. IL-19 adenoviral gene transfer significantly reduced proliferation and neointimal formation in balloon angioplasty-injured rat carotid arteries (0.172 ± 29.9, versus 0.333 ± 71.9, and 0.309 ± 56.6 μm2). IL-19 induced activation of STAT3 as well as the expression of the suppressor of cytokine signaling 5 (SOCS5) in VSMCs. IL-19 treatment significantly reduced the activation of p44/42 and p38 MAPKs in stimulated VSMCs. Additionally, SOCS5 was found to interact with both p44/42 and p38 MAPKs in IL-19-treated human VSMCs. This is the first description of the expression of both IL-19 and SOCS5 in VSMCs and of the functional interaction between SOCS5 and MAPKs. We propose that through induction of SOCS5 and inhibition of signal transduction, IL-19 expression in VSMCs may represent a novel, protective, autocrine response of VSMCs to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:18669613

  15. Diabetic conditions promote binding of monocytes to vascular smooth muscle cells and their subsequent differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Li; Park, Jehyun; Cai, Qiangjun; Lanting, Linda; Reddy, Marpadga A; Natarajan, Rama

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes is associated with significantly accelerated rates of atherosclerosis, key features of which include the presence of excessive macrophage-derived foam cells in the subendothelial space. We examined the hypothesis that enhanced monocyte-vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) interactions leading to subendothelial monocyte retention and differentiation to macrophages under diabetic conditions may be underlying mechanisms. Human aortic VSMCs (HVSMCs) treated with diabetic stimuli high gluco...

  16. Voltage-dependent effects of barnidipine in rat vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, J W; Korstanje, C; Nawrath, H

    2003-08-01

    The effects of the dihydropyridine nifedipine and its more lipophilic congener, barnidipine, were investigated in smooth muscle preparations from the rat in resting and depolarizing conditions. Both drugs relaxed precontracted aortic rings more potently in depolarizing conditions, barnidipine being more potent than nifedipine. Currents through Ca2+ channels in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (A7r5) and in isolated rat cardiomyocytes were reduced more potently by both drugs at a holding potential of -40 mV than at -80 mV. However, barnidipine and nifedipine were more effective in reducing the current in A7r5 cells than in cardiomyocytes. The IC(50) obtained in aortic rings and in A7r5 cells were similar for barnidipine but an order of magnitude different for nifedipine. The results show that, in depolarizing conditions, barnidipine was more effective than nifedipine. It is suggested that the higher potency of barnidipine acting in vascular smooth muscle is related to both a higher affinity to the inactivated state of vascular Ca2+ channels and to a more lipophilic property as compared with nifedipine.

  17. Vascularization of the facial bones by facial artery: implications for full face allotransplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Rampazzo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background-The maxillary artery is recognized as the main vascular supply of the facial bones; nonetheless clinical evidence supports a co-dominant role for the facial artery. This study explores the extent of the facial skeleton within a facial allograft that can be harvested based on the facial artery. Methods-Twenty-three cadaver heads were used in this study. In 12 heads, the right facial, superficial temporal and maxillary arteries were injected. In 1 head, facial artery angiography w...

  18. Impaired LRP6-TCF7L2 Activity Enhances Smooth Muscle Cell Plasticity and Causes Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshni Srivastava

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in Wnt-signaling coreceptor LRP6 have been linked to coronary artery disease (CAD by unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that reduced LRP6 activity in LRP6R611C mice promotes loss of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC differentiation, leading to aortic medial hyperplasia. Carotid injury augmented these effects and led to partial to total vascular obstruction. LRP6R611C mice on high-fat diet displayed dramatic obstructive CAD and exhibited an accelerated atherosclerotic burden on LDLR knockout background. Mechanistically, impaired LRP6 activity leads to enhanced non-canonical Wnt signaling, culminating in diminished TCF7L2 and increased Sp1-dependent activation of PDGF signaling. Wnt3a administration to LRP6R611C mice improved LRP6 activity, led to TCF7L2-dependent VSMC differentiation, and rescued post-carotid-injury neointima formation. These findings demonstrate the critical role of intact Wnt signaling in the vessel wall, establish a causal link between impaired LRP6/TCF7L2 activities and arterial disease, and identify Wnt signaling as a therapeutic target against CAD.

  19. Onychin inhibits proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells by regulating cell cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming YANG; Hong-lin HUANG; Bing-yang ZHU; Qin-hui TUO; Duan-fang LIAO

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of onychin on the proliferation of cultured rat artery vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the presence of 10% new-borncalf serum (NCS). Methods: Rat VSMCs were incubated with onychin 1-50 μmol/L or genistein 10 μmol/L in the presence of 10% NCS for 24 h. The proliferation of VSMCs was measured by cell counting and MTS/PMS colorimetric assays. Cell cycle progression was evaluated by flow cytometry. Retinoblastoma (Rb) phosphorylation, and expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E were measured by Western blot assays. The tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was examined by immunoprecipitation techniques using anti-phospho-tyrosine antibodies. Results: The proliferation of VSMCs was accelerated significantly in the presence of 10% NCS. Onychin reduced the metabolic rate of MTS and the cell number of VSMCs in the presence of 10% NCS in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analy sis revealed that the G1-phase fraction ratio in the onychin group was higher than that in the 10% NCS group (85.2% vs 70.0%, P<0.01), while the S-phase fraction ratio in the onychin group was lower than that in 10% NCS group (4.3% vs 16.4%, P<0.01). Western blot analysis showed that onychin inhibited Rb phos phorylation and reduced the expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E. The effects of onychin on proliferation, the cell cycle and the expression of cyclins in VSMCs were similar to those of genistein, an inhibitor of tyrosine kinase. Furthermore immunoprecipitation studies showed that both onychin and genistein markedly inhibited the tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK1/2 induced by 10% NCS.Conclusion: Onychin inhibits the proliferation of VSMCs through G1 phase cell cycle arrest by decreasing the tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and the expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E, and sequentially inhibiting Rb phosphorylation.

  20. Metformin inhibits inflammatory response via AMPK-PTEN pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Ae [Department of Pharmacology, Aging-Associated Vascular Disease Research Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyoung Chul, E-mail: hcchoi@med.yu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, Aging-Associated Vascular Disease Research Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN was induced by metformin and inhibited by compound C and AMPK siRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin suppressed TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 and iNOS mRNA expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound C and bpv (pic) increased iNOS and COX-2 protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B activation was restored by inhibiting AMPK and PTEN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AMPK and PTEN regulated TNF-{alpha}-induced ROS production in VSMCs. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammation of the coronary arteries. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated by cytokines and chemokines accelerate the inflammatory response and migrate to the injured endothelium during the progression of atherosclerosis. Activation of AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor maintaining metabolic homeostasis, suppresses the inflammatory response. However, how AMPK regulates the inflammatory response is poorly understood. To identify the mechanism of this response, we focused on phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which is a negative regulator of inflammation. We investigated that activation of AMPK-induced PTEN expression and suppression of the inflammatory response through the AMPK-PTEN pathway in VSMCs. We treated with the well-known AMPK activator metformin to induce PTEN expression. PTEN was induced by metformin (2 mM) and inhibited by compound C (10 {mu}M) and AMPK siRNA. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) was used to induce inflammation. The inflammatory response was confirmed by cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B. Metformin suppressed COX-2 and iNOS mRNA and protein expression dose dependently. Treatment with compound C and bpv (pic) in the presence of metformin, iNOS and COX-2 protein expression increased. NF-{kappa}B activation decreased in response to metformin and was restored by inhibiting AMPK

  1. Resveratrol Increases Serum BDNF Concentrations and Reduces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Contractility via a NOS-3-Independent Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Wiciński

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol is a polyphenol that presents both antineuroinflammatory properties and the ability to interact with NOS-3, what contributes to vasorelaxation. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF, a molecule associated with neuroprotection in many neurodegenerative disorders, is considered as an important element of maintaining stable cerebral blood flow. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs are considered to be an important element in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration and a potential preventative target by agents which reduce the contractility of the vessels. Our main objectives were to define the relationship between serum and long-term oral resveratrol administration in the rat model, as well as to assess the effect of resveratrol on phenylephrine- (PHE- induced contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. Moreover, we attempt to define the dependence of contraction mechanisms on endothelial NO synthase. Experiments were performed on Wistar rats (n=17 pretreated with resveratrol (4 weeks; 10 mg/kg p.o. or placebo. Serum BDNF levels were quantified after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment with ELISA. Contraction force was measured on isolated and perfused tail arteries as the increase of perfusion pressure with a constant flow. Values of serum BNDF in week 0 were 1.18±0.12 ng/mL (treated and 1.17±0.13 ng/mL (control (p = ns. After 2 weeks of treatment, BDNF in the treatment group was higher than in controls, 1.52±0.23 ng/mL and 1.24±0.13 ng/mL, respectively. (p=0.02 Following 4 weeks of treatment, BDNF values were higher in the resveratrol group compared to control 1.64±0.31 ng/mL and 1.32±0.26 ng/mL, respectively (p=0.031. EC50 values obtained for PHE in resveratrol pretreated arteries were significantly higher than controls (5.33±1.7 × 10−7 M/L versus 4.53±1.2 × 10−8 M/L, p<0.05. These results show a significant increase in BDNF concentration in the resveratrol pretreated group. The reactivity of resistant

  2. Fibroblast growth factor-2 induces osteogenic differentiation through a Runx2 activation in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, Takehiro; Sato, Hiroko; Shimizu, Takehisa; Tanaka, Toru; Matsui, Hiroki; Kawai-Kowase, Keiko; Sato, Mahito; Iso, Tatsuya; Arai, Masashi [Department of Medicine and Biological Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Kurabayashi, Masahiko, E-mail: mkuraba@med.gunma-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biological Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan)

    2010-04-02

    Expression of bone-associated proteins and osteoblastic transcription factor Runx2 in arterial cells has been implicated in the development of vascular calcification. However, the signaling upstream of the Runx2-mediated activation of osteoblastic program in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is poorly understood. We examined the effects of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), an important regulator of bone formation, on osteoblastic differentiation of VSMC. Stimulation of cultured rat aortic SMC (RASMC) with FGF-2 induced the expression of the osteoblastic markers osteopontin (OPN) and osteocalcin. Luciferase assays showed that FGF-2 induced osteocyte-specific element (OSE)-dependent transcription. Downregulation of Runx2 by siRNA repressed the basal and FGF-2-stimulated expression of the OPN gene in RASMC. FGF-2 produced hydrogen peroxide in RASMC, as evaluated by fluorescent probe. Induction of OPN expression by FGF-2 was inhibited not only by PD98059 (MEK1 inhibitor) and PP1 (c-Src inhibitor), but also by an antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine. Nuclear extracts from FGF-2-treated RASMC exhibited increased DNA-binding of Runx2 to its target sequence. Immunohistochemistry of human coronary atherectomy specimens and calcified aortic tissues showed that expression of FGF receptor-1 and Runx2 was colocalized. In conclusion, these results suggest that FGF-2 plays a role in inducing osteoblastic differentiation of VSMC by activating Runx2 through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent- and oxidative stress-sensitive-signaling pathways.

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  11. Phenotype commitment in vascular smooth muscle cells derived from coronary atherosclerotic plaques: differential gene expression of endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ML Rossi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Unstable angina and myocardial infarction are the clinical manifestations of the abrupt thrombotic occlusion of an epicardial coronary artery as a result of spontaneous atherosclerotic plaque rupture or fissuring, and the exposure of highly thrombogenic material to blood. It has been demonstrated that the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs and impaired bioavailabilty of nitric oxide (NO are among the most important mechanisms involved in the progression of atherosclerosis. It has also been suggested that a NO imbalance in coronary arteries may be involved in myocardial ischemia as a result of vasomotor dysfunction triggering plaque rupture and the thrombotic response. We used 5’ nuclease assays (TaqMan™ PCRs to study gene expression in coronary plaques collected by means of therapeutic directional coronary atherectomy from 15 patients with stable angina (SA and 15 with acute coronary syndromes (ACS without ST elevation. Total RNA was extracted from the 30 plaques and the cDNA was amplified in order to determine endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS gene expression. Analysis of the results showed that the expression of eNOS was significantly higher (p<0.001 in the plaques from the ACS patients. Furthermore, isolated VSMCs from ACS and SA plaques confirmed the above pattern even after 25 plating passages. In situ RT-PCR was also carried out to co-localize the eNOS messengers and the VSMC phenotype.

  12. Cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells are resistant to methylamine toxicity: no correlation to semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, S. D.; Trent, M. B.; Boor, P. J.

    2001-01-01

    Methylamine (MA), a component of serum and a metabolite of nicotine and certain insecticides and herbicides, is metabolized by semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO). MA is toxic to cultured human umbilical vein and calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells. Endothelial cells, which do not exhibit endogenous SSAO activity, are exposed to SSAO circulating in serum. In contrast, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) do exhibit innate SSAO activity both in vivo and in vitro. This property, together with the critical localization of VSMC within the arterial wall, led us to investigate the potential toxicity of MA to VSMC. Cultured rat VSMC were treated with MA (10-5 to 1 M). In some cultures, SSAO was selectively inhibited with semicarbazide or MDL-72145 [(E)-2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-fluoroallylamine]. Cytotoxicity was measured via MTT, vital dye exclusion, and clonogenic assays. MA proved to be toxic to VSMC only at relatively high concentrations (LC(50) of 0.1 M). The inhibition of SSAO with semicarbazide or MDL-72145 did not increase MA toxicity, suggesting that the production of formaldehyde via tissue-bound, SSAO-mediated MA metabolism does not play a role in the minimal toxicity observed in isolated rat VSMC. The omission of fetal calf serum (FCS), which contains high SSAO activity, from media similarly showed little effect on cytotoxicity. We conclude that VSMC--in contrast to previous results in endothelial cells--are relatively resistant to MA toxicity, and SSAO does not play a role in VSMC injury by MA.

  13. INHIBITORY EFFECT OF ANGIOTENSIN Ⅱ TYPE 1 RECEPTOR-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN ON VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL GROWTH AND NEOINTIMAL FORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Li; Zhong-gao Wang; Xiu Chen; Xiao-dong Chen

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mechanism of a novel angiotensin n type 1 receptor-associated protein (ATRAP) interfering with angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 (AT1) receptor-mediated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) growth and neointimal formation. Methods VSMCs isolated from thoracic aorta of adult Sprague-Dawley ( SD) rats were used in this study. ATRAP Cdna was subcloned into pcDNA3 vector and then transfected into VSMCs. DNA synthesis and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phospho-ERK expressions in VSMCs were assayed by measurement of 3H thymidine incorporation and Western blotting, respectively. Morphological changes were observed in the balloon injured artery with or without transfection of ATRAP Cdna using 12-week-old male SD rats. Results ATRAP overexpression in VSMCs inhibited angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ) -induced 3H thymidine incorporation 48 hours after Ang Ⅱ stimulation (P < 0.05). In VSMC, Ang Ⅱ stimulation increased the phosphorylation of ERK, which reached the peak around 60 minutes. The activation of phospho-ERK was significantly decreased by ATRAP (P < 0.05). Neointimal formation was markedly inhibited by ATRAP overexpression in injuried arteries. Conclusions The AT1 receptor-derived activation of ERK plays an essential role in Ang Ⅱ-induced VSMC growth. The growth inhibitory effects of ATRAP might be due to interfering with AT1 receptor-mediated activation of ERK in VSMC growth and neointimal formation.

  14. Increased arterial vascular tone during the night in patients with essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, A; Burkert, A; Mardanzai, K;

    2007-01-01

    The time-dependent incidence of cardiovascular events points to an important role of chronobiology for arterial properties. To evaluate arterial properties in patients with essential hypertension, we assessed arterial vascular tone during sleep at night in patients with essential hypertension...

  15. c-Ski inhibits the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells via suppressing Smad3 signaling but stimulating p38 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Li, Ping; Zhang, Yan; Li, Gong-Bo; Zhou, Yuan-Guo; Yang, Kang; Dai, Shuang-Shuang

    2013-01-01

    Proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays key roles in the progression of intimal hyperplasia, but the molecular mechanisms that trigger VSMC proliferation after vascular injury remain unclear. c-Ski, a co-repressor of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling, was detected to express in VSMC of rat artery. During the course of arterial VSMC proliferation induced by balloon injury in rat, the endogenous protein expressions of c-Ski decreased markedly in a time-dependent manner. In vivo c-Ski gene delivery was found to significantly suppress balloon injury-induced VSMC proliferation and neointima formation. Further investigation in A10 rat aortic smooth muscle cells demonstrated that overexpression of c-Ski gene inhibited TGF-β1 (1 ng/ml)-induced A10 cell proliferation while knockdown of c-Ski by RNAi enhanced the stimulatory effect of TGF-β1 on A10 cell growth. Western blot for signaling detection showed that suppression of Smad3 phosphorylation while stimulating p38 signaling associated with upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27 was responsible for the inhibitory effect of c-Ski on TGF-β1-induced VSMC proliferation. These data suggest that the decrease of endogenous c-Ski expression is implicated in the progression of VSMC proliferation after arterial injury and c-Ski administration represents a promising role for treating intimal hyperplasia via inhibiting the proliferation of VSMC.

  16. On the evolution of arterial vascular patterns of tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, C G

    2011-11-01

    The factors that explain the diverse arrangement of the major arteries of tetrapods are not known. Here, I aim to illuminate some of the underpinnings of these patterns. I review the variation in the sauropsid left, right, and dorsal aortae regarding the origin of the gastrointestinal blood vessels and the relative diameters of left and right aortae where they join together to form the dorsal aorta. I focus on these features because the quality of blood that flows through these aortae can vary depending on the state of cardiac shunting and the size of the vessel can provide insight into the quantity of blood borne by the vessels. I then place the information in a phyletic, historical, and ecological context. The plesiomorphic pattern is for the gastrointestinal vessels to arise as segmental arteries from the dorsal aorta, which is formed from the confluence of left and right aortae with similar diameters. The pattern is well conserved with only two major variations. First, in several clades of reptiles (testudines, crocodilians, lizards of the genera Varanus and Hydrosaurus) a substantial portion of the gastrointestinal arteries arises from the left aorta, leaving the diameter of the left aorta smaller than the right at their confluence. I hypothesize that this vascular arrangement facilitates growth by allowing more alkaline blood to flow to the somatic (body wall) and appendicular circulations, which may promote bone deposition and inhibit resorption, whereas hypercapnic, acidic blood flows to the digestive viscera, which may provide CO(2) as a substrate for the synthesis of gastric acid, bicarbonate, fatty acids, glutamine, purine rings, as well as glucose from lactate. Second, in some snakes and lizards with snake-like body forms, such as Amphisbaenidae, the diameters of left and right aortae are asymmetrical at their confluence with the left aorta exceeding the right, but in members of the amphibian order Gymnophiona the right generally exceeds the left. This

  17. Expression pattern of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), their receptors and antagonists in primary endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, M; Wirz, W; Tag, C G; Mavituna, M; Emans, N; Korff, T; Stoldt, V; Gressner, A M; Kiefer, P

    2005-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are important angiogenic growth factors. While basic FGF (FGF2) is well established as a potent inducer of angiogenesis much less is known about other FGFs possibly expressed by EC. We investigated the expression of all known FGFs, their main tyrosine kinase receptors and antagonists by RT-PCR analysis in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) to obtain a complete expression profile of this important growth factor system in model endothelial cells (EC). In addition to FGFR1IIIc, which is considered as the major FGF receptor in EC, HUVECs express similar levels of FGFR3IIIc, detectable amounts of FGFR2IIIc and a new FGF receptor without an intracellular kinase domain (FGFR5). HUVECs express several secreted FGFs, including FGF5, 7, 8, 16 and 18 and two members of the fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs), not yet reported to be expressed in EC. The expression panel was compared with that obtained from human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and human aortic tissue. Human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) and HUVECs express the identical FGF receptor and ligand panel implicating that both cell types act, according the FGF signals more as an entity than as individual cell types. Expression of Fgf1, 2, 7, 16 and 18 and the antagonists Sprouty 2,3 and 4 was demonstrated for all analysed cDNAs. The IIIc isoforms of FGFR1 and 2 and the novel FGFR5 were expressed in the aorta, but expression of the FGF receptor 3 was not detected in cDNAs derived from aortic tissue. In the VSMC of rat aortic tissue and in HUASM cultured cells we could demonstrate FGF18 immunoreactivity in the nucleus of the cells. The expression of several secreted FGFs by EC may focus the view more on their paracrine effects on neighbouring cells during tissue regeneration or tumor formation.

  18. Mercury induces proliferation and reduces cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells through MAPK, oxidative stress and cyclooxygenase-2 pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguado, Andrea; Galán, María; Zhenyukh, Olha; Wiggers, Giulia A.; Roque, Fernanda R. [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); Redondo, Santiago [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Peçanha, Franck [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); Martín, Angela [Departamento de Bioquímica, Fisiología y Genética Molecular, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28922, Alcorcón (Spain); Fortuño, Ana [Área de Ciencias Cardiovasculares, Centro de Investigación Médica Aplicada, Universidad de Navarra, 31008, Pamplona (Spain); Cachofeiro, Victoria [Departamento de Fisiología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Tejerina, Teresa [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Salaices, Mercedes, E-mail: mercedes.salaices@uam.es [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2013-04-15

    Mercury exposure is known to increase cardiovascular risk but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain undetermined. We analyzed whether chronic exposure to HgCl{sub 2} affects vascular structure and the functional properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2 dependent pathways. Mesenteric resistance arteries and aortas from Wistar rats treated with HgCl{sub 2} (first dose 4.6 mg kg{sup −1}, subsequent doses 0.07 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}, 30 days) and cultured aortic VSMC stimulated with HgCl{sub 2} (0.05–5 μg/ml) were used. Treatment of rats with HgCl{sub 2} decreased wall thickness of the resistance and conductance vasculature, increased the number of SMC within the media and decreased SMC nucleus size. In VSMCs, exposure to HgCl{sub 2}: 1) induced a proliferative response and a reduction in cell size; 2) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity, gene and/or protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunit NOX-1, the EC- and Mn-superoxide dismutases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2); 3) induced activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized the proliferative response and the altered cell size induced by HgCl{sub 2}. Blockade of ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished the HgCl{sub 2}-induced Nox1 and COX-2 expression and normalized the alterations induced by mercury in cell proliferation and size. In conclusion, long exposure of VSMC to low doses of mercury activates MAPK signaling pathways that result in activation of inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2 that in turn induce proliferation of VSMC and changes in cell size. These findings offer further evidence that mercury might be considered an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: ► Chronic HgCl{sub 2} exposure induces vascular remodeling. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces proliferation and decreased cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces

  19. Differential effects of relaxin deficiency on vascular aging in arteries of male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinic, Maria; Tare, Marianne; Conrad, Kirk P; Parry, Laura J

    2015-08-01

    Exogenous treatment with the naturally occurring peptide relaxin increases arterial compliance and reduces vascular stiffness. In contrast, relaxin deficiency reduces the passive compliance of small renal arteries through geometric and compositional vascular remodeling. The role of endogenous relaxin on passive mechanical wall properties in other vascular beds is unknown. Importantly, no studies have investigated the effects of aging in arteries of relaxin-deficient mice. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that mesenteric and femoral arteries stiffen with aging, and this is exacerbated with relaxin deficiency. Male wild-type (Rln (+/+)) and relaxin knockout (Rln (-/-)) mice were aged to 3, 6, 12, 18, and 23 months. Passive mechanical wall properties were assessed by pressure myography. In both genotypes, there was a significant increase in circumferential stiffening in mesenteric arteries with aging, whereas in the femoral artery, aging reduced volume compliance. This was associated with a reduced ability of the artery to lengthen with aging. The predominant phenotype observed in Rln (-/-) mice was reduced volume compliance in young mice in both mesenteric and femoral arteries. In summary, aging induces circumferential stiffening in mesenteric arteries and axial stiffening in femoral arteries. Passive mechanical wall properties of Rln (-/-) mouse arteries predominantly differ at younger ages compared with Rln (+/+) mice, suggesting that a lack of endogenous relaxin only has a minor effect on vascular aging.

  20. Vascular dysfunction induced in offspring by maternal dietary fat involves altered arterial polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Kelsall

    Full Text Available Nutrition during development affects risk of future cardiovascular disease. Relatively little is known about whether the amount and type of fat in the maternal diet affect vascular function in the offspring. To investigate this, pregnant and lactating rats were fed either 7%(w/w or 21%(w/w fat enriched in either 18:2n-6, trans fatty acids, saturated fatty acids, or fish oil. Their offspring were fed 4%(w/w soybean oil from weaning until day 77. Type and amount of maternal dietary fat altered acetylcholine (ACh-mediated vaso-relaxation in offspring aortae and mesenteric arteries, contingent on sex. Amount, but not type, of maternal dietary fat altered phenylephrine (Pe-induced vasoconstriction in these arteries. Maternal 21% fat diet decreased 20:4n-6 concentration in offspring aortae. We investigated the role of Δ6 and Δ5 desaturases, showing that their inhibition in aortae and mesenteric arteries reduced vasoconstriction, but not vaso-relaxation, and the synthesis of specific pro-constriction eicosanoids. Removal of the aortic endothelium did not alter the effect of inhibition of Δ6 and Δ5 desaturases on Pe-mediated vasoconstriction. Thus arterial smooth muscle 20:4n-6 biosynthesis de novo appears to be important for Pe-mediated vasoconstriction. Next we studied genes encoding these desaturases, finding that maternal 21% fat reduced Fads2 mRNA expression and increased Fads1 in offspring aortae, indicating dysregulation of 20:4n-6 biosynthesis. Methylation at CpG -394 bp 5' to the Fads2 transcription start site predicted its expression. This locus was hypermethylated in offspring of dams fed 21% fat. Pe treatment of aortae for 10 minutes increased Fads2, but not Fads1, mRNA expression (76%; P<0.05. This suggests that Fads2 may be an immediate early gene in the response of aortae to Pe. Thus both amount and type of maternal dietary fat induce altered regulation of vascular tone in offspring though differential effects on vaso-relaxation, and

  1. Gallic acid tailoring surface functionalities of plasma-polymerized allylamine-coated 316L SS to selectively direct vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell fate for enhanced endothelialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhilu; Xiong, Kaiqin; Qi, Pengkai; Yang, Ying; Tu, Qiufen; Wang, Jin; Huang, Nan

    2014-02-26

    The creation of a platform for enhanced vascular endothelia cell (VEC) growth while suppressing vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation offers possibility for advanced coatings of vascular stents. Gallic acid (GA), a chemically unique phenolic acid with important biological functions, presents benefits to the cardiovascular disease therapy because of its superior antioxidant effect and a selectivity to support the growth of ECs more than SMCs. In this study, GA was explored to tailor such a multifunctional stent surface combined with plasma polymerization technique. On the basis of the chemical coupling reaction, GA was bound to an amine-group-rich plasma-polymerized allylamine (PPAam) coating. The GA-functionalized PPAam (GA-PPAam) surface created a favorable microenvironment to obtain high ECs and SMCs selectivity. The GA-PPAam coating showed remarkable enhancement in the adhesion, viability, proliferation, migration, and release of nitric oxide (NO) of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The GA-PPAam coating also resulted in remarkable inhibition effect on human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell (HUASMC) adhesion and proliferation. These striking findings may provide a guide for designing the new generation of multifunctional vascular devices.

  2. Benefits of Synchrotron Microangiography for Dynamic Studies of Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Roles in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, James T.; Schwenke, Daryl O.; Jenkins, Mathew J.; Edgley, Amanda J.; Sonobe, Takashi; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Umetani, Keiji; Eppel, Gabriela A.; Evans, Roger G.; Okura, Yasuhiko; Shirai, Mikiyasu

    2010-07-01

    Changes in endothelial and smooth muscle function compromise organ perfusion in the chronic disease states of diabetes, atherosclerosis and hypertension. Moreover, vascular dysfunction increases the likelihood of lethal acute events such as myocardial infarction and stroke, which are now leading causes of adult mortality. Many circulating and local tissue factors in these disease states contribute to impaired vasomotor regulation of the arterial vessels, leading to spasm, chronic constriction and eventually vessel remodelling. X-ray contrast absorption imaging allows assessment of vessel lumen diameter and the factors contributing to steady-state vessel calibre, however, conventional clinical devices (>200 μm resolution) are not adequate to detect microvessels or accurately assess function in real time. Using synchrotron imaging we are now able to detect small vessel calibres (˜30 μm) and quantify regional differences in calibre even under conditions of high heart rate (>500 bpm). Herein we describe recent experiments that were conducted at the Japanese Synchrotron, SPring-8 using anaesthetised Sprague-Dawley rats and C57Bl/6 mice and a synchrotron radiation contrast angiography (single narrow energy bandwidth) approach based on selective arterial injection of iodine contrast agents. Application of this approach to imaging of the heart and other vasculatures are described. Our studies show that within-animal comparisons of 3-4 branching orders of arterial vessels are possible using small bolus contrast injections and appropriate contrast washout times (15-30 min) in many organ systems. Determination of relative calibre changes before and after any treatment allows us to evaluate the contributions of different endogenous factors and ligand-receptor pathways in the maintenance of vasomotor tone. Finally, we will present our findings relating to novel therapies to prevent endothelial dysfunction in heart failure.

  3. Agonistic Anti-PDGF Receptor Autoantibodies from Patients with Systemic Sclerosis Impact Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells Function In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svegliati, Silvia; Amico, Donatella; Spadoni, Tatiana; Fischetti, Colomba; Finke, Doreen; Moroncini, Gianluca; Paolini, Chiara; Tonnini, Cecilia; Grieco, Antonella; Rovinelli, Marina; Gabrielli, Armando

    2017-01-01

    One of the earliest events in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is microvasculature damage with intimal hyperplasia and accumulation of cells expressing PDGF receptor. Stimulatory autoantibodies targeting PDGF receptor have been detected in SSc patients and demonstrated to induce fibrosis in vivo and convert in vitro normal fibroblasts into SSc-like cells. Since there is no evidence of the role of anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of SSc vascular lesions, we investigated the biologic effect of agonistic anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies from SSc patients on human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and the signaling pathways involved. The synthetic (proliferation, migration, and type I collagen gene α1 chain expression) and contractile (smooth muscle-myosin heavy chain and smooth muscle-calponin expression) profiles of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells were assessed in vitro after incubation with SSc anti-PDGF receptors stimulatory autoantibodies. The role of reactive oxygen species, NOX isoforms, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was investigated. Human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells acquired a synthetic phenotype characterized by higher growth rate, migratory activity, gene expression of type I collagen α1 chain, and less expression of markers characteristic of the contractile phenotype such as smooth muscle-myosin heavy chain and smooth muscle-calponin when stimulated with PDGF and autoantibodies against PDGF receptor, but not with normal IgG. This phenotypic profile is mediated by increased generation of reactive oxygen species and expression of NOX4 and mTORC1. Our data indicate that agonistic anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies may contribute to the pathogenesis of SSc intimal hyperplasia. PMID:28228756

  4. 肺动脉平滑肌细胞增殖相关因子与肺动脉高压%Relevant factors of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells proliferation and pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锋; 庞玉生; 劳金泉

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH)is a disease of unknown etiology that leads to a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR),if untreated,ultimately right heart failure and high mortality.It is concerted pulmonary vascular contraction and vascular remodeling are the 2 main courses of physiology and pathology leading to PAH,especially the significant role of proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.A lot of relevant factors are revealed to take a participation into regulating the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and finally PAH.%肺动脉高压是一不明原因导致的肺血管阻力不断增加的疾病,若未经治疗,最终导致右心衰竭和高病死率。肺血管收缩和血管重塑被认为是导致肺动脉高压的2个主要病理生理变化,特别是肺动脉平滑肌细胞的增殖起了重要的作用。研究表明许多相关因子参与肺动脉平滑肌细胞增殖的调控,从而导致肺动脉高压的发生。

  5. Downregulation of L-type Ca2+ channel in rat mesenteric arteries leads to loss of smooth muscle contractile phenotype and inward hypertrophic remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtseva, Olga; Herum, Kate Møller; Dam, Vibeke Secher; Straarup, Marthe Simonsen; Kamaev, Dmitry; Briggs Boedtkjer, Donna M; Matchkov, Vladimir V; Aalkjær, Christian

    2014-05-01

    L-type Ca(2+) channels (LTCCs) are important for vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) contraction, as well as VSMC differentiation, as indicated by loss of LTCCs during VSMC dedifferentiation. However, it is not clear whether loss of LTCCs is a primary event underlying phenotypic modulation or whether loss of LTCCs has significance for vascular structure. We used small interference RNA (siRNA) transfection in vivo to investigate the role of LTCCs in VSMC phenotypic expression and structure of rat mesenteric arteries. siRNA reduced LTCC mRNA and protein expression in rat mesenteric arteries 3 days after siRNA transfection to 12.7 ± 0.7% and 47.3 ± 13%, respectively: this was associated with an increased resting intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). Despite the high [Ca(2+)]i, the contractility was reduced (tension development to norepinephrine was 3.5 ± 0.2 N/m and 0.8 ± 0.2 N/m for sham-transfected and downregulated arteries respectively; P arteries downregulated for LTCCs. Phenotypic changes were associated with a 45% increase in number of VSMCs and a consequent increase of media thickness and media area. Ten days after siRNA transfection arterial structure was again normalized. The contractile responses of LTCC-siRNA transfected arteries were elevated in comparison with matched controls 10 days after transfection. The study provides strong evidence for causal relationships between LTCC expression and VSMC contractile phenotype, as well as novel data addressing the complex relationship between VSMC contractility, phenotype, and vascular structure. These findings are relevant for understanding diseases, associated with phenotype changes of VSMC and vascular remodeling, such as atherosclerosis and hypertension.

  6. Intercellular ultrafast Ca(2+) wave in vascular smooth muscle cells: numerical and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, J C; Raynaud, F; Nguyen, D; Piacentini, N; Meister, J J

    2016-08-10

    Vascular smooth muscle cells exhibit intercellular Ca(2+) waves in response to local mechanical or KCl stimulation. Recently, a new type of intercellular Ca(2+) wave was observed in vitro in a linear arrangement of smooth muscle cells. The intercellular wave was denominated ultrafast Ca(2+) wave and it was suggested to be the result of the interplay between membrane potential and Ca(2+) dynamics which depended on influx of extracellular Ca(2+), cell membrane depolarization and its intercel- lular propagation. In the present study we measured experimentally the conduction velocity of the membrane depolarization and performed simulations of the ultrafast Ca(2+) wave along coupled smooth muscle cells. Numerical results reproduced a wide spectrum of experimental observations, including Ca(2+) wave velocity, electrotonic membrane depolarization along the network, effects of inhibitors and independence of the Ca(2+) wave speed on the intracellular stores. The numerical data also provided new physiological insights suggesting ranges of crucial model parameters that may be altered experimentally and that could significantly affect wave kinetics allowing the modulation of the wave characteristics experimentally. Numerical and experimental results supported the hypothesis that the propagation of membrane depolarization acts as an intercellular messenger mediating intercellular ultrafast Ca(2+) waves in smooth muscle cells.

  7. Influences on vascular wall smooth muscle cells with novel short-duration thermal angioplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunio, M.; Shimazaki, N.; Arai, T.; Sakurada, M.

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the influences on smooth muscle cells after our novel short-duration thermal angioplasty, Photo-thermo Dynamic Balloon Angioplasty (PTDBA), to reveal the mechanism that can suppress neo-intimal hyperplasia after PTDBA. We obtained the sufficient arterial dilatations by short-duration heating (angioplasty in vivo. The measured neo-intimal hyperplasia occupancy rate was less than 20% after PTDBA in vivo. We prospect that the inhibition of the growth factor's expression by stretch-fixing may result to suppress the neo-intimal hyperplasia. In addition, the decrease of smooth muscle cells' density in the vessel media by heating might be another reason for the neo-intimal hyperplasia suppression.

  8. Characterization of vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype in long-term culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, M; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Baldor, L; Low, R; Warshaw, D

    1989-02-01

    Studies of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells, during long-term in vitro subcultivation (up to 100 population doublings), have revealed phenotypic heterogeneity among cells, as characterized by differences in proliferative behavior, cell morphology, and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. In vivo, smooth muscle cells were spindle-shaped and expressed desmin and alpha-smooth muscle actin (50% of total actin) as their predominant cytoskeletal and contractile proteins. Within 24 h of culture, vimentin rather than desmin was the predominant intermediate filament protein, with little change in alpha-actin content. Upon initial subcultivation, all cells were flattened and fibroblastic in appearance with a concomitant fivefold reduction in alpha-actin content, whereas the beta and gamma nonmuscle actins predominated. In three out of four cell lines studied, fluctuations in proliferative activity were observed during the life span of the culture. These spontaneous fluctuations in proliferation were accompanied by coordinated changes in morphology and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. During periods of enhanced proliferation a significant proportion of cells reverted to their original spindle-shaped morphology with a simultaneous increase in alpha-actin content (20 to 30% of total actin). These results suggest that in long-term culture smooth muscle cells undergo spontaneous modulations in cell phenotype and may serve as a useful model for studying the regulation of intracellular protein expression.

  9. Heme oxygenase-1-derived carbon monoxide is an autocrine inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyton, Kelly J; Reyna, Sylvia V; Chapman, Gary B; Ensenat, Diana; Liu, Xiao-ming; Wang, Hong; Schafer, Andrew I; Durante, William

    2002-06-15

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) generate carbon monoxide (CO) via the catabolism of heme by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO). In the present study, we found that serum stimulated a time- and concentration-dependent increase in the levels of HO-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in vascular SMCs. The induction of HO-1 expression by serum was inhibited by actinomycin D or cycloheximide. In addition, serum stimulated HO activity, as reflected by an increase in the concentration of bilirubin in the culture media. Treatment of vascular SMCs with serum stimulated DNA synthesis and this was potentiated by the HO inhibitors, zinc and tin protoporphyrin-IX as well as by the CO scavenger, hemoglobin. The iron chelator desferrioxamine had no effect on DNA synthesis. However, exposure of vascular SMCs to exogenous CO inhibited serum-stimulated SMC proliferation and the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. In addition, CO arrested SMCs at the G(1)/S transition phase of the cell cycle and selectively blocked the serum-stimulated expression of cyclin A mRNA and protein without affecting the expression of cyclin D1 and E. CO also inhibited the serum-stimulated activation of cyclin A-associated kinase activity and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity. These results demonstrate that serum stimulates HO-1 gene expression and CO synthesis. Furthermore, they show that CO acts in a negative feedback fashion to inhibit vascular SMC growth by regulating specific components of the cell cycle machinery. The capacity of vascular mitogens to induce CO synthesis may provide a novel mechanism by which these agents modulate cell growth.

  10. Vascular reactivity of rabbit isolated renal and femoral resistance arteries in renal wrap hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khammy, Makhala M; Angus, James A; Wright, Christine E

    2016-02-15

    In rabbits with cellophane renal wrap hypertension, hindquarter and total vascular resistance changes to pressor and depressor agents are amplified compared to those of normotensive rabbits. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro pharmacodynamics of hypertensive and normotensive rabbit small artery segments isolated from the renal and hindquarter vascular beds. Using wire myography, the full range (Emax) and sensitivity (EC50) to a range of agonists of segments of renal interlobar (≈ 600 µm i.d.), renal arcuate (≈ 250 µm i.d.) and deep femoral branch (≈ 250 µm i.d.) arteries were assessed under normalised conditions of passive tension. Interlobar arteries from hypertensive rabbits were more sensitive (EC50) than those from normotensive rabbits to noradrenaline (6-fold), methoxamine (3-fold) and angiotensin II (3-fold). Arcuate artery reactivity was largely unaffected by hypertension. Deep femoral arteries from hypertensive rabbits had enhanced sensitivity only to noradrenaline (2-fold) and methoxamine (4-fold). Sensitivity to relaxation by acetylcholine was unaffected by hypertension in all arteries. Deep femoral arteries from hypertensive rabbits were more sensitive to sodium nitroprusside than normotensive counterparts. Adenosine caused little relaxation in renal arteries, but full relaxation in deep femoral arteries, unaltered by hypertension. This study found substantial heterogeneity in the pharmacodynamic profile of vessels isolated from different vascular beds and between arterial segments within the kidney. These profiles were differentially affected by hypertension suggesting that hypertension per se is not a resultant of general vascular dysfunction.

  11. Increased expression of osteoprotegerin in vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongshan MOU; Tianhua LEI; Luning ZHAO; Xiaojun ZHU; Mingui FU; Yuqing E CHEN

    2004-01-01

    Background Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a secreted protein of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, which regulates bone mass by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and activation. Although OPG is expressed ubiquitously and abundantly in many tissues and cell types including vascular cells, the role of OPG in other tissues is unknown.Our previous studies demonstrated that OPG was highly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and upregulated during vascular lesion formation. Methods and Results We documented, by Northern blot analysis,that the expression of OPG was more prevalent in the aorta and cultured VSMC from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SI-IR) compared to Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). In addition, we found that the expression of Angiotensin II (Ang II)type I receptor (AT1R) in SHR VSMC was at significantly increased levels than in WKY VSMC. Furthermore, Ang II potently induced the expression of OPG in VSMC in a time- and dose-dependent manner through the AT1R signaling pathway. Conclusions OPG expression was substantially greater in SHR VSMC, suggesting that OPG may be an important determinant of vascular remodeling in SHR.

  12. Mitochondrial metabolism and the control of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario eChiong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation and dedifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs are essential processes of vascular development. VSMCs have biosynthetic, proliferative and contractile roles in the vessel wall. Alterations in the differentiated state of the VSMCs play a critical role in the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension and vascular stenosis. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of molecular mechanisms involved in the control of VSMC proliferation, with particular focus on mitochondrial metabolism. Mitochondrial activity can be controlled by regulating mitochondrial dynamics, i.e. mitochondrial fusion and fission, and by regulating mitochondrial calcium handling through the interaction with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Alterations in both VSMC proliferation and mitochondrial function can be triggered by dysregulation of mitofusin-2, a small GTPase associated with mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial-ER interaction. Several lines of evidence highlight the relevance of mitochondrial metabolism in the control of VSMC proliferation, indicating a new area to be explored in the treatment of vascular diseases.

  13. Activating transcription factor-4 promotes mineralization in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Masashi; Miyazaki-Anzai, Shinobu; Keenan, Audrey L.; Shiozaki, Yuji; Okamura, Kayo; Chick, Wallace S.; Williams, Kristina; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Rahman, Shaikh Mizanoor; Tintut, Yin; Adams, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that upregulation of the ER stress–induced pro-osteogenic transcription factor ATF4 plays an important role in vascular calcification, a common complication in patients with aging, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study, we demonstrated the pathophysiological role of ATF4 in vascular calcification using global Atf4 KO, smooth muscle cell–specific (SMC-specific) Atf4 KO, and transgenic (TG) mouse models. Reduced expression of ATF4 in global ATF4-haplodeficient and SMC-specific Atf4 KO mice reduced medial and atherosclerotic calcification under normal kidney and CKD conditions. In contrast, increased expression of ATF4 in SMC-specific Atf4 TG mice caused severe medial and atherosclerotic calcification. We further demonstrated that ATF4 transcriptionally upregulates the expression of type III sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporters (PiT1 and PiT2) by interacting with C/EBPβ. These results demonstrate that the ER stress effector ATF4 plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification through increased phosphate uptake in vascular SMCs. PMID:27812542

  14. Activated mineralocorticoid receptor regulates micro-RNA-29b in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretschneider, Maria; Busch, Bianca; Mueller, Daniel; Nolze, Alexander; Schreier, Barbara; Gekle, Michael; Grossmann, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Inappropriately activated mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a risk factor for vascular remodeling with unclear molecular mechanism. Recent findings suggest that post-transcriptional regulation by micro-RNAs (miRs) may be involved. Our aim was to search for MR-dependent miRs in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to explore the underlying molecular mechanism and the pathologic relevance. We detected that aldosteroneviathe MR reduces miR-29bin vivoin murine aorta and in human primary and cultured VSMCs (ED50= 0.07 nM) but not in endothelial cells [quantitative PCR (qPCR), luciferase assays]. This effect was mediated by an increased decay of miR-29b in the cytoplasm with unchanged miR-29 family member or primary-miR levels. Decreased miR-29b led to an increase in extracellular matrix measured by ELISA and qPCR and enhanced VSMC migration in single cell-tracking experiments. Additionally, cell proliferation and the apoptosis/necrosis ratio (caspase/lactate dehydrogenase assay) was modulated by miR-29b. Enhanced VSMC migration by aldosterone required miR-29b regulation. Control experiments were performed with scrambled RNA and empty plasmids, by comparing aldosterone-stimulated with vehicle-incubated cells. Overall, our findings provide novel insights into the molecular mechanism of aldosterone-mediated vascular pathogenesis by identifying miR-29b as a pathophysiologic relevant target of activated MR in VSMCs and by highlighting the importance of miR processing for miR regulation.-Bretschneider, M., Busch, B., Mueller, D., Nolze, A., Schreier, B., Gekle, M., Grossmann, C. Activated mineralocorticoid receptor regulates micro-RNA-29b in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  15. Phenylephrine Decreases Vascular Tension in Goat Arteries in Specific Circumstances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu R Raj

    Full Text Available Phenylephrine (PE causes vasoconstriction through alpha adrenergic receptors. PE-induced vasodilatation has also been reported earlier in pre-constricted vessels. Here we demonstrate in spiral strips of goat arteries that addition of PE can decrease tone even from base-line levels (i.e. not pre-constricted and show that this process requires nitric oxide (NO and alpha adrenergic stimulation, but is cGMP-independent. Under control conditions, PE caused vasoconstriction, but under conditions where NO levels are higher, as with L-Arginine or sodium nitroprusside, PE decreased vessel tension. L-Arginine/PE combination was not able to decrease tension when alpha adrenoceptors were blocked with Phentolamine or endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS was blocked with Nω-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA. Propranolol, a beta blocker, was unable to prevent the reduction in tension by the L-Arginine/PE combination. Adrenaline and noradrenaline (and not isoproterenol also reduced vessel tension in the presence of L-Arginine. Even when NO levels were not enhanced, relieving NO from having to stimulate the enzyme soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC (either by using sGC blockers, namely ODQ or methylene blue, or by enhancing cGMP levels (with sildenafil which by negative feedback probably inhibits sGC led to PE-induced reduction of vascular tension. PMA-phorbol myristate acetate-an agonist which stimulates Protein Kinase C was able to prevent the ability of PE to reduce vascular tension in a high NO environment. Our conclusion is that PE reduces vascular tension through alpha adrenoceptors if there is excess NO availability to activate a putative pathway. Though the reduction of vessel tone by PE is dependent on NO, it is independent of cGMP. Prior treatment with PMA or PE itself can prevent further PE-induced reduction of tension in a high NO environment. The results here suggest, counter-intuitively, that alpha blockers may be of help in the treatment of septic shock

  16. Phenylephrine Decreases Vascular Tension in Goat Arteries in Specific Circumstances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Renu R.

    2016-01-01

    Phenylephrine (PE) causes vasoconstriction through alpha adrenergic receptors. PE-induced vasodilatation has also been reported earlier in pre-constricted vessels. Here we demonstrate in spiral strips of goat arteries that addition of PE can decrease tone even from base-line levels (i.e. not pre-constricted) and show that this process requires nitric oxide (NO) and alpha adrenergic stimulation, but is cGMP-independent. Under control conditions, PE caused vasoconstriction, but under conditions where NO levels are higher, as with L-Arginine or sodium nitroprusside, PE decreased vessel tension. L-Arginine/PE combination was not able to decrease tension when alpha adrenoceptors were blocked with Phentolamine or endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was blocked with Nω-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA). Propranolol, a beta blocker, was unable to prevent the reduction in tension by the L-Arginine/PE combination. Adrenaline and noradrenaline (and not isoproterenol) also reduced vessel tension in the presence of L-Arginine. Even when NO levels were not enhanced, relieving NO from having to stimulate the enzyme soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) (either by using sGC blockers, namely ODQ or methylene blue, or by enhancing cGMP levels (with sildenafil) which by negative feedback probably inhibits sGC) led to PE-induced reduction of vascular tension. PMA—phorbol myristate acetate—an agonist which stimulates Protein Kinase C was able to prevent the ability of PE to reduce vascular tension in a high NO environment. Our conclusion is that PE reduces vascular tension through alpha adrenoceptors if there is excess NO availability to activate a putative pathway. Though the reduction of vessel tone by PE is dependent on NO, it is independent of cGMP. Prior treatment with PMA or PE itself can prevent further PE-induced reduction of tension in a high NO environment. The results here suggest, counter-intuitively, that alpha blockers may be of help in the treatment of septic shock where

  17. Phenylephrine Decreases Vascular Tension in Goat Arteries in Specific Circumstances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Renu R; Subramani, Sathya

    2016-01-01

    Phenylephrine (PE) causes vasoconstriction through alpha adrenergic receptors. PE-induced vasodilatation has also been reported earlier in pre-constricted vessels. Here we demonstrate in spiral strips of goat arteries that addition of PE can decrease tone even from base-line levels (i.e. not pre-constricted) and show that this process requires nitric oxide (NO) and alpha adrenergic stimulation, but is cGMP-independent. Under control conditions, PE caused vasoconstriction, but under conditions where NO levels are higher, as with L-Arginine or sodium nitroprusside, PE decreased vessel tension. L-Arginine/PE combination was not able to decrease tension when alpha adrenoceptors were blocked with Phentolamine or endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was blocked with Nω-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA). Propranolol, a beta blocker, was unable to prevent the reduction in tension by the L-Arginine/PE combination. Adrenaline and noradrenaline (and not isoproterenol) also reduced vessel tension in the presence of L-Arginine. Even when NO levels were not enhanced, relieving NO from having to stimulate the enzyme soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) (either by using sGC blockers, namely ODQ or methylene blue, or by enhancing cGMP levels (with sildenafil) which by negative feedback probably inhibits sGC) led to PE-induced reduction of vascular tension. PMA-phorbol myristate acetate-an agonist which stimulates Protein Kinase C was able to prevent the ability of PE to reduce vascular tension in a high NO environment. Our conclusion is that PE reduces vascular tension through alpha adrenoceptors if there is excess NO availability to activate a putative pathway. Though the reduction of vessel tone by PE is dependent on NO, it is independent of cGMP. Prior treatment with PMA or PE itself can prevent further PE-induced reduction of tension in a high NO environment. The results here suggest, counter-intuitively, that alpha blockers may be of help in the treatment of septic shock where nitric

  18. Uhrf2 is important for DNA damage response in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tao; Cui, Shijun; Bian, Chunjing; Yu, Xiaochun

    2013-11-08

    Emerging evidence shows that Uhrf1 plays an important role in DNA damage response for maintaining genomic stability. Interestingly, Uhrf1 has a paralog Uhrf2 in mammals. Uhrf1 and Uhrf2 share similar domain architectures. However, the role of Uhrf2 in DNA damage response has not been studied yet. During the analysis of the expression level of Uhrf2 in different tissues, we found that Uhrf2 is highly expressed in aorta and aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. Thus, we studied the role of Uhrf2 in DNA damage response in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. Using laser microirradiation, we found that like Uhrf1, Uhrf2 was recruited to the sites of DNA damage. We dissected the functional domains of Uhrf2 and found that the TTD, PHD and SRA domains are important for the relocation of Uhrf2 to the sites of DNA damage. Moreover, depletion of Uhrf2 suppressed DNA damage-induced H2AX phosphorylation and DNA damage repair. Taken together, our results demonstrate the function of Uhrf2 in DNA damage response.

  19. Matrine inhibits the expression of adhesion molecules in activated vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Lihua; Ren, Yingang; Gao, Yanli; Kang, Li; Lu, Shaoping

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased expression of adhesion molecules in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Matrine is a main active ingredient of Sophora flavescens roots, which are used to treat inflammatory diseases. However, the effects of matrine on the expression of adhesion molecules in VSMCs have largely remained elusive. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of matrine on the expression of adhesion molecules in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α‑stimulated human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). The results showed that matrine inhibited the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule‑1 (VCAM‑1) and intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 (ICAM‑1) in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs. Matrine markedly inhibited the TNF‑α‑induced expression of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB p65 and prevented the TNF‑α‑caused degradation of inhibitor of NF‑κB; it also inhibited TNF‑α‑induced activation of mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, matrine inhibited the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that matrine inhibited the expression of VCAM‑1 and ICAM‑1 in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs via the suppression of ROS production as well as NF‑κB and MAPK pathway activation. Therefore, matrine may have a potential therapeutic use for preventing the advancement of atherosclerotic lesions.

  20. American ginseng inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation via suppressing Jak/Stat pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi; Wang, Wenjuan; Li, Siying; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Windust, Anthony; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Cui, Taixing

    2014-01-01

    Ethnopharmcological relevance Ginseng, a folk medicine which has been used for thousands of years in Asia, has been promoted for the treatment or prevention of health problems including cardiovascular disease. However, the molecular mechanism of ginseng-induced cardiovascular protection is unclear. Thus, we investigated signaling mechanism by which American ginseng inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, a key feature of diverse vascular disease. Materials and methods A standardized crude extract of American ginseng was supplied by the National Research Council of Canada, Institute for National Measurement Standards. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs) were exposed to fetal bovine serum (FBS), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), insulin, or angiotensin II (Ang II) to induce proliferation that was examined by measuring DNA synthesis and cell numbers. Western blot was applied to determine the activations of Jak, Stat, Akt, and ERK. Results American ginseng inhibited RASMC proliferation induced by FBS, PDGF, insulin or Ang II. American ginseng slightly increased both basal and FBS-, PDGF- or Ang II-induced activities of Akt and ERK in RASMCs; however, it dramatically inhibited the activation of Jak2 and Stat3. Conclusion These results demonstrate that American ginseng inhibits VSMC proliferation through suppressing the Jak/Stat pathway. PMID:23041701

  1. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine [Pôle de Recherche Cardiovasculaire, IREC, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Morel, Nicole, E-mail: nicole.morel@uclouvain.be [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium)

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  2. Effects of nitrendipine on growth activity in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, M P; Baldor, L; Warshaw, D M

    1988-01-01

    Proliferation and migration of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the arterial wall may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis and hypertension. If cell migration and proliferation are dependent on extracellular calcium, then treatment with calcium channel blockers such as nitrendipine may alter these cellular responses. In the studies reported here, proliferation and migration activities were assessed in cultured bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells exposed to nitrendipine. SMCs in long-term culture are characterized by periods of either stable or enhanced proliferative activity. During the stable periods, 1 microM nitrendipine has no effect on proliferation, but during periods of enhanced proliferation, 1 microM nitrendipine augments growth by approximately 20%. SMC migration rates and interdivision times were determined from analysis of time-lapse cinematography films. During stable periods of growth, cell migration rate was inversely related to interdivision time (i.e., fast migrating cells had the shortest interdivision times). Treatment with 1 microM nitrendipine abolished the relationship between migration rate and interdivision time and prolonged interdivision times. These data suggest that the ability of nitrendipine to alter SMC proliferation, interdivision time, and migration is dependent upon the overall proliferative state of the culture.

  3. Calphostin-C induction of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis proceeds through phospholipase D and microtubule inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xi-Long; Gui, Yu; Du, Guangwei; Frohman, Michael A; Peng, Dao-Quan

    2004-02-20

    Calphostin-C, a protein kinase C inhibitor, induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the mechanisms are not completely defined. Because apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells is critical in several proliferating vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty, we decided to investigate the mechanisms underlying the calphostin-C-induced apoptotic pathway. We show here that apoptosis is inhibited by the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid, a metabolite of phospholipase D (PLD), and that calphostin-C inhibits completely the activities of both isoforms of PLD, PLD1 and PLD2. Overexpression of either PLD1 or PLD2 prevented the vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal but not the calphostin-C-elicited apoptosis. These data suggest that PLDs have anti-apoptotic effects and that complete inhibition of PLD activity by calphostin-C induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis. We also report that calphostin-C induced microtubule disruption and that the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid inhibits calphostin-C effects on microtubules, suggesting a role for PLD in stabilizing the microtubule network. Overexpressing PLD2 in Chinese hamster ovary cells phenocopies this result, providing strong support for the hypothesis. Finally, taxol, a microtubule stabilizer, not only inhibited the calphostin-C-induced microtubule disruption but also inhibited apoptosis. We therefore conclude that calphostin-C induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibiting PLD activity and subsequent microtubule polymerization.

  4. Kaurane and pimarane-type diterpenes from the Viguiera species inhibit vascular smooth muscle contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Sergio R; Tirapelli, Carlos R; da Costa, Fernando B; de Oliveira, Ana M

    2006-08-01

    The research, development and use of natural products as therapeutic agents, especially those derived from plants, have been increasing in recent years. Despite the fact that plants provide a rich source of novel biologically active compounds, only a small percentage have been phytochemically investigated and studied for their medical potential. Viguiera is a genus that belongs to the family Asteraceae and to the sunflower tribe Heliantheae, which is widespread mostly in Mexico and in other areas of the Andes and upland areas of Brazil. A review on the secondary metabolites pointed out that sesquiterpene lactones and diterpenes, of the kaurane and pimarane-type, are the main compounds produced by these plants. Some reports have shown that kaurane- and pimarane-type diterpenes exert several biological activities such as anti-inflammatory action, antimicrobial and antispasmodic activities. Kaurenoic and pimaradienoic acids, which are the main secondary metabolites isolated by our research group from the roots of Viguiera robusta and V. arenaria, respectively, have been evaluated on vascular smooth muscle contractility. We showed that these diterpenoids are able to inhibit the vascular contractility mainly by blocking extracellular Ca(2+) influx. Additionally, in this review we discuss the structure-activity relationship of the diterpenes regarding their inhibitory activity on vascular contractility.

  5. SIRT1 inhibits angiotensin Ⅱ-induced vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Chihchuan Liang; Peng Gao; Huina Zhang; Houzao Chen; Wei Zheng; Xiang Lv; Tingting Xu; Yusheng Wei; Depei Liu

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ) stimulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) hypertrophy as a critical event in the development of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis.Sirtuin (SIRT) 1, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dependent deacetylase, has been demonstrated to exert protective effects in atherosclerosis by promoting endo-thelium-dependent vascular relaxation and reducing macrophage foam cell formation, but its role in VSMC hypertrophy remains unknown. In this study, we tried to investigate the effect of SIRTI on Ang Ⅱ-induced VSMC hypertrophy. Results showed that adenoviral-mediated over-expression of SIRT1 significantly inhibited Ang Ⅱ-induced VSMC hypertrophy, while knockdown of SIRT1 by RNAi resulted in an increased [3H]-leucine incorpor-ation of VSMC. Accordingly, nicotinamide adenine dinu-cleotide phosphate oxidase 1 (Nox1) expression induced by Ang Ⅱ was inhibited by SIRT1 in VSMCs. SIRT1 acti-vator resveratrol decreased, whereas endogenous SIRT1 inhibitor nicotinamide increased Nox1 expression in A7r5 VSMCs. Furthermore, transcription factor GATA-6 was involved in the down-regulation of Nox1 expression by SIRT1. These results provide new insight into SIRTI's anti-atherogenic properties by suppressing Ang Ⅱ-induced VSMC hypertrophy.

  6. Phenotypic Modulation of Mesenteric Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from Type 2 Diabetic Rats is Associated with Decreased Caveolin-1 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alicia Carrillo-Sepulveda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Diabetes-induced vascular complications are associated with vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC phenotypic modulation, switching from a contractile to a synthetic-proliferative phenotype. Loss of caveolin-1 is involved with proliferation of VSMCs. We tested the hypothesis that mesenteric VSMCs from type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK rat undergo phenotypic modulation and it is linked to decreased caveolin-1 expression. Methods: VSMCs were isolated from mesenteric arteries from GK rats and age-matched control Wistar rats. Western blotting was used to determine expression of target proteins such as caveolin-1, calponin (marker of differentiation, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, marker of proliferation. In addition, we measured intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS production using H2DCF-DA and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 by western blotting in VSMCs from GK stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, an endotoxin upregulated in diabetes. Results: Mesenteric VSMCs from diabetic GK rats exhibited decreased caveolin-1 and calponin expression and increased PCNA expression compared to control. Increased levels of ROS and phospho-ERK1/2 expression were also found in GK VSMCs. LPS augmented ROS and phosphorylated ERK1/2 levels to a greater extent in GK VSMCs than in control. Likewise, high glucose decreased caveolin-1 and calponin expression, increased PCNA expression and augmented ROS production in control mesenteric VSMCs. Conclusion: These results suggest that mesenteric VSMCs from diabetic GK rats undergo phenotypic modulation and it is associated with decreased caveolin-1 expression. These alterations may be due to enhanced inflammatory stimuli and glucose levels present in diabetic milieu.

  7. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta positively regulates Notch signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells: role in cell proliferation and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Shaunta; Cullen, John P; Morrow, David; Colombo, Alberto; Lally, Caitríona; Walls, Dermot; Redmond, Eileen M; Cahill, Paul A

    2011-09-01

    The role of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) in modulating Notch control of vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) growth (proliferation and apoptosis) was examined in vitro under varying conditions of cyclic strain and validated in vivo following changes in medial tension and stress. Modulation of GSK-3β in vSMC following ectopic expression of constitutively active GSK-3β, siRNA knockdown and pharmacological inhibition with SB-216763 demonstrated that GSK-3β positively regulates Notch intracellular domain expression, CBF-1/RBP-Jκ transactivation and downstream target gene mRNA levels, while concomitantly promoting vSMC proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis. In contrast, inhibition of GSK-3β attenuated Notch signaling and decreased vSMC proliferation and survival. Exposure of vSMC to cyclic strain environments in vitro using both a Flexercell™ Tension system and a novel Sylgard™ phantom vessel following bare metal stent implantation revealed that cyclic strain inhibits GSK-3β activity independent of p42/p44 MAPK and p38 activation concomitant with reduced Notch signaling and decreased vSMC proliferation and survival. Exposure of vSMC to changes in medial strain microenvironments in vivo following carotid artery ligation revealed that enhanced GSK-3β activity was predominantly localized to medial and neointimal vSMC concomitant with increased Notch signaling, proliferating nuclear antigen and decreased Bax expression, respectively, as vascular remodeling progressed. GSK-3β is an important modulator of Notch signaling leading to altered vSMC cell growth where low strain/tension microenvironments prevail.

  8. Andrographolide, a Novel NF-κB Inhibitor, Inhibits Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Cerebral Endothelial Cell Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chao-Chien; Duann, Yeh-Fang; Yen, Ting-Lin; Chen, Yu-Ying; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Ong, Eng-Thiam; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Background Aberrant vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and cerebral endothelial cell (CEC) dysfunction contribute significantly in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, inhibition of these cellular events would be by candidate agents for treating these diseases. In the present study, the mechanism of anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory effects of andrographolides, a novel nuclear factor-κB inhibitor, was investigated in VSMC and CEC cells. Methods VSMCs and CECs were isolated from rat artery and mouse brain, respectively, and cultured before experimentation. The effect of andro on platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) induced VSMC cell proliferation was evaluated by cell number, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The expression of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and the effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) were detected by Western blotting. Results Andro significantly inhibited PDGF-BB (10 ng/ml) induced cell proliferation in a concentration (20-100 μM) dependent manner, which may be due to reducing the expression of ERK1/2, and by inhibiting the expression of PCNA. Andro also remarkably diminished LPS-induced iNOS and COX2 expression. Conclusions The results of this study suggested that the effects of andro against VSMCs proliferation and CECs dysfunction may represent a promising approach for treatment of vascular diseases. PMID:27122804

  9. MicroRNA 181b promotes vascular smooth muscle cells proliferation through activation of PI3K and MAPK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tie-Jun; Chen, Yan-Li; Gua, Chao-Jun; Xue, Sheng-Jiang; Ma, Shu-Mei; Li, Xiao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) hyperplasia is a common feature of pathologic cardiovascular event such as restenosis and atherosclerosis. The role and mechanisms of microRNAs (miRs) in VSMCs proliferation are poorly understood. Here, we report that miR-181b promotes VSMCs proliferation and migration. In an animal model, miR-181b was significantly increased in the rat carotid artery after balloon catheter injury. Delivery of miR-181b inhibitor to injured artery exhibited a marked inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia. Transfection of miR-181b with "mimics" to A10 cells accelerated cell proliferation, which was accompanied by an increase of cell migration. The induction of A10 cells proliferation by miR-181b appeared to be involved in activation of S and G2/M checkpoint, concomitant with decreases in cell-cycle inhibitors p21 and p27, and increases in cell-cycle activators CDK4 and cyclinD1. In contract, miR-181b inhibition attenuated A10 cells proliferation, inhibited cell migration and arrested cell cycle transition. Moreover, forced miR-181b expression elevated the phosphorylation levels of Akt and Erk1/2, whereas inhibition of miR-181b produced the opposite effects. Additionally, inhibition of PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways with specific inhibitors, but not inhibition of JNK pathway, significantly abolished the effects of miR-181b in promoting cell proliferation. These findings demonstrate that miR-181b enhances the proliferation and migration of VSMCs through activation of PI3K and MAPK pathways.

  10. Abnormal Ca2+ spark/STOC coupling in cerebral artery smooth muscle cells of obese type 2 diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Rueda

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a major risk factor for stroke. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in cerebral artery dysfunction found in the diabetic patients are not completely elucidated. In cerebral artery smooth muscle cells (CASMCs, spontaneous and local increases of intracellular Ca2+ due to the opening of ryanodine receptors (Ca2+ sparks activate large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK channels that generate spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs. STOCs have a key participation in the control of vascular myogenic tone and blood pressure. Our goal was to investigate whether alterations in Ca(2+ spark and STOC activities, measured by confocal microscopy and patch-clamp technique, respectively, occur in isolated CASMCs of an experimental model of type-2 diabetes (db/db mouse. We found that mean Ca(2+ spark amplitude, duration, size and rate-of-rise were significantly smaller in Fluo-3 loaded db/db compared to control CASMCs, with a subsequent decrease in the total amount of Ca(2+ released through Ca(2+ sparks in db/db CASMCs, though Ca(2+ spark frequency remained. Interestingly, the frequency of large-amplitude Ca(2+ sparks was also significantly reduced in db/db cells. In addition, the frequency and amplitude of STOCs were markedly reduced at all voltages tested (from -50 to 0 mV in db/db CASMCs. The latter correlates with decreased BK channel β1/α subunit ratio found in db/db vascular tissues. Taken together, Ca(2+ spark alterations lead to inappropriate BK channels activation in CASMCs of db/db mice and this condition is aggravated by the decrease in the BK β1 subunit/α subunit ratio which underlies the significant reduction of Ca(2+ spark/STOC coupling in CASMCs of diabetic animals.

  11. An α-smooth muscle actin (acta2/αsma) zebrafish transgenic line marking vascular mural cells and visceral smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesell, Thomas R; Kennedy, Regan M; Carter, Alyson D; Rollins, Evvi-Lynn; Georgijevic, Sonja; Santoro, Massimo M; Childs, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    Mural cells of the vascular system include vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and pericytes whose role is to stabilize and/or provide contractility to blood vessels. One of the earliest markers of mural cell development in vertebrates is α smooth muscle actin (acta2; αsma), which is expressed by pericytes and SMCs. In vivo models of vascular mural cell development in zebrafish are currently lacking, therefore we developed two transgenic zebrafish lines driving expression of GFP or mCherry in acta2-expressing cells. These transgenic fish were used to trace the live development of mural cells in embryonic and larval transgenic zebrafish. acta2:EGFP transgenic animals show expression that largely mirrors native acta2 expression, with early pan-muscle expression starting at 24 hpf in the heart muscle, followed by skeletal and visceral muscle. At 3.5 dpf, expression in the bulbus arteriosus and ventral aorta marks the first expression in vascular smooth muscle. Over the next 10 days of development, the number of acta2:EGFP positive cells and the number of types of blood vessels associated with mural cells increases. Interestingly, the mural cells are not motile and remain in the same position once they express the acta2:EGFP transgene. Taken together, our data suggests that zebrafish mural cells develop relatively late, and have little mobility once they associate with vessels.

  12. An α-smooth muscle actin (acta2/αsma zebrafish transgenic line marking vascular mural cells and visceral smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Whitesell

    Full Text Available Mural cells of the vascular system include vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs and pericytes whose role is to stabilize and/or provide contractility to blood vessels. One of the earliest markers of mural cell development in vertebrates is α smooth muscle actin (acta2; αsma, which is expressed by pericytes and SMCs. In vivo models of vascular mural cell development in zebrafish are currently lacking, therefore we developed two transgenic zebrafish lines driving expression of GFP or mCherry in acta2-expressing cells. These transgenic fish were used to trace the live development of mural cells in embryonic and larval transgenic zebrafish. acta2:EGFP transgenic animals show expression that largely mirrors native acta2 expression, with early pan-muscle expression starting at 24 hpf in the heart muscle, followed by skeletal and visceral muscle. At 3.5 dpf, expression in the bulbus arteriosus and ventral aorta marks the first expression in vascular smooth muscle. Over the next 10 days of development, the number of acta2:EGFP positive cells and the number of types of blood vessels associated with mural cells increases. Interestingly, the mural cells are not motile and remain in the same position once they express the acta2:EGFP transgene. Taken together, our data suggests that zebrafish mural cells develop relatively late, and have little mobility once they associate with vessels.

  13. Platelet-localized FXI promotes a vascular coagulation-inflammatory circuit in arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossmann, Sabine; Lagrange, Jeremy; Jäckel, Sven; Jurk, Kerstin; Ehlken, Moritz; Schönfelder, Tanja; Weihert, Yvonne; Knorr, Maike; Brandt, Moritz; Xia, Ning; Li, Huige; Daiber, Andreas; Oelze, Matthias; Reinhardt, Christoph; Lackner, Karl; Gruber, Andras; Monia, Brett; Karbach, Susanne H; Walter, Ulrich; Ruggeri, Zaverio M; Renné, Thomas; Ruf, Wolfram; Münzel, Thomas; Wenzel, Philip

    2017-02-01

    Multicellular interactions of platelets, leukocytes, and the blood vessel wall support coagulation and precipitate arterial and venous thrombosis. High levels of angiotensin II cause arterial hypertension by a complex vascular inflammatory pathway that requires leukocyte recruitment and reactive oxygen species production and is followed by vascular dysfunction. We delineate a previously undescribed, proinflammatory coagulation-vascular circuit that is a major regulator of vascular tone, blood pressure, and endothelial function. In mice with angiotensin II-induced hypertension, tissue factor was up-regulated, as was thrombin-dependent endothelial cell vascular cellular adhesion molecule 1 expression and integrin αMβ2- and platelet-dependent leukocyte adhesion to arterial vessels. The resulting vascular inflammation and dysfunction was mediated by activation of thrombin-driven factor XI (FXI) feedback, independent of factor XII. The FXI receptor glycoprotein Ibα on platelets was required for this thrombin feedback activation in angiotensin II-infused mice. Inhibition of FXI synthesis with an antisense oligonucleotide was sufficient to prevent thrombin propagation on platelets, vascular leukocyte infiltration, angiotensin II-induced endothelial dysfunction, and arterial hypertension in mice and rats. Antisense oligonucleotide against FXI also reduced the increased blood pressure and attenuated vascular and kidney dysfunction in rats with established arterial hypertension. Further, platelet-localized thrombin generation was amplified in an FXI-dependent manner in patients with uncontrolled arterial hypertension, suggesting that platelet-localized thrombin generation may serve as an inflammatory marker of high blood pressure. Our results outline a coagulation-inflammation circuit that promotes vascular dysfunction, and highlight the possible utility of FXI-targeted anticoagulants in treating hypertension, beyond their application as antithrombotic agents in

  14. Unexpected role of the copper transporter ATP7A in PDGF-induced vascular smooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashino, T.; Varadarajan, S.; Urao, N.; Oshikawa, J.; Chen, G. -F.; Wang, H.; Huo, Y.; Finney, L.; Vogt, S.; McKinney, R. D.; Maryon, E. B.; Kaplan, J. H.; Ushio-Fukai, M.; Fukai, T. (Biosciences Division); ( XSD); ( PSC-USR); (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago); (Univ. of Minnesota)

    2010-09-09

    Copper, an essential nutrient, has been implicated in vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis with unknown mechanism. Bioavailability of intracellular copper is regulated not only by the copper importer CTR1 (copper transporter 1) but also by the copper exporter ATP7A (Menkes ATPase), whose function is achieved through copper-dependent translocation from trans-Golgi network (TGN). Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) promotes vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, a key component of neointimal formation. To determine the role of copper transporter ATP7A in PDGF-induced VSMC migration. Depletion of ATP7A inhibited VSMC migration in response to PDGF or wound scratch in a CTR1/copper-dependent manner. PDGF stimulation promoted ATP7A translocation from the TGN to lipid rafts, which localized at the leading edge, where it colocalized with PDGF receptor and Rac1, in migrating VSMCs. Mechanistically, ATP7A small interfering RNA or CTR small interfering RNA prevented PDGF-induced Rac1 translocation to the leading edge, thereby inhibiting lamellipodia formation. In addition, ATP7A depletion prevented a PDGF-induced decrease in copper level and secretory copper enzyme precursor prolysyl oxidase (Pro-LOX) in lipid raft fraction, as well as PDGF-induced increase in LOX activity. In vivo, ATP7A expression was markedly increased and copper accumulation was observed by synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy at neointimal VSMCs in wire injury model. These findings suggest that ATP7A plays an important role in copper-dependent PDGF-stimulated VSMC migration via recruiting Rac1 to lipid rafts at the leading edge, as well as regulating LOX activity. This may contribute to neointimal formation after vascular injury. Our findings provide insight into ATP7A as a novel therapeutic target for vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis.

  15. AMPK induces vascular smooth muscle cell senescence via LKB1 dependent pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Jin Young; Woo, Chang-Hoon [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Aging-associated Vascular Disease Research Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Young Jin; Lee, Kwang Youn [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyoung Chul, E-mail: hcchoi@med.yu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Aging-associated Vascular Disease Research Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} An aging model was established by stimulating VSMC with adriamycin. {yields} Adriamycin increased p-LKB1, p-AMPK, p53 and p21 expressions. {yields} Inhibition of AMPK diminished SA-{beta}-gal staining and restored VSMC proliferation. {yields} p53 and p21 siRNA attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining in VSMC. {yields} p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK induced VSMC senescence. -- Abstract: Vascular cells have a limited lifespan with limited cell proliferation and undergo cellular senescence. The functional changes associated with cellular senescence are thought to contribute to age-related vascular disorders. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been discussed in terms of beneficial or harmful effects for aging-related diseases. However, the detailed functional mechanisms of AMPK are largely unclear. An aging model was established by stimulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) with adriamycin. Adriamycin progressively increased the mRNA and protein expressions of AMPK. The phosphorylation levels of LKB1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the upstream and downstream of AMPK, were dramatically increased by adriamycin stimulation. The expressions of p53 and p21, which contribute to vascular senescence, were also increased. Inhibition of AMPK diminished senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) staining, and restored VSMC proliferation. Cytosolic translocation of LKB1 by adriamycin could be a mechanism for AMPK activation in senescence. Furthermore, p53 siRNA and p21 siRNA transfection attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining. These results suggest that LKB1 dependent AMPK activation elicits VSMC senescence and p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK-induced senescence.

  16. Human vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells cocultured on polyglycolic acid (70/30) scaffold in tissue engineered vascular graft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Shao-jun; ZHAO Li-min; WANG Shen-guo; LI Jing-xing; CHEN Hua-ying; LIU Jie-lin; LIU Ya; LUO Yi; Roo Changizi

    2007-01-01

    Background Current prosthetic, small diameter vascular grafts showing poor long term patency rates have led to the pursuit of other biological materials. Biomaterials that successfully integrate into surrounding tissue should match not only the mechanical properties of tissues, but also topography. Polyglycolic acid (70/30) has been used as synthetic grafts to determine whether human vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells attach, survive and secrete endothelin and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α (6-keto-PGF1α).Methods Endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells were isolated from adult human great saphenous vein. They were seeded on polyglycolic acid scaffold in vitro separately to grow vascular patch (Groups A and B respectively) and cocultured in vitro to grow into vascular patch (Group C). Smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells were identified by immunohistochemical analysis and growth of cells on polyglycolic acid was investigated using scanning electron microscopy. The levels of endothelin and 6-keto-PGF1α in the culturing solutions were examined by radioimmunology to measure endothelial function.Results Seed smooth muscle cells adhered to polyglycolic acid scaffold and over 28 days grew in the interstices to form a uniform cell distribution throughout the scaffold. Then seed endothelial cells formed a complete endothelial layer on the smooth muscle cells. The levels of endothelin and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha in the culturing solution were (234±29) pg/ml and (428+98) pg/ml respectively in Group C and (196+30) pg/ml and (346±120) pg/ml in Group B; both significantly higher than in Groups A and D (blank control group, all P<0.05 ).Conclusions Cells could be grown successfully on polyglycolic acid and retain functions of secretion. Our next step is to use human saphenous vein smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells to grow tubular vascular grafts in vitro.

  17. Medical Textiles as Vascular Implants and Their Success to Mimic Natural Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charanpreet Singh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vascular implants belong to a specialised class of medical textiles. The basic purpose of a vascular implant (graft and stent is to act as an artificial conduit or substitute for a diseased artery. However, the long-term healing function depends on its ability to mimic the mechanical and biological behaviour of the artery. This requires a thorough understanding of the structure and function of an artery, which can then be translated into a synthetic structure based on the capabilities of the manufacturing method utilised. Common textile manufacturing techniques, such as weaving, knitting, braiding, and electrospinning, are frequently used to design vascular implants for research and commercial purposes for the past decades. However, the ability to match attributes of a vascular substitute to those of a native artery still remains a challenge. The synthetic implants have been found to cause disturbance in biological, biomechanical, and hemodynamic parameters at the implant site, which has been widely attributed to their structural design. In this work, we reviewed the design aspect of textile vascular implants and compared them to the structure of a natural artery as a basis for assessing the level of success as an implant. The outcome of this work is expected to encourage future design strategies for developing improved long lasting vascular implants.

  18. Eugenol dilates rat cerebral arteries by inhibiting smooth muscle cell voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto-Neves, Dieniffer; Leal-Cardoso, Jose Henrique; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2014-11-01

    Plants high in eugenol, a phenylpropanoid compound, are used as folk medicines to alleviate diseases including hypertension. Eugenol has been demonstrated to relax conduit and ear arteries and reduce systemic blood pressure, but mechanisms involved are unclear. Here, we studied eugenol regulation of resistance-size cerebral arteries that control regional brain blood pressure and flow and investigated mechanisms involved. We demonstrate that eugenol dilates arteries constricted by either pressure or membrane depolarization (60 mM K) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experiments performed using patch-clamp electrophysiology demonstrated that eugenol inhibited voltage-dependent calcium (Ca) currents, when using Ba as a charge carrier, in isolated cerebral artery smooth muscle cells. Eugenol inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca currents involved pore block, a hyperpolarizing shift (∼-10 mV) in voltage-dependent inactivation, an increase in the proportion of steady-state inactivating current, and acceleration of inactivation rate. In summary, our data indicate that eugenol dilates cerebral arteries by means of multimodal inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca channels.

  19. Inhibition of rac1 reduces PDGF-induced reactive oxygen species and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    In vascular smooth muscle cells, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were known to mediate platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced cell proliferation and NADH/NADPH oxidase is the major source of ROS. NADH/NADPH oxidase is controlled by rac1 in non-phagocytic cells. In this study, we examined whether the inhibition of rac1 by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer of a dominant negative rac1 gene product (Ad.N17rac1) could reduce the proliferation of rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (RASMC)...

  20. Correlation between penile cavernosal artery blood flow and retinal vascular findings in arteriogenic erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M Emarah

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed M Emarah1, Shawky M El-Haggar2, Ihab A Osman2, Abdel Wahab S Khafagy21Departments of Ophthalmology, 2Andrology and Sexology, Cairo University Hospital, EgyptObjectives: Arteriogenic erectile dysfunction (ED is a target organ disease of atherosclerosis, and therefore might be a predictor of systemic atherosclerosis. Being systemic, it might be possible to evaluate the extent of atherosclerosis from retinal vascular findings. We investigated the possible correlation between penile cavernosal artery blood flow and retinal vascular findings in patients with arteriogenic ED.Patients and methods: Sixty patients with ED were divided according to the peak systolic velocity (PSV in their penile cavernosal arteries into two groups; Group A included 30 patients with PSV less than 25 cm/sec, and Group B included 30 patients with PSV more than 35 cm/sec. Blood flow in the penile cavernosal artery was measured with color Doppler ultrasonography. All patients were assessed by ocular fundus examination under amydriatic conditions to evaluate retinal vascular atherosclerotic changes using Hyman’s classification.Results: Evidence of retinal vascular atherosclerotic changes was found in 19 patients (63.3% in Group A and in 10 patients (33.3% in Group B.Conclusions: Our study confirms the possibility of predicting penile arterial vascular status in patients with ED from their retinal vascular findings by using amydriatic simple, practical funduscopy.Keywords: erectile dysfunction, atherosclerosis, retinal vascular atherosclerosis

  1. [3H]ouabain binding to cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, F; Hopp, L; Searle, B M; Tokushige, A; Tamura, H; Kino, M; Aviv, A

    1984-05-01

    The number of Na+ pump units (Bmax) and the equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for ouabain as well as parameters of K+ binding to the Na+ pump were examined in in vitro-grown vascular smooth muscle cells ( VSMC ) derived from Sprague-Dawley rats. The technique to measure these variables utilizes analyses of [3H]ouabain displacement from its VSMC receptors by nonlabeled ouabain and K+. The mean values for Bmax and Kd in the cultured VSMCs were 1.95 X 10(5) receptor sites per single VSMC and 2.68 X 10(-6) M, respectively. The equilibrium dissociation constant for K+ (Ki) was 0.92 mM. K+ binding to the cultured VSMCs demonstrated positive cooperativity with a Hill coefficient (n) of 1.78.

  2. Involvement of phospholipase D in store-operated calcium influx in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, M; Tepel, M; Nofer, J R; Neusser, M; Assmann, G; Zidek, W

    2000-08-11

    In non-excitable cells, sustained intracellular Ca2+ increase critically depends on influx of extracellular Ca2+. Such Ca2+ influx is thought to occur by a 'store-operated' mechanism, i.e. the signal for Ca2+ entry is believed to result from the initial release of Ca2+ from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive intracellular stores. Here we show that the depletion of cellular Ca2+ stores by thapsigargin or bradykinin is functionally linked to a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase D (PLD) activity in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), and that phosphatidic acid formed via PLD enhances sustained calcium entry in this cell type. These results suggest a regulatory role for PLD in store-operated Ca2+ entry in VSMC.

  3. STUDY ON THE INHIBITORY EFFECT OF ANTISENSE ETAR OLIGODEOXYNUCLEOTIDES ON THE PROLIFERATION OF VASCULAR SMOOTH CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张岚; 张柏根; 张纪蔚; 钱济先; 张皓; 黄晓钟

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the inhibitory effect of antisense endothelin receptor A (ETAR) on the proliferation of the vascular smooth muscle cells. Methods The sense, antisense and mismatched ODNs for ETAR were designed and synthetized. The study was carried out using MTT method and binding assays.Results ETAR-ODNs could move successfully across VSMC membranes. Photo-absorption in the MTT test was reduced significantly (P<0.05) in the antisense group at 5μmol/L; the reduction of CPM also occurred in the 125I-ET-1 specific binding assay; and the sense and mismatched ODNs groups did not show this reduction. Conclusion Our study suggested that the antisense oligomers inhibited the proliferation of VSMCs by hindering the translation of target mRNA and by reducing the production of related protein.

  4. In vascular smooth muscle cells paricalcitol prevents phosphate-induced Wnt/β-catenin activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Julio M; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R; Herencia, Carmen; Oca, Addy Montes de; Estepa, Jose C; Canalejo, Rocio; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Maria E; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Canalejo, Antonio; Rodríguez, Mariano; Almadén, Yolanda

    2012-10-15

    The present study investigates the differential effect of two vitamin D receptor agonists, calcitriol and paricalcitol, on human aortic smooth muscle cells calcification in vitro. Human vascular smooth muscle cells were incubated in a high phosphate (HP) medium alone or supplemented with either calcitriol 10(-8)M (HP + CTR) or paricalcitol 3·10(-8) M (HP + PC). HP medium induced calcification, which was associated with the upregulation of mRNA expression of osteogenic factors such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), Runx2/Cbfa1, Msx2, and osteocalcin. In these cells, activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling was evidenced by the translocation of β-catenin into the nucleus and the increase in the expression of direct target genes as cyclin D1, axin 2, and VCAN/versican. Addition of calcitriol to HP medium (HP + CTR) further increased calcification and also enhanced the expression of osteogenic factors together with a significant elevation of nuclear β-catenin levels and the expression of cyclin D1, axin 2, and VCAN. By contrast, the addition of paricalcitol (HP + PC) not only reduced calcification but also downregulated the expression of BMP2 and other osteoblastic phenotype markers as well as the levels of nuclear β-catenin and the expression of its target genes. The role of Wnt/β-catenin on phosphate- and calcitriol-induced calcification was further demonstrated by the inhibition of calcification after addition of Dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK-1), a specific natural antagonist of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In conclusion, the differential effect of calcitriol and paricalcitol on vascular calcification appears to be mediated by a distinct regulation of the BMP and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways.

  5. Piperlongumine inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by suppressing PDGF receptor signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Dong Ju [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kim, Soo Yeon [Division of Life Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seong Su [University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Kim, Chan Woo [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Bioinspired Science, Ehwa Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kumar, Sandeep [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Park, Byeoung Soo [Nanotoxtech Co., Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Eun [Division of Applied Biology and Chemistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Yeo Pyo [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Hanjoong, E-mail: hjo@emory.edu [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Bioinspired Science, Ehwa Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Hyun, E-mail: pyh012@sch.ac.kr [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Natural Sciences, Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-atherogenic effect of PL was examined using partial carotid ligation model in ApoE KO mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL prevented atherosclerotic plaque development, VSMCs proliferation, and NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Piperlongumine reduced vascular smooth muscle cell activation through PDGF-R{beta} and NF-{kappa}B-signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for atherosclerosis treatment. -- Abstract: Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL) is an alkaloid found in the long pepper (Piper longum L.) and has well-documented anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties; however, the role of PL in prevention of atherosclerosis is unknown. We evaluated the anti-atherosclerotic potential of PL in an in vivo murine model of accelerated atherosclerosis and defined its mechanism of action in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local treatment with PL significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation as well as proliferation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation in an in vivo setting. PL treatment in VSMCs in vitro showed inhibition of migration and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-induced proliferation to the in vivo findings. We further identified that PL inhibited PDGF-BB-induced PDGF receptor beta activation and suppressed downstream signaling molecules such as phospholipase C{gamma}1, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt. Lastly, PL significantly attenuated activation of NF-{kappa}B-a downstream transcriptional regulator in PDGF receptor signaling, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a novel, therapeutic mechanism by which PL suppresses atherosclerosis plaque formation in vivo.

  6. Pharmacological inhibition of PHOSPHO1 suppresses vascular smooth muscle cell calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Yadav, Manisha C; Zhu, Dongxing; Narisawa, Sonoko; Sheen, Campbell; Stec, Boguslaw; Cosford, Nicholas D; Dahl, Russell; Farquharson, Colin; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Macrae, Vicky E; Millán, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Medial vascular calcification (MVC) is common in patients with chronic kidney disease, obesity, and aging. MVC is an actively regulated process that resembles skeletal mineralization, resulting from chondro-osteogenic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we used mineralizing murine VSMCs to study the expression of PHOSPHO1, a phosphatase that participates in the first step of matrix vesicles-mediated initiation of mineralization during endochondral ossification. Wild-type (WT) VSMCs cultured under calcifying conditions exhibited increased Phospho1 gene expression and Phospho1(-/-) VSMCs failed to mineralize in vitro. Using natural PHOSPHO1 substrates, potent and specific inhibitors of PHOSPHO1 were identified via high-throughput screening and mechanistic analysis and two of these inhibitors, designated MLS-0390838 and MLS-0263839, were selected for further analysis. Their effectiveness in preventing VSMC calcification by targeting PHOSPHO1 function was assessed, alone and in combination with a potent tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) inhibitor MLS-0038949. PHOSPHO1 inhibition by MLS-0263839 in mineralizing WT cells (cultured with added inorganic phosphate) reduced calcification in culture to 41.8% ± 2.0% of control. Combined inhibition of PHOSPHO1 by MLS-0263839 and TNAP by MLS-0038949 significantly reduced calcification to 20.9% ± 0.74% of control. Furthermore, the dual inhibition strategy affected the expression of several mineralization-related enzymes while increasing expression of the smooth muscle cell marker Acta2. We conclude that PHOSPHO1 plays a critical role in VSMC mineralization and that "phosphatase inhibition" may be a useful therapeutic strategy to reduce MVC.

  7. Phytoncide, Nanochemicals from Chamaecyparis obtusa, Inhibits Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Leejin; Jang, Young-Su; Yun, Je-Jung; Song, Heesang

    2015-01-01

    Phytoncide, nanochemicals extracted from Chamaecyparis obtusa (C. obtusa), is reported to possess many pharmacological activities including immunological stimulating, anti-cancer, antioxidant, and antiinflammatory activities. However, the effect of phytoncide in vascuar diseases, especially on the behavior of vascular smooth muscle cells, has not yet been clearly elucidated. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effects of 15 kinds of phytoncide by various extraction conditions from C. obtusa on the proliferation and migration in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RAoSMCs). First of all, we determined the concentration of each extracts not having cytotoxicity by MTT assay. We observed that the proliferation rate measured using BrdU assay was significantly reduced by supercritical fluid, steam distillation, Me-OH, and hexane extraction fraction in order with higher extent, respectively. Moreover, the treatment of above nanofractions inhibit the migration of RAoSMCs by 40%, 60%, and 30%, respectively, both in 2-D wound healing assay and 3-D boyden chamber assay. Immunoblot revealed that the phosphorylated levels of Akt and ERK were significantly reduced in nanofractions treated RAoSMCs. Taken together, these data suggest that phytoncide extracted from C. obtusa inhibits proliferation and migration in RAoSMCs via the modulation of phosphorylated levels of Akt and ERK. Therefore, phytoncide nanomolecules might be a potential therapeutic approach to prevent or treat atheroscrelosis and restenosis.

  8. Induction of interleukin-8 production by angiotensin Ⅱ in rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Wang; Lili Zhang; Baogui Sun; Qiuyan Dai

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Interleukin-8(IL-8) represents the prototypical chemokine that is made by a wide variety of cell types.Previously studies have suggested that angiotensin Ⅱ(Ang Ⅱ) is involved in atherogenesis through induction ofproinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMCs),while the role orang Ⅱ on IL-8 expression in VSMCs is poorly studied.Methods:In this study,VSMCs were isolated from the thoracic aorta of Sprague-Dawley rats.The expression of smooth muscle α-actin was confirmed by an immunohistochemical method.Semi-quantitative RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analyses were conducted to detect IL-8 expression.Results:In the present study we found that Ang Ⅱ significantly increased the expression of IL-8 both at the mRNA and protein levels in rat VSMCs in a dose- and time-dependent manner.Conclusion:These findings suggested that Ang Ⅱ may participate in atherosclerosis through induction of inflammatory mediator in VSMCs.

  9. Cell-Cell Interactions Mediate the Response of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells to Substrate Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Olga V.; Lee, Kristen L.; Isenberg, Brett C.; Rich, Celeste B.; Nugent, Matthew A.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2011-01-01

    The vessel wall experiences progressive stiffening with age and the development of cardiovascular disease, which alters the micromechanical environment experienced by resident vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In vitro studies have shown that VSMCs are sensitive to substrate stiffness, but the exact molecular mechanisms of their response to stiffness remains unknown. Studies have also shown that cell-cell interactions can affect mechanotransduction at the cell-substrate interface. Using flexible substrates, we show that the expression of proteins associated with cell-matrix adhesion and cytoskeletal tension is regulated by substrate stiffness, and that an increase in cell density selectively attenuates some of these effects. We also show that cell-cell interactions exert a strong effect on cell morphology in a substrate-stiffness dependent manner. Collectively, the data suggest that as VSMCs form cell-cell contacts, substrate stiffness becomes a less potent regulator of focal adhesion signaling. This study provides insight into the mechanisms by which VSMCs respond to the mechanical environment of the blood vessel wall, and point to cell-cell interactions as critical mediators of VSMC response to vascular injury. PMID:21806930

  10. Effect of crocetin on vascular smooth muscle cells migration induced by advanced glycosylation end products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Min; Yang, Runlin; Zhang, Yaqin; Wu, Pingping; Wang, Lizhen; Gao, Zhenyu; Wang, Jianmei

    2017-02-13

    Crocetin is a major active constituent of Gardenia jasminoides J. Ellis, and can aid in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. The effect and possible mechanism of crocetin on the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) induced by advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) were investigated. VSMCs were pre-incubated with or without crocetin and exposed to AGEs subsequently. The invasion of the cells was investigated using a 24-well Cell Invasion Chamber. The anti-proliferative activity of crocetin was evaluated by MTT assay and VSMCs cell-cycle distribution was examined by flow cytometry. Cytokine TNF-α and IL-6 secreted by VSMCs and the amount of matrix metalloproteinase MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the culture supernatant were detected by ELISA. The expression level of RAGE (AGEs receptor), in cells was analyzed by western blot. The results demonstrated that AGEs increased about two-fold migration of VSMCs compared with control (OD=0.778±0.191 vs OD=0.413±0.214, Pvalue of MMP-2 and MMP-9 compared with the AGEs group (2.81±0.35ng/ml vs 6.40±0.85ng/ml, 2.69±0.25ng/ml vs 4.32±0.57ng/ml, respectively). In summary, crocetin inhibits the migration of VSMCs induced by AGEs through RAGE-dependent signaling pathway. And it is meaningful to diabetic vascular complications.

  11. Growth arrest of vascular smooth muscle cells in suspension culture using low-acyl gellan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natori, Tomomi; Fujiyoshi, Masachika; Uchida, Masashi; Abe, Natsuki; Kanaki, Tatsuro; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Ishii, Itsuko

    2017-03-01

    The proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) causes restenosis in biomaterial vascular grafts. The purposes of this study were to establish a suspension culture system for SMCs by using a novel substrate, low-acyl gellan gum (GG) and to maintain SMCs in a state of growth inhibition. When SMCs were cultured in suspension with GG, their proliferation was inhibited. Their viability was 70% at day 2, which was maintained at more than 50% until day 5. In contrast, the viability of cells cultured in suspension without GG was 5.6% at day 2. By cell cycle analysis, the ratio of SMCs in the S phase when cultured in suspension with GG was lower than when cultured on plastic plates. In SMCs cultured in suspension with GG, the ratio of phosphorylated retinoblastoma (Rb) protein to Rb protein was decreased and p27(Kip1) expression was unchanged in comparison with SMCs cultured on plastic plates. In addition, SMCs could be induced to proliferate again by changing the culture condition from suspension with GG to plastic plates. These results suggest that our established culturing method for SMCs is useful to maintain SMCs in a state of growth inhibition with high viability.

  12. Tropomyosin variants describe distinct functional subcellular domains in differentiated vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, Cynthia; Appel, Sarah; Graceffa, Philip; Leavis, Paul; Lin, Jim Jung-Ching; Gunning, Peter W; Schevzov, Galina; Chaponnier, Christine; DeGnore, Jon; Lehman, William; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2011-06-01

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is known to be an important gatekeeper of actin function. Tm isoforms are encoded by four genes, and each gene produces several variants by alternative splicing, which have been proposed to play roles in motility, proliferation, and apoptosis. Smooth muscle studies have focused on gizzard smooth muscle, where a heterodimer of Tm from the α-gene (Tmsm-α) and from the β-gene (Tmsm-β) is associated with contractile filaments. In this study we examined Tm in differentiated mammalian vascular smooth muscle (dVSM). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC MS/MS) analysis and Western blot screening with variant-specific antibodies revealed that at least five different Tm proteins are expressed in this tissue: Tm6 (Tmsm-α) and Tm2 from the α-gene, Tm1 (Tmsm-β) from the β-gene, Tm5NM1 from the γ-gene, and Tm4 from the δ-gene. Tm6 is by far most abundant in dVSM followed by Tm1, Tm2, Tm5NM1, and Tm4. Coimmunoprecipitation and coimmunofluorescence studies demonstrate that Tm1 and Tm6 coassociate with different actin isoforms and display different intracellular localizations. Using an antibody specific for cytoplasmic γ-actin, we report here the presence of a γ-actin cortical cytoskeleton in dVSM cells. Tm1 colocalizes with cortical cytoplasmic γ-actin and coprecipitates with γ-actin. Tm6, on the other hand, is located on contractile bundles. These data indicate that Tm1 and Tm6 do not form a classical heterodimer in dVSM but rather describe different functional cellular compartments.

  13. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B; Bowman, Frederick P; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Waxman, Aaron B; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A; Maron, Bradley A

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10(-9) to 10(-7) M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor-small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.-Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth

  14. Erythropoietin Attenuates Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Experimental Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension through Interplay between Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Heme Oxygenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, Rosa Laura E; Bartelds, Beatrijs; Wagener, Frank A D T G; Affara, Nada; Mohaupt, Saffloer; Wijnberg, Hans; Pennings, Sebastiaan W C; Takens, Janny; Berger, Rolf M F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a pulmonary vascular disease with a high mortality, characterized by typical angio-proliferative lesions. Erythropoietin (EPO) attenuates pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH. We postulated that EPO acts through mobilization of endothelial progeni

  15. Regulation of SIRT1 in vascular smooth muscle cells from streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Toniolo

    Full Text Available Sirtuins enzymes are a conserved family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD-dependent deacetylases and ADP-ribosyltransferases that mediate responses to oxidative stress, fasting and dietary restriction in mammals. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs are involved in many mechanisms that regulate vascular biology in vivo but the role of SIRT1 has not been explored in much detail. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of SIRT1 in cultured VSMCs under various stress conditions including diabetes. Sprague-Dawley rats were made diabetic by injecting a single dose of streptozotocin (65 mg/Kg, and aortic VSMCs were isolated after 4 weeks. Immunocytochemistry showed that SIRT1 was localized predominantly in the nucleus, with lower staining in VSMCs from STZ-diabetic as compared with normoglycemic rats. Previous diabetes induction in vivo and high glucose concentrations in vitro significantly downregulated SIRT1 amounts as detected in Western blot assays, whereas TNF-α (30 ng/ml stimulation failed to induce significant changes. Because estrogen signaling affects several pathways of oxidative stress control, we also investigated SIRT1 modulation by 17β-estradiol. Treatment with the hormone (10 nM or a selective estrogen receptor-α agonist decreased SIRT1 levels in VSMCs from normoglycemic but not in those from STZ-diabetic animals. 17β-estradiol treatment also enhanced activation of AMP-dependent kinase, which partners with SIRT1 in a signaling axis. SIRT1 downregulation by 17β-estradiol could be observed as well in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a cell type in which SIRT1 downregulation is associated with insulin resistance and subclinical atherosclerosis. These data suggest that SIRT1 protein levels are regulated by diverse cellular stressors to a variable extent in VSMCs from diabetic and normoglycemic rats, warranting further investigation on SIRT1 as a modulator of VSMC activity in settings of vascular inflammation.

  16. Protocatechuic aldehyde inhibits migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and intravascular thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chang Yoon [The Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, CT (United States); Endocrinology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Institute of Endocrine Research, and Severance Integrative Research Institute for Cerebral and Cardiovascular Disease, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ku, Cheol Ryong [Endocrinology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Institute of Endocrine Research, and Severance Integrative Research Institute for Cerebral and Cardiovascular Disease, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Yoon Hee, E-mail: wooriminji@gmail.com [Endocrinology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Institute of Endocrine Research, and Severance Integrative Research Institute for Cerebral and Cardiovascular Disease, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun Jig, E-mail: ejlee423@yuhs.ac [Endocrinology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Institute of Endocrine Research, and Severance Integrative Research Institute for Cerebral and Cardiovascular Disease, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Endocrinology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protocatechuic aldehyde (PCA) inhibits ROS production in VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA inhibits proliferation and migration in PDGF-induced VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA has anti-platelet effects in ex vivo rat whole blood. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the potential therapeutic role of PCA in atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: The migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and formation of intravascular thrombosis play crucial roles in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. This study examined the effects of protocatechuic aldehyde (PCA), a compound isolated from the aqueous extract of the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza, an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a variety of vascular diseases, on the migration and proliferation of VSMCs and platelets due to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). DNA 5-bromo-2 Prime -deoxy-uridine (BrdU) incorporation and wound-healing assays indicated that PCA significantly attenuated PDGF-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs at a pharmacologically relevant concentration (100 {mu}M). On a molecular level, we observed down-regulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, both of which regulate key enzymes associated with migration and proliferation. We also found that PCA induced S-phase arrest of the VSMC cell cycle and suppressed cyclin D2 expression. In addition, PCA inhibited PDGF-BB-stimulated reactive oxygen species production in VSMCs, indicating that PCA's antioxidant properties may contribute to its suppression of PDGF-induced migration and proliferation in VSMCs. Finally, PCA exhibited an anti-thrombotic effect related to its inhibition of platelet aggregation, confirmed with an aggregometer. Together, these findings suggest a potential therapeutic role of PCA in the treatment of atherosclerosis and angioplasty-induced vascular restenosis.

  17. The vascular smooth muscle cell: a therapeutic target in Type 2 diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Karen E; Riches, Kirsten

    2013-08-01

    The rising epidemic of T2DM (Type 2 diabetes mellitus) worldwide is of significant concern. The inherently silent nature of the disease in its early stages precludes early detection; hence cardiovascular disease is often established by the time diabetes is diagnosed. This increased cardiovascular risk leads to significant morbidity and mortality in these individuals. Progressive development of complications as a result of previous exposure to metabolic disturbances appears to leave a long-lasting impression on cells of the vasculature that is not easily reversed and is termed 'metabolic memory'. SMCs (smooth muscle cells) of blood vessel walls, through their inherent ability to switch between a contractile quiescent phenotype and an active secretory state, maintain vascular homoeostasis in health and development. This plasticity also confers SMCs with the essential capacity to adapt and remodel in pathological states. Emerging clinical and experimental studies propose that SMCs in diabetes may be functionally impaired and thus contribute to the increased incidence of macrovascular complications. Although this idea has general support, the underlying molecular mechanisms are currently unknown and hence are the subject of intense research. The aim of the present review is to explore and evaluate the current literature relating to the problem of vascular disease in T2DM and to discuss the critical role of SMCs in vascular remodelling. Possibilities for therapeutic strategies specifically at the level of T2DM SMCs, including recent novel advances in the areas of microRNAs and epigenetics, will be evaluated. Since restoring glucose control in diabetic patients has limited effect in ameliorating their cardiovascular risk, discovering alternative strategies that restrict or reverse disease progression is vital. Current research in this area will be discussed.

  18. Substance-specific importance of EGFR for vascular smooth muscle cells motility in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Barbara; Schwerdt, Gerald; Heise, Christian; Bethmann, Daniel; Rabe, Sindy; Mildenberger, Sigrid; Gekle, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Besides their importance for the vascular tone, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) also contribute to pathophysiological vessel alterations. Various G-protein coupled receptor ligands involved in vascular dysfunction and remodeling can transactivate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) of VSMC, yet the importance of EGFR transactivation for the VSMC phenotype is incompletely understood. The aims of this study were (i) to characterize further the importance of the VSMC-EGFR for proliferation, migration and marker gene expression for inflammation, fibrosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis and (ii) to test the hypothesis that vasoactive substances (endothelin-1, phenylephrine, thrombin, vasopressin and ATP) rely differentially on the EGFR with respect to the abovementioned phenotypic alterations. In primary, aortic VSMC from mice without conditional deletion of the EGFR, proliferation, migration, marker gene expression (inflammation, fibrosis and ROS homeostasis) and cell signaling (ERK 1/2, intracellular calcium) were analyzed. VSMC-EGFR loss reduced collective cell migration and single cell migration probability, while no difference between the genotypes in single cell velocity, chemotaxis or marker gene expression could be observed under control conditions. EGF promoted proliferation, collective cell migration, chemokinesis and chemotaxis and leads to a proinflammatory gene expression profile in wildtype but not in knockout VSMC. Comparing the impact of five vasoactive substances (all reported to transactivate EGFR and all leading to an EGFR dependent increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation), we demonstrate that the importance of EGFR for their action is substance-dependent and most apparent for crowd migration but plays a minor role for gene expression regulation.

  19. Oxidative modification of high density lipoprotein induced by cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江渝; 刘红; 彭家和; 叶治家; 何凤田; 董燕麟; 刘秉文

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To observe the oxidative modification of high density lipoprotein (HDL) induced by cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Methods: HDL cocultured with SMCs at 37℃ in 48 h was subjected, and native HDL (N-HDL) served as control. Oxidative modification of HDL was identified by using agarose gel electrophoresis. Absorbances of conjugated diene (CD) and lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) were measured with ultraviolet spectrophotometry at 234 and 560 nm respectively, and fluorescence intensity of thiobarbuturic acid reaction substance (TBARS) with fluorescence spectrophotometry at 550 nm emission wavelength with excitation at 515 nm. Results: In comparison with N-HDL, the electrophoretic mobility of SMCs-cocultured HDL was increased, and the contents of CD, LOOH and TBARS HDL were very significantly higher than those of the control HDL (P<0.01). Conclusion: Oxidative modification of HDL can be induced by human arterial SMCs.

  20. Pleiotropic effects of statins in distal human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butrous Ghazwan S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent clinical data suggest statins have transient but significant effects in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. In this study we explored the molecular effects of statins on distal human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs and their relevance to proliferation and apoptosis in pulmonary arterial hypertension. Methods Primary distal human PASMCs from patients and controls were treated with lipophilic (simvastatin, atorvastatin, mevastatin and fluvastatin, lipophobic (pravastatin and nitric-oxide releasing statins and studied in terms of their DNA synthesis, proliferation, apoptosis, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and endothelin-1 release. Results Treatment of human PASMCs with selected statins inhibited DNA synthesis, proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 production in a concentration-dependent manner. Statins differed in their effectiveness, the rank order of anti-mitogenic potency being simvastatin > atorvastatin > > pravastatin. Nevertheless, a novel nitric oxide-releasing derivative of pravastatin (NCX 6550 was effective. Lipophilic statins, such as simvastatin, also enhanced the anti-proliferative effects of iloprost and sildenafil, promoted apoptosis and inhibited the release of the mitogen and survival factor endothelin-1. These effects were reversed by mevalonate and the isoprenoid intermediate geranylgeranylpyrophosphate and were mimicked by inhibitors of the Rho and Rho-kinase. Conclusions Lipophilic statins exert direct effects on distal human PASMCs and are likely to involve inhibition of Rho GTPase signalling. These findings compliment some of the recently documented effects in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  1. Value of cerebral perfusion and vascular reserve for the treatment of symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li'an Huang; Xuewen Song; Anding Xu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is crucial to understand cerebral perfusion and vascular reserve in stegnotic arterial blood-supply regions to treat ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. However, effects on symptomatic intracrani-al arterial stenosis (SICAS) need to be further studied in additional applications. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and summarize the effects of cerebral perfusion and vascular reserve on the treatment of SICAS. RETRIEVAL STRATEGY: A computer-based online search of English language publications from January 2000 to July 2007 was conducted in PubMed to identify publications that addressed cerebral perfusion and vascular reserve of SICAS. Search key words were "intracranial stenosis, perfusion, brain reserve". Relevant data were also searched with the China Journal Net, using the same key words in Chinese from January 2000 to January 2007. In total, 101 articles were retrieved. Inclusion criteria: ① Articles describing the current status for the diagnosis and treatment of SICAS; ② Articles concerning research developments of cerebral perfusion and vascular reserve of SICAS. Exclusion criteria: duplicated articles. LITERATURE EVALUATION: This study included 21 articles of experimental studies and conference re-ports.DATA SYNTHESIS: When performing interventional surgery in SICAS patients, it is important to under-stand cerebral perfusion and vascular reserve in addition to knowing the clinical symptoms and degrees of arterial stenosis. In recent years, there are a growing number of reports on measurements of vascular reserve through the use of magnetic resonance perfusion imaging (MR-PWI). Investigations demonstrate cerebral perfusion and vascular reserve decrease in many SICAS patients. Many studies show that both improve after surgical intervention. CONCLUSION: Cerebral perfusion could provide direct evidence of whether ischemia has occurred in the brain. Because of lateral circulation and cerebral vascular reserve, intracranial vascular stenosis and/or decreased

  2. Connective tissue growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor from airway smooth muscle interact with the extracellular matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, Janette K; Ge, Qi; Poniris, Maree H; Boustany, Sarah; Twigg, Stephen M; Black, Judith L; Johnson, Peter R A

    2006-01-01

    Airway remodeling describes the structural changes that occur in the asthmatic airway that include airway smooth muscle hyperplasia, increases in vascularity due to angiogenesis, and thickening of the basement membrane. Our aim in this study was to examine the effect of transforming growth factor-be

  3. Mast Cells Induce Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Apoptosis via a Toll-Like Receptor 4 Activation Pathway.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, W.K.; Tempel, D.; Bot, I.; Biessen, E.A.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Netea, M.G.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Cheng, C.; Duckers, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Activated mast cells (MCs) release chymase, which can induce vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) apoptosis leading to plaque destabilization. Because the mechanism through which MCs release chymase in atherosclerosis is unknown, we studied whether MC-associated VSMC apoptosis is regulated

  4. Smooth muscle LDL receptor-related protein-1 deletion induces aortic insufficiency and promotes vascular cardiomyopathy in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua E Basford

    Full Text Available Valvular disease is common in patients with Marfan syndrome and can lead to cardiomyopathy. However, some patients develop cardiomyopathy in the absence of hemodynamically significant valve dysfunction, suggesting alternative mechanisms of disease progression. Disruption of LDL receptor-related protein-1 (Lrp1 in smooth muscle cells has been shown to cause vascular pathologies similar to Marfan syndrome, with activation of smooth muscle cells, vascular dysfunction and aortic aneurysms. This study used echocardiography and blood pressure monitoring in mouse models to determine whether inactivation of Lrp1 in vascular smooth muscle leads to cardiomyopathy, and if so, whether the mechanism is a consequence of valvular disease. Hemodynamic changes during treatment with captopril were also assessed. Dilation of aortic roots was observed in young Lrp1-knockout mice and progressed as they aged, whereas no significant aortic dilation was detected in wild type littermates. Diastolic blood pressure was lower and pulse pressure higher in Lrp1-knockout mice, which was normalized by treatment with captopril. Aortic dilation was followed by development of aortic insufficiency and subsequent dilated cardiomyopathy due to valvular disease. Thus, smooth muscle cell Lrp1 deficiency results in aortic dilation and insufficiency that causes secondary cardiomyopathy that can be improved by captopril. These findings provide novel insights into mechanisms of cardiomyopathy associated with vascular activation and offer a new model of valvular cardiomyopathy.

  5. Microscopic study of ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction effects on vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Zhang; Yi-Rong Hou; Tian Chen; Bing Hu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe vascular smooth muscle cell morphological changes induced by ultrasound combined with microbubbles by Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy (AFAM). Methods: A7r5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells were divided into groups: control group (without ultrasonic irradiation, no micro bubbles) and US+MB group (45 kHz, 0.4 W/cm2 ultrasound irradiate for 20 seconds with a SonoVue™ concentration of [(56-140)×10 5/mL]. Cell micro-morphological changes (such as topographic and acoustic prognosis) were detected, before and after ultrasound destruction by AFAM. Results: In cell morphology, smooth muscle cells were spread o and connected to each another by fibers. At the center of the cell, the nuclear area had a rough surface and was significantly elevated from its surroundings. The cytoskeletal structure of the reticular nucleus and cytoplasm in the morphology of A7r5 cells (20μm×20μm) were clear before microbubble intervention. After acoustic exciting, the cell structure details of the acoustic image were improved with better resolution, showing the elasticity of different tissues. In the acoustic image, the nucleus was harder, more flexible and uneven compared with the cytoplasm. Many strong various-sized echo particles were stuck on the rough nuclear membrane’s substrate surface. The nuclear membrane did not have a continuous smooth surface; there were many obstructions (pores). After ultrasound-intervention was combined with microbubbles, the dark areas of the A7r5 cell images was increased in various sizes and degrees. The dark areas showed the depth or low altitudes of the lower regions, suggesting regional depressions. However, the location and scope of the acoustic image dark areas were not similar to those found in the topographic images. Therefore, it was likely that the dark areas, both from the topographic and acoustic images, were sound-holes. In addition, some cell nuclei become round in different degrees after irradiation. Conclusions: Atomic

  6. Focal adhesion kinase antisense oligodeoxynucleotides inhibit human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells proliferation and promote human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chun-long; ZHANG Zhen-xiang; XU Yong-jian; NI Wang; CHEN Shi-xin

    2005-01-01

    Background Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation plays an important role in pulmonary vessel structural remodelling. At present, the mechanisms related to proliferation of PASMCs are not clear. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a widely expressed nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase. Recent research indicates that FAK is implicated in signalling pathways which regulate cytoskeletal organization, adhesion, migration, survival and proliferation of cells. Furthermore, there are no reports about the role of FAK in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs). We investigated whether FAK takes part in the intracellular signalling pathway involved in HPASMCs proliferation and apoptosis, by using antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) to selectively suppress the expression of FAK protein.Methods Cultured HPASMCs stimulated by fibronectin (40 μg/ml) were passively transfected with ODNs, sense FAK, mismatch sense and antisense-FAK respectively. Expression of FAK, Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK 2) and caspase-3 proteins were detected by immunoprecipitation and Western blots. Cell cycle and cell apoptosis were analysed by flow cytometry. In addition, cytoplasmic FAK expression was detected by immunocytochemical staining.Results When compared with mismatch sense group, the protein expressions of FAK, JNK and CDK 2 in HPASMCs decreased in antisense-FAK ODNs group and increased in sense-FAK ODNs group significantly. Caspase-3 expression upregulated in HPASMCs when treated with antisense ODNs and downregulated when treated with sense ODNs. When compared with mismatch sense ODNs group, the proportion of cells at G1 phase decreased significantly in sense ODNs group, while the proportion of cells at S phase increased significantly. In contrast, compared with mismatch sense ODNs group, the proportion of cells at G1 phase was increased significantly in antisense-FAK ODNs group. The level of cell apoptosis in antisense-FAK group

  7. Gene expression profiles of vascular smooth muscle show differential expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways during captopril therapy of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Frank C; Brozovich, Frank V

    2008-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is characterized by increased vascular tone and an impairment in nitric-oxide-mediated vasodilatation. We have demonstrated that the blunted response to nitric oxide is due, in part, to a reduction in the leucine-zipper-positive isoform of the myosin-targeting subunit (MYPT1) of myosin light-chain phosphatase. Additionally, we have shown that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, but not afterload reduction with prazosin, preserves leucine-zipper-positive MYPT1 isoform expression in vascular smooth muscle cells and normalizes the sensitivity to cGMP-mediated vasodilatation. We therefore hypothesized that in CHF, growth regulators and cytokines downstream of the angiotensin II receptor are involved in modulating gene expression in vascular tissue. Rats were divided into control and captopril-treated groups following left coronary artery ligation. Gene expression profiles in the aorta and portal vein at baseline and 2 and 4 weeks after myocardial infarction (MI) were analyzed using microarray technology and quantitative real-time PCR. After MI, microarray analysis revealed differential mRNA expression of 21 genes in the aorta of captopril-treated rats 2 and 4 weeks after surgery when compared to gene expression profiles at baseline and without captopril therapy. Real-time PCR demonstrated that captopril suppressed the expression of protein kinases in the angiotensin-II-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, including Taok1 and Raf1. These data suggest that in CHF, captopril therapy modulates gene expression in vascular smooth muscle, and some of the beneficial effects of ACE inhibition may be due to differential gene expression in the vasculature.

  8. Human vascular smooth muscle cells both express and respond to heparin-binding growth factor I (endothelial cell growth factor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkles, J.A.; Friesel, R.; Burgess, W.H.; Howk, R.; Mehlman, T.; Weinstein, R.; Maciag, T.

    1987-10-01

    The control of vascular endothelial and muscle cell proliferation is important in such processes as tumor angiogenesis, wound healing, and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Class I heparin-binding growth factor (HBGF-I) is a potent mitogen and chemoattractant for human endothelial cells in vitro and will induce angiogenesis in vivo. RNA gel blot hybridization experiments demonstrate that cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells, but not human umbilical cells also synthesize an HBGF-I mRNA. Smooth muscle cells also synthesize an HBGF-I-like polypeptide since (i) extract prepared from smooth muscle cells will compete with /sup 125/I-labeled HBGF-I for binding to the HBGF-I cell surface receptor, and (ii) the competing ligand is eluted from heparin-Sepharose affinity resin at a NaCl concentration similar to that required by purified bovine brain HBGF-I and stimulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, like endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells possess cell-surface-associated HBGF-I receptors and respond to HBGF-I as a mitogen. These results indicate the potential for an additional autocrine component of vascular smooth muscle cell growth control and establish a vessel wall source of HBGF-I for endothelial cell division in vivo.

  9. Chemerin Stimulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Carotid Neointimal Hyperplasia by Activating Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Luo, Yu; Wu, Lin; Liu, Feng; Liu, Huadong; Li, Jianghua; Liao, Bihong; Dong, Shaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular neointimal hyperplasia and remodeling arising from local inflammation are characteristic pathogeneses of proliferative cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis and post angioplasty restenosis. The molecular mechanisms behind these pathological processes have not been fully determined. The adipokine chemerin is associated with obesity, metabolism, and control of inflammation. Recently, chemerin has gained increased attention as it was found to play a critical role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of chemerin on the regulation of vascular smooth muscle cells and carotid neointimal formation after angioplasty. We found that circulating chemerin levels increased after carotid balloon injury, and that knockdown of chemerin significantly inhibited the proliferative aspects of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB and pro-inflammatory chemokines in vitro as well as prohibited carotid neointimal hyperplasia and pro-inflammatory chemokines in vivo after angioplasty. Additionally, inhibition of chemerin down-regulated the expression of several proteins, including phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2, nuclear factor-kappa B p65, and proliferation cell nuclear antigen. The novel finding of this study is that chemerin stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells proliferation and carotid intimal hyperplasia through activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, which may lead to vascular inflammation and remodeling, and is relevant to proliferative cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27792753

  10. Development of Decellularized Human Umbilical Arteries as Small-Diameter Vascular Grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Liqiong; Muto, Akihito; Chan, Stephen A.; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Developing a tissue-engineered small-diameter (<6 mm) vascular graft for reconstructive surgery has remained a challenge for the past several decades. This study was conducted to develop a decellularized umbilical artery and to evaluate its composition, endothelial cell compatibility, mechanical properties, and in vivo stability for potential use as a small-diameter vascular graft. Methods and Results Human umbilical arteries were isolated and decellularized by incubation in CHAPS and sodium dodecyl sulfate buffers followed by incubation in endothelial growth media-2. Decellularized umbilical arteries were completely devoid of cellular and nuclear material while retaining the integrity of extracellular collagenous matrix. The mechanical strength of the decellularized umbilical artery as assessed by its burst pressure in vitro showed no significant change from its native form. Decellularized umbilical arteries supported endothelial adherence as indicated by the re-endotheliazation with a monolayer of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, decellularized vessels that were implanted into nude rats as abdominal aorta interposition grafts remained mechanically intact and patent for up to 8 weeks. Conclusion Decellularized human umbilical arteries preserved the extracellular matrix, supported endothelialization, and retained function in vivo for up to 8 weeks. These properties suggest the potential use of decellularized umbilical arteries as small-diameter vascular grafts. PMID:19207043

  11. Increased activity of chondroitin sulfate-synthesizing enzymes during proliferation of arterial smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollmann, J.; Thiel, J.; Schmidt, A.; Buddecke, E.

    1986-12-01

    Cultured arterial smooth muscle cells incorporate (/sup 35/S)sulfate into the extracellular chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate containing proteoglycans at a higher rate in the phase of logarithmic growth than do non-dividing cells. The cell growth-dependent decrease in /sup 35/S incorporation with increasing cell density is accompanied by a decrease in the activity of chondroitin sulfate-synthesizing enzymes. The specific activity of xylosyl transferase, N-acetylgalactosaminyl transferase I and chondroitin sulfotransferase declines as the cells proceed from low to high densities. The corresponding correlation coefficients are 0.86, 0.91 and 0.89. The ratio of C-60H/C-40H sulfation of chondroitin shows a cell proliferation-dependent decrease indicating an inverse correlation of chondroitin 6-sulfotransferase and chondroitin 4-sulfotransferase activity. The observed changes in the expression of enzyme activities are thought to have some implications in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerosis, the initial stages of which are characterized by proliferation of arterial smooth muscle cells.

  12. Vitamin D modulates tissue factor and protease-activated receptor 2 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Moreno, Julio M; Herencia, Carmen; Montes de Oca, Addy; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R; Rodríguez-Ortiz, M Encarnación; Díaz-Tocados, Juan M; Peralbo-Santaella, Esther; Camargo, Antonio; Canalejo, Antonio; Rodriguez, Mariano; Velasco-Gimena, Francisco; Almaden, Yolanda

    2016-03-01

    Clinical and epidemiologic studies reveal an association between vitamin D deficiency and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Because vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)-derived tissue factor (TF) is suggested to be critical for arterial thrombosis, we investigated whether the vitamin D molecules calcitriol and paricalcitol could reduce the expression of TF induced by the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α in human aortic VSMCs. We found that, compared with controls, incubation with TNF-α increased TF expression and procoagulant activity in a NF-κB-dependent manner, as deduced from the increased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells protein 65 (p65-NF-κB) and direct interaction of NF-κB to the TF promoter. This was accompanied by the up-regulation of TF signaling mediator protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) expression and by the down-regulation of vitamin D receptor expression in a miR-346-dependent way. However, addition of calcitriol or paricalcitol blunted the TNF-α-induced TF expression and activity (2.01 ± 0.24 and 1.32 ± 0.14 vs. 3.02 ± 0.39 pmol/mg protein, P < 0.05), which was associated with down-regulation of NF-κB signaling and PAR-2 expression, as well as with restored levels of vitamin D receptor and enhanced expression of TF pathway inhibitor. Our data suggest that inflammation promotes a prothrombotic state through the up-regulation of TF function in VSMCs and that the beneficial cardiovascular effects of vitamin D may be partially due to decreases in TF expression and its activity in VSMCs.

  13. Increased atherosclerosis and vascular smooth muscle cell activation in AIF-1 transgenic mice fed a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerville, Laura J; Kelemen, Sheri E; Ellison, Stephen P; England, Ross N; Autieri, Michael V

    2012-01-01

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is a cytoplasmic, scaffold signal transduction protein constitutively expressed in inflammatory cells, but inducible in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in response to injury or inflammatory stimuli. Although several basic science and population studies have reported increased AIF-1 expression in human and experimental atherosclerosis, a direct causal effect of AIF-1 expression on development of atherosclerosis has not been reported. The purpose of this study is to establish a direct relationship between AIF-1 expression and development of atherosclerosis. AIF-1 expression is detected VSMC in atherosclerotic lesions from ApoE(-/-) mice, but not normal arteries from wild-type mice. AIF-1 expression can be induced in cultured VSMC by stimulation with oxidized LDL (ox-LDL). Transgenic mice in which AIF-1 expression is driven by the G/C modified SM22 alpha promoter to restrict AIF-1 expression to VSMC develop significantly increased atherosclerosis compared with wild-type control mice when fed a high-fat diet (P=0.022). Cultured VSMC isolated from Tg mice demonstrated significantly increased migration in response to ox-LDL compared with matched controls (P<0.001). VSMC isolated from Tg mice and cultured human VSMC which over express AIF-1 demonstrated increased expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA and protein and increased NF-κB activation in response to ox-LDL as compared with wild-type control mice. VSMC which over express AIF-1 have significantly increased uptake of ox-LDL, and increased CD36 expression. Together, these data suggest a strong association between AIF-1 expression, NF-κB activation, and development of experimental atherosclerosis.

  14. Toxicology and pharmacology of some euthenium compounds: vascular smooth muscle relaxation by nitrosyl derivatives of ruthenium and iridium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruszyna, H.; Kruszyna, R.; Hurst, J.; Smith, R.P.

    1980-07-01

    A series of compounds were synthesized from ruthenium trichloride, and their ip LD50s were determined in mice: pentamminenitrosylruthenium(II) chloride, 8.9; chloronitrobis(2,2'-dipyridyl)ruthenium(II), 55; dichlorobis(2,2'-dipyridyl)ruthenium(II) 63; ruthenium trichloride, 108; and potassium pentachloronitrosylruthenate(II), 127 mg/kg. The two bis-bipyridyl complexes produced death in convulsions within minutes, whereas the remaining compounds resulted in long, debilitating courses with death occuring in 4 to 7 d. When given in massive overdoses, however, the compounds with inorganic ligands also produced rapid convulsive death in mice, and when given iv to anesthetized cats, they produced respiratory arrest. The major toxic effects of all the complexes appeared to be due to the metal and not to its associated ligands. Only complexes having a nitrosyl ligand specifically relaxed vascular smooth muscle. Potassium pentabromoiridate(III) also relaxed rabbit aortic strips that had been contracted by adrenergic argonists, but potassium pentachloroiridate(III) did not. None of the complexes was as active as nitroprusside in relaxing aortic strips or in decreasing arterial blood pressure in cats. No compound tested was as potent as cisplatin in antitumor activity. The pentamminenitrosylruthenium(II) complex also relaxed guinea pig ileum and frog rectus abdominum when these isolated muscles had been contracted by acetylcholine. It appears that these organoruthenium compounds may produce death in central respiratory arrest, as do the inorganic complexes when given iv or ip in massive overdoses. In minimllylethal doses, the complexes with inorganic ligands may affect a variety of contractile tissues, perhaps by a general mechanism involving Ca. These complexes are apt to be generally cytotoxic as well.

  15. Influence of Carbon Monoxide on Growth and Apoptosis of Human Umbilical Artery Smooth Muscle Cells and Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajuan Li, Hai Wang, Bin Yang, Jichen Yang, Xiuyan Ruan, Yadong Yang, Edward K. Wakeland, Quanzhen Li, Xiangdong Fang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is a vasoactive molecule that is generated by vascular cells as a byproduct of heme catabolism and it plays an important physiological role in circulation system. In order to investigate whether exogenous CO can mediate the growth and proliferation of vascular cells, in this study, we used 250 parts per million (ppm of CO to treat human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell (hUASMC and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HuVEC and further evaluated the growth and apoptosis status of SMC and HuVEC. After SMC and HuVEC were exposed to CO for 7-day, the growth of SMC and HuVEC was significantly inhibited by CO in vitro on day 5 of CO exposure. And CO blocked cell cycle progress of SMC and HuVEC, more SMC and HuVEC stagnated at G0/G1 phase by flow cytometric analysis. Moreover, CO treatment inhibited SMC and HuVEC apoptosis caused by hydrogen peroxide through decreasing caspase 3 and 9 activities. To confirm the molecular mechanism of CO effect on SMC and HuVEC growth, we compared the gene expression profile in SMC and CO-treated SMC, HuVEC and CO-treated HuVEC. By microarray analysis, we found the expression level of some genes which are related to cell cycle regulation, cell growth and proliferation, and apoptosis were changed during CO exposure. We further identified that the down-regulated CDK2 contributed to arresting cell growth and the down-regulated Caspase 3 (CASP3 and Caspase 9 (CASP9 were associated with the inhibition of cell apoptosis. Therefore, CO exerts a certain growth arrest on SMC and HuVEC by inhibiting cell cycle transition from G0/G1 phase to S phase and has regulatory effect on cell apoptosis by regulating the expression of apoptosis-associated genes.

  16. Lipid-soluble smoke particles upregulate vascular smooth muscle ETB receptors via activation of mitogen-activating protein kinases and NF-kappaB pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, C.B.; Zheng, J.P.; Zhang, W.;

    2008-01-01

    particles (dimethylsulfoxide-soluble cigarette smoke particles; DSP) increased the expression of endothelin type B (ET(B)) receptors in arterial smooth muscle cells. The increased ET(B) receptors in arterial smooth muscle cells was documented as enhanced contractility (sensitive myograph technique...

  17. Verapamil stereoisomers induce antiproliferative effects in vascular smooth muscle cells via autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salabei, Joshua K. [Diabetes and Obesity Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Balakumaran, Arun [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555‐0438 (United States); Frey, Justin C. [Department of Biology, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Eau Claire, WI 54702 (United States); Boor, Paul J. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555‐0438 (United States); Treinen-Moslen, Mary [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555‐0609 (United States); Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555‐0438 (United States); Conklin, Daniel J., E-mail: dj.conklin@louisville.edu [Diabetes and Obesity Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Department of Biology, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Eau Claire, WI 54702 (United States); Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555‐0438 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are important in the management of hypertension and limit restenosis. Although CCB efficacy could derive from decreased blood pressure, other mechanisms independent of CCB activity also can contribute to antiproliferative action. To understand mechanisms of CCB-mediated antiproliferation, we studied two structurally dissimilar CCBs, diltiazem and verapamil, in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). To elucidate CCB-independent effects, pure stereoisomers of verapamil (R-verapamil, inactive VR; S-verapamil, active, VS) were used. The effects of CCB exposure on cell viability (MTT reduction), cell proliferation ({sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation), VSMC morphology by light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and autophagy (LC3I/II, ATG5) were measured. In general, verapamil, VR or VS treatment alone (80 μM) appreciably enhanced MTT absorbance although higher concentrations (VR or VS) slightly decreased MTT absorbance. Diltiazem (140 μM) markedly decreased MTT absorbance (40%) at 120 h. VR or VS treatment inhibited {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation (24 h) and induced cytological alterations (i.e., karyokinesis, enhanced perinuclear MTT deposition, accumulated perinuclear “vacuoles”). TEM revealed perinuclear “vacuoles” to be aggregates of highly laminated and electron-dense vesicles resembling autophagosomes and lysosomes, respectively. Increased autophagosome activity was confirmed by a concentration-dependent increase in LC3-II formation by Western blotting and by increased perinuclear LC3-GFP{sup +} puncta in verapamil-treated VSMC. Verapamil stereoisomers appeared to decrease perinuclear mitochondrial density. These observations indicate that antiproliferative effects of verapamil stereoisomers are produced by enhanced mitochondrial damage and upregulated autophagy in VSMC. These effects are independent of CCB activity indicating a distinct mechanism of action that could be targeted for more efficacious anti

  18. Continuous exposure to low amplitude extremely low frequency electrical fields characterizing the vascular streaming potential alters elastin accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergethon, Peter R; Kindler, Dean D; Hallock, Kevin; Blease, Susan; Toselli, Paul

    2013-07-01

    In normal development and pathology, the vascular system depends on complex interactions between cellular elements, biochemical molecules, and physical forces. The electrokinetic vascular streaming potential (EVSP) is an endogenous extremely low frequency (ELF) electrical field resulting from blood flowing past the vessel wall. While generally unrecognized, it is a ubiquitous electrical biophysical force to which the vascular tree is exposed. Extracellular matrix elastin plays a central role in normal blood vessel function and in the development of atherosclerosis. It was hypothesized that ELF fields of low amplitude would alter elastin accumulation, supporting a link between the EVSP and the biology of vascular smooth muscle cells. Neonatal rat aortic smooth muscle cell cultures were exposed chronically to electrical fields characteristic of the EVSP. Extracellular protein accumulation, DNA content, and electron microscopic (EM) evaluation were performed after 2 weeks of exposure. Stimulated cultures showed no significant change in cellular proliferation as measured by the DNA concentration. The per-DNA normalized protein in the extracellular matrix was unchanged while extracellular elastin accumulation decreased 38% on average. EM analysis showed that the stimulated cells had a 2.85-fold increase in mitochondrial number. These results support the formulation that ELF fields are a potential factor in both normal vessel biology and in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic diseases including heart disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease.

  19. Flow-dependent regulation of vascular function and gene expression in rat superior mesenteric artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Shang; DENG Chang-sheng

    2009-01-01

    Background Mesenteric artery thrombosis is prone to occur at specific arterial regions with different fluid flow patterns,yet mechanistic links between blood flow and vascular function remain unclear. This study aired to investigate the role of blood flow in regulation of vascular function and gene expression in rats.Methods Isometric tension was recorded in wire myograph to examine vascular function of specific regions (trunk parts and proximal parts from the origin) with different blood flow in superior mesenteric artery (SMA). Endothelial nitric oxide syntheses (eNOS), phosphorylated-eNOS (p-eNOS), serine-threonine kinase Akt and phosphorylated-Akt (p-Akt) protein expressions in SMA were examined by Western blotting. Significance was analyzed using a Student's ttest or analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by a Dunnett's multiple-comparison post hoc test.Results Compared with trunks, proximal parts exhibited severely impaired relaxant responses to acetylcholine (Ach) (1 nmol/L to 10 pmol/L) (P 0.05).Conclusion Critical components that drive the vascular function and influence the localization of mesenteric artery thrombosis are flow-responsive elements within the vascular endothelium.

  20. Calcineurin-NFAT signaling is involved in phenylephrine-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao PANG; Ning-ling SUN

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Catecholamine-induced vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is one of the major events in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling. The calcineurin-NFAT pathway plays a role in regulating growth and differentiation in various cell types. We investigated whether the calcineurin-NFAT pathway was involved in the regulation of phenylephrine-induced VSMC proliferation.Methods: Proliferation of VSMC was measured using an MTT assay and cell counts. Localization of NFATcl was detected by immunofluorescence staining. NFATcl-DNA binding was determined by EMSA and luciferase activity analyses.NFATcl and calcineurin levels were assayed by immunoprecipitation.Results: Phenylephrine (PE, an α1-adrenoceptor agonist) increased VSMC proliferation and cell number. Prazosin (an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist), cyclosporin A (CsA, an inhibitor of calcineurin) and chelerythrine (an inhibitor of PKC)decreased PE-induced proliferation and cell number. Additional treatment of VSMC with CsA or chelerythrine further inhibited proliferation and cell number in the chelerythrine-pretreatment group and the CsA-pretreatment group. CsA and chelerythrine alone had no effect on either absorbance or cell number. CsA decreased PE-induced calcineurin levels and activity. NFATc1 was translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus upon treatment with PE. This translocation was reversed by CsA. CsA decreased the PE-induced NFATc1 level in the nucleus. PE increased NFAT's DNA binding activity and NFAT-dependent reporter gene expression. CsA blocked these effects.Conclusion: CsA partially suppresses PE-induced VSMC proliferation by inhibiting calcineurin activity and NFATc1 nuclear translocation. The calcineurin-NFATc1 pathway is involved in the hyperplastic growth of VSMC induced by phenylephrine.

  1. Autophagy inhibits PDGF-BB-induced calcification in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Qian-qian; MEI Han; ZHANG Xu-hui; DONG Li-hua

    2016-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the relationship between autophagy and calcification in vascular smooth muscle cells ( VSMCs) after platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB stimulation.METHODS:Cultured VSMCs were stimulated with PDGF-BB for different time, the expression of vascular calcification-related proteins and autophagy-related proteins were detected by Western blot .The interaction be-tween Beclin1 and PI3KC3 was detected by co-immunoprecipitation.RESULTS: The expression of BMP2 and ALP showed a trend from decline to rise.ALP slumped at 12 h, and BMP2 slumped at 6 h.Moreover, the expression of Beclin-1 showed a trend from rise to decline, and peaked at 12 h.The conversion of LC3-ⅠtoⅡincreased in a time-dependent manner , and peaked at 24 h.The ex-pression of BMP2 and ALP was increased in VSMCs incubated with PDGF-BB and autophagy inhibitor 3-MA, compared with PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs.Furthermore, the interaction between Beclin1 and PI3KC3 was enhanced at 6 h after PDGF-BB stimulated, peaked at 12 h, and kept in high level at 24 h.Moreover, the phosphorylation level of Beclin 1 was enhanced by PDGF-BB stimulation, and peaked at 6 h.CONCLUSION:Our findings demonstrate that PDGF-BB-induced autophagy inhibits VSMC calcification by en-hancing Beclin1 phosphorylation and interaction between Beclin 1 and PI3KC3.

  2. Essential role of TGF-beta/Smad pathway on statin dependent vascular smooth muscle cell regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Rodríguez-Vita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (also called statins exert proven beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases. Recent data suggest a protective role for Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-beta in atherosclerosis by regulating the balance between inflammation and extracellular matrix accumulation. However, there are no studies about the effect of statins on TGF-beta/Smad pathway in atherosclerosis and vascular cells. METHODOLOGY: In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs statins enhanced Smad pathway activation caused by TGF-beta. In addition, statins upregulated TGF-beta receptor type II (TRII, and increased TGF-beta synthesis and TGF-beta/Smad-dependent actions. In this sense, statins, through Smad activation, render VSMCs more susceptible to TGF-beta induced apoptosis and increased TGF-beta-mediated ECM production. It is well documented that high doses of statins induce apoptosis in cultured VSMC in the presence of serum; however the precise mechanism of this effect remains to be elucidated. We have found that statins-induced apoptosis was mediated by TGF-beta/Smad pathway. Finally, we have described that RhoA inhibition is a common intracellular mechanisms involved in statins effects. The in vivo relevance of these findings was assessed in an experimental model of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E deficient mice: Treatment with Atorvastatin increased Smad3 phosphorylation and TRII overexpression, associated to elevated ECM deposition in the VSMCs within atheroma plaques, while apoptosis was not detected. CONCLUSIONS: Statins enhance TGF-beta/Smad pathway, regulating ligand levels, receptor, main signaling pathway and cellular responses of VSMC, including apoptosis and ECM accumulation. Our findings show that TGF-beta/Smad pathway is essential for statins-dependent actions in VSMCs.

  3. Critical Parameters of the In Vitro Method of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Calcification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Hortells

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification (VC is primarily studied using cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the use of very different protocols and extreme conditions can provide findings unrelated to VC. In this work we aimed to determine the critical experimental parameters that affect calcification in vitro and to determine the relevance to calcification in vivo.Rat VSMC calcification in vitro was studied using different concentrations of fetal calf serum, calcium, and phosphate, in different types of culture media, and using various volumes and rates of change. The bicarbonate content of the media critically affected pH and resulted in supersaturation, depending on the concentration of Ca2+ and Pi. Such supersaturation is a consequence of the high dependence of bicarbonate buffers on CO2 vapor pressure and bicarbonate concentration at pHs above 7.40. Such buffer systems cause considerable pH variations as a result of minor experimental changes. The variations are more critical for DMEM and are negligible when the bicarbonate concentration is reduced to ¼. Particle nucleation and growth were observed by dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy. Using 2mM Pi, particles of ~200nm were observed at 24 hours in MEM and at 1 hour in DMEM. These nuclei grew over time, were deposited in the cells, and caused osteogene expression or cell death, depending on the precipitation rate. TEM observations showed that the initial precipitate was amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP, which converts into hydroxyapatite over time. In blood, the scenario is different, because supersaturation is avoided by a tightly controlled pH of 7.4, which prevents the formation of PO43--containing ACP.The precipitation of ACP in vitro is unrelated to VC in vivo. The model needs to be refined through controlled pH and the use of additional procalcifying agents other than Pi in order to reproduce calcium phosphate deposition in vivo.

  4. Inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase attenuate vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Benjamin B.; Thompson, David A.; Howard, Laura L.; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Weiss, Robert H.

    2002-02-01

    Atherosclerosis, in its myriad incarnations the foremost killer disease in the industrialized world, is characterized by aberrant proliferation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells in part as a result of the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the blood vessel wall. The epoxyeicosatrienoic acids are synthesized from arachidonic acid in a reaction catalyzed by the cytochrome P450 system and are vasoactive substances. Metabolism of these compounds by epoxide hydrolases results in the formation of compounds that affect the vasculature in a pleiotropic manner. As an outgrowth of our observations that urea inhibitors of the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) reduce blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats as well as the findings of other investigators that these compounds possess antiinflammatory actions, we have examined the effect of sEH inhibitors on VSM cell proliferation. We now show that the sEH inhibitor 1-cyclohexyl-3-dodecyl urea (CDU) inhibits human VSM cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and is associated with a decrease in the level of cyclin D1. In addition, cis-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid mimics the growth-suppressive activity of CDU; there is no evidence of cellular toxicity or apoptosis in CDU-treated cells when incubated with 20 μM CDU for up to 48 h. These results, in light of the antiinflammatory and antihypertensive properties of these compounds that have been demonstrated already, suggest that the urea class of sEH inhibitors may be useful for therapy for diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis characterized by exuberant VSM cell proliferation and vascular inflammation.

  5. BMP-2 Overexpression Augments Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Motility by Upregulating Myosin Va via Erk Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The disruption of physiologic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC migration initiates atherosclerosis development. The biochemical mechanisms leading to dysfunctional VSMC motility remain unknown. Recently, cytokine BMP-2 has been implicated in various vascular physiologic and pathologic processes. However, whether BMP-2 has any effect upon VSMC motility, or by what manner, has never been investigated. Methods. VSMCs were adenovirally transfected to genetically overexpress BMP-2. VSMC motility was detected by modified Boyden chamber assay, confocal time-lapse video assay, and a colony wounding assay. Gene chip array and RT-PCR were employed to identify genes potentially regulated by BMP-2. Western blot and real-time PCR detected the expression of myosin Va and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (Erk1/2. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed myosin Va expression locale. Intracellular Ca2+ oscillations were recorded. Results. VSMC migration was augmented in VSMCs overexpressing BMP-2 in a dose-dependent manner. siRNA-mediated knockdown of myosin Va inhibited VSMC motility. Both myosin Va mRNA and protein expression significantly increased after BMP-2 administration and were inhibited by Erk1/2 inhibitor U0126. BMP-2 induced Ca2+ oscillations, generated largely by a “cytosolic oscillator”. Conclusion. BMP-2 significantly increased VSMCs migration and myosin Va expression, via the Erk signaling pathway and intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. We provide additional insight into the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, and inhibition of BMP-2-induced myosin Va expression may represent a potential therapeutic strategy.

  6. Effect of Oxysterol-Induced Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells on Experimental Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Perales

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle cells (SMCs undergo changes related to proliferation and apoptosis in the physiological remodeling of vessels and in diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Recent studies also have demonstrated the vascular cell proliferation and programmed cell death contribute to changes in vascular architecture in normal development and in disease. The present study was designed to investigate the apoptotic pathways induced by 25-hydroxycholesterol in SMCs cultures, using an in vivo/in vitro cell model in which SMCs were isolated and culture from chicken exposed to an atherogenic cholesterol-rich diet (SMC-Ch and/or an antiatherogenic fish oil-rich diet (SMC-Ch-FO. Cells were exposed in vitro to 25-hydroxycholesterol to study levels of apoptosis and apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Bax and the expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL, genes. The quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and the Immunoblotting western blot analysis showed that 25-hydroxycholesterol produces apoptosis in SMCs, mediated by a high increase in Bax protein and Bax gene expression. These changes were more marked in SMC-Ch than in SMC-Ch-FO, indicating that dietary cholesterol produces changes in SMCs that make them more susceptible to 25-hydroxycholesterol-mediated apoptosis. Our results suggest that the replacement of a cholesterol-rich diet with a fish oil-rich diet produces some reversal of cholesterol-induced changes in the apoptotic pathways induced by 25-hydroxycholesterol in SMCs cultures, making SMCs more resistant to apoptosis.

  7. Vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and adhesion to collagen I modified by vasoactive agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongkui Hong

    Full Text Available In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs integrin-mediated adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM proteins play important roles in sustaining vascular tone and resistance. The main goal of this study was to determine whether VSMCs adhesion to type I collagen (COL-I was altered in parallel with the changes in the VSMCs contractile state induced by vasoconstrictors and vasodilators. VSMCs were isolated from rat cremaster skeletal muscle arterioles and maintained in primary culture without passage. Cell adhesion and cell E-modulus were assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM by repetitive nano-indentation of the AFM probe on the cell surface at 0.1 Hz sampling frequency and 3200 nm Z-piezo travelling distance (approach and retraction. AFM probes were tipped with a 5 μm diameter microbead functionalized with COL-I (1 mg\\ml. Results showed that the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II (ANG-II; 10-6 significantly increased (p<0.05 VSMC E-modulus and adhesion probability to COL-I by approximately 35% and 33%, respectively. In contrast, the vasodilator adenosine (ADO; 10-4 significantly decreased (p<0.05 VSMC E-modulus and adhesion probability by approximately -33% and -17%, respectively. Similarly, the NO donor (PANOate, 10-6 M, a potent vasodilator, also significantly decreased (p<0.05 the VSMC E-modulus and COL-I adhesion probability by -38% and -35%, respectively. These observations support the hypothesis that integrin-mediated VSMC adhesion to the ECM protein COL-I is dynamically regulated in parallel with VSMC contractile activation. These data suggest that the signal transduction pathways modulating VSMC contractile activation and relaxation, in addition to ECM adhesion, interact during regulation of contractile state.

  8. Vascular complications following therapeutic and diagnostic cardiac catheterisation by the femoral artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitsch, M; Liisberg-Larsen, Ole Christian; Schroeder, T V

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-one of 6327 (0.33%) patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation via the femoral artery had an acute vascular complication requiring surgical intervention. The complication rate was 0.1% after coronary angiography, 2% after PTCA and 6% after aortic ballon dilatation. The size of the cathete...... and evaluation of vascular injuries following diagnostic and therapeutic invasive interventions could have a self limitating effect on the complication rate....

  9. miRNA-146a induces vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in a rat model of coronary heart disease via NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z W; Liu, Y F; Wang, S; Li, B

    2015-12-29

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miRNA-146a in modulating the function of vascular smooth muscle cells in a rat model of coronary heart disease. Vascular smooth muscle cells were isolated and cultured from the rat coronary heart disease model and normal rats (controls). miRNA-146a levels were measured in vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease and control rats. The proliferation, growth, apoptosis, and activation of the NF-κB pathway in the vascular smooth muscle cells were detected using the MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The role of the NF-κB pathway in modulating the apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells was investigated by measuring the reactivity of the cells to an NF-κB pathway inhibitor (TPCA-1). Vascular smooth muscle cells from the disease model exhibited higher levels of miRNA-146a than that by the normal controls (P = 0.0024). The vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease showed decreased proliferation and growth and increased apoptosis. miRNA-146a overexpression elevated the rate of cell apoptosis. The NF-κB pathway was activated in vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease. Inhibition of the NF- κB pathway significantly decreased the rate of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in coronary heart disease rats (P = 0.0038). In conclusion, miRNA- 146a was found to induce vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in rats with coronary heart disease via the activation of the NF-κB signal pathway.

  10. The functional expression of extracellular calcium-sensing receptor in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei-hua

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR belongs to family C of the G protein coupled receptors. Whether the CaSR is expressed in the pulmonary artery (PA is unknown. Methods The expression and distribution of CaSR were detected by RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. PA tension was detected by the pulmonary arterial ring technique, and the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i was detected by a laser-scanning confocal microscope. Results The expressions of CaSR mRNA and protein were found in both rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs and PAs. Increased levels of [Ca2+]o (extracellular calcium concentration or Gd3+ (an agonist of CaSR induced an increase of [Ca2+]i and PAs constriction in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, the above-mentioned effects of Ca2+ and Gd3+ were inhibited by U73122 (specific inhibitor of PLC, 2-APB (specific antagonist of IP3 receptor, and thapsigargin (blocker of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase. Conclusions CaSR is expressed in rat PASMCs, and is involved in regulation of PA tension by increasing [Ca2+]i through G-PLC-IP3 pathway.

  11. Effects of serotonin on expression of the LDL receptor family member LR11 and 7-ketocholesterol-induced apoptosis in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagayama, Daiji; Ishihara, Noriko [Center of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Toho University, Sakura Medical Center, 564-1, Shimoshizu, Sakura-City, Chiba 285-8741 (Japan); Bujo, Hideaki [Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine, Toho University, Sakura Medical Center, 564-1, Shimoshizu, Sakura-City, Chiba 285-8741 (Japan); Shirai, Kohji [Department of Vascular Function, Toho University, Sakura Medical Center, 564-1, Shimoshizu, Sakura-City, Chiba 285-8741 (Japan); Tatsuno, Ichiro, E-mail: ichiro.tatsuno@med.toho-u.ac.jp [Center of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Toho University, Sakura Medical Center, 564-1, Shimoshizu, Sakura-City, Chiba 285-8741 (Japan)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • The dedifferentiation of VSMCs in arterial intima is involved in atherosclerosis. • 5-HT showed proliferative effect on VSMCs which was abolished by sarpogrelate. • 5-HT enhanced expression of LR11 mRNA in VSMCs which was abolished by sarpogrelate. • 5-HT suppressed 7KCHO-induced apoptosis of VSMCs via caspase-3/7-dependent pathway. • The mechanisms explain the 5-HT-induced remodeling of arterial structure. - Abstract: Serotonin (5-HT) is a known mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The dedifferentiation and proliferation/apoptosis of VSMCs in the arterial intima represent one of the atherosclerotic changes. LR11, a member of low-density lipoprotein receptor family, may contribute to the proliferation of VSMCs in neointimal hyperplasia. We conducted an in vitro study to investigate whether 5-HT is involved in LR11 expression in human VSMCs and apoptosis of VSMCs induced by 7-ketocholesterol (7KCHO), an oxysterol that destabilizes plaque. 5-HT enhanced the proliferation of VSMCs, and this effect was abolished by sarpogrelate, a selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist. Sarpogrelate also inhibited the 5-HT-enhanced LR11 mRNA expression in VSMCs. Furthermore, 5-HT suppressed the 7KCHO-induced apoptosis of VSMCs via caspase-3/7-dependent pathway. These findings provide new insights on the changes in the differentiation stage of VSMCs mediated by 5-HT.

  12. Protease-Activated Receptor 2 Promotes Pro-Atherogenic Effects through Transactivation of the VEGF Receptor 2 in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

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    Indrakusuma, Ira; Romacho, Tania; Eckel, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Obesity is associated with impaired vascular function. In the cardiovascular system, protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) exerts multiple functions such as the control of the vascular tone. In pathological conditions, PAR2 is related to vascular inflammation. However, little is known about the impact of obesity on PAR2 in the vasculature. Therefore, we explored the role of PAR2 as a potential link between obesity and cardiovascular diseases. Methods: C57BL/6 mice were fed with either a chow or a 60% high fat diet for 24 weeks prior to isolation of aortas. Furthermore, human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) and human coronary smooth muscle cells (HCSMC) were treated with conditioned medium obtained from in vitro differentiated primary human adipocytes. To investigate receptor interaction vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) was blocked by exposure to calcium dobesilate and a VEGFR2 neutralization antibody, before treatment with PAR2 activating peptide. Student's t-test or one-way were used to determine statistical significance. Results: Both, high fat diet and exposure to conditioned medium increased PAR2 expression in aortas and human vascular cells, respectively. In HCSMC, conditioned medium elicited proliferation as well as cyclooxygenase 2 induction, which was suppressed by the PAR2 antagonist GB83. Specific activation of PAR2 by the PAR2 activating peptide induced proliferation and cyclooxygenase 2 expression which were abolished by blocking the VEGFR2. Additionally, treatment of HCSMC with the PAR2 activating peptide triggered VEGFR2 phosphorylation. Conclusion: Under obesogenic conditions, where circulating levels of pro-inflammatory adipokines are elevated, PAR2 arises as an important player linking obesity-related adipose tissue inflammation to atherogenesis. We show for the first time that the underlying mechanisms of these pro-atherogenic effects involve a potential transactivation of the VEGFR2 by PAR2. PMID

  13. Effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Yang; Chao Chang; YuQing Wang; Yibo Feng; ShuLing Rong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the inhibitory effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester(CAPE) on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to clarify its mechanism. Methods: VSMC activated by LPS (1 mg·L-1) were treated with CAPE at different concentrations. The inhibitory effects of CAPE on the proliferation of VSMC were determined by methabenzthiazuron(MTT) colorimetry. The effects of CAPE on the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Survivin protein in VSMC were evaluated by immunocytochemistry staining technique (SABC method). Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry(FCM) with propidium iodide (PI) labeling method. The relative expression level of Survivin mRNA was measured with real-time quantified RT-PCR technique. Results: CAPE exerted significant inhibitory effects on. proliferation of VSMC at concentrations ranging from 5 mg·L-1 to 80 mg·L-1, decreased the rate of cells positive for PCNA and Survivin protein and repressed the expression of Survivin mRNA in a dose- and time-dependent manner (P < 0.05).FCM analysis displayed that CAPE up-regulated the ratio of G0/G1 stages and reduced the percentage of VSMC in S stage (P <0.05). Conclusion: CAPE can significantly inhibit the proliferation of VSMC activated by LPS in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which may be carried out through regulating cell cycle and repressing the expression of PCNA and Survivin.

  14. Adhesion and Growth of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells on Nanostructured and Biofunctionalized Polyethylene

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    Vaclav Svorcik

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell colonization of synthetic polymers can be regulated by physical and chemical modifications of the polymer surface. High-density and low-density polyethylene (HDPE and LDPE were therefore activated with Ar+ plasma and grafted with fibronectin (Fn or bovine serum albumin (BSA. The water drop contact angle usually decreased on the plasma-treated samples, due to the formation of oxidized groups, and this decrease was inversely related to the plasma exposure time (50–300 s. The presence of nitrogen and sulfur on the polymer surface, revealed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and also by immunofluorescence staining, showed that Fn and BSA were bound to this surface, particularly to HDPE. Plasma modification and grafting with Fn and BSA increased the nanoscale surface roughness of the polymer. This was mainly manifested on HDPE. Plasma treatment and grafting with Fn or BSA improved the adhesion and growth of vascular smooth muscle cells in a serum-supplemented medium. The final cell population densities on day 6 after seeding were on an average higher on LDPE than on HDPE. In a serum-free medium, BSA grafted to the polymer surface hampered cell adhesion. Thus, the cell behavior on polyethylene can be modulated by its type, intensity of plasma modification, grafting with biomolecules, and composition of the culture medium.

  15. Vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis promotes transplant arteriosclerosis through inducing the production of SDF-1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Liu, S; Li, W; Hu, S; Xiong, J; Shu, X; Hu, Q; Zheng, Q; Song, Z

    2012-08-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is a leading cause of late allograft loss. Medial smooth muscle cell (SMC) apoptosis is considered to be an important event in transplant arteriosclerosis. However, the precise contribution of medial SMC apoptosis to transplant arteriosclerosis and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We transferred wild-type p53 to induce apoptosis of cultured SMCs. We found that apoptosis induces the production of SDF-1α from apoptotic and neighboring viable cells, resulting in increased SDF-1α in the culture media. Conditioned media from Ltv-p53-transferred SMCs activated PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK/Erk signaling in a SDF-1α-dependent manner and thereby promoted mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) migration and proliferation. In a rat aorta transplantation model, lentivirus-mediated BclxL transfer selectively inhibits medial SMC apoptosis in aortic allografts, resulting in a remarkable decrease of SDF-1α both in allograft media and in blood plasma, associated with diminished recruitment of CD90(+)CD105(+) double-positive cells and impaired neointimal formation. Systemic administration of rapamycin or PD98059 also attenuated MSC recruitment and neointimal formation in the aortic allografts. These results suggest that medial SMC apoptosis is critical for the development of transplant arteriosclerosis through inducing SDF-1α production and that MSC recruitment represents a major component of vascular remodeling, constituting a relevant target and mechanism for therapeutic interventions.

  16. Alpha adrenergic modulation of the Na/sup +/ pump of canine vascular smooth muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navran, S.S.; Adair, S.E.; Allen, J.C.; Seidel, C.L.

    1986-03-01

    Some vasoactive agents, eg. beta adrenergic agonists and forskolin, stimulate the Na/sup 7/ pump by a cAMP- dependent mechanism. The authors have now demonstrated that phenylephrine (PE) stimulates the Na/sup 7/ pump in intact blood vessels as quantitated by an increased ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake. The stimulation is dose-dependent (ED/sub 50/, 3 x 10/sup -6/M) and blocked by phentolamine (I/sub 50/, 10/sup -7/M), prazosin (I/sub 50/, 10/sup -8/M) yohimbine (I/sub 50/, 10/sup -6/M) or elevated intracellular Na/sup +/. These data suggest that the Na/sup +/ pump stimulation is mediated through alpha/sub 1/ receptors which produce an influx of extracellular Na/sup +/. In vascular smooth muscle cell cultures PE stimulates the Na/sup +/ pump, but only when cells have been deprived of fetal calf serum (FCS). Since FCS is known to stimulate Na/sup +/influx, in the continuous presence of FCS, these cells may already be Na/sup +/-loaded and therefore refractory to further stimulation by alpha-adrenergic agents. Unlike those vasorelaxants whose mechanism involves stimulation of the Na/sup +/ pump, alpha adrenergic agents are vasoconstrictors and therefore the role of Na/sup +/ pump stimulation in this case may be as a mechanism of feedback inhibition of contractility.

  17. Increased proliferation of explanted vascular smooth muscle cells: a marker presaging atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, P M; Schneider, D J; Baldor, L C; Russell, J C; Sobel, B E

    1997-06-01

    The JCR:LA-cp homozygous cp/cp corpulent rat is genetically predisposed to develop atherosclerosis evident after 9 and 18 months of age in males and females and to manifest metabolic derangements resembling those seen in type II diabetes in humans (hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia). The present study was undertaken to determine whether vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) explanted from vessels destined to become atherosclerotic later in life exhibit intrinsic properties ex vivo that presage atherogenesis to provide a means for evaluating promptly intervention designed to modify it. SMCs were cultured from aortic explants of JCR:LA-cp corpulent (cp/cp) and lean control (+/+) rats of 4, 5, 6, and 9 months of age. Compared with SMCs from controls, SMCs from cp/cp rats exhibited increased proliferation, higher saturation density, increased augmentation of proliferation in response to selected mitogens and greater adherence to extracellular matrix proteins. The increased proliferative activity ex vivo anteceded by several months the development of atherosclerotic lesions in vivo. Thus, it is a promising marker in assessments of the efficacy of interventions designed to retard or prevent atherosclerosis.

  18. Interaction between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells enhances matrix metalloproteinase-1 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Takahashi, M; Shimada, K

    2000-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) plays an important role in atherosclerotic plaque rupture. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of MMP-1 by cell-to-cell interactions between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human VSMCs and THP-1 cells (human monocytoid cells) were cocultured. MMP-1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Collagenolytic activity was determined by fluorescent labeled-collagen digestion. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine which types of cells produce MMP-1. Adding THP-1 cells to VSMCs markedly increased the MMP-1 levels and activity of the culture media. MMP-1 levels were maximal when the cellular ratio of THP-1 cells/VSMCs was 1.0. Immunohistochemistry revealed that both types of cells in the coculture produced MMP-1. Separated coculture experiments showed that both direct contact and a soluble factor(s) contributed to MMP-1 production. Neutralizing anti-interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha antibodies inhibited coculture conditioned medium-induced MMP-1 production by VSMCs and THP-1 cells. Protein kinase C inhibitors, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and a mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor significantly inhibited MMP-1 production by cocultures. Direct cell-to-cell interaction between THP-1 cells and VSMCs enhanced MMP-1 synthesis in both types of cells. Increased local MMP-1 production and activity induced by monocyte-VSMC interaction play an important pathogenic role in atherosclerotic plaque rupture.

  19. Growth factors induce monocyte binding to vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for monocyte retention in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qiangjun; Lanting, Linda; Natarajan, Rama

    2004-09-01

    Adhesive interactions between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) may contribute to subendothelial monocyte-macrophage retention in atherosclerosis. We investigated the effects of angiotensin II (ANG II) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB on VSMC-monocyte interactions. Treatment of human aortic VSMC (HVSMC) with ANG II or PDGF-BB significantly increased binding to human monocytic THP-1 cells and to peripheral blood monocytes. This was inhibited by antibodies to monocyte beta(1)- and beta(2)-integrins. The binding was also attenuated by blocking VSMC arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism by inhibitors of 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LO) or cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Conversely, binding was enhanced by overexpression of 12/15-LO or COX-2. Direct treatment of HVSMC with AA or its metabolites also increased binding. Furthermore, VSMC derived from 12/15-LO knockout mice displayed reduced binding to mouse monocytic cells relative to genetic control mice. Using specific signal transduction inhibitors, we demonstrated the involvement of Src, phosphoinositide 3-kinase, and MAPKs in ANG II- or PDGF-BB-induced binding. Interestingly, after coculture with HVSMC, THP-1 cell surface expression of the scavenger receptor CD36 was increased. These results show for the first time that growth factors may play additional roles in atherosclerosis by increasing monocyte binding to VSMC via AA metabolism and key signaling pathways. This can lead to monocyte subendothelial retention, CD36 expression, and foam cell formation.

  20. Suppression of angiotensin II stimulated responses in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells of experimental cirrhotic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Functional responses to angiotensin II(AT-II) were determined in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from experimental cirrhotic rats.Our data showed that AT-II-stimulated extracellular acidification rate (ECAR),which was measured by Cytosesor microphysiometry,was significantly reduced in the aortic VSMCs from the cirrhotic rats as compared to those from the control animals.The ability of AT-II to promote formation of inositol phosphates,the second messenger produced by the activation of Gq-coupled receptors,was also considerably suppressed in the cirrhotic VSMCs.Furthermore,the maximal p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation stimulated by AT-II was significantly reduced in the cirrhotic VSMCs in contrast to that in the normal VSMCs.Taken together,our data clearly demonstrated that the functional responses to AT-II was severely suppressed in aortic VSMCs in cirrhosis,indicating the impairment of general Gq-coupled receptor signaling and subsequent biological function in the cirrhotic VSMCs.

  1. Molecular Pathways Regulating Macrovascular Pathology and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Phenotype in Type 2 Diabetes

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    Sara Casella

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a disease reaching a pandemic proportion in developed countries and a major risk factor for almost all cardiovascular diseases and their adverse clinical manifestations. T2DM leads to several macrovascular and microvascular alterations that influence the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs are fundamental players in macrovascular alterations of T2DM patients. VSMCs display phenotypic and functional alterations that reflect an altered intracellular biomolecular scenario of great vessels of T2DM patients. Hyperglycemia itself and through intraparietal accumulation of advanced glycation-end products (AGEs activate different pathways, in particular nuclear factor-κB and MAPKs, while insulin and insulin growth-factor receptors (IGFR are implicated in the activation of Akt and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK 1/2. Nuclear factor-κB is also responsible of increased susceptibility of VSMCs to pro-apoptotic stimuli. Down-regulation of insulin growth-factor 1 receptors (IGFR-1R activity in diabetic vessels also influences negatively miR-133a levels, so increasing apoptotic susceptibility of VSMCs. Alterations of those bimolecular pathways and related genes associate to the prevalence of a synthetic phenotype of VSMCs induces extracellular matrix alterations of great vessels. A better knowledge of those biomolecular pathways and related genes in VSMCs will help to understand the mechanisms leading to macrovascular alterations in T2DM patients and to suggest new targeted therapies.

  2. Panax notoginseng Saponins Attenuate Phenotype Switching of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Induced by Notch3 Silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan; Shan, Dazhi; Li, Ying; Chen, Hui; Gao, Yonghong; Huang, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS) could maintain vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in stable phenotypes so as to keep blood vessel elasticity as well as prevent failing in endovascular treatment with stent. Downregulation of Notch3 expression in VSMCs could influence the phenotype of VSMCs under pathologic status. However, whether PNS is able to attenuate the Notch3 silencing induced phenotype switching of VSMCs remains poorly understood. Primary human VSMCs were transfected with a plasmid containing a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Notch3 and then exposed to different doses of PNS. The control groups included cells not receiving any treatment and cells transfected with a control siRNA. Phenotypic switching was evaluated by observing cell morphology with confocal microscopy, as well as examining α-SM-actin, SM22α, and OPN using Western blot. Downregulated Notch3 with a siRNA induced apparent phenotype switching, as reflected by morphologic changes, decreased expression of α-SM-actin and SM22α and increased expression of OPN. These changes were inhibited by PNS in a dose-dependent manner. The phenotype switching of VSMCs induced by Notch3 knockdown could be inhibited by PNS in a dose-dependent manner. Our study provided new evidence for searching effective drug for amending stability of atherosclerotic disease. PMID:26539217

  3. Panax notoginseng Saponins Attenuate Phenotype Switching of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Induced by Notch3 Silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS could maintain vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs in stable phenotypes so as to keep blood vessel elasticity as well as prevent failing in endovascular treatment with stent. Downregulation of Notch3 expression in VSMCs could influence the phenotype of VSMCs under pathologic status. However, whether PNS is able to attenuate the Notch3 silencing induced phenotype switching of VSMCs remains poorly understood. Primary human VSMCs were transfected with a plasmid containing a small interfering RNA (siRNA against Notch3 and then exposed to different doses of PNS. The control groups included cells not receiving any treatment and cells transfected with a control siRNA. Phenotypic switching was evaluated by observing cell morphology with confocal microscopy, as well as examining α-SM-actin, SM22α, and OPN using Western blot. Downregulated Notch3 with a siRNA induced apparent phenotype switching, as reflected by morphologic changes, decreased expression of α-SM-actin and SM22α and increased expression of OPN. These changes were inhibited by PNS in a dose-dependent manner. The phenotype switching of VSMCs induced by Notch3 knockdown could be inhibited by PNS in a dose-dependent manner. Our study provided new evidence for searching effective drug for amending stability of atherosclerotic disease.

  4. Cytotoxic effects of the lipid peroxidation product 2,4-decadienal in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabré, Anna; Girona, Josefa; Vallvé, Joan-C; Heras, Mercedes; Masana, Lluís

    2003-08-01

    It is well known that oxidized LDL can be cytotoxic to smooth muscle cells (SMC) and then contribute to the progression of atherosclerosis. Nevertheless, which oxidized compound and which mechanism are involved in cell death is still under study. In this work we have studied the role of two representative apolar aldehydes (hexanal and 2,4-decadienal (2,4-DDE)), derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids oxidation, on human SMC cytotoxicity. Cell cytotoxicity was assessed by means of lactate deshydrogenase (LDH) release, cell morphology and DNA fragmentation. Results showed that hexanal up to 50 microM for 24 h was not cytotoxic to cells. However, 2,4-DDE at 50 microM for 24 h induced a 48% LDH leakage. The observed cytotoxic effect of 2,4-DDE was not due to a programmed cell death as no DNA ladder was detected. After aldehydes exposition a decreased expression of p53 and c-myc mRNA, genes involved in cell death regulation, was also demonstrated by RT-PCR. These observations suggest that 2,4-DDE may be the molecular cause of lipid oxidation cytotoxicity to human vascular SMC. By inducing cell necrosis in advanced stages, lipid oxidation may contribute to the cell debris core which is growing in the atherosclerotic lesion leading to a weakened and unstable plaque.

  5. Inhibition Mechanism of Emodin on Rabbit Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contributes to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty and vein graft.In this study, MTT colormetry was used to test the effective scope of emodin to inhibit VSMCs proliferation.Flow cytometry and confocal image were adopted to investigate its inhibitive mechanism.The results show that emodin could inhibit the growth and proliferation of VSMCs and the inhibition rate of emodin on VSMCs is 24.6%-94.58%, which is time - and concentration - dependent.Emodin could reduce S phase entry, increase the apoptosis of VSMCs, and reduce the intensity of[Ca2+]i in hPDGF B/B stimulated VSMCs.This research provides theoretical basis for medical application of emodin.It is concluded that emodin could inhibit the growth and proliferation of VSMCs effectively.Decreasing the DNA synthesis, increasing the cell apoptosis and reducing the intensity of[Ca2+]i in hPDGF B/B stimulated VSMCs may be the inhibitive mechanism of emodin against VSMCs proliferation.

  6. SDF-1 promotes ox-LDL induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling-Xing; Zhang, Xian-Feng; Bai, Xue; Tong, Qian

    2013-09-01

    The mechanism of the regulatory roles of stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/C-X-C motif receptor 4 (CXCR4) on cell proliferation and apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via the protein kinase C (PKC) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathways have been investigated. Rat aortic VSMCs were treated with control or an oxidised low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) atherosclerosis (AS) model. Cells exposed to the AS model were treated with SDF-1 plus inhibitors specific for PKC (Ro31-8220), CXCR4 (12G5) or NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, PDTC). Cell proliferation was measured with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and apoptosis by flow cytometry. NF-κB protein expression was analysed using Western blotting. The proliferation rate in the AS model group was significantly higher than the control group, but lower than the SDF-1 group (P SDF-1 group was significantly lower than the normal control group (P SDF-1 group was significantly higher than the AS model (ox-LDL) group (P SDF-1 can promote the proliferation of VSMCs induced by ox-LDL and inhibit cell apoptosis, via the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

  7. Shikonin inhibits TNF-α-induced growth and invasion of rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuemin; Hu, Wenyu; Wu, Fang; Yuan, Xue; Hu, Jian

    2015-08-01

    Shikonin is a naphthoquinone compound extracted from the Chinese herb purple gromwell. Shikonin has broad antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor activities. The tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced proliferation and invasion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is an important factor that contributes to atherosclerosis. The effects of shikonin on the proliferation and apoptosis of VSMCs have been reported; however, the function of shikonin on TNF-α-mediated growth and invasion of VSMCs during atherosclerosis remains unclear. In this study, we used Western blot, flow cytometry, real-time quantitative PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to investigate the effect of shikonin on the TNF-α-induced growth and invasion of VSMCs and to determine the underlying mechanism. Our results showed that shikonin inhibits the TNF-α-mediated growth and invasion. Further study revealed that shikonin regulates the activation of nuclear factor kappa B and phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase signaling pathways; modulates the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, B-cell lymphoma 2, and Bax; activates caspase-3 and caspase-9; induces cell cycle arrest; and promotes the apoptosis of VSMCs. Together, our results indicate that shikonin may become a promising agent for the treatment of atherosclerosis and they also establish foundation for the development of anti-atherosclerosis drugs.

  8. PGC-1alpha inhibits oleic acid induced proliferation and migration of rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

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    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oleic acid (OA stimulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC proliferation and migration. The precise mechanism is still unclear. We sought to investigate the effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1alpha on OA-induced VSMC proliferation and migration. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Oleate and palmitate, the most abundant monounsaturated fatty acid and saturated fatty acid in plasma, respectively, differently affect the mRNA and protein levels of PGC-1alpha in VSMCs. OA treatment resulted in a reduction of PGC-1alpha expression, which may be responsible for the increase in VSMC proliferation and migration caused by this fatty acid. In fact, overexpression of PGC-1alpha prevented OA-induced VSMC proliferation and migration while suppression of PGC-1alpha by siRNA enhanced the effects of OA. In contrast, palmitic acid (PA treatment led to opposite effects. This saturated fatty acid induced PGC-1alpha expression and prevented OA-induced VSMC proliferation and migration. Mechanistic study demonstrated that the effects of PGC-1alpha on VSMC proliferation and migration result from its capacity to prevent ERK phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS: OA and PA regulate PGC-1alpha expression in VSMCs differentially. OA stimulates VSMC proliferation and migration via suppression of PGC-1alpha expression while PA reverses the effects of OA by inducing PGC-1alpha expression. Upregulation of PGC-1alpha in VSMCs provides a potential novel strategy in preventing atherosclerosis.

  9. Differential Mitochondrial Adaptation in Primary Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from a Diabetic Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Amy C; Knaub, Leslie A; McClatchey, P Mason; Connon, Chelsea A; Bouchard, Ron; Miller, Matthew W; Geary, Kate E; Walker, Lori A; Klemm, Dwight J; Reusch, Jane E B

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 330 million people worldwide and causes elevated cardiovascular disease risk. Mitochondria are critical for vascular function, generate cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and are perturbed by diabetes, representing a novel target for therapeutics. We hypothesized that adaptive mitochondrial plasticity in response to nutrient stress would be impaired in diabetes cellular physiology via a nitric oxide synthase- (NOS-) mediated decrease in mitochondrial function. Primary smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from aorta of the nonobese, insulin resistant rat diabetes model Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and the Wistar control rat were exposed to high glucose (25 mM). At baseline, significantly greater nitric oxide evolution, ROS production, and respiratory control ratio (RCR) were observed in GK SMCs. Upon exposure to high glucose, expression of phosphorylated eNOS, uncoupled respiration, and expression of mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and V were significantly decreased in GK SMCs (p < 0.05). Mitochondrial superoxide increased with high glucose in Wistar SMCs (p < 0.05) with no change in the GK beyond elevated baseline concentrations. Baseline comparisons show persistent metabolic perturbations in a diabetes phenotype. Overall, nutrient stress in GK SMCs caused a persistent decline in eNOS and mitochondrial function and disrupted mitochondrial plasticity, illustrating eNOS and mitochondria as potential therapeutic targets.

  10. Critical role of exogenous nitric oxide in ROCK activity in vascular smooth muscle cells.

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    Tatsuya Maruhashi

    Full Text Available Rho-associated kinase (ROCK signaling pathway has been shown to mediate various cellular functions including cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, apoptosis, and contraction, all of which may be involved in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Endogenous nitric oxide (NO is well known to have an anti-atherosclerotic effect, whereas the exogenous NO-mediated cardiovascular effect still remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of exogenous NO on ROCK activity in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs in vitro and in vivo.VSMCs migration was evaluated using a modified Boyden chamber assay. ROCK activities were measured by Western blot analysis in murine and human VSMCs and aorta of mice treated with or without angiotensin II (Ang II and/or sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor.Co-treatment with SNP inhibited the Ang II-induced cell migration and increases in ROCK activity in murine and human VSMCs. Similarly, the increased ROCK activity 2 weeks after Ang II infusion in the mouse aorta was substantially inhibited by subcutaneous injection of SNP.These findings suggest that administration of exogenous NO can inhibit ROCK activity in VSMCs in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Localization and function of KLF4 in cytoplasm of vascular smooth muscle cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Key Laboratory of Neurobiology and Vascular Biology (China); The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijazhuang (China); Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Xin-hua; Nie, Chan-juan; Li, Yong-hui [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Key Laboratory of Neurobiology and Vascular Biology (China); Wen, Jin-kun, E-mail: wjk@hebmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Key Laboratory of Neurobiology and Vascular Biology (China)

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •PDGF-BB prompts the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm. •PDGF-BB promotes interaction between KLF4 and actin in the cytoplasm. •Phosphorylation and SUMOylation of KLF4 participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization. •KLF4 regulates cytoskeleton by promoting the expression of contraction-associated genes. -- Abstract: The Krüppel-like factor 4 is a DNA-binding transcriptional regulator that regulates a diverse array of cellular processes, including development, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The previous studies about KLF4 functions mainly focused on its role as a transcription factor, its functions in the cytoplasm are still unknown. In this study, we found that PDGF-BB could prompt the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm through CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and increased the interaction of KLF4 with actin in the cytoplasm. Further study showed that both KLF4 phosphorylation and SUMOylation induced by PDGF-BB participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton in VSMCs. In conclusion, these results identify that KLF4 participates in the cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing cytoskeleton in the cytoplasm of VSMCs.

  12. Insulin-independent GLUT4 translocation in proliferative vascular smooth muscle cells involves SM22α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Li; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Peng; Xie, Xiao-Li; Dou, Yong-Qing; Lin, Yan-Ling; Nie, Lei; Lv, Pin; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Li, Xiao-Kun; Miao, Sui-Bing; Yin, Ya-Juan; Dong, Li-Hua; Song, Yu; Shu, Ya-Nan; Han, Mei

    2017-02-01

    The insulin-sensitive glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) is a predominant facilitative glucose transporter in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and is significantly upregulated in rabbit neointima. This study investigated the role of GLUT4 in VSMC proliferation, the cellular mechanism underlying PDGF-BB-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, and effects of SM22α, an actin-binding protein, on this process. Chronic treatment of VSMCs with PDGF-BB significantly elevated GLUT4 expression and glucose uptake. PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation was dependent on GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake. Meanwhile, the response of GLUT4 to insulin decreased in PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs. PDGF-BB-induced GLUT4 translocation partially rescued glucose utilization in insulin-resistant cells. Immunofluorescence and western blot analysis revealed that PDGF-BB induced GLUT4 translocation in an actin dynamics-dependent manner. SM22α disruption facilitated GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake by promoting actin dynamics and cortical actin polymerization. Similar results were observed in VSMCs of SM22α (-/-) mice. The in vivo experiments showed that the glucose level in the neointima induced by ligation was significantly increased in SM22α (-/-) mice, accompanied by increased neointimal thickness, compared with those in wild-type mice. These findings suggest that GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake is involved in VSMC proliferation, and provide a novel link between SM22α and glucose utilization in PDGF-BB-triggered proliferation.

  13. Differential Cellular and Molecular Effects of Butyrate and Trichostatin A on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasturi Ranganna

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, butyrate and trichostatin A (TSA, are epigenetic histone modifiers and proliferation inhibitors by downregulating cyclin D1, a positive cell cycle regulator, and upregulating p21Cip1 and INK family of proteins, negative cell cycle regulators. Our recent study indicated cyclin D1 upregulation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC that are proliferation-arrested by butyrate. Here we investigate whether cyclin D1 upregulation is a unique response of VSMC to butyrate or a general response to HDAC inhibitors (HDACi by evaluating the effects of butyrate and TSA on VSMC. While butyrate and TSA inhibit VSMC proliferation via cytostatic and cytotoxic effects, respectively, they downregulate cdk4, cdk6, and cdk2, and upregulate cyclin D3, p21Cip1 and p15INK4B, and cause similar effects on key histone H3 posttranslational modifications. Conversely, cyclin D1 is upregulated by butyrate and inhibited by TSA. Assessment of glycogen synthase 3-dependent phosphorylation, subcellular localization and transcription of cyclin D1 indicates that differential effects of butyrate and TSA on cyclin D1 levels are linked to disparity in cyclin D1 gene expression. Disparity in butyrate- and TSA-induced cyclin D1 may influence transcriptional regulation of genes that are associated with changes in cellular morphology/cellular effects that these HDACi confer on VSMC, as a transcriptional modulator.

  14. TRPC1 transcript variants, inefficient nonsense-mediated decay and low up-frameshift-1 in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Bhaskar

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient Receptor Potential Canonical 1 (TRPC1 is a widely-expressed mammalian cationic channel with functional effects that include stimulation of cardiovascular remodelling. The initial aim of this study was to investigate variation in TRPC1-encoding gene transcripts. Results Extensive TRPC1 transcript alternative splicing was observed, with exons 2, 3 and 5-9 frequently omitted, leading to variants containing premature termination codons. Consistent with the predicted sensitivity of such variants to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD the variants were increased by cycloheximide. However it was notable that control of the variants by NMD was prominent in human embryonic kidney 293 cells but not human vascular smooth muscle cells. The cellular difference was attributed in part to a critical protein in NMD, up-frameshift-1 (UPF1, which was found to have low abundance in the vascular cells. Rescue of UPF1 by expression of exogenous UPF1 was found to suppress vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Conclusions The data suggest: (i extensive NMD-sensitive transcripts of TRPC1; (ii inefficient clearance of aberrant transcripts and enhanced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells in part because of low UPF1 expression.

  15. Contribution of Nrf2 to Atherogenic Phenotype Switching of Coronary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells Lacking CD38 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Xu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Recent studies have indicated that CD38 gene deficiency results in dedifferentiation or transdifferentiation of arterial smooth muscle cells upon atherogenic stimulations. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating this vascular smooth muscle (SMC phenotypic switching remain unknown. Methods & Results: In the present study, we first characterized the phenotypic change in the primary cultures of coronary arterial myocytes (CAMs from CD38-/- mice. It was shown that CD38 deficiency decreased the expression of contractile marker calponin, SM22α and α-SMA but increased the expression of SMC dedifferentiation marker, vimentin, which was accompanied by enhanced cell proliferation. This phenotypic change in CD38-/- CAMs was enhanced by 7-ketocholesterol (7-Ket, an atherogenic stimulus. We further found that the CD38 deficiency decreased the expression and activity of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, a basic leucine zipper (bZIP transcription factor sensitive to redox regulation. Similar to CD38 deletion, Nrf2 gene silencing increased CAM dedifferentiation upon 7-Ket stimulation. In contrast, the overexpression of Nrf2 gene abolished 7-Ket-induced dedifferentiation in CD38-/- CAMs. Given the sensitivity of Nrf2 to oxidative stress, we determined the role of redox signaling in the regulation of Nrf2 expression and activity associated with CD38 effect in CAM phenotype changes. It was demonstrated that in CD38-/- CAMs, 7-Ket failed to stimulate the production of O2-., while in CD38+/+ CAMs 7-Ket induced marked O2-. production and enhancement of Nrf2 activity, which was substantially attenuated by NOX4 gene silencing. Finally, we demonstrated that 7-Ket-induced and NOX4-dependent O2-. production was inhibited by 8-Br-cADPR, an antagonist of cADPR or NED-19, an antagonist of NAADP as product of CD38 ADP-ribosylcyclase, which significantly inhibited the level of cytosolic Ca2+ and the activation of Nrf2 under 7-Ket. Conclusion

  16. Arterial spasm as a finding intimately associated with the onset of vascular headache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnic, J.D.; Schellinger, D.

    1983-03-01

    A patient with migraine headaches of the ''cluster'' variant type is presented in whom vasospasm of the middle cerebral artery, the anterior cerebral artery and the internal carotid artery triggered a pain episode identical in character and severity to the headaches which had led to his investigation. Vasospasm associated with the painful phase of headache in this case conflicts with the more accepted theory that the pain phase of a vascular headache is related to vasodilatation of cerebral or extracerebral vessels. The literature is reviewed.

  17. Vascular adaptation in athletes: is there an 'athlete's artery'?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, D.J.; Spence, A.; Rowley, N.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Naylor, L.H.

    2012-01-01

    Whilst the existence of a specific phenotype characterized as 'athlete's heart' is generally acknowledged, the question of whether athletes exhibit characteristic vascular adaptations has not been specifically addressed. To do so in this symposium, studies which have assessed the size, wall thicknes

  18. Vascular Cures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  19. Endothelin—1 promoted proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cell through pathway of extracellular signal—regulated kinase and cyclin D1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYing-Min; WANGKe-Qiang; ZHOUGuo-Min; ZHOJi; GEJun-Bo

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To investigate whether endothelin-1(ET-1) can promote human umbilical artery smooth muscle artery smooth muscle cell (HUASMC) proliferation through pathway of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cyclin D1.METHODS: The effects of ET-1 and PD98059 on HUASMC were evaluated by MTT assay. The content of DNA was defined by [3H]TdR assay and cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytomerty. Western blot analysis was employed to detect the active phosphorylated state of ERK and the expression of cylin D1.RESULTS:Firstly, ET-1(100nmol/L) stimulated HUASMC proliferation compared with the group withou ET-1(P<0.05) and PD98059 group (P<0.05). PD98059 inhibited the HUASMC proliferation stimulated by ET-1(P<0.05). Secondly, ET-1 stimulated DNA synthesis of HUASMC compared with the group without ET-1(P<0.05). Thirdly, ET-1 promoted the cell cycle transition from G0/G1 phase to S phase. G0/G1 phase cell percentage was obviously decreased compared with the group without ET-1(P<0.05). S phase cell percentage was increased compared with the group without ET-1(P<0.05). Fourthly, ET-1 increased the phosphorylated level of ERK and the expression of cylin D1, an inhibitor of ERK blocked phosphorylated level of ERK and cyclin D1 expression. ERK phosphorylated level of ET-1 group was evidently increased compared with PD98059 group (P<0.05), Cyclin D1 protein expression also was increased compared with PD98059 group (P<0.05). While nonphosphorylated ERK expression remained unchanged. CONCLUSION:Endothelin-1 promoted vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through pathway of ERK and cyclin D1.

  20. Roles of NHE-1 in the proliferation and apoptosis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚伟; 钱桂生; 杨晓静

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the roles of Na+/H+ exchanger-1 (NHE-1)in the proliferation and apoptosis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in rats. Methods Twenty Wistar rats were randomized into control group and 3-week hypoxic group. Intracellular pH (pHi) of the smooth muscle was determined with fluorescence measurement of the pH-sensitive dye BCECF-AM, and the expression of NHE-1 mRNA was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Primary culture of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in vitro was performed. In situ cell death detection kit (TUNEL) was used for studying the effect of specific NHE-1 inhibitor-dimethyl amiloride (DMA) on the apoptosis of muscle cells which had intracellular acidification. Results pHi value and NHE-1 mRNA expression of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells were significantly higher in the hypoxic group than in the control group (P<0.01, P<0.001). DMA elevated the apoptotic ratio remarkably. The effect was enhanced when DMA concentration increased and the time prolonged. Conclusions With the function of adjusting pHi, NHE-1 may play an important role in the proliferation and apoptosis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

  1. A cyclic GMP-dependent calcium-activated chloride current in smooth-muscle cells from rat mesenteric resistance arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matchkov, Vladimir; Aalkjær, Christian; Nilsson, Holger

    2004-01-01

    -PET-cGMP or with a peptide inhibitor of PKG, or with the nonhydrolysable ATP analogue AMP-PNP. Under biionic conditions, the anion permeability sequence of the channel was SCN- > Br- > I- > Cl- > acetate > F- >> aspartate, but the conductance sequence was I- > Br- > Cl- > acetate > F- > aspartate = SCN-. The current had...... conditions of high calcium in the patch-pipette solution, a current similar to the latter could be identified also in the mesenteric artery smooth-muscle cells. We conclude that smooth-muscle cells from rat mesenteric resistance arteries have a novel cGMP-dependent calcium-activated chloride current, which...

  2. Vascular Pathology in the Extracranial Vertebral Arteries in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, L; Nygård, A; Ovesen, C;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular pathology in the extracranial vertebral arteries remains among the possible causes in cryptogenic stroke. However, the diagnosis is challenged by the great variety in the anatomy of the vertebral arteries, clinical symptoms and difficulties in the radiological assessments....... The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of CT angiography (CTA)-detected pathological findings in the extracranial vertebral arteries in an acute stroke population and secondly to determine the frequency of posterior pathology as probable cause in patients with otherwise cryptogenic stroke...... scans systematically, assessing the four segments of the extracranial vertebral arteries. First, the frequency of pathological findings including stenosis, plaques, dissection, kinked artery and coiling was assessed. Subsequently, we explored the extent of the pathological findings that were the most...

  3. Relationship between dyslipidemia and vascular endothelial function in patients with coronary artery spasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向定成

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of dyslipidemia on vascular endothelial function in patients with coronary artery spasm. Methods Sixty-four patients with chest pain but without significant angiographic stenosis were divided into coronary spasm group (n=46 with coronary spasm) and control group (n=18 without coronary spasm) according to acetylcholine provoking test. Endothelin-1 (ET-1), nitric oxide (NO) and lipids were

  4. The management of combined coronary artery disease and peripheral vascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Cassar (Andrew); D. Poldermans (Don); C.S. Rihal (Charanjit); B.J. Gersh (Bernard)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCoronary artery disease (CAD) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) remain highly prevalent in the population due to population ageing, smoking, diabetes, unhealthy lifestyles, and the epidemic of obesity, and frequently coexist. The management of combined CAD and PVD is a common challen

  5. VEGF, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 immunoreactivity in the porcine arteries of vascular subovarian plexus (VSP during the estrous cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Andronowska

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is an important angiogenic factor in the female reproductive tract. It binds to cell surface through ligand-stimulatable tyrosine kinase receptors, the most important being VEGFR-1 (flt-1 and VEGFR-2 (flk-1. The broad ligament of the uterus is a dynamic organ consisting of specialized complexes of blood vessels connected functionally to the uterus, oviduct and ovary. Endothelial cells form an inner coating of the vessel walls and thus they stay under the influence of various modulators circulating in blood including ovarian steriods involved in developmental changes in the female reproductive system. The aim of the present study was to immunolocalize VEGF and its two receptors: VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 in the broad ligament of the uterus in the area of vascular subovarian plexus during different phases of the estrous cycle in pig and to determine the correlation between immunoreactivity of the investigated factors and phases of the estrous cycle. The study was performed on cryostat sections of vascular subovarian plexus stained immunohistochemically by ABC method. Specific polyclonal antibodies: anti-VEGF, anti-VEGFR-1 and anti-VEGFR-2 were used. Data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance. Our study revealed the presence of VEGF and its receptors in endothelial and smooth muscle cells of VSP arteries. All agents displayed phase-related differences in immunoreactivity suggesting the modulatory effect of VEGF, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 on the arteries of the VSP in the porcine broad ligament of the uterus.

  6. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Modulates the Vascular Responses of Mesenteric Arteries from Human Colorectal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ferrero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze whether tyrosine phosphorylation in tumoral arteries may modulate their vascular response. To do this, mesenteric arteries supplying blood flow to colorectal tumors or to normal intestine were obtained during surgery and prepared for isometric tension recording in an organ bath. Increasing tyrosine phosphorylation with the phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate produced arterial contraction which was lower in tumoral than in control arteries, whereas it reduced the contraction to noradrenaline in tumoral but not in control arteries and reduced the relaxation to bradykinin in control but not in tumoral arteries. Protein expression of VEGF-A and of the VEGF receptor FLT1 was similar in control and tumoral arteries, but expression of the VEGF receptor KDR was increased in tumoral compared with control arteries. This suggests that tyrosine phosphorylation may produce inhibition of the contraction in tumoral mesenteric arteries, which may increase blood flow to the tumor when tyrosine phosphorylation is increased by stimulation of VEGF receptors.

  7. Adipose tissue and vascular inflammation in coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Enrica; Golia; Giuseppe; Limongelli; Francesco; Natale; Fabio; Fimiani; Valeria; Maddaloni; Pina; Elvira; Russo; Lucia; Riegler; Renatomaria; Bianchi; Mario; Crisci; Gaetano; Di; Palma; Paolo; Golino; Maria; Giovanna; Russo; Raffaele; Calabrò; Paolo; Calabrò

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has become an important public health issue in Western and developing countries,with well known metabolic and cardiovascular complications.In the last decades,evidence have been growing about the active role of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ in determining these pathological consequences.As a consequence of the expansion of fat depots,in obese subjects,adipose tissue cells develope a phenotypic modification,which turns into a change of the secretory output.Adipocytokines produced by both adipocytes and adipose stromal cells are involved in the modulation of glucose and lipid handling,vascular biology and,moreover,participate to the systemic inflammatory response,which characterizes obesity and metabolic syndrome.This might represent an important pathophysiological link with atherosclerotic complications and cardiovascular events.A great number of adipocytokines have been described recently,linking inflammatory mileu and vascular pathology.The understanding of these pathways is crucial not only from a pathophysiological point of view,but also to a better cardiovascular disease risk stratification and to the identification of possible therapeutic targets.The aim of this paper is to review the role of Adipocytokines as a possible link between obesity and vascular disease.

  8. Vascular Surgery in World War II: The Shift to Repairing Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Justin; Cherry, Kenneth J; Rich, Norman M

    2016-03-01

    Vascular surgery in World War II has long been defined by DeBakey and Simeone's classic 1946 article describing arterial repair as exceedingly rare. They argued ligation was and should be the standard surgical response to arterial trauma in war. We returned to and analyzed the original records of World War II military medical units housed in the National Archives and other repositories in addition to consulting published accounts to determine the American practice of vascular surgery in World War II. This research demonstrates a clear shift from ligation to arterial repair occurring among American military surgeons in the last 6 months of the war in the European Theater of Operations. These conclusions not only highlight the role of war as a catalyst for surgical change but also point to the dangers of inaccurate history in stymieing such advances.

  9. Secreted Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 of Proliferating Smooth Muscle Cells as a Trigger for Drug Release from Stent Surface Polymers in Coronary Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliesche, Daniel G; Hussner, Janine; Witzigmann, Dominik; Porta, Fabiola; Glatter, Timo; Schmidt, Alexander; Huwyler, Jörg; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of death in industrialized countries. Atherosclerotic coronary arteries are commonly treated with percutaneous transluminal coronary intervention followed by stent deployment. This treatment has significantly improved the clinical outcome. However, triggered vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation leads to in-stent restenosis in bare metal stents. In addition, stent thrombosis is a severe side effect of drug eluting stents due to inhibition of endothelialization. The aim of this study was to develop and test a stent surface polymer, where cytotoxic drugs are covalently conjugated to the surface and released by proteases selectively secreted by proliferating smooth muscle cells. Resting and proliferating human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC) and endothelial cells (HCAEC) were screened to identify an enzyme exclusively released by proliferating HCASMC. Expression analyses and enzyme activity assays verified selective and exclusive activity of the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in proliferating HCASMC. The principle of drug release exclusively triggered by proliferating HCASMC was tested using the biodegradable stent surface polymer poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) and the MMP-9 cleavable peptide linkers named SRL and AVR. The specific peptide cleavage by MMP-9 was verified by attachment of the model compound fluorescein. Fluorescein release was observed in the presence of MMP-9 secreting HCASMC but not of proliferating HCAEC. Our findings suggest that cytotoxic drug conjugated polymers can be designed to selectively release the attached compound triggered by MMP-9 secreting smooth muscle cells. This novel concept may be beneficial for stent endothelialization thereby reducing the risk of restenosis and thrombosis.

  10. Conditional deletion of Dicer in vascular smooth muscle cells leads to the developmental delay and embryonic mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yaoqian [Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Center for Cancer Research, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Balazs, Louisa [Department of Pathology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Tigyi, Gabor [Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Yue, Junming, E-mail: yue@uthsc.edu [Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Center for Cancer Research, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States)

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} Deletion of Dicer in vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMCs) leads to embryonic mortality. {yields} Loss of Dicer in VSMCs leads to developmental delay. {yields} Loss of Dicer in VSMCs leads to hemorrhage in various organs including brain, skin and liver. {yields} Loss of Dicer in VSMCs leads to vascular wall remodeling. {yields} Loss of Dicer in VSMCs dysregulates the expression of miRNA and VSMC marker genes. -- Abstract: Dicer is a RNAase III enzyme that cleaves double stranded RNA and generates small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA). The goal of this study is to examine the role of Dicer and miRNAs in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). We deleted Dicer in VSMCs of mice, which caused a developmental delay that manifested as early as embryonic day E12.5, leading to embryonic death between E14.5 and E15.5 due to extensive hemorrhage in the liver, brain, and skin. Dicer KO embryos showed dilated blood vessels and a disarray of vascular architecture between E14.5 and E15.5. VSMC proliferation was significantly inhibited in Dicer KOs. The expression of VSMC marker genes were significantly downregulated in Dicer cKO embryos. The vascular structure of the yolk sac and embryo in Dicer KOs was lost to an extent that no blood vessels could be identified after E15.5. Expression of most miRNAs examined was compromised in VSMCs of Dicer KO. Our results indicate that Dicer is required for vascular development and regulates vascular remodeling by modulating VSMC proliferation and differentiation.

  11. OVER-EXPRESSION OF EXTRACELLULAR SIGNAL-REGULATED KINASE IN VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL OF HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) was involved in changes of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) under hypertension. Methods Two-kidney one clip Wistar hypertensive rats (WHR) were sacrificed and their right kidneys were harvested 4 weeks after surgery. The spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were divided into 4, 8, and 16 weeks old groups (SHR4w, SHR8w, and SHR16w), respectively. The control group were sham operated age-matched Wistar rats. Immunohistochemical technique and Western blotting were applied to study ERK1/2 protein expression in VSMC of the renal vascular trees in WHR, SHR, and control rats. Results Blood pressure in two-kidney one clip WHR obviously increased at one week after surgery, and reached to 198.00 ± 33.00 mm Hg at the end of experiment, significantly higher than that in the control rats ( P < 0. 01 ). Blood pressure in SHR4w ( 108.00 ± 11.25 mm Hg) was similar to that in the controls. However, it rose to 122.25 ± 21.75 mm Hg in SHR8w, and even up to 201.75 ± 18.00 mm Hg in SHR16w, which were significantly higher than that of both the SHR4w and the controls ( P < 0. 01 ). The rate and degree of glomerular fibrosis in WHR were significantly higher than controls (P < 0. 05 ). Hyaline degeneration of the afferent arterioles was found in WHR. In contrast, either fibrosis of glomerulus or hyaline degeneration of the arterioles or protein casts was not observed in SHR4w, SHR8w,and SHR16w. Immunohistochemical staining results showed expression of ERK1 was similar to that of ERK2. The positive rates of ERK2 staining in VSMC of afferent arterioles, interlobular, interlobar, and arcuate arteries in two-kidney one clip WHR were significantly higher (7. 09% ± 1.75%, 14. 57% ± 4. 58%, 29.44% ± 7. 35%, and 13.63% ±3.85%, respectively) than that of the controls( P < 0. 01 ). The positive rates of ERK2 staining in VSMC at afferent arterioles, interlobular, interlobar, and arcuate arteries in SHR

  12. Expression of conventional and novel glucose transporters, GLUT1, -9, -10, and -12, in vascular smooth muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pyla, Rajkumar; Poulose, Ninu; Jun, John Y.; Segar, Lakshman

    2013-01-01

    Intimal hyperplasia is characterized by exaggerated proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Enhanced VSMC growth is dependent on increased glucose uptake and metabolism. Facilitative glucose transporters (GLUTs) are comprised of conventional GLUT isoforms (GLUT1–5) and novel GLUT isoforms (GLUT6–14). Previous studies demonstrate that GLUT1 overexpression or GLUT10 downregulation contribute to phenotypic changes in VSMCs. To date, the expression profile of all 14 GLUT isoforms h...

  13. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans mediate Aβ-induced oxidative stress and hypercontractility in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Substantial evidence suggests that amyloid-β (Aβ) species induce oxidative stress and cerebrovascular (CV) dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), potentially contributing to the progressive dementia of this disease. The upstream molecular pathways governing this process, however, are poorly understood. In this report, we examine the role of heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) in Aβ-induced vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) dysfunction in vitro. Results Our results demonstrate t...

  14. 17Beta-estradiol Promotes Proliferation of Rat Synthetic Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells by Up-regulating Cyclin D_1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionCardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in women after 50 years of age in most developed countries. Estrogen deficiency plays a key role in causing CVD in women. The cardiovascular protective actions of estrogen are partially mediated by a direct effect on the vessel wall, and the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) plays a major role as an initiating event of atherosclerosis. A previous study by us in cooperation with Campble's group~([1])...

  15. Vascular Pathology in the Extracranial Vertebral Arteries in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bentsen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vascular pathology in the extracranial vertebral arteries remains among the possible causes in cryptogenic stroke. However, the diagnosis is challenged by the great variety in the anatomy of the vertebral arteries, clinical symptoms and difficulties in the radiological assessments. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of CT angiography (CTA-detected pathological findings in the extracranial vertebral arteries in an acute stroke population and secondly to determine the frequency of posterior pathology as probable cause in patients with otherwise cryptogenic stroke. Method: The analysis was based on 657 consecutive patients with symptoms of acute stroke and a final diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. On admission, a noncontrast CT cerebrum and CTA were performed. A senior consultant neuroradiologist, blinded to clinical data, reviewed all CTA scans systematically, assessing the four segments of the extracranial vertebral arteries. First, the frequency of pathological findings including stenosis, plaques, dissection, kinked artery and coiling was assessed. Subsequently, we explored the extent of the pathological findings that were the most plausible causes of stroke, namely either a possible dissection or a kinked artery. Results: Findings in the extracranial vertebral arteries included significant stenosis (0.8%, atherosclerotic plaque types (3.8%, possible dissections (2.6%, kinked arteries (2.6% and coiling (32.0%. Eighteen patients (2.8% with pathological findings had an unknown cause of stroke, likely posterior symptoms and no clinical stroke symptoms from the anterior circuit. Of these, 3 cases were kinked arteries (0.5% and 15 cases (2.3% were possible dissections. Conclusion: We found that in approximately 3% of the study population, the most plausible cause of the cryptogenic strokes was due to a pathological finding in the posterior extracranial vertebral arteries, being either a possible

  16. Impaired SIRT1 promotes the migration of vascular smooth muscle cell-derived foam cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Jie; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xu; Pi, Yan; Long, Chun-Yan; Sun, Meng-Jiao; Chen, Xue; Gao, Chang-Yue; Li, Jing-Cheng; Zhang, Li-Li

    2016-07-01

    The formation of fat-laden foam cells, contributing to the fatty streaks of the plaques of atheroma, is the critical early process in atherosclerosis. The previous study demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contain a much larger burden of the excess cholesterol in comparison with monocyte-derived macrophages in human coronary atherosclerosis, as the main origin of foam cells. It is noteworthy that VSMC-derived foam cells are deposited in subintima but not media, where VSMCs normally deposit in. Therefore, migration from media to intima is an indispensable step for a VSMC to accrue neutral lipids and form foam cell. Whether this migration occurs paralleled with or prior to the formation of foam cell is still unclear. Herein, the present study was designed to test the VSMC migratory capability in the process of foam cell formation induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). In conclusion, we provide evidence that oxLDL induces the VSMC-derived foam cells formation with increased migration ability and MMP-9 expression, which were partly attributed to the impaired SIRT1 and enhanced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity. As activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) has been reported to have anti-atherosclerotic effects, we investigated its role in oxLDL-treated VSMC migration. It is found that activating TRPV1 by capsaicin inhibits VSMC foam cell formation and the accompanied migration through rescuing the SIRT1 and suppressing NF-κB signaling. The present study provides evidence that SIRT1 may be a promising intervention target of atherosclerosis, and raises the prospect of TRPV1 in prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis.

  17. Urotensin Ⅱ increases endothelin production by vascular smooth muscle cells in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effects of urotensin Ⅱ (UII) on production of endothelin (ET) in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Cultured VSMCs incubated with various concentrations of UII were used to measure the VSMC 3H-TdR incorporation, the amount of ET mRNA and ET production in VSMCs. In this work we found that UII (10-10-10-8 mol/L) promoted VSMC 3H-TdR incorporation (47%-83%, P < 0.01) and increased the amount of ET mRNA by 17.1% (P < 0.05) to 112.8% (P < 0.01), respectively, in a concentration dependent manner compared with control. After 4 and 8 h incubation, 10-10-10-8 mol/L of UII elevated the ET synthesis and release in a concentration dependent manner. After 4 h incubation, the content of ET in medium was 4.9, 5.36 and 7.12 pg/mL (P < 0.01). After 8 h incubation, the ET content released from VSMCs was 12.6, 12.07 and 17.17 pg/mL (P < 0.01). In addition, it was found that BQ123, a specific ETA receptor antagonist, obviously decreased the VSMC DNA synthesis induced by UII. The results of this study showed that UII could stimulate the ET mRNA expression and ET production in VSMC. The effects of UII on VSMC DNA synthesis were partly mediated by ET autocrine pathway. It suggests that the interaction between UII and ET plays an important biological regulating role as endogenous active peptides.

  18. Yangxueqingnao particles inhibit rat vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by lysophosphatidic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Wei; XU Yi; CHEN Jun-zhu; HUANG Shu-ru; LU Zhen-ya; WANG Zhan-kun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of Yangxueqingnao particles on rat vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation induced by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). Methods: The amount of3H-TdR (3H-thymidine) admixed in cultured rat VSMC was measured and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity and lipid peroxidation end product malondialdehyde (MDA)content of the VSMC were assayed. Results: 1×10-9, 1×10-8, 1×10-7 mol/L LPA in a concentration dependent manner, induced the amount of 3H-TdR admixed, MAP kinase activity, and MDA content of the cultured rat VSMC to increase. However, 5%, 10%,and 15% Yangxueqingnao serum preincubation resulted in a decrease of 23.0%, 42.0%, and 52.0% (P<0.01) respectively in the amount of 3H-TdR admixed, a decline in VSMC MAP kinase activity of 13.9% (P<0.05), 29.6% (P<0.01), and 48.9% (P<0.01)respectively, and also, a decrease in MDA content of VSMC of 19.4%, 24.7%, and 43.2% (P<0.01) respectively, in the 1×10-7mol/L LPA-treated VSMC. Conclusions: LPA activates the proliferation and lipid peroxidation of VSMC in a concentration dependent manner. The LPA-induced VSMC proliferation is related to the activity of MAP kinases, enzymes involved in an intracellular signalling pathway. The results of the present study showed that Yangxueqingnao particles can effectively inhibit LPA-induced VSMC proliferation, MAP kinase activation, and reduce lipid peroxidative lesion.

  19. Diabetic conditions promote binding of monocytes to vascular smooth muscle cells and their subsequent differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Li; Park, Jehyun; Cai, Qiangjun; Lanting, Linda; Reddy, Marpadga A; Natarajan, Rama

    2010-03-01

    Diabetes is associated with significantly accelerated rates of atherosclerosis, key features of which include the presence of excessive macrophage-derived foam cells in the subendothelial space. We examined the hypothesis that enhanced monocyte-vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) interactions leading to subendothelial monocyte retention and differentiation to macrophages under diabetic conditions may be underlying mechanisms. Human aortic VSMCs (HVSMCs) treated with diabetic stimuli high glucose (HG) or S100B, a ligand of the receptor for advanced glycation end products, exhibited significantly increased binding of THP-1 monocytic cells. Diabetic stimuli increased the expression of the adhesive chemokine fractalkine (FKN) in HVSMCs. Pretreatment of HVSMCs with FKN or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) neutralizing antibodies significantly inhibited monocyte-VSMC binding, whereas monocytes treated with FKN showed enhanced binding to VSMC. Mouse aortic VSMCs (MVSMCs) derived from type 2 diabetic db/db mice exhibited significantly increased FKN levels and binding to mouse WEHI78/24 monocytic cells relative to nondiabetic control db/+ cells. The enhanced monocyte binding in db/db cells was abolished by both FKN and MCP-1 antibodies. Endothelium-denuded aortas from db/db mice and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice also exhibited enhanced FKN expression and monocyte binding, relative to respective controls. Coculture with HVSMCs increased CD36 expression in THP-1 cells, and this was significantly augmented by treatment of HVSMCs with S100B or HG. CD36 mRNA and protein levels were also significantly increased in WEHI78/24 cells after coincubation with db/db MVSMCs relative to control MVSMCs. These results demonstrate that diabetic conditions may accelerate atherosclerosis by inducing key chemokines in the vasculature that promote VSMC-monocyte interactions, subendothelial monocyte retention, and differentiation.

  20. Vasopressin-stimulated Ca2+ spiking in vascular smooth muscle cells involves phospholipase D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Shiels, A J; Maszak, G; Byron, K L

    2001-06-01

    Physiological concentrations of [Arg(8)]vasopressin (AVP; 10-500 pM) stimulate oscillations of cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+ spikes) in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells. We previously reported that this effect of AVP was blocked by a putative phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor, ONO-RS-082 (5 microM). In the present study, the products of PLA2, arachidonic acid (AA), and lysophospholipids were found to be ineffective in stimulating Ca2+ spiking, and inhibitors of AA metabolism did not prevent AVP-stimulated Ca2+ spiking. Thin layer chromatography was used to monitor the release of AA and phosphatidic acid (PA), which are the products of PLA2 and phospholipase D (PLD), respectively. AVP (100 pM) stimulated both AA and PA formation, but only PA formation was inhibited by ONO-RS-082 (5 microM). Exogenous PLD (type VII; 2.5 U/ml) stimulated Ca2+ spiking equivalent to the effect of 100 pM AVP. AVP stimulated transphosphatidylation of 1-butanol (a PLD-catalyzed reaction) but not 2-butanol, and 1-butanol (but not 2-butanol) completely prevented AVP-stimulated Ca2+ spiking. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibition, which completely prevents AVP-stimulated Ca2+ spiking, did not inhibit AVP-stimulated phosphatidylbutanol formation. These results suggest that AVP-stimulated Ca2+ spiking depends on activation of PLD rather than PLA2 and that PKC activation may be downstream of PLD in the signaling cascade.

  1. Taurine antagonized oxidative stress injury induced by homocysteine in rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin CHANG; Jian-xin XU; Jing ZHAO; Yong-zheng PANG; Chao-shu TANG; Yong-fen QI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To observe protective effects of taurine on reactive oxygen species generation induced by homocysteine in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). METHODS: Rat VSMC was incubated with various concentrations of homocysteine and taurine. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity which released into culture medium was elevated as an indicator for VSMC injury. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) - hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide anion (O2- )were measured with luminol or lucigenin chemiluminescences method, and the mitochondria Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) and catalase (CAT) were also measured in treated VSMC. RESULTS: LDH leakage from cultured VSMC treated with homocystenie, was increased (P<0.01 vs control), and it was markedly inhibited when co-incubated with taurine (P<0.01). Homocysteine induced H2O2 generation from VSMC in a concentration dependent manner (P<0.01 vs control). However, taurine (5, 10, and 20 mmol/L) significantly antagonized 0.5 mmol/L homocysteine-induced H2O2 generation in VSMC in a concentration dependent manner (P<0.01 vs homocysteine alone group), although taurine itself did not alter the H2O2 generation in VSMC (P>0.05 vs control).In this study, the superoxide anion in VSMC was not detectable by chemiluminent method. In addition, treatment of VSMC with taurine increased mitochondria Mn-SOD and CAT activity in a concentration dependent manner (P<0.05), but homocysteine decreased mitochondria Mn-SOD and CAT activity (P<0.01 vs control). In addition,co-administration of taurine markedly ameliorated homocysteine-induced inhibition of Mn-SOD and CAT activity in VSMC (P<0.01 vs homocysteine alone group). CONCLUSION: Taurine antagonized the effects of homocysteine on ROS generation and anti-oxidant enzyme activities in rat VSMC in vitro.

  2. Effect of Nateglinide and Glibenclamide on Endothelial Cells and Smooth Muscle Cells from Human Coronary Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seeger H

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the effect of nateglinide and glibenclamide, two different substances used for therapy of diabetes mellitus type 2, were investigated on the synthesis of markers of endothelial function and on the proliferation of smooth muscle cells in vitro. As cell models endothelial and smooth muscle cells from human coronary arteries were used. Both substances were tested at concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 10 mmol/l. As markers of endothelial function prostacyclin, endothelin and plasminogen-activator-inhibitor-1 (PAI-1 were tested. Nateglinide and glibenclamide were similarly able to inhibit endothelial endothelin and PAI-1 synthesis, but only at the highest concentration tested. Endothelial prostacyclin synthesis and proliferation of smooth muscle cells were not significantly changed by both substances. These results indicate that both nateglinide and glibenclamide may have potential in reducing negative long-term effects of diabetes such as atherogenesis. Kurzfassung: Effekt von Nateglinid und Glibenclamid auf Endothel- und Muskelzellen humaner Koronararterien. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde die Wirkung von Nateglinid und Glibenclamid, zweier unterschiedlicher Substanzen zur Behandlung des Diabetes mellitus Typ 2, auf die Synthese von Markern der Endothelfunktion und auf die Proliferation glatter Muskelzellen untersucht. Als Zellmodell dienten Endothelzellen und glatte Muskelzellen menschlicher Koronararterien. Beide Substanzen wurden in den Konzentrationen 0,1, 1 und 10 mmol/l getestet. Als Marker der Endothelfunktion dienten Prostazyklin, Endothelin und Plasminogen-Aktivator-Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1. Sowohl Nateglinid als auch Glibenclamid konnten die endotheliale Endothelin- und PAI-1-Produktion in ähnlichem Ausmaß senken, allerdings nur in der höchsten Konzentration. Die Prostazyklinsynthese und die Muskelzellproliferation wurden nicht signifikant beeinflußt. Diese Ergebnisse deuten daraufhin, daß sowohl Nateglinid als auch

  3. Human Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Responses to Bioactive Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Newcomer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Under normal physiological conditions, mature human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs exhibit a “contractile” phenotype marked by low rates of proliferation and protein synthesis, but these cells possess the remarkable ability to dedifferentiate into a “synthetic” phenotype when stimulated by conditions of pathologic stress. A variety of polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEMU films are shown here to exhibit bioactive properties that induce distinct responses from cultured hCASMCs. Surfaces terminated with Nafion or poly(styrenesulfonic acid (PSS induce changes in the expression and organization of intracellular proteins, while a hydrophilic, zwitterionic copolymer of acrylic acid and 3-[2-(acrylamido-ethyl dimethylammonio] propane sulfonate (PAA-co-PAEDAPS is resistant to cell attachment and suppresses the formation of key cytoskeletal components. Differential expression of heat shock protein 90 and actin is observed, in terms of both their magnitude and cellular localization, and distinct cytoplasmic patterns of vimentin are seen. The ionophore A23187 induces contraction in confluent hCASMC cultures on Nafion-terminated surfaces. These results demonstrate that PEMU coatings exert direct effects on the cytoskeletal organization of attaching hCASMCs, impeding growth in some cases, inducing changes consistent with phenotypic modulation in others, and suggesting potential utility for PEMU surfaces as a coating for coronary artery stents and other implantable medical devices.

  4. Tetraspanin CD9 regulates cell contraction and actin arrangement via RhoA in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Herr

    Full Text Available The most prevalent cardiovascular diseases arise from alterations in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC morphology and function. Tetraspanin CD9 has been previously implicated in regulating vascular pathologies; however, insight into how CD9 may regulate adverse VSMC phenotypes has not been provided. We utilized a human model of aortic smooth muscle cells to understand the consequences of CD9 deficiency on VSMC phenotypes. Upon knocking down CD9, the cells developed an abnormally small and rounded morphology. We determined that this morphological change was due to a lack of typical parallel actin arrangement. We also found similar total RhoA but decreased GTP-bound (active RhoA levels in CD9 deficient cells. As a result, cells lacking a full complement of CD9 were less contractile than their control treated counterparts. Upon restoration of RhoA activity in the CD9 deficient cells, the phenotype was reversed and cell contraction was restored. Conversely, inhibition of RhoA activity in the control cells mimicked the CD9-deficient cell phenotype. Thus, alteration in CD9 expression was sufficient to profoundly disrupt cellular actin arrangement and endogenous cell contraction by interfering with RhoA signaling. This study provides insight into how CD9 may regulate previously described vascular smooth muscle cell pathophysiology.

  5. The Na+/H+ exchanger contributes to increased smooth muscle proliferation and migration in a rat model of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huetsch, John C; Jiang, Haiyang; Larrain, Carolina; Shimoda, Larissa A

    2016-03-01

    Increased muscularity of small pulmonary vessels, involving enhanced proliferation and migration of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs), is a key component of the vascular remodeling underlying the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Stimuli such as growth factors and hypoxia induce PASMC alkalinization, proliferation, and migration through upregulation of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE), inhibition of which prevents the development of hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling and PH. We wanted to explore whether NHE was also necessary for pathologic PASMC proliferation and migration in a model of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a severe form of PH not associated with persistent hypoxia. PASMCs were isolated from rats exposed to SU5416-hypoxia (SuHx) followed by return to normoxia and from vehicle controls. We measured resting intracellular pH (pHi) and NHE activity using the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF-AM. PASMC proliferation and migration were assessed using BrdU incorporation and transwell filters, respectively. NHE activity was increased in SuHx PASMCs, although resting pHi was unchanged. SuHx PASMCs also exhibited increased proliferation and migration relative to controls, which was attenuated in the setting of pharmacologic inhibition of NHE. Our findings suggest that increased NHE activity contributes to pathologic PASMC function in the SuHx model of PAH, although this effect does not appear to be mediated by global changes in pHi homeostasis.

  6. Effects of infection with recombinant adenovirus on human vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quax, P.H.A.; Lamfers, M.L.M.; Grimbergen, J.M.; Teeling, J.; Hoeben, R.C.; Nieuw Amerongen, G.P. van; Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van

    1996-01-01

    The plasminogen activation (PA) system is involved in vascular remodelling. Modulating its activity in vascular cells might be a way to interfere in processes such as angiogenesis and restenosis. Adenoviral vectors have become a favourable tool for direct gene transfer into vascular cells. In the in

  7. Neuropeptide Y Stimulates Proliferation and Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from Pregnancy Hypertensive Rats via Y1 and Y5 Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhang

    Full Text Available The increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs play important roles in pathophysiological remodeling of arteries during hypertension in pregnancy. However, the mechanisms involved in this process remain unclear. We hypothesized that Neuropeptide Y (NPY, which is a potent mitogenic peptide, participates in modulating proliferation and migration of VSMCs during hypertension in pregnancy. Using pregnant hypertensive rats, induced by intraperitoneal injection of L-nitro-arginine methylester (L-NAME, the plasma concentration of NPY was detected. Open angle, which reflects the non-uniform remodeling with high sensitivity, was used to detect the pathophysiological vascular remodeling in vivo. The results revealed that NPY concentration and artery open angle were both significantly increased in rats with hypertension in pregnant. The underlying mechanism of elevated NPY on vascular remodeling were further analyzed by using cultured VSMCs in vitro. In cultured VSMCs, NPY most effectively stimulated the migration and proliferation of VSMCs at 10-6 mol/L, similar to the plasma concentration in L-NAME hypertension in pregnant rats. NPY up-regulated the expressions of both Y1 and Y5 receptors, increased the phosphorylations of STAT3 on Tyr705 and Ser727 residues, and induced the expression of c-Fos. The NPY-induced VSMCs proliferation was reduced by Y5 receptor antagonist, and fully blocked by combinations with other antagonist, such as Y2+Y5, Y1+Y5, and Y1+Y2+Y5. In contrast, the NPY-induced VSMC migration was blocked by either Y receptor antagonist or any combination of Y receptor antagonists. These results suggest that the elevated plasma concentration of NPY during hypertension in pregnancy may induce VSMC proliferation mainly via Y5 receptor, which subsequently modulate STAT3 and c-Fos signaling pathways to result in the vascular remodeling. These results also suggest that NPY mainly acts on VSMCs in vitro via Y1, Y5

  8. High resolution MR angiography with rephasing and dephasing sequences for selective vascular imaging of arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiderer, M.; Laub, G.; Staebler, A.; Yousry, P.; Lauterjung, L.

    1988-03-01

    With rephasing and dephasing sequences the vascular system is imaged with high or low signal intensity whereas stationary tissue is imaged with identical signal intensity. With images recorded in systole and diastole followed by image subtraction separate imaging of arteries or veins without background superposition is possible. 13 patients with vascular lesions of the lower extremities and 7 volunteers were examined. Vascular stenosis, aneurysm, dilatation, occlusion and collateral vessels could be imaged similar to digital subtraction angiography. Vessels with a diameter down to 1 mm could be imaged. The large slice thickness up to 80 mm results in projection type images where the vascular tree is imaged over the whole field of view and without partial volume effects.

  9. The effects of epinine on arterial blood pressure and regional vascular resistances in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Mir, I; Palop, V; Morales-Olivas, F J; Estañ, L; Rubio, E

    1998-07-01

    1. We carried out experiments in anesthetized rats to study the hemodynamic effects of intravenous injections of epinine. 2. Epinine (1-320 micrograms/kg) produced a biphasic effect on mean arterial blood pressure (n = 30). At doses lower than 40 micrograms/kg, arterial blood pressure decreased (by as much as 21.5 +/- 3.4%), though at higher doses it increased dose dependently (by as much as 73.2 +/- 14.5%). Epinine also produced bradicardia in a dose-dependent manner (by as much as 26.4 +/- 4.9%). Sulpiride (100 micrograms/kg) suppressed the hypotensive effect of epinine but did not change the hypertensive effect. In the presence of prazosin (1,000 micrograms/kg), arterial blood pressure remained significantly decreased at all doses of epinine. Neither sulpiride nor prazosin changed the bradycardic effect of epinine. 3. Prazosin produced a significant decrease in renal vascular resistance. Epinine (5 micrograms/kg) after prazosin reverted the effects of prazosin in renal vascular resistance, without any significant modification in the renal blood flows. However, 20 micrograms/kg epinine increased the renal vascular resistances and, moreover, produced a significant decrease in the blood flows of both kidneys. Neither prazosin nor epinine produced modifications in the intestinal vascular bed. 4. Although epinine possesses significant dopamine and alpha-adrenergic activities that are involved in the biphasic effect of the agent on mean arterial blood pressure in anesthetized rats, in the presence of prazosin, it is not possible to manifest dopaminergic activity involved in the increase in renal or mesenteric blood flow; this may be due to the low tone of the vascular wall induced by the alpha-adrenergic antagonist, though an alpha 2-activity cannot be discarded.

  10. Atorvastatin Protects Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells From TGF-β1-Stimulated Calcification by Inducing Autophagy via Suppression of the β-Catenin Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demin Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arterial calcification is a major event in the progression of atherosclerosis. It is reported that statins exhibit various protective effects against vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC inflammation and proliferation in cardiovascular remodeling. Although statins counteract atherosclerosis, the molecular mechanisms of statins on the calcium release from VSMCs have not been clearly elucidated. Methods: Calcium content of VSMCs was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The expression of proteins involved in cellular transdifferentiation was analyzed by western blot. Cell autophagy was measured by fluorescence microscopic analysis for acridine orange staining and transmission electron microscopy analysis. The autophagic inhibitors (3-MA, chloroquine, NH4Cl and bafilomycin A1 and β-catenin inhibitor JW74 were used to assess the effects of atorvastatin on autophagy and the involvement of β-catenin on cell calcification respectively. Furthermore, cell transfection was performed to overexpress β-catenin. Results: In VSMCs, atorvastatin significantly suppressed transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1-stimulated calcification, accompanied by the induction of autophagy. Downregulation of autophagy with autophagic inhibitors significantly suppressed the inhibitory effect of atorvastatin on cell calcification. Moreover, the beneficial effect of atorvastatin on calcification and autophagy was reversed by β-catenin overexpression. Conversely, JW74 supplement enhanced this effect. Conclusion: These data demonstrated that atorvastatin protect VSMC from TGF-β1-stimulated calcification by inducing autophagy through suppression of the β-catenin pathway, identifying autophagy induction might be a therapeutic strategy for use in vascular calcification.

  11. Pravastatin inhibits fibrinogen- and FDP-induced inflammatory response via reducing the production of IL-6, TNF-α and iNOS in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peipei; Liu, Juntian; Pang, Xiaoming

    2015-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory response of the arterial wall to pro‑atherosclerotic factors. As an inflammatory marker, fibrinogen directly participates in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Our previous study demonstrated that fibrinogen and fibrin degradation products (FDP) produce a pro‑inflammatory effect on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) through inducing the production of interleukin‑6 (IL‑6), tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In the present study, the effects of pravastatin on fibrinogen‑ and FDP‑induced expression of IL‑6, TNF‑α and iNOS were observed in VSMCs. The results showed that pravastatin dose‑dependently inhibited fibrinogen‑ and FDP‑stimulated expression of IL‑6, TNF‑α and iNOS in VSMCs at the mRNA and protein level. The maximal inhibition of protein expression of IL‑6, TNF‑α and iNOS was 46.9, 42.7 and 49.2% in fibrinogen‑stimulated VSMCs, and 50.2, 49.8 and 53.6% in FDP‑stimulated VSMCs, respectively. This suggests that pravastatin has the ability to relieve vascular inflammation via inhibiting the generation of IL‑6, TNF‑α and iNOS. The results of the present study may aid in further explaining the beneficial effects of pravastatin on atherosclerosis and related cardiovascular diseases. In addition, they suggest that application of pravastatin may be beneficial for prevention of atherosclerosis formation in hyperfibrinogenemia.

  12. Experi mental Study on Preparation of Decellularized Artery Vascular Graftand Transplantation of Carotid Artery Allografts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionRemoval of cells may decrease the antigenicity of artery allografts and xenografts~([1~3]). This study was to set up a new process to prepare the decellularized artery grafts. And the feasibility of small diameter decellularized artery allografts in vivo was evaluate. 2 Materials and Methods2.1 Set up a new processA four-step process, including hypotonic, hypertonic solutions and combining with 1% t-octyl-phenoxypolyethoxyethanol (Triton X-100) and 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) detergents, w...

  13. [Vascular rehabilitation in patients with peripheral arterial disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Holanda, Ana; Aubourg, Marion; Dubus-Bausière, Valérie; Eveno, Dominique; Abraham, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    Lower limb peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a frequent debilitating disease associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate. The benefit of rehabilitation in PAD patients has been largely demonstrated, both for patients that undergo amputation, and for patients with claudication. In these latter patients, rehabilitation programs rely on a variety of additional techniques or tools, among which: stretching, specific muscle proprioception, walking and a variety of other physical activities, exercise or situations adapted to community life, lower limb and respiratory physiotherapy, patient's education, support for smoking cessation and healthy nutrition, social support, etc. Whether rehabilitation is performed in specialised integrated structures or performed on a home-based basis, various clinicians are involved. Despite evidence-based proof of efficacy, rehabilitation of PAD patients with claudication is still under-used.

  14. The tight junction protein ZO-2 and Janus kinase 1 mediate intercellular communications in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkachuk, Natalia; Tkachuk, Sergey; Patecki, Margret [Department of Nephrology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover D-30625 (Germany); Kusch, Angelika [Department of Nephrology and Intensive Care Medicine, Charite Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin D-13353 (Germany); Korenbaum, Elena; Haller, Hermann [Department of Nephrology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover D-30625 (Germany); Dumler, Inna, E-mail: dumler.inna@mh-hannover.de [Department of Nephrology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover D-30625 (Germany)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} The tight junction protein ZO-2 associates with Jak1 in vascular smooth muscle cells via ZO-2 N-terminal fragment. {yields} Jak1 mediates ZO-2 tyrosine phosphorylation and ZO-2 localization to the sites of homotypic intercellular contacts. {yields} The urokinase receptor uPAR regulates ZO-2/Jak1 functional association. {yields} The ZO-2/Jak1/uPAR signaling complex is required for vascular smooth muscle cells functional network formation. -- Abstract: Recent evidence points to a multifunctional role of ZO-2, the tight junction protein of the MAGUK (membrane-associated guanylate kinase-like) family. Though ZO-2 has been found in cell types lacking tight junction structures, such as vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), little is known about ZO-2 function in these cells. We provide evidence that ZO-2 mediates specific homotypic cell-to-cell contacts between VSMC. Using mass spectrometry we found that ZO-2 is associated with the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Jak1. By generating specific ZO-2 constructs we further found that the N-terminal fragment of ZO-2 molecule is responsible for this interaction. Adenovirus-based expression of Jak1 inactive mutant demonstrated that Jak1 mediates ZO-2 tyrosine phosphorylation. By means of RNA silencing, expression of Jak1 mutant form and fluorescently labeled ZO-2 fusion protein we further specified that active Jak1, but not Jak1 inactive mutant, mediates ZO-2 localization to the sites of intercellular contacts. We identified the urokinase receptor uPAR as a pre-requisite for these cellular events. Functional requirement of the revealed signaling complex for VSMC network formation was confirmed in experiments using Matrigel and in contraction assay. Our findings imply involvement of the ZO-2 tight junction independent signaling complex containing Jak1 and uPAR in VSMC intercellular communications. This mechanism may contribute to vascular remodeling in occlusive cardiovascular diseases and in arteriogenesis.

  15. Smooth muscle cell–extrinsic vascular spasm arises from cardiomyocyte degeneration in sarcoglycan-deficient cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Matthew T.; Allikian, Michael J.; Heydemann, Ahlke; Hadhazy, Michele; Zarnegar, Sara; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2004-01-01

    Vascular spasm is a poorly understood but critical biomedical process because it can acutely reduce blood supply and tissue oxygenation. Cardiomyopathy in mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan or δ-sarcoglycan is characterized by focal damage. In the heart, sarcoglycan gene mutations produce regional defects in membrane permeability and focal degeneration, and it was hypothesized that vascular spasm was responsible for this focal necrosis. Supporting this notion, vascular spasm was noted in coronary art...

  16. Echocardiographic assessment of pulmonary vascular resistance in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergot Emmanuel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Echocardiographic ratio of peak tricuspid regurgitant velocity to the right ventricular outflow tract time-velocity integral (TRV/TVI rvot was presented as a reliable non-invasive method of estimating pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR. Studies using this technique in patients with moderate to high PVR are scarce. Left ventricular outflow tract time-velocity integral (TVI lvot can be easier to measure than TVI rvot, especially in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension (PH with significant anatomical modifications of the right structures. Aims We wanted to determine whether the TRV/TVI rvot and TRV/TVI lvot ratios would form a reliable non-invasive tool to estimate PVR in a cohort of patients with moderate to severe pulmonary vascular disease. Methods Doppler echocardiographic examination and right heart catheterisation were performed in 37 patients. Invasive PVR was compared with TRV/TVI rvot and TRV/TVI lvot ratios using regression analysis. Two equations were modelled and the results compared with invasive measurements using the Bland-Altman analysis. Using receiver-operating characteristics curve analysis, a cut-off value for the two ratios was generated. Results Correlation coefficients between invasive PVR and TRV/TVI rvot then TRV/TVI lvot were respectively 0.76 and 0.74. Two new equations were found but the Bland-Altman analysis showed wide standard deviations (respectively 3.8 and 3.9 Wood units. A TRV/TVI rvot then TRV/TVI lvot ratio cut-off value of 0.14 had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 57% for the first and a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 57% for the second to determine PVR > 2 Wood units. Conclusion Echocardiography is useful for the screening of patients with pulmonary hypertension and PVR > 2 WU. It remains disappointing for accurate assessment of high PVR. TVI lvot may be an alternative to TVI rvot for patients for whom accurate TVI rvot measurement is not possible.

  17. Vascular progenitor cells isolated from human embryonic stem cells give rise to endothelial and smooth muscle like cells and form vascular networks in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lino S; Gerecht, Sharon; Shieh, Hester F; Watson, Nicki; Rupnick, Maria A; Dallabrida, Susan M; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Langer, Robert

    2007-08-03

    We report that human embryonic stem cells contain a population of vascular progenitor cells that have the ability to differentiate into endothelial-like and smooth muscle (SM)-like cells. Vascular progenitor cells were isolated from EBs grown in suspension for 10 days and were characterized by expression of the endothelial/hematopoietic marker CD34 (CD34+ cells). When these cells are subsequently cultured in EGM-2 (endothelial growth medium) supplemented with vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (50 ng/mL), they give rise to endothelial-like cells characterized by a cobblestone cell morphology, expression of endothelial markers (platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1, CD34, KDR/Flk-1, vascular endothelial cadherin, von Willebrand factor), incorporation of acetylated low-density lipoprotein, and formation of capillary-like structures when placed in Matrigel. In contrast, when CD34+ cells are cultured in EGM-2 supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (50 ng/mL), they give rise to SM-like cells characterized by spindle-shape morphology, expression of SM cell markers (alpha-SM actin, SM myosin heavy chain, calponin, caldesmon, SM alpha-22), and the ability to contract and relax in response to common pharmacological agents such as carbachol and atropine but rarely form capillary-like structures when placed in Matrigel. Implantation studies in nude mice show that both cell types contribute to the formation of human microvasculature. Some microvessels contained mouse blood cells, which indicates functional integration with host vasculature. Therefore, the vascular progenitors isolated from human embryonic stem cells using methods established in the present study could provide a means to examine the mechanisms of endothelial and SM cell development, and they could also provide a potential source of cells for vascular tissue engineering.

  18. Anatomy and arterial vascularization of female genital system of margay (Leopardus weidii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrezza Braga Soares Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The margay (Leopardus wiedii belongs to Carnivora order and present’s nocturnal habits. There are few studies using this specie, whereas it is between feline species vulnerable to extinction. Thus, we propose a descriptive study about female genital system and behavior of the arteries responsible for the blood supply to these organs in margay. It used one exemplary victim of poaching that to death. The animal was stored in freezer. Subsequent to defrost at room temperature, it proceeded with the solution injection Leoprene Latex ‘650’ colored in red for better identification of vessels before the adjacent strutures. The specimen was fixed using an aqueous 10% formaldehyde with subsequent immersion in the same fixative solution. The genital system were dissected and the organs and arterial branches were identified and photodocumented. The female genital system of margay consists of a pair of ovaries, uterus with a pair of uterine horns, vagina and vulva. The arterial distribution of female system have a common vessel to iliac artery which branches and leads to internal pudendal artery sends a branch along the pudendal nerve pathway, urogenital artery. This, we performed divided into two branches, cranial and caudal. The cranial branch irrigates laterally cervix and uterine horns and caudal branch, vagina and vulva. The ovarian arteries, peers, originate from abdominal aorta only vascularization the ovaries. The female genital system and vascularization of the genitals organs of margay resembles of domestic carnivores including cats and some wild felines like the ocelot and find differences with the same description held in other domestic and wild species.

  19. Spontaneous Dissection of the Renal Artery in Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Filipa; Cardoso, Teresa; Sá, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a rare heterogeneous group of connective tissue disorders. The vascular type (vEDS) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the COL3A1 gene predisposing to premature arterial, intestinal, or uterine rupture. We report a case of a 38-year-old woman with a recent diagnosis of vEDS admitted in the Emergency Department with a suspicion of a pyelonephritis that evolved to a cardiopulmonary arrest. A fatal retroperitoneal hematoma related with a haemorrhagic dissection of the right renal artery was found after emergency surgery. This case highlights the need to be aware of the particular characteristics of vEDS, such as a severe vascular complication that can lead to a fatal outcome. PMID:26175915

  20. Atherosclerosis in vascular grafts for peripheral vascular disease. Part 2. Synthetic arterial prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, K W; Slaney, G; Ashton, F

    1986-08-01

    Thirty-nine synthetic (32 Dacron and 7 Teflon) arterial prostheses (from 38 patients with peripheral arterial disease) removed after periods between 2 months and 18 years, were examined by histology and immuno-histology. The grafts were initially permeated by thrombus containing platelet antigens and this became organised and converted to granulation, and then to fibrous, tissue. The newly-formed tissue contained 'foreign-body' giant-cells in contact with the plastic prosthesis and showed evidence of permeation by plasma proteins. In grafts of over 2 years duration, this reactive tissue no longer contained platelet antigens but invariably revealed bound lipid, identifiable as apolipoprotein-B-containing lipoproteins (LpB), and fibrinogen-related antigens (FRA), in a distribution resembling that seen in atherosclerotic arteries. LpB and FRA were also seen in organised, or partially organised, mural thrombi in older grafts. The oldest grafts additionally showed stenosis, calcification or aneurysm formation. Lipid deposition increases with the age of grafts; is independent of the nature of the plastic fibre used or its mode of fabrication; and sometimes contributes to graft failure. Immuno-histology indicates that this is an insudative process indistinguishable from 'true' atherosclerosis which occurs in graft-linings of prostheses of long duration and in old mural thrombi in grafts and that the lipid in these lesions derives from plasma LpB rather than from platelets. This source for the lipid suggests that the insudative and thrombogenic theories of atherogenesis can be reconciled.

  1. Metformin inhibits vascular calcification in female rat aortic smooth muscle cells via the AMPK-eNOS-NO pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaorui; Li, Huan; Tao, Huiren; Wu, Ning; Yu, Lifeng; Zhang, Dawei; Lu, Xiaozhao; Zhu, Jinyu; Lu, Zifan; Zhu, Qingsheng

    2013-10-01

    Metformin exhibits diverse protective effects against diabetic complications, such as bone loss. Here, we investigated the effect of metformin on vascular calcification, another type 2 diabetes complication. In female rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMCs), we observed that metformin significantly alleviated β-glycerophosphate-induced Ca deposition and alkaline phosphatase activity, corresponding with reduced expression of some specific genes in osteoblast-like cells, including Runx2 and bone morphogenetic protein-2, and positive effects on α-actin expression, a specific marker of smooth muscle cells. Mechanistic analysis showed that phosphorylation levels of both AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were increased with NO overproduction. After inhibition of either AMPK or eNOS with the pharmacologic inhibitors, compound C or Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, NO production was lowered and metformin-meditated vascular protection against β-glycerophosphate-induced Ca deposition was removed. Our results support that metformin prevents vascular calcification via AMPK-eNOS-NO pathway.

  2. Importance of hemodynamic factors in vascular remodeling of muscular elastic type in arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melnikova L.V.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to investigate the relationship between hemodynamic factors and parameters of remodeling of common carotid arteries. 102 patients with essential hypertension of l-ll stage (49 men, 53 women, average age 47,5±11,2 years, duration of hypertension 7,8±1,5 years have been examined. The study has revealed the relation between blood flow velocity in the common carotid artery (CCA and the parameters of vascular remodeling, depending on the degree of hypertension. With the increase in systolic blood pressure dilation of common carotid arteries has been observed, reducing the rate of blood flow and wall thickness of the intima-media complex, accompanied by increased stiffness of the vascular wall. The increase in systolic blood pressure is accompanied by decrease in the rate of blood flow and wall tension on the endothelium, which contributes to thickness of the intima-media complex and increases the rigidity of the vascular wall

  3. Aldosterone and vascular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprez, D; De Buyzere, M; Rietzschel, E R; Clement, D L

    2000-06-01

    Although the aldosterone escape mechanism is well known, aldosterone has often been neglected in the pathophysiologic consequences of the activated renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in arterial hypertension and chronic heart failure. There is now evidence for vascular synthesis of aldosterone aside from its secretion by the adrenal cortex. Moreover, aldosterone is involved in vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia, as well as in vascular matrix impairment and endothelial dysfunction. The mechanisms of action of aldosterone may be either delayed (genomic) or rapid (nongenomic). Deleterious effects of aldosterone leading to vascular target-organ damage include (besides salt and water retention) decreased arterial and venous compliance, increased peripheral vascular resistance, and impaired autonomic vascular control due to baroreflex dysfunction.

  4. Increased shear stress inhibits angiogenesis in veins and not arteries during vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard-Pelletier, Guillaume; Jahnsen, Espen D; Jones, Elizabeth A V

    2013-01-01

    Vascular development is believed to occur first by vasculogenesis followed by angiogenesis. Though angiogenesis is the formation of new vessels, we found that vascular density actually decreases during this second stage. The onset of the decrease coincided with the entry of erythroblasts into circulation. We therefore measured the level of shear stress at various developmental stages and found that it was inversely proportional to vascular density. To investigate whether shear stress was inhibitory to angiogenesis, we altered shear stress levels either by preventing erythroblasts from entering circulation ("low" shear stress) or by injection of a starch solution to increase the blood plasma viscosity ("high" shear stress). By time-lapse microscopy, we show that reverse intussusception (merging of two vessels) is inversely proportional to the level of shear stress. We also found that angiogenesis (both sprouting and splitting) was inversely proportional to shear stress levels. These effects were specific to the arterial or venous plexus however, such that the effect on reverse intussusception was present only in the arterial plexus and the effect on sprouting only in the venous plexus. We cultured embryos under altered shear stress in the presence of either DAPT, a Notch inhibitor, or DMH1, an inhibitor of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. DAPT treatment phenocopied the inhibition of erythroblast circulation ("low" shear stress) and the effect of DAPT treatment could be partially rescued by injection of starch. Inhibition of the BMP signaling prevented the reduction in vascular density that was observed when starch was injected to increase shear stress levels.

  5. Precise renal artery segmentation for estimation of renal vascular dominant regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenglong; Kagajo, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Oda, Masahiro; Yoshino, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Tokunori; Mori, Kensaku

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel renal artery segmentation method combining graph-cut and template-based tracking methods and its application to estimation of renal vascular dominant region. For the purpose of giving a computer assisted diagnose for kidney surgery planning, it is important to obtain the correct topological structures of renal artery for estimation of renal vascular dominant regions. Renal artery has a low contrast, and its precise extraction is a difficult task. Previous method utilizing vesselness measure based on Hessian analysis, still cannot extract the tiny blood vessels in low-contrast area. Although model-based methods including superellipsoid model or cylindrical intensity model are low-contrast sensitive to the tiny blood vessels, problems including over-segmentation and poor bifurcations detection still remain. In this paper, we propose a novel blood vessel segmentation method combining a new Hessian-based graph-cut and template modeling tracking method. Firstly, graph-cut algorithm is utilized to obtain the rough segmentation result. Then template model tracking method is utilized to improve the accuracy of tiny blood vessel segmentation result. Rough segmentation utilizing graph-cut solves the bifurcations detection problem effectively. Precise segmentation utilizing template model tracking focuses on the segmentation of tiny blood vessels. By combining these two approaches, our proposed method segmented 70% of the renal artery of 1mm in diameter or larger. In addition, we demonstrate such precise segmentation can contribute to divide renal regions into a set of blood vessel dominant regions utilizing Voronoi diagram method.

  6. Pathology of Human Coronary and Carotid Artery Atherosclerosis and Vascular Calcification in Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahagi, Kazuyuki; Kolodgie, Frank D; Lutter, Christoph; Mori, Hiroyoshi; Romero, Maria E; Finn, Aloke V; Virmani, Renu

    2017-02-01

    The continuing increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the general population is predicted to result in a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease. Although the mechanisms of diabetes mellitus-associated progression of atherosclerosis are not fully understood, at clinical and pathological levels, there is an appreciation of increased disease burden and higher levels of arterial calcification in these subjects. Plaques within the coronary arteries of patients with diabetes mellitus generally exhibit larger necrotic cores and significantly greater inflammation consisting mainly of macrophages and T lymphocytes relative to patients without diabetes mellitus. Moreover, there is a higher incidence of healed plaque ruptures and positive remodeling in hearts from subjects with type 1 diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes mellitus, suggesting a more active atherogenic process. Lesion calcification in the coronary, carotid, and other arterial beds is also more extensive. Although the role of coronary artery calcification in identifying cardiovascular disease and predicting its outcome is undeniable, our understanding of how key hormonal and physiological alterations associated with diabetes mellitus such as insulin resistance and hyperglycemia influence the process of vascular calcification continues to grow. Important drivers of atherosclerotic calcification in diabetes mellitus include oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, alterations in mineral metabolism, increased inflammatory cytokine production, and release of osteoprogenitor cells from the marrow into the circulation. Our review will focus on the pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus- and type 2 diabetes mellitus-associated vascular disease with particular focus on coronary and carotid atherosclerotic calcification.

  7. UDP acts as a growth factor for vascular smooth muscle cells by activation of P2Y(6) receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Mingyan; Harden, T Kendall; Kuhn, Cynthia M;

    2002-01-01

    Mitogenic effects of the extracellular nucleotides ATP and UTP are mediated by P2Y(1), P2Y(2), and P2Y(4) receptors. However, it has not been possible to examine the highly expressed UDP-sensitive P2Y(6) receptor because of the lack of stable, selective agonists. In rat aorta smooth muscle cells...... (vascular smooth muscle cells; VSMC), UDP and UTP stimulated (3)H-labeled thymidine incorporation with similar pEC(50) values (5.96 and 5.69). Addition of hexokinase did not reduce the mitogenic effect of UDP. In cells transfected with P2Y receptors the stable pyrimidine agonist uridine 5'-O-(2...

  8. Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplemented Diet Influences the Orchidectomy-Induced Vascular Dysfunction in Rat Mesenteric Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalpando, Diva M.; Navarro, Rocío; del Campo, Lara; Largo, Carlota; Muñoz, David; Tabernero, María; Baeza, Ramiro; Otero, Cristina; García, Hugo S.; Ferrer, Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    Over the past few decades, the cardiovascular benefits of a high dietary intake of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), like docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), have been extensively studied. However, many of the molecular mechanisms and effects exerted by PUFAs have yet to be well explained. The lack of sex hormones alters vascular tone, and we have described that a DHA-supplemented diet to orchidectomized rats improve vascular function of the aorta. Based on these data and since the mesenteric artery importantly controls the systemic vascular resistance, the objective of this study was to analyze the effect of a DHA-supplemented diet on the mesenteric vascular function from orchidectomized rats. For this purpose mesenteric artery segments obtained from control, orchidectomized or orchidectomized plus DHA-supplemented diet were utilized to analyze: (1) the release of prostanoids, (2) formation of NO and ROS, (3) the vasodilator response to acetylcholine (ACh), as well as the involvement of prostanoids and NO in this response, and (4) the vasoconstrictor response to electrical field stimulation (EFS), analyzing also the effect of exogenous noradrenaline (NA), and the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP). The results demonstrate beneficial effects of DHA on the vascular function in orchidectomized rats, which include a decrease in the prostanoids release and superoxide formation that were previously augmented by orchidectomy. Additionally, there was an increase in endothelial NO formation and the response to ACh, in which NO involvement and the participation of vasodilator prostanoids were increased. DHA also reversed the decrease in EFS-induced response caused by orchidectomy. All of these findings suggest beneficial effects of DHA on vascular function by reversing the neurogenic response and the endothelial dysfunction caused by orchidectomy. PMID:28068359

  9. Proliferation of neointimal smooth muscle cells after arterial injury. Dependence on interactions between fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 and fibroblast growth factor-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrotis, Alex; Kanellakis, Peter; Kostolias, Gina; Di Vitto, Giovanna; Wei, Chen; Hannan, Ross; Jennings, Garry; Bobik, Alex

    2004-10-01

    The growth factor signaling mechanisms responsible for neointimal smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and accumulation, a characteristic feature of many vascular pathologies that can lead to restenosis after angioplasty, remain to be identified. Here, we examined the contribution of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) 2 and 3 as well as novel fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) to such proliferation. Balloon catheter injury to the rat carotid artery stimulated the expression of two distinctly spliced FGFR-2 isoforms, differing only by the presence or absence of the acidic box, and two distinctly spliced FGFR-3 isoforms containing the acidic box and differing only by the presence of either the IIIb or IIIc exon. Post-injury arterial administration of recombinant adenoviruses expressing dominant negative mutant forms of these FGFRs were used to assess the roles of the endogenous FGFR isoforms in neointimal SMC proliferation. Dominant negative FGFR-2 containing the acidic box inhibited such proliferation by 40%, whereas the dominant negative FGFR-3 forms had little effect. Expression of FGF-9, known to be capable of binding to all four neointimal FGFR-2/-3 isoforms, was abundant within the neointima. FGF-9 markedly stimulated both the proliferation of neointimal SMCs and the activation of extracellular signal-related kinases 1/2, effects which were abrogated by the administration of antisense FGF-9 oligonucleotides to injured arteries and the expression of the dominant negative FGFR-2 adenovirus in cultured neointimal SMCs. These studies demonstrate that, although multiple FGFRs are induced in neointimal SMCs following arterial injury, specific interactions between distinctly spliced FGFR-2 isoforms and FGF-9 contribute to the proliferation of these SMCs.

  10. Massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage from a giant renal angiomyolipoma treated by selective arterial embolization with an Amplatzer Vascular Plug II

    OpenAIRE

    Teichgräber, Ulf KM; de Bucourt, Maximilian

    2012-01-01

    We report on a 36-year-old Caucasian woman who presented to the emergency department with post-traumatic retroperitoneal bleeding diagnosed by computed tomography. After clinical stabilization of the patient, selective arterial embolization was performed. The angiomyolipoma's feeding artery was successfully treated with an 8-mm Amplatzer Vascular Plug Type II. The upper pole of the left kidney, which was supplied by a separate upper renal artery, was conserved. Consequently, the renal angiomy...

  11. Embolization of Life-Threatening Arterial Rupture in Patients with Vascular Ehlers–Danlos Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Takuya, E-mail: okabone@gmail.com [Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Interventional Radiology Department (France); Frank, Michael, E-mail: michael.frank@egp.aphp.fr [Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Rare Vascular Diseases Reference Center (France); Pellerin, Olivier, E-mail: olivier@pellerin.as; Primio, Massimiliano Di, E-mail: massimiliano.di.primio@gmail.com; Angelopoulos, Georgios, E-mail: giorginos78@msn.com [Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Interventional Radiology Department (France); Boughenou, Marie-Fazia, E-mail: marie-fazia.boughenou@egp.aphp.fr [Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Anesthesia and Surgical Intensive Care Unit (France); Pagny, Jean-Yves, E-mail: jean-yves.pagny@egp.aphp.fr [Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Interventional Radiology Department (France); Messas, Emmanuel, E-mail: emmanuel.messas@egp.aphp.fr [Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Rare Vascular Diseases Reference Center (France); Sapoval, Marc, E-mail: marc.sapoval2@egp.aphp.fr [Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Interventional Radiology Department (France)

    2013-05-09

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of transarterial embolization of life-threatening arterial rupture in patients with vascular Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (vEDS) in a single tertiary referral center.MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed transarterial embolization for vEDS performed at our institution from 2000 to 2012. The indication of embolization was spontaneous arterial rupture or pseudoaneurysm with acute bleeding. All interventions used a percutaneous approach through a 5F or less introducer sheath. Embolic agents were microcoils and glue in 3 procedures, glue alone in 2, and microcoils alone in 2.ResultsFive consecutive vEDS patients were treated by 7 embolization procedures (4 women, mean age 29.8 years). All procedures were successfully performed. Two patients required a second procedure for newly arterial lesions at a different site from the first procedure. Four of the five patients were still alive after a mean follow-up of 19.4 (range 1–74.7) months. One patient died of multiple organ failure 2 days after procedure. Minor procedural complications were observed in 3 procedures (43 %), all directly managed during the same session. Remote arterial lesions occurred after 3 procedures (43 %); one underwent a second embolization, and the other 2 were observed conservatively. Puncture site complication was observed in only one procedure (14 %).ConclusionEmbolization for vEDS is a safe and effective method to manage life-threatening arterial rupture.

  12. Transgenic overexpression of pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A in murine arterial smooth muscle accelerates atherosclerotic lesion development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conover, Cheryl A; Mason, Megan A; Bale, Laurie K

    2010-01-01

    of atherosclerotic lesions, we generated transgenic mice that express human PAPP-A in arterial smooth muscle. Four founder lines were characterized for transgenic human PAPP-A mRNA and protein expression, IGFBP-4 protease activity, and tissue specificity. In study I, apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE KO) mice, a well...... from ApoE KO/Tg compared with ApoE KO mice (P smooth muscle of double ApoE KO/PAPP-A KO mice resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in lesion area (P = 0.002), without an effect...... on lesion number. PAPP-A transgene expression was associated with a significant increase in an IGF-responsive gene (P smooth muscle accelerates lesion progression in a mouse model...

  13. Screening of Active Compounds from Gastrodia elata Blume for Vascular Smooth Muscle Relaxation%云南昭通天麻松弛血管平滑肌活性成分的筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张维明; 杨莲; 李秀芳; 林青; 李国花; 魏文彬

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To study the vascular smooth muscle relaxation effect and explicit the material base of Gastrodia elata Blume. Method:Tension recording for rat isolated aortic artery was used to study the effect of vascular smooth muscle relaxation. Column chromatography and mass spectrography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry were used to isolate and identify the active compounds of G. elata Blume. Result: G. elata Blume.could significantly inhibit the smooth muscle constriction of isolated aortic artery induced by KCI. Five esterified phenolic compounds ( Ⅰ-Ⅴ ) were isolated from G. elata Blume, such as p-hydroxybenz aldehyde ( Ⅰ ); phydroxybenzyl methylether ( Ⅱ ); p-hydroxybenzyl alcohol ( Ⅲ ); 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl methane ( Ⅳ ); 4,4'-dihydroxydibenzyl ether( Ⅴ ). The results showed that the vascular smooth muscle relaxation effects were the result of the role of five compounds. Conclusion: The five esterified phenolic compounds ( Ⅰ - Ⅴ ) from G. elata Blume.play a combined role for vascular smooth muscle relaxation.%目的:观察天麻血管平滑肌松弛作用,明确其作用物质基础.方法:采用大鼠离体胸主动脉环灌流实验方法,对天麻血管平滑肌松弛作用进行考察,采用柱色谱法、光谱法(MS,NMR)对其活性成分进行了分离鉴定.结果:天麻能够显著抑制KCl引起的大鼠胸主动脉环收缩,从天麻乙酸乙酯提取物中分离并鉴定了5个酯溶性酚性成分(Ⅰ~Ⅴ):对羟基苯甲醛(Ⅰ)、对羟苄基甲醚(Ⅱ)、对羟基苯甲醇(Ⅲ)、4,4'-二羟基二苯基甲烷(Ⅳ),4,4-二羟基二苄醚(Ⅴ),明确了天麻的血管平滑肌松弛作用是这5个成分共同作用的结果.结论:天麻具有显著的血管平滑肌松弛作用,其作用主要由5个酯溶性酚性成分共同发挥.

  14. Modification of intracellular free calcium in cultured A10 vascular smooth muscle cells by exogenous phosphatidic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhugra, Praveen; Xu, Yan-Jun; Rathi, Satyajeet; Dhalla, Naranjan S

    2003-06-15

    Exogenous phosphatidic acid (PA) was observed to produce a concentration-dependent increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in cultured A10 vascular smooth muscle cells. Preincubation of cells with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors (cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin), a phospholipase C inhibitor (2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl-N,N-diphenylcarbamate), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor antagonists (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and xestospongin), and an activator of protein kinase C (PKC) (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) depressed the PA-evoked increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Although EGTA, an extracellular Ca(2+) chelator, decreased the PA-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i), sarcolemmal Ca(2+)-channel blockers (verapamil or diltiazem) did not alter the action of PA. On the other hand, inhibitors of PKC (bisindolylmaleimide I) and G(i)-protein (pertussis toxin) potentiated the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) evoked by PA significantly. These results suggest that the PA-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in vascular smooth muscle cells may occur upon the activation of phospholipase C and the subsequent release of Ca(2+) from the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive Ca(2+) pool in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This action of PA may be mediated through the involvement of PKC.

  15. Proteomic analysis of the effect of iptakalim on human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingxia YANG; Zhengxia LIU; Shu ZHANG; Yu JING; Shijiang ZHANG; Weiping XIE; Lei MA; Changliang ZHU; Hong WANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the anti-proliferative effect of iptakalim (Ipt),a newly selective KATP channel opener,in endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) using proteomic analysis.Methods: Human PASMCs were incubated with ET-1 (10-8 mol/L) and ETA (10-8 mol/L) plus iptaklim (10-5 mol/L) for 24 h.Analysis via 2-DE gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS was employed to display the different protein profiles of whole-cell protein from cultures of control,ET-1 treatment alone,and treatment with ET-1 and iptaklim combined.Real time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were used to confirm the proteomic analysis.Results: When iptakalim inhibited the proliferative effect of ET-1 in human PASMCs by opening the KATP channels,the expression of different groups of cellular proteins was changed,including cytoskeleton-associated proteins,plasma mem-brane proteins and receptors,chaperone proteins,ion transport-associated proteins,and glycolytic and metabolism-associ-ated proteins.We found that iptakalim could inhibit the proliferation of human PASMCs partly by affecting the expression of Hsp60,vimentin,nucleoporin P54 (NUP54) and Bcl-XL by opening the KATP channel.Conclusion: The data suggest that a wide range of signaling pathways may be involved in abolishing ET-1-induced prolif-eration of human PASMCs following iptakalim treatment.

  16. Adrenomedullin and adrenotensin regulate collagen synthesis and proliferation in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, W. [School of Control Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Kong, Q.Y.; Zhao, C.F. [Department of Pediatrics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Zhao, F. [Department of Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY (United States); Li, F.H.; Xia, W. [Department of Pediatrics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Wang, R. [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Hu, Y.M. [School of Control Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Hua, M. [Shandong Institute of Scientific and Technical Information, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2013-12-10

    To understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation and extracellular-matrix accumulation in the development of pulmonary hypertension and remodeling, this study determined the effects of different doses of adrenomedullin (ADM) and adrenotensin (ADT) on PASMC proliferation and collagen synthesis. The objective was to investigate whether extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signaling was involved in ADM- and ADT-stimulated proliferation of PASMCs in 4-week-old male Wistar rats (body weight: 100-150 g, n=10). The proliferation of PASMCs was examined by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation. A cell growth curve was generated by the Cell Counting Kit-8 method. Expression of collagen I, collagen III, and phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) was evaluated by immunofluorescence. The effects of different concentrations of ADM and ADT on collagen I, collagen III, and p-ERK1/2 protein expression were determined by immunoblotting. We also investigated the effect of PD98059 inhibition on the expression of p-ERK1/2 protein by immunoblotting. ADM dose-dependently decreased cell proliferation, whereas ADT dose-dependently increased it; and ADM and ADT inhibited each other with respect to their effects on the proliferation of PASMCs. Consistent with these results, the expression of collagen I, collagen III, and p-ERK1/2 in rat PASMCs decreased after exposure to ADM but was upregulated after exposure to ADT. PD98059 significantly inhibited the downregulation by ADM and the upregulation by ADT of p-ERK1/2 expression. We conclude that ADM inhibited, and ADT stimulated, ERK1/2 signaling in rat PASMCs to regulate cell proliferation and collagen expression.

  17. Pioglitazone alleviates cardiac and vascular remodelling and improves survival in monocrotaline induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behringer, Arnica; Trappiel, Manuela; Berghausen, Eva Maria; Ten Freyhaus, Henrik; Wellnhofer, Ernst; Odenthal, Margarete; Blaschke, Florian; Er, Fikret; Gassanov, Natig; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Baldus, Stephan; Kappert, Kai; Caglayan, Evren

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a fatal disease with limited therapeutic options. Pathophysiological changes comprise obliterative vascular remodelling of small pulmonary arteries, elevated mean pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) due to elevated resistance of pulmonary vasculature, adverse right ventricular remodelling, and heart failure. Recent findings also indicate a role of increased inflammation and insulin resistance underlying the development of PAH. We hypothesized that treatment of this condition with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) activator pioglitazone, known to regulate the expression of different genes addressing insulin resistance, inflammatory changes, and vascular remodelling, could be a beneficial approach. PAH was induced in adult rats by a single subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline (MCT). Pioglitazone was administered for 2 weeks starting 3 weeks after MCT-injection. At day 35, hemodynamics, organ weights, and -indices were measured. We performed morphological and molecular characterization of the pulmonary vasculature, including analysis of the degree of muscularization, proliferation rates, and medial wall thickness of the small pulmonary arteries. Furthermore, markers of cardiac injury, collagen content, and cardiomyocyte size were analyzed. Survival rates were monitored throughout the experimental period. Pioglitazone treatment improved survival, reduced PASP, muscularization of small pulmonary arteries, and medial wall thickness. Further, MCT-induced right ventricular hypertrophy and fibrosis were attenuated. This was accompanied with reduced cardiac expression of brain natriuretic peptide, as well as decreased cardiomyocyte size. Finally, pulmonary macrophage content and osteopontin gene expression were attenuated. Based on the beneficial impact of pioglitazone, activation of PPARγ might be a promising treatment option in PAH.

  18. Vascular loops in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, as identified by magnetic resonance imaging, and their relationship with otologic symptoms

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    Luiz de Abreu Junior

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To use magnetic resonance imaging to identify vascular loops in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery and to evaluate their relationship with otologic symptoms. Materials and Methods: We selected 33 adults with otologic complaints who underwent magnetic resonance imaging at our institution between June and November 2013. Three experienced independent observers evaluated the trajectory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery in relation to the internal auditory meatus and graded the anterior inferior cerebellar artery vascular loops according to the Chavda classification. Kappa and chi-square tests were used. Values of p < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: The interobserver agreement was moderate. Comparing ears that presented vascular loops with those that did not, we found no association with tinnitus, hearing loss, or vertigo. Similarly, we found no association between the Chavda grade and any otological symptom. Conclusion: Vascular loops do not appear to be associated with otoneurological manifestations.

  19. Vascular loops in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, as identified by magnetic resonance imaging, and their relationship with otologic symptoms*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu Junior, Luiz; Kuniyoshi, Cristina Hiromi; Wolosker, Angela Borri; Borri, Maria Lúcia; Antunes, Augusto; Ota, Vanessa Kiyomi Arashiro; Uchida, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Objective To use magnetic resonance imaging to identify vascular loops in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery and to evaluate their relationship with otologic symptoms. Materials and Methods We selected 33 adults with otologic complaints who underwent magnetic resonance imaging at our institution between June and November 2013. Three experienced independent observers evaluated the trajectory of the anterior inferior cerebellar artery in relation to the internal auditory meatus and graded the anterior inferior cerebellar artery vascular loops according to the Chavda classification. Kappa and chi-square tests were used. Values of p < 0.05 were considered significant. Results The interobserver agreement was moderate. Comparing ears that presented vascular loops with those that did not, we found no association with tinnitus, hearing loss, or vertigo. Similarly, we found no association between the Chavda grade and any otological symptom. Conclusion Vascular loops do not appear to be associated with otoneurological manifestations. PMID:27818543

  20. Intracellular Acid-extruding regulators and the effect of lipopolysaccharide in cultured human renal artery smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hurng Loh

    Full Text Available Homeostasis of the intracellular pH (pHi in mammalian cells plays a pivotal role in maintaining cell function. Thus far, the housekeeping Na(+-H(+ exchanger (NHE and the Na(+-HCO3(- co-transporter (NBC have been confirmed in many mammalian cells as major acid extruders. However, the role of acid-extruding regulators in human renal artery smooth muscle cells (HRASMCs remains unclear. It has been demonstrated that lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced vascular occlusion is associated with the apoptosis, activating calpain and increased [Ca(2+]i that are related to NHE1 activity in endothelia cells. This study determines the acid-extruding mechanisms and the effect of LPS on the resting pHi and active acid extruders in cultured HRASMCs. The mechanism of pHi recovery from intracellular acidosis (induced by NH4Cl-prepulse is determined using BCECF-fluorescence in cultured HRASMCs. It is seen that (a the resting pHi is 7.19 ± 0.03 and 7.10 ± 0.02 for HEPES- and CO2/HCO3(-- buffered solution, respectively; (b apart from the housekeeping NHE1, another Na(+-coupled HCO3(- transporter i.e. NBC, functionally co-exists to achieve acid-equivalent extrusion; (c three different isoforms of NBC: NBCn1 (SLC4A7; electroneutral, NBCe1 (SLC4A4; electrogenic and NBCe2 (SLC4A5, are detected in protein/mRNA level; and (d pHi and NHE protein expression/activity are significantly increased by LPS, in both a dose- and time- dependent manner, but NBCs protein expression is not. In conclusion, it is demonstrated, for the first time, that four pHi acid-extruding regulators: NHE1, NBCn1, NBCe1 and NBCe2, co-exist in cultured HRASMCs. LPS also increases cellular growth, pHi and NHE in a dose- and time-dependent manner.

  1. Cyclic Stretch Induces Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase and Soluble Guanylate Cyclase in Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells

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    Kathryn N. Farrow

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the pulmonary vasculature, mechanical forces such as cyclic stretch induce changes in vascular signaling, tone and remodeling. Nitric oxide is a potent regulator of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC, which drives cGMP production, causing vasorelaxation. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs express inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, and while iNOS expression increases during late gestation, little is known about how cyclic stretch impacts this pathway. In this study, PASMC were subjected to cyclic stretch of 20% amplitude and frequency of 1 Hz for 24 h and compared to control cells maintained under static conditions. Cyclic stretch significantly increased cytosolic oxidative stress as compared to static cells (62.9 ± 5.9% vs. 33.3 ± 5.7% maximal oxidation, as measured by the intracellular redox sensor roGFP. Cyclic stretch also increased sGCβ protein expression (2.5 ± 0.9-fold, sGC activity (1.5 ± 0.2-fold and cGMP levels (1.8 ± 0.2-fold, as well as iNOS mRNA and protein expression (3.0 ± 0.9 and 2.6 ± 0.7-fold, respectively relative to control cells. An antioxidant, recombinant human superoxide dismutase (rhSOD, significantly decreased stretch-induced cytosolic oxidative stress, but did not block stretch-induced sGC activity. Inhibition of iNOS with 1400 W or an iNOS-specific siRNA inhibited stretch-induced sGC activity by 30% and 68% respectively vs. static controls. In conclusion, cyclic stretch increases sGC expression and activity in an iNOS-dependent manner in PASMC from fetal lambs. The mechanism that produces iNOS and sGC upregulation is not yet known, but we speculate these effects represent an early compensatory mechanism to counteract the effects of stretch-induced oxidative stress. A better understanding of the interplay between these two distinct pathways could provide key insights into future avenues to treat infants with pulmonary hypertension.

  2. Doxorubicin-induced vasomotion and [Ca~(2+)]_i elevation in vascular smooth muscle cells from C57BL/6 mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing SHEN; Chun-ling YE; Kai-he YE; Lan ZHUANG; Jia-hua JIANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To explore the action of doxorubicin on vascular smooth muscle cells.Methods: Isometric tension of denuded or intact thoracic aortic vessels was recorded and [Ca~(2+)]_i in isolated aortic smooth muscle cells was measured by using Fluo-3.Results: Doxorubicin induced phasic and tonic contractions in denuded vessels and increased levels of [Ca~(2+)]_i in single muscle cells. Treatment with 10 μmol/L ryanodine had no effect on basal tension, but it did abolish doxorubicin-induced phasic contraction. Treatment with 10 mmol/L caffeine induced a transient phasic contraction only, and the effect was not significantly altered by ryanodine, the omission of extracellular Ca~(2+) or both. Phenylephrine induced rhythmic contraction (RC) in intact vessels. Treatment with 100 μmol/L doxorubicin enhanced RC amplitude, but 1 mmol/L doxorubicin abolished RC, with an increase in maximal tension. Caffeine at 100 μmol/L increased the frequency of the RC only. In the presence of 100 μmol/L caffeine, however, 100 μmol/L doxorubicin abolished the RC and decreased its maximal tension. Treatment with 10 μmol/L ryanodine abolished the RC, with an increase in the maximal tension. In Ca~(2+)-free solution, doxorubicin induced a transient [Ca~(2+)]_i increase that could be abolished by ryanodine pretreatment in single muscle cells. The doxorubicin-induced increase in [Ca~(2+)]_i was suppressed by nifedipine and potentiated by ryanodine and cha-rybdotoxin.Conclusion: Doxorubicin not only releases Ca~(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum but also promotes the entry of extracellular Ca~(2+) into vascular smooth muscle cells.

  3. Intracellular Angiotensin II and cell growth of vascular smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipeanu, CM; Henning, RH; de Zeeuw, D; Nelemans, A

    2001-01-01

    1 We recently demonstrated that intracellular application of Angiotensin II (Angiotensin IIintr) induces rat aorta contraction independent of plasma membrane Angiotensin II receptors. In this study we investigated the effects of Angiotensin IIintr on cell growth in A7r5 smooth muscle cells. 2 DNA-sy

  4. Platelet-derived growth factor stimulates heme oxygenase-1 gene expression and carbon monoxide production in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, W; Peyton, K J; Schafer, A I

    1999-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) generate CO from the degradation of heme by the enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Because platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) modulates various responses of VSMCs, we examined whether this peptide regulates the expression of HO-1 and the production of CO by rat aortic SMCs. Treatment of SMCs with PDGF resulted in a time- and concentration-dependent increase in the levels of HO-1 mRNA and protein. Both actinomycin D and cycloheximide blocked PDGF-stimulated HO-1 mRNA and protein. In addition, PDGF stimulated the production of reactive oxygen species by SMCs. Both the PDGF-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species and the induction of HO-1 protein was inhibited by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Incubation of platelets with PDGF-treated SMCs resulted in a significant increase in platelet cGMP concentration that was reversed by treatment of SMCs with the HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin-IX or by addition of the CO scavenger hemoglobin to platelets. In contrast, the nitric oxide inhibitor methyl-L-arginine did not block the stimulatory effect of PDGF-treated SMCs on platelet cGMP. Finally, incubation of SMCs with the releasate from collagen-activated platelets induced HO-1 protein expression that was blocked by a neutralizing antibody to PDGF. These results demonstrate that either administered exogenously or released by platelets, PDGF stimulates HO-1 gene expression and CO synthesis in vascular smooth muscle. The ability of PDGF to induce HO-1-catalyzed CO release by VSMCs may represent a novel mechanism by which this growth factor regulates vascular cell and platelet function.

  5. Nitric oxide inhibits neointimal hyperplasia following vascular injury via differential, cell-specific modulation of SOD-1 in the arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahnson, Edward S M; Koo, Nathaniel; Cantu-Medellin, Nadiezhda; Tsui, Aaron Y; Havelka, George E; Vercammen, Janet M; Jiang, Qun; Kelley, Eric E; Kibbe, Melina R

    2015-01-30

    Superoxide (O2(•-)) promotes neointimal hyperplasia following arterial injury. Conversely, nitric oxide ((•)NO) inhibits neointimal hyperplasia through various cell-specific mechanisms, including redox regulation. What remains unclear is whether (•)NO exerts cell-specific regulation of the vascular redox environment following arterial injury to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess whether (•)NO exerts cell-specific, differential modulation of O2(•-) levels throughout the arterial wall, establish the mechanism of such modulation, and determine if it regulates (•)NO-dependent inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia. In vivo, (•)NO increased superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) levels following carotid artery balloon injury in a rat model. In vitro, (•)NO increased SOD-1 levels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), but had no effect on SOD-1 in endothelial cells or adventitial fibroblasts. This SOD-1 increase was associated with an increase in sod1 gene expression, increase in SOD-1 activity, and decrease in O2(•-) levels. Lastly, to determine the role of SOD-1 in (•)NO-mediated inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia, we performed the femoral artery wire injury model in wild type and SOD-1 knockout (KO) mice, with and without (•)NO. Interestingly, (•)NO inhibited neointimal hyperplasia only in wild type mice, with no effect in SOD-1 KO mice. In conclusion, these data show the cell-specific modulation of O2(•-) by (•)NO through regulation of SOD-1 in the vasculature, highlighting its importance on the inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia. These results also shed light into the mechanism of (•)NO-dependent redox balance, and suggest a novel VSMC redox target to prevent neointimal hyperplasia.

  6. Static pressure drives proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells via caveolin-1/ERK1/2 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Di-xian, E-mail: luodixian_2@163.com [Division of Pharmacoproteomics, Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Research Center of Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); The First People' s Hospital of Chenzhou City, Chenzhou, Hunan 421001 (China); Cheng, Jiming [Internal Medicine and SimmonsCooper Cancer Institute, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 911 N. Rutledge Street, Springfield, IL 62794-9626 (United States); Suzhou Health College of Technology, 20 Shuyuanxiang, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215002 (China); Xiong, Yan [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Li, Junmo [Division of Pharmacoproteomics, Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Research Center of Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); Xia, Chenglai [Division of Pharmacoproteomics, Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Research Center of Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); School of Pharmaceutics, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515 (China); Xu, Canxin; Wang, Chun; Zhu, Bingyang [Division of Pharmacoproteomics, Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Research Center of Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); Hu, Zhuowei [Institute of Materia Medical, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China); Liao, Duan-fang, E-mail: dfliao66@yahoo.com.cn [Division of Pharmacoproteomics, Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Research Center of Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China)

    2010-01-22

    Intimal hyperplasia plays an important role in various types of vascular remodeling. Mechanical forces derived from blood flow are associated with the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). This contributes to many vascular disorders such as hypertension, atherosclerosis and restenosis after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). In this study, we show that static pressure induces the proliferation of VSMC and activates its related signal pathway. VSMC from a rat aorta were treated with different pressures (0, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 mm Hg) in a custom-made pressure incubator for 24 h. The most active proliferation of VSMC was detected at a pressure of 120 mm Hg. VSMC was also incubated under a static pressure of 120 mm Hg for different time intervals (0, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h). We found that static pressure significantly stimulates VSMC proliferation. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation showed a peak at the pressure of 120 mm Hg at 4-h time point. Moreover, caveolin-1 expression was significantly inhibited by rising static pressure. Downregulation of VSMC proliferation could be found after PD98059 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation inhibitor) treatment. Our data also showed that a siRNA-mediated caveolin-1 knock down increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and VSMC proliferation. These results demonstrate that static pressure promotes VSMC proliferation via the Caveolin-1/ERK1/2 pathway.

  7. Mechanical stretch increases MMP-2 production in vascular smooth muscle cells via activation of PDGFR-β/Akt signaling pathway.

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    Kyo Won Seo

    Full Text Available Increased blood pressure, leading to mechanical stress on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC, is a known risk factor for vascular remodeling via increased activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP within the vascular wall. This study aimed to identify cell surface mechanoreceptors and intracellular signaling pathways that influence VSMC to produce MMP in response to mechanical stretch (MS. When VSMC was stimulated with MS (0-10% strain, 60 cycles/min, both production and gelatinolytic activity of MMP-2, but not MMP-9, were increased in a force-dependent manner. MS-enhanced MMP-2 expression and activity were inhibited by molecular inhibition of Akt using Akt siRNA as well as by PI3K/Akt inhibitors, LY293002 and AI, but not by MAPK inhibitors such as PD98059, SP600125 and SB203580. MS also increased Akt phosphorylation in VSMC, which was attenuated by AG1295, a PDGF receptor (PDGFR inhibitor, but not by inhibitors for other receptor tyrosine kinase including EGF, IGF, and FGF receptors. Although MS activated PDGFR-α as well as PDGFR-β in VSMC, MS-induced Akt phosphorylation was inhibited by molecular deletion of PDGFR-β using siRNA, but not by inhibition of PDGFR-α. Collectively, our data indicate that MS induces MMP-2 production in VSMC via activation of Akt pathway, that is mediated by activation of PDGFR-β signaling pathways.

  8. HSP70 increases extracellular matrix production by human vascular smooth muscle through TGF-β1 up-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ramos, Marta; Calleros, Laura; López-Ongil, Susana; Raoch, Viviana; Griera, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2013-02-01

    The circulating levels of heat shock proteins (HSP) are increased in cardiovascular diseases; however, the implication of this for the fibrotic process typical of such diseases remains unclear. HSP70 can interact with the vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), the major producer of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, through the Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) is a well known vascular pro-fibrotic cytokine that is regulated in part by AP-1-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that extracellular HSP70 could interact with SMCs, inducing TGF-β1 synthesis and subsequent changes in the vascular ECM. We demonstrate that extracellular HSP70 binds to human aorta SMC TLR4, which up-regulates the AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity of the TGF-β1 promoter. This is achieved through the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and ERK, as demonstrated by the use of specific blockers and the knockdown of TLR4 with specific small interfering RNAs. The TGF-β1 upregulation increase the expression of the ECM proteins type I collagen and fibronectin. This novel observation may elucidate the mechanisms by which HSP70 contributes in the inflammation and fibrosis present in atherosclerosis and other fibrosis-related diseases.

  9. Apelin-13 inhibits large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels in cerebral artery smooth muscle cells via a PI3-kinase dependent mechanism.

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    Amit Modgil

    Full Text Available Apelin-13 causes vasoconstriction by acting directly on APJ receptors in vascular smooth muscle (VSM cells; however, the ionic mechanisms underlying this action at the cellular level remain unclear. Large-conductance Ca(2+-activated K(+ (BKCa channels in VSM cells are critical regulators of membrane potential and vascular tone. In the present study, we examined the effect of apelin-13 on BK(Ca channel activity in VSM cells, freshly isolated from rat middle cerebral arteries. In whole-cell patch clamp mode, apelin-13 (0.001-1 μM caused concentration-dependent inhibition of BK(Ca in VSM cells. Apelin-13 (0.1 µM significantly decreased BK(Ca current density from 71.25 ± 8.14 pA/pF to 44.52 ± 7.10 pA/pF (n=14 cells, P<0.05. This inhibitory effect of apelin-13 was confirmed by single channel recording in cell-attached patches, in which extracellular application of apelin-13 (0.1 µM decreased the open-state probability (NPo of BK(Ca channels in freshly isolated VSM cells. However, in inside-out patches, extracellular application of apelin-13 (0.1 µM did not alter the NPo of BK(Ca channels, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of apelin-13 on BKCa is not mediated by a direct action on BK(Ca. In whole cell patches, pretreatment of VSM cells with LY-294002, a PI3-kinase inhibitor, markedly attenuated the apelin-13-induced decrease in BK(Ca current density. In addition, treatment of arteries with apelin-13 (0.1 µM significantly increased the ratio of phosphorylated-Akt/total Akt, indicating that apelin-13 significantly increases PI3-kinase activity. Taken together, the data suggest that apelin-13 inhibits BK(Ca channel via a PI3-kinase-dependent signaling pathway in cerebral artery VSM cells, which may contribute to its regulatory action in the control of vascular tone.

  10. Role of TGF-beta1 and MAP kinases in the antiproliferative effect of aspirin in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

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    Santiago Redondo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to test the antiproliferative effect of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC from bypass surgery patients and the role of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: VSMC were isolated from remaining internal mammary artery from patients who underwent bypass surgery. Cell proliferation and DNA fragmentation were assessed by ELISA. Protein expression was assessed by Western blot. ASA inhibited BrdU incorporation at 2 mM. Anti-TGF-beta1 was able to reverse this effect. ASA (2 mM induced TGF-beta1 secretion; however it was unable to induce Smad activation. ASA increased p38(MAPK phosphorylation in a TGF-beta1-independent manner. Anti-CD105 (endoglin was unable to reverse the antiproliferative effect of ASA. Pre-surgical serum levels of TGF-beta1 in patients who took at antiplatelet doses ASA were assessed by ELISA and remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In vitro antiproliferative effects of aspirin (at antiinflammatory concentration on human VSMC obtained from bypass patients are mediated by TGF-beta1 and p38(MAPK. Pre-surgical serum levels of TGF- beta1 from bypass patients who took aspirin at antiplatelet doses did not change.

  11. Blockade of L-type calcium channel in myocardium and calcium-induced contractions of vascular smooth muscle by by CPU 86017

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-zai DAI; Hui-juan HU; Jing ZHAO; Xue-mei HAO; Dong-mei YANG; Pei-ai ZHOU; Cai-hong WU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To assess the blockade by CPU 86017 on the L-type calcium channels in the myocardium and on the Ca2+related contractions of vascular smooth muscle. METHODS: The whole-cell patch-clamp was applied to investigate the blocking effect of CPU 86017 on the L-type calcium current in isolated guinea pig myocytes and contractions by KC1 or phenylephrine (Phe) of the isolated rat tail arteries were measured. RESULTS: Suppression of the L-type current of the isolated myocytes by CPU 86017 was moderate, in time- and concentration-dependent manner and with no influence on the activation and inactivation curves. The IC50 was 11.5 μmol/L. Suppressive effect of CPU 86017 on vaso-contractions induced by KC1 100 mmol/L, phenylephrine I μmol/Lin KH solution (phase 1),Ca2+ free KH solution ( phase 2), and by addition of CaCI2 into Ca2+-free KH solution (phase 3) were observed. The IC50 to suppress vaso-contractions by calcium entry via the receptor operated channel (ROC) and Voltage-dependent channel (VDC) was 0.324 μmol/L and 16.3 μmol/L, respectively. The relative potency of CPU 86017 to suppress vascular tone by Ca2+ entry through ROC and VDC is 1/187 of prazosin and 1/37 of verapamil, respectively.CONCLUSION: The blocking effects of CPU 86017 on the L-type calcium channel of myocardium and vessel are moderate and non-selective. CPU 86017 is approximately 50 times more potent in inhibiting ROC than VDC.

  12. A small molecule PAI-1 functional inhibitor attenuates neointimal hyperplasia and vascular smooth muscle cell survival by promoting PAI-1 cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Tessa M; Higgins, Stephen P; Archambeault, Jaclyn; Higgins, Craig E; Ginnan, Roman G; Singer, Harold; Higgins, Paul J

    2015-05-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), the primary inhibitor of urokinase-and tissue-type plasminogen activators (uPA and tPA), is an injury-response gene implicated in the development of tissue fibrosis and cardiovascular disease. PAI-1 mRNA and protein levels were elevated in the balloon catheter-injured carotid and in the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)-enriched neointima of ligated arteries. PAI-1/uPA complex formation and PAI-1 antiproteolytic activity can be inhibited, via proteolytic cleavage, by the small molecule antagonist tiplaxtinin which effectively increased the VSMC apoptotic index in vitro and attenuated carotid artery neointimal formation in vivo. In contrast to the active full-length serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN), elastase-cleaved PAI-1 (similar to tiplaxtinin) also promoted VSMC apoptosis in vitro and similarly reduced neointimal formation in vivo. The mechanism through which cleaved PAI-1 (CL-PAI-1) stimulates apoptosis appears to involve the TNF-α family member TWEAK (TNF-α weak inducer of apoptosis) and it's cognate receptor, fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-inducible 14 (FN14). CL-PAI-1 sensitizes cells to TWEAK-stimulated apoptosis while full-length PAI-1 did not, presumably due to its ability to down-regulate FN14 in a low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1)-dependent mechanism. It appears that prolonged exposure of VSMCs to CL-PAI-1 induces apoptosis by augmenting TWEAK/FN14 pro-apoptotic signaling. This work identifies a critical, anti-stenotic, role for a functionally-inactive (at least with regard to its protease inhibitory function) cleaved SERPIN. Therapies that promote the conversion of full-length to cleaved PAI-1 may have translational implications.

  13. Role of oxidized lipids in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Salil; Ruffenach, Grégoire; Umar, Soban; Motayagheni, Negar; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Eghbali, Mansoureh

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a multifactorial disease characterized by interplay of many cellular, molecular, and genetic events that lead to excessive proliferation of pulmonary cells, including smooth muscle and endothelial cells; inflammation; and extracellular matrix remodeling. Abnormal vascular changes and structural remodeling associated with PAH culminate in vasoconstriction and obstruction of pulmonary arteries, contributing to increased pulmonary vascular resistance, pul...

  14. Role of Na + -K + ATPase enzyme in vascular response of goat ruminal artery

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    Kathirvel K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the role of Na + , K + - ATPase enzyme in the vascular response of goat ruminal artery. Materials and Methods: Ruminal artery was obtained in chilled aerated modified Krebs-Henseleit solution (KHS from a local slaughterhouse and transported in ice for further processing. The endothelium intact arterial ring was mounted in a thermostatically controlled (37 ± 0.5°C organ bath containing 20 ml of modified KHS (pH 7.4 bubbled with oxygen (95% and CO 2 (5% under 2g tension. An equilibration of 90 min was allowed before addition of drugs into the bath. The responses were recorded isometrically in an automatic organ bath connected to PowerLab data acquisition system. In order to examine intact functional endothelium, ACh (10µM was added on the 5-HT (1.0µM - induced sustained contractile response. Similarly, functional characterization of Na + , K + -ATPase activity was done by K + -induced relaxation (10µM-10mM in the absence and presence of ouabain (0.1µM/ 0.1mM, digoxin (0.1µM and barium (30µM. Results: ACh (10-5 M did not produce any relaxing effect on 5-HT-induced sustained contractile response suggesting that vascular endothelium has no significant influence on the activation of sodium pump by extracellular K + in ruminal artery. Low concentration of Ba 2+ (30 µM (IC 50 : 0.479mM inhibited K + -induced relaxation suggesting K ir (inward rectifier channel in part had role in K + -induced vasodilatation in ruminal artery. Vasorelaxant effect of KCl (10µM-10mM in K + -free medium is also blocked by ouabain (0.1µM and 0.1mM (IC 50 :0.398mM and IC 35 : 1.36mM, but not by digoxin (0.1µM (IC 50 0.234mM suggesting that ouabain sensitive Na + , K + -ATPase isoform is present in the ruminal artery. Conclusion: In the goat ruminal artery functional regulation of sodium pump is partly mediated by K + channel and ouabain sensitive Na + , K + ATPase.

  15. Vitamin D induces increased systolic arterial pressure via vascular reactivity and mechanical properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Portugal Dos Santos

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate whether supplementation of high doses of cholecalciferol for two months in normotensive rats results in increased systolic arterial pressure and which are the mechanisms involved. Specifically, this study assesses the potential effect on cardiac output as well as the changes in aortic structure and functional properties.Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: 1 Control group (C, n = 20, with no supplementation of vitamin D, 2 VD3 (n = 19, supplemented with 3,000 IU vitamin D/kg of chow; 3 VD10 (n = 21, supplemented with 10,000 IU vitamin D/kg of chow. After two months, echocardiographic analyses, measurements of systolic arterial pressure (SAP, vascular reactivity, reactive oxygen species (ROS generation, mechanical properties, histological analysis and metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activity were performed.SAP was higher in VD3 and VD10 than in C rats (p = 0.001. Echocardiographic variables were not different among groups. Responses to phenylephrine in endothelium-denuded aortas was higher in VD3 compared to the C group (p = 0.041. Vascular relaxation induced by acetylcholine (p = 0.023 and sodium nitroprusside (p = 0.005 was impaired in both supplemented groups compared to the C group and apocynin treatment reversed impaired vasodilation. Collagen volume fraction (<0.001 and MMP-2 activity (p = 0.025 was higher in VD10 group compared to the VD3 group. Elastin volume fraction was lower in VD10 than in C and yield point was lower in VD3 than in C.Our findings support the view that vitamin D supplementation increases arterial pressure in normotensive rats and this is associated with structural and functional vascular changes, modulated by NADPH oxidase, nitric oxide, and extracellular matrix components.

  16. Ansys Fluent versus Sim Vascular for 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics in renal arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumbaraddi, Avinash; Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Sawchuk, Alan; Dalsing, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this clinical-need driven research is to investigate the effect of renal artery stenosis (RAS) on the blood flow and wall shear stress in renal arteries through 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) and search for possible critical RASs that significantly alter the pressure gradient across the stenosis by manually varying the size of RAS from 50% to 95%. The identification of the critical RAS is important to understand the contribution of RAS to the overall renal resistance thus appropriate clinical therapy can be determined in order to reduce the hypertension. Clinical CT angiographic data together with Doppler Ultra sound images of an anonymous patient are used serving as the required inputs of the PSCH. To validate the PSCH, we use both Ansys Fluent and Sim Vascular and compare velocity, pressure, and wall-shear stress under identical conditions. Renal Imaging Technology Development Program (RITDP) Grant.

  17. Endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, arterial hemodynamics, and subclinical vascular disease: the PREVENCION Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirinos, Julio A; David, Robert; Bralley, J Alexander; Zea-Díaz, Humberto; Muñoz-Atahualpa, Edgar; Corrales-Medina, Fernando; Cuba-Bustinza, Carolina; Chirinos-Pacheco, Julio; Medina-Lezama, Josefina

    2008-12-01

    Endogenous NO synthase inhibitors (end-NOSIs) have been associated with cardiovascular risk factors and atherosclerosis. In addition, end-NOSIs may directly cause hypertension through hemodynamic effects. We aimed to examine the association between end-NOSI asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA) and N-guanidino-monomethyl-arginine (NMMA), subclinical atherosclerosis, and arterial hemodynamics. We studied 922 adults participating in a population-based study (PREVENCION Study) and examined the correlation between end-NOSI/L-arginine and arterial hemodynamics, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and carotid intima-media thickness using linear regression. ADMA, NMMA, and L-arginine were found to be differentially associated with various classic cardiovascular risk factors. ADMA and NMMA (but not L-arginine) were significant predictors of carotid intima-media thickness, even after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, C-reactive protein, and renal function. In contrast, ADMA and NMMA did not predict carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, blood pressure, or hemodynamic abnormalities. Higher L-arginine independently predicted systolic hypertension, higher central pulse pressure, incident wave amplitude, central augmented pressure, and lower total arterial compliance but not systemic vascular resistance or cardiac output. We conclude that ADMA and NMMA are differentially associated with cardiovascular risk factors, but both end-NOSIs are independent predictors of carotid atherosclerosis. In contrast, they are not associated with large artery stiffness, hypertension, or hemodynamic abnormalities. Our findings are consistent with a role for asymmetrical arginine methylation in atherosclerosis but not in large artery stiffening, hypertension, or long-term hemodynamic regulation. L-arginine is independently associated with abnormal pulsatile (but not resistive) arterial hemodynamic indices, which may reflect abnormal L-arginine transport, leading to decreased intracellular

  18. Vascular reconstruction of a ruptured and infected aneurysm of extracranial carotid artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Jin-qiu; ZHANG Jian; YIN Ming-di; SHAN Shao-yin; WU Bin; DUAN Zhi-quan; XIN Shi-jie

    2008-01-01

    @@ Extracranial carotid artery aneurysm represents an uncommon vascular condition with relatively higher incidence in China than in the West.1 The complication with infection and rupture is even rarer,but potentially lethal.Management of mis condition is challenging but urgent because of high risks for embolization,generalized sepsis,further expansion,rupture,and life threatening.1,2 We present an exceptional case of carotid aneurysm at bifurcation complicated with rupture and infection and discuss the Dathogenesis and vailOUS aspects of diagnosis and surgical management.

  19. Vascular pentraxin 3 controls arterial thrombosis by targeting collagen and fibrinogen induced platelets aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacina, F.; Barbieri, S.S.; Cutuli, L.; Amadio, P.; Doni, A.; Sironi, M.; Tartari, S.; Mantovani, A.; Bottazzi, B.; Garlanda, C.; Tremoli, E.; Catapano, A.L.; Norata, G.D.

    2016-01-01

    Aim The long pentraxin PTX3 plays a non-redundant role during acute myocardial infarction, atherosclerosis and in the orchestration of tissue repair and remodeling during vascular injury, clotting and fibrin deposition. The aim of this work is to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective role of PTX3 during arterial thrombosis. Methods and results PTX3 KO mice transplanted with bone marrow from WT or PTX3 KO mice presented a significant reduction in carotid artery blood flow following FeCl3 induced arterial thrombosis (− 80.36 ± 11.5% and − 95.53 ± 4.46%), while in WT mice transplanted with bone marrow from either WT or PTX3 KO mice, the reduction was less dramatic (− 45.55 ± 1.37% and − 53.39 ± 9.8%), thus pointing to a protective effect independent of a hematopoietic cell's derived PTX3. By using P-selectin/PTX3 double KO mice, we further excluded a role for P-selectin, a target of PTX3 released by neutrophils, in vascular protection played by PTX3. In agreement with a minor role for hematopoietic cell-derived PTX3, platelet activation (assessed by flow cytometric expression of markers of platelet activation) was similar in PTX3 KO and WT mice as were haemostatic properties. Histological analysis indicated that PTX3 localizes within the thrombus and the vessel wall, and specific experiments with the N-terminal and the C-terminal PTX3 domain showed the ability of PTX3 to selectively dampen either fibrinogen or collagen induced platelet adhesion and aggregation. Conclusion PTX3 interacts with fibrinogen and collagen and, by dampening their pro-thrombotic effects, plays a protective role during arterial thrombosis. PMID:26976330

  20. A tissue engineered renovascular graft composed of proteins, polymers, smooth muscle and endothelial cells for renal artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hao; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Zhu, Xiang-Dong; Han, Huifang; Guo, Wen-Yuan; Ful, Zhi-Ren

    2013-08-01

    Endarterectomy and bypass surgery to treat renal artery stenosis are increasingly shunned these days due to high risks of complications during and after the surgery. Striving to find a sound alternative solution, we pioneered the construction of a tissue engineered renovascular graft that could immediately restore the normal blood flow to kidneys and sustain renal functions without suffering restenosis after the surgery. A highly porous scaffold was first constructed by electrospinning polycaprolactone, poliglecaprone, gelatin and elastin, giving the vast majority of non-woven fibers in the scaffold a diameter below 1200 nm. To recapitulate the anatomical and functional signatures of renal arteries, a bi-layer vasculature comprising a smooth muscle layer topped by an endothelial layer was built on the scaffold. The vasculature witnessed a sustained proliferation for up to 10 days in vitro and robustly secreted prostacyclin and endothelin-1, evidencing that the vasculature was functionally comparable to native renal arteries. After 30 days as a renovascular graft in mice, the luminal diameter of the graft remained clear without a restenosis and an increased confluence of the endothelial layer was observed. The tensile test confirmed that the renovascular graft was mechanically superior to native renal arteries and retained this advantage within 30 days in vivo. Also, this renovascular graft sustained renal functions as evidenced by normal levels of serum creatinine, urine creatinine and serum urea nitrogen and the lack of edema in the kidney cortex. These results demonstrate that this renovascular graft holds a great therapeutic promise for renal artery stenosis.

  1. Effects of oxidized low density lipoprotein on the growth of human artery smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Gao-feng; SENG Jing-jing; ZHANG Hua; SHE Ming-peng

    2005-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) promotes the pathogenesis and development of atherosclerosis (AS), and that the proliferation, migration and phenotype alteration of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) into foam cells are critical changes in AS. It is proposed that ox-LDL might play a novel role in the pathologic process of vSMCs. The present study was performed ex vivo to investigate the effects of ox-LDL on the growth of cultured human vSMCs.Methods Using NaBr density gradient centrifugation, LDL from human plasma was isolated and purified. ox-LDL was produced from LDL after being incubated with CuSO4. ox-LDL was then added to the culture medium at different concentrations (25 μg/ml, 50 μg/ml, 75 μg/ml, 100 μg/ml, 125 μg/ml, and 150 μg/ml) for 7 days. The influence of ox-LDL on vSMC growth was observed from several aspects as growth curve, mitosis index, lipid staining, and in situ determination of apoptosis. The digital results were analyzed with SPSS 10.0.Results The ox-LDL produced ex vivo had a good purity and optimal oxidative degree, which was similar to the intrinsic ox-LDL in atherosclerotic plaque. ox-LDL at a concentration of 25 μg/ml demonstrated the strongest proliferation. At the concentration of 125 μg/ml, ox-LDL suppressed the growth of vSMCs. At concentrations of 25 μg/ml and 50 μg/ml, ox-LDL presented powerful mitotic trigger. When the concentration of ox-LDL increased, the mitotic index of vSMCs decreased gradually. ox-LDL induced more foam cells from vSMCs with rich intracellular lipid accumulation at concentrations of 25 μg/ml and 50 μg/ml. ox-LDL at higher concentrations induced more apoptotic vSMCs.Conclusions ox-LDL at lower concentrations may trigger proliferation and phenotype alteration into foam cells of vSMCs, and at higher concentrations it may induce apoptosis in vSMCs. ox-LDL plays an important role in the pathogenesis and development of atherosclerosis by its effect on v

  2. Postsynaptic density-95 scaffolding of Shaker-type K⁺ channels in smooth muscle cells regulates the diameter of cerebral arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Biny K; Thakali, Keshari M; Pathan, Asif R; Kang, Eunju; Rusch, Nancy J; Rhee, Sung W

    2011-11-01

    Postsynaptic density-95 (PSD95) is a 95 kDa scaffolding molecule in the brain that clusters postsynaptic proteins including ion channels, receptors, enzymes and other signalling partners required for normal cognition. The voltage-gated, Shaker-type K(+) (K(V)1) channel is one key binding partner of PSD95 scaffolds in neurons. However, K(V)1 channels composed of α1.2 and α1.5 pore-forming subunits also are expressed in the vascular smooth muscle cells (cVSMCs) of the cerebral circulation, although the identity of their molecular scaffolds is unknown. Since α1.2 contains a binding motif for PSD95, we explored the possibility that cVSMCs express PSD95 as a scaffold to promote K(V)1 channel expression and cerebral vasodilatation. Cerebral arteries from Sprague-Dawley rats were isolated for analysis of PSD95 and K(V)1 channel proteins. PSD95 was detected in cVSMCs and it co-immunoprecipitated and co-localized with the pore-forming α1.2 subunit of the K(V)1 channel. Antisense-mediated knockdown of PSD95 profoundly reduced K(V)1 channel expression and suppressed K(V)1 current in patch-clamped cVSMCs. Loss of PSD95 also depolarized cVSMCs in pressurized cerebral arteries and induced a strong constriction associated with a loss of functional K(V)1 channels. Our findings provide initial evidence that PSD95 is expressed in cVSMCs, and the K(V)1 channel is one of its important binding partners. PSD95 appears to function as a critical 'dilator' scaffold in cerebral arteries by increasing the number of functional K(V)1 channels at the plasma membrane.

  3. Impaired autonomic regulation of resistance arteries in mice with low vascular endothelial growth factor or upon vascular endothelial growth factor trap delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storkebaum, Erik; Ruiz de Almodovar, Carmen; Meens, Merlijn;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Control of peripheral resistance arteries by autonomic nerves is essential for the regulation of blood flow. The signals responsible for the maintenance of vascular neuroeffector mechanisms in the adult, however, remain largely unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Here, we report that VEGF( ...

  4. Cell-to-cell contact of human monocytes with infected arterial smooth-muscle cells enhances growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puolakkainen, Mirja; Campbell, Lee Ann; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Richards, Theresa; Patton, Dorothy L; Kuo, Cho-Chou

    2003-02-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae can infect arterial cells. It has been shown that coculture of human monocytes (U937) and endothelial cells promotes infection of C. pneumoniae in endothelial cells and that the enhancement was mediated by a soluble factor (insulin-like growth factor 2) secreted by monocytes. In this study, it is shown that coculture of monocytes with C. pneumoniae enhances infection of C. pneumoniae in arterial smooth-muscle cells 5.3-fold at a monocyte-to-smooth-muscle cell ratio of 5. However, unlike endothelial cells, no enhancement was observed if monocytes were placed in cell culture inserts or if conditioned medium from monocyte cultures was used, which suggests that cell-to-cell contact is critical. The addition of mannose 6-phosphate or octyl glucoside, a nonionic detergent containing a sugar group, to cocultures inhibited the enhancement. These findings suggest that the monocyte-smooth-muscle cell interaction may be mediated by mannose 6-phosphate receptors present on monocytes.

  5. Niflumic Acid Attenuated Pulmonary Artery Tone and Vascular Structural Remodeling of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Induced by High Pulmonary Blood Flow In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Ma, Jianfa; Pang, Yusheng; Lao, Jinquan; Pan, Xuanren; Tang, Qiaoyun; Zhang, Feng; Su, Danyan; Qin, Suyuan; Shrestha, Arnav Prasad

    2015-10-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (CaCCs) play a vital role in regulating pulmonary artery tone during pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induced by high blood flow. The role of CaCCs inhibitor niflumic acid (NFA) in vivo during this process requires further investigation. We established the PAH model by abdominal shunt surgery and treated with NFA in vivo. Fifty rats were randomly divided into normal, sham, shunt, NFA group 1 (0.2 mg/kg), and NFA group 2 (0.4 mg/kg). Pathological changes, right ventricle hypertrophy index, arterial wall area/vessel area, and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter were analyzed. Then contraction reactions of pulmonary arteries were measured. Finally, the electrophysiological characteristics of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells were investigated using patch-clamp technology. After 11 weeks of shunting, PAH developed, accompanied with increased right ventricle hypertrophy index, arterial wall area/vessel area, and arterial wall thickness/vessel external diameter. In the NFA treatment groups, the pressure and pathological changes were alleviated. The pulmonary artery tone in the shunt group increased, whereas it decreased after NFA treatment. The current density of CaCC was higher in the shunt group, and it was decreased in the NFA treatment groups. In conclusion, NFA attenuated pulmonary artery tone and structural remodeling in PAH induced by high pulmonary blood flow in vivo. CaCCs were involved and the augmented current density was alleviated by NFA treatment.

  6. Kaempferol inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell migration by modulating BMP-mediated miR-21 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangho; Kim, Sunghwan; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kang, Hara

    2015-09-01

    Bioflavonoids are known to induce cardioprotective effects by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and migration. Kaempferol has been shown to inhibit VSMC proliferation. However, little is known about the effect of kaempferol on VSMC migration and the underlying molecular mechanisms. Our studies provide the first evidence that kaempferol inhibits VSMC migration by modulating the BMP4 signaling pathway and microRNA expression levels. Kaempferol activates the BMP signaling pathway, induces miR-21 expression and downregulates DOCK4, 5, and 7, leading to inhibition of cell migration. Moreover, kaempferol antagonizes the PDGF-mediated pro-migratory effect. Therefore, our study uncovers a novel regulatory mechanism of VSMC migration by kaempferol and suggests that miRNA modulation by kaempferol is a potential therapy for cardiovascular diseases.

  7. MAPKK-dependent growth factor-induced upregulation of P2Y2 receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, M; Möller, S; Edvinsson, L;

    1999-01-01

    The ATP- and UTP-sensitive P2Y2 receptor which mediates both contractile and mitogenic effects has recently been shown to be upregulated in the synthetic phenotype of the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC). Using a competitive RT-PCR we demonstrate that the P2Y2 receptor mRNA is increased by fetal...... calf serum and other growth factors in a MAPKK-dependent way. This was confirmed at the functional level by examining UTP-stimulated release of intracellular Ca2+. Furthermore, the P2Y2 receptor mRNA is positively autoregulated by ATP and the mRNA is rapidly degraded with only 26% remaining after 1 h...... in the presence of actinomycin D. Our results indicate growth factor regulation and rapid turnover of the P2Y2 receptor mRNA, which may be of importance in atherosclerosis and neointima formation after balloon angioplasty....

  8. Nox4 Is Expressed In Pulmonary Artery Adventitia And Contributes To Hypertensive Vascular Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Scott A.; Chen, Feng; Su, Yunchao; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Wang, Yusi; Catravas, John D.; Han, Weihong; Orfi, Laszlo; Szantai-Kis, Csaba; Keri, Gyorgy; Szabadkai, Istvan; Barabutis, Nektarios; Rafikova, Olga; Rafikov, Ruslan; Black, Stephen M.; Jonigk, Danny; Giannis, Athanassios; Asmis, Reto; Stepp, David W.; Ramesh, Ganesan; Fulton, David J.R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) is a progressive disease arising from remodeling and narrowing of pulmonary arteries (PA) resulting in high pulmonary blood pressure and ultimately right ventricular failure. Elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) is associated with increased pressure in PH. However, the cellular location of Nox4 and its contribution to aberrant vascular remodeling in PH remains poorly understood. Therefore, we sought to identify the vascular cells expressing Nox4 in PA and determine the functional relevance of Nox4 in PH. APPROACH AND RESULTS Elevated expression of Nox4 was detected in hypertensive PA from 3 rat PH models and human PH using qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence. In the vascular wall, Nox4 was detected in both endothelium and adventitia and perivascular staining was prominently increased in hypertensive lung sections, colocalizing with cells expressing fibroblast and monocyte markers and matching the adventitial location of ROS production. Small molecule inhibitors of Nox4 reduced adventitial ROS generation and vascular remodeling as well as ameliorating right ventricular hypertrophy and non-invasive indices of PA stiffness in monocrotaline (MCT)-treated rats as determined by morphometric analysis and high resolution digital ultrasound. Nox4 inhibitors improved PH in both prevention and reversal protocols and reduced the expression of fibroblast markers in isolated PA. In fibroblasts, Nox4 over-expression stimulated migration and proliferation and was necessary for matrix gene expression. CONCLUSIONS These findings indicate that Nox4 is prominently expressed in the adventitia and contributes to altered fibroblast behavior, hypertensive vascular remodeling and the development of PH. PMID:24947524

  9. Potassium channels in vascular smooth muscle and essential hypertension%血管平滑肌钾通道与原发性高血压

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周述芝; 魏宗德

    2003-01-01

    Essential hypertension(EH)is characterized by an increased total peripheral resistance.There are four types of potassium channels in vascular smooth muscle cells,including Kca,Kv,Kir,KATP,which play an important role in regulating the diameter of vascular.The change of potassium channels may have something to do with the pathogenesis of hypertension.This article reviews the characters of potassium channels and their roles in EH.

  10. The intermediate phenotype of vascular smooth muscle cells in adult%成年合成型血管平滑肌细胞的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莽; 田河林; 韦立顺

    2003-01-01

    The intermediate phenotype of vascular smooth muscle cell in adult is the dedifferentiation state returned from the high differentiation state , appeared on the damaged blood vessels. It is regulated by many factors. Its distribution, the characteristics of morphology and structure, the regulated transform factors and the molecular biological mechanism are introduced, and its functional significance and the role in vascular diseases are also discussed in this article.

  11. Preparation of liposome-coated oligonucleotide labeled with 99mTc and its uptake in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To explore the preparation method of liposome-coated 99mTc-labeled antisense oligonucleotide (ASON),targeteing the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and to explore the biological characteristics and the uptake kinetics of a radiolabeled probe in vascular smooth muscle cells, an 18-base single-stranded antisense oligonucleotide targeting PCNA mRNA and the complementary strand (sense oligonucleotide, SON) were synthesized. The ASON (SON) was labeled with 99mTc, by conjugating the bifunctional chelator (hydrazino nicotinamide, HYNIC), and purified through a gel filtration column of Sephadex G-25. The product was then encapsulated in cationic liposome (oligofectamineTM). The radiolabeling efficiency, radiochemical purity, stability of the liposome-coated 99mTc-HYNIC-ASON in a phosphate buffered solution (PBS), and fresh human serum and its uptake rate were studied. There was no significant difference between the 99mTc radiolabeling efficiencies of HYNIC-ASON and HYNIC-SON, which were 60.04% ± 1.92% and 59.60% ± 2.53%, respectively (P > 0.05, n = 5). The radiochemical purity of the liposome-coated 99mTc-HYNIC-ASON was 94.70% ± 1.90% (n = 5). And after incubation with PBS and fresh human seAt 90 min after transfection, the uptake rate of the liposome-coated 99mTc-HYNIC-ASON reached its peak of 83.8% ±5.92% in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and was much higher than that of the nonliposome-coated 99mTc-HYNIC-ASON, which was 11.16% ± 0.54% (P < 0.01, n = 4). The labeling method of PCNA ASON (SON) conjugated by HYNIC has been proved successful. The liposome was able to enhance the ASON (SON) uptake in VSMCs,and could be widely used as a safe, convenient, effective gene transfer carrier.

  12. Phosphatidylcholine is a major source of phosphatidic acid and diacylglycerol in angiotensin II-stimulated vascular smooth-muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassègue, B; Alexander, R W; Clark, M; Akers, M; Griendling, K K

    1993-06-01

    In cultured vascular smooth-muscle cells, angiotensin II produces a sustained formation of diacylglycerol (DG) and phosphatidic acid (PtdOH). Since the fatty acid composition of these molecules is likely to determine their efficacy as second messengers, it is important to ascertain the phospholipid precursors and the biochemical pathways from which they are produced. Our experiments suggest that phospholipase D (PLD)-mediated phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) hydrolysis is the major source of both DG and PtdOH during the late signalling phase. First, in cells labelled with [3H]myristate, which preferentially labels PtdCho, formation of [3H]PtdOH precedes formation of [3H]DG. Second, in contrast with phospholipase C (PLC) activation, DG mass accumulation is dependent on extracellular Ca2+. Similarly, DG mass accumulation is not attenuated by protein kinase C activation, which we have previously shown to inhibit the phosphoinositide-specific PLC. Third, the fatty acid composition of late-phase DG and PtdOH more closely resembles that of PtdCho than that of phosphatidylinositol. Finally, in cells labelled for a short time with [3H]glycerol, the radioactivity incorporated into [3H]DG and PtdOH was greater than that incorporated into PtdIns, but not into PtdCho. We found no evidence that synthesis de novo or phosphatidylethanolamine breakdown contributes to sustained DG and PtdOH formation. Thus, in angiotensin II-stimulated cultured vascular smooth-muscle cells, PLD-mediated PtdCho hydrolysis is the major source of sustained DG and PtdOH, whereas phosphoinositide breakdown is a minor contributor. Furthermore, PtdOH phosphohydrolase, which determines the relative levels of DG and PtdOH, appears to be regulated by protein kinase C. These results have important implications for the role of these second messengers in growth and contraction.

  13. EFFECT OF STENT ABSORBED c-myc ANTISENSE OLIGODEOXYNUCLEOTIDE ON SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS APOPTOSIS IN RABBIT CAROTID ARTERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张新霞; 崔长琮; 李江; 崔翰斌; 徐仓宝; 朱参战

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of gelatin coated Platinium-Iridium stent absorbed c-myc antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASODN) on smooth muscle cells apoptosis in a normal rabbit carotid arteries. Methods Gelatin coated Platinium-Iridium stents were implanted in the right carotid arteries of 32 rabbits under vision. Animals were randomly divided into control group and treated group receiving c-myc ASODN (n=16, respectively). On 7, 14, 30 and 90 days following the stenting procedure ,morphometry for caculation of neointimal area and mean neointimal thickness were performed.The expression of c-myc protein was detected by immunohistochemical method. Apoptotic smooth muscle cells was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Results At 7 and 14 days after stenting,there were no detectable apoptotic cells in both groups. The apoptotic cells occurred in the neointima 30 and 90 days after stenting, and the number of apoptotic cells at 30 days were less [4.50±1.29 vs 25.75±1.89 (number/0.1mm2)] than that at 90 days [13.50±1.91 vs 41.50±6.46 (number/0.1mm2)]. Meanwhile c-myc ASODN induced more apoptotic cells than the control group(P<0.0001). c-myc protein expression was weak positive or negative in treated group and positive in control group.Conclusion c-myc ASODN can induce smooth muscle cells apoptosis after stenting in normal rabbit carotid arteries,and it can be used to prevent in-stent restenosis.

  14. Eukaryotic Expression of Human Arresten Gene and Its Effect on the Proliferation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Dan; ZHENG Qichang; SONG Zifang; LI Yiqing; WANG Xiedan; GUO Xingjun

    2006-01-01

    The eukaryotic expression of human arresten geneand its effect on the proliferation of in vitro cultured vascular smooth cells (VSMCs) in vitro were investigated. COS-7 cells were transfected with recombinant eukaryotic expression plasmid pSecTag2-AT or control plasmid pSecTag2 mediated by liposome. Forty-eight h after transfection, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect the expression of arresten mRNA in the cells,while Western blot assay was applied to detect the expression of arresten protein in concentrated supernatant. Primary VSMCs from thoracic aorta of male Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured using the tissue explant method, and identified by immunohistochemical staining with a smooth muscle-specific anti-αactin monoclonal antibody before serial subcultivation. VSMCs were then co-cultured with the concentrated supernatant and their proliferation was detected using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) in vitro. The results showed that RT-PCR revealed that the genome of arresten-transfected cells contained a 449 bp specific fragment of arresten gene, suggesting the successful transfection. Successful protein expression in supernatants was confirmed by Western blot. CCK-8 assay showed that the proliferation of VSMCs were inhibited significantly by arresten protein as compared with control cells (F=40.154, P<0.01). It was concluded that arresten protein expressed in eukaryotic cells can inhibit proliferation of VSMCs effectively in vitro, which would provide possibility to the animal experiments.

  15. Monomethylarsonous acid, but not inorganic arsenic, is a mitochondria-specific toxicant in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Clare; Banerjee, Tania Das; Welch, Barrett; Khalili, Roxana; Dagda, Ruben K; Angermann, Jeff

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic exposure has been implicated as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, metabolic disorders, and cancer, yet the role mitochondrial dysfunction plays in the cellular mechanisms of pathology is largely unknown. To investigate arsenic-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), we exposed rat aortic smooth muscle cells (A7r5) to inorganic arsenic (iAs(III)) and its metabolite monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and compared their effects on mitochondrial function and oxidative stress. Our results indicate that MMA(III) is significantly more toxic to mitochondria than iAs(III). Exposure of VSMCs to MMA(III), but not iAs(III), significantly decreased basal and maximal oxygen consumption rates and concomitantly increased compensatory extracellular acidification rates, a proxy for glycolysis. Treatment with MMA(III) significantly increased hydrogen peroxide and superoxide levels compared to iAs(III). Exposure to MMA(III) resulted in significant decreases in mitochondrial ATP, aberrant perinuclear clustering of mitochondria, and decreased mitochondrial content. Mechanistically, we observed that mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide contribute to mitochondrial toxicity, as treatment of cells with MnTBAP (a mitochondrial superoxide dismutase mimetic) and catalase significantly reduced mitochondrial respiration deficits and cell death induced by both arsenic compounds. Overall, our data demonstrates that MMA(III) is a mitochondria-specific toxicant that elevates mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial sources of ROS.

  16. Coronary artery disease associated transcription factor TCF21 regulates smooth muscle precursor cells that contribute to the fibrous cap

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    S.T. Nurnberg

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available TCF21 is a basic helix–loop–helix transcription factor that has recently been implicated as contributing to susceptibility to coronary heart disease based on genome wide association studies. In order to identify transcriptionally regulated target genes in a major disease relevant cell type, we performed siRNA knockdown of TCF21 in in vitro cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells and compared the transcriptome of siTCF21 versus siCONTROL treated cells. The raw (FASTQ as well as processed (BED data from 3 technical replicates per treatment has been deposited with Gene Expression Omnibus (GSE44461.

  17. Pioglitazone suppresses advanced glycation end product-induced expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in vascular smooth muscle cells

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    Xiaochen Yuan; Naifeng Liu

    2011-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) play an important role in vascular complications of diabetes, including fibrinolytic abnormalities.Pioglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARΥ) agonist, has recently been shown to reduce circulating plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels in diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we investigated the effects of pioglitazone on the expression of local PAI-1 in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) induced by AGEs and the underlying mechanism. The result showed that AGEs could enhance the PAI-1 expression by 5.1-fold in mRNA and 2.7-fold in protein level, as evaluated by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting,respectively. Pioglitazone was found to down-regulate the AGE-stimulated PAI-1 expression in VSMCs. However, these inhibitory effects were partially attenuated by the PPARΥ antagonist, GW9662. Furthermore, we found that AGEs induced a rapid increase in phosphorylation and activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2). The ERK kinase inhibitor, UO126, partially prevented the induction of PAI-1 by AGEs. Moreover, pioglitazone was also found to inhibit the phosphorylation of ERKi/2. Taken together, it was concluded that pioglitazone could inhibit AGE-induced PAI-1 expression, which was mediated by the ERK1/2 and PPARΥ pathways. Our findings suggestedpioglitazone had a therapeutic potential in improving fibrinolytic activity, and consequently preventing thromboembolic complications of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  18. Retinoid-induced expression and activity of an immediate early tumor suppressor gene in vascular smooth muscle cells.

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    Jeffrey W Streb

    Full Text Available Retinoids are used clinically to treat a number of hyper-proliferative disorders and have been shown in experimental animals to attenuate vascular occlusive diseases, presumably through nuclear receptors bound to retinoic acid response elements (RARE located in target genes. Here, we show that natural or synthetic retinoids rapidly induce mRNA and protein expression of a specific isoform of A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 12 (AKAP12β in cultured smooth muscle cells (SMC as well as the intact vessel wall. Expression kinetics and actinomycin D studies indicate Akap12β is a retinoid-induced, immediate-early gene. Akap12β promoter analyses reveal a conserved RARE mildly induced with atRA in a region that exhibits hyper-acetylation. Immunofluorescence microscopy and protein kinase A (PKA regulatory subunit overlay assays in SMC suggest a physical association between AKAP12β and PKA following retinoid treatment. Consistent with its designation as a tumor suppressor, inducible expression of AKAP12β attenuates SMC growth in vitro. Further, immunohistochemistry studies establish marked decreases in AKAP12 expression in experimentally-injured vessels of mice as well as atheromatous lesions in humans. Collectively, these results demonstrate a novel role for retinoids in the induction of an AKAP tumor suppressor that blocks vascular SMC growth thus providing new molecular insight into how retiniods may exert their anti-proliferative effects in the injured vessel wall.

  19. Biomimetic control of vascular smooth muscle cell morphology and phenotype for functional tissue-engineered small-diameter blood vessels.

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    Chan-Park, Mary B; Shen, Jin Ye; Cao, Ye; Xiong, Yun; Liu, Yunxiao; Rayatpisheh, Shahrzad; Kang, Gavin Chun-Wei; Greisler, Howard P

    2009-03-15

    Small-diameter blood vessel substitutes are urgently needed for patients requiring replacements of their coronary and below-the-knee vessels and for better arteriovenous dialysis shunts. Circulatory diseases, especially those arising from atherosclerosis, are the predominant cause of mortality and morbidity in the developed world. Current therapies include the use of autologous vessels or synthetic materials as vessel replacements. The limited availability of healthy vessels for use as bypass grafts and the failure of purely synthetic materials in small-diameter sites necessitate the development of a biological substitute. Tissue engineering is such an approach and has achieved promising results, but reconstruction of a functional vascular tunica media, with circumferentially oriented contractile smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and extracellular matrix, appropriate mechanical properties, and vasoactivity has yet to be demonstrated. This review focuses on strategies to effect the switch of SMC phenotype from synthetic to contractile, which is regarded as crucial for the engineering of a functional vascular media. The synthetic SMC phenotype is desired initially for cell proliferation and tissue remodeling, but the contractile phenotype is then necessary for sufficient vasoactivity and inhibition of neointima formation. The factors governing the switch to a more contractile phenotype with in vitro culture are reviewed.

  20. Effects of integrin α5β1 on the proliferation and migration of human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells.

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    Song, Yan; Qin, Xiaoyu; Wang, Hanjie; Miao, Renying; Zhang, Yonggan; Miao, Chaofeng; Wang, Zifan

    2016-02-01

    Integrin (ITG) α5β1 is a dominant fibronectin receptor that is abundantly expressed on the surface of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). However, the association between integrin α5β1 and the proliferation and migration of VSMCs has yet to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to characterize the roles of ITGα5 and ITGβ1 in the proliferation and migration of VSMCs, and to determine the effects of ITGα5β1 on integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) mRNA expression. Lentiviral expression vectors as well as RNA interference vectors of ITGα5 and ITGβ1 were successfully constructed and transfected into VSMCs to obtain ITGα5‑ and ITGβ1‑overexpressing or -silenced cells, respectively. Cell cycle distribution, proliferation and migration were analyzed in the transfected VSMCs in order to clarify the roles of ITGβ1 and ITGα5 in the proliferation and migration of VSMCs. ITGβ1 was markedly associated with the proliferation and migration of VSMCs, and FAK was shown to be involved in the signaling pathways of ITGβ1. ITGα5 did not exert any effects on VSMCs. The results of the present study may provide a possible therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of early vascular disease associated with VSMCs.

  1. Acute effect of tea, wine, beer, and polyphenols on ecto-alkaline phosphatase activity in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

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    Negrão, Maria R; Keating, Elisa; Faria, Ana; Azevedo, Isabel; Martins, Maria J

    2006-07-12

    Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is an ecto-enzyme widely distributed across species. It modulates a series of transmembranar transport systems, has an important role in bone mineralization, and can also be involved in vascular calcification. Polyphenol-rich diets seem to have protective effects on human health, namely, in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate the effects of polyphenols and polyphenol-rich beverages upon membranar alkaline phosphatase (ecto-ALP) activity in intact human vascular smooth muscle cells (AALTR). The ecto-ALP activity was determined at pH 7.8, with p-nitrophenyl phosphate as the substrate, by absorbance spectrophotometry at 410 nm. Cell viability was assessed by the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) method, and the polyphenol content of beverages was assessed using the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. All polyphenols tested inhibited ecto-ALP activity, in a concentration-dependent way. Teas, wines, and beers also inhibited ecto-ALP activity, largely according to their polyphenol content. All tested compounds and beverages improved or did not change AALTR cell viability. Stout beer was an exception to the described behavior. Although more studies must be done, the inhibition of AALTR ecto-ALP activity by polyphenolic compounds and polyphenol-containing beverages may contribute to their cardiovascular protective effects.

  2. NADPH oxidase (NOX) 1 mediates cigarette smoke-induced superoxide generation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

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    Chang, Kyung-Hwa; Park, Jung-Min; Lee, Chang Hoon; Kim, Bumseok; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Choi, Seong-Jin; Lee, Kyuhong; Lee, Moo-Yeol

    2017-02-01

    Smoking is a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Oxidative stress is one of the common etiological factors, and NADPH oxidase (NOX) has been suggested as a potential mediator of oxidative stress. In this study, cigarette smoke (CS)-induced superoxide production was characterized in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). CS was prepared in forms of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and total particulate matter (TPM). Several molecular probes for reactive oxygen species were trialed, and dihydroethidium (DHE) and WST-1 were chosen for superoxide detection considering the autofluorescence, light absorbance, and peroxidase inhibitory activity of CS. Both CSE and TPM generated superoxide in a VSMC culture system by stimulating cells to produce superoxide and by directly producing superoxide in the aqueous solution. NOX, specifically NOX1 was found to be an important cellular source of superoxide through experiments with the NOX inhibitors diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) and VAS2870 as well as isoform-specific NOX knockdown. NOX inhibitors and the superoxide dismutase mimetic TEMPOL reduced the cytotoxicity of CSE, thus suggesting the contribution of NOX1-derived superoxide to cytotoxicity. Since NOX1 is known to mediate diverse pathological processes in the vascular system, NOX1 may be a critical effector of cardiovascular toxicity caused by smoking.

  3. Electromobility Shift Analysis (EMSA) Applied to the Study of NF-kappa B Binding Interactions in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourcier, T

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) family of transcription factors has emerged as a signaling pathway that figures prominently in a cell's initial response to a plethora of inflammatory stimuli. Modified lipids, oxidative stress, bacterial endotoxins, growth factors and cytokines, such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and interleukin-1 (IL-1), are among the stimuli that free NFκB dimers from their cytosolic inhibitor proteins leading to nuclear translocation of NFκB and transactivation of target genes (1-3). The smooth muscle cells (SMC) of the vasculature express components of this pathway and are activated by these stimuli, promoting dysregulation of gene expression by cells within the atherosclerotic vessel. Indeed, NFκB proteins have been localized within the nuclei of vascular SMC at sites of human atherosclerotic lesions, suggesting a role for NFκB in activation of this cell type in vivo (4-6). NFκB participates in dysregulated gene expression not only by SMC but also by endothelial cells and macrophages, prominent cell types within atherosclerotic lesions, thus much attention has focused on the workings of this signaling pathway within vascular cells and its role in atherogenesis.

  4. Influence of oxygen tension of the metabolism of vascular smooth muscle: demonstration of a Pasteur effect.

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    Arnqvist, H J; Lundholm, L

    1976-01-01

    The influence of variations of oxygen tension on the metabolism of bovine mesenteric arteries was studied in vitro. Glucose uptake, lactate production, glycogen content, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), creatine phosphate (CrP) and incorporation of [14C]leucine into protein were determined. The mesenteric arteries were suspended in Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer which was aerated with a gas mixture containing 5% CO2,O-95% O2 and N2 to 100%. Reduction of the O2 concentration of the gas phase from 95-20% resulted in little metabolic change. A further reduction from 20-0% O2 increased the lactate production 4-fold, indicating a marked Pasteur effect. At 0% O2 the glucose uptake was moderately increased and the glycogen content was decreased. The tissue level of CrP was reduced at a low oxygen tension and at 0% O2 the ATP content was also lowered. The incorporation of leucine into proteins was reduced at 0% O2.

  5. Inorganic phosphate accelerates the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells: evidence for the involvement of miR-223.

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    Ashraf Yusuf Rangrez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An elevated serum inorganic phosphate (Pi level is a major risk factor for kidney disease and downstream vascular complications. We focused on the effect of Pi levels on human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, with an emphasis on the role of microRNAs (miRNAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Exposure of human primary VSMCs in vitro to pathological levels of Pi increased calcification, migration rate and concomitantly reduced cell proliferation and the amount of the actin cytoskeleton. These changes were evidenced by significant downregulation of miRNA-143 (miR-143 and miR-145 and concomitant upregulation of their targets and key markers in synthetic VSMCs, such as Krüppel-like factors-4 and -5 and versican. Interestingly, we also found that miR-223 (a marker of muscle damage and a key factor in osteoclast differentiation is expressed in VSMCs and is significantly upregulated in Pi-treated cells. Over-expressing miR-223 in VSMCs increased proliferation and markedly enhanced VSMC migration. Additionally, we found that the expression of two of the known miR-223 targets, Mef2c and RhoB, was highly reduced in Pi treated as well as miR-223 over-expressing VSMCs. To complement these in vitro findings, we also observed significant downregulation of miR-143 and miR-145 and upregulation of miR-223 in aorta samples collected from ApoE knock-out mice, which display vascular calcification. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that (i high levels of Pi increase VSMC migration and calcification, (ii altered expression levels of miR-223 could play a part in this process and (iii miR-223 is a potential new biomarker of VSMC damage.

  6. Angiotensin II upregulates the expression of placental growth factor in human vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells

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    Guo Yingqiang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atherosclerosis is now recognized as a chronic inflammatory disease. Angiotensin II (Ang II is a critical factor in inflammatory responses, which promotes the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Placental growth factor (PlGF is a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF family cytokines and is associated with inflammatory progress of atherosclerosis. However, the potential link between PlGF and Ang II has not been investigated. In the current study, whether Ang II could regulate PlGF expression, and the effect of PlGF on cell proliferation, was investigated in human vascular endothelial cells (VECs and smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. Results In growth-arrested human VECs and VSMCs, Ang II induced PlGF mRNA expression after 4 hour treatment, and peaked at 24 hours. 10-6 mol/L Ang II increased PlGF protein production after 8 hour treatment, and peaked at 24 hours. Stimulation with Ang II also induced mRNA expression of VEGF receptor-1 and -2(VEGFR-1 and -2 in these cells. The Ang II type I receptor (AT1R antagonist blocked Ang II-induced PlGF gene expression and protein production. Several intracellular signals elicited by Ang II were involved in PlGF synthesis, including activation of protein kinase C, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 and PI3-kinase. A neutralizing antibody against PlGF partially inhibited the Ang II-induced proliferation of VECs and VSMCs. However, this antibody showed little effect on the basal proliferation in these cells, whereas blocking antibody of VEGF could suppress both basal and Ang II-induced proliferation in VECs and VSMCs. Conclusion Our results showed for the first time that Ang II could induce the gene expression and protein production of PlGF in VECs and VSMCs, which might play an important role in the pathogenesis of vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  7. WISP1 overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of human vascular smooth muscle cells via AKT signaling pathway.

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    Lu, Shun; Liu, Hao; Lu, Lihe; Wan, Heng; Lin, Zhiqi; Qian, Kai; Yao, Xingxing; Chen, Qing; Liu, Wenjun; Yan, Jianyun; Liu, Zhengjun

    2016-10-05

    Proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play crucial roles in the development of vascular restenosis. Our previous study showed that CCN4, namely Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1), significantly promotes proliferation and migration of rat VSMCs, but its mechanism remains unclear. This study aims to investigate whether and how WISP1 stimulates proliferation and migration of human VSMCs. Western blot analysis showed that FBS treatment increased WISP1 protein levels in human VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner. Overexpression of WISP1 using adenovirus encoding WISP1 (AD-WISP1) significantly increased proliferation rate of human VSMCs by 2.98-fold compared with empty virus (EV)-transfected cells, shown by EdU incorporation assay. Additionally, Scratch-induced wound healing assay revealed that adenovirus-mediated overexpression of WISP1 significantly increased cell migration compared with EV-transfected cells from 6h (4.56±1.14% vs. 11.23±2.25%, PMigration Assay confirmed that WISP1 overexpression significantly promoted human VSMC migration by 2.25-fold compared with EV. Furthermore, WISP1 overexpression stimulated Akt signaling activation in human VSMCs. Blockage of Akt signaling by Akt inhibitor AZD5363 or PI3K inhibitor LY294002, led to an inhibitory effect of WISP1-induced proliferation and migration in human VSMCs. Moreover, we found that WISP1 overexpression stimulated GSK3α/β phosphorylation, and increased expression of cyclin D1 and MMP9 in human VSMCs, and this effect was abolished by AZD5363. Collectively, we demonstrated that Akt signaling pathway mediates WISP1-induced migration and proliferation of human VSMCs, suggesting that WISP1 may act as a novel potential therapeutic target for vascular restenosis.

  8. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor

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    Liu, Gang [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Department of Anesthesiology, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Hitomi, Hirofumi, E-mail: hitomi@kms.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Hosomi, Naohisa [Department of Cardiorenal and Cerebrovascular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Lei, Bai; Nakano, Daisuke [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Deguchi, Kazushi; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu [Department of Gastroenterology and Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Ma, Hong [Department of Anesthesiology, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Griendling, Kathy K. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Nishiyama, Akira [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    Insulin resistance and hypertension have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease; however, little is known about the roles of insulin and mechanical force in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) remodeling. We investigated the contribution of mechanical stretch to insulin-induced VSMC proliferation. Thymidine incorporation was stimulated by insulin in stretched VSMCs, but not in un-stretched VSMCs. Insulin increased 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation in both stretched and un-stretched VSMCs. Mechanical stretch augmented insulin-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt phosphorylation. Inhibitors of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase and Src attenuated insulin-induced ERK and Akt phosphorylation, as well as thymidine incorporation, whereas 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation was not affected by these inhibitors. Moreover, stretch augmented insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor expression, although it did not alter the expression of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1. Insulin-induced ERK and Akt activation, and thymidine incorporation were inhibited by siRNA for the IGF-1 receptor. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via upregulation of IGF-1 receptor, and downstream Src/EGF receptor-mediated ERK and Akt activation. Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor expression was also augmented in hypertensive rats. These results provide a basis for clarifying the molecular mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertensive patients with hyperinsulinemia. -- Highlights: {yields} Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via IGF-1 receptor. {yields} Src/EGFR-mediated ERK and Akt phosphorylation are augmented in stretched VSMCs. {yields} Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor is increased in hypertensive rats. {yields} Results provide possible mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertension with DM.

  9. Testosterone delays vascular smooth muscle cell senescence and inhibits collagen synthesis via the Gas6/Axl signaling pathway.

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    Chen, Yan-qing; Zhao, Jing; Jin, Cheng-wei; Li, Yi-hui; Tang, Meng-xiong; Wang, Zhi-hao; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yun; Li, Li; Zhong, Ming

    2016-06-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular diseases in men. However, its effect on cell senescence, which plays a causal role in vascular aging, remains unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that testosterone alleviated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) senescence and collagen synthesis via growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6)/Axl- and Akt/FoxO1a-dependent pathways. Testosterone significantly ameliorated angiotensin II-induced VSMC senescence and collagen overexpression. In addition, testosterone inhibited angiotensin II-induced matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity, which played a pivotal role in facilitating age-related collagen deposition. Testosterone increased the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 but decreased the expression of MMP-2 and membrane type-1 metalloproteinase which contributed to increase MMP-2 activity. The effects on VSMCs senescence and collagen synthesis were mediated by restoration of angiotensin II-induced downregulation of Gas6 and Axl expression and a subsequent reduction of Akt and FoxO1a phosphorylation. The effects of testosterone were reversed by a Gas6 blocker, Axl-Fc, and a specific inhibitor of Axl, R428. Treatment of VSMCs with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 abrogated the downregulating effect of testosterone on MMP-2 activity. Furthermore, when FoxO1a expression was silenced by using a specific siRNA, the inhibitory effect of testosterone on MMP-2 activity was revered as well, that indicated this process was Akt/FoxO1a dependence. Taken together, Gas6/Axl and Akt/FoxO1a were involved in protective effects of testosterone on VSMCs senescence and collagen synthesis. Our results provide a novel mechanism underlying the protective effect of testosterone on vascular aging and may serve as a theoretical basis for testosterone replacement therapy.

  10. Piperine inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-BB-induced proliferation and migration in vascular smooth muscle cells.

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    Lee, Kang Pa; Lee, Kwan; Park, Won-Hwan; Kim, Hyuck; Hong, Heeok

    2015-02-01

    The proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in blood vessels are important in the pathogenesis of vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Piperine, a major component of black pepper, has antioxidant, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory activity. However, the antiatherosclerotic effects of piperine have not been investigated. In this study, the effects of piperine on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs were investigated. The antiproliferative effects of piperine were determined using MTT assays, cell counting, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and western blots. Our results showed that piperine significantly attenuated the proliferation of VSMCs by increasing the expression of p27(kip1), regulating the mRNA expression of cell cycle enzymes (cyclin D, cyclin E, and PCNA), and decreasing the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 in a noncytotoxic concentration-dependent manner (30-100 μM). Moreover, we examined the effects of piperine on the migration of PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs, as determined by the Boyden chamber assay, H2DCFDA staining, and western blots. Our results showed that 100 μM piperine decreased cell migration, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and phosphorylation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Taken together, our results suggest that piperine inhibits PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and the migration of VSMCs by inducing cell cycle arrest and suppressing MAPK phosphorylation and ROS. These findings suggest that piperine may be beneficial for the treatment of vascular-related disorders and diseases.

  11. Influence of cholesterol and fish oil dietary intake on nitric oxide-induced apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells.

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    Perales, Sonia; Alejandre, Ma José; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio; Torres, Carolina; Linares, Ana

    2010-04-01

    Apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) is critically involved in the progression of atherosclerosis. We previously reported that dietary cholesterol intake induces changes in SMC at molecular and gene expression levels. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the differential response to nitric oxide of vascular SMC obtained from chicks after cholesterol and fish oil dietary intake and to examine effects on the main pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes. Dietary cholesterol intake reduced the Bcl-2/Bax (anti-apoptotic/pro-apoptotic) protein ratio in SMC, making them more susceptible to apoptosis. When cholesterol was withdrawn and replaced with a fish oil-enriched diet, the Bcl-xl/Bax protein ratio significantly increased, reversing the changes induced by cholesterol. The decrease in c-myc gene expression after apoptotic stimuli and the increase in Bcl-xl/Bax ratio indicate that fish oil has a protective role against apoptosis in SMC. Nitroprussiate-like nitric oxide donors exerted an intensive action on vascular SMC cultures. However, SMC-C (isolated from animals fed with control diet) and SMC-Ch (isolated from animals fed with cholesterol-enriched diet) responded differently to nitric oxide, especially in their bcl-2 and bcl-xl gene expression. SMC isolated from animals fed with cholesterol-enriched and then fish oil-enriched diet (SMC-Ch-FO cultures) showed an intermediate apoptosis level (Bcl-2/Bax ratio) between SMC-C and SMC-Ch, induction of c-myc expression and elevated p53 expression. These findings indicate that fish oil protects SMC against apoptosis.

  12. Role of Ryanodine Receptor Subtypes in Initiation and Formation of Calcium Sparks in Arterial Smooth Muscle: Comparison with Striated Muscle

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    Maik Gollasch

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium sparks represent local, rapid, and transient calcium release events from a cluster of ryanodine receptors (RyRs in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. In arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs, calcium sparks activate calcium-dependent potassium channels causing decrease in the global intracellular [Ca2+] and oppose vasoconstriction. This is in contrast to cardiac and skeletal muscle, where spatial and temporal summation of calcium sparks leads to global increases in intracellular [Ca2+] and myocyte contraction. We summarize the present data on local RyR calcium signaling in arterial SMCs in comparison to striated muscle and muscle-specific differences in coupling between L-type calcium channels and RyRs. Accordingly, arterial SMC Cav1.2 L-type channels regulate intracellular calcium stores content, which in turn modulates calcium efflux though RyRs. Downregulation of RyR2 up to a certain degree is compensated by increased SR calcium content to normalize calcium sparks. This indirect coupling between Cav1.2 and RyR in arterial SMCs is opposite to striated muscle, where triggering of calcium sparks is controlled by rapid and direct cross-talk between Cav1.1/Cav1.2 L-type channels and RyRs. We discuss the role of RyR isoforms in initiation and formation of calcium sparks in SMCs and their possible molecular binding partners and regulators, which differ compared to striated muscle.

  13. EXPRESSION OF TISSUE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR IN SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS OF INJURED ILIAC ARTERIES IN RABBITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晓莉; 黄文英; 佘铭鹏; 李晓惠; 笪冀平

    1996-01-01

    In this experiment, expression of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) in smooth muscle cells(SMCs) was measured at different iutervals after the arterial injury. In the normal lilac arteries, only low levels of t-PA activity were estimated, t-PA activity in extracts of the iliac arteries increased significantly at the 4th day after the injury, equivalent to the process that SMCs migrated from the media to the intima,and the t-PA activity was then decreased approximately to the normal level at the 7th day. Coexistent to the above data, results from in situ hybridization showed that the expression of t-PA mRNA in the intimaas well as media increased also significantly nr the 4th day after the arterial injury, and at the 7th day, t-PA mRNA was detected only in those SMCs locating closely adjacent to the internal elastic lamina. These results suggest that t-PA might play an important role in SMC migration following endothelial injury, and antagcaaism of t-PA expression and/or activity within the vessel wall might be helpful in intervening the devnlopment of restenosis following angioplasty.

  14. Circulating vascular progenitor cells and central arterial stiffness in polycystic ovary syndrome.

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    Cecile Dessapt-Baradez

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Subjects with Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS are at increased risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. The mechanism of this enhanced risk is unclear. Circulating vascular progenitor cells (VPC are immature bone marrow derived cells capable of differentiating into mature endothelial cells. VPC number/function and central arterial stiffness predict cardio-metabolic disease in at-risk populations. DESIGN: We studied VPC and arterial stiffness measures in non-obese PCOS subjects as compared to age and body mass index (BMI matched healthy controls in a cross-sectional study. METHODS: Fourteen subjects with PCOS and 12 controls of similar age, BMI (all <30 kg/m(2 and metabolic profile were studied. VPC number and in vitro function were studied by flow cytometry and tube formation assays respectively. Augmentation index (AIx, a measure of central arterial stiffness, and central (aortic blood pressures (BP were measured by applanation tonometry. RESULTS: Subjects with PCOS had a reduced number, mean±SEM, of circulating CD34(+133(+ VPCs (317.5±51.0 vs. 558.3±101.2, p = 0.03 and impaired in vitro tube formation (completed tube area 1.0±0.06 vs. 1.2±0.05×10(6 µm(2 p = 0.02. PCOS subjects had significantly higher AIx (18.4±1.9% vs. 4.9±2.0% and this difference remained significant even after adjustments for age, BMI and smoking (p = 0.003 in multivariate analyses. Central systolic and pulse pressure were higher in PCOS subjects but these differences were not statistically significant after adjustment for age. Brachial systolic and pulse pressures were similar. VPC number/function and arterial stiffness or BP measures were not correlated. CONCLUSIONS: Non-obese PCOS is characterized by a reduced VPC number, impaired VPC function and increased central arterial stiffness. These changes in novel vascular risk markers may explain the enhanced risk of T2DM and CVD in PCOS.

  15. Photobiomodulation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells in vitro with red laser light

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    Kipshidze, Nicholas; Keelan, Michael H., Jr.; Horn, Joseph B.; Nikolaychik, Victor

    1996-12-01

    Numerous reports suggest that low power red laser light (LPRLL) is capable of affecting cellular processes in the absence of significant thermal effect. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of LPRLL on viability, growth, and attachment characteristics of rabbit and human aortic endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) in vitro. All cell cultures were irradiated with single dose LPRLL using a He-Ne continuous wave laser with different energy densities. Assessment of effect on cell viability, growth, and attachment was performed utilizing Alamar Blue assay. Based upon our experiments, we conclude that: 1) stimulation and/or inhibition of cell growth and death can be obtained with LPRLL by varying the energy level, 2) LPRLL increases EC attachment, and 3) EC are more sensitive to photobiomodulation with LPRLL than SMC. These data may have significant importance leading to the establishment of new methods for phototherapy of atherosclerosis and restenosis.

  16. Cigarette smoke exposure induced pulmonary artery pressure increase through inhibiting Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 mRNA expression in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林纯意

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of cigarette smoke exposure on Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 mRNA expression in rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells(PASMCs), and further to clarify the possible mechanism of cigarette smoking induced pulmonary arterial hypertension. Methods Primary

  17. Utility of Indocyanine Green Angiography in Arterial Selection during Free Flap Harvest in Patients with Severe Peripheral Vascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell, Anne K.; Deleyiannis, Frederic W.-B.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Indocyanine green angiography (SPY) was used to guide arterial selection for an anterolateral thigh free flap in the setting of severe peripheral vascular disease. SPY technology serves as a novel and sensitive intraoperative tool to predict decreased tissue perfusion from vessel sacrifice for flap harvest. Change in SPY time parameters measuring superficial blood flow distal to the donor site while temporarily intraoperatively clamping different possible arterial pedicles can optimi...

  18. Comparison of MEK/ERK pathway inhibitors on the upregulation of vascular G-protein coupled receptors in rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, Hardip; Ansar, Saema; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    on translational level and increased respective contractions. The prostanoid TP receptor mediated contraction curve was left-wards shifted by organ culture. Organ culture was associated with elevated pERK1/2 in the vascular smooth muscle cells: the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 attenuated the endothelin ET(B) receptor......Organ culture is an in vitro method for investigating cellular mechanisms involved in upregulation of vasocontractile G-protein coupled receptors. We hypothesize that mitogen-activated-protein kinase (MEK) and/or extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) specific inhibitors will attenuate the G......-protein coupled receptor expression following organ culture. Rat cerebral arteries were incubated 48h in the presence of MEK/ERK specific inhibitors U0126, PD98059, SL327, or AG126 for different time periods. Contractile responses by activation of endothelin receptor type A and type B, serotonin receptor 5-HT(1B...

  19. Inhibition of Collagen Synthesis and Regulation of Cell Motility in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells by Suppression of Connective Tissue growth Factor Expression Using RNA Interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Jing LIU; Huai-Qing CHEN

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) hyperplasia plays an important role in both chronic and acute pathologies including atherosclerosis and restenosis. Recent studies have shown that connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a novel growth factor involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis.

  20. A monovalent ion-selective cation current activated by noradrenaline in smooth muscle cells of rabbit ear artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Hogg, R C; Large, W A

    1993-04-01

    Membrane currents were recorded with the perforated-patch method with a low-chloride (35 mM) pipette solution in isolated smooth muscle cells of the rabbit ear artery. At a holding potential of -50 mV in potassium-free conditions spontaneous inward single-channel currents were observed and noradrenaline evoked a noisy inward current, which appeared to be comprised of the spontaneous currents. The reversal potential (Vr) of the spontaneous channel and noradrenaline-induced current was not affected in anion-substitution experiments but Vr was altered when external Na+ was replaced with choline or TRIS. The relationship between clamp potential and spontaneous single-channel current amplitude was linear and the mean unitary conductance was 28 pS. Caffeine, which releases calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and the calcium ionophore ionomycin activated the cation current and also blocked the response to noradrenaline. Spontaneous channel current activity and the noradrenaline-induced current were blocked when external NaCl was replaced with 89 mM CaCl2. The response to noradrenaline was blocked by prazosin but was not affected by yohimbine and therefore the response is mediated by alpha 1-adrenoceptors. It is concluded that in rabbit ear artery smooth muscle cells there is a calcium-activated cation channel of 28 pS conductance, which is relatively impermeable to calcium but can be activated by noradrenaline.

  1. Relaxation of vascular smooth muscle induced by low-power laser radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, H; Lynch, M; Schomacker, K; Birngruber, R; Gregory, K; Kochevar, I

    1993-11-01

    The relaxation of rabbit aorta rings induced by low-power laser radiation was investigated in vitro to determine the location of the chromophore(s) responsible for this response and evaluate possible mechanisms. An action spectrum for relaxation was measured on rabbit thoracic aorta rings precontracted with norepinephrine. The decrease in isometric tension was measured during exposure to laser light (351-625 nm) delivered via a fiber optic to a small spot on the adventitial surface. The shortest UV wavelength (351 nm) was 35-fold more effective than 390 nm and 1700-fold more effective than 460 nm. Ultraviolet wavelengths also produced greater maximum relaxation (0.40-0.45) than visible wavelengths (0.20-0.25), suggesting that photovasorelaxation involves more than one chromophore. The adventitial layer was not necessary for photovasorelaxation, indicating that the light is absorbed by a chromophore in the medial layer. The same degree of relaxation was obtained on rings without adventitia when either one-half of the ring, or a small spot was irradiated indicating that communication between smooth muscle cells spreads a signal from the area illuminated to the entire ring. The mechanism for photovasorelaxation was investigated using potential inhibitors. N-monomethyl-L-arginine and N-amino-L-arginine, inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase, did not alter photovasorelaxation nor did indomethacin, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, and zinc protoporphyrin, an inhibitor of heme oxygenase.

  2. MARCKS Signaling Differentially Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Cell Proliferation through a KIS-, p27kip1- Dependent Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Yu

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the myristolated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS occurs in vascular proliferative diseases such as restenosis after bypass surgery. MARCKS knockdown results in arrest of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC proliferation with little effect on endothelial cell (EC proliferation. We sought to identify the mechanism of differential regulation by MARCKS of VSMC and EC proliferation in vitro and in vivo.siRNA-mediated MARCKS knockdown in VSMCs inhibited proliferation and prevented progression from phase G0/G1 to S. Protein expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27kip1, but not p21cip1 was increased by MARCKS knockdown. MARCKS knockdown did not affect proliferation in VSMCs derived from p27kip1-/- mice indicating that the effect of MARCKS is p27kip1-dependent. MARCKS knockdown resulted in decreased phosphorylation of p27kip1 at threonine 187 and serine 10 as well as, kinase interacting with stathmin (KIS, cyclin D1, and Skp2 expression. Phosphorylation of p27kip1 at serine 10 by KIS is required for nuclear export and degradation of p27kip1. MARCKS knockdown caused nuclear trapping of p27kip1. Both p27kip1 nuclear trapping and cell cycle arrest were released by overexpression of KIS, but not catalytically inactive KIS. In ECs, MARCKS knockdown paradoxically increased KIS expression and cell proliferation. MARCKS knockdown in a murine aortic injury model resulted in decreased VSMC proliferation determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU integration assay, and inhibition of vascular wall thickening. MARCKS knockdown increased the rate of re-endothelialization.MARCKS knockdown arrested VSMC cell cycle by decreasing KIS expression. Decreased KIS expression resulted in nuclear trapping of p27kip1 in VSMCs. MARCKS knockdown paradoxically increased KIS expression in ECs resulting in increased EC proliferation. MARCKS knockdown significantly attenuated the VSMC proliferative response to vascular injury, but accelerated

  3. Preeclampsia serum-induced collagen I expression and intracellular calcium levels in arterial smooth muscle cells are mediated by the PLC-γ1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rongzhen; Teng, Yincheng; Huang, Yajuan; Gu, Jinghong; Ma, Li; Li, Ming; Zhou, Yuedi

    2014-09-26

    In women with preeclampsia (PE), endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction can lead to altered secretion of paracrine factors that induce peripheral vasoconstriction and proteinuria. This study examined the hypothesis that PE sera may directly or indirectly, through human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs), stimulate phospholipase C-γ1-1,4,5-trisphosphate (PLC-γ1-IP3) signaling, thereby increasing protein kinase C-α (PKC-α) activity, collagen I expression and intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs). HUASMCs and HUVECs were cocultured with normal or PE sera before PLC-γ1 silencing. Increased PLC-γ1 and IP3 receptor (IP3R) phosphorylation was observed in cocultured HUASMCs stimulated with PE sera (PPLC-γ1 silencing. Compared with normal sera, PE sera increased [Ca(2+)]i in cocultured HUASMCs (PPLC-γ1 and IP3R silencing. Finally, PE sera-induced PKC-α activity and collagen I expression was inhibited by PLC-γ1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) (PPLC-γ1, which may in turn result in thickening and hardening of the placental vascular wall, placental blood supply shortage, fetal hypoxia-ischemia and intrauterine growth retardation or intrauterine fetal death. PE sera increased [Ca(2+)]i and induced PKC-α activation and collagen I expression in cocultured HUASMCs via the PLC-γ1 pathway.

  4. Presión arterial sistólica y pronóstico funcional en pacientes con enfermedad vascular cerebral aguda: Registro mexicano de enfermedad vascular cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    Baños-González,Manuel; Cantú-Brito, Carlos; Chiquete, Erwin; Arauz, Antonio; Ruiz-Sandoval,José Luís; Villarreal-Careaga,Jorge; Barinagarrementeria,Fernando; Lozano,José Juan

    2011-01-01

    Objetivo: Analizar la asociación de la presión arterial sistólica (PAS) al ingreso hospitalario y la evolución clínica a 30 días en pacientes con enfermedad vascular cerebral (EVC) aguda. Métodos: El REgistro NAcional Mexicano de Enfermedad VAScular Cerebral (RENAMEVASC) es un registro hospitalario multicéntrico realizado de noviembre de 2002 a octubre de 2004. Se registraron 2000 pacientes con distintos síndromes clínicos de EVC aguda confirmados por neuroimagen. La estratificación de la evo...

  5. Combined vascular reconstruction and free flap transfer in diabetic arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermassen, F E; van Landuyt, K

    2000-01-01

    Gangrenous lesions of the foot or lower leg due to severe diabetic arterial disease resulting in extensive soft tissue defects with exposed bones or tendons often result, even after successful revascularisation, in staged or primary amputation. We present our experience with 45 such patients treated with combined arterial reconstruction and free tissue transfer for limb-salvage. All presented with peripheral vascular disease of diabetic origin, and extensive gangrenous lesions that could not be treated by simple wound closure or skin-grafting without major amputation. A total of 53 arterial reconstructions and 47 free-flap transfers were performed. In the majority of patients, the distal anastomosis was on a pedal or tibial vessel. These bypass grafts or a native revascularized artery served as the inflow tract for the free flap which was anastomosed using microsurgical techniques. Venous anastomoses were preferentially performed on the deep venous system. Donor muscles were Musculus rectus abdominis (n=37), Musculus latissimus dorsi (n=5), Musculus serratus anterior (n=3), and a perforator flap (n=2) tailored to the size of the defect and covered with a split thickness graft (STG). The operation was set up as a combined procedure in 39/45 patients, two teams working simultaneously, limiting the mean operative time to 6 h. Early reinterventions had to be performed in 14 patients resulting in five flap losses of which two could be treated with a new free flap transfer and three were amputated. Three other patients died in the postoperative period, leaving us with a total of 39/45 patients leaving the hospital with a full-length limb. Independent ambulation was achieved in 32 of these 39 patients. During late follow-up (mean 26 months) eight bypasses occluded resulting in two amputations and two new vascular reconstructions. Combined survival and limb-salvage rate was 84% after 1 year, 77% after 2 years and 65% after 3 years. The advantages of this combined technique

  6. Baicalin Inhibits Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation via the AKT/HIF-1α/p27-Associated Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Baicalin, a flavonoid compound purified from the dry roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has been shown to possess various pharmacological actions. Previous studies have revealed that baicalin inhibits the growth of cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a devastating disease characterized by enhanced pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMCs proliferation and suppressed apoptosis. However, the potential mechanism of baicalin in the regulation of PASMC proliferation and the prevention of cardiovascular diseases remains unexplored. To test the effects of baicalin on hypoxia, we used rats treated with or without baicalin (100 mg·kg−1 each rat at the beginning of the third week after hypoxia. Hemodynamic and pulmonary pathomorphology data showed that right ventricular systolic pressures (RVSP, the weight of the right ventricle/left ventricle plus septum (RV/LV + S ratio and the medial width of pulmonary arterioles were much higher in chronic hypoxia. However, baicalin treatment repressed the elevation of RVSP, RV/LV + S and attenuated the pulmonary vascular structure remodeling (PVSR of pulmonary arterioles induced by chronic hypoxia. Additionally, baicalin (10 and 20 μmol·L−1 treatment suppressed the proliferation of PASMCs and attenuated the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-α under hypoxia exposure. Meanwhile, baicalin reversed the hypoxia-induced reduction of p27 and increased AKT/protein kinase B phosphorylation p-AKT both in vivo and in vitro. These results suggested that baicalin could effectively attenuate PVSR and hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

  7. Conjugated agent insulin-antisense-c-myb-PS-ODN enhances the inhibitory effect on proliferation of rat aortic artery smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM:Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and migration from the arterial wall media into the intima are believed to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of restenosis. Several studies have demonstrated that phosphothioate (PS) oligodeoxynucleotides targeted against genes involved in SMC proliferation inhibits in vitro SMC proliferation and migration. However, the therapeutic effect of antisense ODN on the individual who receives the treatment of delivery of the agent depends on the efficacy of this agent in great degree. We investigated the inhibition effect of a novel agent, insulin-antisense-c-myb-PS-ODN on SMC proliferation in vitro. METHODS:The rat aortic artery SMCs were cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagel's medium. The passage 8 to 13 were used as the experiment. Cell surface receptor binding assay was quantified through counting gamma particles emitted from 125    I labeled insulin. SMC rapid proliferation was brought by stimulation of high concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS). The novel agent of insulin conjugated to the antisense-c-myb-PS-ODN was obtained via incubation of both in condition of certain reagents, pH, temperature, and ion concentration. The characterization and purification of the agent was performed through HPLC. Inhibition of SMC proliferation was reflected by incorporation rate of trillium labeled thymidine deoxyribonucleotide.RESULTS:The binding efficacy of insulin to the receptor was remarkably increased in SMC cultured in supplement of 20% FBS. The inhibition effect of conjugator insulin-c-myb-antisense-PS-ODN was stronger than that of the simple c-myb-antisense-PS-ODN. The inhibition rate of conjugator and simple form on SMC proliferation were 48.34% and 29.54%, respectively. CONCLUSION:The binding efficacy and specificity of c-myb-antisense-PS-ODN to SMC may be enhanced by the insulin receptor mediation through the insulin-insulin receptor interaction. The insulin-receptor targeted method may be a

  8. Effect of 103Pd on proliferation and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Quan-Yong; ZHU Jun; LU Han-Kui; ZHU Rui-Sen

    2003-01-01

    This study aimed at the effect of γ -emitting radionuclide 103Pd on the proliferation and apoptosis ofvascular SMCs (smooth muscle cells) in vitro. The cavy aortic SMCs were cultured with culture medium M-199. Theexperiments were carried out in two groups, one for proliferation test and the other for apoptosis test. In each group,103Pd solutions with various radioactivities were respectively added to the culture solution to irradiate SMCs for 72 h,while non-radioactive palladium solution was added to the control. 3H-thymidine incorporation test and liquid scin-tillator were used to detect the effect of 103Pd on the proliferation of SMCs. Flow cytometer was used to detect theapoptotic SMCs. The inhibition rate of SMCs proliferation by 1.85 MBq 103Pd solution was 2.3%, which was not sig-nificant, while the inhibition rate increased from 41.6% to 91.3% as the 103Pd activity increased from 7.40 MBq to 37MBq. The apoptosis rate of SMCs was extremely low (less than 4.0%) by 103Pd with activity from 1.85 MBq to 37MBq. The results suggest that the proliferation of SMCs can be repressed effectively in a dose-dependent fashion by103Pd in vitro. The mechanism of its inhibiting over neointima proliferation is likely to inhibite SMCs proliferationrather than to induce its apoptosis by 103Pd. 103Pd can be used as a γ -emitting intravascular brachytherapy radionu-clide to inhibit SMCs proliferation.

  9. Messenger molecules of the phospholipase signaling system have dual effects on vascular smooth muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidulescu, Cristina; Mironneau, J.; Mironneau, Chantal; Popescu, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Background and methods. In order to investigate the role of phospholipases and their immediately derived messengers in agonist-induced contraction of portal vein smooth muscle, we used the addition in the organ bath of exogenous molecules such as: phospholipases C, A(2), and D, diacylglycerol, arachidonic acid, phosphatidic acid, choline. We also used substances modulating activity of downstream molecules like protein kinase C, phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, or cyclooxygenase. Results. a) Exogenous phospholipases C or A(2), respectively, induced small agonist-like contractions, while exogenous phospholipase D did not. Moreover, phospholipase D inhibited spontaneous contractions. However, when added during noradrenaline-induced plateau, phospholipase D shortly potentiated it. b) The protein kinase C activator, phorbol dibutyrate potentiated both the exogenous phospholipase C-induced contraction and the noradrenaline-induced plateau, while the protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(-5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methyl-piperazine relaxed the plateau. c) When added before noradrenaline, indomethacin inhibited both phasic and tonic contractions, but when added during the tonic contraction shortly potentiated it. Arachidonic acid strongly potentiated both spontaneous and noradrenaline-induced contractions, irrespective of the moment of its addition. d) In contrast, phosphatidic acid inhibited spontaneous contractile activity, nevertheless it was occasionally capable of inducing small contractions, and when repetitively added during the agonist-induced tonic contraction, produced short potentiations of the plateau. Pretreatment with propranolol inhibited noradrenaline-induced contractions and further addition of phosphatidic acid augmented this inhibition. Choline augmented the duration and amplitude of noradrenaline-induced tonic contraction and final contractile oscillations. Conclusions. These data suggest that messengers produced by phospholipase C and phospholipase A(2

  10. Unusual effects of SCN and lyotropic anions on contractility of vascular smooth muscle from female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A M; Altura, B T; Altura, B M

    1991-08-01

    Replacement of extracellular chloride ions by thiocyanate anions (SCN-) followed by washout in normal chloride-containing solution produced contractions in isolated rat aortas and portal veins of female rats followed by slow relaxation; these contractions consisted of fast and slow phases. These SCN(-)-induced biphasic contractions were also noted in rat aortas precontracted by 80 mM KCl and 100 microM noradrenaline. No differences were noted between isolated aortic precontracted by 80 mM KCl and 100 microM noradrenaline. No differences were noted between isolated aortic strips versus intact ring preparations. The SCN(-)-induced contractions in both the aorta and portal vein were inhibited markedly by denervation with 6-hydroxydopamine. Use of prazosin, rauwolscine, propranolol, atropine, methysergide, diphenydramine, indomethacin or procaine (10(-3) M) failed to alter the SCN(-)-induced responses. However, use of phentolamine at 10(-5) M, but not at lower concentrations of the drug, resulted in complete inhibition of SCN(-)-induced contractions. Treatment of the vascular tissues with EGTA (5 mM) or incubation in Ca(2+)-free media abolished the SCN(-)-induced contractile responses. Treatment with verapamil (10(-6) M) or washing in Ca(2+)-free Krebs Ringer solution after incubation with SCN(-)-Krebs Ringer selectively inhibited the slow phases of the aortic contractions. Replacement of SCN- anions with other foreign monovalent anions or with sucrose modified the amplitude of the SCN(-)-induced contractions. These foreign anions seemed to follow a relative order of potency similar to that for a lyotropic series of anions, where acetate greater than isethionate greater than chloride greater than bromide greater than nitrate greater than iodide ions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Polyclonal antibody production and expression of CREG protein in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaling HAN; Haiwei LIU; Jian KANG; Xiaozeng WANG; Ye HU; Lianyou ZHAO; Shaohua LI

    2005-01-01

    Objectives The cellular repressor of E1A-activated genes (CREG), a novel gene, was recently found to play a role in inhibiting cell growth and promoting cell differentiation. The purpose of this study was to obtain antibody against CREG protein and to study the expression of CREG protein in human internal thoracic artery cells (HITASY) which express different patterns of differentiation markers after serum withdrawal. Methods The open reading frame of CREG gene sequence was amplified by PCR and cloned into the pGEX-4T-1 vector. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-CREG fusion protein was expressed in E. Coli BL21 and purified from inclusion bodies by Sephacryl S-200 chromatography. Rabbits were immunized with the purified GST-CREG protein. Western blot examined with immunohistochemistry staining and the protein expression level was analyzed by Western blot in HITASY cells after serum removal. Results It was confirmed by using endonuclease digesting and DNA sequencing that the PCR product of CREG was correctly inserted into the vector. The GST-CREG protein was purified with gel filtration chromatography. Polyclonal antibody against GST-CREG was obtained from rabbits. CREG protein immunohistochemistry staining displayed a perinuclear distribution in the cytoplasm of HITASY cells. Results from Western blot suggested that comparing with the untreated cells upregulation of CREG polyclonal antibody against CREG was comfirmed. Using this antibody, the changes of CREG protein expression was observed in the process of phenotypic modulation of HITASY cells. These results provide basic understanding o