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  1. 3D Reconstruction of Coronary Artery Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Luo

    Full Text Available The 3D geometry of individual vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, which are essential for understanding the mechanical function of blood vessels, are currently not available. This paper introduces a new 3D segmentation algorithm to determine VSMC morphology and orientation.A total of 112 VSMCs from six porcine coronary arteries were used in the analysis. A 3D semi-automatic segmentation method was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs from cell clumps as well as to extract the 3D geometry of VSMCs. A new edge blocking model was introduced to recognize cell boundary while an edge growing was developed for optimal interpolation and edge verification. The proposed methods were designed based on Region of Interest (ROI selected by user and interactive responses of limited key edges. Enhanced cell boundary features were used to construct the cell's initial boundary for further edge growing. A unified framework of morphological parameters (dimensions and orientations was proposed for the 3D volume data. Virtual phantom was designed to validate the tilt angle measurements, while other parameters extracted from 3D segmentations were compared with manual measurements to assess the accuracy of the algorithm. The length, width and thickness of VSMCs were 62.9±14.9 μm, 4.6±0.6 μm and 6.2±1.8 μm (mean±SD. In longitudinal-circumferential plane of blood vessel, VSMCs align off the circumferential direction with two mean angles of -19.4±9.3° and 10.9±4.7°, while an out-of-plane angle (i.e., radial tilt angle was found to be 8±7.6° with median as 5.7°.A 3D segmentation algorithm was developed to reconstruct individual VSMCs of blood vessel walls based on optical image stacks. The results were validated by a virtual phantom and manual measurement. The obtained 3D geometries can be utilized in mathematical models and leads a better understanding of vascular mechanical properties and function.

  2. Differential effects of formoterol on thrombin- and PDGF-induced proliferation of human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Goncharova Elena A; Khavin Irene S; Goncharov Dmitry A; Krymskaya Vera P

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Increased pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (PAVSM) cell proliferation is a key pathophysiological component of pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH). The long-acting β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonist formoterol, a racemate comprised of (R,R)- and (S,S)-enantiomers, is commonly used as a vasodilator in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PH, a common complication of COPD, increases patients’ morbidity and reduces surviv...

  3. Differential effects of formoterol on thrombin- and PDGF-induced proliferation of human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Goncharova, Elena A.; Khavin, Irene S; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Vera P Krymskaya

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (PAVSM) cell proliferation is a key pathophysiological component of pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH). The long-acting β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonist formoterol, a racemate comprised of (R,R)- and (S,S)-enantiomers, is commonly used as a vasodilator in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PH, a common complication of COPD, increases patients’ morbidity and reduces survival. Recen...

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by Thapsigargin in vascular smooth muscle cells of rat coronary artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-yan; DENG Chun-yu; JIANG Li

    2016-01-01

    AIM:To establish the endoplasmic reticulum stress ( ERS) cell model in vascular smooth muscle cells ( VSMCs) of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats.METHODS:Under sterile condition, the coronary arteries were isolated from SD rats .The primary VSMCs were cultured by tissue-sticking method , and observed the basic morphological characteristics under optical microscope .The marker proteins of VSMCs including α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain ( SM-MHC) were identified by immuno-fluorescence technique .VSMCs were treated with thapsigargin (0.5, 1 and 2 μmol/L) for 24 h, and the expression levels of binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and C/EBP homologus protein (CHOP), the marker molecules of ERS, were detected using Western blotting.RESULTS:VSMCs climbed out from coronary artery tissues after about six days , and the cells had a nice state and formed the VSMC-like typical "peak valley".The results of immunofluorescence technique show that the marker proteins of VSMCs ,α-SMA and SM-MHC were expressed significantly .The results of Western blotting show that the protein expression levels of BiP and CHOP were increased by thapsigargin in a dose-dependent manner .CONCLUSION:VSMCs can be successfully cultured by tissue-sticking method and built the ERS model induced by thapsigargin .

  5. Vascular smooth muscle desensitization in rabbit epigastric and mesenteric arteries during hemorrhagic shock.

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    Ratz, P H; Miner, A S; Huang, Y; Smith, C A; Barbee, R W

    2016-07-01

    The decompensatory phase of hemorrhage (shock) is caused by a poorly defined phenomenon termed vascular hyporeactivity (VHR). VHR may reflect an acute in vivo imbalance in levels of contractile and relaxant stimuli favoring net vascular smooth muscle (VSM) relaxation. Alternatively, VHR may be caused by intrinsic VSM desensitization of contraction resulting from prior exposure to high levels of stimuli that temporarily adjusts cell signaling systems. Net relaxation, but not desensitization, would be expected to resolve rapidly in an artery segment removed from the in vivo shock environment and examined in vitro in a fresh solution. Our aim was to 1) induce shock in rabbits and apply an in vitro mechanical analysis on muscular arteries isolated pre- and postshock to determine whether VHR involves intrinsic VSM desensitization, and 2) identify whether net VSM relaxation induced by nitric oxide and cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase activation in vitro can be sustained for some time after relaxant stimulus washout. The potencies of phenylephrine- and histamine-induced contractions in in vitro epigastric artery removed from rabbits posthemorrhage were decreased by ∼0.3 log units compared with the control contralateral epigastric artery removed prehemorrhage. Moreover, a decrease in KCl-induced tonic, relative to phasic, tension of in vitro mesenteric artery correlated with the degree of shock severity as assessed by rates of lactate and K(+) accumulation. VSM desensitization was also caused by tyramine in vivo and PE in vitro, but not by relaxant agents in vitro. Together, these results support the hypothesis that VHR during hemorrhagic decompensation involves contractile stimulus-induced long-lasting, intrinsic VSM desensitization. PMID:27199133

  6. Lipogenesis in arterial wall and vascular smooth muscular cells: regulation and abnormalities in insulin-resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feugier Patrick

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular smooth muscular cells (VSMC express lipogenic genes. Therefore in situ lipogenesis could provide fatty acids for triglycerides synthesis and cholesterol esterification and contribute to lipid accumulation in arterial wall with aging and during atheroma. Methods We investigated expression of lipogenic genes in human and rat arterial walls, its regulation in cultured VSMC and determined if it is modified during insulin-resistance and diabetes, situations with increased risk for atheroma. Results Zucker obese (ZO and diabetic (ZDF rats accumulated more triglycerides in their aortas than their respective control rats, and this triglycerides content increased with age in ZDF and control rats. However the expression in aortas of lipogenic genes, or of genes involved in fatty acids uptake, was not higher in ZDF and ZO rats and did not increase with age. Expression of lipogenesis-related genes was not increased in human arterial wall (carotid endarterectomy of diabetic compared to non-diabetic patients. In vitro, glucose and adipogenic medium (ADM stimulated moderately the expression and activity of lipogenesis in VSMC from control rats. LXR agonists, but not PXR agonist, stimulated also lipogenesis in VSMC but not in arterial wall in vivo. Lipogenic genes expression was lower in VSMC from ZO rats and not stimulated by glucose or ADM. Conclusion Lipogenic genes are expressed in arterial wall and VSMC; this expression is stimulated (VSMC by glucose, ADM and LXR agonists. During insulin-resistance and diabetes, this expression is not increased and resists to the actions of glucose and ADM. It is unlikely that this metabolic pathway contribute to lipid accumulation of arterial wall during insulin-resistance and diabetes and thus to the increased risk of atheroma observed in these situations.

  7. Effect of L-Arginine on Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Apoptosis in Rats with Hypoxic Pulmonary Vascular Structural Remodeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ingrid Karmane SUMOU; Jun-Bao DU; Bing WEI; Chun-Yu ZHANG; Jian-Guang QI; Chao-Shu TANG

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of L-arginine (L-Arg) on the apoptosis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) in rats with hypoxic pulmonary vascular structural remodeling, and its mechanisms. Seventeen Wistar rats were randomly divided into a control group (n=5), a hypoxia group (n=7), and a hypoxia+L-Arg group (n=5). The morphologic changes of lung tissues were observed under optical microscope. Using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphatebiotin nick end labeling assay, the apoptosis of PASMC was examined. Fas expression in PASMC was examined using immunohistochemistry. The results showed that the percentage of muscularized artery in small pulmonary vessels, and the relative medial thickness and relative medial area of the small and median pulmonary muscularized arteries in the hypoxic group were all significantly increased. Pulmonary vascular structural remodeling developed after hypoxia. Apoptotic smooth muscle cells of the small and median pulmonary arteries in the hypoxia group were significantly less than those in the control group. After 14 d of hypoxia, Fas expression by smooth muscle cells of median and small pulmonary arteries was significantly inhibited. L-Arg significantly inhibited hypoxic pulmonary vascular structural remodeling in association with an augmentation of apoptosis of smooth muscle cells as well as Fas expression in PASMC. These results showed that L-Arg could play an important role in attenuating hypoxic pulmonary vascular structural remodeling by upregulating Fas expression in PASMC, thus promoting the apoptosis of PASMC.

  8. Assays for in vitro monitoring of proliferation of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, Elena A; Lim, Poay; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Eszterhas, Andrew; Panettieri, Reynold A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Vascular and airway remodeling, which are characterized by airway smooth muscle (ASM) and pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) proliferation, contribute to the pathology of asthma, pulmonary hypertension, restenosis and atherosclerosis. To evaluate the proliferation of VSM and ASM cells in response to mitogens, we perform a [3H]thymidine incorporation assay. The proliferation protocol takes approximately 48 h and includes stimulating cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle with agonists, labeling cells with [3H]thymidine and examining levels of [3H]thymidine incorporation by scintillation counting. Although using radiolabeled [3H]thymidine incorporation is a limitation, the greatest benefit of the assay is providing reliable and statistically significant data. PMID:17406550

  9. Composition of connective tissues and morphometry of vascular smooth muscle in arterial wall of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats - In relation with arterial remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kozaburo; Shimizu, Emiko

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension (HT) was induced in Wistar rats aged 16 and 48 weeks by a deoxycortico-sterone acetate (DOCA)-salt procedure. Common carotid arteries were resected 16 weeks after, and their histological specimens were selectively stained for observations of collagen, elastin, and vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. Then, the fractions of collagen and elastin and their radial distributions, and the size and number of VSM cells were determined with an image analyzer. These results were compared with the results from age-matched, non-treated, normotensive (NT) animals and also with those from our previous biomechanical studies. In both age groups, there were no significant differences in the fractions of collagen and elastin, and the ratio of collagen to elastin content between HT and NT arteries. These results correspond well with our previous biomechanical results, which showed no significant difference in wall elasticity between HT and NT vessels. Moreover, in the innermost layer out of 4 layers bordered with thick elastic lamellae, the fraction of collagen was significantly greater in HT arteries than in NT ones, which is attributable to HT-related stress concentration in the layer. VSM cells were significantly hypertrophied and their content was increased by HT, although their total number in the media remained unchanged. The increased size and content of cells correspond to the enhancement of vascular tone and contractility in HT arteries.

  10. Composition of connective tissues and morphometry of vascular smooth muscle in arterial wall of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats - In relation with arterial remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kozaburo; Shimizu, Emiko

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension (HT) was induced in Wistar rats aged 16 and 48 weeks by a deoxycortico-sterone acetate (DOCA)-salt procedure. Common carotid arteries were resected 16 weeks after, and their histological specimens were selectively stained for observations of collagen, elastin, and vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. Then, the fractions of collagen and elastin and their radial distributions, and the size and number of VSM cells were determined with an image analyzer. These results were compared with the results from age-matched, non-treated, normotensive (NT) animals and also with those from our previous biomechanical studies. In both age groups, there were no significant differences in the fractions of collagen and elastin, and the ratio of collagen to elastin content between HT and NT arteries. These results correspond well with our previous biomechanical results, which showed no significant difference in wall elasticity between HT and NT vessels. Moreover, in the innermost layer out of 4 layers bordered with thick elastic lamellae, the fraction of collagen was significantly greater in HT arteries than in NT ones, which is attributable to HT-related stress concentration in the layer. VSM cells were significantly hypertrophied and their content was increased by HT, although their total number in the media remained unchanged. The increased size and content of cells correspond to the enhancement of vascular tone and contractility in HT arteries. PMID:26987272

  11. Differential effects of formoterol on thrombin- and PDGF-induced proliferation of human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goncharova Elena A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (PAVSM cell proliferation is a key pathophysiological component of pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH. The long-acting β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR agonist formoterol, a racemate comprised of (R,R- and (S,S-enantiomers, is commonly used as a vasodilator in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. PH, a common complication of COPD, increases patients’ morbidity and reduces survival. Recent studies demonstrate that formoterol has anti-proliferative effects on airway smooth muscle cells and bronchial fibroblasts. The effects of formoterol and its enantiomers on PAVSM cell proliferation are not determined. The goals of this study were to examine effects of racemic formoterol and its enantiomers on PAVSM cell proliferation as it relates to COPD-associated PH. Methods Basal, thrombin-, PDGF- and chronic hypoxia-induced proliferation of primary human PAVSM cells was examined by DNA synthesis analysis using BrdU incorporation assay. ERK1/2, mTORC1 and mTORC2 activation were determined by phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2, ribosomal protein S6 and S473-Akt using immunoblot analysis. Results We found that (R,R and racemic formoterol inhibited basal, thrombin- and chronic hypoxia-induced proliferation of human PAVSM cells while (S,S formoterol had lesser inhibitory effect. The β2AR blocker propranolol abrogated the growth inhibitory effect of formoterol. (R,R, but not (S,S formoterol attenuated basal, thrombin- and chronic hypoxia-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but had little effect on Akt and S6 phosphorylation levels. Formoterol and its enantiomers did not significantly affect PDGF-induced DNA synthesis and PDGF-dependent ERK1/2, S473-Akt and S6 phosphorylation in human PAVSM cells. Conclusions Formoterol inhibits basal, thrombin-, and chronic hypoxia-, but not PDGF-induced human PAVSM cell proliferation and ERK1/2, but has little effect on

  12. Recipient origin of neointimal vascular smooth muscle cells in cardiac allografts with transplant arteriosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hillebrands, JL; van den Hurk, BMH; Klatter, FA; Popa, ER; Nieuwenhuis, P; Rozing, J

    2000-01-01

    Background: Coronary artery disease is today's most important post-heart transplantation problem after the first perioperative year. Histologically, coronary artery disease is characterized by transplant arteriosclerosis. The current view on this vasculopathy is that vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cel

  13. Trophoblast- and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell-Derived MMP-12 Mediates Elastolysis during Uterine Spiral Artery Remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Lynda K.; Smith, Samantha D.; Rosemary J Keogh; Jones, Rebecca L; Philip N Baker; Knöfler, Martin; Cartwright, Judith E.; Whitley, Guy St J; John D Aplin

    2010-01-01

    During the first trimester of pregnancy, the uterine spiral arteries are remodeled, creating heavily dilated conduits that lack maternal vasomotor control but allow the placenta to meet an increasing requirement for nutrients and oxygen. To effect permanent vasodilatation, the internal elastic lamina and medial elastin fibers must be degraded. In this study, we sought to identify the elastolytic proteases involved in this process. Primary first-trimester cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) derived from t...

  14. Selective biological response of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells on cold-plasma-modified polyester vascular prostheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work was to improve the hemocompatibility and the selectivity according to cells of non-woven poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) membranes. Non-woven PET membranes were modified by a combined plasma-chemical process. The surface of these materials was pre-activated by cold-plasma treatment and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was grafted by the in situ free radical polymerization of acrylic acid (AA). The extent of this reaction and the number of carboxylic groups incorporated were evaluated by colorimetric titration using toluidine blue O. All samples were characterized by SEM, AFM and thermogravimetric analysis, and the mechanical properties of the PAA grafted sample were determined. A selective cell response was observed when human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMC) or human pulmonary micro vascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) were seeded on the modified surfaces. HPASMC proliferation decreased about 60%, while HPMEC proliferation was just reduced about 10%. PAA grafted samples did not present hemolytic activity and the platelet adhesion decreased about 28% on PAA grafted surfaces.

  15. Increased rhythmicity in hypertensive arterial smooth muscle is linked to transient receptor potential canonical channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiaoping; Yang, Dachun; Ma, Shuangtao;

    2010-01-01

    Vasomotion describes oscillations of arterial vascular tone due to synchronized changes of intracellular calcium concentrations. Since increased calcium influx into vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) has been associated with variances of transient receptor pot...

  16. Effect of Nuclear Factor-kappa B on Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor mRNA Expression of Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells in Hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张焕萍; 徐永健; 张珍祥; 许淑云; 倪望; 陈士新

    2004-01-01

    Summary: In order to investigate the effect of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA expression of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs) in hypoxia, the cultured HPASMCs in vitro were stimulated with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), an inhibitor of NF-κB. The NF-κB p65 nuclei positive expression was detected by immunocytochemical technique. The IκBa protein expression was measured by Western blot.RT-PCR was used to detect the VEGF mRNA expression of HPASMCs. The results showed that no significant change was observed in the NF-κB p65 nuclei positive expression of cultured HPASMCs during 6 h-24 h in normoxia, but the levels of NF-κB p65 nuclei positive expression of cultured HPASMCs were significantly increased in hypoxia groups as compared with those in all normoxia groups (P<0.05). The IκBα protein expression of cultured HPASMCs showed no significant change during 6 h-24 h in normoxia, but significantly decreased in hypoxia as comapred with that in normoxia groups (P<0.05). PDTC (1 to 100 μmol/L) could inhibit the VEGF mRNA expression of HPASMCs in a concentration-dependent manner in hypoxia. In conclusion, NF-κB can be partly translocation activated from cytoplasm into nuclei in the cultured HPASMCs under hypoxia. The inhibition of NF-κB activation can decrease the VEGF mRNA expression. h is suggested that the activation of NF-κB is involved in the VEGFmRNA expression of HPASMCs under hypoxia.

  17. Caveolin-3 promotes a vascular smooth muscle contractile phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L. Gutierrez-Pajares

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the importance of cardiovascular diseases in Western countries. Among the cell types associated with a dysfunctional vasculature, smooth muscle cells are believed to play an essential role in the development of these illnesses. Vascular smooth muscle cells are key regulators of the vascular tone and also have an important function in the development of atherosclerosis and restenosis. While in the normal vasculature contractile smooth muscle cells are predominant, in atherosclerotic vascular lesions, synthetic cells migrate toward the neointima, proliferate, and synthetize extracellular matrix proteins. In the present study, we have examined the role of caveolin-3 in the regulation of smooth muscle cell phenotype. Caveolin-3 is expressed in vivo in normal arterial smooth muscle cells, but its expression appears to be lost in cultured smooth muscle cells. Our data show that caveolin-3 expression in the A7r5 smooth muscle cell line is associated with increased expression of contractility markers such as smooth muscle  actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain but decreased expression of the synthetic phenotype markers such as p-Elk and Klf4. Moreover, we also show that caveolin-3 expression can reduce proliferation upon treatment with LDL or PDGF. Finally, we show that caveolin-3-expressing smooth muscle cells are less sensitive to apoptosis than control cells upon treatment with oxidized LDL. Taken together, our data suggest that caveolin-3 can regulate the phenotypic switch between contractile and synthetic smooth muscle cells. A better understanding of the factors regulating caveolin-3 expression and function in this cell type will permit the development of a better comprehension of the factors regulating smooth muscle function in atherosclerosis and restenosis.

  18. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area.

  19. Pasteur effect in vascular and intestinal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, G; Lundholm, L

    1985-01-01

    The increase in lactate production on changing from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, i.e. the Pasteur effect, has been reported to be small in vascular muscle and especially in aorta. It has been suggested that this may be an artefact caused by damage to the intimal endothelium. We have compared the Pasteur effect in different kinds of pig arteries, but also in rabbit colon. The aerobic lactate production in 60 min was 11-15 mumol/g in the aorta and the carotid artery, but 3 mumol/g in the mesenteric and renal arteries and 4 mumol/g in the rabbit colon. The increase in lactate production under anaerobic conditions was 12-20 mumol/g/60 min in the carotid artery, aorta and rabbit colon and 10 mumol/g/60 min in the mesenteric and renal arteries. When calculated in per cent, the Pasteur effect was greater in the mesenteric artery than in the aorta, but the actual rise in lactate production in mumol/g was higher in the aorta and carotid artery. The high aerobic lactate production of smooth muscle in vitro may be related to its low ability to oxidize glucose; some other substrates may be preferentially oxidized when present in vitro or in vivo.

  20. Crk-associated substrate, vascular smooth muscle and hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dale D. TANG

    2008-01-01

    Hypertension is characterized by vascular smooth muscle constriction and vascular remodeling involving cell migration, hypertrophy and growth. Crk-associated substrate (CAS), the first discovered member of the adapter protein CAS family, has been shown to be a critical cellular component that regulates various smooth muscle functions. In this review, the molecular structure and protein interactions of the CAS family members are summarized. Evidence for the role of CAS in the regu-lation of vascular smooth muscle contractility is pre-sented. Contraction stimulation induces CAS phosphor-ylation on Tyr-410 in arterial smooth muscle, creating the binding site for the Src homology (SH) 2/SH3 protein Crkll, which activates neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syn-drome protein (N-WASP)-mediated actin assembly and force development. The functions of CAS in cell migra-tion, hypertrophy and growth are also summarized. Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl), c-Src, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (PYK2), pro-tein tyrosine phosphatase-proline, glutamate, serine and threonine sequence protein (PTP-PEST) and SHP-2 have been documented to coordinate the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of CAS. The downstream signaling partners of CAS in the context of cell motility, hyper-trophy, survival and growth are also discussed. These new findings establish the important role of CAS in the modulation of vascular smooth muscle functions. Furthermore, the upstream regulators of CAS may be new biologic targets for the development of more effective and specific treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension.

  1. Arteriolar vascular smooth muscle cells: mechanotransducers in a complex environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Michael A; Meininger, Gerald A

    2012-09-01

    Contraction of small artery (diameters typically less than 250 μm) vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a critical role in local control of blood flow and arterial pressure through its affect on vascular caliber. Specifically, contraction of small arteries in response to increased intraluminal pressure is referred to as the myogenic response and represents an important role for mechanotransduction. Critical questions remain as to how changes in pressure are sensed by VSMCs and transduced across the cell membrane to tune the contractile state of the cell. Recent studies suggest a pivotal role for interactions between VSMCs and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Thus, pressure-induced deformation of ECM proteins and their cell surface receptors (for example, integrins) may initiate contraction and cytoskeletal remodeling through modulation of ion channels, membrane depolarization, increased intracellular Ca(2+) and actomyosin crossbridge cycling. Importantly, it is argued that the contractile properties of small artery VSMCs reflect an intimate and integrated interaction with their extracellular environment and the three-dimensional structure of the vessel wall. PMID:22677491

  2. Relationship Between Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells and Mechanism of Hypoxia-induced Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling%肺动脉平滑肌细胞与低氧性肺血管重塑形成机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凌云

    2013-01-01

    低氧条件下肺血管收缩、重塑,继而导致肺血管的持续对抗,其中以中膜增厚为主的肺血管重塑是导致低氧性肺动脉高压持续不可逆性病理改变的重要因素.肺动脉平滑肌细胞是肺动脉中膜的主要构成部分,慢性缺氧条件下由于各种活性介质及细胞生长因子稳态的失衡,肺动脉平滑肌细胞聚集、增殖、肥大及分泌胞外基质;另外,肺动脉平滑肌细胞通过各种信号通路与内膜的内皮细胞及外膜的成纤维细胞相互作用,在低氧性肺血管重塑过程中起着至关重要的作用,本文将对肺动脉平滑肌细胞与低氧性肺血管重塑形成机制的最新研究概况作一综述.%Under conditions of hypoxia generalized vasoconstriction and remodeling of the pulmonary vascular leads to pulmonary vascular persistent resistance. The medial thickening is the main reason of pulmonary vascular remodeling and hypoxic pulmonary artery hypertension, pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) are the principal structure of media, and chronic hypoxia induces the imbalance of vasoactive substances and growth factors. Under this condition, the main medial thickening is believed to be attributable to proliferation, hypertrophy and increased accumulation of PASMC as well as expression of extracellular matrix proteins. Moreover, PASMC has an interaction with endothelial cell of intima and fibroblast of adventitia through multiple signal pathways and plays a crucial role in the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling. The article will make a summary of latest research on PASMC and mechanism of hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling.

  3. Biophysical induction of vascular smooth muscle cell podosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Young Kim

    Full Text Available Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC migration and matrix degradation occurs with intimal hyperplasia associated with atherosclerosis, vascular injury, and restenosis. One proposed mechanism by which VSMCs degrade matrix is through the use of podosomes, transient actin-based structures that are thought to play a role in extracellular matrix degradation by creating localized sites of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP secretion. To date, podosomes in VSMCs have largely been studied by stimulating cells with phorbol esters, such as phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu, however little is known about the physiological cues that drive podosome formation. We present the first evidence that physiological, physical stimuli mimicking cues present within the microenvironment of diseased arteries can induce podosome formation in VSMCs. Both microtopographical cues and imposed pressure mimicking stage II hypertension induce podosome formation in A7R5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Moreover, wounding using a scratch assay induces podosomes at the leading edge of VSMCs. Notably the effect of each of these biophysical stimuli on podosome stimulation can be inhibited using a Src inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that physical cues can induce podosome formation in VSMCs.

  4. Calcium oscillations in human mesenteric vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Garcia-Alonso, Mauricio; van Breemen, Cornelis; Tejerina, Teresa; Fameli, Nicola

    2014-02-28

    Phenylephrine (PE)-induced oscillatory fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) of vascular smooth muscle have been observed in many blood vessels isolated from a wide variety of mammals. Paradoxically, until recently similar observations in humans have proven elusive. In this study, we report for the first time observations of adrenergically-stimulated [Ca(2+)]i oscillations in human mesenteric artery smooth muscle. In arterial segments preloaded with Fluo-4 AM and mounted on a myograph on the stage of a confocal microscope, we observed PE-induced oscillations in [Ca(2+)]i, which initiated and maintained vasoconstriction. These oscillations present some variability, possibly due to compromised health of the tissue. This view is corroborated by our ultrastructural analysis of the cells, in which we found only (5 ± 2)% plasma membrane-sarcoplasmic reticulum apposition, markedly less than measured in healthy tissue from laboratory animals. We also partially characterized the oscillations by using the inhibitory drugs 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) and nifedipine. After PE contraction, all drugs provoked relaxation of the vessel segments, sometimes only partial, and reduced or inhibited oscillations, except CPA, which rarely caused relaxation. These preliminary results point to a potential involvement of the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) in the maintenance of the Ca(2+) oscillations observed in human blood vessels. PMID:24508261

  5. MFAP4 Promotes Vascular Smooth Muscle Migration, Proliferation and Accelerates Neointima Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlosser, Anders; Pilecki, Bartosz; Hemstra, Line E.;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Arterial injury stimulates remodeling responses that, when excessive, lead to stenosis. These responses are influenced by integrin signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Microfibrillar-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) is an integrin ligand localized to extracellular matrix fibe...

  6. Smooth Muscle Cell Mineralocorticoid Receptors Are Mandatory for Aldosterone–Salt to Induce Vascular Stiffness

    OpenAIRE

    Galmiche, Guillaume; Pizard, Anne; Gueret, Alexandre; El Moghrabi, Soumaya; Ouvrard-Pascaud, Antoine; Berger, Stefan; Challande, Pascal; Jaffe, Iris Z.; Labat, Carlos; Lacolley, Patrick; Jaisser, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Arterial stiffness is recognized as a risk factor for many cardiovascular diseases. Aldosterone via its binding to and activation of the mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) is a main regulator of blood pressure by controlling renal sodium reabsorption. Although both clinical and experimental data indicate that MR activation by aldosterone is involved in arterial stiffening, the molecular mechanism is not known. In addition to the kidney, MR is expressed in both endothelial and vascular smooth m...

  7. Akt1/PKB upregulation leads to vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy and polyploidization

    OpenAIRE

    Hixon, Mary L.; Muro-Cacho, Carlos; Wagner, Mark W.; Obejero-Paz, Carlos; Millie, Elise; Fujio, Yasushi; Kureishi, Yasuko; Hassold, Terry; Walsh, Kenneth; Gualberto, Antonio

    2000-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) at capacitance arteries of hypertensive individuals and animals undergo marked age- and blood pressure–dependent polyploidization and hypertrophy. We show here that VSMCs at capacitance arteries of rat models of hypertension display high levels of Akt1/PKB protein and activity. Gene transfer of Akt1 to VSMCs isolated from a normotensive rat strain was sufficient to abrogate the activity of the mitotic spindle cell–cycle checkpoint, promoting polyploidizati...

  8. Effects of platelet-derived growth factor on the function of smooth muscle cells from different orders of pulmonary artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    国桓

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the functional responses of normal rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells(PASMCs)from different orders of pulmonary artery to the platelet-derived growth factor(PDGF).Methods The pulmonary artery branches were gently isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats(250-350 g)and eventually cut into three groups according to the vascular grading:the

  9. Versican accumulates in vascular lesions in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ya-Ting; Chan, Christina K; Eriksson, Inger; Johnson, Pamela Y; Cao, Xiaofang; Westöö, Christian; Norvik, Christian; Andersson-Sjöland, Annika; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Johansson, Staffan; Hedin, Ulf; Kjellén, Lena; Wight, Thomas N; Tran-Lundmark, Karin

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a lethal condition for which there is no effective curative pharmacotherapy. PAH is characterized by vasoconstriction, wall thickening of pulmonary arteries, and increased vascular resistance. Versican is a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in the vascular extracellular matrix that accumulates following vascular injury and promotes smooth-muscle cell proliferation in systemic arteries. Here, we investigated whether versican may play a similar role in PAH. Paraffin-embedded lung sections from patients who underwent lung transplantation to treat PAH were used for immunohistochemistry. The etiologies of PAH in the subjects involved in this study were idiopathic PAH, scleroderma, and congenital heart disease (atrial septal defect) with left-to-right shunt. Independent of the underlying etiology, increased versican immunostaining was observed in areas of medial thickening, in neointima, and in plexiform lesions. Western blot of lung tissue lysates confirmed accumulation of versican in patients with PAH. Double staining for versican and CD45 showed only occasional colocalization in neointima of high-grade lesions and plexiform lesions. In vitro, metabolic labeling with [(35)S]sulfate showed that human pulmonary artery smooth-muscle cells (hPASMCs) produce mainly chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. In addition, hypoxia, but not cyclic stretch, was demonstrated to increase both versican messenger RNA expression and protein synthesis by hPASMCs. Versican accumulates in vascular lesions of PAH, and the amount of versican correlates more with lesion severity than with underlying etiology or inflammation. Hypoxia is a possible regulator of versican accumulation, which may promote proliferation of pulmonary smooth-muscle cells and vascular remodeling in PAH. PMID:27683612

  10. Arterial Myogenic Activation through Smooth Muscle Filamin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Retailleau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the filamin A (FlnA gene are frequently associated with severe arterial abnormalities, although the physiological role for this cytoskeletal element remains poorly understood in vascular cells. We used a conditional mouse model to selectively delete FlnA in smooth muscle (sm cells at the adult stage, thus avoiding the developmental effects of the knockout. Basal blood pressure was significantly reduced in conscious smFlnA knockout mice. Remarkably, pressure-dependent tone of the resistance caudal artery was lost, whereas reactivity to vasoconstrictors was preserved. Impairment of the myogenic behavior was correlated with a lack of calcium influx in arterial myocytes upon an increase in intraluminal pressure. Notably, the stretch activation of CaV1.2 was blunted in the absence of smFlnA. In conclusion, FlnA is a critical upstream element of the signaling cascade underlying the myogenic tone. These findings allow a better understanding of the molecular basis of arterial autoregulation and associated disease states.

  11. Sympathetically evoked Ca2+ signaling in arterial smooth muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-jin ZANG; Joseph ZACHARIA; Christine LAMONT; Withrow Gil WIER

    2006-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system plays an essential role in the control of total peripheral vascular resistance and blood flow, by controlling the contraction of small arteries. Perivascular sympathetic nerves release ATP, norepinephrine (NE) and neuropeptide Y. This review summarizes our knowledge of the intracellular Ca2+ signals that are activated by ATP and NE, acting respectively on P2X1 and α1 adrenoceptors in arterial smooth muscle. Each neurotransmitter produces a unique type of post-synaptic Ca2+ signal and associated contraction. The neural release of ATP and NE is thought to vary markedly with the pattern of nerve activity, probably reflecting both pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms. Finally, we show that Ca2+ signaling during neurogenic contractions activated by trains of sympathetic nerve fiber action potentials are in fact significantly different from that elicited by simple bath application of exogenous neurotransmitters to isolated arteries (a common experimental technique), and end by identifying important questions remaining in our understanding of sympathetic neurotransmission and the physiological regulation of contraction of small arteries.

  12. Functional preservation of vascular smooth muscle tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, W. C.; Hutchins, P. M.; Kimzey, S. L.

    1973-01-01

    The ionic and cellular feedback relationships operating to effect the vascular decompensatory modifications were examined to reveal procedures for implementing protective measures guarding against vascular collapse when returning from a weightless environment to that of the earth's gravity. The surgical procedures for preparing the rat cremaster, and the fixation methods are described. Abstracts of publications resulting from this research are included.

  13. Piperine Congeners as Inhibitors of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mair, Christina E; Liu, Rongxia; Atanasov, Atanas G; Wimmer, Laurin; Nemetz-Fiedler, Daniel; Sider, Nadine; Heiss, Elke H; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Dirsch, Verena M; Rollinger, Judith M

    2015-08-01

    Successful vascular healing after percutaneous coronary interventions is related to the inhibition of abnormal vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and efficient re-endothelialization. In the search for vascular smooth muscle cell anti-proliferative agents from natural sources we identified piperine (1), the main pungent constituent of the fruits from Piper nigrum (black pepper). Piperine inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation with an IC50 of 21.6 µM, as quantified by a resazurin conversion assay. Investigations of ten piperamides isolated from black pepper fruits and 15 synthesized piperine derivatives resulted in the identification of three potent vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation inhibitors: the natural alkaloid pipertipine (4), and the two synthetic derivatives (2E,4E)-N,N-dibutyl-5-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)penta-2,4-dienamide (14) and (E)-N,N-dibutyl-3-(naphtho[2,3-d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl)acrylamide (20). They showed IC50 values of 3.38, 6.00, and 7.85 µM, respectively. Furthermore, the synthetic compound (2E,4E)-5-(4-fluorophenyl)-1-(piperidin-1-yl)penta-2,4-dien-1-one (12) was found to be cell type selective, by inhibiting vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation with an IC50 of 11.8 µM without influencing the growth of human endothelial cells. PMID:26132851

  14. Disruption of TGF-β signaling in smooth muscle cell prevents flow-induced vascular remodeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fu [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China); Chambon, Pierre [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (CNRS UMR7104, INSERM U596, ULP, Collége de France) and Institut Clinique de la Souris, ILLKIRCH, Strasbourg (France); Tellides, George [Department of Surgery, Interdepartmental Program in Vascular Biology and Therapeutics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Kong, Wei [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Basic Medical College of Peking University, Beijing (China); Zhang, Xiaoming, E-mail: rmygxgwk@163.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China); Li, Wei [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • TGF-β signaling in SMC contributes to the flow-induced vascular remodeling. • Disruption of TGF-β signaling in SMC can prevent this process. • Targeting SM-specific Tgfbr2 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for vascular remodeling. - Abstract: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling has been prominently implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling, especially the initiation and progression of flow-induced vascular remodeling. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the principal resident cells in arterial wall and are critical for arterial remodeling. However, the role of TGF-β signaling in SMC for flow-induced vascular remodeling remains unknown. Therefore, the goal of our study was to determine the effect of TGF-β pathway in SMC for vascular remodeling, by using a genetical smooth muscle-specific (SM-specific) TGF-β type II receptor (Tgfbr2) deletion mice model. Mice deficient in the expression of Tgfbr2 (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup f/f}) and their corresponding wild-type background mice (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup WT/WT}) underwent partial ligation of left common carotid artery for 1, 2, or 4 weeks. Then the carotid arteries were harvested and indicated that the disruption of Tgfbr2 in SMC provided prominent inhibition of vascular remodeling. And the thickening of carotid media, proliferation of SMC, infiltration of macrophage, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) were all significantly attenuated in Tgfbr2 disruption mice. Our study demonstrated, for the first time, that the TGF-β signaling in SMC plays an essential role in flow-induced vascular remodeling and disruption can prevent this process.

  15. Hypoxia, vascular smooth muscles and endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin K. Chan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia, or the lack of oxygen, has multiple impacts on the vascular system. The major molecular sensors for hypoxia at the cellular level are hypoxia inducible factor and heme oxygenase. Hypoxia also acts on the vasculature directly conveying its damaging effects through disruption of the control of vascular tone, particularly in the coronary circulation, enhancement of inflammatory responses and activation of coagulation pathways. These effects could be particularly detrimental under pathological conditions such as obstructive sleep apnea and other breathing disorders.

  16. Advance in molecular imaging research of vascular smooth muscle cells in the vascular diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are the primary cells within the vascular wall structure and maintain the tension of blood vessels, playing a key role in the restenosis, atherosclerosis and some other vascular diseases. With the development of molecular imaging, VSMCs cellular level of imaging studies is becoming more and more attention. The phenotype modulation, proliferation, migration and molecular imaging research progress of VSMCs in pathologic state were reviewed, to improve the management of vascular restenosis and atherosclerosis. (authors)

  17. Vascular smooth muscle cell-derived adiponectin: a paracrine regulator of contractile phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Min; Carrao, Ana Catarina; Wagner, Robert J.; Xie, Yi; Jin, Yu; Rzucidlo, Eva M.; Yu, Jun; Li, Wei; Tellides, George; Hwa, John; Aprahamian, Tamar R.; Martin, Kathleen A.

    2011-01-01

    Adiponectin is a cardioprotective adipokine derived predominantly from visceral fat. We recently demonstrated that exogenous adiponectin induces vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) differentiation via repression of mTORC1 and FoxO4. Here we report for the first time that VSMC express and secrete adiponectin, which acts in an autocrine and paracrine manner to regulate VSMC contractile phenotype. Adiponectin was found to be expressed in human coronary artery and mouse aortic VSMC. Importantly, s...

  18. The Fat1 cadherin integrates vascular smooth muscle cell growth and migration signals

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Rong; Liu, Liming; Anees, Syed; Hiroyasu, Shungo; Sibinga, Nicholas E. S.

    2006-01-01

    The significance of cadherin superfamily proteins in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) biology is undefined. Here we describe recent studies of the Fat1 protocadherin. Fat1 expression in VSMCs increases significantly after arterial injury or growth factor stimulation. Fat1 knockdown decreases VSMC migration in vitro, but surprisingly, enhances cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Despite limited similarity to classical cadherins, the Fat1 intracellular domain (Fat1IC) interacts with β-cat...

  19. Cinematographic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cell interactions with extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, M; Baldor, L

    1991-01-01

    The interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells with growth modulators and extracellular matrix molecules may play a role in the proliferation and migration of these cells after vascular injury and during the development of atherosclerosis. Time-lapse cinematographic techniques have been used to study cell division and migration of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells in response to matrix molecules consisting of solubilized basement membrane (Matrigel) and type I collagen. When cells were grown adjacent to Matrigel, both migration and cell proliferation were increased and interdivision time was shortened. Cells grown in Matrigel or in type I collagen had markedly reduced migration rates but interdivision time was not altered. Further, diffusible components of the Matrigel were found to stimulate proliferation of the smooth muscle cells.

  20. Effects of One Resistance Exercise Session on Vascular Smooth Muscle of Hypertensive Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da; Mota, Marcelo Mendonça; Fontes, Milene Tavares; Araújo, João Eliakim dos Santos; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi; Santos, Márcio Roberto Viana, E-mail: marciorvsantos@bol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Universidade de São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    Hypertension is a public health problem and increases the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. To evaluate the effects of a resistance exercise session on the contractile and relaxing mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle in mesenteric arteries of N{sup G}-nitro L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME)-induced hypertensive rats. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (C), hypertensive (H), and exercised hypertensive (EH). Hypertension was induced by administration of 20 mg/kg of L-NAME for 7 days prior to experimental protocols. The resistance exercise protocol consisted of 10 sets of 10 repetitions and intensity of 40% of one repetition maximum. The reactivity of vascular smooth muscle was evaluated by concentration‑response curves to phenylephrine (PHEN), potassium chloride (KCl) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Rats treated with L-NAME showed an increase (p < 0.001) in systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) compared to the initial period of induction. No difference in PHEN sensitivity was observed between groups H and EH. Acute resistance exercise reduced (p < 0.001) the contractile response induced by KCl at concentrations of 40 and 60 mM in group EH. Greater (p < 0.01) smooth muscle sensitivity to NPS was observed in group EH as compared to group H. One resistance exercise session reduces the contractile response induced by KCl in addition to increasing the sensitivity of smooth muscle to NO in mesenteric arteries of hypertensive rats.

  1. Notch signal reception is required in vascular smooth muscle cells for ductus arteriosus closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Luke T; Norton, Christine R; Gridley, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The ductus arteriosus is an arterial vessel that shunts blood flow away from the lungs during fetal life, but normally occludes after birth to establish the adult circulation pattern. Failure of the ductus arteriosus to close after birth is termed patent ductus arteriosus, and is one of the most common congenital heart defects. Our previous work demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cell expression of the Jag1 gene, which encodes a ligand for Notch family receptors, is essential for postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice. However, it was not known what cell population was responsible for receiving the Jag1-mediated signal. Here we show, using smooth muscle cell-specific deletion of the Rbpj gene, which encodes a transcription factor that mediates all canonical Notch signaling, that Notch signal reception in the vascular smooth muscle cell compartment is required for ductus arteriosus closure. These data indicate that homotypic vascular smooth muscle cell interactions are required for proper contractile smooth muscle cell differentiation and postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice.

  2. KCNQ Modulators Reveal a Key Role for KCNQ Potassium Channels in Regulating the Tone of Rat Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, Shreena; Sedivy, Vojtech; Hodyc, Daniel; Herget, Jan; Gurney, Alison M

    2009-01-01

    Potassium channels are central to the regulation of pulmonary vascular tone. The smooth muscle cells of pulmonary artery display a background K+ conductance with biophysical properties resembling those of KCNQ (KV7) potassium channels. Therefore, we investigated the expression and functional role of KCNQ channels in pulmonary artery. The effects of selective KCNQ channel modulators were investigated on K+ current and membrane potential in isolated pulmonary artery smoo...

  3. Piezo1 in Smooth Muscle Cells Is Involved in Hypertension-Dependent Arterial Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Retailleau

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The mechanically activated non-selective cation channel Piezo1 is a determinant of vascular architecture during early development. Piezo1-deficient embryos die at midgestation with disorganized blood vessels. However, the role of stretch-activated ion channels (SACs in arterial smooth muscle cells in the adult remains unknown. Here, we show that Piezo1 is highly expressed in myocytes of small-diameter arteries and that smooth-muscle-specific Piezo1 deletion fully impairs SAC activity. While Piezo1 is dispensable for the arterial myogenic tone, it is involved in the structural remodeling of small arteries. Increased Piezo1 opening has a trophic effect on resistance arteries, influencing both diameter and wall thickness in hypertension. Piezo1 mediates a rise in cytosolic calcium and stimulates activity of transglutaminases, cross-linking enzymes required for the remodeling of small arteries. In conclusion, we have established the connection between an early mechanosensitive process, involving Piezo1 in smooth muscle cells, and a clinically relevant arterial remodeling.

  4. SGLT inhibitors attenuate NO-dependent vascular relaxation in the pulmonary artery but not in the coronary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ying; Cho, Young-Eun; Ayon, Ramon; Guo, Rui; Youssef, Katia D; Pan, Minglin; Dai, Anzhi; Yuan, Jason X-J; Makino, Ayako

    2015-11-01

    Inhibitors of sodium-glucose cotransporter (SGLT)2 are a new class of oral drugs for type 2 diabetic patients that reduce plasma glucose levels by inhibiting renal glucose reabsorption. There is increasing evidence showing the beneficial effect of SGLT2 inhibitors on glucose control; however, less information is available regarding the impact of SGLT2 inhibitors on cardiovascular outcomes. The present study was designed to determine whether SGLT inhibitors regulate vascular relaxation in mouse pulmonary and coronary arteries. Phlorizin (a nonspecific SGLT inhibitor) and canagliflozin (a SGLT2-specific inhibitor) relaxed pulmonary arteries in a dose-dependent manner, but they had little or no effect on coronary arteries. Pretreatment with phlorizin or canagliflozin significantly inhibited sodium nitroprusside (SNP; a nitric oxide donor)-induced vascular relaxation in pulmonary arteries but not in coronary arteries. Phlorizin had no effect on cGMP-dependent relaxation in pulmonary arteries. SNP induced membrane hyperpolarization in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, and pretreatment of cells with phlorizin and canagliflozin attenuated SNP-induced membrane hyperpolarization by decreasing K(+) activities induced by SNP. Contrary to the result observed in ex vivo experiments with SGLT inhibitors, SNP-dependent relaxation in pulmonary arteries was not altered by chronic administration of canagliflozin. On the other hand, canagliflozin administration significantly enhanced SNP-dependent relaxation in coronary arteries in diabetic mice. These data suggest that SGLT inhibitors differentially regulate vascular relaxation depending on the type of arteries, duration of the treatment, and health condition, such as diabetes. PMID:26361875

  5. Differential response of human fetal smooth muscle cells from arterial duct to retinoid acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-hui WU; Shao-jun XU; Jian-ying TENG; Wei WU; Du-yun YE; Xing-zhong WU

    2008-01-01

    Aim:The aim of the present study was to understand the role of retinoic acid (RA) in the development of isolated patent ductus arteriosus and the features of arterial duct-derived vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Methods:The VSMC were isolated, and the biological characteristics and the response to RA were investi-gated in the arterial duct, aorta, and pulmonary artery VSMC from 6 human embry-onic samples. Western blotting, immunostaining, and cell-based ELISA were em-ployed to analyze the proliferation regulation of VSMC. Results:The VSMC from the arterial duct expressed proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) at a signifi-cantly lower rate than those from the aorta and pulmonary artery, but expressed a higher level of Bax and Bcl-2. The expression level of PCNA or Bcl-2 was associ-ated with the embryonic age. The effects of RA on the VSMC from the arterial duct were quite different from those from the aorta and pulmonary artery. In arterial duct VSMC, RA stimulated PCNA expression, but such stimulation could be sup-pressed by CD2366, an antagonist of nuclear retinoid receptor activation. In aorta or pulmonary artery VSMC, the expression response of PCNA to RA was insignificant. The ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 decreased in arterial duct VSMC after RA treatment due to the significant inhibition of Bax expression. Conclusion:The VSMC from the arterial duct possessed distinct biological behaviors. RA might be important in the development of ductus arteriosus VSMC.

  6. Establishment of artery smooth muscle cell proliferation model after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-jie CHEN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The current paper aims to simulate the effects of hemolytic products on intracranial vascular smooth muscle cell after subarachnoid hemorrhage(SAH,and probe into the molecular mechanism and strategy for the prevention and cure of vascular proliferation after SAH.Methods Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups,including sham-operated,24 h after SAH,and 72 h after SAH groups.The artificial hemorrhage model around the common carotid artery was established for the latter two groups.The animals were put to death after 24 h and 72 h to take the common carotid artery,and to measure the expression level of PCNA,SM-α-actin protein,and mRNA in the smooth muscle cell.Results The PCNA mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated in the 24-h group(P < 0.01.The expression in the 72-h group was lower than that of the 24-h group(P < 0.01,whereas it was still remarkably higher than that of the sham group(P < 0.01.The SM-α-actin mRNA expression in the smooth muscle cell in the 24-h and 72-h groups decreased compared with that of the Sham group(P < 0.05,whereas the 72-h group was significantly lower than that of the 24-h group(P < 0.05.The protein expression of PCNA and SM-α-actin showed a similar trend.Conclusion The current experiment simulates better effects of the hemolytic products on vascular smooth muscle cell after SAH.It also shows that artificial hemorrhage around the common carotid artery could stimulate vascular smooth muscle cell to change from contractile phenotype into synthetic phenotype,and improve it to proliferate.

  7. Effects of tetrandrine on phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells and expression of p38 MAPK as well as MKP-1 after intimal injury of rabbit carotid arteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinping Zhang; Lihong Xiang; Yibai Feng; Yongzhi Deng; Zhuolin Fu; Chunzhi Shi; Xiang Gu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of tetrandrine (Tet) on phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and expression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) as well as mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1(MKP-1) after vascular intimal injury. Methods: HE staining was used to analyze vascular morphology of sham-injured group, injured group and Tet-treated group at day 28. Immunohistochemistry, Western blot and RT-PCR were respectively used to detect the expression change of smooth muscle α-actin (SMα-actin), proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), p38MAPK and MKP-1 of injured group and Tet neointimal area was significantly increased and the lumen area notably decreased in injured group at day 28. The neointimal proliferation in Tet treated group was less than that in injured group, and the lumen area of Tet group was significantly increased than that of injured group was no difference, and the neointimal proliferation condition was also basically as same as injured group at day 7 after injury. The expression of PCNA and p38MAKP in Tet group was obviously lower than that in injured group, and the expression of MKP-1 in Tet group was obviously higher than that in injured group at days 14 and 28 after injury. The expression of SMa-actin in Tet group was slightly higher than that in injured group at days 14 and 28 after injury. Conclusions: Tet could reduce neointimal proliferation by inhibiting VSMCs phenotypic modulation and p38MAPK signaling transduction pathway as well as its down regulation.

  8. Mechanisms of Vascular Smooth Muscle NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) Contribution to Injury-induced Neointimal Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, M. Y.; San Martin, Alejandra; Mehta, P. K.; Dikalova, A. E.; Garrido, A. M.; Datla, S. R.; Lyons, Erin; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Banfi, Botond; Lambeth, J D; Lassegue, Bernard; Griendling, K. K.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Vascular NADPH oxidases (Noxes) have been implicated in cardiovascular diseases; however, the importance of individual Nox homologues remains unclear. Here, the role of the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) Nox1 in neointima formation was studied using genetically modified animal models. METHODS AND RESULTS: Wire injury-induced neointima formation in the femoral artery, along with proliferation and apoptosis, was reduced in Nox1(y/-) mice, but there was little difference in Tg(SMC...

  9. Healing arterial ulcers: Endothelial lining regeneration upon vascular denudation injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Austin I; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa

    2015-09-01

    Thrombosis and restenosis are the most prevalent late complications of coronary artery stenting. Current standards of clinical care focus on prevention of smooth muscle cell proliferation by the use of drug-eluting stents able to release anti-proliferative drugs. Unfortunately, these drugs also block endothelial cell proliferation and, in this manner, prevent recovery of endothelial cell coverage. Continued lack of endothelial repair leaves the root cause of thrombosis and restenosis unchanged, creating a vicious cycle where drug-mediated prevention of restenosis simultaneously implies promotion of thrombosis. In this issue of Vascular Pharmacology, Hussner and colleagues provide in vitro evidence and a mechanistic basis for the use of atorvastatin in stents as a way to bypass this roadblock. Here we review the pathological mechanisms and therapeutic approaches to restore flow in occluded arteries. We argue that rational design of drug eluting stents should focus on specific inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation with concurrent stimulation of endothelial regeneration. We comment on the current poor understanding of the cellular and molecular regulation of endothelial cell proliferation in the context of a functional artery, and on the pitfalls of extrapolating from the well-studied process of neovascularization by sprouting vessel formation.

  10. Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery: An Unusual Cause of Vascular Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananya Panda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulsatile tinnitus is generally of vascular origin and can be due to arterial, venous, or systemic causes. While certain congenital anatomical variants and arterial vascular loops have been commonly found in symptomatic patients undergoing imaging, persistent primitive trigeminal artery in association with isolated tinnitus is unusual. Thus we report a patient with unilateral isolated pulsatile tinnitus who was evaluated with magnetic resonance angiography and was found to have a persistent primitive trigeminal artery. We also briefly discuss vascular tinnitus as well as the embryology, imaging, and classification of persistent primitive trigeminal artery with the clinical implications.

  11. Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery: An Unusual Cause of Vascular Tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Arundeep; Jana, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus is generally of vascular origin and can be due to arterial, venous, or systemic causes. While certain congenital anatomical variants and arterial vascular loops have been commonly found in symptomatic patients undergoing imaging, persistent primitive trigeminal artery in association with isolated tinnitus is unusual. Thus we report a patient with unilateral isolated pulsatile tinnitus who was evaluated with magnetic resonance angiography and was found to have a persistent primitive trigeminal artery. We also briefly discuss vascular tinnitus as well as the embryology, imaging, and classification of persistent primitive trigeminal artery with the clinical implications. PMID:24459596

  12. Persistent primitive trigeminal artery: an unusual cause of vascular tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Ananya; Arora, Arundeep; Jana, Manisha

    2013-01-01

    Pulsatile tinnitus is generally of vascular origin and can be due to arterial, venous, or systemic causes. While certain congenital anatomical variants and arterial vascular loops have been commonly found in symptomatic patients undergoing imaging, persistent primitive trigeminal artery in association with isolated tinnitus is unusual. Thus we report a patient with unilateral isolated pulsatile tinnitus who was evaluated with magnetic resonance angiography and was found to have a persistent primitive trigeminal artery. We also briefly discuss vascular tinnitus as well as the embryology, imaging, and classification of persistent primitive trigeminal artery with the clinical implications. PMID:24459596

  13. Effects of One Resistance Exercise Session on Vascular Smooth Muscle of Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharciano Luiz Teixeira Braga da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Hypertension is a public health problem and increases the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Objective: To evaluate the effects of a resistance exercise session on the contractile and relaxing mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle in mesenteric arteries of NG-nitro L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME-induced hypertensive rats. Methods: Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control (C, hypertensive (H, and exercised hypertensive (EH. Hypertension was induced by administration of 20 mg/kg of L-NAME for 7 days prior to experimental protocols. The resistance exercise protocol consisted of 10 sets of 10 repetitions and intensity of 40% of one repetition maximum. The reactivity of vascular smooth muscle was evaluated by concentration‑response curves to phenylephrine (PHEN, potassium chloride (KCl and sodium nitroprusside (SNP. Results: Rats treated with L-NAME showed an increase (p < 0.001 in systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP and mean arterial pressure (MAP compared to the initial period of induction. No difference in PHEN sensitivity was observed between groups H and EH. Acute resistance exercise reduced (p < 0.001 the contractile response induced by KCl at concentrations of 40 and 60 mM in group EH. Greater (p < 0.01 smooth muscle sensitivity to NPS was observed in group EH as compared to group H. Conclusion: One resistance exercise session reduces the contractile response induced by KCl in addition to increasing the sensitivity of smooth muscle to NO in mesenteric arteries of hypertensive rats.

  14. Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 as a Potential Mediator of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration and Chronic Vascular Remodeling in Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, V A; Guimarães, Danielle A; Castro, Michele Mazzaron

    2015-01-01

    For vascular remodeling in hypertension, it is essential that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) reshape in order to proliferate and migrate. The extracellular matrix (ECM) needs to be degraded to favor VSMC migration. Many proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), contribute to ECM proteolysis and VSMC migration. Bioactive peptides, hemodynamic forces and reactive oxygen-nitrogen species regulate MMP-2 expression and activity. Increased MMP-2 activity contributes to hypertension-induced maladaptive arterial changes and sustained hypertension. New ECM is synthesized to supply VSMCs with bioactive mediators, which stimulate hypertrophy. MMP-2 stimulates the interaction of VSMCs with newly formed ECM, which triggers intracellular signaling via integrins to induce a phenotypic switch and persistent migration. VSMCs switch from a contractile to a synthetic phenotype in order to migrate and contribute to vascular remodeling in hypertension. MMPs also disrupt growth factors bound to ECM, thus contributing to their capacity to regulate VSMC migration. This review sheds light on the proteolytic effects of MMP-2 on ECM and non-ECM substrates in the vasculature and how these effects contribute to VSMC migration in hypertension. The inhibition of MMP activity as a therapeutic target may make it possible to reduce arterial maladaptation caused by hypertension and prevent the resulting fatal cardiovascular events. PMID:26731549

  15. IP3 receptors regulate vascular smooth muscle contractility and hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qingsong; Zhao, Guiling; Fang, Xi; Peng, Xiaohong; Tang, Huayuan; Wang, Hong; Jing, Ran; Liu, Jie; Ouyang, Kunfu

    2016-01-01

    Inositol 1, 4, 5-trisphosphate receptor–mediated (IP3R-mediated) calcium (Ca2+) release has been proposed to play an important role in regulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) contraction for decades. However, whether and how IP3R regulates blood pressure in vivo remains unclear. To address these questions, we have generated a smooth muscle–specific IP3R triple-knockout (smTKO) mouse model using a tamoxifen-inducible system. In this study, the role of IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in adult VSMCs on aortic vascular contractility and blood pressure was assessed following tamoxifen induction. We demonstrated that deletion of IP3Rs significantly reduced aortic contractile responses to vasoconstrictors, including phenylephrine, U46619, serotonin, and endothelin 1. Deletion of IP3Rs also dramatically reduced the phosphorylation of MLC20 and MYPT1 induced by U46619. Furthermore, although the basal blood pressure of smTKO mice remained similar to that of wild-type controls, the increase in systolic blood pressure upon chronic infusion of angiotensin II was significantly attenuated in smTKO mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate an important role for IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in VSMCs in regulating vascular contractility and hypertension.

  16. Vascular Smooth Muscle Sirtuin-1 Protects Against Diet-Induced Aortic Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Jessica L; Al Sayah, Leona; Weisbrod, Robert M; Van Roy, Isabelle; Weng, Xiang; Cohen, Richard A; Bachschmid, Markus M; Seta, Francesca

    2016-09-01

    Arterial stiffness, a major cardiovascular risk factor, develops within 2 months in mice fed a high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS) diet, serving as a model of human metabolic syndrome, and it is associated with activation of proinflammatory and oxidant pathways in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. Sirtuin-1 (SirT1) is an NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase regulated by the cellular metabolic status. Our goal was to study the effects of VSM SirT1 on arterial stiffness in the context of diet-induced metabolic syndrome. Overnight fasting acutely decreased arterial stiffness, measured in vivo by pulse wave velocity, in mice fed HFHS for 2 or 8 months, but not in mice lacking SirT1 in VSM (SMKO). Similarly, VSM-specific genetic SirT1 overexpression (SMTG) prevented pulse wave velocity increases induced by HFHS feeding, during 8 months. Administration of resveratrol or S17834, 2 polyphenolic compounds known to activate SirT1, prevented HFHS-induced arterial stiffness and were mimicked by global SirT1 overexpression (SirT1 bacterial artificial chromosome overexpressor), without evident metabolic improvements. In addition, HFHS-induced pulse wave velocity increases were reversed by 1-week treatment with a specific, small molecule SirT1 activator (SRT1720). These beneficial effects of pharmacological or genetic SirT1 activation, against HFHS-induced arterial stiffness, were associated with a decrease in nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) activation and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) and p47phox protein expressions, in aorta and VSM cells. In conclusion, VSM SirT1 activation decreases arterial stiffness in the setting of obesity by stimulating anti-inflammatory and antioxidant pathways in the aorta. SirT1 activators may represent a novel therapeutic approach to prevent arterial stiffness and associated cardiovascular complications in overweight/obese individuals with metabolic syndrome. PMID:27432859

  17. In vitro differentiation of porcine aortic vascular precursor cells to endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaniboni, Andrea; Bernardini, Chiara; Bertocchi, Martina; Zannoni, Augusta; Bianchi, Francesca; Avallone, Giancarlo; Mangano, Chiara; Sarli, Giuseppe; Calzà, Laura; Bacci, Maria Laura; Forni, Monica

    2015-09-01

    Recent findings suggest that progenitor and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are associated with vascular niches. Cells displaying mesenchymal properties and differentiating to whole components of a functional blood vessel, including endothelial and smooth muscle cells, can be defined as vascular stem cells (VSCs). Recently, we isolated a population of porcine aortic vascular precursor cells (pAVPCs), which have MSC- and pericyte-like properties. The aim of the present work was to investigate whether pAVPCs possess VSC-like properties and assess their differentiation potential toward endothelial and smooth muscle lineages. pAVPCs, maintained in a specific pericyte growth medium, were cultured in high-glucose DMEM + 10% FBS (long-term medium, LTM) or in human endothelial serum-free medium + 5% FBS and 50 ng/ml of hVEGF (endothelial differentiation medium, EDM). After 21 days of culture in LTM, pAVPCs showed an elongated fibroblast-like morphology, and they seem to organize in cord-like structures. qPCR analysis of smooth muscle markers [α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), calponin, and smooth muscle myosin (SMM) heavy chain] showed a significant increment of the transcripts, and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the presence of α-SMA and SMM proteins. After 21 days of culture in EDM, pAVPCs displayed an endothelial cell-like morphology and revealed the upregulation of the expression of endothelial markers (CD31, vascular endothelial-cadherin, von Willebrand factor, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase) showing the CD31-typical pattern. In conclusion, pAVPCs could be defined as a VSC-like population considering that, if they are maintained in a specific pericyte medium, they express MSC markers, and they have, in addition to the classical mesenchymal trilineage differentiation potential, the capacity to differentiate in vitro toward the smooth muscle and the endothelial cell phenotypes. PMID:26135800

  18. Bone morphogenetic proteins regulate osteoprotegerin and its ligands in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kirsten Quyen Nguyen; Olesen, Ping; Ledet, Thomas;

    2007-01-01

    ) and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in HVSMC. All three growth factors decreased OPG protein production significantly; these results were paralleled by reduced OPG mRNA expression. TRAIL mRNA levels were also decreased. RANKL mRNA expression declined when treated with TGF-beta1 but were......The bone-related protein osteoprotegerin (OPG) may be involved in the development of vascular calcifications, especially in diabetes, where it has been found in increased amounts in the arterial wall. Experimental studies suggest that members of the TGF-superfamily are involved in the...... transformation of human vascular smooth muscle cells (HVSMC) to osteoblast-like cells. In this study, we evaluated the effect of BMP-2, BMP-7 and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta1) on the secretion and mRNA expression of OPG and its ligands receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappabeta ligand (RANKL...

  19. Loss of Notch3 Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Promotes Severe Heart Failure Upon Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragot, Hélène; Monfort, Astrid; Baudet, Mathilde; Azibani, Fériel; Fazal, Loubina; Merval, Régine; Polidano, Evelyne; Cohen-Solal, Alain; Delcayre, Claude; Vodovar, Nicolas; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Samuel, Jane-Lise

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension, which is a risk factor of heart failure, provokes adaptive changes at the vasculature and cardiac levels. Notch3 signaling plays an important role in resistance arteries by controlling the maturation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Notch3 deletion is protective in pulmonary hypertension while deleterious in arterial hypertension. Although this latter phenotype was attributed to renal and cardiac alterations, the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. To investigate the role of Notch3 signaling in the cardiac adaptation to hypertension, we used mice with either constitutive Notch3 or smooth muscle cell-specific conditional RBPJκ knockout. At baseline, both genotypes exhibited a cardiac arteriolar rarefaction associated with oxidative stress. In response to angiotensin II-induced hypertension, the heart of Notch3 knockout and SM-RBPJκ knockout mice did not adapt to pressure overload and developed heart failure, which could lead to an early and fatal acute decompensation of heart failure. This cardiac maladaptation was characterized by an absence of media hypertrophy of the media arteries, the transition of smooth muscle cells toward a synthetic phenotype, and an alteration of angiogenic pathways. A subset of mice exhibited an early fatal acute decompensated heart failure, in which the same alterations were observed, although in a more rapid timeframe. Altogether, these observations indicate that Notch3 plays a major role in coronary adaptation to pressure overload. These data also show that the hypertrophy of coronary arterial media on pressure overload is mandatory to initially maintain a normal cardiac function and is regulated by the Notch3/RBPJκ pathway. PMID:27296994

  20. Multiple vascular anomalies involving testicular, suprarenal arteries and lumbar veins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Jyothsna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Testicular arteries arise from the abdominal aorta and the inferior suprarenal artery from the renal artery. There are reports about variant origin and course of these arteries. Accessory testicular artery is also a common finding but its providing origin to inferior suprarenal artery is an important observation. During a routine dissection of abdomen of approximately 55-year-old male cadaver, unique vascular abnormality was observed. On the left side, a common arterial trunk originating from abdominal aorta immediately branched to give rise to superior testicular and inferior suprarenal arteries, the former after a short course hooked by the left suprarenal vein. In addition, the left suprarenal vein, second left lumbar vein, and left testicular vein joined to form a common trunk which drained into the left renal vein. A sound knowledge of vascular variations in relation to the kidney and suprarenal gland is important to surgeons dissecting the abdominal cavity.

  1. Opioid receptor antagonists increase [Ca2+]i in rat arterial smooth muscle cells in hemorrhagic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li KAI; Zhong-feng WANG; Yu-liang SHI; Liang-ming LIU; De-yao HU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of opioid receptor antagonists and norepinephrine on intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in mesenteric arterial (MA) smooth muscle cells (SMC) isolated from normal and hemorrhagic shocked rats in the vascular hyporesponse stage. METHODS: The rat model of hemorrhagic shock was made by withdrawing blood to decrease the artery mean blood pressure to 3.73-4.26 kPa and keeping at the level for 3 h.[Ca2+]i of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) were detected by the laser scan confocal microscopy. RESULTS:In the hyporesponse VMSC of rats in hemorrhagic shock, selective δ-, κ-, and μ-opioid receptor antagonists (naltrindole, nor-binaltorphimine, and β-funaltrexamine, 100 nmol/L) as well as norepinephrine 5 μmol/L significantly increased [Ca2+]i by 47 %±13 %, 37 %±14 %, 33 %±10 %, and 54 %±17 %, respectively, although their effects were lower than those in the normal rat cells (the increased values were 148 %±54 %, 130 %±44 %, 63 %±17 %and 110 %±38 %, respectively); and the norepinephrine-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was further augmented by three δ-, κ-, and μ-opioid receptor antagonists (50 nmol/L, respectively) application (from 52 %± 16 % to 99 %±29 %,146 %±54 % and 137 %±47 %, respectively). CONCLUSION: The disorder of [Ca2+]i regulation induced by hemorrhagic shock was mediated by opioid receptor and α-adrenoceptor, which may be partly responsible for the vascular hyporesponse, and the opioid receptor antagonists improved the response of resistance arteries to vascular stimulants in decompensatory stage of hemorrhagic shock.

  2. Atrophin Proteins Interact with the Fat1 Cadherin and Regulate Migration and Orientation in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Rong; Sibinga, Nicholas E. S.

    2009-01-01

    Fat1, an atypical cadherin induced robustly after arterial injury, has significant effects on mammalian vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) growth and migration. The related Drosophila protein Fat interacts genetically and physically with Atrophin, a protein essential for development and control of cell polarity. We hypothesized that interactions between Fat1 and mammalian Atrophin (Atr) proteins might contribute to Fat1 effects on VSMCs. Like Fat1, mammalian Atr expres...

  3. Structural properties of lipid reconstructs and lipid composition of normotensive and hypertensive rat vascular smooth muscle cell membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.R. Oliveira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple cell membrane alterations have been reported to be the cause of various forms of hypertension. The present study focuses on the lipid portion of the membranes, characterizing the microviscosity of membranes reconstituted with lipids extracted from the aorta and mesenteric arteries of spontaneously hypertensive (SHR and normotensive control rat strains (WKY and NWR. Membrane-incorporated phospholipid spin labels were used to monitor the bilayer structure at different depths. The packing of lipids extracted from both aorta and mesenteric arteries of normotensive and hypertensive rats was similar. Lipid extract analysis showed similar phospholipid composition for all membranes. However, cholesterol content was lower in SHR arteries than in normotensive animal arteries. These findings contrast with the fact that the SHR aorta is hyporeactive while the SHR mesenteric artery is hyperreactive to vasopressor agents when compared to the vessels of normotensive animal strains. Hence, factors other than microviscosity of bulk lipids contribute to the vascular smooth muscle reactivity and hypertension of SHR. The excess cholesterol in the arteries of normotensive animal strains apparently is not dissolved in bulk lipids and is not directly related to vascular reactivity since it is present in both the aorta and mesenteric arteries. The lower cholesterol concentrations in SHR arteries may in fact result from metabolic differences due to the hypertensive state or to genes that co-segregate with those that determine hypertension during the process of strain selection.

  4. Activation of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor induces endothelium-independent relaxation of coronary artery smooth muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuan; Ma, Handong; Barman, Scott A.; Liu, Alexander T.; Sellers, Minga; Stallone, John N.; Prossnitz, Eric R.; White, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogens can either relax or contract arteries via rapid, nongenomic mechanisms involving classic estrogen receptors (ER). In addition to ERα and ERβ, estrogen may also stimulate G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER) in nonvascular tissue; however, a potential role for GPER in coronary arteries is unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine how GPER activity influenced coronary artery reactivity. In vitro isometric force recordings were performed on endothelium-denuded porcine arteries. These studies were augmented by RT-PCR and single-cell patch-clamp experiments. RT-PCR and immunoblot studies confirmed expression of GPER mRNA and protein, respectively, in smooth muscle from either porcine or human coronary arteries. G-1, a selective GPER agonist, produced a concentration-dependent relaxation of endothelium-denuded porcine coronary arteries in vitro. This response was attenuated by G15, a GPER-selective antagonist, or by inhibiting large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BKCa) channels with iberiotoxin, but not by inhibiting NO signaling. Last, single-channel patch-clamp studies demonstrated that G-1 stimulates BKCa channel activity in intact smooth muscle cells from either porcine or human coronary arteries but had no effect on channels isolated in excised membrane patches. In summary, GPER activation relaxes coronary artery smooth muscle by increasing potassium efflux via BKCa channels and requires an intact cellular signaling mechanism. This novel action of estrogen-like compounds may help clarify some of the controversy surrounding the vascular effects of estrogens. PMID:21791623

  5. Simulated Hypergravity Alters Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Shameka; Bettis, Barika; Harris-Hooker, Sandra; Sanford, Gary L.

    1997-01-01

    The cellular effects of gravity are poorly understood due to its constancy and nonavailability of altered gravitational models. Such an understanding is crucial for prolonged space flights. In these studies, we assessed the influence of centrifugation at 6G (HGrav) on vascular smooth muscle (SMC) mobility and proliferation. Cells were: (a) plated at low density and subjected to HGrav for 24-72 hr for proliferation studies, or (b) grown to confluency, subjected to HGrav, mechanically denuded and monitored for cell movement into the denuded area. Controls were maintained under normogravity. SMC showed a 50% inhibition of growth under HGrav and 10% serum; HGrav and low serum resulted in greater growth inhibition. The rate of movement of SMC into the denuded area was 2-3-fold higher under HGrav in low serum compared to controls, but similar in 10% serum. These studies show that HGrav has significant effects on SMC growth and mobility, which are dependent on serum levels.

  6. Activity of sap from Croton lechleri on rat vascular and gastric smooth muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froldi, G; Zagotto, G; Filippini, R; Montopoli, M; Dorigo, P; Caparrotta, L

    2009-08-01

    The effects of red sap from Croton lechleri (SdD), Euphorbiaceae, on vascular and gastric smooth muscles were investigated. SdD, from 10 to 1000 microg/ml, induced concentration-dependent vasoconstriction in rat caudal arteries, which was endothelium-independent. In arterial preparations pre-constricted by phenylephrine (0.1 microM) or KCl (30 mM), SdD also produced concentration-dependent vasoconstriction. To study the mechanisms implicated in this effect we used selective inhibitors such as prazosin (0.1 microM), an antagonist of alpha(1)-adrenoceptors, atropine (0.1 microM), an antagonist of muscarinic receptors, and ritanserin (50 nM), a 5-HT(2A) antagonist; none of these influenced vasoconstriction caused by SdD. Likewise, nifedipine (50 nM), an inhibitor of L-type calcium channels, did not modify the action of SdD. Capsaicin (100 nM), an agonist of vanilloid receptors, also did not affect vasoconstriction by SdD. We also investigated the action of SdD (10-1000 microg/ml) on rat gastric fundus; per se the sap slightly increased contractile tension. When the gastric fundus was pre-treated with SdD (100 microg/ml) the contraction induced by carbachol (1 microM) was increased, whereas that by KCl (60mM) or capsaicin (100 nM) were unchanged. The data shows that SdD increased contractile tension in a concentration-dependent way, both on vascular and gastric smooth muscles. The vasoconstriction is unrelated to alpha(1), M, 5-HT(2A) and vanilloid receptors as well as L-type calcium channels. SdD increased also contraction by carbachol on rat gastric fundus. Thus for the first time, experimental data provides evidence that sap from C. lechleri owns constricting activity on smooth muscles. PMID:19406630

  7. Advanced Glycation End-Products Induce Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells: A Mechanism for Vascular Calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayo Koike

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification, especially medial artery calcification, is associated with cardiovascular death in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD. To determine the underlying mechanism of vascular calcification, we have demonstrated in our previous report that advanced glycation end-products (AGEs stimulated calcium deposition in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs through excessive oxidative stress and phenotypic transition into osteoblastic cells. Since AGEs can induce apoptosis, in this study we investigated its role on VSMC apoptosis, focusing mainly on the underlying mechanisms. A rat VSMC line (A7r5 was cultured, and treated with glycolaldehyde-derived AGE-bovine serum albumin (AGE3-BSA. Apoptotic cells were identified by Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL staining. To quantify apoptosis, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for histone-complexed DNA fragments was employed. Real-time PCR was performed to determine the mRNA levels. Treatment of A7r5 cells with AGE3-BSA from 100 µg/mL concentration markedly increased apoptosis, which was suppressed by Nox inhibitors. AGE3-BSA significantly increased the mRNA expression of NAD(PH oxidase components including Nox4 and p22phox, and these findings were confirmed by protein levels using immunofluorescence. Dihydroethidisum assay showed that compared with cBSA, AGE3-BSA increased reactive oxygen species level in A7r5 cells. Furthermore, AGE3-induced apoptosis was significantly inhibited by siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nox4 or p22phox. Double knockdown of Nox4 and p22phox showed a similar inhibitory effect on apoptosis as single gene silencing. Thus, our results demonstrated that NAD(PH oxidase-derived oxidative stress are involved in AGEs-induced apoptosis of VSMCs. These findings might be important to understand the pathogenesis of vascular calcification in diabetes and CKD.

  8. Insulin induces PKC-dependent proliferation of mesenteric vascular smooth muscle cells from hypertensive patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xukai WANG; Yan WANG; Chenming YANG; Ying WAN; Xianwen JI

    2006-01-01

    Background and objectives Proliferation of human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) induced by hyperinsulinemia is a very common clinical pathology. Extensive research has focused on PKC (Protein kinase C)-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)intracellular signal transduction and the phenotypic modulation accompanied by reorganization of intracellular F-actins in VSMCs.Methods DNA synthesis, signaling of ERK1/2 MAPKs, and changes in α-smooth muscle (SM) actin and F-actin were studied in hypertensive and normotensive human arterial VSMCs exposed to insulin and PMA with and without the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X.Results Differences among cell types in MAPK signaling, α-SM actin, and F-actin isoforms in VSMCs harvested from the arteries of patients with essential hypertension (EH) and normotension (NT) were identified in response to insulin treatment. Proliferation and activation of MAPK were more pronounced in EH VSMCs than in NEH VSMCs. Insulin exposure decreased expression of α-SM actin and was accompanied by rearrangement of intracellular F-actins in VSMCs, especially in the EH group. These effects were reversed by treatment with the PKC inhibitor. Conclusions Human mesenteric VSMCs of EH and NT patients differed in proliferation, MAPK signaling, and degree of changes in α-SM actin and F-actin isoforms immediately following insulin exposure in vitro.

  9. Anti-Proliferative Effect of an Aqueous Extract of Prunella vulgaris in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Mi Hwang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs in arterial walls is an important pathogenic factor of vascular disorders such as diabetic atherosclerosis. We have reported the anti-inflammatory effect of an aqueous extract from Prunella vulgaris (APV in vascular endothelial cell. In the present study, APV exhibited inhibitory effects on high glucose-stimulated VSMC proliferation, migration, and invasion activities, inducing G1 cell cycle arrest with downregulation of cyclins and CDKs and upregulation of the CKIs, p21waf1/cip1 and p27kip1. Furthermore, APV dose dependently suppressed the high glucose-induced matrix metalloproteinase activity. High glucose-induced phosphorylation of ERK, p38 MAPK, was decreased by the pretreatment of APV. NF-κB activation by high glucose was attenuated by APV, as an antioxidant. APV attenuated the high glucose-induced decrease of nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2 translocation and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 expression. Intracellular cGMP level was also increased by APV treatment. These results demonstrate that APV may inhibit VSMC proliferation via downregulating ROS/NF-κB /ERK/p38 MAPK pathways. In addition, APV has a beneficial effect by the interaction of Nrf2-mediated NO/cGMP with HO-1, suggesting that Prunella vulgaris may be useful in preventing diabetic atherosclerosis.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells-derived vascular smooth muscle cells release abundant levels of osteoprotegerin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vaccarezza

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Although several studies have shown that the serum levels of osteoprotegerin (OPG are significantly elevated in patients affected with atherosclerotic lesions in coronary and peripheral arteries, the cellular source and the role of OPG in the physiopathology of atherosclerosis are not completely defined. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the potential contribution of mesenchymal stem cells in the production/release of OPG. OPG was detectable by immunohistochemistry in aortic and coronary atherosclerotic plaques, within or in proximity of intimal vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC. In addition, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC-derived vascular SMC as well as primary aortic SMC released in the culture supernatant significantly higher levels of OPG with respect to MSCderived endothelial cells (EC or primary aortic EC. On the other hand, in vitro exposure to full-length human recombinant OPG significantly increased the proliferation rate of aortic SMC cultures, as monitored by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Taken together, these data suggest that OPG acts as an autocrine/paracrine growth factor for vascular SMC, which might contribute to the progression of atherosclerotic lesions.

  11. Calmodulin kinase II is required for angiotensin II-mediated vascular smooth muscle hypertrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hui; Li, Weiwei; Arun K Gupta; Mohler, Peter J.; Anderson, Mark E.; Grumbach, Isabella M.

    2009-01-01

    Despite our understanding that medial smooth muscle hypertrophy is a central feature of vascular remodeling, the molecular pathways underlying this pathology are still not well understood. Work over the past decade has illustrated a potential role for the multifunctional calmodulin-dependent kinase CaMKII in smooth muscle cell contraction, growth, and migration. Here we demonstrate that CaMKII is enriched in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and that CaMKII inhibition blocks ANG II-dependent VSM c...

  12. Molecular mechanisms of decreased smooth muscle differentiation marker expression after vascular injury

    OpenAIRE

    Regan, Christopher P.; Adam, Paul J.; Madsen, Cort S.; Owens, Gary K.

    2000-01-01

    While it is well established that phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contributes to the development and progression of vascular lesions, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms of phenotypic modulation in vivo. Here we show that vascular injury reduces transcription of VSMC differentiation marker genes, and we identify cis regulatory elements that may mediate this decrease. Using a carotid wire-injury model in mice carrying transgenes for smooth muscle α-...

  13. Effects of ginsenosides on vascular reactivity in rat cerebral and renal arteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WONG Wing-tak; LEUNG Fung-ping; YUNG Lai-hang; TIAN Xiao-yu; WONG Ricky Ngok Shun; HUANG Yu

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate possible mechanisms underlying the antioxidant property (1) and the in vitro vasodilator effects (2) of the two ginsenosides, Rb1 and Rg1, in isolated rat renal and cerebral arteries. Methods Arterial rings were mounted in a multi-channel myograph for recording of isometric tension. To examine the antioxidant activity, some rings were exposed to a free radical-generating reaction (hypoxan-thine and xanthine oxidase) with and without pre-treatment with ginsenosides. The calcium antagonistic effects were tested on rings contracted by membrane depolarization in elevated extracellular potassium ions, a condition that promoted Ca2+ influx in vascular smooth muscle cells. Results Ginsenosides protected endothelial function (endothelial nitric oxide-dependent relaxation) against oxidative stress; (2) ginsenoside Rb1 reduced the high K+ -induced contractions of both renal and cerebral arteries while ginsenoside Rgl relaxed the rat cerebral artery but not the renal artery. Conclusions Ginsenosides are vaso-protective via (1) the antioxidant activity which protects endothelial cell function and (2) the inhibition of Ca2+ influx through voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels in vascular smooth muscle. The vasodilator effects may suggest the potential preventive or therapeutic values of ginsenosides against stroke and renal hypertension.

  14. Influence of 103Pd radioactive stent on apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the influence of 103Pd radioactive stent on apoptosis and its relative genes bcl-2 and bax in injured vascular media smooth muscle cells of rabbit abdominal arteries and to investigate the mechanism of 103Pd radioactive stent for preventing restenosis after angioplasty. Methods: Fifty male New Zealand rabbits were randomized into stent group and 103Pd stent group. Each group was subdivided into 5 sub-groups. Control group was set up. The study arteries were harvested at 3, 7, 14, 28 and 56 d after stenting and the pathomorphology, apoptosis analysis and in situ hybridization were performed to evaluate the expression of bcl-2 and bax mRNA. Results: The severity of the restenosis in 103Pd stent group was less than that of stent group. It was most obvious at the 56th day (P103Pd stent group had much more apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells than stent group did and reached the peak at the 7th day, (14.72±0.53)% vs (12.42±1.13)% (P103Pd stent group was much lower than that of stent group at 3 to 28 d. The difference was most obvious at the 28th day after stenting, (18.43± 0.67)% vs (21.55±0.93)% (P103Pd stent group was higher than that of stent group, the peak was at the 7th day, (11.17±0.94)% vs (9.30±1.01)%. The ratio of bcl-2/bax in 103Pd stent group was much lower than that of stent group at 3 to 28 d. Linear correlation analysis showed that there was significant negative correlation between bcl-2 mRNA and apoptosis. Between bax mRNA and apoptosis, the positive correlation was found (P103Pd radioactive stent induced more significant apoptosis in vascular media smooth muscle cells by promoting the expression of apoptosis related genes and relieved the expanding of restenosis

  15. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology. -- Highlights: ► CADASIL is an inherited disease of cerebral vascular cells. ► Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CADASIL. ► Lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC. ► Increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria and lower mitochondrial membrane potential in CADASIL VSMCs. ► Reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs.

  16. Experimental studies of mitochondrial function in CADASIL vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viitanen, Matti [Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Geriatrics, Turku City Hospital and University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Sundström, Erik [Division of Neurodegeneration, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Baumann, Marc [Protein Chemistry Unit, Institute of Biomedicine/Anatomy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Poyhonen, Minna [Department of Clinical Genetics, Helsinki University Hospital, HUSLAB, Helsinki (Finland); Tikka, Saara [Protein Chemistry Unit, Institute of Biomedicine/Anatomy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Behbahani, Homira, E-mail: homira.behbahani@ki.se [Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet Alzheimer' s Disease Research Center, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-02-01

    Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a familiar fatal progressive degenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline, and recurrent stroke in young adults. Pathological features include a dramatic reduction of brain vascular smooth muscle cells and severe arteriopathy with the presence of granular osmophilic material in the arterial walls. Here we have investigated the cellular and mitochondrial function in vascular smooth muscle cell lines (VSMCs) established from CADASIL mutation carriers (R133C) and healthy controls. We found significantly lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC as compared to VSMC from controls. Cultured CADASIL VSMCs were not more vulnerable than control cells to a number of toxic substances. Morphological studies showed reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. Measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ{sub m}) showed a lower percentage of fully functional mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs. For a number of genes previously reported to be changed in CADASIL VSMCs, immunoblotting analysis demonstrated a significantly reduced SOD1 expression. These findings suggest that alteration of proliferation and mitochondrial function in CADASIL VSMCs might have an effect on vital cellular functions important for CADASIL pathology. -- Highlights: ► CADASIL is an inherited disease of cerebral vascular cells. ► Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of CADASIL. ► Lower proliferation rates in CADASIL VSMC. ► Increased irregular and abnormal mitochondria and lower mitochondrial membrane potential in CADASIL VSMCs. ► Reduced mitochondrial connectivity and increased number of mitochondria in CADASIL VSMCs.

  17. Study on expression of PKC in vascular smooth muscle of rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion and interfering effect of electro-acupuncture at Shuigou%大脑中动脉梗塞大鼠大脑中动脉蛋白激酶C表达及电针水沟穴干预的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕艳; 杜元灏; 徐彦龙; 高靓; 崔景军; 杨丽红; 何娇君; 李晶

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To observe the influence of electro-acupuncture (EA) at Shuigou (GV26) on vascular smooth muscle contraction related Protein Kinase C,to discuss the regulation effect of PKC on vascular smooth muscle contraction and to reveal the molecular mechanism of vascular smooth muscle contraction underlying the acupuncture at Shuigou (GV26) via using Wistar rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model (Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion,MCAO),detecting PKC expression in the brain artery vascular smooth muscle at different time.Methods:96 healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups:model group (n=30),electro-acupuncture group (n=30),sham-operation group (n=30).Each group was further divided except control group into 0.5h,1h,3h,6h and 12h with 6 in each subgroup.Model group were set up by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery.Electro-acupuncture (15Hz,20mA) was applied to ‘Shuigou' (GV 26) for 20 minutes.The middle cerebral arteries on the infarct side of the brain were fixed in formalin,embedded with paraffin,followed by sectioning and staining with immunohistochemistry.Results:Compared with control group,PKC expression levels of model group and acupuncture group of each time-points were both increased (P<0.05).None of difference was observed between Sham-operation group and control group.Remarkable difference existed between model group and the electro-acupuncture at each time-point other than 6h and 12h (P<0.05).PKC expression level of model group was up-regulated with the increasing time-points (P<0.05).There was no difference in electro-acupuncture group between 6h and 12h other than the rest of the time-points (P<0.05).Conclusion:Upregulation of PKC expression during cerebral ischemia underlying mechanisms of MCAO and ischemia injury; PKC expression in rat model of MCAO was significantly down-regulated by EA treatment.%目的:通过检测Wistar大鼠大脑中动脉梗塞(MCAO)后,与血管平滑肌收缩相关的蛋白激酶C

  18. Quantification of Adventitial Vasa Vasorum Vascularization in Double-injury Restenotic Arteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Ye; Bai-Gen Zhang; Lan Zhang; Hui Xie; Hao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Accumulating evidence indicates a potential role of adventitial vasa vasorum (VV) dysfunction in the pathophysiology of restenosis.However,characterization ofVV vascularization in restenotic arteries with primary lesions is still missing.In this study,we quantitatively evaluated the response of adventitial VV to vascular injury resulting from balloon angioplasty in diseased arteries.Methods:Primary atherosclerotic-like lesions were induced by the placement of an absorbable thread surrounding the carotid artery of New Zealand rabbits.Four weeks following double-injury induced that was induced by secondary balloon dilation,three-dimensional patterns of adventitial VV were reconstructed;the number,density,and endothelial surface of VV were quantified using micro-computed tomography.Histology and immunohistochemistry were performed in order to examine the development of intimal hyperplasia.Results:Results from our study suggest that double injured arteries have a greater number of VV,increased luminal surface,and an elevation in the intima/media ratio (I/M),along with an accumulation ofmacrophages and smooth muscle cells in the intima,as compared to sham or single injury arteries.I/M and the number of VV were positively correlated (R2 =0.82,P < 0.001).Conclusions:Extensive adventitial VV neovascularization occurs in injured arteries after balloon angioplasty,which is associated with intimal hyperplasia.Quantitative assessment of adventitial VV response may provide insight into the basic biological process of postangioplasty restenosis.

  19. [Local vascular complications after iatrogenic femoral artery puncture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruhwirth, J; Pascher, O; Hauser, H; Amann, W

    1996-01-01

    Over a period of 5 years 81 vascular complications after 15,460 catheterizations of the femoral artery for diagnostic (n = 11,883) or therapeutic (n = 3577) procedures were registered. The following complications were observed in declining frequency: 1. False aneurysm (n = 65), 2. arterial occlusion (dissection, embolia, thrombosis) (n = 8), 3. vascular lesion causing profuse bleeding (n = 7), 4. AV-fistula (n = 1). The total complication rate was 0.52%. The complication rate was significantly higher in therapeutical procedures (1,03%) than in diagnostic investigations (0.37%). Pseudoaneurysms were complicated by thrombosis of the femoral vein (n = 3), lymphatic fistula (n = 3) and deep wound infection (n = 9); secondary complication rate 18.5%. Risk factors for local vascular complications are old age, female gender, high grade arteriosclerosis at the puncture site, overweight, manifest arterial hypertension and medication with cumarin, acetylsalicylic acid or heparin. Further complicating factors are connected with technical risks such as duration of the procedure. French size of the catheter, the catheter sheath and multiple punctures. Vascular repair was performed by simple angiography in most cases, but in 14.8% more extensive surgical procedures were required. In patients with signs of occlusive vascular disease the external iliac artery was replaced by a PTFE-vascular access graft in 4 cases and an arterioplasty of the deep femoral artery was performed in 2 patients. 36% of the operations were undertaken as emergencies. Reintervention was necessary for a postoperative bleeding complication in 1 case (surgical complication rate 1.2%). A female patient suffering from aortic valve stenosis died during emergency operation due to massive retroperitoneal hemorrhage after cardiac catheterization (mortality rate 1.2%). Over a median follow-up period of 37 months no late complications of the intervention were recorded, nor recurrences of peripheral arterial occlusive

  20. Molecular Mechanisms of Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane A. Leopold

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a devastating disease that is precipitated by hypertrophic pulmonary vascular remodeling of distal arterioles to increase pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance in the absence of left heart, lung parenchymal, or thromboembolic disease. Despite available medical therapy, pulmonary artery remodeling and its attendant hemodynamic consequences result in right ventricular dysfunction, failure, and early death. To limit morbidity and mortality, attention has focused on identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying aberrant pulmonary artery remodeling to identify pathways for intervention. While there is a well-recognized heritable genetic component to PAH, there is also evidence of other genetic perturbations, including pulmonary vascular cell DNA damage, activation of the DNA damage response, and variations in microRNA expression. These findings likely contribute, in part, to dysregulation of proliferation and apoptosis signaling pathways akin to what is observed in cancer; changes in cellular metabolism, metabolic flux, and mitochondrial function; and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition as key signaling pathways that promote pulmonary vascular remodeling. This review will highlight recent advances in the field with an emphasis on the aforementioned molecular mechanisms as contributors to the pulmonary vascular disease pathophenotype.

  1. Vascular Endothelin and Angiotensin Receptors Regulation in Inflammatory Arterial Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrijevic, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    The present thesis is aimed to examine the hypothesis that the degree of vascular inflammation correlates with the expression of vascular endothelin and angiotensin receptors. The receptor changes were studied in subcutaneous resistance arteries in patients with different degrees of ischemic heart disease (IHD). In addition, patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) were also investigated because of the massive inflammatory activity in affected vessels. For functional studies of the resistance...

  2. Effects of chronic renal failure rat serum on histone acetyltransferase p300 and activation of activating transcription factor 4 of arterial smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张耀全

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of the rat serum with chronic renal failure(CRF)on ubiquitin-proteasome pathway,histone acetyltransferase p300 and activation of activating transcription factor 4(ATF4)of rat arterial vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMCs)cultured in vitro,and explore the possible mechanism.Methods Objective To establish the rat model of

  3. Nuclear envelope proteins modulate proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells during cyclic stretch application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ying-Xin; Yao, Qing-Ping; Huang, Kai; Shi, Qian; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Guo-Liang; Han, Yue; Bao, Han; Wang, Lu; Li, Hai-Peng; Shen, Bao-Rong; Wang, Yingxiao; Chien, Shu; Jiang, Zong-Lai

    2016-05-10

    Cyclic stretch is an important inducer of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, which is crucial in vascular remodeling during hypertension. However, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. We studied the effects of emerin and lamin A/C, two important nuclear envelope proteins, on VSMC proliferation in hypertension and the underlying mechano-mechanisms. In common carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo and in cultured cells subjected to high (15%) cyclic stretch in vitro, VSMC proliferation was increased significantly, and the expression of emerin and lamin A/C was repressed compared with normotensive or normal (5%) cyclic stretch controls. Using targeted siRNA to mimic the repressed expression of emerin or lamin A/C induced by 15% stretch, we found that VSMC proliferation was enhanced under static and 5%-stretch conditions. Overexpression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed VSMC proliferation induced by 15% stretch. Hence, emerin and lamin A/C play critical roles in suppressing VSMC hyperproliferation induced by hyperstretch. ChIP-on-chip and MOTIF analyses showed that the DNAs binding with emerin contain three transcription factor motifs: CCNGGA, CCMGCC, and ABTTCCG; DNAs binding with lamin A/C contain the motifs CVGGAA, GCCGCYGC, and DAAGAAA. Protein/DNA array proved that altered emerin or lamin A/C expression modulated the activation of various transcription factors. Furthermore, accelerating local expression of emerin or lamin A/C reversed cell proliferation in the carotid artery of hypertensive rats in vivo. Our findings establish the pathogenetic role of emerin and lamin A/C repression in stretch-induced VSMC proliferation and suggest mechanobiological mechanism underlying this process that involves the sequence-specific binding of emerin and lamin A/C to specific transcription factor motifs.

  4. Magnolol inhibits migration of vascular smooth muscle cells via cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karki, Rajendra [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City (United States); Department of Oriental Medicine Resources, Mokpo National University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong-Bin [Jeollanamdo Development Institute for Korean Traditional Medicine, Jangheung gun, Jeollanamdo (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Wook, E-mail: dbkim@mokpo.ac.kr [Department of Oriental Medicine Resources, Mokpo National University (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-10

    Background: Increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contribute importantly to the formation of both atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of magnolol on VSMC migration. Methods: The proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) stimulated VSMCs was performed by gelatin zymography. VSMC migration was assessed by wound healing and Boyden chamber methods. Collagen induced VSMC adhesion was determined by spectrofluorimeter and stress fibers formation was evaluated by fluorescence microscope. The expression of signaling molecules involved in stress fibers formation was determined by western blot. The phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC20) was determined by urea-glycerol polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression of β1-integrin and collagen type I in the injured carotid arteries of rats on day 35 after vascular injury. Results: VSMC migration was strongly inhibited by magnolol without affecting MMPs expression. Also, magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, FAK phosphorylation and RhoA and Cdc42 activation to inhibit the collagen induced stress fibers formation. Moreover, magnolol inhibited the phosphorylation of MLC20. Our in vivo results showed that magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, collagen type I deposition and FAK phosphorylation in injured carotid arteries without affecting MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: Magnolol inhibited VSMC migration via inhibition of cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation. General significance: This study provides a rationale for further evaluation of magnolol for the management of atherosclerosis and restenosis. - Highlights: • Magnolol strongly inhibited migration of VSMCs. • Magnolol inhibited stress fibers formation. • MLC20 phosphorylation was also inhibited by magnolol. • Anti

  5. Control of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Growth by Connexin 43

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chintamani eJoshi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Connexin 43 (Cx43, the principal gap junction protein in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs, regulates movement of ions and other signaling molecules through gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC and plays important roles in maintaining normal vessel function; however, many of the signaling mechanisms controlling Cx43 in VSMCs are not clearly described. The goal of this study was to investigate mechanisms of Cx43 regulation with respect to VSMC proliferation. Treatment of rat primary VSMCs with the cAMP analog 8Br-cAMP, the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 (BAY, or the Cx inducer diallyl disulfide (DADS significantly reduced proliferation after 72 h compared to vehicle controls. Bromodeoxyuridine uptake revealed reduction (p<.001 in DNA synthesis after 6 h and flow cytometry showed reduced (40% S phase cell numbers after 16 h in DADS-treated cells compared to controls. Cx43 expression significantly increased after 270 min treatment with 8Br-cAMP, 8Br-cGMP, BAY or DADS. Inhibition of PKA, PKG or PKC reversed 8Br-cAMP-stimulated increases in Cx43 expression, whereas only PKG or PKC inhibition reversed 8Br-cGMP- and BAY-stimulated increases in total Cx43. Interestingly, stimulation of Cx43 expression by DADS was not dependent on PKA, PKG or PKC. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, only 8Br-cAMP or DADS increased GJIC with 8Br-cAMP mediated by PKC and DADS mediated by PKG. Further, DADS significantly increased phosphorylation at the MAPK-sensitive serine (Ser255 and Ser279, the cell cycle regulatory kinase-sensitive Ser262 and the PKC-sensitive Ser368 after 30 min while 8Br-cAMP significantly increased phosphorylation only at Ser279 compared to controls. This study demonstrates that 8Br-cAMP- and DADS-enhanced GJIC rather than Cx43 expression and/or phosphorylation plays an important role in regulation of VSMC proliferation and provides new insights into the growth-regulatory capacities of Cx43 in VSMCs.

  6. An In Vitro Murine Model of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelynack, Kristen J; Holt, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification (VC) is seen ubiquitously in aging blood vessels and prematurely in disease states like renal failure. It is thought to be driven by a number of systemic and local factors that lead to extra-osseous deposition of mineral in the vascular wall and valves as a common endpoint. The response of resident vascular smooth muscle cell to these dystrophic signals appears to be important in this process. Whilst in vivo models allow the observation of global changes in a pro-calcific environment, identifying the specific cells and mechanisms involved has been largely garnered from in vitro experiments, which provide added benefits in terms of reproducibility, cost, and convenience. Here we describe a 7-21 day cell culture model of calcification developed using immortalized murine vascular smooth muscle cells (MOVAS-1). This model provides a method by which vascular smooth muscle cell involvement and manipulation within a mineralizing domain can be studied.

  7. The effects of TSH on human vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田利民

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of thyroid-stimulating hormone(TSH)on human vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells and to explore the roles of TSH in the development of atherosclerosis.Methods Human vascular endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells were cultured in vitro.MTT method was used to assay the effect of TSH on cell viability.Real-time PCR was used

  8. N-acetylcysteine improves arterial vascular reactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittstock, Antje; Burkert, Magdalena; Zidek, Walter;

    2009-01-01

    Patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease show increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality that are partly related to impaired arterial vascular reactivity. We investigated whether intravenous administration of the antioxidant acetylcysteine improves arterial vascular reactivity...

  9. PPARα-Independent Arterial Smooth Muscle Relaxant Effects of PPARα Agonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neerupma Silswal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We sought to determine direct vascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα agonists using isolated mouse aortas and middle cerebral arteries (MCAs. The PPARα agonists GW7647, WY14643, and gemfibrozil acutely relaxed aortas held under isometric tension and dilated pressurized MCAs with the following order of potency: GW7647≫WY14643>gemfibrozil. Responses were endothelium-independent, and the use of PPARα deficient mice demonstrated that responses were also PPARα-independent. Pretreating arteries with high extracellular K+ attenuated PPARα agonist-mediated relaxations in the aorta, but not in the MCA. In the aorta, the ATP sensitive potassium (KATP channel blocker glibenclamide also impaired relaxations whereas the other K+ channel inhibitors, 4-aminopyridine and Iberiotoxin, had no effect. In aortas, GW7647 and WY14643 elevated cGMP levels by stimulating soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC, and inhibition of sGC with ODQ blunted relaxations to PPARα agonists. In the MCA, dilations were inhibited by the protein kinase C (PKC activator, phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, and also by ODQ. Our results demonstrated acute, nonreceptor-mediated relaxant effects of PPARα agonists on smooth muscle of mouse arteries. Responses to PPARα agonists in the aorta involved KATP channels and sGC, whereas in the MCA the PKC and sGC pathways also appeared to contribute to the response.

  10. A pro-inflammatory role of deubiquitinating enzyme cylindromatosis (CYLD) in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shuai [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Lv, Jiaju [Department of Urology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan 250021 (China); Han, Liping; Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Wang, Wenjuan; Li, Siying [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Wang, Xing Li [Shandong University Qilu Hospital Research Center for Cell Therapy, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Tang, Dongqi, E-mail: tangdq@pathology.ufl.edu [Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL 32610-0275 (United States); Cui, Taixing, E-mail: taixing.cui@uscmed.sc.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyld deficiency suppresses pro-inflammatory phenotypic switch of VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyld deficiency inhibits MAPK rather than NF-kB activity in inflamed VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYLD is up-regulated in the coronary artery with neointimal hyperplasia. -- Abstract: CYLD, a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB), is a critical regulator of diverse cellular processes, ranging from proliferation and differentiation to inflammatory responses, via regulating multiple key signaling cascades such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) pathway. CYLD has been shown to inhibit vascular lesion formation presumably through suppressing NF-{kappa}B activity in vascular cells. However, herein we report a novel role of CYLD in mediating pro-inflammatory responses in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via a mechanism independent of NF-{kappa}B activity. Adenoviral knockdown of Cyld inhibited basal and the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF{alpha})-induced mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines including monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (Mcp-1), intercellular adhesion molecule (Icam-1) and interleukin-6 (Il-6) in rat adult aortic SMCs (RASMCs). The CYLD deficiency led to increases in the basal NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity in RASMCs; however, did not affect the TNF{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activity. Intriguingly, the TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B phosphorylation was enhanced in the CYLD deficient RASMCs. While knocking down of Cyld decreased slightly the basal expression levels of I{kappa}B{alpha} and I{kappa}B{beta} proteins, it did not alter the kinetics of TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B protein degradation in RASMCs. These results indicate that CYLD suppresses the basal NF-{kappa}B activity and TNF{alpha}-induced I{kappa}B kinase activation without affecting TNF{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activity in VSMCs. In addition, knocking down of Cyld suppressed TNF{alpha}-induced activation of mitogen activated protein

  11. Arterial vascular properties in individuals with spina bifida.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, C.R.L.; Langen, H. van; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2003-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Observational cross-sectional study. OBJECTIVE: To assess the vascular characteristics of the arterial circulation in individuals with spina bifida (SB) in comparison with individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) and able-bodied controls (C). SETTING: University Medical Centre, Nijmeg

  12. MicroRNA-34a Induces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Senescence by SIRT1 Downregulation and Promotes the Expression of Age-Associated Pro-inflammatory Secretory Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badi, Ileana; Burba, Ilaria; Ruggeri, Clarissa; Zeni, Filippo; Bertolotti, Matteo; Scopece, Alessandro; Pompilio, Giulio; Raucci, Angela

    2015-11-01

    Arterial aging is a major risk factor for the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. The aged artery is characterized by endothelial dysfunction and vascular smooth muscle cells altered physiology together with low-grade chronic inflammation. MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) has been recently implicated in cardiac, endothelial, and endothelial progenitor cell senescence; however, its contribution to aging-associated vascular smooth muscle cells phenotype has not been explored so far. We found that miR-34a was highly expressed in aortas isolated from old mice. Moreover, its well-known target, the longevity-associated protein SIRT1, was significantly downregulated during aging in both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells. Increased miR-34a as well as decreased SIRT1 expression was also observed in replicative-senescent human aortic smooth muscle cells. miR-34a overexpression in proliferative human aortic smooth muscle cells caused cell cycle arrest along with enhanced p21 protein levels and evidence of cell senescence. Furthermore, miR-34a ectopic expression induced pro-inflammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype molecules. Finally, SIRT1 protein significantly decreased upon miR-34a overexpression and restoration of its levels rescued miR-34a-dependent human aortic smooth muscle cells senescence, but not senescence-associated secretory phenotype factors upregulation. Taken together, our findings suggest that aging-associated increase of miR-34a expression levels, by promoting vascular smooth muscle cells senescence and inflammation through SIRT1 downregulation and senescence-associated secretory phenotype factors induction, respectively, may lead to arterial dysfunctions.

  13. Multiple vascular anomalies involving renal, testicular and suprarenal arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of variations of blood vessels of the abdomen is important during operative, diagnostic and endovascular pro- cedures. During routine dissection of the abdominal cavity, we came across multiple vascular anomalies involving renal, suprarenal and testicular arteries. The left kidney was supplied by two renal arteries originating together from the abdomi- nal aorta, and the right kidney was supplied by two accessory renal arteries, one of which was arising from the right renal artery and the other one from the aorta (about 2 inches below the origin of the renal artery. Accessory renal veins were present on both sides. The right testicular artery was arising from the lower accessory renal artery. The left testicular artery was looping around the inferior tributary of the left renal vein, whereby forming a sharp kink. The left middle suprarenal artery was diving into three small branches; the upper two branches were supplying the left suprarenal gland, whereas the lower branch was supplying the left kidney. Furthermore, detailed literature and the clinical and surgical importance of the case are discussed. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(3.000: 168-171

  14. Embryonic origins of human vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for in vitro modeling and clinical application

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Sanjay; Iyer, Dharini; Granata, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) arise from multiple origins during development, raising the possibility that differences in embryological origins between SMCs could contribute to site-specific localization of vascular diseases. In this review, we first examine the developmental pathways and embryological origins of vascular SMCs and then discuss in vitro strategies for deriving SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We then review in detail...

  15. Effects of Raloxifene on Caveolin-1 mRNA and Protein Expressions in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fa-Lin YANG; Hong HE; Xian-Xi LIU; Bing TU; Xian-Wei ZENG; Ji-Xin SU; Xin WANG; Qin HU

    2006-01-01

    Caveolin-1 is regulated by estrogen in vascular smooth muscle cells. Raloxifene, a selectiveestrogen receptor modulator that possibly has cardioprotective properties without an increased risk of c ancer or other side effects of estrogen, may be used in women with risk of coronary artery disease. However, the relationship between raloxifene and caveolin-1 is still unknown. Therefore, this study was designed to see whether raloxifene regulates caveolin- 1 expression and if so, whether such regulation is mediated by estrogen receptor. Rat aortic smooth muscle cells were cultured in the absence or presence of raloxifene (10-8 to 10-6 M) for 12 or 24 h. Both mRNA and protein levels of caveolin-1 were increased significantly after 24 h treatment with raloxifene. These increases were inhibited by estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780 (10-5 M). Results of this study suggest that raloxifene stimulates caveolin- 1 transcription and translation through estrogen receptor mediated mechanisms.

  16. File list: InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle hg19 Input control Cardiovascular Coronary artery smooth musc...le SRX699739,SRX699736 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.CDV.05.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle.bed ...

  17. File list: DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle hg19 DNase-seq Cardiovascular Coronary artery smooth muscle... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.CDV.50.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle.bed ...

  18. File list: InP.CDV.50.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Pol.CDV.50.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: Pol.CDV.10.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: NoD.CDV.20.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: ALL.CDV.50.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: ALL.CDV.10.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: His.CDV.05.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: NoD.CDV.10.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. File list: His.CDV.50.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  7. File list: NoD.CDV.05.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: ALL.CDV.05.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  9. File list: Unc.CDV.50.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  10. File list: Pol.CDV.05.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Unc.CDV.20.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: NoD.CDV.50.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: His.CDV.20.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: DNS.CDV.05.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Unc.CDV.10.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  16. File list: Unc.CDV.05.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: ALL.CDV.20.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: InP.CDV.10.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Oth.CDV.05.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  20. File list: DNS.CDV.10.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: Oth.CDV.20.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Oth.CDV.50.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  3. File list: His.CDV.10.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. File list: Oth.CDV.10.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Pol.CDV.20.AllAg.Coronary_artery_smooth_muscle [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. On arterial physiology, pathophysiology of vascular compliance, and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasser, S P

    2000-01-01

    Traditionally, the main emphasis in hypertension treatment has been on lowering diastolic blood pressure. Recently, this emphasis has been shifting toward systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, the latter of which might be a better indicator of future clinical events than either blood pressure reading alone or in combination. Increased pulse pressure indicates increased arterial stiffness and hence is commonly seen in older subjects. As patients age and vessels stiffen, there is a resulting loss of arterial compliance, the ability of the vessel to store blood volume temporarily as it is ejected with each systole. The arterial system acts like a Windkessel, or pump, as it converts intermittent flow from the heart into continuous flow to the organs. The process of stiffening occurs via vascular remodeling, a redistribution of the heterogeneous elements of the vascular wall. Endothelial dysfunction can trigger this remodeling process, increasing stiffness, raising blood pressure and pulse pressure, and ultimately leading to atherosclerosis, plaque formation, and attendant clinical events. Because angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and calcium antagonists can restore arterial compliance, they are suitable choices for hypertension treatment when it is complicated by vascular stiffness. PMID:11728285

  7. Arterial structure and function in vascular ageing: are you as old as your arteries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thijssen, Dick H J; Carter, Sophie E; Green, Daniel J

    2016-04-15

    Advancing age may be the most potent independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, a relationship that is not fully explained by time-related changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Since some arteries exhibit differential susceptibility to atherosclerosis, generalisations regarding the impact of ageing in humans may be overly simplistic, whereas in vivo assessment of arterial function and health provide direct insight. Coronary and peripheral (conduit, resistance and skin) arteries demonstrate a gradual, age-related impairment in vascular function that is likely to be related to a reduction in endothelium-derived nitric oxide bioavailability and/or increased production of vasoconstrictors (e.g. endothelin-1). Increased exposure and impaired ability for defence mechanisms to resist oxidative stress and inflammation, but also cellular senescence processes, may contribute to age-related changes in vascular function and health. Arteries also undergo structural changes as they age. Gradual thickening of the arterial wall, changes in wall content (i.e. less elastin, advanced glycation end-products) and increase in conduit artery diameter are observed with older age and occur similarly in central and peripheral arteries. These changes in structure have important interactive effects on artery function, with increases in small and large arterial stiffness representing a characteristic change with older age. Importantly, direct measures of arterial function and structure predict future cardiovascular events, independent of age or other cardiovascular risk factors. Taken together, and given the differential susceptibility of arteries to atherosclerosis in humans, direct measurement of arterial function and health may help to distinguish between biological and chronological age-related change in arterial health in humans.

  8. Cocaine mediated apoptosis of vascular cells as a mechanism for carotid artery dissection leading to ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbouseh, Noura M; Ardelt, Agnieszka

    2011-08-01

    In arterial dissection, blood may enter the arterial wall through an intimal tear, splitting the arterial wall and activating the coagulation cascade at the site of endothelial damage. Dissection of extracranial and intracranial vessels may lead to ischemic stroke through thromboembolic or hemodynamic mechanisms. Major blunt trauma or rapid acceleration-deceleration may cause dissection, but in patients with inherent arterial wall weakness, dissection can occur spontaneously or as a result of minor neck movement. Cocaine use has been associated with dissection of the aortic arch and coronary and renal arteries through cocaine-mediated hypertension. Recent preclinical studies have suggested, however, that cocaine may cause apoptosis of cells in the vascular wall. In this article, we postulate that cocaine may cause apoptosis of vascular endothelial and/or smooth muscle cells, thus weakening the vascular wall and resulting in a dissection-prone state. We review the literature and propose a biological basis for vasculopathy, vascular dissection, and ischemic stroke in the setting of cocaine use. Further research studies on vascular cells, as well as focused analysis of human pathological material, will be important in providing evidence for or against our hypotheses. PMID:21546166

  9. Glycogen synthase kinase 3beta contributes to proliferation of arterial smooth muscle cells in pulmonary hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Sklepkiewicz

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a rare progressive pulmonary vascular disorder associated with vascular remodeling and right heart failure. Vascular remodeling involves numerous signaling cascades governing pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC proliferation, migration and differentiation. Glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3ß is a serine/threonine kinase and can act as a downstream regulatory switch for numerous signaling pathways. Hence, we hypothesized that GSK3ß plays a crucial role in pulmonary vascular remodeling. METHODS: All experiments were done with lung tissue or isolated PASMCs in a well-established monocrotaline (MCT-induced PAH rat model. The mRNA expression of Wnt ligands (Wnt1, Wnt3a, Wnt5a, upstream Wnt signaling regulator genes (Frizzled Receptors 1, 2 and secreted Frizzled related protein sFRP-1 and canonical Wnt intracellular effectors (GSK3ß, Axin1 were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and protein levels of GSK3ß, phospho-GSK3ß (ser 9 by western blotting and localization by immunohistochemistry. The role of GSK3ß in PASMCs proliferation was assessed by overexpression of wild-type GSK3ß (WT and constitutively active GSK3ß S9A by [(3H]-thymidine incorporation assay. RESULTS: Increased levels of total and phosphorylated GSK3ß (inhibitory phosphorylation were observed in lungs and PASMCs isolated from MCT-induced PAH rats compared to controls. Further, stimulation of MCT-PASMCs with growth factors induced GSK3ß inactivation. Most importantly, treatment with the PDGFR inhibitor, Imatinib, attenuated PDGF-BB and FCS induced GSK3ß phosphorylation. Increased expression of GSK3ß observed in lungs and PASMC isolated from MCT-induced PAH rats was confirmed to be clinically relevant as the same observation was identified in human iPAH lung explants. Overexpression of GSK3ß significantly increased MCT-PASMCs proliferation by regulating ERK phosphorylation. Constitutive activation of

  10. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; Pmuscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  11. 45Ca distribution and transport in saponin skinned vascular smooth muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    45Ca distribution and transport were studied in chemically skinned strips of caudal artery from Kyoto Wistar rats. Sarcolemmal membranes were made hyperpermeable by exposure for 60 min to solutions containing 0.1 mg/ml of saponin. Skinned helical strips responded with graded contractions to changes in ethylene glycol bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid buffered free Ca solutions (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) and were sensitive to the Mg-ATP concentration. Tissues loaded in the presence of 10(-7) M Ca contracted in response to 10 mM caffeine. These experiments indicate the strips are skinned and possess a functional regulatory and contractile system and an intact Ca sequestering system. 45Ca distributes in three compartments in skinned caudal artery strips. The Ca contents of two components are linear functions of the Ca-ethylene glycol bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid concentration and desaturate at rapid rates. They correspond to the extracellular and cytoplasmic spaces. A significantly smaller component releases Ca at comparatively slower rates. 45Ca uptake by the slow component consists of an ATP-dependent and an ATP-independent fraction. The 45Ca content of the ATP-dependent fraction is a function of the free Ca concentration and is independent of the Ca-ethylene glycol bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid concentration. Its content was enhanced by oxalate and was abolished by Triton X-100 skinning solutions. The ATP-independent component was not affected by Triton X-100 skinning and may represent Ca binding to cytoplasmic molecules and structures. The sequestered Ca was released with caffeine or Ca but not by epinephrine. The observations indicate that the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria of vascular smooth muscle strips skinned with saponin retain their functional integrity after saponin skinning

  12. Sphingosine induces phospholipase D and mitogen activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, M M; Abd-Elfattah, A S; Sholley, M M

    1998-12-01

    The enzymes phospholipase D and diacylglycerol kinase generate phosphatidic acid which is considered to be a mitogen. Here we report that sphingosine produced a significant amount of phosphatidic acid in vascular smooth muscle cells from the rat aorta. The diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor R59 949 partially depressed sphingosine induced phosphatidic acid formation, suggesting that activation of phospholipase C and diacylglycerol kinase can not account for the bulk of phosphatidic acid produced and that additional pathways such as phospholipase D may contribute to this. Further, we have shown that phosphatidylethanol was produced by sphingosine when vascular smooth muscle cells were stimulated in the presence of ethanol. Finally, as previously shown for other cell types, sphingosine stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  13. Myoedothelial connection, a relationship between spiral arrangement of smooth muscle cells and endothelium in resistance muscular arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arribas S.M,

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground and Purpose: Conventionally, the architecture of the artery wall is based upon the close-packed smooth muscle cells, endothelial and adventitial cells in both sides of internal elastic lamina (IEL. However, the adventitia and endothelium are now viewed as key players in vascular growth and repair. Recent work raises fundamental questions about the cellular heterogeneity of arteries, time course, triggering of normal and pathological re-modeling.Materials and Methods: Twelve wild type mice were employed. After killing with CO2 inhalation, dissected mesenteric arteries were removed and cleaned with adipose tissue. Arteries were mounted in the perfusion pressure myograph under normal pressure (70mmHg in Kreb’s solution, which bubbled with 95% O2 and 5% CO2 to pH 7.4, at 37°C. After staining with fluorescent ligands (Syto 13 for nuclei and (DIO 1µM for cytoplasm, arteries were scanned with the Laser Scanning Co focal Microscopy (LSCM under (488nm/515nm, (484nm/501nm and (543nm/580nm Argon-Helium ion laser wavelength.Results: Three dimensional images of computer observation suggest that there may be a close relationship between the helical organization of smooth muscle cells and the underlying pattern of endothelial cells (myoendothelial connection.Conclusion: Tight junctions between cells must be broken and remade during the remodeling process. This suggests a carefully controlled defensive structure for intra-cellular connections, that is capable of withstanding the acute stresses of normal function, but which must be capable of modification to adapt to a new state, when the bio-physical conditions dictate. Endothelial mosaicism related to spiral arrangements of underlying smooth muscle cells, are associated with the functional cell connections. Taken together, these issues provide an exciting new phase in understanding the physiological modeling of the vascular wall, producing a new view of the dynamic nature of vascular

  14. Cadmium Toxicity on Arterioles Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elbert L. Myles

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd is frequently used in various industrial applications and is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant, also present in tobacco smoke. An important route of exposure is the circulatory system whereas blood vessels are considered to be main stream organs of Cd toxicity. Our previous results indicate that cadmium chloride (CdCl2 affects mean arterial blood pressure in hypertensive rats. We hypothesized that Cd alters the intracellular calcium transient mechanism, by cadmium-induced stimulation of MAPKs (ERK 1 & 2 which is mediated partially through calcium-dependent PKC mechanism. To investigate this hypothesis, we exposed primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs from wistar kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR to increased concentrations of CdCl2 on cell viability, expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs/ERK 1 & 2, and protein kinase C (PKC which are activated by Cd in several cell types. The results from these studies indicate that CdCl2 decreased cell viability of both SHR and WKY VSMCs in a concentration dependent-manner. Viability of both cell types decreased 33±5.3 (SHR and 39±2.3% (WKY when exposed to 1 μM CdCl2, whereas, 8 and 16 μM reduced viability by 66±3.1 and 62±4.5% in SHR cells. CdCl2 increased ERK 1 & 2 in a biphasic manner with maximum increase occurring when cells are exposed to 1 and 4 μM in SHR VSMCs, whereas, a reduction in ERK 1 and 2 is observed when WKY cells are treated with 2 μM. The results also indicate that CdCl2 increased PKC a/ß in both SHR and WKY VSMCs with a greater increase in expression in SHR VSMCs. In addition, the [Ca2+]i chelator, BAPTA, suppressed the CdCl2 effect, whereas, the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X, reduced the CdCl2 induced-effect on PKC expression. The present studies support the hypothesis that Cd can be a risk factor of hypertension through dysfunction of vascular smooth muscle cells

  15. Vascular nanomedicine: Site specific delivery of elastin stabilizing therapeutics to damaged arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Aditi

    Elastin, a structural protein in the extra-cellular matrix, plays a critical role in the normal functioning of blood vessels. Apart from performing its primary function of providing resilience to arteries, it also plays major role in regulating cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, response to injury, and morphogenesis. Medial arterial calcification (MAC) and abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are two diseases where the structural and functional integrity of elastin is severely compromised. Although the clinical presentation of MAC and AAA differ, they have one common underlying causative mechanism---pathological degradation of elastin. Hence prevention of elastin degradation in the early stages of MAC and AAA can mitigate, partially if not wholly, the fatal consequences of both the diseases. The work presented here is motivated by the overwhelming statistics of people afflicted by elastin associated cardiovascular diseases and the unavailability of cure for the same. Overall goal of our research is to understand role of elastin degradation in cardiovascular diseases and to develop a targeted vascular drug delivery system that is minimally invasive, biodegradable, and non-toxic, that prevents elastin from degradation. Our hope is that such treatment will also help regenerate elastin, thereby providing a multi-fold treatment option for elasto-degenerative vascular diseases. For this purpose, we have first confirmed the combined role of degraded elastin and hyperglycemia in the pathogenesis of MAC. We have shown that in the absence of degraded elastin and TGF-beta1 (abundantly present in diabetic arteries) vascular smooth muscle cells maintain their homeostatic state, regardless of environmental glucose concentrations. However simultaneous exposure to glucose, elastin peptides and TGF-beta1 causes the pathological transgenesis of vascular cells to osteoblast-like cells. We show that plant derived polyphenols bind to vascular elastin with great affinity resulting in

  16. Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI as an indicator of arterial stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun CK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cheuk-Kwan Sun Department of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medical Education, E-Da Hospital, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan Abstract: Arterial stiffness has been identified as an independent predictor of prognostic outcomes for patients with cardiovascular disease. Although measurement of pulse wave velocity has been a widely accepted noninvasive approach to the assessment of arterial stiffness, its accuracy is hampered by changes in blood pressure. Taking the exponential relation between intravascular pressure and arterial diameter into consideration, a stiffness parameter can be obtained by plotting the natural logarithm of systolic–diastolic pressure ratio against the arterial wall extensibility. Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI, which is calculated based on the stiffness parameter thus obtained, is theoretically independent of changes in blood pressure. With this distinct advantage, CAVI has been widely applied clinically to assess arterial stiffness in subjects with known cardiovascular diseases including those with diagnosed atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, and stroke as well as those at risk, including those with hypertension, diabetes, the elderly, and the obese. Because of its enhanced sensitivity, not only has the index been used to discern subtle changes in the disease process, it has also been utilized in studying normal individuals to assess their potential risks of developing cardiovascular diseases. The primary aims of assessing arterial stiffness using CAVI are not only to aid in early detection of arteriosclerosis to allow timely treatment and change in lifestyle, but also to quantitatively evaluate the progression of disease and the effectiveness of treatment. Despite its merit of being unaffected by blood pressure, discretion in data interpretation is suggested because an elevated CAVI represents not just vascular stiffness caused by pathological changes in the arterial wall, but can also be attributed to

  17. Doxycycline Alters Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Adhesion, Migration, and Reorganization of Fibrillar Collagen Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Franco, Christopher; Ho, Bernard; Mulholland, Diane; Hou, Guangpei; Islam, Muzharul; Donaldson, Katey; Bendeck, Michelle Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Remodeling of injured blood vessels is dependent on smooth muscle cells and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Doxycycline is a broad spectrum matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor that is under investigation for the treatment of acute coronary syndromes and aneurysms. In the present study, we examine the mechanisms by which doxycycline inhibits smooth muscle cell responses using a series of in vitro assays that mimic critical steps in pathological vascular remodeling. Doxycycline treatment dram...

  18. Endothelin converting enzyme (ECE) activity in human vascular smooth muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Maguire, Janet J.; Johnson, Christopher M.; Mockridge, James W; Davenport, Anthony P

    1997-01-01

    We have characterized the human smooth muscle endothelin converting enzyme (ECE) present in the media of the endothelium-denuded human umbilical vein preparation.Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and ET-2 were potent constrictors of umbilical vein with EC50 values of 9.2 nM and 29.6 nM, respectively. ET-1 was at least 30 times more potent than ET-3 suggesting the presence of constrictor ETA receptors. Little or no response was obtained to the ETB-selective agonist sarafotoxin 6c. These data suggest that en...

  19. Resveratrol Induces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Differentiation through Stimulation of SirT1 and AMPK

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Marie Thompson; Martin, Kathleen A.; Rzucidlo, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is necessary for vessel maintenance, repair and adaptation to vascular changes associated with aging. De-differentiated VSMC contribute to pathologies including atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia. As resveratrol has been reported to have cardio- protective effects, we investigated its role in VSMC phenotypic modulation. We demonstrated the novel finding that resveratrol promoted VSMC differentiation as measured by contractile p...

  20. Effect of Oxysterol-Induced Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells on Experimental Hypercholesterolemia

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) undergo changes related to proliferation and apoptosis in the physiological remodeling of vessels and in diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Recent studies also have demonstrated the vascular cell proliferation and programmed cell death contribute to changes in vascular architecture in normal development and in disease. The present study was designed to investigate the apoptotic pathways induced by 25-hydroxycholesterol in SMCs cultures, using an in viv...

  1. Thrombospondin-1, -2 and -5 have differential effects on vascular smooth muscle cell physiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helkin, Alex; Maier, Kristopher G. [SUNY Upstate Medical University, Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Services, Syracuse, NY (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs VA Healthcare Network Upstate New York at Syracuse, Syracuse, NY (United States); Gahtan, Vivian, E-mail: gahtanv@upstate.edu [SUNY Upstate Medical University, Division of Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Services, Syracuse, NY (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs VA Healthcare Network Upstate New York at Syracuse, Syracuse, NY (United States)

    2015-09-04

    Introduction: The thrombospondins (TSPs) are matricellular proteins that exert multifunctional effects by binding cytokines, cell-surface receptors and other proteins. TSPs play important roles in vascular pathobiology and are all expressed in arterial lesions. The differential effects of TSP-1, -2, and -5 represent a gap in knowledge in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) physiology. Our objective is to determine if structural differences of the TSPs imparted different effects on VSMC functions critical to the formation of neointimal hyperplasia. We hypothesize that TSP-1 and -2 induce similar patterns of migration, proliferation and gene expression, while the effects of TSP-5 are different. Methods: Human aortic VSMC chemotaxis was tested for TSP-2 and TSP-5 (1–40 μg/mL), and compared to TSP-1 and serum-free media (SFM) using a modified Boyden chamber. Next, VSMCs were exposed to TSP-1, TSP-2 or TSP-5 (0.2–40 μg/mL). Proliferation was assessed by MTS assay. Finally, VSMCs were exposed to TSP-1, TSP-2, TSP-5 or SFM for 3, 6 or 24 h. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed on 96 genes using a microfluidic card. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA or t-test, with p < 0.05 being significant. Results: TSP-1, TSP-2 and TSP-5 at 20 μg/mL all induce chemotaxis 3.1 fold compared to serum-free media. TSP-1 and TSP-2 induced proliferation 53% and 54% respectively, whereas TSP-5 did not. In the gene analysis, overall, cardiovascular system development and function is the canonical pathway most influenced by TSP treatment, and includes multiple growth factors, cytokines and proteases implicated in cellular migration, proliferation, vasculogenesis, apoptosis and inflammation pathways. Conclusions and relevance: The results of this study indicate TSP-1, -2, and -5 play active roles in VSMC physiology and gene expression. Similarly to TSP-1, VSMC chemotaxis to TSP-2 and -5 is dose-dependent. TSP-1 and -2 induces VSMC proliferation, but TSP-5 does not, likely

  2. Effects of the dual TP receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor EV-077 on human endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petri, Marcelo H. [Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Tellier, Céline; Michiels, Carine [NARILIS, URBC, University of Namur, Namur (Belgium); Ellertsen, Ingvill [Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Dogné, Jean-Michel [Department of Pharmacy, Namur Thrombosis and Hemostasis Center, University of Namur, Namur (Belgium); Bäck, Magnus, E-mail: Magnus.Back@ki.se [Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet and Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •EV-077 reduced TNF-α induced inflammation in endothelial cells. •The thromboxane mimetic U69915 enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. •EV-077 inhibited smooth muscle cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The prothrombotic mediator thromboxane A{sub 2} is derived from arachidonic acid metabolism through the cyclooxygenase and thromboxane synthase pathways, and transduces its effect through the thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptor. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the TP receptor antagonist and thromboxane synthase inhibitor EV-077 on inflammatory markers in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and on human coronary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation. To this end, mRNA levels of different proinflammatory mediators were studied by real time quantitative PCR, supernatants were analyzed by enzyme immune assay, and cell proliferation was assessed using WST-1. EV-077 significantly decreased mRNA levels of ICAM-1 and PTX3 after TNFα incubation, whereas concentrations of 6-keto PGF1α in supernatants of endothelial cells incubated with TNFα were significantly increased after EV-077 treatment. Although U46619 did not alter coronary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation, this thromboxane mimetic enhanced the proliferation induced by serum, insulin and growth factors, which was significantly inhibited by EV-077. In conclusion, EV-077 inhibited TNFα-induced endothelial inflammation and reduced the enhancement of smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by a thromboxane mimetic, supporting that the thromboxane pathway may be associated with early atherosclerosis in terms of endothelial dysfunction and vascular hypertrophy.

  3. Oxygen mediates vascular smooth muscle relaxation in hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Dada

    Full Text Available The activation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC by nitric oxide (NO and other ligands has been extensively investigated for many years. In the present study we considered the effect of molecular oxygen (O2 on sGC both as a direct ligand and its affect on other ligands by measuring cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP production, as an index of activity, as well as investigating smooth muscle relaxation under hypoxic conditions. Our isolated enzyme studies confirm the function of sGC is impaired under hypoxic conditions and produces cGMP in the presence of O2, importantly in the absence of NO. We also show that while O2 could partially affect the magnitude of sGC stimulation by NO when the latter was present in excess, activation by the NO independent, haem-dependent sGC stimulator 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl-1-benzylindazole (YC-1 was unaffected. Our in vitro investigation of smooth muscle relaxation confirmed that O2 alone in the form of a buffer bolus (equilibrated at 95% O2/5% CO2 had the ability to dilate vessels under hypoxic conditions and that this was dependent upon sGC and independent of eNOS. Our studies confirm that O2 can be a direct and important mediator of vasodilation through an increase in cGMP production. In the wider context, these observations are key to understanding the relative roles of O2 versus NO-induced sGC activation.

  4. Vascular smooth muscle cell spreading onto fibrinogen is regulated by calpains and phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulhe, F; Bogyo, A; Chap, H; Perret, B; Racaud-Sultan, C

    2001-11-01

    Fibrinogen deposition and smooth muscle cell migration are important causes of atherosclerosis and angiogenesis. Involvement of calpains in vascular smooth muscle cell adhesion onto fibrinogen was investigated. Using calpain inhibitors, we showed that activation of calpains was required for smooth muscle cell spreading. An increase of (32)P-labeled phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate, respective products of phospholipase C and phosphoinositide 3-kinase activities, was measured in adherent cells. Addition of the calpain inhibitor calpeptin strongly decreased phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate. However, smooth muscle cell spreading was prevented by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, but poorly modified by phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitors wortmannin and LY-294002. Moreover, PLC was found to act upstream of the PI 3-kinase IA isoform. Thus, our data provide the first evidence that calpains are required for smooth muscle cell spreading. Further, phospholipase C activation is pointed as a key step of cell-spreading regulation by calpains.

  5. Differential regulation of protease activated receptor-1 and tissue plasminogen activator expression by shear stress in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, M.; Ruef, J.; Nguyen, K. T.; Li, F.; Patterson, C.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.; Runge, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells are responsive to changes in their local hemodynamic environment. The effects of shear stress on the expression of human protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) mRNA and protein were investigated in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Under conditions of low shear stress (5 dyn/cm2), PAR-1 mRNA expression was increased transiently at 2 hours compared with stationary control values, whereas at high shear stress (25 dyn/cm2), mRNA expression was decreased (to 29% of stationary control; P<0.05) at all examined time points (2 to 24 hours). mRNA half-life studies showed that this response was not due to increased mRNA instability. tPA mRNA expression was decreased (to 10% of stationary control; P<0.05) by low shear stress after 12 hours of exposure and was increased (to 250% of stationary control; P<0.05) after 24 hours at high shear stress. The same trends in PAR-1 mRNA levels were observed in rat smooth muscle cells, indicating that the effects of shear stress on human PAR-1 were not species-specific. Flow cytometry and ELISA techniques using rat smooth muscle cells and HASMCs, respectively, provided evidence that shear stress exerted similar effects on cell surface-associated PAR-1 and tPA protein released into the conditioned media. The decrease in PAR-1 mRNA and protein had functional consequences for HASMCs, such as inhibition of [Ca2+] mobilization in response to thrombin stimulation. These data indicate that human PAR-1 and tPA gene expression are regulated differentially by shear stress, in a pattern consistent with their putative roles in several arterial vascular pathologies.

  6. MiR-21 inhibits c-Ski signaling to promote the proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Li; He, Xie; Yang, Ting; Yang, Kang

    2014-04-01

    Previously, we reported that the decrease of endogenous c-Ski expression is implicated in the progression of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation after arterial injury. However, the molecular mechanism of the down-regulation of c-Ski is not clear. In this study, a potential miR-21 recognition element was identified in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of rat c-Ski mRNA. A reporter assay revealed that miR-21 could recognize the miR-21 recognition element of c-Ski mRNA. In A10 rat aortic smooth muscle cells, overexpression of miR-21 significantly inhibited the expression of c-Ski protein and promoted cell proliferation, which could be blocked by inhibition of miR-21 or overexpression of c-Ski. Further investigation demonstrated that the effect of miR-21 on VSMC proliferation resulted from negative regulation of c-Ski to suppress p38-p21/p27 signaling, the downstream pathway of c-Ski in VSMCs. These results indicate that c-Ski is a target gene of miR-21. miR-21 specifically binds to the 3'-untranslated region of c-Ski and negatively regulates c-Ski expression to diminish the protective effects of c-Ski and stimulate VSMC proliferation in the progression of arterial injury.

  7. Vascular CaMKII: heart and brain in your arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Fanny; Charbel, Chimène; Allen, Bruce G; Ledoux, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    First characterized in neuronal tissues, the multifunctional calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a key signaling component in several mammalian biological systems. Its unique capacity to integrate various Ca(2+) signals into different specific outcomes is a precious asset to excitable and nonexcitable cells. Numerous studies have reported roles and mechanisms involving CaMKII in brain and heart tissues. However, corresponding functions in vascular cell types (endothelium and vascular smooth muscle cells) remained largely unexplored until recently. Investigation of the intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics, their impact on vascular cell function, the regulatory processes involved and more recently the spatially restricted oscillatory Ca(2+) signals and microdomains triggered significant interest towards proteins like CaMKII. Heteromultimerization of CaMKII isoforms (four isoforms and several splice variants) expands this kinase's peculiar capacity to decipher Ca(2+) signals and initiate specific signaling processes, and thus controlling cellular functions. The physiological functions that rely on CaMKII are unsurprisingly diverse, ranging from regulating contractile state and cellular proliferation to Ca(2+) homeostasis and cellular permeability. This review will focus on emerging evidence of CaMKII as an essential component of the vascular system, with a focus on the kinase isoform/splice variants and cellular system studied. PMID:27306369

  8. 雷帕霉素对球囊损伤大鼠颈总动脉VSMC迁移抑制及β3整合素、MMP9表达的影响%Effect of rapamycin on migration of vascular smooth muscle cell and the expression of β3 interin, MMP-9 post balloon injury in rat carotid artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武衡; 汤显靖; 黄开亮; 成志

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of rapamycin on migration of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) and the expression level of β3 interin, matrix metalloproteinase9( MMP9 ) in a rat model of restenosis after balloon injury carotid artery . Methods Fourty rats were randomly divided into two groups : balloon group :received balloon injury only, and rapamycin group: intramuscular rapamycin 3 days before injury and continued for 28 days at a dose a of 0.5 mg/kg . Animals were killed after 28 days. The injured artery segments were prepared for histomorphologieal observation and β3 interin , MMP9 were examined by immunohistochemistry staining. Results The tunica intima thickness ( Ⅰ ), tunica media thickness and I/M of the rapamycin group were significantly less than that of the balloon group (P < 0. 05). And the expression of β3 interin and MMP9 were decreased in the rapamycin group compared with the balloon group(P < 0. 05). Conclusion Rapamycin could inhibit the migration of VSMC and tunica intima hyperplasia possibly through inhibiting the expression of β3 interin and MMP9%目的 探讨雷帕霉素(Rapa)对大鼠颈总动脉球囊损伤后血管平滑肌细胞迁移的抑制作用及对β3整合素、基质金属蛋白酶9(MMP9)表达的影响.方法 40只大鼠随机分为球囊损伤组和雷帕霉素组.球囊导管损伤大鼠颈总动脉做成球囊损伤模型.雷帕霉素组术前3 d及术后28d连续肌注雷帕霉素0.5 mg·kg-1·d-1.28d后取目标血管段行HE染色行组织学观察和形态学分析,免疫组化分析雷帕霉素对VSMC的迁移及β3整合素、MMP9表达的影响.结果 雷帕霉素组损伤段血管内膜厚度(I)、中膜厚度(M)及内膜增生程度(I/M)均较球囊损伤组小(P<0.05),同时雷帕霉素组新生内膜中β3整合素、MMP9阳性细胞数较球囊损伤组少(P<0.05).结论 雷帕霉素能抑制大鼠颈总动脉球囊损伤后VSMC迁移和内膜增生,其作用机制可能与其抑制MMP9、β3 整合素的表达有关.

  9. TLR4-Activated MAPK-IL-6 Axis Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guan-Lin; Wu, Jing-Yiing; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Fu; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Kuo, Cheng-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into the intima is considered to be a vital event in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Despite substantial evidence supporting the pathogenic role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the progression of atherogenesis, its function in the regulation of VSMC migration remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism by which TLR4 regulates VSMC migration. Inhibitor experiments revealed that TLR4-induced IL-6 secretion and VSMC migration were mediated via the concerted actions of MyD88 and TRIF on the activation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling. Neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibodies abrogated TLR4-driven VSMC migration and F-actin polymerization. Blockade of p38 MAPK or ERK1/2 signaling cascade inhibited TLR4 agonist-mediated activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of CREB production repressed TLR4-induced IL-6 production and VSMC migration. Rac-1 inhibitor suppressed TLR4-driven VSMC migration but not IL-6 production. Importantly, the serum level of IL-6 and TLR4 endogenous ligand HMGB1 was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) than in healthy subjects. Serum HMGB1 level was positively correlated with serum IL-6 level in CAD patients. The expression of both HMGB1 and IL-6 was clearly detected in the atherosclerotic tissue of the CAD patients. Additionally, there was a positive association between p-CREB and HMGB1 in mouse atherosclerotic tissue. Based on our findings, we concluded that, upon ligand binding, TLR4 activates p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling through MyD88 and TRIF in VSMCs. These signaling pathways subsequently coordinate an additive augmentation of CREB-driven IL-6 production, which in turn triggers Rac-1-mediated actin cytoskeleton to promote VSMC migration. PMID:27563891

  10. Drug packaging and delivery using perfluorocarbon nanoparticles for targeted inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-xiong ZHOU; Bai-gen ZHANG; Hao ZHANG; Xiao-zhong HUANG; Ya-li HU; Li SUN; Xiao-min WANG; Ji-wei ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the in vitro release profile of drugs encapsulated within perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoparticles (NPs) and their ability to inhibit the activity of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs).Methods: Dexamethasone phosphate (DxP) or dexamethasone acetate (DxA) was encapsulated into PFC nanoparticles using a high-pressure homogenous method. The morphology and size of the NPs were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a laser particle size analyzer. Drug loading and in vitro release were assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The impact of NP capsules on SMC proliferation, migration and apoptosis in vitro was assessed using cell counting kit-8, transwell cell migration and flow cytometry assays.Results: The sizes of DxP-NPs and DxA-NPs were 224±6 nm and 236±9 nm, respectively. The encapsulation efficiency (EE) of DxP-NPs was 66.4%±1.0%, with an initial release rate of 77.2%, whereas the EE of DxA-NPs was 95.3%±1.3%, with an initial release rate of 23.6%. Both of the NP-coated drugs could be released over 7 d. Human umbilical artery SMCs were harvested and cultured for four to six passages. Compared to free DxP, SMCs treated with tissue factor (TF)-directed DxP-NPs showed significant differences in the inhibition of proliferation, migration and apoptosis (P<0.05).Conclusion: The results collectively suggest that PFC nanoparticles will be beneficial for targeted drug delivery because of the sustained drug release and effective inhibition of SMC proliferation and migration.

  11. Microarray Analysis of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Responses to Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Minta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggest a causal role of bacterial and viral infections in atherogenesis. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS has been shown to stimulate resting vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC with the production of inflammatory cytokines and modulation of quiescent cells to the proliferative and synthetic phenotype. To comprehensively identify biologically important genes associated with LPS-induced SMC phenotype modulation, we compared the transcriptomes of quiescent human coronary artery SMC and cells treated with LPS for 4 and 22 h. The SMCs responded robustly to LPS treatment by the differential regulation of several genes involved in chromatin remodeling, transcription regulation, translation, signal transduction, metabolism, host defense, cell proliferation, apoptosis, matrix formation, adhesion and motility and suggest that the induction of clusters of genes involved in cell proliferation, migration and ECM production may be the main force that drives the LPS-induced phenotypic modulation of SMC rather than the differential expression of a single gene or a few genes. An interesting observation was the early and dramatic induction of four tightly clustered interferon-induced genes with tetratricopeptide repeats (IFIT1, 2, 4, 5. siRNA knock-down of IFIT1 in SMC was found to be associated with a remarkable up-regulation of TP53, CDKN1A and FOS, suggesting that IFIT1 may play a role in cell proliferation. Our data provide a comprehensive list of genes involved in LPS biology and underscore the important role of LPS in SMC activation and phenotype modulation which is a pivotal event in the onset of atherogenesis.

  12. Vascular function and mild renal impairment in stable coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Harst, P; Smilde, TDJ; Buikema, H; Voors, AA; Navis, G; van Veldhuisen, DJ; van Gilst, WH

    2006-01-01

    Objective - In patients with coronary artery disease, the concomitant presence of renal function impairment is associated with decreased survival. We aimed to assess whether in coronary artery diseased patients renal function impairment is associated with systemic vascular function, functional param

  13. Smooth Muscle Specific Overexpression of p22phox Potentiates Carotid Artery Wall Thickening in Response to Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Manogue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that transgenic mice overexpressing the p22phox subunit of the NADPH oxidase selectively in smooth muscle (Tgp22smc would exhibit an exacerbated response to transluminal carotid injury compared to wild-type mice. To examine the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS as a mediator of vascular injury, the injury response was quantified by measuring wall thickness (WT and cross-sectional wall area (CSWA of the injured and noninjured arteries in both Tgp22smc and wild-type animals at days 3, 7, and 14 after injury. Akt, p38 MAPK, and Src activation were evaluated at the same time points using Western blotting. WT and CSWA following injury were significantly greater in Tgp22smc mice at both 7 and 14 days after injury while noninjured contralateral carotids were similar between groups. Apocynin treatment attenuated the injury response in both groups and rendered the response similar between Tgp22smc mice and wild-type mice. Following injury, carotid arteries from Tgp22smc mice demonstrated elevated activation of Akt at day 3, while p38 MAPK and Src activation was elevated at day 7 compared to wild-type mice. Both increased activation and temporal regulation of these signaling pathways may contribute to enhanced vascular growth in response to injury in this transgenic model of elevated vascular ROS.

  14. CO2 vascular anastomosis of atherosclerotic and calcified arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, John V.; Leefmans, Eric; Stewart, Gwendolyn J.; Katz, Mira L.; Comerota, Anthony J.

    1990-06-01

    The technique for CO2 laser fusion vascular anastomosis in normal vessels has been well established. Normal arterial wall has a predictable thermal response to the incident laser energy, with rapid heating and cooling of collagen within the arterial wall. Since atherosclerosis involves subendothelial cellular proliferation, lipid and calcium deposition, it may modify the thermal responsiveness of the arterial wall. To this study, CO2 laser fusion anastomoses were attempted in rabbits with non-calcific atherosclerosis and humans with calcific atherosclerosis. All anastomoses were successfully completed without alteration in technique despite the presence of plaque at the site of laser fusion. Histology of rabbit vessels revealed the classic laser fusion cap within the adventitia and persistent atherosclerotic plaque at the flow surface. Duplex imaging of patients post-operatively demonstrated long term anastomotic patency in 2 of 3 fistulae. These results suggest that neither non-calcified or calcified atherosclerosis significantly alters the arterial wall thermal responsiveness to CO2 laser energy or inhibits creation of laser fusion anastomoses. Therefore, this technique may be applicable to the treatment of patients with atherosclerotic occlusive disease.

  15. Current Trends in Heparin Use During Arterial Vascular Interventional Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durran, Alexandra C., E-mail: durranjobs@hotmail.com [Peninsula Radiology Academy, Plymouth International Business Park (United Kingdom); Watts, Christopher, E-mail: Christopher.watts@salisbury.nhs.uk [Salisbury District Hospital (United Kingdom)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess the current use of heparinized saline and bolus doses of heparin in non-neurological interventional radiology and to determine whether consensus could be reached to produce guidance for heparin use during arterial vascular intervention. Methods: An interactive electronic questionnaire was distributed to members of the British Society of Interventional Radiology regarding their current practice in the use, dosage, and timing of heparin boluses and heparinized flushing solutions.ResultsA total of 108 completed questionnaires were received. More than 80% of respondents used heparinized saline with varying concentrations; the most prevalent was 1,000 IU/l (international units of heparin per liter) and 5,000 IU/l. Fifty-one percent of interventionalists use 3,000 IU as their standard bolus dose; however, the respondents were split regarding the timing of bolus dose with {approx}60% administering it after arterial access is obtained and 40% after crossing the lesion. There was no consensus on altering dose according to body weight, and only 4% monitored clotting parameters. Conclusions: There seems to be some coherence among practicing interventionalists regarding heparin administration. We hypothesize that heparinized saline should be used at a recognized standard concentration of 1,000 IU/l as a flushing concentration in all arterial vascular interventions and that 3,000 IU bolus is considered the standard dose for straightforward therapeutic procedures and 5000 IU for complex, crural, and endovascular aneurysm repair work. The bolus should be given after arterial access is obtained to allow time for optimal anticoagulation to be achieved by the time of active intervention and stenting. Further research into clotting abnormalities following such interventional procedures would be an interesting quantifiable follow-up to this initial survey of opinions and practice.

  16. Current Trends in Heparin Use During Arterial Vascular Interventional Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study was designed to assess the current use of heparinized saline and bolus doses of heparin in non-neurological interventional radiology and to determine whether consensus could be reached to produce guidance for heparin use during arterial vascular intervention. Methods: An interactive electronic questionnaire was distributed to members of the British Society of Interventional Radiology regarding their current practice in the use, dosage, and timing of heparin boluses and heparinized flushing solutions.ResultsA total of 108 completed questionnaires were received. More than 80% of respondents used heparinized saline with varying concentrations; the most prevalent was 1,000 IU/l (international units of heparin per liter) and 5,000 IU/l. Fifty-one percent of interventionalists use 3,000 IU as their standard bolus dose; however, the respondents were split regarding the timing of bolus dose with ∼60% administering it after arterial access is obtained and 40% after crossing the lesion. There was no consensus on altering dose according to body weight, and only 4% monitored clotting parameters. Conclusions: There seems to be some coherence among practicing interventionalists regarding heparin administration. We hypothesize that heparinized saline should be used at a recognized standard concentration of 1,000 IU/l as a flushing concentration in all arterial vascular interventions and that 3,000 IU bolus is considered the standard dose for straightforward therapeutic procedures and 5000 IU for complex, crural, and endovascular aneurysm repair work. The bolus should be given after arterial access is obtained to allow time for optimal anticoagulation to be achieved by the time of active intervention and stenting. Further research into clotting abnormalities following such interventional procedures would be an interesting quantifiable follow-up to this initial survey of opinions and practice.

  17. Killing effect of coexpressing cytosine deaminase and thymidine kinase on rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹慧青; 孟宪敏; 刘冬青; 赵秀文; 丁金凤

    2004-01-01

    Background Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation following arterial injury plays a critical role in a variety of vascular proliferative disorders, such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after balloon angioplasty. Herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-TK)/ganciclovir (GCV) and E.coli cytosine deaminase (CD)/5-fluorocytosine (5-Fc) suicide gene systems have been successfully employed in cardiovascular gene therapy, respectively. We reasoned that coexpression of both HSV-TK with CD suicide genes would lead to increased cell killing. To test this imagine, the adenoviral vectors expressing TK and/or CD genes were developed and tested on vascular smooth muscle cells. Methods Adenoviral vectors, including Ad-EF1α-CD-cytomegolovirus (CMV)-TK coexpressing both CD and TK double suicide genes, Ad-EF1α-CD and Ad-CMV-TK expressing CD and TK respectively, and control vector Ad-CMV-LacZ, were constructed and prepared with homologous recombination in RecA+E.coli cells. Integration and expression of CD and/or TK gene were identified by PCR and Western blot. Primary cultured VSMCs were infected at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 20 with exposure to their matching prodrugs 5-Fc and GCV. Cell mortality was measured by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) assays. Flow cytometry analysis was used to detect cell death. Apoptotic cells were analyzed using Hoechst 33342 fluorescence dye as a DNA probe. Genomic DNA cleavage of apoptotic VSMCs was tested by agarose gel electrophoresis. Results Recombinant adenovirus expressing CD and/or TK suicide genes were successfully constructed. Both single and double suicide genes could be integrated into adenoviral genome and expressed. Cytotoxic effects of Ad-EF1α-CD-CMV-TK double suicide genes combined with 5-Fc and GCV were higher than those of Ad-CMV-TK and Ad-EF1α-CD single gene groups. The rate of cell survival was only (9±3)% in the Ad-EF1α-CD-CMV-TK group, but (37±3)% in the Ad-CMV-TK and (46±4)% in the Ad-EF1

  18. Azelnidipine inhibits Msx2-dependent osteogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takehisa; Tanaka, Toru; Iso, Tatsuya; Kawai-Kowase, Keiko; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    Vascular calcification is an active and regulated process that is similar to bone formation. While calcium channel blockers (CCBs) have been shown to improve outcomes in atherosclerotic vascular disease, it remains unknown whether CCBs have an effect on the process of vascular calcification. Here we investigated whether CCBs inhibit osteogenic differentiation and matrix mineralization of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by Msx2, a key factor of vascular calcification. Human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) were transduced with adenovirus expressing MSX2 and were treated with 3 distinct CCBs. Azelnidipine, a dihydropyridine subclass of CCBs, significantly decreased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of Msx2-overexpressed HASMCs, whereas verapamil and diltiazem had no effect. Furthermore, azelnidipine, but not verapamil and diltiazem, significantly decreased matrix mineralization of Msx2-overexpressing HASMCs. Azelnidipine significantly attenuated the induction of ALP gene expression by Msx2, a key transcription factor in osteogenesis, while it did not reduce enzymatic activity of ALP. Furthermore, azelnidipine inhibited the ability of Msx2 to activate the ALP gene, but had no effect on Notch-induced Msx2 expression. Given that L-type calcium channels are equally blocked by these CCBs, our results suggest that azelnidipine inhibits the Msx2-dependent process of vascular calcification by mechanisms other than inhibition of calcium channel activity.

  19. The Effect of Erigeron Breviscapus on Proliferation of Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells in Hypoxic Porcines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING; Yipeng; XU; Yongjian; ZHANG; Zhenxiang

    2001-01-01

    In order to study the effect of Erigeron Breviscapus (EB) on proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) in hypoxic porcines, immunohistochemical and MTT methods were employed to measure the proliferation of PASMC. It was found that the proliferation of PASMC in porcines was obvious, and the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)was significantly high within 48 h after exposure to hypoxia. The EB could inhibit the proliferation and the expression of PCNA in PASMC under hypoxia, but it had no effect on the proliferation and expression of PCNA in PASMC under normal condition. The EB could inhibit the proliferation and the expression of PCNA in PASMC induced by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), an agonist of PKC in normal and hypoxic conditions. It was concluded that the hypoxia could enhance the proliferation and expression of PCNA in PASMC. The EB can inhibit the proliferation and expression of PCNA in PASMC under hypoxia through PKC-signal way. The EB may be used in treating the pulmonary hypertension by inhibiting the proliferation of PASMC and the pulmonary vascular remodeling.

  20. HYPOXIA AND ENDOTHELIN-1 STIMULATE DNA SYNTHESIS OF PULMONARY ARTERY SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯晓东; 蔡英年

    1996-01-01

    Hypoxia and endothelin-1 (ET-1) are associated with constriction of pulmonary vasculature both in vivo and in vitro. However, the role of hypoxia and ET-1 in the vascular remodelling during the development of pulmonary, hypertension is unciear. This study demonstrated that ET-1 (0.1nmol/L to 100nmol./L)increased the 3H]thymldine uptake in a dose-dependent manner in cuhured bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells(PASMC), which was enhanced by exposing PASMC to hypoxia (2% O2, 93%N2,5%CO2). BQ123, the specific antagonist of endot helin receptor subtype A, eiLmLnated the ET-1 medicated proliferati0n of PASMC and the cooperative effect of hypoxia. Some dilatory drugs could inhibite the mitogenic effect of ET-1. We also observed that hypoxia significantiy increased [3H]thymldine uptake in PASMC without ET-1 and BQ123 could inhibite this effect. Radioimmunoassay suggested that there was an autocrine of ET-1 in cultured PASMC which was enhanced by hypoxia significantly.

  1. Regulation of CCL5 expression in smooth muscle cells following arterial injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Liu

    Full Text Available Chemokines play a crucial role in inflammation and in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis by recruiting inflammatory immune cells to the endothelium. Chemokine CCL5 has been shown to be involved in atherosclerosis progression. However, little is known about how CCL5 is regulated in vascular smooth muscle cells. In this study we report that CCL5 mRNA expression was induced and peaked in aorta at day 7 and then declined after balloon artery injury, whereas IP-10 and MCP-1 mRNA expression were induced and peaked at day 3 and then rapidly declined.The expression of CCL5 receptors (CCR1, 3 & 5 were also rapidly induced and then declined except CCR5 which expression was still relatively high at day 14 after balloon injury. In rat smooth muscle cells (SMCs, similar as in aorta CCL5 mRNA expression was induced and kept increasing after LPS plus IFN-gamma stimulation, whereas IP-10 mRNA expression was rapidly induced and then declined. Our data further indicate that induction of CCL5 expression in SMCs was mediated by IRF-1 via binding to the IRF-1 response element in CCL5 promoter. Moreover, p38 MAPK was involved in suppression of CCL5 and IP-10 expression in SMCs through common upstream molecule MKK3. The downstream molecule MK2 was required for p38-mediated CCL5 but not IP-10 inhibition. Our findings indicate that CCL5 induction in aorta and SMCs is mediated by IRF-1 while activation of p38 MAPK signaling inhibits CCL5 and IP-10 expression. Methods targeting MK2 expression could be used to selectively regulate CCL5 but not IP-10 expression in SMCs.

  2. Pathogenesis of Focal Cytoplasmic Necrosis of the Smooth Muscle Cells in Hypertensive Rat Arterial Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypertensive rat arteries exhibited severe medial smooth muscle cell injury and necrosis. Electron microscopic observations showed the smooth muscle cells of these arteries exhibited characteristics of focal cytoplasmic necrosis forming new cytodemarcating membrane between the healthy cytoplasm and necrotic cytoplasm. When the focal necrotic cytoplasm disappeared from the injured smooth muscle cells, it left it with a moth-eaten leaf-like appearance (moth-eaten necrosis). At an advanced stage of injury, smooth muscle cells changed to islet-like cell bodies with newly formed basement membranes around them, and further islet-like cell bodies and cell debris disappeared leaving lamellar and reticular basement membranes. In hypertensive rats injected with nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT), formazan deposits were observed in the medial cells and nitrotyrosine, a biomarker of peroxynitrite, were immunohistochemically observed in the arterial media. Nick-end positive extranuclear small granular bodies, which might have derived from focal necrotic cytoplasm and nucleus, were detected in the arterial media using DNA nick-end labeling method. Based on electron microscopical and histochemical findings, we conjectured that the focal cytoplasmic necrosis of the smooth muscle cells in the arterial media depended on injury arising from mitochondria-derived oxidants

  3. Phospholipase D signaling in serotonin-induced mitogenesis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Fanburg, B L

    2008-09-01

    We have previously reported the participation of mitogen-activated protein, Rho, and phosphoinositide-3 (PI3) kinases in separate pathways in serotonin (5-HT)-induced proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In this study, we investigated the possible participation of phospholipase D (PLD) and phosphatidic acid (PA) in this growth process. 5-HT stimulated a time-dependent increase in [(3)H]phosphatidylbutanol and PA generation. Exposure of SMCs to 1-butanol or overexpression of an inactive mutant of human PLD1R898R blocked 5-HT-induced proliferation. Furthermore, 1-butanol inhibited 5-HT activation of S6K1 and S6 protein, downstream effectors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), by 80 and 72%, respectively, and partially blocked activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by 30% but had no effect on other associated signaling pathways. Exogenous PA caused cellular proliferation and revitalized cyclin D1 expression by 5-HT of the 1-butanol-treated cells. PA also reproduced activations by 5-HT of mTOR, S6K1, and ERK. Transfection with inactive human PLD1 reduced 5-HT-induced activation of S6K1 by approximately 50%. Inhibition of 5-HT receptor 2A (R 2A) with ketaserin blocked PLD activation by 5-HT. Inhibition with PI3-kinase inhibitor failed to block either activation of PLD by 5-HT or PA-dependent S6K1 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that ligation of the 5-HTR 2A by 5-HT initiates PLD activation in SMCs, and that its product, PA, is an early signaling molecule in 5-HT-induced pulmonary artery SMC proliferation. Signaling by PA produces its downstream effects primarily through the mTOR/S6K1 pathway and to a lesser extent through the ERK pathway. Hydrolysis of cell membrane lipid may be important in vascular effects of 5-HT. PMID:18621911

  4. Phospholipase D signaling in serotonin-induced mitogenesis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Fanburg, B L

    2008-09-01

    We have previously reported the participation of mitogen-activated protein, Rho, and phosphoinositide-3 (PI3) kinases in separate pathways in serotonin (5-HT)-induced proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In this study, we investigated the possible participation of phospholipase D (PLD) and phosphatidic acid (PA) in this growth process. 5-HT stimulated a time-dependent increase in [(3)H]phosphatidylbutanol and PA generation. Exposure of SMCs to 1-butanol or overexpression of an inactive mutant of human PLD1R898R blocked 5-HT-induced proliferation. Furthermore, 1-butanol inhibited 5-HT activation of S6K1 and S6 protein, downstream effectors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), by 80 and 72%, respectively, and partially blocked activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by 30% but had no effect on other associated signaling pathways. Exogenous PA caused cellular proliferation and revitalized cyclin D1 expression by 5-HT of the 1-butanol-treated cells. PA also reproduced activations by 5-HT of mTOR, S6K1, and ERK. Transfection with inactive human PLD1 reduced 5-HT-induced activation of S6K1 by approximately 50%. Inhibition of 5-HT receptor 2A (R 2A) with ketaserin blocked PLD activation by 5-HT. Inhibition with PI3-kinase inhibitor failed to block either activation of PLD by 5-HT or PA-dependent S6K1 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that ligation of the 5-HTR 2A by 5-HT initiates PLD activation in SMCs, and that its product, PA, is an early signaling molecule in 5-HT-induced pulmonary artery SMC proliferation. Signaling by PA produces its downstream effects primarily through the mTOR/S6K1 pathway and to a lesser extent through the ERK pathway. Hydrolysis of cell membrane lipid may be important in vascular effects of 5-HT.

  5. Synergistic effects of matrix nanotopography and stiffness on vascular smooth muscle cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaterji, Somali; Kim, Peter; Choe, Seung H; Tsui, Jonathan H; Lam, Christoffer H; Ho, Derek S; Baker, Aaron B; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2014-08-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) retain the ability to undergo modulation in their phenotypic continuum, ranging from a mature contractile state to a proliferative, secretory state. vSMC differentiation is modulated by a complex array of microenvironmental cues, which include the biochemical milieu of the cells and the architecture and stiffness of the extracellular matrix. In this study, we demonstrate that by using UV-assisted capillary force lithography (CFL) to engineer a polyurethane substratum of defined nanotopography and stiffness, we can facilitate the differentiation of cultured vSMCs, reduce their inflammatory signature, and potentially promote the optimal functioning of the vSMC contractile and cytoskeletal machinery. Specifically, we found that the combination of medial tissue-like stiffness (11 MPa) and anisotropic nanotopography (ridge width_groove width_ridge height of 800_800_600 nm) resulted in significant upregulation of calponin, desmin, and smoothelin, in addition to the downregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1, tissue factor, interleukin-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Further, our results allude to the mechanistic role of the RhoA/ROCK pathway and caveolin-1 in altered cellular mechanotransduction pathways via differential matrix nanotopography and stiffness. Notably, the nanopatterning of the stiffer substrata (1.1 GPa) resulted in the significant upregulation of RhoA, ROCK1, and ROCK2. This indicates that nanopatterning an 800_800_600 nm pattern on a stiff substratum may trigger the mechanical plasticity of vSMCs resulting in a hypercontractile vSMC phenotype, as observed in diabetes or hypertension. Given that matrix stiffness is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and that CFL can create different matrix nanotopographic patterns with high pattern fidelity, we are poised to create a combinatorial library of arterial test beds, whether they are healthy, diseased, injured, or aged. Such

  6. Enhanced production and action of cyclic ADP-ribose during oxidative stress in small bovine coronary arterial smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Andrew Y; Yi, Fan; Teggatz, Eric G; Zou, Ai-Ping; Li, Pin-Lan

    2004-03-01

    Recent studies in our lab and by others have indicated that cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) as a novel second messenger is importantly involved in vasomotor response in various vascular beds. However, the mechanism regulating cADPR production and actions remains poorly understood. The present study determined whether changes in redox status influence the production and action of cADPR in coronary arterial smooth muscle cells (CASMCs) and thereby alters vascular tone in these arteries. HPLC analyses demonstrated that xanthine (X, 40 microM)/xanthine oxidase (XO, 0.1 U/ml), a superoxide-generating system, increased the ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity by 59% in freshly isolated bovine CASMCs. However, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1-100 microM) had no significant effect on ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity. In these CASMCs, X/XO produced a rapid increase in [Ca2+]i (Delta[Ca2+]i=201 nM), which was significantly attenuated by a cADPR antagonist, 8-Br-cADPR. Both inhibition of cADPR production by nicotinamide (Nicot) and blockade of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) by tetracaine (TC) and ryanodine (Rya) significantly reduced X/XO-induced rapid Ca2+ responses. In isolated, perfused, and pressurized small bovine coronary arteries, X at 2.5-80 microM with a fixed XO level produced a concentration-dependent vasoconstriction with a maximal decrease in arterial diameter of 45%. This X/XO-induced vasoconstriction was significantly attenuated by 8-Br-cADPR, Nicot, TC, or Rya. We conclude that superoxide activates cADPR production, and thereby mobilizes intracellular Ca2+ from the SR and produces vasoconstriction in coronary arteries.

  7. miR-155-dependent regulation of mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 2 (MST2) coordinates inflammation, oxidative stress and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhan; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Yu; He, Ming; Zhang, Xin-hua; Ma, Dong; Zhang, Ruo-nan; Wu, Xiao-li; Wen, Jin-kun

    2015-07-01

    In response to vascular injury, inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell proliferation often occur simultaneously in vascular tissues. We previously observed that microRNA-155 (miR-155), which is implicated in proliferation and inflammation is involved in neointimal hyperplasia; however, the molecular mechanisms by which it regulates these processes remain largely unknown. In this study, we observed that vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation and neointimal formation in wire-injured femoral arteries were reduced by the loss of miR-155 and increased by the gain of miR-155. The proliferative effect of miR-155 was also observed in cultured VSMCs. Notably, expression of the miR-155-target protein mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 2 (MST2) was increased in the injured arteries of miR-155-/- mice. miR-155 directly repressed MST2 and thus activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway by promoting an interaction between RAF proto-oncogene serine/threonine-protein kinase (Raf-1) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) and stimulating inflammatory and oxidative stress responses; together, these effects lead to VSMC proliferation and vascular remodeling. Our data reveal that MST2 mediates miR-155-promoted inflammatory and oxidative stress responses by altering the interaction of MEK with Raf-1 and MST2 in response to vascular injury. Therefore, suppression of endogenous miR-155 might be a novel therapeutic strategy for vascular injury and remodeling. PMID:25892184

  8. Paraoxon Attenuates Vascular Smooth Muscle Contraction through Inhibiting Ca2+ Influx in the Rabbit Thoracic Aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouhong Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of paraoxon on vascular contractility using organ baths in thoracic aortic rings of rabbits and examined the effect of paraoxon on calcium homeostasis using a whole-cell patch-clamp technique in isolated aortic smooth muscle cells of rabbits. The findings show that administration of paraoxon (30 μM attenuated thoracic aorta contraction induced by phenylephrine (1 μM and/or a high K+ environment (80 mM in both the presence and absence of thoracic aortic endothelium. This inhibitory effect of paraoxon on vasoconstrictor-induced contraction was abolished in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, or in the presence of the Ca2+ channel inhibitor, verapamil. But atropine had little effect on the inhibitory effect of paraoxon on phenylephrine-induced contraction. Paraoxon also attenuated vascular smooth muscle contraction induced by the cumulative addition of CaCl2 and attenuated an increase of intracellular Ca2+ concentration induced by K+ in vascular smooth muscle cells. Moreover, paraoxon (30 μM inhibited significantly L-type calcium current in isolated aortic smooth muscle cells of rabbits. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that paraoxon attenuates vasoconstrictor-induced contraction through inhibiting Ca2+ influx in the rabbits thoracic aorta.

  9. Embryonic origins of human vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for in vitro modeling and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sanjay; Iyer, Dharini; Granata, Alessandra

    2014-06-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) arise from multiple origins during development, raising the possibility that differences in embryological origins between SMCs could contribute to site-specific localization of vascular diseases. In this review, we first examine the developmental pathways and embryological origins of vascular SMCs and then discuss in vitro strategies for deriving SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We then review in detail the potential for vascular disease modeling using iPSC-derived SMCs and consider the pathological implications of heterogeneous embryonic origins. Finally, we touch upon the role of human ESC-derived SMCs in therapeutic revascularization and the challenges remaining before regenerative medicine using ESC- or iPSC-derived cells comes of age.

  10. UAP56 is an important mediator of Angiotensin II/platelet derived growth factor induced vascular smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahni, Abha [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Wang, Nadan [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Center for Translational Medicine, Department of Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Alexis, Jeffrey, E-mail: jeffrey_alexis@urmc.rochester.edu [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Knockdown of UAP56 inhibits Angiotensin II/PDGF induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. ► UAP56 is a positive regulator of E2F transcriptional activation. ► UAP56 is present in the vessel wall of low flow carotid arteries. -- Abstract: Angiotensin (Ang) II and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are important mediators of pathologic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. Identifying downstream mediators of Ang II and PDGF signaling may provide insights for therapies to improve vascular proliferative diseases. We have previously demonstrated that breakpoint cluster region (Bcr) is an important mediator of Ang II/PDGF signaling in VSMC. We have recently reported that the DExD/H box protein UAP56 is an interacting partner of Bcr in regulating VSMC DNA synthesis. We hypothesized that UAP56 itself is an important regulator of VSMC proliferation. In this report we demonstrate that knockdown of UAP56 inhibits Ang II/PDGF induced VSMC DNA synthesis and proliferation, and inhibits E2F transcriptional activity. In addition, we demonstrate that UAP56 is present in the vessel wall of low-flow carotid arteries. These findings suggest that UAP56 is a regulator of VSMC proliferation and identify UAP56 as a target for preventing vascular proliferative disease.

  11. UAP56 is an important mediator of Angiotensin II/platelet derived growth factor induced vascular smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Knockdown of UAP56 inhibits Angiotensin II/PDGF induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. ► UAP56 is a positive regulator of E2F transcriptional activation. ► UAP56 is present in the vessel wall of low flow carotid arteries. -- Abstract: Angiotensin (Ang) II and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are important mediators of pathologic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. Identifying downstream mediators of Ang II and PDGF signaling may provide insights for therapies to improve vascular proliferative diseases. We have previously demonstrated that breakpoint cluster region (Bcr) is an important mediator of Ang II/PDGF signaling in VSMC. We have recently reported that the DExD/H box protein UAP56 is an interacting partner of Bcr in regulating VSMC DNA synthesis. We hypothesized that UAP56 itself is an important regulator of VSMC proliferation. In this report we demonstrate that knockdown of UAP56 inhibits Ang II/PDGF induced VSMC DNA synthesis and proliferation, and inhibits E2F transcriptional activity. In addition, we demonstrate that UAP56 is present in the vessel wall of low-flow carotid arteries. These findings suggest that UAP56 is a regulator of VSMC proliferation and identify UAP56 as a target for preventing vascular proliferative disease

  12. Arterial vascularization of the brain of the agouti (Dasyprocta aguti Linnaeus, 1766

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Sávio Bessa da Silva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The agouti, a rodent that is geographically distributed throughout South America, is greatly valued for its meat. This paper describes the arterial vascularization of the base of the agouti’s brain, characterizing behavior, and arterial origin and distribution. Ten animals from the Center for the Multiplication of Wild Animals (CEMAS/UFERSA were used and the study was approved by SISBIO (report number 32413- 1 and the Ethics Committee on Animal Use (CEUA/UFERSA (protocol 02/2010. After euthanasia, the animals were incised in the thoracic cavity by an injection of red-stained Neoprene latex 650 and the skulls were subsequently opened. The brains were extracted from the skulls for ventral surface analysis and then fixed in an aqueous 10% formaldehyde solution. The agouti’s arterial vascularization of the brain has two main components, namely the carotid and vertebrobasilar systems. The agouti’s carotid system accounts for vascularization of almost the entire forebrain, while the vertebrobasilar system accounts for vascularization of almost the entire posterior brain (medulla oblongata, pyramid, trapezoid body, cerebellum, bridge, and part of the third caudal section of the forebrain through the caudal cerebral arteries originating from the terminal branches of the basilar artery. The main arteries on the brain surface include the basilar artery, which is unique, and the arterial pairs, specifically the vertebral arteries, cerebellar caudal arteries, trigeminal artery, rostral cerebellar artery, basilar terminal branch artery, cerebral caudal artery, communicating caudal branch of the cerebral carotid artery, cerebral carotid artery, communicating branch rostral cerebral carotid artery, choroidal rostral artery, medial branch of the communicating branch rostral artery, internal ophthalmic artery, middle cerebral artery, and rostral cerebral artery.

  13. Transmembrane Protein 184A Is a Receptor Required for Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Responses to Heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Raymond J; Slee, Joshua B; Farwell, Sara Lynn N; Li, Yaqiu; Barthol, Trista; Patton, Walter A; Lowe-Krentz, Linda J

    2016-03-01

    Vascular cell responses to exogenous heparin have been documented to include decreased vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation following decreased ERK pathway signaling. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which heparin interacts with cells to induce those responses has remained unclear. Previously characterized monoclonal antibodies that block heparin binding to vascular cells have been found to mimic heparin effects. In this study, those antibodies were employed to isolate a heparin binding protein. MALDI mass spectrometry data provide evidence that the protein isolated is transmembrane protein 184A (TMEM184A). Commercial antibodies against three separate regions of the TMEM184A human protein were used to identify the TMEM184A protein in vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. A GFP-TMEM184A construct was employed to determine colocalization with heparin after endocytosis. Knockdown of TMEM184A eliminated the physiological responses to heparin, including effects on ERK pathway activity and BrdU incorporation. Isolated GFP-TMEM184A binds heparin, and overexpression results in additional heparin uptake. Together, these data support the identification of TMEM184A as a heparin receptor in vascular cells.

  14. Expression and Suppressive Effects of Interleukin-19 on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Pathophysiology and Development of Intimal Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ying; Sommerville, Laura J.; Cuneo, Anthony; Kelemen, Sheri E.; Autieri, Michael V.

    2008-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory cytokines may play a protective role in the progression of vascular disease. The purpose of this study was to characterize interleukin (IL)-19 expression and function in the development of intimal hyperplasia, and discern a potential mechanism of its direct effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). IL-19 is an immunomodulatory cytokine, the expression of which is reported to be restricted to inflammatory cells. In the present study, we found that IL-19 is not expressed in quiescent VSMCs or normal arteries but is induced in human arteries by injury and in cultured human VSMCs by inflammatory cytokines. Recombinant IL-19 significantly reduced VSMC proliferation (37.1 ± 4.8 × 103 versus 72.2 ± 6.1 × 103 cells/cm2) in a dose-dependent manner. IL-19 adenoviral gene transfer significantly reduced proliferation and neointimal formation in balloon angioplasty-injured rat carotid arteries (0.172 ± 29.9, versus 0.333 ± 71.9, and 0.309 ± 56.6 μm2). IL-19 induced activation of STAT3 as well as the expression of the suppressor of cytokine signaling 5 (SOCS5) in VSMCs. IL-19 treatment significantly reduced the activation of p44/42 and p38 MAPKs in stimulated VSMCs. Additionally, SOCS5 was found to interact with both p44/42 and p38 MAPKs in IL-19-treated human VSMCs. This is the first description of the expression of both IL-19 and SOCS5 in VSMCs and of the functional interaction between SOCS5 and MAPKs. We propose that through induction of SOCS5 and inhibition of signal transduction, IL-19 expression in VSMCs may represent a novel, protective, autocrine response of VSMCs to inflammatory stimuli. PMID:18669613

  15. Major and minor arterial malformations in patients with cutaneous vascular abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Castroviejo, Ignacio; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel I; Viaño, Juan; López-Gutierrez, Juan C; Palencia, Rafael

    2010-05-01

    The association of persistent embryonic arteries and the absence of 1 carotid or vertebral arteries with facial or neck hemangioma or vascular malformation have been frequently described. The abnormalities can involve major or minor vessels. Of 22 patients of our series with this neurocutaneous syndrome, 20 had the origin of both anterior cerebral arteries from the same internal carotid artery. Thirteen patients showed absence or hypoplasia of 1 carotid artery and 10 of 1 vertebral artery; 10 showed persistence of the trigeminal artery; 3 had persistent proatlantal artery; 6 showed the absence of the posterior communicating artery; and 4 had hypoplastic posterior cerebral artery. Other less frequent abnormalities were found in 7 patients. Intellectual level of most patients was either borderline or below normal. Abnormalities in the vascularization and perfusion of the frontal lobes may contribute to the borderline or lower mental level of these patients. PMID:19808986

  16. Generation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells from human pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Patsch, Christoph; Challet-Meylan, Ludivine; Eva C Thoma; Urich, Eduard; Heckel, Tobias; O’Sullivan, John F.; Grainger, Stephanie J.; Kapp, Friedrich G.; Sun, Lin; Christensen, Klaus; Xia, Yulei; Florido, Mary H. C.; He, Wei; Pan, Wei; Prummer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The use of human pluripotent stem cells for in vitro disease modeling and clinical applications requires protocols that convert these cells into relevant adult cell types. Here, we report the rapid and efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. We found that GSK3 inhibition and BMP4 treatment rapidly committed pluripotent cells to a mesodermal fate and subsequent exposure to VEGF or PDGF-BB resulted in the differentiation of ei...

  17. Antagonism by lipophilic quaternary ions of the K+ channel opener, levcromakalim, in vascular smooth muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    McPherson, G. A.; Piekarska, A. E.

    1994-01-01

    1. The aim of this study was to characterize the interaction between the K+ channel opener levcromakalim (LKM) and several quaternary ions, in vascular smooth muscle, in vitro. Segments of isolated, thoracic aorta of the rat were suspended in organ baths filled with Krebs solution at 37 degrees C. Cumulative concentration-response curves to LKM were obtained in the absence and in the presence of increasing concentrations of quaternary ions using a number of agents to pre-constrict the vessel....

  18. miR-599 Inhibits Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Proliferation and Migration by Targeting TGFB2

    OpenAIRE

    Baodong Xie; Chunfeng Zhang; Kai Kang; Shulin Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases including coronary heart disease, restenosis and atherosclerosis. MicroRNAs are a class of small, non-coding and endogenous RNAs that play critical roles in VSMCs function. In this study, we showed that PDGF-bb, as a stimulant, promoted VSMCs proliferation and suppressed the expression of miR-599. Moreover, overexpression of miR-599 inhibited VSMCs pr...

  19. Piperlongumine inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by suppressing PDGF receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Dong Ju; Kim, Soo Yeon; Han, Seong Su; Kim, Chan Woo; Kumar, Sandeep; Park, Byeoung Soo; Lee, Sung Eun; Yun, Yeo Pyo; Jo, Hanjoong; Park, Young Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL) is an alkaloid found in the long pepper (Piper longum L.) and has well-documented anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties; however, the role of PL in prevention of atherosclerosis is unknown. We evaluated the anti-atherosclerotic potential of PL in an in vivo murine model of accelerated atherosclerosis and defined its mechanism of action in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local treatment with PL significant...

  20. The vascular smooth muscle alpha-actin gene is reactivated during cardiac hypertrophy provoked by load.

    OpenAIRE

    Black, F M; Packer, S E; Parker, T G; Michael, L H; Roberts, R; R J Schwartz; Schneider, M D

    1991-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy triggered by mechanical load possesses features in common with growth factor signal transduction. A hemodynamic load provokes rapid expression of the growth factor-inducible nuclear oncogene, c-fos, and certain peptide growth factors specifically stimulate the "fetal" cardiac genes associated with hypertrophy, even in the absence of load. These include the gene encoding vascular smooth muscle alpha-actin, the earliest alpha-actin expressed during cardiac myogenesis; howeve...

  1. Impaired LRP6-TCF7L2 Activity Enhances Smooth Muscle Cell Plasticity and Causes Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshni Srivastava

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in Wnt-signaling coreceptor LRP6 have been linked to coronary artery disease (CAD by unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that reduced LRP6 activity in LRP6R611C mice promotes loss of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC differentiation, leading to aortic medial hyperplasia. Carotid injury augmented these effects and led to partial to total vascular obstruction. LRP6R611C mice on high-fat diet displayed dramatic obstructive CAD and exhibited an accelerated atherosclerotic burden on LDLR knockout background. Mechanistically, impaired LRP6 activity leads to enhanced non-canonical Wnt signaling, culminating in diminished TCF7L2 and increased Sp1-dependent activation of PDGF signaling. Wnt3a administration to LRP6R611C mice improved LRP6 activity, led to TCF7L2-dependent VSMC differentiation, and rescued post-carotid-injury neointima formation. These findings demonstrate the critical role of intact Wnt signaling in the vessel wall, establish a causal link between impaired LRP6/TCF7L2 activities and arterial disease, and identify Wnt signaling as a therapeutic target against CAD.

  2. Onychin inhibits proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells by regulating cell cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming YANG; Hong-lin HUANG; Bing-yang ZHU; Qin-hui TUO; Duan-fang LIAO

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of onychin on the proliferation of cultured rat artery vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the presence of 10% new-borncalf serum (NCS). Methods: Rat VSMCs were incubated with onychin 1-50 μmol/L or genistein 10 μmol/L in the presence of 10% NCS for 24 h. The proliferation of VSMCs was measured by cell counting and MTS/PMS colorimetric assays. Cell cycle progression was evaluated by flow cytometry. Retinoblastoma (Rb) phosphorylation, and expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E were measured by Western blot assays. The tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was examined by immunoprecipitation techniques using anti-phospho-tyrosine antibodies. Results: The proliferation of VSMCs was accelerated significantly in the presence of 10% NCS. Onychin reduced the metabolic rate of MTS and the cell number of VSMCs in the presence of 10% NCS in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analy sis revealed that the G1-phase fraction ratio in the onychin group was higher than that in the 10% NCS group (85.2% vs 70.0%, P<0.01), while the S-phase fraction ratio in the onychin group was lower than that in 10% NCS group (4.3% vs 16.4%, P<0.01). Western blot analysis showed that onychin inhibited Rb phos phorylation and reduced the expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E. The effects of onychin on proliferation, the cell cycle and the expression of cyclins in VSMCs were similar to those of genistein, an inhibitor of tyrosine kinase. Furthermore immunoprecipitation studies showed that both onychin and genistein markedly inhibited the tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK1/2 induced by 10% NCS.Conclusion: Onychin inhibits the proliferation of VSMCs through G1 phase cell cycle arrest by decreasing the tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and the expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E, and sequentially inhibiting Rb phosphorylation.

  3. Extravillous trophoblast cells-derived exosomes promote Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eSalomon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs migration is a critical process during human uterine spiral artery (SpA remodeling and a successful pregnancy. Extravillous trophoblast cells (EVT interact with VSMC and enhance their migration, however, the mechanisms by which EVT remodel SpA remain to be fully elucidated. We hypothesize that exosomes released from EVT promote VSMC migration.Methods: JEG-3 and HTR-8/SVneo cell lines were used as models for EVT. Cells were cultured at 37 0C and humidified under an atmosphere of 5% CO2-balanced N2 to obtain 8% O2. Cell-conditioned media were collected and exosomes (exo-JEG-3 and exo- HTR-8/SVneo isolated by differential and buoyant density centrifugation. The effects of exo-EVT on VSMC migration were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™. Exosomal proteins where identified by mass spectrometry and submitted to bioinformatic pathway analysis (Ingenuity software .Results: HTR-8/SVneo cells were significantly more (~30% invasive than JEG-3 cells. HTR-8/SVneo cells released 2.6-fold more exosomes (6.39 x 108 ± 2.5 x108 particles/106 cells compared to JEG-3 (2.86 x 108 ± 0.78 x108 particles/106 cells. VSMC migration was significantly increased in the presence of exo-JEG-3 and exo-HTR-8/SVneo compared to control (-exosomes (21.83 ± 0.49 h and 15.57 ± 0.32, respectively, versus control 25.09 ± 0.58 h, p<0.05. Sonication completely abolished the effect of exosomes on VSMC migration. Finally, mass spectrometry analysis identified unique exosomal proteins for each EVT cell line-derived exosomes.Conclusion: The data obtained in this study are consistent with the hypothesis that the release, content and bioactivity of exosomes derived from EVT-like cell lines is cell origin-dependent and differentially regulates VSMC migration. Thus, an EVT exosomal signaling pathway may contribute to SpA remodeling by promoting the migration of VSMC out of the vessel walls.

  4. Metformin inhibits inflammatory response via AMPK-PTEN pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Ae [Department of Pharmacology, Aging-Associated Vascular Disease Research Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyoung Chul, E-mail: hcchoi@med.yu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, Aging-Associated Vascular Disease Research Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN was induced by metformin and inhibited by compound C and AMPK siRNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin suppressed TNF-{alpha}-induced COX-2 and iNOS mRNA expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound C and bpv (pic) increased iNOS and COX-2 protein expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B activation was restored by inhibiting AMPK and PTEN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AMPK and PTEN regulated TNF-{alpha}-induced ROS production in VSMCs. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammation of the coronary arteries. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) stimulated by cytokines and chemokines accelerate the inflammatory response and migrate to the injured endothelium during the progression of atherosclerosis. Activation of AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor maintaining metabolic homeostasis, suppresses the inflammatory response. However, how AMPK regulates the inflammatory response is poorly understood. To identify the mechanism of this response, we focused on phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), which is a negative regulator of inflammation. We investigated that activation of AMPK-induced PTEN expression and suppression of the inflammatory response through the AMPK-PTEN pathway in VSMCs. We treated with the well-known AMPK activator metformin to induce PTEN expression. PTEN was induced by metformin (2 mM) and inhibited by compound C (10 {mu}M) and AMPK siRNA. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) was used to induce inflammation. The inflammatory response was confirmed by cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and activation of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B. Metformin suppressed COX-2 and iNOS mRNA and protein expression dose dependently. Treatment with compound C and bpv (pic) in the presence of metformin, iNOS and COX-2 protein expression increased. NF-{kappa}B activation decreased in response to metformin and was restored by inhibiting AMPK

  5. INHIBITORY EFFECT OF ANGIOTENSIN Ⅱ TYPE 1 RECEPTOR-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN ON VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL GROWTH AND NEOINTIMAL FORMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Li; Zhong-gao Wang; Xiu Chen; Xiao-dong Chen

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the mechanism of a novel angiotensin n type 1 receptor-associated protein (ATRAP) interfering with angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 (AT1) receptor-mediated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) growth and neointimal formation. Methods VSMCs isolated from thoracic aorta of adult Sprague-Dawley ( SD) rats were used in this study. ATRAP Cdna was subcloned into pcDNA3 vector and then transfected into VSMCs. DNA synthesis and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and phospho-ERK expressions in VSMCs were assayed by measurement of 3H thymidine incorporation and Western blotting, respectively. Morphological changes were observed in the balloon injured artery with or without transfection of ATRAP Cdna using 12-week-old male SD rats. Results ATRAP overexpression in VSMCs inhibited angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ) -induced 3H thymidine incorporation 48 hours after Ang Ⅱ stimulation (P < 0.05). In VSMC, Ang Ⅱ stimulation increased the phosphorylation of ERK, which reached the peak around 60 minutes. The activation of phospho-ERK was significantly decreased by ATRAP (P < 0.05). Neointimal formation was markedly inhibited by ATRAP overexpression in injuried arteries. Conclusions The AT1 receptor-derived activation of ERK plays an essential role in Ang Ⅱ-induced VSMC growth. The growth inhibitory effects of ATRAP might be due to interfering with AT1 receptor-mediated activation of ERK in VSMC growth and neointimal formation.

  6. Cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells are resistant to methylamine toxicity: no correlation to semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, S. D.; Trent, M. B.; Boor, P. J.

    2001-01-01

    Methylamine (MA), a component of serum and a metabolite of nicotine and certain insecticides and herbicides, is metabolized by semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO). MA is toxic to cultured human umbilical vein and calf pulmonary artery endothelial cells. Endothelial cells, which do not exhibit endogenous SSAO activity, are exposed to SSAO circulating in serum. In contrast, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) do exhibit innate SSAO activity both in vivo and in vitro. This property, together with the critical localization of VSMC within the arterial wall, led us to investigate the potential toxicity of MA to VSMC. Cultured rat VSMC were treated with MA (10-5 to 1 M). In some cultures, SSAO was selectively inhibited with semicarbazide or MDL-72145 [(E)-2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-fluoroallylamine]. Cytotoxicity was measured via MTT, vital dye exclusion, and clonogenic assays. MA proved to be toxic to VSMC only at relatively high concentrations (LC(50) of 0.1 M). The inhibition of SSAO with semicarbazide or MDL-72145 did not increase MA toxicity, suggesting that the production of formaldehyde via tissue-bound, SSAO-mediated MA metabolism does not play a role in the minimal toxicity observed in isolated rat VSMC. The omission of fetal calf serum (FCS), which contains high SSAO activity, from media similarly showed little effect on cytotoxicity. We conclude that VSMC--in contrast to previous results in endothelial cells--are relatively resistant to MA toxicity, and SSAO does not play a role in VSMC injury by MA.

  7. Effects of low-intensity laser irradiation on the apoptosis of rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells in culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S. D.; Chen, P.; Zhang, C. P.; Wen, J. X.; Liang, J.; Kang, H. X.; Gao, R. L.; Fu, X. B.

    2011-11-01

    Restenosis is a major complication after coronary intervention therapy. Excessive proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and a decline in their apoptosis, which eventually leads to excessive neointimal thickening in coronary arteries, are the main causes of restenosis. Induction of the apoptosis of VSMCs and inhibition of excessive proliferation of VSMCs are therefore crucial for the prevention of restenosis, and low-intensity laser irradiation of coronary arteries may play a promising role in keeping this in balance. In this study, we used in vitro cultured rabbit VSMCs to investigate the effects of low-intensity laser irradiation at a wavelength of 532 nm on the apoptosis of VSMCs via morphological observation and molecular biology. The results showed that apoptotic bodies and obvious intranuclear apoptosis-positive particles formed within VSMCs 24 h after laser irradiation, suggesting that low-intensity laser irradiation at certain doses can inhibit the proliferation of VSMCs by promoting their apoptosis. This experiment provides evidences for further animal experiments and clinical trials on prevention and treatment of restenosis by intracoronary low-intensity laser irradiation at a wavelength of 532 nm.

  8. Induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase in vascular smooth muscle cells by interferon-gamma contributes to medial immunoprivilege.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffy, Madison C; Silverio, Amanda M; Qin, Lingfeng; Wang, Yinong; Eid, Raymond; Brandacher, Gerald; Lakkis, Fadi G; Fuchs, Dietmar; Pober, Jordan S; Tellides, George

    2007-10-15

    Atherosclerosis and graft arteriosclerosis are characterized by leukocytic infiltration of the vessel wall that spares the media. The mechanism(s) for medial immunoprivilege is unknown. In a chimeric humanized mouse model of allograft rejection, medial immunoprivilege was associated with expression of IDO by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of rejecting human coronary artery grafts. Inhibition of IDO by 1-methyl-tryptophan (1-MT) increased medial infiltration by allogeneic T cells and increased VSMC loss. IFN-gamma-induced IDO expression and activity in cultured human VSMCs was considerably greater than in endothelial cells (ECs) or T cells. IFN-gamma-treated VSMCs, but not untreated VSMCs nor ECs with or without IFN-gamma pretreatment, inhibited memory Th cell alloresponses across a semipermeable membrane in vitro. This effect was reversed by 1-MT treatment or tryptophan supplementation and replicated by the absence of tryptophan, but not by addition of tryptophan metabolites. However, IFN-gamma-treated VSMCs did not activate allogeneic memory Th cells, even after addition of 1-MT or tryptophan. Our work extends the concept of medial immunoprivilege to include immune regulation, establishes the compartmentalization of immune responses within the vessel wall due to distinct microenvironments, and demonstrates a duality of stimulatory EC signals versus inhibitory VSMC signals to artery-infiltrating T cells that may contribute to the chronicity of arteriosclerotic diseases.

  9. Suppression of Akt1 phosphorylation by adenoviral transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits hypoxia-induced proliferation of rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Chunxia [Department of Neurosurgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Yi, Bin, E-mail: yibin1974@163.com [Department of Anesthesia, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Institute of Respiratory Disease, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Bai, Li [Institute of Respiratory Disease, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Xia, Yongzhi [Department of Neurosurgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Wang, Guansong; Qian, Guisheng [Institute of Respiratory Disease, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Feng, Hua [Department of Neurosurgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2010-07-02

    Recent findings identify the role of proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase (Akt) proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been identified as a negative regulator of cytokine signaling that inhibits the PI3K-Akt pathway. However, little is known about the role of PTEN/Akt signaling in hypoxia-associated vascular remodeling. In this study, we found that hypoxia-induced the expression of Akt1 mRNA and phosphorylated protein by at least twofold in rat PASMCs. Phospho-PTEN significantly decreased in the nuclei of PASMCs after hypoxic stimulation. After forcing over-expression of PTEN by adenovirus-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) transfection, the expression of phospho-Akt1 was significantly suppressed in PASMCs at all time-points measured. Additionally, we showed here that hypoxia increased proliferation of PASMCs by nearly twofold and over-expression of PTEN significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced PASMCs proliferation. These findings suggest that phospho-PTEN loss in the nuclei of PASMCs under hypoxic conditions may be the major cause of aberrant activation of Akt1 and may, therefore, play an important role in hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling. Finally, the fact that transfection with Ad-PTEN inhibits the phosphorylation of Akt1 in PASMCs suggests a potential therapeutic effect on hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling.

  10. Regulation of Collagen Type I in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells by Competition between Nkx2.5 and δEF1/ZEB1

    OpenAIRE

    Ponticos, Markella; Partridge, Terrence; BLACK, CAROL M.; Abraham, David J.; Bou-Gharios, George

    2004-01-01

    A major component of the vessel wall of large arteries and veins is the extracellular matrix (ECM), which consists of collagens, elastin, and proteoglycans. Collagen type I is one of the most abundant of the ECM proteins. We have previously shown that the pro-collagen type I alpha 2 gene contains an enhancer which confers tissue-specific expression in the majority of collagen-producing cells, including blood vessels. In this paper, we delineate a specific vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) el...

  11. Human vascular smooth muscle cells both express and respond to heparin-binding growth factor I (endothelial cell growth factor).

    OpenAIRE

    Winkles, J A; Friesel, R; Burgess, W H; Howk, R; Mehlman, T; Weinstein, R.; T. MACIAG

    1987-01-01

    The control of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell proliferation is important in such processes as tumor angiogenesis, wound healing, and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Class I heparin-binding growth factor (HBGF-I) is a potent mitogen and chemoattractant for human endothelial cells in vitro and will induce angiogenesis in vivo. RNA gel blot hybridization experiments demonstrate that cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells, but not human umbilical vein endothelial cells, exp...

  12. Mercury induces proliferation and reduces cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells through MAPK, oxidative stress and cyclooxygenase-2 pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercury exposure is known to increase cardiovascular risk but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain undetermined. We analyzed whether chronic exposure to HgCl2 affects vascular structure and the functional properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2 dependent pathways. Mesenteric resistance arteries and aortas from Wistar rats treated with HgCl2 (first dose 4.6 mg kg−1, subsequent doses 0.07 mg kg−1 day−1, 30 days) and cultured aortic VSMC stimulated with HgCl2 (0.05–5 μg/ml) were used. Treatment of rats with HgCl2 decreased wall thickness of the resistance and conductance vasculature, increased the number of SMC within the media and decreased SMC nucleus size. In VSMCs, exposure to HgCl2: 1) induced a proliferative response and a reduction in cell size; 2) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity, gene and/or protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunit NOX-1, the EC- and Mn-superoxide dismutases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2); 3) induced activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized the proliferative response and the altered cell size induced by HgCl2. Blockade of ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished the HgCl2-induced Nox1 and COX-2 expression and normalized the alterations induced by mercury in cell proliferation and size. In conclusion, long exposure of VSMC to low doses of mercury activates MAPK signaling pathways that result in activation of inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2 that in turn induce proliferation of VSMC and changes in cell size. These findings offer further evidence that mercury might be considered an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: ► Chronic HgCl2 exposure induces vascular remodeling. ► HgCl2 induces proliferation and decreased cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► HgCl2 induces MAPK activation, oxidative stress and COX-2 expression. ► Inhibition of

  13. Mercury induces proliferation and reduces cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells through MAPK, oxidative stress and cyclooxygenase-2 pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguado, Andrea; Galán, María; Zhenyukh, Olha; Wiggers, Giulia A.; Roque, Fernanda R. [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); Redondo, Santiago [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Peçanha, Franck [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); Martín, Angela [Departamento de Bioquímica, Fisiología y Genética Molecular, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28922, Alcorcón (Spain); Fortuño, Ana [Área de Ciencias Cardiovasculares, Centro de Investigación Médica Aplicada, Universidad de Navarra, 31008, Pamplona (Spain); Cachofeiro, Victoria [Departamento de Fisiología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Tejerina, Teresa [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Salaices, Mercedes, E-mail: mercedes.salaices@uam.es [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Instituto de Investigación Hospital Universitario La Paz (IdiPAZ), 28029, Madrid (Spain); and others

    2013-04-15

    Mercury exposure is known to increase cardiovascular risk but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain undetermined. We analyzed whether chronic exposure to HgCl{sub 2} affects vascular structure and the functional properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2 dependent pathways. Mesenteric resistance arteries and aortas from Wistar rats treated with HgCl{sub 2} (first dose 4.6 mg kg{sup −1}, subsequent doses 0.07 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}, 30 days) and cultured aortic VSMC stimulated with HgCl{sub 2} (0.05–5 μg/ml) were used. Treatment of rats with HgCl{sub 2} decreased wall thickness of the resistance and conductance vasculature, increased the number of SMC within the media and decreased SMC nucleus size. In VSMCs, exposure to HgCl{sub 2}: 1) induced a proliferative response and a reduction in cell size; 2) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity, gene and/or protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunit NOX-1, the EC- and Mn-superoxide dismutases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2); 3) induced activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized the proliferative response and the altered cell size induced by HgCl{sub 2}. Blockade of ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished the HgCl{sub 2}-induced Nox1 and COX-2 expression and normalized the alterations induced by mercury in cell proliferation and size. In conclusion, long exposure of VSMC to low doses of mercury activates MAPK signaling pathways that result in activation of inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2 that in turn induce proliferation of VSMC and changes in cell size. These findings offer further evidence that mercury might be considered an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: ► Chronic HgCl{sub 2} exposure induces vascular remodeling. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces proliferation and decreased cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces

  14. Differential effects of relaxin deficiency on vascular aging in arteries of male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinic, Maria; Tare, Marianne; Conrad, Kirk P; Parry, Laura J

    2015-08-01

    Exogenous treatment with the naturally occurring peptide relaxin increases arterial compliance and reduces vascular stiffness. In contrast, relaxin deficiency reduces the passive compliance of small renal arteries through geometric and compositional vascular remodeling. The role of endogenous relaxin on passive mechanical wall properties in other vascular beds is unknown. Importantly, no studies have investigated the effects of aging in arteries of relaxin-deficient mice. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that mesenteric and femoral arteries stiffen with aging, and this is exacerbated with relaxin deficiency. Male wild-type (Rln (+/+)) and relaxin knockout (Rln (-/-)) mice were aged to 3, 6, 12, 18, and 23 months. Passive mechanical wall properties were assessed by pressure myography. In both genotypes, there was a significant increase in circumferential stiffening in mesenteric arteries with aging, whereas in the femoral artery, aging reduced volume compliance. This was associated with a reduced ability of the artery to lengthen with aging. The predominant phenotype observed in Rln (-/-) mice was reduced volume compliance in young mice in both mesenteric and femoral arteries. In summary, aging induces circumferential stiffening in mesenteric arteries and axial stiffening in femoral arteries. Passive mechanical wall properties of Rln (-/-) mouse arteries predominantly differ at younger ages compared with Rln (+/+) mice, suggesting that a lack of endogenous relaxin only has a minor effect on vascular aging.

  15. Benefits of Synchrotron Microangiography for Dynamic Studies of Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Roles in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, James T.; Schwenke, Daryl O.; Jenkins, Mathew J.; Edgley, Amanda J.; Sonobe, Takashi; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Umetani, Keiji; Eppel, Gabriela A.; Evans, Roger G.; Okura, Yasuhiko; Shirai, Mikiyasu

    2010-07-01

    Changes in endothelial and smooth muscle function compromise organ perfusion in the chronic disease states of diabetes, atherosclerosis and hypertension. Moreover, vascular dysfunction increases the likelihood of lethal acute events such as myocardial infarction and stroke, which are now leading causes of adult mortality. Many circulating and local tissue factors in these disease states contribute to impaired vasomotor regulation of the arterial vessels, leading to spasm, chronic constriction and eventually vessel remodelling. X-ray contrast absorption imaging allows assessment of vessel lumen diameter and the factors contributing to steady-state vessel calibre, however, conventional clinical devices (>200 μm resolution) are not adequate to detect microvessels or accurately assess function in real time. Using synchrotron imaging we are now able to detect small vessel calibres (˜30 μm) and quantify regional differences in calibre even under conditions of high heart rate (>500 bpm). Herein we describe recent experiments that were conducted at the Japanese Synchrotron, SPring-8 using anaesthetised Sprague-Dawley rats and C57Bl/6 mice and a synchrotron radiation contrast angiography (single narrow energy bandwidth) approach based on selective arterial injection of iodine contrast agents. Application of this approach to imaging of the heart and other vasculatures are described. Our studies show that within-animal comparisons of 3-4 branching orders of arterial vessels are possible using small bolus contrast injections and appropriate contrast washout times (15-30 min) in many organ systems. Determination of relative calibre changes before and after any treatment allows us to evaluate the contributions of different endogenous factors and ligand-receptor pathways in the maintenance of vasomotor tone. Finally, we will present our findings relating to novel therapies to prevent endothelial dysfunction in heart failure.

  16. Benefits of Synchrotron Microangiography for Dynamic Studies of Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Roles in the Pathophysiology of Vascular Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in endothelial and smooth muscle function compromise organ perfusion in the chronic disease states of diabetes, atherosclerosis and hypertension. Moreover, vascular dysfunction increases the likelihood of lethal acute events such as myocardial infarction and stroke, which are now leading causes of adult mortality. Many circulating and local tissue factors in these disease states contribute to impaired vasomotor regulation of the arterial vessels, leading to spasm, chronic constriction and eventually vessel remodelling. X-ray contrast absorption imaging allows assessment of vessel lumen diameter and the factors contributing to steady-state vessel calibre, however, conventional clinical devices (>200 μm resolution) are not adequate to detect microvessels or accurately assess function in real time. Using synchrotron imaging we are now able to detect small vessel calibres (∼30 μm) and quantify regional differences in calibre even under conditions of high heart rate (>500 bpm). Herein we describe recent experiments that were conducted at the Japanese Synchrotron, SPring-8 using anaesthetised Sprague-Dawley rats and C57Bl/6 mice and a synchrotron radiation contrast angiography (single narrow energy bandwidth) approach based on selective arterial injection of iodine contrast agents. Application of this approach to imaging of the heart and other vasculatures are described. Our studies show that within-animal comparisons of 3-4 branching orders of arterial vessels are possible using small bolus contrast injections and appropriate contrast washout times (15-30 min) in many organ systems. Determination of relative calibre changes before and after any treatment allows us to evaluate the contributions of different endogenous factors and ligand-receptor pathways in the maintenance of vasomotor tone. Finally, we will present our findings relating to novel therapies to prevent endothelial dysfunction in heart failure.

  17. Rosiglitzone Suppresses Angiotensin II-Induced Production of KLF5 and Cell Proliferation in Rat Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Dengfeng; Hao, Guanghua; Meng, Zhe; Ning, Ning; Yang, Guang; Liu, Zhongwei; Dong, Xin; Niu, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor (KLF) 5, which initiates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, also participates in Angiotensin (Ang) II-induced vascular remodeling. The protective effect of rosiglitazone on vascular remodeling may be due to their impact on VSMC proliferation. However, the underlying mechanisms involved remain unclear. This study was designed to investigate whether the antiproliferation effects of rosiglitazone are mediated by regulating Ang II/KLF5 response. We found that, i...

  18. Impaired Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor-γ Contributes to Phenotypic Modulation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells during Hypertension*

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lili; Xie, Peng; Wang, Jingzhou; Yang, Qingwu; Fang, Chuanqin; Zhou, Shuang; Li, Jingcheng

    2010-01-01

    The phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a pivotal role in hypertension-induced vascular changes including vascular remodeling. The precise mechanisms underlying VSMC phenotypic modulation remain elusive. Here we test the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in the VSMC phenotypic modulation during hypertension. Both spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) aortas and SHR-derived VSMCs exhibited reduced PPAR-γ expression and excessive VSMC phe...

  19. Intercellular ultrafast Ca(2+) wave in vascular smooth muscle cells: numerical and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, J C; Raynaud, F; Nguyen, D; Piacentini, N; Meister, J J

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells exhibit intercellular Ca(2+) waves in response to local mechanical or KCl stimulation. Recently, a new type of intercellular Ca(2+) wave was observed in vitro in a linear arrangement of smooth muscle cells. The intercellular wave was denominated ultrafast Ca(2+) wave and it was suggested to be the result of the interplay between membrane potential and Ca(2+) dynamics which depended on influx of extracellular Ca(2+), cell membrane depolarization and its intercel- lular propagation. In the present study we measured experimentally the conduction velocity of the membrane depolarization and performed simulations of the ultrafast Ca(2+) wave along coupled smooth muscle cells. Numerical results reproduced a wide spectrum of experimental observations, including Ca(2+) wave velocity, electrotonic membrane depolarization along the network, effects of inhibitors and independence of the Ca(2+) wave speed on the intracellular stores. The numerical data also provided new physiological insights suggesting ranges of crucial model parameters that may be altered experimentally and that could significantly affect wave kinetics allowing the modulation of the wave characteristics experimentally. Numerical and experimental results supported the hypothesis that the propagation of membrane depolarization acts as an intercellular messenger mediating intercellular ultrafast Ca(2+) waves in smooth muscle cells. PMID:27507785

  20. Intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ wave in vascular smooth muscle cells: numerical and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijano, J. C.; Raynaud, F.; Nguyen, D.; Piacentini, N.; Meister, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells exhibit intercellular Ca2+ waves in response to local mechanical or KCl stimulation. Recently, a new type of intercellular Ca2+ wave was observed in vitro in a linear arrangement of smooth muscle cells. The intercellular wave was denominated ultrafast Ca2+ wave and it was suggested to be the result of the interplay between membrane potential and Ca2+ dynamics which depended on influx of extracellular Ca2+, cell membrane depolarization and its intercel- lular propagation. In the present study we measured experimentally the conduction velocity of the membrane depolarization and performed simulations of the ultrafast Ca2+ wave along coupled smooth muscle cells. Numerical results reproduced a wide spectrum of experimental observations, including Ca2+ wave velocity, electrotonic membrane depolarization along the network, effects of inhibitors and independence of the Ca2+ wave speed on the intracellular stores. The numerical data also provided new physiological insights suggesting ranges of crucial model parameters that may be altered experimentally and that could significantly affect wave kinetics allowing the modulation of the wave characteristics experimentally. Numerical and experimental results supported the hypothesis that the propagation of membrane depolarization acts as an intercellular messenger mediating intercellular ultrafast Ca2+ waves in smooth muscle cells. PMID:27507785

  1. Cytotoxicity of some oxysterols on human vascular smooth muscle cells was mediated by apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Y; Shirai, K; Ito, Y; Watanabe, J; Urano, Y; Murano, T; Tomioka, H

    1997-01-01

    A decrease in smooth muscle cells is observed in advanced atherosclerotic lesion. To understand this mechanism, we selected oxysterols as candidates for toxic lipid, and examined their cytotoxicity on human cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, together with the manner of cell death. In the presence of 7-ketocholesterol or 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol (50 mumol/L), the percentage of detached cells increased significantly with dose dependency, and an increase in detached cell number and DNA nick detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling study (TUNEL) preceded an increase in lactate dehydrogenase released into the medium. DNA extracted from smooth muscle cells incubated with 7-ketocholesterol or 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol showed a laddering pattern on agarose electrophoresis. In the presence of 7-ketocholesterol or 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol, fragmented DNA quantified by the quantitative sandwich enzyme immunoassay was significantly increased. From these results, it is proposed that 7-ketocholesterol and 7 beta-hydroxycholesterol are toxic to smooth muscle cells, and that this cytotoxicity is mediated by apoptosis. PMID:9638517

  2. Fibulin-2 is present in murine vascular lesions and is important for smooth muscle cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ström, A.; Olin, A. I.; Aspberg, A.;

    2006-01-01

    and is upregulated during SMC phenotypic modulation in cell culture. Moreover, treatments with peptides that block the interaction between versican and fibulin-2 inhibit SMC migration in vitro. Conclusions: Fibulin-2 can be produced by SMC as a response to injury and may participate in the ECM organisation......Objective: The vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) can affect smooth muscle cell (SMC) adhesion, migration and proliferation-events that are important during the atherosclerotic process. Fibulin-2 is a member of the ECM protein family of fibulins and has been found to cross-link versican....../hyaluronan complexes, an ECM network that has been suggested to be important during tissue repair. In this study we have analysed the presence of fibulin-2 in two different models of murine vascular lesions. We have also examined how the fibulin-2/versican network influences SMC migration. Methods: Presence of fibulin...

  3. Influences on vascular wall smooth muscle cells with novel short-duration thermal angioplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunio, M.; Shimazaki, N.; Arai, T.; Sakurada, M.

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the influences on smooth muscle cells after our novel short-duration thermal angioplasty, Photo-thermo Dynamic Balloon Angioplasty (PTDBA), to reveal the mechanism that can suppress neo-intimal hyperplasia after PTDBA. We obtained the sufficient arterial dilatations by short-duration heating (angioplasty in vivo. The measured neo-intimal hyperplasia occupancy rate was less than 20% after PTDBA in vivo. We prospect that the inhibition of the growth factor's expression by stretch-fixing may result to suppress the neo-intimal hyperplasia. In addition, the decrease of smooth muscle cells' density in the vessel media by heating might be another reason for the neo-intimal hyperplasia suppression.

  4. Krüppel-like Factor 5 contributes to pulmonary artery smooth muscle proliferation and resistance to apoptosis in human pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulin Roxane

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a vascular remodeling disease characterized by enhanced proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC and suppressed apoptosis. This phenotype has been associated with the upregulation of the oncoprotein survivin promoting mitochondrial membrane potential hyperpolarization (decreasing apoptosis and the upregulation of growth factor and cytokines like PDGF, IL-6 and vasoactive agent like endothelin-1 (ET-1 promoting PASMC proliferation. Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5, is a zinc-finger-type transcription factor implicated in the regulation of cell differentiation, proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Recent studies have demonstrated the implication of KLF5 in tissue remodeling in cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis, restenosis, and cardiac hypertrophy. Nonetheless, the implication of KLF5 in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH remains unknown. We hypothesized that KLF5 up-regulation in PAH triggers PASMC proliferation and resistance to apoptosis. Methods and results We showed that KFL5 is upregulated in both human lung biopsies and cultured human PASMC isolated from distal pulmonary arteries from PAH patients compared to controls. Using stimulation experiments, we demonstrated that PDGF, ET-1 and IL-6 trigger KLF-5 activation in control PASMC to a level similar to the one seen in PAH-PASMC. Inhibition of the STAT3 pathway abrogates KLF5 activation in PAH-PASMC. Once activated, KLF5 promotes cyclin B1 upregulation and promotes PASMC proliferation and triggers survivin expression hyperpolarizing mitochondria membrane potential decreasing PASMC ability to undergo apoptosis. Conclusion We demonstrated for the first time that KLF5 is activated in human PAH and implicated in the pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic phenotype that characterize PAH-PASMC. We believe that our findings will open new avenues of investigation on the role of KLF5 in PAH and might lead to the

  5. IGF-1 Has Plaque-Stabilizing Effects in Atherosclerosis by Altering Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    von der Thüsen, Jan H; Borensztajn, Keren S.; Moimas, Silvia; van Heiningen, Sandra; Teeling, Peter; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Biessen, Erik A. L.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling is important for the maintenance of plaque stability in atherosclerosis due to its effects on vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) phenotype. To investigate this hypothesis, we studied the effects of the highly inflammatory milieu of the atherosclerotic plaque on IGF-1 signaling and stability-related phenotypic parameters of murine vSMCs in vitro, and the effects of IGF-1 supplementation on plaque phenotype in an atherosclerotic mouse model. M1-pol...

  6. Characterization of vascular smooth muscle cell phenotype in long-term culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, M; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Mitchell, J; Baldor, L; Low, R; Warshaw, D

    1989-02-01

    Studies of bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells, during long-term in vitro subcultivation (up to 100 population doublings), have revealed phenotypic heterogeneity among cells, as characterized by differences in proliferative behavior, cell morphology, and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. In vivo, smooth muscle cells were spindle-shaped and expressed desmin and alpha-smooth muscle actin (50% of total actin) as their predominant cytoskeletal and contractile proteins. Within 24 h of culture, vimentin rather than desmin was the predominant intermediate filament protein, with little change in alpha-actin content. Upon initial subcultivation, all cells were flattened and fibroblastic in appearance with a concomitant fivefold reduction in alpha-actin content, whereas the beta and gamma nonmuscle actins predominated. In three out of four cell lines studied, fluctuations in proliferative activity were observed during the life span of the culture. These spontaneous fluctuations in proliferation were accompanied by coordinated changes in morphology and contractile-cytoskeletal protein profiles. During periods of enhanced proliferation a significant proportion of cells reverted to their original spindle-shaped morphology with a simultaneous increase in alpha-actin content (20 to 30% of total actin). These results suggest that in long-term culture smooth muscle cells undergo spontaneous modulations in cell phenotype and may serve as a useful model for studying the regulation of intracellular protein expression.

  7. Contact-mediated and humoral communication between vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascular endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) co-exist in close apposition to each other in all blood vessels except capillaries. Investigations of the metabolic interactions that may occur between these cells are essential to an understanding of vascular homeostasis and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The authors have developed two in vitro models of co-temporal vascular cell communication. The first facilitates reversible microcarrier-mediated gap junctional communication between EC and SMC monolayers. When either EC or SMC were prelabelled with 3H-uridine, intracellular nucleotide rapidly transferred across the region of heterocellular attachment to the complementary cell population. Cytoplasmic continuity between EC and SMC allowed metabolic cooperation via ions and small molecules (<1.5 KD). Thus, vascular reactivity, particularly in the microcirculation where myoendothelial gap junctions have been observed, may involve cytoplasmic second messengers transported from EC to SMC. In the second model, humoral communication was established between separated cultures of EC and SMC which shared the same culture medium. Endothelial-specific stimulation of SMC growth and lipoprotein metabolism via soluble factors was demonstrated. Two mechanisms of stimulation of SMC lipoprotein metabolism were identified; one endothelial derived mitogen-dependent, the other mitogen-independent which was mediated via low molecular weight endothelial cell products

  8. Activating transcription factor-4 promotes mineralization in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Masashi; Miyazaki-Anzai, Shinobu; Keenan, Audrey L.; Shiozaki, Yuji; Okamura, Kayo; Chick, Wallace S.; Williams, Kristina; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Rahman, Shaikh Mizanoor; Tintut, Yin; Adams, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that upregulation of the ER stress–induced pro-osteogenic transcription factor ATF4 plays an important role in vascular calcification, a common complication in patients with aging, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study, we demonstrated the pathophysiological role of ATF4 in vascular calcification using global Atf4 KO, smooth muscle cell–specific (SMC-specific) Atf4 KO, and transgenic (TG) mouse models. Reduced expression of ATF4 in global ATF4-haplodeficient and SMC-specific Atf4 KO mice reduced medial and atherosclerotic calcification under normal kidney and CKD conditions. In contrast, increased expression of ATF4 in SMC-specific Atf4 TG mice caused severe medial and atherosclerotic calcification. We further demonstrated that ATF4 transcriptionally upregulates the expression of type III sodium-dependent phosphate cotransporters (PiT1 and PiT2) by interacting with C/EBPβ. These results demonstrate that the ER stress effector ATF4 plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of vascular calcification through increased phosphate uptake in vascular SMCs. PMID:27812542

  9. Mitochondrial metabolism and the control of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario eChiong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation and dedifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs are essential processes of vascular development. VSMCs have biosynthetic, proliferative and contractile roles in the vessel wall. Alterations in the differentiated state of the VSMCs play a critical role in the pathogenesis of a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, hypertension and vascular stenosis. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of molecular mechanisms involved in the control of VSMC proliferation, with particular focus on mitochondrial metabolism. Mitochondrial activity can be controlled by regulating mitochondrial dynamics, i.e. mitochondrial fusion and fission, and by regulating mitochondrial calcium handling through the interaction with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Alterations in both VSMC proliferation and mitochondrial function can be triggered by dysregulation of mitofusin-2, a small GTPase associated with mitochondrial fusion and mitochondrial-ER interaction. Several lines of evidence highlight the relevance of mitochondrial metabolism in the control of VSMC proliferation, indicating a new area to be explored in the treatment of vascular diseases.

  10. Increased expression of osteoprotegerin in vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongshan MOU; Tianhua LEI; Luning ZHAO; Xiaojun ZHU; Mingui FU; Yuqing E CHEN

    2004-01-01

    Background Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a secreted protein of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, which regulates bone mass by inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and activation. Although OPG is expressed ubiquitously and abundantly in many tissues and cell types including vascular cells, the role of OPG in other tissues is unknown.Our previous studies demonstrated that OPG was highly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) and upregulated during vascular lesion formation. Methods and Results We documented, by Northern blot analysis,that the expression of OPG was more prevalent in the aorta and cultured VSMC from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SI-IR) compared to Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). In addition, we found that the expression of Angiotensin II (Ang II)type I receptor (AT1R) in SHR VSMC was at significantly increased levels than in WKY VSMC. Furthermore, Ang II potently induced the expression of OPG in VSMC in a time- and dose-dependent manner through the AT1R signaling pathway. Conclusions OPG expression was substantially greater in SHR VSMC, suggesting that OPG may be an important determinant of vascular remodeling in SHR.

  11. Phenylephrine Decreases Vascular Tension in Goat Arteries in Specific Circumstances.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu R Raj

    Full Text Available Phenylephrine (PE causes vasoconstriction through alpha adrenergic receptors. PE-induced vasodilatation has also been reported earlier in pre-constricted vessels. Here we demonstrate in spiral strips of goat arteries that addition of PE can decrease tone even from base-line levels (i.e. not pre-constricted and show that this process requires nitric oxide (NO and alpha adrenergic stimulation, but is cGMP-independent. Under control conditions, PE caused vasoconstriction, but under conditions where NO levels are higher, as with L-Arginine or sodium nitroprusside, PE decreased vessel tension. L-Arginine/PE combination was not able to decrease tension when alpha adrenoceptors were blocked with Phentolamine or endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS was blocked with Nω-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA. Propranolol, a beta blocker, was unable to prevent the reduction in tension by the L-Arginine/PE combination. Adrenaline and noradrenaline (and not isoproterenol also reduced vessel tension in the presence of L-Arginine. Even when NO levels were not enhanced, relieving NO from having to stimulate the enzyme soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC (either by using sGC blockers, namely ODQ or methylene blue, or by enhancing cGMP levels (with sildenafil which by negative feedback probably inhibits sGC led to PE-induced reduction of vascular tension. PMA-phorbol myristate acetate-an agonist which stimulates Protein Kinase C was able to prevent the ability of PE to reduce vascular tension in a high NO environment. Our conclusion is that PE reduces vascular tension through alpha adrenoceptors if there is excess NO availability to activate a putative pathway. Though the reduction of vessel tone by PE is dependent on NO, it is independent of cGMP. Prior treatment with PMA or PE itself can prevent further PE-induced reduction of tension in a high NO environment. The results here suggest, counter-intuitively, that alpha blockers may be of help in the treatment of septic shock

  12. Effect of Caspase Inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO on Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Induced by Artesunate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwen Zhang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have shown that the proliferation and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells play a key role in restenosis. Artesunate is a triterpenoid with a peroxide structure and its antimalarial, antitumor, and antiangiogenetic activities can inhibit the proliferation and apoptosis of multifarious cells. Apoptosis is caused by the activation of a series of intracellular proteolytic enzymes, among which caspase-dependent apoptosis was the earliest to be recognized. The purpose of this article is to study the effects of caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO on proliferation and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by Artesunate and to explore the mechanism of Artesunate-induced apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells. By using the method based on methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium to observe the effects of Artesunate on the growth and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells; observing the change in cell shape before and after Artesunate administration by transmission electron microscopy; detecting the changes in cell cycle and apoptosis rates before and after drug administration by flow cytometry; detecting the activity of caspase-3 in the caspase apoptosis pathway by the Western Blot method, we found that Artesunate inhibits the growth and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner within the concentration range of 7.5–120 μg/mL, and the inhibition rate of Artesunate can be as high as 89.49 % at a concentration of 120 μg/mL after acting for 72 hours; vascular smooth muscle cells show a typical apoptosis peak due to the effects of higher concentration of Artesunate. Compared with the control group, the higher-concentration group shows major variability, Ac-DEVD-CHO, however, can significantly decrease this induction; it has been detected by Western Blot that Artesunate can induce caspase-3 activity dramatically in vascular smooth muscle cells, but this activation may be remarkably

  13. Superoxide-mediated modification of low density lipoprotein by arterial smooth muscle cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Heinecke, J W; Baker, L; Rosen, H; Chait, A.

    1986-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide was detected in cultures of monkey and human arterial smooth muscle cells as indicated by superoxide dismutase inhibitable reduction of cytochrome c. Superoxide production by these cells in the presence of Fe or Cu resulted in modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL). The degree of LDL modification was directly proportional to the rate of superoxide production by cells. Superoxide dismutase (100 micrograms/ml), and the general free radical scavengers butylated hy...

  14. Phospholipase D signaling in serotonin-induced mitogenesis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Y; Fanburg, B L

    2008-01-01

    We have previously reported the participation of mitogen-activated protein, Rho, and phosphoinositide-3 (PI3) kinases in separate pathways in serotonin (5-HT)-induced proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In this study, we investigated the possible participation of phospholipase D (PLD) and phosphatidic acid (PA) in this growth process. 5-HT stimulated a time-dependent increase in [3H]phosphatidylbutanol and PA generation. Exposure of SMCs to 1-butanol or overexpressio...

  15. Matrine inhibits the expression of adhesion molecules in activated vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Lihua; Ren, Yingang; Gao, Yanli; Kang, Li; Lu, Shaoping

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased expression of adhesion molecules in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Matrine is a main active ingredient of Sophora flavescens roots, which are used to treat inflammatory diseases. However, the effects of matrine on the expression of adhesion molecules in VSMCs have largely remained elusive. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of matrine on the expression of adhesion molecules in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α‑stimulated human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). The results showed that matrine inhibited the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule‑1 (VCAM‑1) and intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 (ICAM‑1) in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs. Matrine markedly inhibited the TNF‑α‑induced expression of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB p65 and prevented the TNF‑α‑caused degradation of inhibitor of NF‑κB; it also inhibited TNF‑α‑induced activation of mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, matrine inhibited the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that matrine inhibited the expression of VCAM‑1 and ICAM‑1 in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs via the suppression of ROS production as well as NF‑κB and MAPK pathway activation. Therefore, matrine may have a potential therapeutic use for preventing the advancement of atherosclerotic lesions.

  16. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine [Pôle de Recherche Cardiovasculaire, IREC, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Morel, Nicole, E-mail: nicole.morel@uclouvain.be [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium)

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  17. Hydrogen peroxide mediates oxidant-dependent stimulation of arterial smooth muscle L-type calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Nathan L; Amberg, Gregory C

    2012-05-01

    Changes in calcium and redox homeostasis influence multiple cellular processes. Dysregulation of these signaling modalities is associated with pathology in cardiovascular, neuronal, endocrine, and other physiological systems. Calcium and oxidant signaling mechanisms are frequently inferred to be functionally related. To address and clarify this clinically relevant issue in the vasculature we tested the hypothesis that the ubiquitous reactive oxygen molecule hydrogen peroxide mediates oxidant-dependent stimulation of cerebral arterial smooth muscle L-type calcium channels. Using a combinatorial approach including intact arterial manipulations, electrophysiology, and total internal reflection fluorescence imaging, we found that application of physiological levels of hydrogen peroxide to isolated arterial smooth muscle cells increased localized calcium influx through L-type calcium channels. Similarly, oxidant-dependent stimulation of L-type calcium channels by the vasoconstrictor ANG II was abolished by intracellular application of catalase. Catalase also prevented ANG II from increasing localized subplasmalemmal sites of increased oxidation previously associated with colocalized calcium influx through L-type channels. Furthermore, catalase largely attenuated the contractile response of intact cerebral arterial segments to ANG II. In contrast, enhanced dismutation of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide with SOD had no effect on ANG II-dependent stimulation of L-type calcium channels. From these data we conclude that hydrogen peroxide is important for oxidant-dependent regulation of smooth muscle L-type calcium channels and arterial function. These data also support the emerging concept of hydrogen peroxide as a biologically relevant oxidant second messenger in multiple cell types with a diverse array of physiological functions.

  18. PPARα-Independent Arterial Smooth Muscle Relaxant Effects of PPARα Agonists

    OpenAIRE

    Silswal, Neerupma; Parelkar, Nikhil K; Michael J. Wacker; Badr, Mostafa; Andresen, Jon

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine direct vascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR α ) agonists using isolated mouse aortas and middle cerebral arteries (MCAs). The PPAR α agonists GW7647, WY14643, and gemfibrozil acutely relaxed aortas held under isometric tension and dilated pressurized MCAs with the following order of potency: GW7647≫WY14643>gemfibrozil. Responses were endothelium-independent, and the use of PPAR α deficient mice demonstrated that responses were also ...

  19. Effects of nitrendipine on growth activity in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, M P; Baldor, L; Warshaw, D M

    1988-01-01

    Proliferation and migration of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the arterial wall may play a role in the development of atherosclerosis and hypertension. If cell migration and proliferation are dependent on extracellular calcium, then treatment with calcium channel blockers such as nitrendipine may alter these cellular responses. In the studies reported here, proliferation and migration activities were assessed in cultured bovine carotid artery smooth muscle cells exposed to nitrendipine. SMCs in long-term culture are characterized by periods of either stable or enhanced proliferative activity. During the stable periods, 1 microM nitrendipine has no effect on proliferation, but during periods of enhanced proliferation, 1 microM nitrendipine augments growth by approximately 20%. SMC migration rates and interdivision times were determined from analysis of time-lapse cinematography films. During stable periods of growth, cell migration rate was inversely related to interdivision time (i.e., fast migrating cells had the shortest interdivision times). Treatment with 1 microM nitrendipine abolished the relationship between migration rate and interdivision time and prolonged interdivision times. These data suggest that the ability of nitrendipine to alter SMC proliferation, interdivision time, and migration is dependent upon the overall proliferative state of the culture.

  20. Calphostin-C induction of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis proceeds through phospholipase D and microtubule inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xi-Long; Gui, Yu; Du, Guangwei; Frohman, Michael A; Peng, Dao-Quan

    2004-02-20

    Calphostin-C, a protein kinase C inhibitor, induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the mechanisms are not completely defined. Because apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells is critical in several proliferating vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty, we decided to investigate the mechanisms underlying the calphostin-C-induced apoptotic pathway. We show here that apoptosis is inhibited by the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid, a metabolite of phospholipase D (PLD), and that calphostin-C inhibits completely the activities of both isoforms of PLD, PLD1 and PLD2. Overexpression of either PLD1 or PLD2 prevented the vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal but not the calphostin-C-elicited apoptosis. These data suggest that PLDs have anti-apoptotic effects and that complete inhibition of PLD activity by calphostin-C induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis. We also report that calphostin-C induced microtubule disruption and that the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid inhibits calphostin-C effects on microtubules, suggesting a role for PLD in stabilizing the microtubule network. Overexpressing PLD2 in Chinese hamster ovary cells phenocopies this result, providing strong support for the hypothesis. Finally, taxol, a microtubule stabilizer, not only inhibited the calphostin-C-induced microtubule disruption but also inhibited apoptosis. We therefore conclude that calphostin-C induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibiting PLD activity and subsequent microtubule polymerization. PMID:14660552

  1. Calphostin-C induction of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis proceeds through phospholipase D and microtubule inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xi-Long; Gui, Yu; Du, Guangwei; Frohman, Michael A; Peng, Dao-Quan

    2004-02-20

    Calphostin-C, a protein kinase C inhibitor, induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the mechanisms are not completely defined. Because apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells is critical in several proliferating vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty, we decided to investigate the mechanisms underlying the calphostin-C-induced apoptotic pathway. We show here that apoptosis is inhibited by the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid, a metabolite of phospholipase D (PLD), and that calphostin-C inhibits completely the activities of both isoforms of PLD, PLD1 and PLD2. Overexpression of either PLD1 or PLD2 prevented the vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal but not the calphostin-C-elicited apoptosis. These data suggest that PLDs have anti-apoptotic effects and that complete inhibition of PLD activity by calphostin-C induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis. We also report that calphostin-C induced microtubule disruption and that the addition of exogenous phosphatidic acid inhibits calphostin-C effects on microtubules, suggesting a role for PLD in stabilizing the microtubule network. Overexpressing PLD2 in Chinese hamster ovary cells phenocopies this result, providing strong support for the hypothesis. Finally, taxol, a microtubule stabilizer, not only inhibited the calphostin-C-induced microtubule disruption but also inhibited apoptosis. We therefore conclude that calphostin-C induces apoptosis of cultured vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibiting PLD activity and subsequent microtubule polymerization.

  2. SIRT1 inhibits angiotensin Ⅱ-induced vascular smooth muscle cell hypertrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Chihchuan Liang; Peng Gao; Huina Zhang; Houzao Chen; Wei Zheng; Xiang Lv; Tingting Xu; Yusheng Wei; Depei Liu

    2011-01-01

    Angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ) stimulates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) hypertrophy as a critical event in the development of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis.Sirtuin (SIRT) 1, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dependent deacetylase, has been demonstrated to exert protective effects in atherosclerosis by promoting endo-thelium-dependent vascular relaxation and reducing macrophage foam cell formation, but its role in VSMC hypertrophy remains unknown. In this study, we tried to investigate the effect of SIRTI on Ang Ⅱ-induced VSMC hypertrophy. Results showed that adenoviral-mediated over-expression of SIRT1 significantly inhibited Ang Ⅱ-induced VSMC hypertrophy, while knockdown of SIRT1 by RNAi resulted in an increased [3H]-leucine incorpor-ation of VSMC. Accordingly, nicotinamide adenine dinu-cleotide phosphate oxidase 1 (Nox1) expression induced by Ang Ⅱ was inhibited by SIRT1 in VSMCs. SIRT1 acti-vator resveratrol decreased, whereas endogenous SIRT1 inhibitor nicotinamide increased Nox1 expression in A7r5 VSMCs. Furthermore, transcription factor GATA-6 was involved in the down-regulation of Nox1 expression by SIRT1. These results provide new insight into SIRTI's anti-atherogenic properties by suppressing Ang Ⅱ-induced VSMC hypertrophy.

  3. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta positively regulates Notch signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells: role in cell proliferation and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Shaunta; Cullen, John P; Morrow, David; Colombo, Alberto; Lally, Caitríona; Walls, Dermot; Redmond, Eileen M; Cahill, Paul A

    2011-09-01

    The role of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) in modulating Notch control of vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) growth (proliferation and apoptosis) was examined in vitro under varying conditions of cyclic strain and validated in vivo following changes in medial tension and stress. Modulation of GSK-3β in vSMC following ectopic expression of constitutively active GSK-3β, siRNA knockdown and pharmacological inhibition with SB-216763 demonstrated that GSK-3β positively regulates Notch intracellular domain expression, CBF-1/RBP-Jκ transactivation and downstream target gene mRNA levels, while concomitantly promoting vSMC proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis. In contrast, inhibition of GSK-3β attenuated Notch signaling and decreased vSMC proliferation and survival. Exposure of vSMC to cyclic strain environments in vitro using both a Flexercell™ Tension system and a novel Sylgard™ phantom vessel following bare metal stent implantation revealed that cyclic strain inhibits GSK-3β activity independent of p42/p44 MAPK and p38 activation concomitant with reduced Notch signaling and decreased vSMC proliferation and survival. Exposure of vSMC to changes in medial strain microenvironments in vivo following carotid artery ligation revealed that enhanced GSK-3β activity was predominantly localized to medial and neointimal vSMC concomitant with increased Notch signaling, proliferating nuclear antigen and decreased Bax expression, respectively, as vascular remodeling progressed. GSK-3β is an important modulator of Notch signaling leading to altered vSMC cell growth where low strain/tension microenvironments prevail.

  4. Phenotypic Modulation of Mesenteric Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from Type 2 Diabetic Rats is Associated with Decreased Caveolin-1 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alicia Carrillo-Sepulveda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Diabetes-induced vascular complications are associated with vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC phenotypic modulation, switching from a contractile to a synthetic-proliferative phenotype. Loss of caveolin-1 is involved with proliferation of VSMCs. We tested the hypothesis that mesenteric VSMCs from type 2 diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK rat undergo phenotypic modulation and it is linked to decreased caveolin-1 expression. Methods: VSMCs were isolated from mesenteric arteries from GK rats and age-matched control Wistar rats. Western blotting was used to determine expression of target proteins such as caveolin-1, calponin (marker of differentiation, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, marker of proliferation. In addition, we measured intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS production using H2DCF-DA and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 by western blotting in VSMCs from GK stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, an endotoxin upregulated in diabetes. Results: Mesenteric VSMCs from diabetic GK rats exhibited decreased caveolin-1 and calponin expression and increased PCNA expression compared to control. Increased levels of ROS and phospho-ERK1/2 expression were also found in GK VSMCs. LPS augmented ROS and phosphorylated ERK1/2 levels to a greater extent in GK VSMCs than in control. Likewise, high glucose decreased caveolin-1 and calponin expression, increased PCNA expression and augmented ROS production in control mesenteric VSMCs. Conclusion: These results suggest that mesenteric VSMCs from diabetic GK rats undergo phenotypic modulation and it is associated with decreased caveolin-1 expression. These alterations may be due to enhanced inflammatory stimuli and glucose levels present in diabetic milieu.

  5. Abnormal Ca2+ spark/STOC coupling in cerebral artery smooth muscle cells of obese type 2 diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Rueda

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a major risk factor for stroke. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in cerebral artery dysfunction found in the diabetic patients are not completely elucidated. In cerebral artery smooth muscle cells (CASMCs, spontaneous and local increases of intracellular Ca2+ due to the opening of ryanodine receptors (Ca2+ sparks activate large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK channels that generate spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs. STOCs have a key participation in the control of vascular myogenic tone and blood pressure. Our goal was to investigate whether alterations in Ca(2+ spark and STOC activities, measured by confocal microscopy and patch-clamp technique, respectively, occur in isolated CASMCs of an experimental model of type-2 diabetes (db/db mouse. We found that mean Ca(2+ spark amplitude, duration, size and rate-of-rise were significantly smaller in Fluo-3 loaded db/db compared to control CASMCs, with a subsequent decrease in the total amount of Ca(2+ released through Ca(2+ sparks in db/db CASMCs, though Ca(2+ spark frequency remained. Interestingly, the frequency of large-amplitude Ca(2+ sparks was also significantly reduced in db/db cells. In addition, the frequency and amplitude of STOCs were markedly reduced at all voltages tested (from -50 to 0 mV in db/db CASMCs. The latter correlates with decreased BK channel β1/α subunit ratio found in db/db vascular tissues. Taken together, Ca(2+ spark alterations lead to inappropriate BK channels activation in CASMCs of db/db mice and this condition is aggravated by the decrease in the BK β1 subunit/α subunit ratio which underlies the significant reduction of Ca(2+ spark/STOC coupling in CASMCs of diabetic animals.

  6. Genes Involved in Systemic and Arterial Bed Dependent Atherosclerosis - Tampere Vascular Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mari Levula; Niku Oksala; Nina Airla; Rainer Zeitlin; Juha-Pekka Salenius; Otso Järvinen; Maarit Venermo; Teemu Partio; Jukka Saarinen; Taija Somppi; VeliPekka Suominen; Jyrki Virkkunen; Juha Hautalahti; Reijo Laaksonen; Mika Kähönen

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is a complex disease with hundreds of genes influencing its progression. In addition, the phenotype of the disease varies significantly depending on the arterial bed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterized the genes generally involved in human advanced atherosclerotic (AHA type V-VI) plaques in carotid and femoral arteries as well as aortas from 24 subjects of Tampere Vascular study and compared the results to non-atherosclerotic internal thoracic arterie...

  7. An α-smooth muscle actin (acta2/αsma) zebrafish transgenic line marking vascular mural cells and visceral smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesell, Thomas R; Kennedy, Regan M; Carter, Alyson D; Rollins, Evvi-Lynn; Georgijevic, Sonja; Santoro, Massimo M; Childs, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    Mural cells of the vascular system include vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and pericytes whose role is to stabilize and/or provide contractility to blood vessels. One of the earliest markers of mural cell development in vertebrates is α smooth muscle actin (acta2; αsma), which is expressed by pericytes and SMCs. In vivo models of vascular mural cell development in zebrafish are currently lacking, therefore we developed two transgenic zebrafish lines driving expression of GFP or mCherry in acta2-expressing cells. These transgenic fish were used to trace the live development of mural cells in embryonic and larval transgenic zebrafish. acta2:EGFP transgenic animals show expression that largely mirrors native acta2 expression, with early pan-muscle expression starting at 24 hpf in the heart muscle, followed by skeletal and visceral muscle. At 3.5 dpf, expression in the bulbus arteriosus and ventral aorta marks the first expression in vascular smooth muscle. Over the next 10 days of development, the number of acta2:EGFP positive cells and the number of types of blood vessels associated with mural cells increases. Interestingly, the mural cells are not motile and remain in the same position once they express the acta2:EGFP transgene. Taken together, our data suggests that zebrafish mural cells develop relatively late, and have little mobility once they associate with vessels.

  8. An α-smooth muscle actin (acta2/αsma zebrafish transgenic line marking vascular mural cells and visceral smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R Whitesell

    Full Text Available Mural cells of the vascular system include vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs and pericytes whose role is to stabilize and/or provide contractility to blood vessels. One of the earliest markers of mural cell development in vertebrates is α smooth muscle actin (acta2; αsma, which is expressed by pericytes and SMCs. In vivo models of vascular mural cell development in zebrafish are currently lacking, therefore we developed two transgenic zebrafish lines driving expression of GFP or mCherry in acta2-expressing cells. These transgenic fish were used to trace the live development of mural cells in embryonic and larval transgenic zebrafish. acta2:EGFP transgenic animals show expression that largely mirrors native acta2 expression, with early pan-muscle expression starting at 24 hpf in the heart muscle, followed by skeletal and visceral muscle. At 3.5 dpf, expression in the bulbus arteriosus and ventral aorta marks the first expression in vascular smooth muscle. Over the next 10 days of development, the number of acta2:EGFP positive cells and the number of types of blood vessels associated with mural cells increases. Interestingly, the mural cells are not motile and remain in the same position once they express the acta2:EGFP transgene. Taken together, our data suggests that zebrafish mural cells develop relatively late, and have little mobility once they associate with vessels.

  9. Unexpected role of the copper transporter ATP7A in PDGF-induced vascular smooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashino, T.; Varadarajan, S.; Urao, N.; Oshikawa, J.; Chen, G. -F.; Wang, H.; Huo, Y.; Finney, L.; Vogt, S.; McKinney, R. D.; Maryon, E. B.; Kaplan, J. H.; Ushio-Fukai, M.; Fukai, T. (Biosciences Division); ( XSD); ( PSC-USR); (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago); (Univ. of Minnesota)

    2010-09-09

    Copper, an essential nutrient, has been implicated in vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis with unknown mechanism. Bioavailability of intracellular copper is regulated not only by the copper importer CTR1 (copper transporter 1) but also by the copper exporter ATP7A (Menkes ATPase), whose function is achieved through copper-dependent translocation from trans-Golgi network (TGN). Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) promotes vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, a key component of neointimal formation. To determine the role of copper transporter ATP7A in PDGF-induced VSMC migration. Depletion of ATP7A inhibited VSMC migration in response to PDGF or wound scratch in a CTR1/copper-dependent manner. PDGF stimulation promoted ATP7A translocation from the TGN to lipid rafts, which localized at the leading edge, where it colocalized with PDGF receptor and Rac1, in migrating VSMCs. Mechanistically, ATP7A small interfering RNA or CTR small interfering RNA prevented PDGF-induced Rac1 translocation to the leading edge, thereby inhibiting lamellipodia formation. In addition, ATP7A depletion prevented a PDGF-induced decrease in copper level and secretory copper enzyme precursor prolysyl oxidase (Pro-LOX) in lipid raft fraction, as well as PDGF-induced increase in LOX activity. In vivo, ATP7A expression was markedly increased and copper accumulation was observed by synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence microscopy at neointimal VSMCs in wire injury model. These findings suggest that ATP7A plays an important role in copper-dependent PDGF-stimulated VSMC migration via recruiting Rac1 to lipid rafts at the leading edge, as well as regulating LOX activity. This may contribute to neointimal formation after vascular injury. Our findings provide insight into ATP7A as a novel therapeutic target for vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis.

  10. AMPK induces vascular smooth muscle cell senescence via LKB1 dependent pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Jin Young; Woo, Chang-Hoon [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Aging-associated Vascular Disease Research Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Young Jin; Lee, Kwang Youn [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyoung Chul, E-mail: hcchoi@med.yu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Aging-associated Vascular Disease Research Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} An aging model was established by stimulating VSMC with adriamycin. {yields} Adriamycin increased p-LKB1, p-AMPK, p53 and p21 expressions. {yields} Inhibition of AMPK diminished SA-{beta}-gal staining and restored VSMC proliferation. {yields} p53 and p21 siRNA attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining in VSMC. {yields} p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK induced VSMC senescence. -- Abstract: Vascular cells have a limited lifespan with limited cell proliferation and undergo cellular senescence. The functional changes associated with cellular senescence are thought to contribute to age-related vascular disorders. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been discussed in terms of beneficial or harmful effects for aging-related diseases. However, the detailed functional mechanisms of AMPK are largely unclear. An aging model was established by stimulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) with adriamycin. Adriamycin progressively increased the mRNA and protein expressions of AMPK. The phosphorylation levels of LKB1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the upstream and downstream of AMPK, were dramatically increased by adriamycin stimulation. The expressions of p53 and p21, which contribute to vascular senescence, were also increased. Inhibition of AMPK diminished senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) staining, and restored VSMC proliferation. Cytosolic translocation of LKB1 by adriamycin could be a mechanism for AMPK activation in senescence. Furthermore, p53 siRNA and p21 siRNA transfection attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining. These results suggest that LKB1 dependent AMPK activation elicits VSMC senescence and p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK-induced senescence.

  11. Dynamic expression of alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1 integrin receptors by human vascular smooth muscle cells. Alpha 2 beta 1 integrin is required for chemotaxis across type I collagen-coated membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Skinner, M P; Raines, E W; Ross, R.

    1994-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the media of normal arteries express alpha 1 beta 1 integrin with no detectable alpha 2 beta 1 as determined by immunocytochemistry. In contrast, immunoprecipitation of integrins expressed by human SMCs cultured from medial explants shows strong expression of alpha 2 beta 1 and no expression of alpha 1 beta 1. The apparent reciprocal expression of these two collagen and laminin receptors was confirmed by flow cytometric analysis of fluorescent labeled ce...

  12. Human vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells cocultured on polyglycolic acid (70/30) scaffold in tissue engineered vascular graft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Shao-jun; ZHAO Li-min; WANG Shen-guo; LI Jing-xing; CHEN Hua-ying; LIU Jie-lin; LIU Ya; LUO Yi; Roo Changizi

    2007-01-01

    Background Current prosthetic, small diameter vascular grafts showing poor long term patency rates have led to the pursuit of other biological materials. Biomaterials that successfully integrate into surrounding tissue should match not only the mechanical properties of tissues, but also topography. Polyglycolic acid (70/30) has been used as synthetic grafts to determine whether human vascular smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells attach, survive and secrete endothelin and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α (6-keto-PGF1α).Methods Endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells were isolated from adult human great saphenous vein. They were seeded on polyglycolic acid scaffold in vitro separately to grow vascular patch (Groups A and B respectively) and cocultured in vitro to grow into vascular patch (Group C). Smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells were identified by immunohistochemical analysis and growth of cells on polyglycolic acid was investigated using scanning electron microscopy. The levels of endothelin and 6-keto-PGF1α in the culturing solutions were examined by radioimmunology to measure endothelial function.Results Seed smooth muscle cells adhered to polyglycolic acid scaffold and over 28 days grew in the interstices to form a uniform cell distribution throughout the scaffold. Then seed endothelial cells formed a complete endothelial layer on the smooth muscle cells. The levels of endothelin and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha in the culturing solution were (234±29) pg/ml and (428+98) pg/ml respectively in Group C and (196+30) pg/ml and (346±120) pg/ml in Group B; both significantly higher than in Groups A and D (blank control group, all P<0.05 ).Conclusions Cells could be grown successfully on polyglycolic acid and retain functions of secretion. Our next step is to use human saphenous vein smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells to grow tubular vascular grafts in vitro.

  13. Eugenol dilates rat cerebral arteries by inhibiting smooth muscle cell voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto-Neves, Dieniffer; Leal-Cardoso, Jose Henrique; Jaggar, Jonathan H

    2014-11-01

    Plants high in eugenol, a phenylpropanoid compound, are used as folk medicines to alleviate diseases including hypertension. Eugenol has been demonstrated to relax conduit and ear arteries and reduce systemic blood pressure, but mechanisms involved are unclear. Here, we studied eugenol regulation of resistance-size cerebral arteries that control regional brain blood pressure and flow and investigated mechanisms involved. We demonstrate that eugenol dilates arteries constricted by either pressure or membrane depolarization (60 mM K) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experiments performed using patch-clamp electrophysiology demonstrated that eugenol inhibited voltage-dependent calcium (Ca) currents, when using Ba as a charge carrier, in isolated cerebral artery smooth muscle cells. Eugenol inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca currents involved pore block, a hyperpolarizing shift (∼-10 mV) in voltage-dependent inactivation, an increase in the proportion of steady-state inactivating current, and acceleration of inactivation rate. In summary, our data indicate that eugenol dilates cerebral arteries by means of multimodal inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca channels.

  14. Correlation between penile cavernosal artery blood flow and retinal vascular findings in arteriogenic erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M Emarah

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed M Emarah1, Shawky M El-Haggar2, Ihab A Osman2, Abdel Wahab S Khafagy21Departments of Ophthalmology, 2Andrology and Sexology, Cairo University Hospital, EgyptObjectives: Arteriogenic erectile dysfunction (ED is a target organ disease of atherosclerosis, and therefore might be a predictor of systemic atherosclerosis. Being systemic, it might be possible to evaluate the extent of atherosclerosis from retinal vascular findings. We investigated the possible correlation between penile cavernosal artery blood flow and retinal vascular findings in patients with arteriogenic ED.Patients and methods: Sixty patients with ED were divided according to the peak systolic velocity (PSV in their penile cavernosal arteries into two groups; Group A included 30 patients with PSV less than 25 cm/sec, and Group B included 30 patients with PSV more than 35 cm/sec. Blood flow in the penile cavernosal artery was measured with color Doppler ultrasonography. All patients were assessed by ocular fundus examination under amydriatic conditions to evaluate retinal vascular atherosclerotic changes using Hyman’s classification.Results: Evidence of retinal vascular atherosclerotic changes was found in 19 patients (63.3% in Group A and in 10 patients (33.3% in Group B.Conclusions: Our study confirms the possibility of predicting penile arterial vascular status in patients with ED from their retinal vascular findings by using amydriatic simple, practical funduscopy.Keywords: erectile dysfunction, atherosclerosis, retinal vascular atherosclerosis

  15. Effect of gamma rays on electrically evoked contractions of non-vascular smooth muscles (rat vas deferens)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have tried, in this experiment, to study the modifications of non-vascular smooth muscles contraction induced via gamma rays. Smooth muscular fibers were isolated from the vas deferens of an adult rat and contractions were electrically evoked. Our results show that irradiation activates the VOC (Voltage Operated Channel) type of ionic channels which causes an increasing in the inward flux of Ca2+ and then causes an increasing in the inner calcium concentration [Ca2]i, the matter which means an increasing in the force of muscular contraction. Concerning to the response of vas deferens smooth muscles to the activation of membrane receptors, we have tried to study the effects of gamma rays on activating adrenergic and cholinergic receptors, also, we have tried to show the effects of different doses of gamma rays (1, 3, 5, 7 Gy) on regulating the contractile response of this type of smooth muscles. And results show that: - Irradiation increases contraction force, mediated by adrenergic and cholinergic receptors, in a dose dependent manner, with Emax 1 Gy maxc 3 Gy max 5 Gy max 7 Gy. There is an important shift on irradiated rats (3, 5, 7 Gy) where the maximum effect of Acetylcholine (Emax) can be obtained in lower concentrations of Acetylcholine. These results mean that irradiation activates the inward flux of Ca2+ through the ROC (Receptors Operated Channels) type of ionic channels, which rely, in their activation, on activating the membrane receptors. By comparing these results with the effects of gamma rays on activating vascular adrenergic and cholinergic receptors, we concluded that: Non-vascular smooth muscles (vas deferens) are less sensitive to irradiation in comparing with vascular smooth muscles (venae portal hepatica), and irradiation increases the sensitivity of cholinergic receptors to acetylcholine in the smooth muscular fibers of vas deferens while; if decreases this sensitivity in the smooth muscular fibers of venae portal hepatica. (author)

  16. Involvement of phospholipase D in store-operated calcium influx in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, M; Tepel, M; Nofer, J R; Neusser, M; Assmann, G; Zidek, W

    2000-08-11

    In non-excitable cells, sustained intracellular Ca2+ increase critically depends on influx of extracellular Ca2+. Such Ca2+ influx is thought to occur by a 'store-operated' mechanism, i.e. the signal for Ca2+ entry is believed to result from the initial release of Ca2+ from inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive intracellular stores. Here we show that the depletion of cellular Ca2+ stores by thapsigargin or bradykinin is functionally linked to a phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase D (PLD) activity in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), and that phosphatidic acid formed via PLD enhances sustained calcium entry in this cell type. These results suggest a regulatory role for PLD in store-operated Ca2+ entry in VSMC.

  17. STUDY ON THE INHIBITORY EFFECT OF ANTISENSE ETAR OLIGODEOXYNUCLEOTIDES ON THE PROLIFERATION OF VASCULAR SMOOTH CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张岚; 张柏根; 张纪蔚; 钱济先; 张皓; 黄晓钟

    2002-01-01

    Objective To study the inhibitory effect of antisense endothelin receptor A (ETAR) on the proliferation of the vascular smooth muscle cells. Methods The sense, antisense and mismatched ODNs for ETAR were designed and synthetized. The study was carried out using MTT method and binding assays.Results ETAR-ODNs could move successfully across VSMC membranes. Photo-absorption in the MTT test was reduced significantly (P<0.05) in the antisense group at 5μmol/L; the reduction of CPM also occurred in the 125I-ET-1 specific binding assay; and the sense and mismatched ODNs groups did not show this reduction. Conclusion Our study suggested that the antisense oligomers inhibited the proliferation of VSMCs by hindering the translation of target mRNA and by reducing the production of related protein.

  18. Local electromechanical properties of different phenotype models of vascular smooth muscle cells using force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Gary; Reukov, Vladimir; Nikiforov, Maxim; Guo, Senli; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei; Vertegel, Alexey

    2010-03-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) exist as a spectrum of diverse phenotypes raning between contractile and synthetic, the latter being associated with disease states. Different VSMC phenotypes, modeled using serum-starvation, exhibit characteristic electromechanical responses that can be distinguished using band excitation piezoresponse force microscopy (BEPFM), which maps information at the same rate as the atomic force microscope (AFM) scan performed simultaneously. BEPFM image formation mechanism in the culture medium is determined using excitation steps from 1 mV to 100 V. High voltage improves contrast between cells and collagen-coated substrates. Viscoelasticity from AFM stress relaxation experiments and local elasticity from force maps correlate to BEPFM data providing a map of local mechanical properties on different VSMCs.

  19. Inhibition of NF-κB activity in rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells by lovastatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear factor NF-κB is believed to play an important role in regulating the production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), which induce atherosclerosis, restenosis and plaque rupture. We incubated rabbit vascular smooth muscle cells (RVSMCs) with 5 μmol/L lovastatin in the presence of IL-1-α and PDGFBB (20 μg/L, respectively) to study whether lovastatin inhibited NF-κB binding activity induced by IL-1 and PDGF. The NF-κB activity was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA); MMP-1 and MMP-3 were measured by western blotting; and MMP-9 was detected by zymography. The result showed that lovastatin strongly reduced NF-κB activity upregulated by IL-1 combined with PDGF, and lovastatin also dose-dependently inhibited the expression of MMP-1, -3 and -9 induced by IL-1 and PDGF. It suggested that the beneficial effects of statins may extend to mechanisms beyond cholesterol reduction

  20. Pharmacological inhibition of PHOSPHO1 suppresses vascular smooth muscle cell calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Yadav, Manisha C; Zhu, Dongxing; Narisawa, Sonoko; Sheen, Campbell; Stec, Boguslaw; Cosford, Nicholas D; Dahl, Russell; Farquharson, Colin; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Macrae, Vicky E; Millán, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Medial vascular calcification (MVC) is common in patients with chronic kidney disease, obesity, and aging. MVC is an actively regulated process that resembles skeletal mineralization, resulting from chondro-osteogenic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we used mineralizing murine VSMCs to study the expression of PHOSPHO1, a phosphatase that participates in the first step of matrix vesicles-mediated initiation of mineralization during endochondral ossification. Wild-type (WT) VSMCs cultured under calcifying conditions exhibited increased Phospho1 gene expression and Phospho1(-/-) VSMCs failed to mineralize in vitro. Using natural PHOSPHO1 substrates, potent and specific inhibitors of PHOSPHO1 were identified via high-throughput screening and mechanistic analysis and two of these inhibitors, designated MLS-0390838 and MLS-0263839, were selected for further analysis. Their effectiveness in preventing VSMC calcification by targeting PHOSPHO1 function was assessed, alone and in combination with a potent tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) inhibitor MLS-0038949. PHOSPHO1 inhibition by MLS-0263839 in mineralizing WT cells (cultured with added inorganic phosphate) reduced calcification in culture to 41.8% ± 2.0% of control. Combined inhibition of PHOSPHO1 by MLS-0263839 and TNAP by MLS-0038949 significantly reduced calcification to 20.9% ± 0.74% of control. Furthermore, the dual inhibition strategy affected the expression of several mineralization-related enzymes while increasing expression of the smooth muscle cell marker Acta2. We conclude that PHOSPHO1 plays a critical role in VSMC mineralization and that "phosphatase inhibition" may be a useful therapeutic strategy to reduce MVC.

  1. Piperlongumine inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by suppressing PDGF receptor signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Dong Ju [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kim, Soo Yeon [Division of Life Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seong Su [University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Kim, Chan Woo [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Bioinspired Science, Ehwa Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kumar, Sandeep [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Park, Byeoung Soo [Nanotoxtech Co., Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Eun [Division of Applied Biology and Chemistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Yeo Pyo [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Hanjoong, E-mail: hjo@emory.edu [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Bioinspired Science, Ehwa Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Hyun, E-mail: pyh012@sch.ac.kr [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Natural Sciences, Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-atherogenic effect of PL was examined using partial carotid ligation model in ApoE KO mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL prevented atherosclerotic plaque development, VSMCs proliferation, and NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Piperlongumine reduced vascular smooth muscle cell activation through PDGF-R{beta} and NF-{kappa}B-signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for atherosclerosis treatment. -- Abstract: Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL) is an alkaloid found in the long pepper (Piper longum L.) and has well-documented anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties; however, the role of PL in prevention of atherosclerosis is unknown. We evaluated the anti-atherosclerotic potential of PL in an in vivo murine model of accelerated atherosclerosis and defined its mechanism of action in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local treatment with PL significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation as well as proliferation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation in an in vivo setting. PL treatment in VSMCs in vitro showed inhibition of migration and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-induced proliferation to the in vivo findings. We further identified that PL inhibited PDGF-BB-induced PDGF receptor beta activation and suppressed downstream signaling molecules such as phospholipase C{gamma}1, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt. Lastly, PL significantly attenuated activation of NF-{kappa}B-a downstream transcriptional regulator in PDGF receptor signaling, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a novel, therapeutic mechanism by which PL suppresses atherosclerosis plaque formation in vivo.

  2. In vascular smooth muscle cells paricalcitol prevents phosphate-induced Wnt/β-catenin activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Julio M; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R; Herencia, Carmen; Oca, Addy Montes de; Estepa, Jose C; Canalejo, Rocio; Rodríguez-Ortiz, Maria E; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolástico; Canalejo, Antonio; Rodríguez, Mariano; Almadén, Yolanda

    2012-10-15

    The present study investigates the differential effect of two vitamin D receptor agonists, calcitriol and paricalcitol, on human aortic smooth muscle cells calcification in vitro. Human vascular smooth muscle cells were incubated in a high phosphate (HP) medium alone or supplemented with either calcitriol 10(-8)M (HP + CTR) or paricalcitol 3·10(-8) M (HP + PC). HP medium induced calcification, which was associated with the upregulation of mRNA expression of osteogenic factors such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), Runx2/Cbfa1, Msx2, and osteocalcin. In these cells, activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling was evidenced by the translocation of β-catenin into the nucleus and the increase in the expression of direct target genes as cyclin D1, axin 2, and VCAN/versican. Addition of calcitriol to HP medium (HP + CTR) further increased calcification and also enhanced the expression of osteogenic factors together with a significant elevation of nuclear β-catenin levels and the expression of cyclin D1, axin 2, and VCAN. By contrast, the addition of paricalcitol (HP + PC) not only reduced calcification but also downregulated the expression of BMP2 and other osteoblastic phenotype markers as well as the levels of nuclear β-catenin and the expression of its target genes. The role of Wnt/β-catenin on phosphate- and calcitriol-induced calcification was further demonstrated by the inhibition of calcification after addition of Dickkopf-related protein 1 (DKK-1), a specific natural antagonist of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In conclusion, the differential effect of calcitriol and paricalcitol on vascular calcification appears to be mediated by a distinct regulation of the BMP and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways.

  3. Sustained diacylglycerol formation from inositol phospholipids in angiotensin II-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griendling, K.K.; Rittenhouse, S.E.; Brock, T.A.; Ekstein, L.S.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.; Alexander, R.W.

    1986-05-05

    Angiotensin II acts on cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells to stimulate phospholipase C-mediated hydrolysis of membrane phosphoinositides and subsequent formation of diacylglycerol and inositol phosphates. In intact cells, angiotensin II induces a dose-dependent increase in diglyceride which is detectable after 5 s and sustained for at least 20 min. Angiotensin II (100 nM)-stimulated diglyceride formation is biphasic, peaking at 15 s (227 +/- 19% control) and at 5 min (303 +/- 23% control). Simultaneous analysis of labeled inositol phospholipids shows that at 15 s phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) decline to 52 +/- 6% control and 63 +/- 5% control, respectively, while phosphatidylinositol (PI) remains unchanged. In contrast, at 5 min, PIP2 and PIP have returned toward control levels (92 +/- 2 and 82 +/- 4% control, respectively), while PI has decreased substantially (81 +/- 2% control). The calcium ionophore ionomycin (15 microM) stimulates diglyceride accumulation but does not cause PI hydrolysis. 4 beta-Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, an activator of protein kinase C, inhibits early PIP and PIP2 breakdown and diglyceride formation, without inhibiting late-phase diglyceride accumulation. Thus, angiotensin II induces rapid transient breakdown of PIP and PIP2 and delayed hydrolysis of PI. The rapid attenuation of polyphosphoinositide breakdown is likely caused by a protein kinase C-mediated inhibition of PIP and PIP2 hydrolysis. While in vascular smooth muscle stimulated with angiotensin II inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation is transient, diglyceride production is biphasic, suggesting that initial and sustained diglyceride formation from the phosphoinositides results from different biochemical and/or cellular processes.

  4. Influence of thyroid status on responses of rat isolated pulmonary artery, vas deferens and trachea to smooth muscle relaxant drugs.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Donnell, S R; Wanstall, J. C.; Mustafa, M. B.

    1987-01-01

    1 Responses to relaxant drugs have been examined on isolated KCl-contracted smooth muscle preparations from rats in which thyroid status was changed by prior treatment with either thyroxine (T4) for 1 week (preparations of pulmonary artery, trachea and vas deferens) or methimazole for 10-12 weeks (pulmonary artery preparations). 2 On pulmonary artery preparations, T4 treatment caused a significant increase in the magnitude of the relaxant responses to noradrenaline and isoprenaline but not th...

  5. Erythropoietin Attenuates Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Experimental Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension through Interplay between Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Heme Oxygenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loon, Rosa Laura E; Bartelds, Beatrijs; Wagener, Frank A D T G; Affara, Nada; Mohaupt, Saffloer; Wijnberg, Hans; Pennings, Sebastiaan W C; Takens, Janny; Berger, Rolf M F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a pulmonary vascular disease with a high mortality, characterized by typical angio-proliferative lesions. Erythropoietin (EPO) attenuates pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH. We postulated that EPO acts through mobilization of endothelial progeni

  6. Cell-Cell Interactions Mediate the Response of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells to Substrate Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Olga V.; Lee, Kristen L.; Isenberg, Brett C.; Rich, Celeste B.; Nugent, Matthew A.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2011-01-01

    The vessel wall experiences progressive stiffening with age and the development of cardiovascular disease, which alters the micromechanical environment experienced by resident vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In vitro studies have shown that VSMCs are sensitive to substrate stiffness, but the exact molecular mechanisms of their response to stiffness remains unknown. Studies have also shown that cell-cell interactions can affect mechanotransduction at the cell-substrate interface. Using flexible substrates, we show that the expression of proteins associated with cell-matrix adhesion and cytoskeletal tension is regulated by substrate stiffness, and that an increase in cell density selectively attenuates some of these effects. We also show that cell-cell interactions exert a strong effect on cell morphology in a substrate-stiffness dependent manner. Collectively, the data suggest that as VSMCs form cell-cell contacts, substrate stiffness becomes a less potent regulator of focal adhesion signaling. This study provides insight into the mechanisms by which VSMCs respond to the mechanical environment of the blood vessel wall, and point to cell-cell interactions as critical mediators of VSMC response to vascular injury. PMID:21806930

  7. Activation of the Retinoid X Receptor Modulates Angiotensin II-Induced Smooth Muscle Gene Expression and Inflammation in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lehman, Allison M.B.; Montford, John R.; Horita, Henrick; Ostriker, Allison C.; Weiser-Evans, Mary C. M.; Nemenoff, Raphael A.; Furgeson, Seth B.

    2014-01-01

    The retinoid X receptor (RXR) partners with numerous nuclear receptors, such as the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) family, liver X receptors (LXRs), and farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Although each heterodimer can be activated by specific ligands, a subset of these receptors, defined as permissive nuclear receptors, can also be activated by RXR agonists known as rexinoids. Many individual RXR heterodimers have beneficial effects in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Because ...

  8. Protocatechuic aldehyde inhibits migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and intravascular thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Protocatechuic aldehyde (PCA) inhibits ROS production in VSMCs. ► PCA inhibits proliferation and migration in PDGF-induced VSMCs. ► PCA has anti-platelet effects in ex vivo rat whole blood. ► We report the potential therapeutic role of PCA in atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: The migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and formation of intravascular thrombosis play crucial roles in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. This study examined the effects of protocatechuic aldehyde (PCA), a compound isolated from the aqueous extract of the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza, an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a variety of vascular diseases, on the migration and proliferation of VSMCs and platelets due to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). DNA 5-bromo-2′-deoxy-uridine (BrdU) incorporation and wound-healing assays indicated that PCA significantly attenuated PDGF-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs at a pharmacologically relevant concentration (100 μM). On a molecular level, we observed down-regulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, both of which regulate key enzymes associated with migration and proliferation. We also found that PCA induced S-phase arrest of the VSMC cell cycle and suppressed cyclin D2 expression. In addition, PCA inhibited PDGF-BB-stimulated reactive oxygen species production in VSMCs, indicating that PCA’s antioxidant properties may contribute to its suppression of PDGF-induced migration and proliferation in VSMCs. Finally, PCA exhibited an anti-thrombotic effect related to its inhibition of platelet aggregation, confirmed with an aggregometer. Together, these findings suggest a potential therapeutic role of PCA in the treatment of atherosclerosis and angioplasty-induced vascular restenosis.

  9. Regulation of SIRT1 in vascular smooth muscle cells from streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Toniolo

    Full Text Available Sirtuins enzymes are a conserved family of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD-dependent deacetylases and ADP-ribosyltransferases that mediate responses to oxidative stress, fasting and dietary restriction in mammals. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs are involved in many mechanisms that regulate vascular biology in vivo but the role of SIRT1 has not been explored in much detail. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of SIRT1 in cultured VSMCs under various stress conditions including diabetes. Sprague-Dawley rats were made diabetic by injecting a single dose of streptozotocin (65 mg/Kg, and aortic VSMCs were isolated after 4 weeks. Immunocytochemistry showed that SIRT1 was localized predominantly in the nucleus, with lower staining in VSMCs from STZ-diabetic as compared with normoglycemic rats. Previous diabetes induction in vivo and high glucose concentrations in vitro significantly downregulated SIRT1 amounts as detected in Western blot assays, whereas TNF-α (30 ng/ml stimulation failed to induce significant changes. Because estrogen signaling affects several pathways of oxidative stress control, we also investigated SIRT1 modulation by 17β-estradiol. Treatment with the hormone (10 nM or a selective estrogen receptor-α agonist decreased SIRT1 levels in VSMCs from normoglycemic but not in those from STZ-diabetic animals. 17β-estradiol treatment also enhanced activation of AMP-dependent kinase, which partners with SIRT1 in a signaling axis. SIRT1 downregulation by 17β-estradiol could be observed as well in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a cell type in which SIRT1 downregulation is associated with insulin resistance and subclinical atherosclerosis. These data suggest that SIRT1 protein levels are regulated by diverse cellular stressors to a variable extent in VSMCs from diabetic and normoglycemic rats, warranting further investigation on SIRT1 as a modulator of VSMC activity in settings of vascular inflammation.

  10. Protocatechuic aldehyde inhibits migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells and intravascular thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chang Yoon [The Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, CT (United States); Endocrinology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Institute of Endocrine Research, and Severance Integrative Research Institute for Cerebral and Cardiovascular Disease, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ku, Cheol Ryong [Endocrinology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Institute of Endocrine Research, and Severance Integrative Research Institute for Cerebral and Cardiovascular Disease, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Yoon Hee, E-mail: wooriminji@gmail.com [Endocrinology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Institute of Endocrine Research, and Severance Integrative Research Institute for Cerebral and Cardiovascular Disease, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun Jig, E-mail: ejlee423@yuhs.ac [Endocrinology, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Institute of Endocrine Research, and Severance Integrative Research Institute for Cerebral and Cardiovascular Disease, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Endocrinology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protocatechuic aldehyde (PCA) inhibits ROS production in VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA inhibits proliferation and migration in PDGF-induced VSMCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA has anti-platelet effects in ex vivo rat whole blood. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the potential therapeutic role of PCA in atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: The migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and formation of intravascular thrombosis play crucial roles in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. This study examined the effects of protocatechuic aldehyde (PCA), a compound isolated from the aqueous extract of the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza, an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat a variety of vascular diseases, on the migration and proliferation of VSMCs and platelets due to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). DNA 5-bromo-2 Prime -deoxy-uridine (BrdU) incorporation and wound-healing assays indicated that PCA significantly attenuated PDGF-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs at a pharmacologically relevant concentration (100 {mu}M). On a molecular level, we observed down-regulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, both of which regulate key enzymes associated with migration and proliferation. We also found that PCA induced S-phase arrest of the VSMC cell cycle and suppressed cyclin D2 expression. In addition, PCA inhibited PDGF-BB-stimulated reactive oxygen species production in VSMCs, indicating that PCA's antioxidant properties may contribute to its suppression of PDGF-induced migration and proliferation in VSMCs. Finally, PCA exhibited an anti-thrombotic effect related to its inhibition of platelet aggregation, confirmed with an aggregometer. Together, these findings suggest a potential therapeutic role of PCA in the treatment of atherosclerosis and angioplasty-induced vascular restenosis.

  11. Substance-specific importance of EGFR for vascular smooth muscle cells motility in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Barbara; Schwerdt, Gerald; Heise, Christian; Bethmann, Daniel; Rabe, Sindy; Mildenberger, Sigrid; Gekle, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Besides their importance for the vascular tone, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) also contribute to pathophysiological vessel alterations. Various G-protein coupled receptor ligands involved in vascular dysfunction and remodeling can transactivate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) of VSMC, yet the importance of EGFR transactivation for the VSMC phenotype is incompletely understood. The aims of this study were (i) to characterize further the importance of the VSMC-EGFR for proliferation, migration and marker gene expression for inflammation, fibrosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis and (ii) to test the hypothesis that vasoactive substances (endothelin-1, phenylephrine, thrombin, vasopressin and ATP) rely differentially on the EGFR with respect to the abovementioned phenotypic alterations. In primary, aortic VSMC from mice without conditional deletion of the EGFR, proliferation, migration, marker gene expression (inflammation, fibrosis and ROS homeostasis) and cell signaling (ERK 1/2, intracellular calcium) were analyzed. VSMC-EGFR loss reduced collective cell migration and single cell migration probability, while no difference between the genotypes in single cell velocity, chemotaxis or marker gene expression could be observed under control conditions. EGF promoted proliferation, collective cell migration, chemokinesis and chemotaxis and leads to a proinflammatory gene expression profile in wildtype but not in knockout VSMC. Comparing the impact of five vasoactive substances (all reported to transactivate EGFR and all leading to an EGFR dependent increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation), we demonstrate that the importance of EGFR for their action is substance-dependent and most apparent for crowd migration but plays a minor role for gene expression regulation.

  12. Oxidative modification of high density lipoprotein induced by cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江渝; 刘红; 彭家和; 叶治家; 何凤田; 董燕麟; 刘秉文

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To observe the oxidative modification of high density lipoprotein (HDL) induced by cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Methods: HDL cocultured with SMCs at 37℃ in 48 h was subjected, and native HDL (N-HDL) served as control. Oxidative modification of HDL was identified by using agarose gel electrophoresis. Absorbances of conjugated diene (CD) and lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH) were measured with ultraviolet spectrophotometry at 234 and 560 nm respectively, and fluorescence intensity of thiobarbuturic acid reaction substance (TBARS) with fluorescence spectrophotometry at 550 nm emission wavelength with excitation at 515 nm. Results: In comparison with N-HDL, the electrophoretic mobility of SMCs-cocultured HDL was increased, and the contents of CD, LOOH and TBARS HDL were very significantly higher than those of the control HDL (P<0.01). Conclusion: Oxidative modification of HDL can be induced by human arterial SMCs.

  13. Clinical Outcomes of Cryopreserved Arterial Allograft Used as a Vascular Conduit for Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Chang, Jai Won; Park, Yangsoon; Han, Youngjin; Kwon, Hyunwook; Kwon, Tae-Won; Han, Duck Jong; Cho, Yong-Pil; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    This single center cohort study aimed to test the hypothesis that use of a cryopreserved arterial allograft could avoid the maturation or healing process of a new vascular access and to evaluate the patency of this technique compared with that of vascular access using a prosthetic graft. Between April 2012 and March 2013, 20 patients underwent an upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft for failed or failing vascular accesses and 53 using a prosthetic graft were included in this study. The mean duration of catheter dependence, calculated as the time interval from upper arm access placement to removal of the tunneled central catheter after successful cannulation of the access, was significantly longer for accesses using a prosthetic graft than a cryopreserved arterial allograft (34.4 ± 11.39 days vs. 4.9 ± 8.5 days, P unassisted; P = 0.314) and cumulative (assisted; P = 0.673) access survivals were similar in the two groups. There were no postoperative complications related to the use of a cryopreserved iliac arterial allograft except for one patient who experienced wound hematoma. In conclusion, upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft may permit immediate hemodialysis without the maturation or healing process, resulting in access survival comparable to that of an access using a prosthetic graft. PMID:27478338

  14. Clinical Outcomes of Cryopreserved Arterial Allograft Used as a Vascular Conduit for Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Chang, Jai Won; Park, Yangsoon; Han, Youngjin; Kwon, Hyunwook; Kwon, Tae-Won; Han, Duck Jong; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    This single center cohort study aimed to test the hypothesis that use of a cryopreserved arterial allograft could avoid the maturation or healing process of a new vascular access and to evaluate the patency of this technique compared with that of vascular access using a prosthetic graft. Between April 2012 and March 2013, 20 patients underwent an upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft for failed or failing vascular accesses and 53 using a prosthetic graft were included in this study. The mean duration of catheter dependence, calculated as the time interval from upper arm access placement to removal of the tunneled central catheter after successful cannulation of the access, was significantly longer for accesses using a prosthetic graft than a cryopreserved arterial allograft (34.4 ± 11.39 days vs. 4.9 ± 8.5 days, P unassisted; P = 0.314) and cumulative (assisted; P = 0.673) access survivals were similar in the two groups. There were no postoperative complications related to the use of a cryopreserved iliac arterial allograft except for one patient who experienced wound hematoma. In conclusion, upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft may permit immediate hemodialysis without the maturation or healing process, resulting in access survival comparable to that of an access using a prosthetic graft.

  15. Clinical Outcomes of Cryopreserved Arterial Allograft Used as a Vascular Conduit for Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Tae-Yong; Kim, Young Hoon; Chang, Jai Won; Park, Yangsoon; Han, Youngjin; Kwon, Hyunwook; Kwon, Tae-Won; Han, Duck Jong; Cho, Yong-Pil; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    This single center cohort study aimed to test the hypothesis that use of a cryopreserved arterial allograft could avoid the maturation or healing process of a new vascular access and to evaluate the patency of this technique compared with that of vascular access using a prosthetic graft. Between April 2012 and March 2013, 20 patients underwent an upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft for failed or failing vascular accesses and 53 using a prosthetic graft were included in this study. The mean duration of catheter dependence, calculated as the time interval from upper arm access placement to removal of the tunneled central catheter after successful cannulation of the access, was significantly longer for accesses using a prosthetic graft than a cryopreserved arterial allograft (34.4 ± 11.39 days vs. 4.9 ± 8.5 days, P unassisted; P = 0.314) and cumulative (assisted; P = 0.673) access survivals were similar in the two groups. There were no postoperative complications related to the use of a cryopreserved iliac arterial allograft except for one patient who experienced wound hematoma. In conclusion, upper arm vascular access using a cryopreserved arterial allograft may permit immediate hemodialysis without the maturation or healing process, resulting in access survival comparable to that of an access using a prosthetic graft.

  16. Macrophage secretory products selectively stimulate dermatan sulfate proteoglycan production in cultured arterial smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arterial dermatan sulfate proteoglycan has been shown to increase with atherosclerosis progression, but factors responsible for this increase are unknown. To test the hypothesis that smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis may be modified by macrophage products, pigeon arterial smooth muscle cells were exposed to the media of either cholesteryl ester-loaded pigeon peritoneal macrophages or a macrophage cell line P388D1. Proteoglycans radiolabeled with [35S]sulfate and [3H]serine were isolated from culture media and smooth muscle cells and purified following precipitation with 1-hexadecylpyridinium chloride and chromatography. Increasing concentrations of macrophage-conditioned media were associated with a dose-response increase in [35S]sulfate incorporation into secreted proteoglycans, but there was no change in cell-associated proteoglycans. Incorporation of [3H]serine into total proteoglycan core proteins was not significantly different (5.2 X 10(5) dpm and 5.5 X 10(5) disintegrations per minute (dpm) in control and conditioned media-treated cultures, respectively), but selective effects were observed on individual proteoglycan types. Twofold increases in dermatan sulfate proteoglycan and limited degradation of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan were apparent based on core proteins separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Immunoinhibition studies indicated that interleukin-1 was involved in the modulation of proteoglycan synthesis by macrophage-conditioned media. These data provide support for the role of macrophages in alteration of the matrix proteoglycans synthesized by smooth muscle cells and provide a mechanism to account for the reported increased dermatan sulfate/chondroitin sulfate ratios in the developing atherosclerotic lesion

  17. Pleiotropic effects of statins in distal human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butrous Ghazwan S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent clinical data suggest statins have transient but significant effects in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. In this study we explored the molecular effects of statins on distal human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs and their relevance to proliferation and apoptosis in pulmonary arterial hypertension. Methods Primary distal human PASMCs from patients and controls were treated with lipophilic (simvastatin, atorvastatin, mevastatin and fluvastatin, lipophobic (pravastatin and nitric-oxide releasing statins and studied in terms of their DNA synthesis, proliferation, apoptosis, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and endothelin-1 release. Results Treatment of human PASMCs with selected statins inhibited DNA synthesis, proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase-9 production in a concentration-dependent manner. Statins differed in their effectiveness, the rank order of anti-mitogenic potency being simvastatin > atorvastatin > > pravastatin. Nevertheless, a novel nitric oxide-releasing derivative of pravastatin (NCX 6550 was effective. Lipophilic statins, such as simvastatin, also enhanced the anti-proliferative effects of iloprost and sildenafil, promoted apoptosis and inhibited the release of the mitogen and survival factor endothelin-1. These effects were reversed by mevalonate and the isoprenoid intermediate geranylgeranylpyrophosphate and were mimicked by inhibitors of the Rho and Rho-kinase. Conclusions Lipophilic statins exert direct effects on distal human PASMCs and are likely to involve inhibition of Rho GTPase signalling. These findings compliment some of the recently documented effects in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  18. Value of cerebral perfusion and vascular reserve for the treatment of symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li'an Huang; Xuewen Song; Anding Xu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is crucial to understand cerebral perfusion and vascular reserve in stegnotic arterial blood-supply regions to treat ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. However, effects on symptomatic intracrani-al arterial stenosis (SICAS) need to be further studied in additional applications. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate and summarize the effects of cerebral perfusion and vascular reserve on the treatment of SICAS. RETRIEVAL STRATEGY: A computer-based online search of English language publications from January 2000 to July 2007 was conducted in PubMed to identify publications that addressed cerebral perfusion and vascular reserve of SICAS. Search key words were "intracranial stenosis, perfusion, brain reserve". Relevant data were also searched with the China Journal Net, using the same key words in Chinese from January 2000 to January 2007. In total, 101 articles were retrieved. Inclusion criteria: ① Articles describing the current status for the diagnosis and treatment of SICAS; ② Articles concerning research developments of cerebral perfusion and vascular reserve of SICAS. Exclusion criteria: duplicated articles. LITERATURE EVALUATION: This study included 21 articles of experimental studies and conference re-ports.DATA SYNTHESIS: When performing interventional surgery in SICAS patients, it is important to under-stand cerebral perfusion and vascular reserve in addition to knowing the clinical symptoms and degrees of arterial stenosis. In recent years, there are a growing number of reports on measurements of vascular reserve through the use of magnetic resonance perfusion imaging (MR-PWI). Investigations demonstrate cerebral perfusion and vascular reserve decrease in many SICAS patients. Many studies show that both improve after surgical intervention. CONCLUSION: Cerebral perfusion could provide direct evidence of whether ischemia has occurred in the brain. Because of lateral circulation and cerebral vascular reserve, intracranial vascular stenosis and/or decreased

  19. Focal adhesion kinase antisense oligodeoxynucleotides inhibit human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells proliferation and promote human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Chun-long; ZHANG Zhen-xiang; XU Yong-jian; NI Wang; CHEN Shi-xin

    2005-01-01

    Background Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation plays an important role in pulmonary vessel structural remodelling. At present, the mechanisms related to proliferation of PASMCs are not clear. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a widely expressed nonreceptor protein tyrosine kinase. Recent research indicates that FAK is implicated in signalling pathways which regulate cytoskeletal organization, adhesion, migration, survival and proliferation of cells. Furthermore, there are no reports about the role of FAK in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs). We investigated whether FAK takes part in the intracellular signalling pathway involved in HPASMCs proliferation and apoptosis, by using antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) to selectively suppress the expression of FAK protein.Methods Cultured HPASMCs stimulated by fibronectin (40 μg/ml) were passively transfected with ODNs, sense FAK, mismatch sense and antisense-FAK respectively. Expression of FAK, Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK 2) and caspase-3 proteins were detected by immunoprecipitation and Western blots. Cell cycle and cell apoptosis were analysed by flow cytometry. In addition, cytoplasmic FAK expression was detected by immunocytochemical staining.Results When compared with mismatch sense group, the protein expressions of FAK, JNK and CDK 2 in HPASMCs decreased in antisense-FAK ODNs group and increased in sense-FAK ODNs group significantly. Caspase-3 expression upregulated in HPASMCs when treated with antisense ODNs and downregulated when treated with sense ODNs. When compared with mismatch sense ODNs group, the proportion of cells at G1 phase decreased significantly in sense ODNs group, while the proportion of cells at S phase increased significantly. In contrast, compared with mismatch sense ODNs group, the proportion of cells at G1 phase was increased significantly in antisense-FAK ODNs group. The level of cell apoptosis in antisense-FAK group

  20. Smooth muscle LDL receptor-related protein-1 deletion induces aortic insufficiency and promotes vascular cardiomyopathy in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua E Basford

    Full Text Available Valvular disease is common in patients with Marfan syndrome and can lead to cardiomyopathy. However, some patients develop cardiomyopathy in the absence of hemodynamically significant valve dysfunction, suggesting alternative mechanisms of disease progression. Disruption of LDL receptor-related protein-1 (Lrp1 in smooth muscle cells has been shown to cause vascular pathologies similar to Marfan syndrome, with activation of smooth muscle cells, vascular dysfunction and aortic aneurysms. This study used echocardiography and blood pressure monitoring in mouse models to determine whether inactivation of Lrp1 in vascular smooth muscle leads to cardiomyopathy, and if so, whether the mechanism is a consequence of valvular disease. Hemodynamic changes during treatment with captopril were also assessed. Dilation of aortic roots was observed in young Lrp1-knockout mice and progressed as they aged, whereas no significant aortic dilation was detected in wild type littermates. Diastolic blood pressure was lower and pulse pressure higher in Lrp1-knockout mice, which was normalized by treatment with captopril. Aortic dilation was followed by development of aortic insufficiency and subsequent dilated cardiomyopathy due to valvular disease. Thus, smooth muscle cell Lrp1 deficiency results in aortic dilation and insufficiency that causes secondary cardiomyopathy that can be improved by captopril. These findings provide novel insights into mechanisms of cardiomyopathy associated with vascular activation and offer a new model of valvular cardiomyopathy.

  1. Connective tissue growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor from airway smooth muscle interact with the extracellular matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, Janette K; Ge, Qi; Poniris, Maree H; Boustany, Sarah; Twigg, Stephen M; Black, Judith L; Johnson, Peter R A

    2006-01-01

    Airway remodeling describes the structural changes that occur in the asthmatic airway that include airway smooth muscle hyperplasia, increases in vascularity due to angiogenesis, and thickening of the basement membrane. Our aim in this study was to examine the effect of transforming growth factor-be

  2. Microscopic study of ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction effects on vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Zhang; Yi-Rong Hou; Tian Chen; Bing Hu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe vascular smooth muscle cell morphological changes induced by ultrasound combined with microbubbles by Atomic Force Acoustic Microscopy (AFAM). Methods: A7r5 rat aortic smooth muscle cells were divided into groups: control group (without ultrasonic irradiation, no micro bubbles) and US+MB group (45 kHz, 0.4 W/cm2 ultrasound irradiate for 20 seconds with a SonoVue™ concentration of [(56-140)×10 5/mL]. Cell micro-morphological changes (such as topographic and acoustic prognosis) were detected, before and after ultrasound destruction by AFAM. Results: In cell morphology, smooth muscle cells were spread o and connected to each another by fibers. At the center of the cell, the nuclear area had a rough surface and was significantly elevated from its surroundings. The cytoskeletal structure of the reticular nucleus and cytoplasm in the morphology of A7r5 cells (20μm×20μm) were clear before microbubble intervention. After acoustic exciting, the cell structure details of the acoustic image were improved with better resolution, showing the elasticity of different tissues. In the acoustic image, the nucleus was harder, more flexible and uneven compared with the cytoplasm. Many strong various-sized echo particles were stuck on the rough nuclear membrane’s substrate surface. The nuclear membrane did not have a continuous smooth surface; there were many obstructions (pores). After ultrasound-intervention was combined with microbubbles, the dark areas of the A7r5 cell images was increased in various sizes and degrees. The dark areas showed the depth or low altitudes of the lower regions, suggesting regional depressions. However, the location and scope of the acoustic image dark areas were not similar to those found in the topographic images. Therefore, it was likely that the dark areas, both from the topographic and acoustic images, were sound-holes. In addition, some cell nuclei become round in different degrees after irradiation. Conclusions: Atomic

  3. Human vascular smooth muscle cells both express and respond to heparin-binding growth factor I (endothelial cell growth factor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkles, J.A.; Friesel, R.; Burgess, W.H.; Howk, R.; Mehlman, T.; Weinstein, R.; Maciag, T.

    1987-10-01

    The control of vascular endothelial and muscle cell proliferation is important in such processes as tumor angiogenesis, wound healing, and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Class I heparin-binding growth factor (HBGF-I) is a potent mitogen and chemoattractant for human endothelial cells in vitro and will induce angiogenesis in vivo. RNA gel blot hybridization experiments demonstrate that cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells, but not human umbilical cells also synthesize an HBGF-I mRNA. Smooth muscle cells also synthesize an HBGF-I-like polypeptide since (i) extract prepared from smooth muscle cells will compete with /sup 125/I-labeled HBGF-I for binding to the HBGF-I cell surface receptor, and (ii) the competing ligand is eluted from heparin-Sepharose affinity resin at a NaCl concentration similar to that required by purified bovine brain HBGF-I and stimulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, like endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells possess cell-surface-associated HBGF-I receptors and respond to HBGF-I as a mitogen. These results indicate the potential for an additional autocrine component of vascular smooth muscle cell growth control and establish a vessel wall source of HBGF-I for endothelial cell division in vivo.

  4. Neuropeptide Y stimulates DNA synthesis in human vascular smooth muscle cells through neuropeptide Y Y1 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, T; Edvinsson, L

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the mitogenic effect, measured as [3H]thymidine incorporation, of neuropeptide Y (NPY) on smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from human subcutaneous arteries (diameter: 0.4 mm). NPY stimulated DNA synthesis in a concentration-dependent manner, Emax 32 +/- 5% relative to control. The effec...

  5. Calcification of human vascular smooth muscle cells: associations with osteoprotegerin expression and acceleration by high-dose insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Ping; Knudsen, Kirsten Quyen Nguyen; Wogensen, Lise;

    2007-01-01

    Arterial medial calcifications occur often in diabetic individuals as part of the diabetic macroangiopathy. The pathogenesis is unknown, but the presence of calcifications predicts risk of cardiovascular events. We examined the effects of insulin on calcifying smooth muscle cells in vitro...

  6. Chemerin Stimulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Carotid Neointimal Hyperplasia by Activating Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wei; Luo, Yu; Wu, Lin; Liu, Feng; Liu, Huadong; Li, Jianghua; Liao, Bihong; Dong, Shaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vascular neointimal hyperplasia and remodeling arising from local inflammation are characteristic pathogeneses of proliferative cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis and post angioplasty restenosis. The molecular mechanisms behind these pathological processes have not been fully determined. The adipokine chemerin is associated with obesity, metabolism, and control of inflammation. Recently, chemerin has gained increased attention as it was found to play a critical role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of chemerin on the regulation of vascular smooth muscle cells and carotid neointimal formation after angioplasty. We found that circulating chemerin levels increased after carotid balloon injury, and that knockdown of chemerin significantly inhibited the proliferative aspects of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by platelet-derived growth factor-BB and pro-inflammatory chemokines in vitro as well as prohibited carotid neointimal hyperplasia and pro-inflammatory chemokines in vivo after angioplasty. Additionally, inhibition of chemerin down-regulated the expression of several proteins, including phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2, nuclear factor-kappa B p65, and proliferation cell nuclear antigen. The novel finding of this study is that chemerin stimulated vascular smooth muscle cells proliferation and carotid intimal hyperplasia through activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, which may lead to vascular inflammation and remodeling, and is relevant to proliferative cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27792753

  7. Detection of differentially regulated subsarcolemmal calcium signals activated by vasoactive agonists in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Krishna P.; Paudel, Omkar

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) plays pivotal roles in distinct cellular functions through global and local signaling in various subcellular compartments, and subcellular Ca2+ signal is the key factor for independent regulation of different cellular functions. In vascular smooth muscle cells, subsarcolemmal Ca2+ is an important regulator of excitation-contraction coupling, and nucleoplasmic Ca2+ is crucial for excitation-transcription coupling. However, information on Ca2+ signals in these subcellular compartments is limited. To study the regulation of the subcellular Ca2+ signals, genetically encoded Ca2+ indicators (cameleon), D3cpv, targeting the plasma membrane (PM), cytoplasm, and nucleoplasm were transfected into rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and Ca2+ signals were monitored using laser scanning confocal microscopy. In situ calibration showed that the Kd for Ca2+ of D3cpv was comparable in the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm, but it was slightly higher in the PM. Stimulation of digitonin-permeabilized cells with 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) elicited a transient elevation of Ca2+ concentration with similar amplitude and kinetics in the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. Activation of G protein-coupled receptors by endothelin-1 and angiotensin II preferentially elevated the subsarcolemmal Ca2+ signal with higher amplitude in the PM region than the nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. In contrast, the receptor tyrosine kinase activator, platelet-derived growth factor, elicited Ca2+ signals with similar amplitudes in all three regions, except that the rise-time and decay-time were slightly slower in the PM region. These data clearly revealed compartmentalization of Ca2+ signals in the subsarcolemmal regions and provide the basis for further investigations of differential regulation of subcellular Ca2+ signals in PASMCs. PMID:24352334

  8. Influence of Carbon Monoxide on Growth and Apoptosis of Human Umbilical Artery Smooth Muscle Cells and Vein Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajuan Li, Hai Wang, Bin Yang, Jichen Yang, Xiuyan Ruan, Yadong Yang, Edward K. Wakeland, Quanzhen Li, Xiangdong Fang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is a vasoactive molecule that is generated by vascular cells as a byproduct of heme catabolism and it plays an important physiological role in circulation system. In order to investigate whether exogenous CO can mediate the growth and proliferation of vascular cells, in this study, we used 250 parts per million (ppm of CO to treat human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell (hUASMC and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HuVEC and further evaluated the growth and apoptosis status of SMC and HuVEC. After SMC and HuVEC were exposed to CO for 7-day, the growth of SMC and HuVEC was significantly inhibited by CO in vitro on day 5 of CO exposure. And CO blocked cell cycle progress of SMC and HuVEC, more SMC and HuVEC stagnated at G0/G1 phase by flow cytometric analysis. Moreover, CO treatment inhibited SMC and HuVEC apoptosis caused by hydrogen peroxide through decreasing caspase 3 and 9 activities. To confirm the molecular mechanism of CO effect on SMC and HuVEC growth, we compared the gene expression profile in SMC and CO-treated SMC, HuVEC and CO-treated HuVEC. By microarray analysis, we found the expression level of some genes which are related to cell cycle regulation, cell growth and proliferation, and apoptosis were changed during CO exposure. We further identified that the down-regulated CDK2 contributed to arresting cell growth and the down-regulated Caspase 3 (CASP3 and Caspase 9 (CASP9 were associated with the inhibition of cell apoptosis. Therefore, CO exerts a certain growth arrest on SMC and HuVEC by inhibiting cell cycle transition from G0/G1 phase to S phase and has regulatory effect on cell apoptosis by regulating the expression of apoptosis-associated genes.

  9. Increased atherosclerosis and vascular smooth muscle cell activation in AIF-1 transgenic mice fed a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerville, Laura J; Kelemen, Sheri E; Ellison, Stephen P; England, Ross N; Autieri, Michael V

    2012-01-01

    Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is a cytoplasmic, scaffold signal transduction protein constitutively expressed in inflammatory cells, but inducible in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in response to injury or inflammatory stimuli. Although several basic science and population studies have reported increased AIF-1 expression in human and experimental atherosclerosis, a direct causal effect of AIF-1 expression on development of atherosclerosis has not been reported. The purpose of this study is to establish a direct relationship between AIF-1 expression and development of atherosclerosis. AIF-1 expression is detected VSMC in atherosclerotic lesions from ApoE(-/-) mice, but not normal arteries from wild-type mice. AIF-1 expression can be induced in cultured VSMC by stimulation with oxidized LDL (ox-LDL). Transgenic mice in which AIF-1 expression is driven by the G/C modified SM22 alpha promoter to restrict AIF-1 expression to VSMC develop significantly increased atherosclerosis compared with wild-type control mice when fed a high-fat diet (P=0.022). Cultured VSMC isolated from Tg mice demonstrated significantly increased migration in response to ox-LDL compared with matched controls (P<0.001). VSMC isolated from Tg mice and cultured human VSMC which over express AIF-1 demonstrated increased expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA and protein and increased NF-κB activation in response to ox-LDL as compared with wild-type control mice. VSMC which over express AIF-1 have significantly increased uptake of ox-LDL, and increased CD36 expression. Together, these data suggest a strong association between AIF-1 expression, NF-κB activation, and development of experimental atherosclerosis.

  10. Vitamin D modulates tissue factor and protease-activated receptor 2 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Moreno, Julio M; Herencia, Carmen; Montes de Oca, Addy; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R; Rodríguez-Ortiz, M Encarnación; Díaz-Tocados, Juan M; Peralbo-Santaella, Esther; Camargo, Antonio; Canalejo, Antonio; Rodriguez, Mariano; Velasco-Gimena, Francisco; Almaden, Yolanda

    2016-03-01

    Clinical and epidemiologic studies reveal an association between vitamin D deficiency and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Because vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC)-derived tissue factor (TF) is suggested to be critical for arterial thrombosis, we investigated whether the vitamin D molecules calcitriol and paricalcitol could reduce the expression of TF induced by the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α in human aortic VSMCs. We found that, compared with controls, incubation with TNF-α increased TF expression and procoagulant activity in a NF-κB-dependent manner, as deduced from the increased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells protein 65 (p65-NF-κB) and direct interaction of NF-κB to the TF promoter. This was accompanied by the up-regulation of TF signaling mediator protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) expression and by the down-regulation of vitamin D receptor expression in a miR-346-dependent way. However, addition of calcitriol or paricalcitol blunted the TNF-α-induced TF expression and activity (2.01 ± 0.24 and 1.32 ± 0.14 vs. 3.02 ± 0.39 pmol/mg protein, P < 0.05), which was associated with down-regulation of NF-κB signaling and PAR-2 expression, as well as with restored levels of vitamin D receptor and enhanced expression of TF pathway inhibitor. Our data suggest that inflammation promotes a prothrombotic state through the up-regulation of TF function in VSMCs and that the beneficial cardiovascular effects of vitamin D may be partially due to decreases in TF expression and its activity in VSMCs.

  11. Toxicology and pharmacology of some euthenium compounds: vascular smooth muscle relaxation by nitrosyl derivatives of ruthenium and iridium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruszyna, H.; Kruszyna, R.; Hurst, J.; Smith, R.P.

    1980-07-01

    A series of compounds were synthesized from ruthenium trichloride, and their ip LD50s were determined in mice: pentamminenitrosylruthenium(II) chloride, 8.9; chloronitrobis(2,2'-dipyridyl)ruthenium(II), 55; dichlorobis(2,2'-dipyridyl)ruthenium(II) 63; ruthenium trichloride, 108; and potassium pentachloronitrosylruthenate(II), 127 mg/kg. The two bis-bipyridyl complexes produced death in convulsions within minutes, whereas the remaining compounds resulted in long, debilitating courses with death occuring in 4 to 7 d. When given in massive overdoses, however, the compounds with inorganic ligands also produced rapid convulsive death in mice, and when given iv to anesthetized cats, they produced respiratory arrest. The major toxic effects of all the complexes appeared to be due to the metal and not to its associated ligands. Only complexes having a nitrosyl ligand specifically relaxed vascular smooth muscle. Potassium pentabromoiridate(III) also relaxed rabbit aortic strips that had been contracted by adrenergic argonists, but potassium pentachloroiridate(III) did not. None of the complexes was as active as nitroprusside in relaxing aortic strips or in decreasing arterial blood pressure in cats. No compound tested was as potent as cisplatin in antitumor activity. The pentamminenitrosylruthenium(II) complex also relaxed guinea pig ileum and frog rectus abdominum when these isolated muscles had been contracted by acetylcholine. It appears that these organoruthenium compounds may produce death in central respiratory arrest, as do the inorganic complexes when given iv or ip in massive overdoses. In minimllylethal doses, the complexes with inorganic ligands may affect a variety of contractile tissues, perhaps by a general mechanism involving Ca. These complexes are apt to be generally cytotoxic as well.

  12. Impaired renal function impacts negatively on vascular stiffness in patients with coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Sabrina H.; McQuarrie, Emily P.; Miller, William H.; Mackenzie, Ruth M; Dymott, Jane A.; Moreno, María U.; Taurino, Chiara; Miller, Ashley M.; Neisius, Ulf; Berg, Geoffrey A.; Valuckiene, Zivile; Hannay, Jonathan A; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Delles, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and coronary artery disease (CAD) are independently associated with increased vascular stiffness. We examined whether renal function contributes to vascular stiffness independently of CAD status. Methods We studied 160 patients with CAD and 169 subjects without CAD. The 4-variable MDRD formula was used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); impaired renal function was defined as eGFR <60 mL/min. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity ...

  13. Vascular complications following therapeutic and diagnostic cardiac catheterisation by the femoral artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitsch, M; Liisberg-Larsen, Ole Christian; Schroeder, T V

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-one of 6327 (0.33%) patients undergoing cardiac catheterisation via the femoral artery had an acute vascular complication requiring surgical intervention. The complication rate was 0.1% after coronary angiography, 2% after PTCA and 6% after aortic ballon dilatation. The size of the cathete...... and evaluation of vascular injuries following diagnostic and therapeutic invasive interventions could have a self limitating effect on the complication rate....

  14. Peripheral artery disease is associated with severe impairment of vascular function

    OpenAIRE

    Kiani, Soroosh; Aasen, Jonathan G; Holbrook, Monika; Khemka, Abhishek; Sharmeen, Farhana; LeLeiko, Rebecca M; Tabit, Corey E; Farber, Alik; Eberhardt, Robert T.; Gokce, Noyan; Vita, Joseph A.; Hamburg, Naomi M.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have higher cardiovascular event rates than patients with established coronary artery disease (CAD) and abnormal endothelial function predicts cardiovascular risk in PAD and CAD. We investigated the hypothesis that PAD is associated with a greater degree of impairment in vascular function than CAD. We used several non-invasive tests to evaluate endothelial function in 1320 men and women with combined PAD and CAD (n = 198), PAD alone (n = 179), CAD...

  15. Verapamil stereoisomers induce antiproliferative effects in vascular smooth muscle cells via autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salabei, Joshua K. [Diabetes and Obesity Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Balakumaran, Arun [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555‐0438 (United States); Frey, Justin C. [Department of Biology, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Eau Claire, WI 54702 (United States); Boor, Paul J. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555‐0438 (United States); Treinen-Moslen, Mary [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555‐0609 (United States); Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555‐0438 (United States); Conklin, Daniel J., E-mail: dj.conklin@louisville.edu [Diabetes and Obesity Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Department of Biology, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Eau Claire, WI 54702 (United States); Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555‐0438 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Calcium channel blockers (CCBs) are important in the management of hypertension and limit restenosis. Although CCB efficacy could derive from decreased blood pressure, other mechanisms independent of CCB activity also can contribute to antiproliferative action. To understand mechanisms of CCB-mediated antiproliferation, we studied two structurally dissimilar CCBs, diltiazem and verapamil, in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). To elucidate CCB-independent effects, pure stereoisomers of verapamil (R-verapamil, inactive VR; S-verapamil, active, VS) were used. The effects of CCB exposure on cell viability (MTT reduction), cell proliferation ({sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation), VSMC morphology by light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and autophagy (LC3I/II, ATG5) were measured. In general, verapamil, VR or VS treatment alone (80 μM) appreciably enhanced MTT absorbance although higher concentrations (VR or VS) slightly decreased MTT absorbance. Diltiazem (140 μM) markedly decreased MTT absorbance (40%) at 120 h. VR or VS treatment inhibited {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation (24 h) and induced cytological alterations (i.e., karyokinesis, enhanced perinuclear MTT deposition, accumulated perinuclear “vacuoles”). TEM revealed perinuclear “vacuoles” to be aggregates of highly laminated and electron-dense vesicles resembling autophagosomes and lysosomes, respectively. Increased autophagosome activity was confirmed by a concentration-dependent increase in LC3-II formation by Western blotting and by increased perinuclear LC3-GFP{sup +} puncta in verapamil-treated VSMC. Verapamil stereoisomers appeared to decrease perinuclear mitochondrial density. These observations indicate that antiproliferative effects of verapamil stereoisomers are produced by enhanced mitochondrial damage and upregulated autophagy in VSMC. These effects are independent of CCB activity indicating a distinct mechanism of action that could be targeted for more efficacious anti

  16. Inhibition of Orai1-mediated Ca(2+) entry is a key mechanism of the antiproliferative action of sirolimus in human arterial smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Sarah; Browne, Sara; Doleschal, Bernhard; Schernthaner, Michaela; Poteser, Michael; Mächler, Heinrich; Wittchow, Eric; Braune, Marlen; Muik, Martin; Romanin, Christoph; Groschner, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    Sirolimus (rapamycin) is used in drug-eluting stent strategies and proved clearly superior in this application compared with other immunomodulators such as pimecrolimus. The molecular basis of this action of sirolimus in the vascular system is still incompletely understood. Measurements of cell proliferation in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASM) demonstrated a higher antiproliferative activity of sirolimus compared with pimecrolimus. Although sirolimus lacks inhibitory effects on calcineurin, nuclear factor of activated T-cell activation in hCASM was suppressed to a similar extent by both drugs at 10 μM. Sirolimus, but not pimecrolimus, inhibited agonist-induced and store-operated Ca(2+) entry as well as cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation in human arterial smooth muscle, suggesting the existence of an as-yet unrecognized inhibitory effect of sirolimus on Ca(2+) signaling and Ca(2+)-dependent gene transcription. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that only sirolimus but not pimecrolimus significantly blocked the classical stromal interaction molecule/Orai-mediated, store-operated Ca(2+) current reconstituted in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293). A link between Orai function and proliferation was confirmed by dominant-negative knockout of Orai in hCASM. Analysis of the effects of sirolimus on cell proliferation and CREB activation in an in vitro model of arterial intervention using human aorta corroborated the ability of sirolimus to suppress stent implantation-induced CREB activation in human arteries. We suggest inhibition of store-operated Ca(2+) entry based on Orai channels and the resulting suppression of Ca(2+) transcription coupling as a key mechanism underlying the antiproliferative activity of sirolimus in human arteries. This mechanism of action is specific for sirolimus and not a general feature of drugs interacting with FK506-binding proteins. PMID:24056904

  17. Vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and adhesion to collagen I modified by vasoactive agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongkui Hong

    Full Text Available In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs integrin-mediated adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM proteins play important roles in sustaining vascular tone and resistance. The main goal of this study was to determine whether VSMCs adhesion to type I collagen (COL-I was altered in parallel with the changes in the VSMCs contractile state induced by vasoconstrictors and vasodilators. VSMCs were isolated from rat cremaster skeletal muscle arterioles and maintained in primary culture without passage. Cell adhesion and cell E-modulus were assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM by repetitive nano-indentation of the AFM probe on the cell surface at 0.1 Hz sampling frequency and 3200 nm Z-piezo travelling distance (approach and retraction. AFM probes were tipped with a 5 μm diameter microbead functionalized with COL-I (1 mg\\ml. Results showed that the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II (ANG-II; 10-6 significantly increased (p<0.05 VSMC E-modulus and adhesion probability to COL-I by approximately 35% and 33%, respectively. In contrast, the vasodilator adenosine (ADO; 10-4 significantly decreased (p<0.05 VSMC E-modulus and adhesion probability by approximately -33% and -17%, respectively. Similarly, the NO donor (PANOate, 10-6 M, a potent vasodilator, also significantly decreased (p<0.05 the VSMC E-modulus and COL-I adhesion probability by -38% and -35%, respectively. These observations support the hypothesis that integrin-mediated VSMC adhesion to the ECM protein COL-I is dynamically regulated in parallel with VSMC contractile activation. These data suggest that the signal transduction pathways modulating VSMC contractile activation and relaxation, in addition to ECM adhesion, interact during regulation of contractile state.

  18. Critical Parameters of the In Vitro Method of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Calcification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Hortells

    Full Text Available Vascular calcification (VC is primarily studied using cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the use of very different protocols and extreme conditions can provide findings unrelated to VC. In this work we aimed to determine the critical experimental parameters that affect calcification in vitro and to determine the relevance to calcification in vivo.Rat VSMC calcification in vitro was studied using different concentrations of fetal calf serum, calcium, and phosphate, in different types of culture media, and using various volumes and rates of change. The bicarbonate content of the media critically affected pH and resulted in supersaturation, depending on the concentration of Ca2+ and Pi. Such supersaturation is a consequence of the high dependence of bicarbonate buffers on CO2 vapor pressure and bicarbonate concentration at pHs above 7.40. Such buffer systems cause considerable pH variations as a result of minor experimental changes. The variations are more critical for DMEM and are negligible when the bicarbonate concentration is reduced to ¼. Particle nucleation and growth were observed by dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy. Using 2mM Pi, particles of ~200nm were observed at 24 hours in MEM and at 1 hour in DMEM. These nuclei grew over time, were deposited in the cells, and caused osteogene expression or cell death, depending on the precipitation rate. TEM observations showed that the initial precipitate was amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP, which converts into hydroxyapatite over time. In blood, the scenario is different, because supersaturation is avoided by a tightly controlled pH of 7.4, which prevents the formation of PO43--containing ACP.The precipitation of ACP in vitro is unrelated to VC in vivo. The model needs to be refined through controlled pH and the use of additional procalcifying agents other than Pi in order to reproduce calcium phosphate deposition in vivo.

  19. Calcineurin-NFAT signaling is involved in phenylephrine-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao PANG; Ning-ling SUN

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Catecholamine-induced vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is one of the major events in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling. The calcineurin-NFAT pathway plays a role in regulating growth and differentiation in various cell types. We investigated whether the calcineurin-NFAT pathway was involved in the regulation of phenylephrine-induced VSMC proliferation.Methods: Proliferation of VSMC was measured using an MTT assay and cell counts. Localization of NFATcl was detected by immunofluorescence staining. NFATcl-DNA binding was determined by EMSA and luciferase activity analyses.NFATcl and calcineurin levels were assayed by immunoprecipitation.Results: Phenylephrine (PE, an α1-adrenoceptor agonist) increased VSMC proliferation and cell number. Prazosin (an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist), cyclosporin A (CsA, an inhibitor of calcineurin) and chelerythrine (an inhibitor of PKC)decreased PE-induced proliferation and cell number. Additional treatment of VSMC with CsA or chelerythrine further inhibited proliferation and cell number in the chelerythrine-pretreatment group and the CsA-pretreatment group. CsA and chelerythrine alone had no effect on either absorbance or cell number. CsA decreased PE-induced calcineurin levels and activity. NFATc1 was translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus upon treatment with PE. This translocation was reversed by CsA. CsA decreased the PE-induced NFATc1 level in the nucleus. PE increased NFAT's DNA binding activity and NFAT-dependent reporter gene expression. CsA blocked these effects.Conclusion: CsA partially suppresses PE-induced VSMC proliferation by inhibiting calcineurin activity and NFATc1 nuclear translocation. The calcineurin-NFATc1 pathway is involved in the hyperplastic growth of VSMC induced by phenylephrine.

  20. Autophagy inhibits PDGF-BB-induced calcification in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Qian-qian; MEI Han; ZHANG Xu-hui; DONG Li-hua

    2016-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the relationship between autophagy and calcification in vascular smooth muscle cells ( VSMCs) after platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB stimulation.METHODS:Cultured VSMCs were stimulated with PDGF-BB for different time, the expression of vascular calcification-related proteins and autophagy-related proteins were detected by Western blot .The interaction be-tween Beclin1 and PI3KC3 was detected by co-immunoprecipitation.RESULTS: The expression of BMP2 and ALP showed a trend from decline to rise.ALP slumped at 12 h, and BMP2 slumped at 6 h.Moreover, the expression of Beclin-1 showed a trend from rise to decline, and peaked at 12 h.The conversion of LC3-ⅠtoⅡincreased in a time-dependent manner , and peaked at 24 h.The ex-pression of BMP2 and ALP was increased in VSMCs incubated with PDGF-BB and autophagy inhibitor 3-MA, compared with PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs.Furthermore, the interaction between Beclin1 and PI3KC3 was enhanced at 6 h after PDGF-BB stimulated, peaked at 12 h, and kept in high level at 24 h.Moreover, the phosphorylation level of Beclin 1 was enhanced by PDGF-BB stimulation, and peaked at 6 h.CONCLUSION:Our findings demonstrate that PDGF-BB-induced autophagy inhibits VSMC calcification by en-hancing Beclin1 phosphorylation and interaction between Beclin 1 and PI3KC3.

  1. Essential role of TGF-beta/Smad pathway on statin dependent vascular smooth muscle cell regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Rodríguez-Vita

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (also called statins exert proven beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases. Recent data suggest a protective role for Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-beta in atherosclerosis by regulating the balance between inflammation and extracellular matrix accumulation. However, there are no studies about the effect of statins on TGF-beta/Smad pathway in atherosclerosis and vascular cells. METHODOLOGY: In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs statins enhanced Smad pathway activation caused by TGF-beta. In addition, statins upregulated TGF-beta receptor type II (TRII, and increased TGF-beta synthesis and TGF-beta/Smad-dependent actions. In this sense, statins, through Smad activation, render VSMCs more susceptible to TGF-beta induced apoptosis and increased TGF-beta-mediated ECM production. It is well documented that high doses of statins induce apoptosis in cultured VSMC in the presence of serum; however the precise mechanism of this effect remains to be elucidated. We have found that statins-induced apoptosis was mediated by TGF-beta/Smad pathway. Finally, we have described that RhoA inhibition is a common intracellular mechanisms involved in statins effects. The in vivo relevance of these findings was assessed in an experimental model of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E deficient mice: Treatment with Atorvastatin increased Smad3 phosphorylation and TRII overexpression, associated to elevated ECM deposition in the VSMCs within atheroma plaques, while apoptosis was not detected. CONCLUSIONS: Statins enhance TGF-beta/Smad pathway, regulating ligand levels, receptor, main signaling pathway and cellular responses of VSMC, including apoptosis and ECM accumulation. Our findings show that TGF-beta/Smad pathway is essential for statins-dependent actions in VSMCs.

  2. BMP-2 Overexpression Augments Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Motility by Upregulating Myosin Va via Erk Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The disruption of physiologic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC migration initiates atherosclerosis development. The biochemical mechanisms leading to dysfunctional VSMC motility remain unknown. Recently, cytokine BMP-2 has been implicated in various vascular physiologic and pathologic processes. However, whether BMP-2 has any effect upon VSMC motility, or by what manner, has never been investigated. Methods. VSMCs were adenovirally transfected to genetically overexpress BMP-2. VSMC motility was detected by modified Boyden chamber assay, confocal time-lapse video assay, and a colony wounding assay. Gene chip array and RT-PCR were employed to identify genes potentially regulated by BMP-2. Western blot and real-time PCR detected the expression of myosin Va and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (Erk1/2. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed myosin Va expression locale. Intracellular Ca2+ oscillations were recorded. Results. VSMC migration was augmented in VSMCs overexpressing BMP-2 in a dose-dependent manner. siRNA-mediated knockdown of myosin Va inhibited VSMC motility. Both myosin Va mRNA and protein expression significantly increased after BMP-2 administration and were inhibited by Erk1/2 inhibitor U0126. BMP-2 induced Ca2+ oscillations, generated largely by a “cytosolic oscillator”. Conclusion. BMP-2 significantly increased VSMCs migration and myosin Va expression, via the Erk signaling pathway and intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. We provide additional insight into the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, and inhibition of BMP-2-induced myosin Va expression may represent a potential therapeutic strategy.

  3. Effect of oxysterol-induced apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells on experimental hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Sonia; Alejandre, M José; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio; Torres, Carolina; Iglesias, Jose; Linares, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) undergo changes related to proliferation and apoptosis in the physiological remodeling of vessels and in diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Recent studies also have demonstrated the vascular cell proliferation and programmed cell death contribute to changes in vascular architecture in normal development and in disease. The present study was designed to investigate the apoptotic pathways induced by 25-hydroxycholesterol in SMCs cultures, using an in vivo/in vitro cell model in which SMCs were isolated and culture from chicken exposed to an atherogenic cholesterol-rich diet (SMC-Ch) and/or an antiatherogenic fish oil-rich diet (SMC-Ch-FO). Cells were exposed in vitro to 25-hydroxycholesterol to study levels of apoptosis and apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L) and Bax and the expression of bcl-2 and bcl-x(L), genes. The quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and the Immunoblotting western blot analysis showed that 25-hydroxycholesterol produces apoptosis in SMCs, mediated by a high increase in Bax protein and Bax gene expression. These changes were more marked in SMC-Ch than in SMC-Ch-FO, indicating that dietary cholesterol produces changes in SMCs that make them more susceptible to 25-hydroxycholesterol-mediated apoptosis. Our results suggest that the replacement of a cholesterol-rich diet with a fish oil-rich diet produces some reversal of cholesterol-induced changes in the apoptotic pathways induced by 25-hydroxycholesterol in SMCs cultures, making SMCs more resistant to apoptosis. PMID:19727411

  4. Inhibitors of soluble epoxide hydrolase attenuate vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Benjamin B.; Thompson, David A.; Howard, Laura L.; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Weiss, Robert H.

    2002-02-01

    Atherosclerosis, in its myriad incarnations the foremost killer disease in the industrialized world, is characterized by aberrant proliferation of vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells in part as a result of the recruitment of inflammatory cells to the blood vessel wall. The epoxyeicosatrienoic acids are synthesized from arachidonic acid in a reaction catalyzed by the cytochrome P450 system and are vasoactive substances. Metabolism of these compounds by epoxide hydrolases results in the formation of compounds that affect the vasculature in a pleiotropic manner. As an outgrowth of our observations that urea inhibitors of the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) reduce blood pressure in spontaneously hypertensive rats as well as the findings of other investigators that these compounds possess antiinflammatory actions, we have examined the effect of sEH inhibitors on VSM cell proliferation. We now show that the sEH inhibitor 1-cyclohexyl-3-dodecyl urea (CDU) inhibits human VSM cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and is associated with a decrease in the level of cyclin D1. In addition, cis-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid mimics the growth-suppressive activity of CDU; there is no evidence of cellular toxicity or apoptosis in CDU-treated cells when incubated with 20 μM CDU for up to 48 h. These results, in light of the antiinflammatory and antihypertensive properties of these compounds that have been demonstrated already, suggest that the urea class of sEH inhibitors may be useful for therapy for diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis characterized by exuberant VSM cell proliferation and vascular inflammation.

  5. Effect of Oxysterol-Induced Apoptosis of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells on Experimental Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Perales

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle cells (SMCs undergo changes related to proliferation and apoptosis in the physiological remodeling of vessels and in diseases such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Recent studies also have demonstrated the vascular cell proliferation and programmed cell death contribute to changes in vascular architecture in normal development and in disease. The present study was designed to investigate the apoptotic pathways induced by 25-hydroxycholesterol in SMCs cultures, using an in vivo/in vitro cell model in which SMCs were isolated and culture from chicken exposed to an atherogenic cholesterol-rich diet (SMC-Ch and/or an antiatherogenic fish oil-rich diet (SMC-Ch-FO. Cells were exposed in vitro to 25-hydroxycholesterol to study levels of apoptosis and apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bcl-XL and Bax and the expression of bcl-2 and bcl-xL, genes. The quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and the Immunoblotting western blot analysis showed that 25-hydroxycholesterol produces apoptosis in SMCs, mediated by a high increase in Bax protein and Bax gene expression. These changes were more marked in SMC-Ch than in SMC-Ch-FO, indicating that dietary cholesterol produces changes in SMCs that make them more susceptible to 25-hydroxycholesterol-mediated apoptosis. Our results suggest that the replacement of a cholesterol-rich diet with a fish oil-rich diet produces some reversal of cholesterol-induced changes in the apoptotic pathways induced by 25-hydroxycholesterol in SMCs cultures, making SMCs more resistant to apoptosis.

  6. miRNA-146a induces vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in a rat model of coronary heart disease via NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z W; Liu, Y F; Wang, S; Li, B

    2015-12-29

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of miRNA-146a in modulating the function of vascular smooth muscle cells in a rat model of coronary heart disease. Vascular smooth muscle cells were isolated and cultured from the rat coronary heart disease model and normal rats (controls). miRNA-146a levels were measured in vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease and control rats. The proliferation, growth, apoptosis, and activation of the NF-κB pathway in the vascular smooth muscle cells were detected using the MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The role of the NF-κB pathway in modulating the apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells was investigated by measuring the reactivity of the cells to an NF-κB pathway inhibitor (TPCA-1). Vascular smooth muscle cells from the disease model exhibited higher levels of miRNA-146a than that by the normal controls (P = 0.0024). The vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease showed decreased proliferation and growth and increased apoptosis. miRNA-146a overexpression elevated the rate of cell apoptosis. The NF-κB pathway was activated in vascular smooth muscle cells obtained from rats with coronary heart disease. Inhibition of the NF- κB pathway significantly decreased the rate of vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in coronary heart disease rats (P = 0.0038). In conclusion, miRNA- 146a was found to induce vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis in rats with coronary heart disease via the activation of the NF-κB signal pathway.

  7. Effects of serotonin on expression of the LDL receptor family member LR11 and 7-ketocholesterol-induced apoptosis in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagayama, Daiji; Ishihara, Noriko [Center of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Toho University, Sakura Medical Center, 564-1, Shimoshizu, Sakura-City, Chiba 285-8741 (Japan); Bujo, Hideaki [Department of Clinical Laboratory Medicine, Toho University, Sakura Medical Center, 564-1, Shimoshizu, Sakura-City, Chiba 285-8741 (Japan); Shirai, Kohji [Department of Vascular Function, Toho University, Sakura Medical Center, 564-1, Shimoshizu, Sakura-City, Chiba 285-8741 (Japan); Tatsuno, Ichiro, E-mail: ichiro.tatsuno@med.toho-u.ac.jp [Center of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Toho University, Sakura Medical Center, 564-1, Shimoshizu, Sakura-City, Chiba 285-8741 (Japan)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • The dedifferentiation of VSMCs in arterial intima is involved in atherosclerosis. • 5-HT showed proliferative effect on VSMCs which was abolished by sarpogrelate. • 5-HT enhanced expression of LR11 mRNA in VSMCs which was abolished by sarpogrelate. • 5-HT suppressed 7KCHO-induced apoptosis of VSMCs via caspase-3/7-dependent pathway. • The mechanisms explain the 5-HT-induced remodeling of arterial structure. - Abstract: Serotonin (5-HT) is a known mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The dedifferentiation and proliferation/apoptosis of VSMCs in the arterial intima represent one of the atherosclerotic changes. LR11, a member of low-density lipoprotein receptor family, may contribute to the proliferation of VSMCs in neointimal hyperplasia. We conducted an in vitro study to investigate whether 5-HT is involved in LR11 expression in human VSMCs and apoptosis of VSMCs induced by 7-ketocholesterol (7KCHO), an oxysterol that destabilizes plaque. 5-HT enhanced the proliferation of VSMCs, and this effect was abolished by sarpogrelate, a selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist. Sarpogrelate also inhibited the 5-HT-enhanced LR11 mRNA expression in VSMCs. Furthermore, 5-HT suppressed the 7KCHO-induced apoptosis of VSMCs via caspase-3/7-dependent pathway. These findings provide new insights on the changes in the differentiation stage of VSMCs mediated by 5-HT.

  8. Effects of serotonin on expression of the LDL receptor family member LR11 and 7-ketocholesterol-induced apoptosis in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The dedifferentiation of VSMCs in arterial intima is involved in atherosclerosis. • 5-HT showed proliferative effect on VSMCs which was abolished by sarpogrelate. • 5-HT enhanced expression of LR11 mRNA in VSMCs which was abolished by sarpogrelate. • 5-HT suppressed 7KCHO-induced apoptosis of VSMCs via caspase-3/7-dependent pathway. • The mechanisms explain the 5-HT-induced remodeling of arterial structure. - Abstract: Serotonin (5-HT) is a known mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The dedifferentiation and proliferation/apoptosis of VSMCs in the arterial intima represent one of the atherosclerotic changes. LR11, a member of low-density lipoprotein receptor family, may contribute to the proliferation of VSMCs in neointimal hyperplasia. We conducted an in vitro study to investigate whether 5-HT is involved in LR11 expression in human VSMCs and apoptosis of VSMCs induced by 7-ketocholesterol (7KCHO), an oxysterol that destabilizes plaque. 5-HT enhanced the proliferation of VSMCs, and this effect was abolished by sarpogrelate, a selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist. Sarpogrelate also inhibited the 5-HT-enhanced LR11 mRNA expression in VSMCs. Furthermore, 5-HT suppressed the 7KCHO-induced apoptosis of VSMCs via caspase-3/7-dependent pathway. These findings provide new insights on the changes in the differentiation stage of VSMCs mediated by 5-HT

  9. 心脉龙注射液对家兔离体血管平滑肌的影响%Effects of sinmailong Injection on Isolated Vascular Smooth Muscle in Rabbit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭芳; 瞿培红; 等

    2001-01-01

    目的:研究心脉龙注射液升压作用与血管平滑肌钙通道之间的关系。方法:观察心脉龙注射液对不同处理的离体血管平滑肌的影响。结果:心脉龙注射液能兴奋家兔离体降主动脉及肺动脉,该药引起上述动脉条收缩 50%效应的浓度分别是 1.99、 4.67mg.ml- 1,分别在 3× 10- 5~ 6× 10- 3、 10- 3~ 6× 10- 3g.ml- 1范围呈量效关系。 50μ mol维拉帕米能完全取消心脉龙注射液兴奋降主动脉、肺动脉的作用。该药对两种血管条在无钙及含钙 Krebs液中分别引起无兴奋及收缩反应。结论:心脉龙注射液收缩血管平滑肌与细胞外钙内流有密切关系。%Objective: To study the relationship between Xinmailong injection raising pressure and calcium channel in vascular smooth muscle.Methods: To observe the effects of Xinmailong injection on isolated vascular smooth muscle by various handles.Results: Xinmailong injection could constrict isolated thoracic artery and pulmonary artery in rabbits, and the concentrations causing the median constrict were 1.99、 4.67 mg.ml 1respectively.Xinmailong injection could appear concentration- effect relationship on thoracic artery and pulmonary artery in scope of 3× 10- 5~ 6× 10- 3、 10- 3~ 6× 10- 3g.ml- 1respectively.50 umol verapamil could entirely conceal the effects of Xinmailong injection exciting the two vascular smooth. Xinmailong injection could cause no excitg and contracting with or without calcium Krebs solution in the two vascular smooth.Conclusion:There is close relationship between Xinmailong injection on contracting vascular smooth muscle and the calcium influx.

  10. Differential Mitochondrial Adaptation in Primary Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from a Diabetic Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Amy C; Knaub, Leslie A; McClatchey, P Mason; Connon, Chelsea A; Bouchard, Ron; Miller, Matthew W; Geary, Kate E; Walker, Lori A; Klemm, Dwight J; Reusch, Jane E B

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 330 million people worldwide and causes elevated cardiovascular disease risk. Mitochondria are critical for vascular function, generate cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and are perturbed by diabetes, representing a novel target for therapeutics. We hypothesized that adaptive mitochondrial plasticity in response to nutrient stress would be impaired in diabetes cellular physiology via a nitric oxide synthase- (NOS-) mediated decrease in mitochondrial function. Primary smooth muscle cells (SMCs) from aorta of the nonobese, insulin resistant rat diabetes model Goto-Kakizaki (GK) and the Wistar control rat were exposed to high glucose (25 mM). At baseline, significantly greater nitric oxide evolution, ROS production, and respiratory control ratio (RCR) were observed in GK SMCs. Upon exposure to high glucose, expression of phosphorylated eNOS, uncoupled respiration, and expression of mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and V were significantly decreased in GK SMCs (p diabetes phenotype. Overall, nutrient stress in GK SMCs caused a persistent decline in eNOS and mitochondrial function and disrupted mitochondrial plasticity, illustrating eNOS and mitochondria as potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27034743

  11. Effects of caffeic acid phenethyl ester on proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang Yang; Chao Chang; YuQing Wang; Yibo Feng; ShuLing Rong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the inhibitory effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester(CAPE) on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to clarify its mechanism. Methods: VSMC activated by LPS (1 mg·L-1) were treated with CAPE at different concentrations. The inhibitory effects of CAPE on the proliferation of VSMC were determined by methabenzthiazuron(MTT) colorimetry. The effects of CAPE on the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Survivin protein in VSMC were evaluated by immunocytochemistry staining technique (SABC method). Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry(FCM) with propidium iodide (PI) labeling method. The relative expression level of Survivin mRNA was measured with real-time quantified RT-PCR technique. Results: CAPE exerted significant inhibitory effects on. proliferation of VSMC at concentrations ranging from 5 mg·L-1 to 80 mg·L-1, decreased the rate of cells positive for PCNA and Survivin protein and repressed the expression of Survivin mRNA in a dose- and time-dependent manner (P < 0.05).FCM analysis displayed that CAPE up-regulated the ratio of G0/G1 stages and reduced the percentage of VSMC in S stage (P <0.05). Conclusion: CAPE can significantly inhibit the proliferation of VSMC activated by LPS in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which may be carried out through regulating cell cycle and repressing the expression of PCNA and Survivin.

  12. Vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis promotes transplant arteriosclerosis through inducing the production of SDF-1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Liu, S; Li, W; Hu, S; Xiong, J; Shu, X; Hu, Q; Zheng, Q; Song, Z

    2012-08-01

    Transplant arteriosclerosis is a leading cause of late allograft loss. Medial smooth muscle cell (SMC) apoptosis is considered to be an important event in transplant arteriosclerosis. However, the precise contribution of medial SMC apoptosis to transplant arteriosclerosis and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We transferred wild-type p53 to induce apoptosis of cultured SMCs. We found that apoptosis induces the production of SDF-1α from apoptotic and neighboring viable cells, resulting in increased SDF-1α in the culture media. Conditioned media from Ltv-p53-transferred SMCs activated PI3K/Akt/mTOR and MAPK/Erk signaling in a SDF-1α-dependent manner and thereby promoted mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) migration and proliferation. In a rat aorta transplantation model, lentivirus-mediated BclxL transfer selectively inhibits medial SMC apoptosis in aortic allografts, resulting in a remarkable decrease of SDF-1α both in allograft media and in blood plasma, associated with diminished recruitment of CD90(+)CD105(+) double-positive cells and impaired neointimal formation. Systemic administration of rapamycin or PD98059 also attenuated MSC recruitment and neointimal formation in the aortic allografts. These results suggest that medial SMC apoptosis is critical for the development of transplant arteriosclerosis through inducing SDF-1α production and that MSC recruitment represents a major component of vascular remodeling, constituting a relevant target and mechanism for therapeutic interventions.

  13. Increased proliferation of explanted vascular smooth muscle cells: a marker presaging atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absher, P M; Schneider, D J; Baldor, L C; Russell, J C; Sobel, B E

    1997-06-01

    The JCR:LA-cp homozygous cp/cp corpulent rat is genetically predisposed to develop atherosclerosis evident after 9 and 18 months of age in males and females and to manifest metabolic derangements resembling those seen in type II diabetes in humans (hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia). The present study was undertaken to determine whether vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) explanted from vessels destined to become atherosclerotic later in life exhibit intrinsic properties ex vivo that presage atherogenesis to provide a means for evaluating promptly intervention designed to modify it. SMCs were cultured from aortic explants of JCR:LA-cp corpulent (cp/cp) and lean control (+/+) rats of 4, 5, 6, and 9 months of age. Compared with SMCs from controls, SMCs from cp/cp rats exhibited increased proliferation, higher saturation density, increased augmentation of proliferation in response to selected mitogens and greater adherence to extracellular matrix proteins. The increased proliferative activity ex vivo anteceded by several months the development of atherosclerotic lesions in vivo. Thus, it is a promising marker in assessments of the efficacy of interventions designed to retard or prevent atherosclerosis.

  14. Molecular Pathways Regulating Macrovascular Pathology and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Phenotype in Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Casella

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a disease reaching a pandemic proportion in developed countries and a major risk factor for almost all cardiovascular diseases and their adverse clinical manifestations. T2DM leads to several macrovascular and microvascular alterations that influence the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs are fundamental players in macrovascular alterations of T2DM patients. VSMCs display phenotypic and functional alterations that reflect an altered intracellular biomolecular scenario of great vessels of T2DM patients. Hyperglycemia itself and through intraparietal accumulation of advanced glycation-end products (AGEs activate different pathways, in particular nuclear factor-κB and MAPKs, while insulin and insulin growth-factor receptors (IGFR are implicated in the activation of Akt and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK 1/2. Nuclear factor-κB is also responsible of increased susceptibility of VSMCs to pro-apoptotic stimuli. Down-regulation of insulin growth-factor 1 receptors (IGFR-1R activity in diabetic vessels also influences negatively miR-133a levels, so increasing apoptotic susceptibility of VSMCs. Alterations of those bimolecular pathways and related genes associate to the prevalence of a synthetic phenotype of VSMCs induces extracellular matrix alterations of great vessels. A better knowledge of those biomolecular pathways and related genes in VSMCs will help to understand the mechanisms leading to macrovascular alterations in T2DM patients and to suggest new targeted therapies.

  15. Inhibition Mechanism of Emodin on Rabbit Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contributes to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty and vein graft.In this study, MTT colormetry was used to test the effective scope of emodin to inhibit VSMCs proliferation.Flow cytometry and confocal image were adopted to investigate its inhibitive mechanism.The results show that emodin could inhibit the growth and proliferation of VSMCs and the inhibition rate of emodin on VSMCs is 24.6%-94.58%, which is time - and concentration - dependent.Emodin could reduce S phase entry, increase the apoptosis of VSMCs, and reduce the intensity of[Ca2+]i in hPDGF B/B stimulated VSMCs.This research provides theoretical basis for medical application of emodin.It is concluded that emodin could inhibit the growth and proliferation of VSMCs effectively.Decreasing the DNA synthesis, increasing the cell apoptosis and reducing the intensity of[Ca2+]i in hPDGF B/B stimulated VSMCs may be the inhibitive mechanism of emodin against VSMCs proliferation.

  16. Differential Mitochondrial Adaptation in Primary Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from a Diabetic Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy C. Keller

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes affects more than 330 million people worldwide and causes elevated cardiovascular disease risk. Mitochondria are critical for vascular function, generate cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, and are perturbed by diabetes, representing a novel target for therapeutics. We hypothesized that adaptive mitochondrial plasticity in response to nutrient stress would be impaired in diabetes cellular physiology via a nitric oxide synthase- (NOS- mediated decrease in mitochondrial function. Primary smooth muscle cells (SMCs from aorta of the nonobese, insulin resistant rat diabetes model Goto-Kakizaki (GK and the Wistar control rat were exposed to high glucose (25 mM. At baseline, significantly greater nitric oxide evolution, ROS production, and respiratory control ratio (RCR were observed in GK SMCs. Upon exposure to high glucose, expression of phosphorylated eNOS, uncoupled respiration, and expression of mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, and V were significantly decreased in GK SMCs (p<0.05. Mitochondrial superoxide increased with high glucose in Wistar SMCs (p<0.05 with no change in the GK beyond elevated baseline concentrations. Baseline comparisons show persistent metabolic perturbations in a diabetes phenotype. Overall, nutrient stress in GK SMCs caused a persistent decline in eNOS and mitochondrial function and disrupted mitochondrial plasticity, illustrating eNOS and mitochondria as potential therapeutic targets.

  17. Localization and function of KLF4 in cytoplasm of vascular smooth muscle cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Key Laboratory of Neurobiology and Vascular Biology (China); The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijazhuang (China); Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Xin-hua; Nie, Chan-juan; Li, Yong-hui [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Key Laboratory of Neurobiology and Vascular Biology (China); Wen, Jin-kun, E-mail: wjk@hebmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Key Laboratory of Neurobiology and Vascular Biology (China)

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •PDGF-BB prompts the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm. •PDGF-BB promotes interaction between KLF4 and actin in the cytoplasm. •Phosphorylation and SUMOylation of KLF4 participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization. •KLF4 regulates cytoskeleton by promoting the expression of contraction-associated genes. -- Abstract: The Krüppel-like factor 4 is a DNA-binding transcriptional regulator that regulates a diverse array of cellular processes, including development, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The previous studies about KLF4 functions mainly focused on its role as a transcription factor, its functions in the cytoplasm are still unknown. In this study, we found that PDGF-BB could prompt the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm through CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and increased the interaction of KLF4 with actin in the cytoplasm. Further study showed that both KLF4 phosphorylation and SUMOylation induced by PDGF-BB participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton in VSMCs. In conclusion, these results identify that KLF4 participates in the cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing cytoskeleton in the cytoplasm of VSMCs.

  18. Critical role of exogenous nitric oxide in ROCK activity in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Maruhashi

    Full Text Available Rho-associated kinase (ROCK signaling pathway has been shown to mediate various cellular functions including cell proliferation, migration, adhesion, apoptosis, and contraction, all of which may be involved in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Endogenous nitric oxide (NO is well known to have an anti-atherosclerotic effect, whereas the exogenous NO-mediated cardiovascular effect still remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of exogenous NO on ROCK activity in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs in vitro and in vivo.VSMCs migration was evaluated using a modified Boyden chamber assay. ROCK activities were measured by Western blot analysis in murine and human VSMCs and aorta of mice treated with or without angiotensin II (Ang II and/or sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor.Co-treatment with SNP inhibited the Ang II-induced cell migration and increases in ROCK activity in murine and human VSMCs. Similarly, the increased ROCK activity 2 weeks after Ang II infusion in the mouse aorta was substantially inhibited by subcutaneous injection of SNP.These findings suggest that administration of exogenous NO can inhibit ROCK activity in VSMCs in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Differential Cellular and Molecular Effects of Butyrate and Trichostatin A on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasturi Ranganna

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, butyrate and trichostatin A (TSA, are epigenetic histone modifiers and proliferation inhibitors by downregulating cyclin D1, a positive cell cycle regulator, and upregulating p21Cip1 and INK family of proteins, negative cell cycle regulators. Our recent study indicated cyclin D1 upregulation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC that are proliferation-arrested by butyrate. Here we investigate whether cyclin D1 upregulation is a unique response of VSMC to butyrate or a general response to HDAC inhibitors (HDACi by evaluating the effects of butyrate and TSA on VSMC. While butyrate and TSA inhibit VSMC proliferation via cytostatic and cytotoxic effects, respectively, they downregulate cdk4, cdk6, and cdk2, and upregulate cyclin D3, p21Cip1 and p15INK4B, and cause similar effects on key histone H3 posttranslational modifications. Conversely, cyclin D1 is upregulated by butyrate and inhibited by TSA. Assessment of glycogen synthase 3-dependent phosphorylation, subcellular localization and transcription of cyclin D1 indicates that differential effects of butyrate and TSA on cyclin D1 levels are linked to disparity in cyclin D1 gene expression. Disparity in butyrate- and TSA-induced cyclin D1 may influence transcriptional regulation of genes that are associated with changes in cellular morphology/cellular effects that these HDACi confer on VSMC, as a transcriptional modulator.

  20. Cyclic strain increases protease-activated receptor-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Frye, S. R.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic strain regulates many vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functions through changing gene expression. This study investigated the effects of cyclic strain on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) expression in VSMCs and the possible signaling pathways involved, on the basis of the hypothesis that cyclic strain would enhance PAR-1 expression, reflecting increased thrombin activity. Uniaxial cyclic strain (1 Hz, 20%) of cells cultured on elastic membranes induced a 2-fold increase in both PAR-1 mRNA and protein levels. Functional activity of PAR-1, as assessed by cell proliferation in response to thrombin, was also increased by cyclic strain. In addition, treatment of cells with antioxidants or an NADPH oxidase inhibitor blocked strain-induced PAR-1 expression. Preincubation of cells with protein kinase inhibitors (staurosporine or Ro 31-8220) enhanced strain-increased PAR-1 expression, whereas inhibitors of NO synthase, tyrosine kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases had no effect. Cyclic strain in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor induced PAR-1 mRNA levels beyond the effect of cyclic strain alone, whereas no additive effect was observed between cyclic strain and platelet-derived growth factor-AB. Our findings that cyclic strain upregulates PAR-1 mRNA expression but that shear stress downregulates this gene in VSMCs provide an opportunity to elucidate signaling differences by which VSMCs respond to different mechanical forces.

  1. CD146 expression on mesenchymal stem cells is associated with their vascular smooth muscle commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espagnolle, Nicolas; Guilloton, Fabien; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Gadelorge, Mélanie; Sensébé, Luc; Bourin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are plastic adherent cells that can differentiate into various tissue lineages, including osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. However, this progenitor property is not shared by all cells within the MSC population. In addition, MSCs vary in their proliferation capacity and expression of markers. Because of heterogeneity of CD146 expression in the MSC population, we compared CD146(-/Low) and CD146(High) cells under clonal conditions and after sorting of the non-clonal cell population to determine whether this expression is associated with specific functions. CD146(-/Low) and CD146(High) bone marrow MSCs did not differ in colony-forming unit-fibroblast number, osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation or in vitro haematopoietic-supportive activity. However, CD146(-/Low) clones proliferated slightly but significantly faster than did CD146(High) clones. In addition, a strong expression of CD146 molecule was associated with a commitment to a vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) lineage characterized by a strong up-regulation of calponin-1 and SM22α expression and an ability to contract collagen matrix. Thus, within a bone marrow MSC population, certain subpopulations characterized by high expression of CD146, are committed towards a VSMC lineage.

  2. Roles of NHE-1 in the proliferation and apoptosis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚伟; 钱桂生; 杨晓静

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the roles of Na+/H+ exchanger-1 (NHE-1)in the proliferation and apoptosis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in rats. Methods Twenty Wistar rats were randomized into control group and 3-week hypoxic group. Intracellular pH (pHi) of the smooth muscle was determined with fluorescence measurement of the pH-sensitive dye BCECF-AM, and the expression of NHE-1 mRNA was detected by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Primary culture of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in vitro was performed. In situ cell death detection kit (TUNEL) was used for studying the effect of specific NHE-1 inhibitor-dimethyl amiloride (DMA) on the apoptosis of muscle cells which had intracellular acidification. Results pHi value and NHE-1 mRNA expression of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells were significantly higher in the hypoxic group than in the control group (P<0.01, P<0.001). DMA elevated the apoptotic ratio remarkably. The effect was enhanced when DMA concentration increased and the time prolonged. Conclusions With the function of adjusting pHi, NHE-1 may play an important role in the proliferation and apoptosis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

  3. Vascular adaptation in athletes: is there an 'athlete's artery'?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, D.J.; Spence, A.; Rowley, N.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Naylor, L.H.

    2012-01-01

    Whilst the existence of a specific phenotype characterized as 'athlete's heart' is generally acknowledged, the question of whether athletes exhibit characteristic vascular adaptations has not been specifically addressed. To do so in this symposium, studies which have assessed the size, wall thicknes

  4. Simulated annealing approach to vascular structure with application to the coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keelan, Jonathan; Chung, Emma M L; Hague, James P

    2016-02-01

    Do the complex processes of angiogenesis during organism development ultimately lead to a near optimal coronary vasculature in the organs of adult mammals? We examine this hypothesis using a powerful and universal method, built on physical and physiological principles, for the determination of globally energetically optimal arterial trees. The method is based on simulated annealing, and can be used to examine arteries in hollow organs with arbitrary tissue geometries. We demonstrate that the approach can generate in silico vasculatures which closely match porcine anatomical data for the coronary arteries on all length scales, and that the optimized arterial trees improve systematically as computational time increases. The method presented here is general, and could in principle be used to examine the arteries of other organs. Potential applications include improvement of medical imaging analysis and the design of vascular trees for artificial organs. PMID:26998317

  5. Vascular Pathology in the Extracranial Vertebral Arteries in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, L; Nygård, A; Ovesen, C;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular pathology in the extracranial vertebral arteries remains among the possible causes in cryptogenic stroke. However, the diagnosis is challenged by the great variety in the anatomy of the vertebral arteries, clinical symptoms and difficulties in the radiological assessments....... The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of CT angiography (CTA)-detected pathological findings in the extracranial vertebral arteries in an acute stroke population and secondly to determine the frequency of posterior pathology as probable cause in patients with otherwise cryptogenic stroke...... scans systematically, assessing the four segments of the extracranial vertebral arteries. First, the frequency of pathological findings including stenosis, plaques, dissection, kinked artery and coiling was assessed. Subsequently, we explored the extent of the pathological findings that were the most...

  6. Up-regulation of Fas Ligand Expression by Sirtuin 1 in both Flow-restricted Vessels and Serum-stimulated Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Peng Gao; Hou-zao Chen; Zhu-qin Zhang; Ting-ting Xu; Yu-yan Jia; Hui-na Zhang; Guan-hua Du; De-pei Liu

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the role of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in Fas ligand (FasL) expression regulation duringvascular lesion formation and to elucidate the potential mechanisms.Methods SIRT1 and FasL protein levels were detected byWestern blotting in either mouse arteries extract or the whole rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) lysate. Smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific human SIRT1 transgenic (Tg) C57BL/6 mice and their littermate wild-type (WT) controlsunderwent complete carotid artery ligation (ligation groups) or the ligation-excluded operation (sham groups). The carotid arteries were collected 1 day after operation. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the mRNA levels of SIRT1 and FasL. Luciferase reporter assays wereperformed todetect the effect of WT-SIRT1, a dominant-negative form of SIRT1 (SIRT1H363Y), andGATA-6 on the promoter activity of FasL. Flow cytometry assay was applied to measure the hypodiploidDNA content of VSMC so as to monitor cellular apoptosis.Results SIRT1 was expressed in both rat aortic VSMCs and mouse arteries. Forced SIRT1 expressionincreased FasL expression both in injured mouse carotid arteries 1 day after ligation (P<0.001) and VSMCs treated with serum (P<0.05 at the transcriptional level, P<0.001 at the protein level). No notable apoptosis was observed. Furthermore, transcription factor GATA-6 increased the promoter activity of FasL (P<0.001).The induction of FasL promoter activity by GATA-6 was enhanced by WT-SIRT1 (P<0.001), whileSIRT1H363Y significantly relieved the enhancing effect of WT-SIRT1 on GATA-6 (P<0.001).ConclusionsOverexpression of SIRT1 up-regulates FasL expression in both flow-restricted mousecarotid arteries and serum-stimulated VSMCs. The transcription factor GATA-6 participates in thetranscriptional regulation of FasL expression by SIRT1.

  7. Effects of cranberry juice consumption on vascular function in patients with coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranberry juice contains polyphenolic compounds that could improve endothelial function and reduce cardiovascular disease risk. The objective was to examine the effects of cranberry juice on vascular function in subjects with coronary artery disease. We completed an acute pilot study with no placebo...

  8. Relationship between dyslipidemia and vascular endothelial function in patients with coronary artery spasm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向定成

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of dyslipidemia on vascular endothelial function in patients with coronary artery spasm. Methods Sixty-four patients with chest pain but without significant angiographic stenosis were divided into coronary spasm group (n=46 with coronary spasm) and control group (n=18 without coronary spasm) according to acetylcholine provoking test. Endothelin-1 (ET-1), nitric oxide (NO) and lipids were

  9. The management of combined coronary artery disease and peripheral vascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Cassar (Andrew); D. Poldermans (Don); C.S. Rihal (Charanjit); B.J. Gersh (Bernard)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCoronary artery disease (CAD) and peripheral vascular disease (PVD) remain highly prevalent in the population due to population ageing, smoking, diabetes, unhealthy lifestyles, and the epidemic of obesity, and frequently coexist. The management of combined CAD and PVD is a common challen

  10. VEGF, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 immunoreactivity in the porcine arteries of vascular subovarian plexus (VSP during the estrous cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Andronowska

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is an important angiogenic factor in the female reproductive tract. It binds to cell surface through ligand-stimulatable tyrosine kinase receptors, the most important being VEGFR-1 (flt-1 and VEGFR-2 (flk-1. The broad ligament of the uterus is a dynamic organ consisting of specialized complexes of blood vessels connected functionally to the uterus, oviduct and ovary. Endothelial cells form an inner coating of the vessel walls and thus they stay under the influence of various modulators circulating in blood including ovarian steriods involved in developmental changes in the female reproductive system. The aim of the present study was to immunolocalize VEGF and its two receptors: VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 in the broad ligament of the uterus in the area of vascular subovarian plexus during different phases of the estrous cycle in pig and to determine the correlation between immunoreactivity of the investigated factors and phases of the estrous cycle. The study was performed on cryostat sections of vascular subovarian plexus stained immunohistochemically by ABC method. Specific polyclonal antibodies: anti-VEGF, anti-VEGFR-1 and anti-VEGFR-2 were used. Data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance. Our study revealed the presence of VEGF and its receptors in endothelial and smooth muscle cells of VSP arteries. All agents displayed phase-related differences in immunoreactivity suggesting the modulatory effect of VEGF, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2 on the arteries of the VSP in the porcine broad ligament of the uterus.

  11. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Modulates the Vascular Responses of Mesenteric Arteries from Human Colorectal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ferrero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze whether tyrosine phosphorylation in tumoral arteries may modulate their vascular response. To do this, mesenteric arteries supplying blood flow to colorectal tumors or to normal intestine were obtained during surgery and prepared for isometric tension recording in an organ bath. Increasing tyrosine phosphorylation with the phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate produced arterial contraction which was lower in tumoral than in control arteries, whereas it reduced the contraction to noradrenaline in tumoral but not in control arteries and reduced the relaxation to bradykinin in control but not in tumoral arteries. Protein expression of VEGF-A and of the VEGF receptor FLT1 was similar in control and tumoral arteries, but expression of the VEGF receptor KDR was increased in tumoral compared with control arteries. This suggests that tyrosine phosphorylation may produce inhibition of the contraction in tumoral mesenteric arteries, which may increase blood flow to the tumor when tyrosine phosphorylation is increased by stimulation of VEGF receptors.

  12. Asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis in patients with severe peripheral vascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasoul Mirsharifi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: The prevalence of carotid artery stenosis (CAS in the  eneral population is not high enough to justify screening programs. This study was done to determine the prevalence of asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (ACAS among patients with severe peripheral vascular disease (PVD.
    • METHODS: Between March 2005 and February 2006, 54 consecutive  atients with severe PVD admitted at a vascular surgery unit and underwent carotid duplex scanning in a prospective study. A  uestionnaire was used to collect data concerning known risk factors. Significant CAS was defined as a stenosis of 70% or greater.
    • RESULTS: The mean age was 62.5 years (51-72. Out of 54 patients, 2 (3.7% had an occluded internal carotid artery. Significant CAS was found in 9 (16.7% and its presence was correlated with diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, coronary artery disease, severity of symptoms, ankle-brachial index, and carotid bruit. On multivariate analysis, only hypercholesterolemia and carotid bruit seemed to have independent influence.
    • CONCLUSION: The prevalence of significant ACAS is higher among  atients with severe PVD. This patient population may indicate a  uitable subgroup for screening of ACAS, especially when hypercholesterolemia and carotid bruit are present.
    • KEYWORDS: Carotid artery stenosis, duplex ultrasound scanning, peripheral vascular disease, carotid endarterectomy,
    • cerebrovascular accident.

  13. Secreted Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 of Proliferating Smooth Muscle Cells as a Trigger for Drug Release from Stent Surface Polymers in Coronary Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliesche, Daniel G; Hussner, Janine; Witzigmann, Dominik; Porta, Fabiola; Glatter, Timo; Schmidt, Alexander; Huwyler, Jörg; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette E

    2016-07-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of death in industrialized countries. Atherosclerotic coronary arteries are commonly treated with percutaneous transluminal coronary intervention followed by stent deployment. This treatment has significantly improved the clinical outcome. However, triggered vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation leads to in-stent restenosis in bare metal stents. In addition, stent thrombosis is a severe side effect of drug eluting stents due to inhibition of endothelialization. The aim of this study was to develop and test a stent surface polymer, where cytotoxic drugs are covalently conjugated to the surface and released by proteases selectively secreted by proliferating smooth muscle cells. Resting and proliferating human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC) and endothelial cells (HCAEC) were screened to identify an enzyme exclusively released by proliferating HCASMC. Expression analyses and enzyme activity assays verified selective and exclusive activity of the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in proliferating HCASMC. The principle of drug release exclusively triggered by proliferating HCASMC was tested using the biodegradable stent surface polymer poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) and the MMP-9 cleavable peptide linkers named SRL and AVR. The specific peptide cleavage by MMP-9 was verified by attachment of the model compound fluorescein. Fluorescein release was observed in the presence of MMP-9 secreting HCASMC but not of proliferating HCAEC. Our findings suggest that cytotoxic drug conjugated polymers can be designed to selectively release the attached compound triggered by MMP-9 secreting smooth muscle cells. This novel concept may be beneficial for stent endothelialization thereby reducing the risk of restenosis and thrombosis.

  14. Vascular Surgery in World War II: The Shift to Repairing Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Justin; Cherry, Kenneth J; Rich, Norman M

    2016-03-01

    Vascular surgery in World War II has long been defined by DeBakey and Simeone's classic 1946 article describing arterial repair as exceedingly rare. They argued ligation was and should be the standard surgical response to arterial trauma in war. We returned to and analyzed the original records of World War II military medical units housed in the National Archives and other repositories in addition to consulting published accounts to determine the American practice of vascular surgery in World War II. This research demonstrates a clear shift from ligation to arterial repair occurring among American military surgeons in the last 6 months of the war in the European Theater of Operations. These conclusions not only highlight the role of war as a catalyst for surgical change but also point to the dangers of inaccurate history in stymieing such advances. PMID:25719811

  15. Vascular Surgery in World War II: The Shift to Repairing Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Justin; Cherry, Kenneth J; Rich, Norman M

    2016-03-01

    Vascular surgery in World War II has long been defined by DeBakey and Simeone's classic 1946 article describing arterial repair as exceedingly rare. They argued ligation was and should be the standard surgical response to arterial trauma in war. We returned to and analyzed the original records of World War II military medical units housed in the National Archives and other repositories in addition to consulting published accounts to determine the American practice of vascular surgery in World War II. This research demonstrates a clear shift from ligation to arterial repair occurring among American military surgeons in the last 6 months of the war in the European Theater of Operations. These conclusions not only highlight the role of war as a catalyst for surgical change but also point to the dangers of inaccurate history in stymieing such advances.

  16. OVER-EXPRESSION OF EXTRACELLULAR SIGNAL-REGULATED KINASE IN VASCULAR SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL OF HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) was involved in changes of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) under hypertension. Methods Two-kidney one clip Wistar hypertensive rats (WHR) were sacrificed and their right kidneys were harvested 4 weeks after surgery. The spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were divided into 4, 8, and 16 weeks old groups (SHR4w, SHR8w, and SHR16w), respectively. The control group were sham operated age-matched Wistar rats. Immunohistochemical technique and Western blotting were applied to study ERK1/2 protein expression in VSMC of the renal vascular trees in WHR, SHR, and control rats. Results Blood pressure in two-kidney one clip WHR obviously increased at one week after surgery, and reached to 198.00 ± 33.00 mm Hg at the end of experiment, significantly higher than that in the control rats ( P < 0. 01 ). Blood pressure in SHR4w ( 108.00 ± 11.25 mm Hg) was similar to that in the controls. However, it rose to 122.25 ± 21.75 mm Hg in SHR8w, and even up to 201.75 ± 18.00 mm Hg in SHR16w, which were significantly higher than that of both the SHR4w and the controls ( P < 0. 01 ). The rate and degree of glomerular fibrosis in WHR were significantly higher than controls (P < 0. 05 ). Hyaline degeneration of the afferent arterioles was found in WHR. In contrast, either fibrosis of glomerulus or hyaline degeneration of the arterioles or protein casts was not observed in SHR4w, SHR8w,and SHR16w. Immunohistochemical staining results showed expression of ERK1 was similar to that of ERK2. The positive rates of ERK2 staining in VSMC of afferent arterioles, interlobular, interlobar, and arcuate arteries in two-kidney one clip WHR were significantly higher (7. 09% ± 1.75%, 14. 57% ± 4. 58%, 29.44% ± 7. 35%, and 13.63% ±3.85%, respectively) than that of the controls( P < 0. 01 ). The positive rates of ERK2 staining in VSMC at afferent arterioles, interlobular, interlobar, and arcuate arteries in SHR

  17. Adipose tissue and vascular inflammation in coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Enrica; Golia; Giuseppe; Limongelli; Francesco; Natale; Fabio; Fimiani; Valeria; Maddaloni; Pina; Elvira; Russo; Lucia; Riegler; Renatomaria; Bianchi; Mario; Crisci; Gaetano; Di; Palma; Paolo; Golino; Maria; Giovanna; Russo; Raffaele; Calabrò; Paolo; Calabrò

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has become an important public health issue in Western and developing countries,with well known metabolic and cardiovascular complications.In the last decades,evidence have been growing about the active role of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ in determining these pathological consequences.As a consequence of the expansion of fat depots,in obese subjects,adipose tissue cells develope a phenotypic modification,which turns into a change of the secretory output.Adipocytokines produced by both adipocytes and adipose stromal cells are involved in the modulation of glucose and lipid handling,vascular biology and,moreover,participate to the systemic inflammatory response,which characterizes obesity and metabolic syndrome.This might represent an important pathophysiological link with atherosclerotic complications and cardiovascular events.A great number of adipocytokines have been described recently,linking inflammatory mileu and vascular pathology.The understanding of these pathways is crucial not only from a pathophysiological point of view,but also to a better cardiovascular disease risk stratification and to the identification of possible therapeutic targets.The aim of this paper is to review the role of Adipocytokines as a possible link between obesity and vascular disease.

  18. Conditional deletion of Dicer in vascular smooth muscle cells leads to the developmental delay and embryonic mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yaoqian [Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Center for Cancer Research, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Balazs, Louisa [Department of Pathology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Tigyi, Gabor [Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Yue, Junming, E-mail: yue@uthsc.edu [Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Center for Cancer Research, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States)

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} Deletion of Dicer in vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMCs) leads to embryonic mortality. {yields} Loss of Dicer in VSMCs leads to developmental delay. {yields} Loss of Dicer in VSMCs leads to hemorrhage in various organs including brain, skin and liver. {yields} Loss of Dicer in VSMCs leads to vascular wall remodeling. {yields} Loss of Dicer in VSMCs dysregulates the expression of miRNA and VSMC marker genes. -- Abstract: Dicer is a RNAase III enzyme that cleaves double stranded RNA and generates small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA). The goal of this study is to examine the role of Dicer and miRNAs in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). We deleted Dicer in VSMCs of mice, which caused a developmental delay that manifested as early as embryonic day E12.5, leading to embryonic death between E14.5 and E15.5 due to extensive hemorrhage in the liver, brain, and skin. Dicer KO embryos showed dilated blood vessels and a disarray of vascular architecture between E14.5 and E15.5. VSMC proliferation was significantly inhibited in Dicer KOs. The expression of VSMC marker genes were significantly downregulated in Dicer cKO embryos. The vascular structure of the yolk sac and embryo in Dicer KOs was lost to an extent that no blood vessels could be identified after E15.5. Expression of most miRNAs examined was compromised in VSMCs of Dicer KO. Our results indicate that Dicer is required for vascular development and regulates vascular remodeling by modulating VSMC proliferation and differentiation.

  19. Vascular Pathology in the Extracranial Vertebral Arteries in Patients with Acute Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bentsen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vascular pathology in the extracranial vertebral arteries remains among the possible causes in cryptogenic stroke. However, the diagnosis is challenged by the great variety in the anatomy of the vertebral arteries, clinical symptoms and difficulties in the radiological assessments. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of CT angiography (CTA-detected pathological findings in the extracranial vertebral arteries in an acute stroke population and secondly to determine the frequency of posterior pathology as probable cause in patients with otherwise cryptogenic stroke. Method: The analysis was based on 657 consecutive patients with symptoms of acute stroke and a final diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack. On admission, a noncontrast CT cerebrum and CTA were performed. A senior consultant neuroradiologist, blinded to clinical data, reviewed all CTA scans systematically, assessing the four segments of the extracranial vertebral arteries. First, the frequency of pathological findings including stenosis, plaques, dissection, kinked artery and coiling was assessed. Subsequently, we explored the extent of the pathological findings that were the most plausible causes of stroke, namely either a possible dissection or a kinked artery. Results: Findings in the extracranial vertebral arteries included significant stenosis (0.8%, atherosclerotic plaque types (3.8%, possible dissections (2.6%, kinked arteries (2.6% and coiling (32.0%. Eighteen patients (2.8% with pathological findings had an unknown cause of stroke, likely posterior symptoms and no clinical stroke symptoms from the anterior circuit. Of these, 3 cases were kinked arteries (0.5% and 15 cases (2.3% were possible dissections. Conclusion: We found that in approximately 3% of the study population, the most plausible cause of the cryptogenic strokes was due to a pathological finding in the posterior extracranial vertebral arteries, being either a possible

  20. Human Coronary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Responses to Bioactive Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Newcomer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Under normal physiological conditions, mature human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs exhibit a “contractile” phenotype marked by low rates of proliferation and protein synthesis, but these cells possess the remarkable ability to dedifferentiate into a “synthetic” phenotype when stimulated by conditions of pathologic stress. A variety of polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEMU films are shown here to exhibit bioactive properties that induce distinct responses from cultured hCASMCs. Surfaces terminated with Nafion or poly(styrenesulfonic acid (PSS induce changes in the expression and organization of intracellular proteins, while a hydrophilic, zwitterionic copolymer of acrylic acid and 3-[2-(acrylamido-ethyl dimethylammonio] propane sulfonate (PAA-co-PAEDAPS is resistant to cell attachment and suppresses the formation of key cytoskeletal components. Differential expression of heat shock protein 90 and actin is observed, in terms of both their magnitude and cellular localization, and distinct cytoplasmic patterns of vimentin are seen. The ionophore A23187 induces contraction in confluent hCASMC cultures on Nafion-terminated surfaces. These results demonstrate that PEMU coatings exert direct effects on the cytoskeletal organization of attaching hCASMCs, impeding growth in some cases, inducing changes consistent with phenotypic modulation in others, and suggesting potential utility for PEMU surfaces as a coating for coronary artery stents and other implantable medical devices.

  1. Orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner inhibits angiotensin II-stimulated PAI-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kyeong-Min; Seo, Hye-Young; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Min, Ae-Kyung; Ryu, Seong-Yeol; Kim, Yoon-Nyun; Park, Young Joo; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Lee, Ki-Up; Park, Wan-Ju; Park, Keun-Gyu; Lee, In-Kyu

    2009-01-01

    Angiotensin II is a major effector molecule in the development of cardiovascular disease. In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), angiotensin II promotes cellular proliferation and extracellular matrix accumulation through the upregulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression. Previously, we demonstrated that small heterodimer partner (SHP) represses PAI-1 expression in the liver through the inhibition of TGF-β signaling pathways. Here, we investigated whether SHP inhibite...

  2. Inhibition of apoptotic signaling in spermine-treated vascular smooth muscle cells by a novel glutathione precursor

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha-Hikim, Indrani; Shen, Ruoqing; Kovacheva, Ekaterina; Crum, Albert; Vaziri, Nosratola D.; Norris, Keith C.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a public health problem, mediated by hemodynamic and non-hemodynamic events including oxidative stress. We investigated the effect of two glutathione (GSH) precursors, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and cystine as the physiologic carrier of cysteine in GSH with added selenomethionine (F1) in preventing spermine (uremic toxin) induced apoptosis in cultured human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). VSMCs exposed to spermine (15 μM) with or without antioxidants (...

  3. Vasopressin-stimulated Ca2+ spiking in vascular smooth muscle cells involves phospholipase D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Shiels, A J; Maszak, G; Byron, K L

    2001-06-01

    Physiological concentrations of [Arg(8)]vasopressin (AVP; 10-500 pM) stimulate oscillations of cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+ spikes) in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells. We previously reported that this effect of AVP was blocked by a putative phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor, ONO-RS-082 (5 microM). In the present study, the products of PLA2, arachidonic acid (AA), and lysophospholipids were found to be ineffective in stimulating Ca2+ spiking, and inhibitors of AA metabolism did not prevent AVP-stimulated Ca2+ spiking. Thin layer chromatography was used to monitor the release of AA and phosphatidic acid (PA), which are the products of PLA2 and phospholipase D (PLD), respectively. AVP (100 pM) stimulated both AA and PA formation, but only PA formation was inhibited by ONO-RS-082 (5 microM). Exogenous PLD (type VII; 2.5 U/ml) stimulated Ca2+ spiking equivalent to the effect of 100 pM AVP. AVP stimulated transphosphatidylation of 1-butanol (a PLD-catalyzed reaction) but not 2-butanol, and 1-butanol (but not 2-butanol) completely prevented AVP-stimulated Ca2+ spiking. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibition, which completely prevents AVP-stimulated Ca2+ spiking, did not inhibit AVP-stimulated phosphatidylbutanol formation. These results suggest that AVP-stimulated Ca2+ spiking depends on activation of PLD rather than PLA2 and that PKC activation may be downstream of PLD in the signaling cascade.

  4. Yangxueqingnao particles inhibit rat vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation induced by lysophosphatidic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Wei; XU Yi; CHEN Jun-zhu; HUANG Shu-ru; LU Zhen-ya; WANG Zhan-kun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of Yangxueqingnao particles on rat vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation induced by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). Methods: The amount of3H-TdR (3H-thymidine) admixed in cultured rat VSMC was measured and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity and lipid peroxidation end product malondialdehyde (MDA)content of the VSMC were assayed. Results: 1×10-9, 1×10-8, 1×10-7 mol/L LPA in a concentration dependent manner, induced the amount of 3H-TdR admixed, MAP kinase activity, and MDA content of the cultured rat VSMC to increase. However, 5%, 10%,and 15% Yangxueqingnao serum preincubation resulted in a decrease of 23.0%, 42.0%, and 52.0% (P<0.01) respectively in the amount of 3H-TdR admixed, a decline in VSMC MAP kinase activity of 13.9% (P<0.05), 29.6% (P<0.01), and 48.9% (P<0.01)respectively, and also, a decrease in MDA content of VSMC of 19.4%, 24.7%, and 43.2% (P<0.01) respectively, in the 1×10-7mol/L LPA-treated VSMC. Conclusions: LPA activates the proliferation and lipid peroxidation of VSMC in a concentration dependent manner. The LPA-induced VSMC proliferation is related to the activity of MAP kinases, enzymes involved in an intracellular signalling pathway. The results of the present study showed that Yangxueqingnao particles can effectively inhibit LPA-induced VSMC proliferation, MAP kinase activation, and reduce lipid peroxidative lesion.

  5. Taurine antagonized oxidative stress injury induced by homocysteine in rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin CHANG; Jian-xin XU; Jing ZHAO; Yong-zheng PANG; Chao-shu TANG; Yong-fen QI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To observe protective effects of taurine on reactive oxygen species generation induced by homocysteine in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). METHODS: Rat VSMC was incubated with various concentrations of homocysteine and taurine. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity which released into culture medium was elevated as an indicator for VSMC injury. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) - hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide anion (O2- )were measured with luminol or lucigenin chemiluminescences method, and the mitochondria Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) and catalase (CAT) were also measured in treated VSMC. RESULTS: LDH leakage from cultured VSMC treated with homocystenie, was increased (P<0.01 vs control), and it was markedly inhibited when co-incubated with taurine (P<0.01). Homocysteine induced H2O2 generation from VSMC in a concentration dependent manner (P<0.01 vs control). However, taurine (5, 10, and 20 mmol/L) significantly antagonized 0.5 mmol/L homocysteine-induced H2O2 generation in VSMC in a concentration dependent manner (P<0.01 vs homocysteine alone group), although taurine itself did not alter the H2O2 generation in VSMC (P>0.05 vs control).In this study, the superoxide anion in VSMC was not detectable by chemiluminent method. In addition, treatment of VSMC with taurine increased mitochondria Mn-SOD and CAT activity in a concentration dependent manner (P<0.05), but homocysteine decreased mitochondria Mn-SOD and CAT activity (P<0.01 vs control). In addition,co-administration of taurine markedly ameliorated homocysteine-induced inhibition of Mn-SOD and CAT activity in VSMC (P<0.01 vs homocysteine alone group). CONCLUSION: Taurine antagonized the effects of homocysteine on ROS generation and anti-oxidant enzyme activities in rat VSMC in vitro.

  6. Batroxobin reduces intracellular calcium concentration and inhibits proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Qing-bin 宋清斌; WEI Min-jie 魏敏杰; DUAN Zhi-quan 段志泉; ZHANG Hai-qiang 张海强; LB Schwartz; XIN Shi-jie 辛世杰

    2004-01-01

    Background Batroxobin (BX), a serine protease used in defibrinogenation and thrombolysis, also has an effect on c-fos gene and growth factor. This study attempted to determine the effects of BX on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and calcium metabolism. Methods VSMCs were treated with BX at concentrations of 0.1, 0.3, or 1.0 mmol/L and cell numbers were determined at 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]I) was measured using direct fluorescence methods. Results BX was found to suppress proliferation of VSMCs in a dose-dependent fashion with inhibition rates of 18% and 31% by 48 and 72 hours, respectively. In addition, BX decreases basal [Ca2+]I significantly. The basal level in untreated cells was 162.7±33.8 nmol/L, and decreased to 131.5±27.7 nmol/L, 128.3±28.5 nmol/L, and 125.6±34.3 nmol/L with the three concentrations of BX, respectively. Noradrenaline (NE)-induced [Ca2+]I stimulation was also attenuated by BX (0.1 mmol/L BX, 20%±8% inhibition; 0.3 mmol/L BX, 54%±11% inhibition; 1.0 mmol/L BX, 62%±15% inhibition). The ability of NE to stimulate [Ca2+]I was attenuated in cultures in Ca2+-free medium, as was the ability of BX to blunt NE-induced stimulation. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that BX can effectively inhibit proliferation of VSMCs, probably by blocking the release and uptake of Ca2+, thus influencing [Ca2+]I.

  7. Urotensin Ⅱ increases endothelin production by vascular smooth muscle cells in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the effects of urotensin Ⅱ (UII) on production of endothelin (ET) in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Cultured VSMCs incubated with various concentrations of UII were used to measure the VSMC 3H-TdR incorporation, the amount of ET mRNA and ET production in VSMCs. In this work we found that UII (10-10-10-8 mol/L) promoted VSMC 3H-TdR incorporation (47%-83%, P < 0.01) and increased the amount of ET mRNA by 17.1% (P < 0.05) to 112.8% (P < 0.01), respectively, in a concentration dependent manner compared with control. After 4 and 8 h incubation, 10-10-10-8 mol/L of UII elevated the ET synthesis and release in a concentration dependent manner. After 4 h incubation, the content of ET in medium was 4.9, 5.36 and 7.12 pg/mL (P < 0.01). After 8 h incubation, the ET content released from VSMCs was 12.6, 12.07 and 17.17 pg/mL (P < 0.01). In addition, it was found that BQ123, a specific ETA receptor antagonist, obviously decreased the VSMC DNA synthesis induced by UII. The results of this study showed that UII could stimulate the ET mRNA expression and ET production in VSMC. The effects of UII on VSMC DNA synthesis were partly mediated by ET autocrine pathway. It suggests that the interaction between UII and ET plays an important biological regulating role as endogenous active peptides.

  8. Tetraspanin CD9 regulates cell contraction and actin arrangement via RhoA in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Herr

    Full Text Available The most prevalent cardiovascular diseases arise from alterations in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC morphology and function. Tetraspanin CD9 has been previously implicated in regulating vascular pathologies; however, insight into how CD9 may regulate adverse VSMC phenotypes has not been provided. We utilized a human model of aortic smooth muscle cells to understand the consequences of CD9 deficiency on VSMC phenotypes. Upon knocking down CD9, the cells developed an abnormally small and rounded morphology. We determined that this morphological change was due to a lack of typical parallel actin arrangement. We also found similar total RhoA but decreased GTP-bound (active RhoA levels in CD9 deficient cells. As a result, cells lacking a full complement of CD9 were less contractile than their control treated counterparts. Upon restoration of RhoA activity in the CD9 deficient cells, the phenotype was reversed and cell contraction was restored. Conversely, inhibition of RhoA activity in the control cells mimicked the CD9-deficient cell phenotype. Thus, alteration in CD9 expression was sufficient to profoundly disrupt cellular actin arrangement and endogenous cell contraction by interfering with RhoA signaling. This study provides insight into how CD9 may regulate previously described vascular smooth muscle cell pathophysiology.

  9. Vascular cell responses to ECM produced by smooth muscle cells on TiO2 nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TiO2 nanotubes with the tube diameter of 30 nm via anodic oxidation was prepared. • SMCs on TiO2 nanotubes presented enhanced extracellular matrix secreting. • ECM prepared via decellularization retained the components: Fn, Ln and collagen. • ECM-covered TiO2 nanotubes significantly improved the proliferation of ECs. - Abstract: There is an increasing interest in developing new methods to promote biocompatibility of biomedical materials. The TiO2 nanotubes with the tube diameter of 30 nm were prepared by anodization. The response behavior of the human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and human umbilical artery smooth muscle cell (HUASMC) to these different nanotube sizes was investigated. Compared to the flat Ti, the growth and viability of HUVEC are prohibited, but there was no significant difference of HUASMC on 30 nm TiO2 nanotubes. In this study, extracellular matrix (ECM) as a complex cellular environment which provides structural support to cells and regulates the cells functions was further used to modify the biological properties of TiO2 nanotubes. The ECM secreted from HUASMC was successfully deposited onto the 30 nm TiO2 nanotubes. Moreover, immunofluorescence staining of common ECM components, such as fibronectin, laminin and type IV collagen, also indicated the successful ECM-covering on nanotube surfaces. Interestingly, the surface of ECM-covered TiO2 nanotubes significantly improved the proliferation of HUVECs in vitro. This suggested that the ECM secreted from HUASMCs on the TiO2 nanotubular surface could further improve the HUVECs adhesion and proliferation

  10. High resolution MR angiography with rephasing and dephasing sequences for selective vascular imaging of arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With rephasing and dephasing sequences the vascular system is imaged with high or low signal intensity whereas stationary tissue is imaged with identical signal intensity. With images recorded in systole and diastole followed by image subtraction separate imaging of arteries or veins without background superposition is possible. 13 patients with vascular lesions of the lower extremities and 7 volunteers were examined. Vascular stenosis, aneurysm, dilatation, occlusion and collateral vessels could be imaged similar to digital subtraction angiography. Vessels with a diameter down to 1 mm could be imaged. The large slice thickness up to 80 mm results in projection type images where the vascular tree is imaged over the whole field of view and without partial volume effects. (orig.)

  11. High resolution MR angiography with rephasing and dephasing sequences for selective vascular imaging of arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiderer, M.; Laub, G.; Staebler, A.; Yousry, P.; Lauterjung, L.

    1988-03-01

    With rephasing and dephasing sequences the vascular system is imaged with high or low signal intensity whereas stationary tissue is imaged with identical signal intensity. With images recorded in systole and diastole followed by image subtraction separate imaging of arteries or veins without background superposition is possible. 13 patients with vascular lesions of the lower extremities and 7 volunteers were examined. Vascular stenosis, aneurysm, dilatation, occlusion and collateral vessels could be imaged similar to digital subtraction angiography. Vessels with a diameter down to 1 mm could be imaged. The large slice thickness up to 80 mm results in projection type images where the vascular tree is imaged over the whole field of view and without partial volume effects.

  12. Changes in pulmonary arterial wall mechanical properties and lumenal architecture with induced vascular remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthen, Robert C.; Heinrich, Amy E.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2004-04-01

    To explore and quantify pulmonary arterial remodeling we used various methods including micro-CT, high-resolution 3-dimensional x-ray imaging, to examine the structure and function of intact pulmonary vessels in isolated rat lungs. The rat is commonly used as an animal model for studies of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and the accompanying vascular remodeling, where vascular remodeling has been defined primarily by changes in the vessel wall composition in response to hypertension inducing stimuli such as chronic hypoxic exposure (CHE) or monocrotaline (MCT) injection. Little information has been provided as to how such changes affect the vessel wall mechanical properties or the lumenal architecture of the pulmonary arterial system that actually account for the hemodynamic consequences of the remodeling. In addition, although the link between primary forms of pulmonary hypertension and inherited genetics is well established, the role that genetic coding plays in hemodynamics and vascular remodeling is not. Therefore, we are utilizing Fawn-Hooded (FH), Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Brown Norway (BN)rat strains along with unique imaging methods to parameterize both vessel distensibility and lumenal morphometry using a principal pulmonary arterial pathway analysis based on self-consistency. We have found for the hypoxia model, in addition to decreased body weight, increased hematocrit, increased right ventricular hypertrophy, the distensibility of the pulmonary arteries is shown to decrease significantly in the presence of remodeling.

  13. Wild-type LRP6 inhibits, whereas atherosclerosis-linked LRP6R611C increases PDGF-dependent vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramati, Ali R.; Singh, Rajvir; Lin, Aiping; Faramarzi, Saeed; Ye, Zhi-jia; Mane, Shrikant; Tellides, George; Lifton, Richard P.; Mani, Arya

    2011-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is an important event in atherosclerosis and other vasculopathies. PDGF signaling is a key mediator of SMC proliferation, but the mechanisms that control its activity remain unclear. We previously identified a mutation in LDL receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), LRP6R611C, that causes early atherosclerosis. Examination of human atherosclerotic coronary arteries showed markedly increased expression of LRP6 and colocalization with PDGF receptor β (PDGFR-β). Further investigation showed that wild-type LRP6 inhibits but LRP6R611C promotes VSMC proliferation in response to PDGF. We found that wild-type LRP6 forms a complex with PDGFR-β and enhances its lysosomal degradation, functions that are severely impaired in LRP6R611C. Further, we observed that wild-type and mutant LRP6 regulate cell-cycle activity by triggering differential effects on PDGF-dependent pathways. These findings implicate LRP6 as a critical modulator of PDGF-dependent regulation of cell cycle in smooth muscle and indicate that loss of this function contributes to development of early atherosclerosis in humans. PMID:21245321

  14. Atorvastatin Protects Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells From TGF-β1-Stimulated Calcification by Inducing Autophagy via Suppression of the β-Catenin Pathway

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    Demin Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arterial calcification is a major event in the progression of atherosclerosis. It is reported that statins exhibit various protective effects against vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC inflammation and proliferation in cardiovascular remodeling. Although statins counteract atherosclerosis, the molecular mechanisms of statins on the calcium release from VSMCs have not been clearly elucidated. Methods: Calcium content of VSMCs was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The expression of proteins involved in cellular transdifferentiation was analyzed by western blot. Cell autophagy was measured by fluorescence microscopic analysis for acridine orange staining and transmission electron microscopy analysis. The autophagic inhibitors (3-MA, chloroquine, NH4Cl and bafilomycin A1 and β-catenin inhibitor JW74 were used to assess the effects of atorvastatin on autophagy and the involvement of β-catenin on cell calcification respectively. Furthermore, cell transfection was performed to overexpress β-catenin. Results: In VSMCs, atorvastatin significantly suppressed transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1-stimulated calcification, accompanied by the induction of autophagy. Downregulation of autophagy with autophagic inhibitors significantly suppressed the inhibitory effect of atorvastatin on cell calcification. Moreover, the beneficial effect of atorvastatin on calcification and autophagy was reversed by β-catenin overexpression. Conversely, JW74 supplement enhanced this effect. Conclusion: These data demonstrated that atorvastatin protect VSMC from TGF-β1-stimulated calcification by inducing autophagy through suppression of the β-catenin pathway, identifying autophagy induction might be a therapeutic strategy for use in vascular calcification.

  15. Pravastatin inhibits fibrinogen- and FDP-induced inflammatory response via reducing the production of IL-6, TNF-α and iNOS in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peipei; Liu, Juntian; Pang, Xiaoming

    2015-10-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory response of the arterial wall to pro‑atherosclerotic factors. As an inflammatory marker, fibrinogen directly participates in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Our previous study demonstrated that fibrinogen and fibrin degradation products (FDP) produce a pro‑inflammatory effect on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) through inducing the production of interleukin‑6 (IL‑6), tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In the present study, the effects of pravastatin on fibrinogen‑ and FDP‑induced expression of IL‑6, TNF‑α and iNOS were observed in VSMCs. The results showed that pravastatin dose‑dependently inhibited fibrinogen‑ and FDP‑stimulated expression of IL‑6, TNF‑α and iNOS in VSMCs at the mRNA and protein level. The maximal inhibition of protein expression of IL‑6, TNF‑α and iNOS was 46.9, 42.7 and 49.2% in fibrinogen‑stimulated VSMCs, and 50.2, 49.8 and 53.6% in FDP‑stimulated VSMCs, respectively. This suggests that pravastatin has the ability to relieve vascular inflammation via inhibiting the generation of IL‑6, TNF‑α and iNOS. The results of the present study may aid in further explaining the beneficial effects of pravastatin on atherosclerosis and related cardiovascular diseases. In addition, they suggest that application of pravastatin may be beneficial for prevention of atherosclerosis formation in hyperfibrinogenemia.

  16. [Vascular rehabilitation in patients with peripheral arterial disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Holanda, Ana; Aubourg, Marion; Dubus-Bausière, Valérie; Eveno, Dominique; Abraham, Pierre

    2013-06-01

    Lower limb peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a frequent debilitating disease associated with a high morbidity and mortality rate. The benefit of rehabilitation in PAD patients has been largely demonstrated, both for patients that undergo amputation, and for patients with claudication. In these latter patients, rehabilitation programs rely on a variety of additional techniques or tools, among which: stretching, specific muscle proprioception, walking and a variety of other physical activities, exercise or situations adapted to community life, lower limb and respiratory physiotherapy, patient's education, support for smoking cessation and healthy nutrition, social support, etc. Whether rehabilitation is performed in specialised integrated structures or performed on a home-based basis, various clinicians are involved. Despite evidence-based proof of efficacy, rehabilitation of PAD patients with claudication is still under-used. PMID:23669319

  17. ASIC1-mediated calcium entry stimulates NFATc3 nuclear translocation via PICK1 coupling in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Bosc, Laura V; Plomaritas, Danielle R; Herbert, Lindsay M; Giermakowska, Wieslawa; Browning, Carly; Jernigan, Nikki L

    2016-07-01

    The development of chronic hypoxia (CH)-induced pulmonary hypertension is associated with increased pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) Ca(2+) influx through acid-sensing ion channel-1 (ASIC1) and activation of the Ca(2+)/calcineurin-dependent transcription factor known as nuclear factor of activated T-cells isoform c3 (NFATc3). Whether Ca(2+) influx through ASIC1 contributes to NFATc3 activation in the pulmonary vasculature is unknown. Furthermore, both ASIC1 and calcineurin have been shown to interact with the scaffolding protein known as protein interacting with C kinase-1 (PICK1). In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that ASIC1 contributes to NFATc3 nuclear translocation in PASMC in a PICK1-dependent manner. Using both ASIC1 knockout (ASIC1(-/-)) mice and pharmacological inhibition of ASIC1, we demonstrate that ASIC1 contributes to CH-induced (1 wk at 380 mmHg) and endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced (10(-7) M) Ca(2+) responses and NFATc3 nuclear import in PASMC. The interaction between ASIC1/PICK1/calcineurin was shown using a Duolink in situ Proximity Ligation Assay. Inhibition of PICK1 by using FSC231 abolished ET-1-induced and ionomycin-induced NFATc3 nuclear import, but it did not alter ET-1-mediated Ca(2+) responses, suggesting that PICK1 acts downstream of Ca(2+) influx. The key findings of the present work are that 1) Ca(2+) influx through ASIC1 mediates CH- and ET-1-induced NFATc3 nuclear import and 2) the scaffolding protein PICK1 is necessary for NFATc3 nuclear import. Together, these data provide an essential link between CH-induced ASIC1-mediated Ca(2+) influx and activation of the NFATc3 transcription factor. Identification of this ASIC1/PICK1/NFATc3 signaling complex increases our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the vascular remodeling and increased vascular contractility that are associated with CH-induced pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27190058

  18. The tight junction protein ZO-2 and Janus kinase 1 mediate intercellular communications in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkachuk, Natalia; Tkachuk, Sergey; Patecki, Margret [Department of Nephrology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover D-30625 (Germany); Kusch, Angelika [Department of Nephrology and Intensive Care Medicine, Charite Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Berlin D-13353 (Germany); Korenbaum, Elena; Haller, Hermann [Department of Nephrology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover D-30625 (Germany); Dumler, Inna, E-mail: dumler.inna@mh-hannover.de [Department of Nephrology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover D-30625 (Germany)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} The tight junction protein ZO-2 associates with Jak1 in vascular smooth muscle cells via ZO-2 N-terminal fragment. {yields} Jak1 mediates ZO-2 tyrosine phosphorylation and ZO-2 localization to the sites of homotypic intercellular contacts. {yields} The urokinase receptor uPAR regulates ZO-2/Jak1 functional association. {yields} The ZO-2/Jak1/uPAR signaling complex is required for vascular smooth muscle cells functional network formation. -- Abstract: Recent evidence points to a multifunctional role of ZO-2, the tight junction protein of the MAGUK (membrane-associated guanylate kinase-like) family. Though ZO-2 has been found in cell types lacking tight junction structures, such as vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), little is known about ZO-2 function in these cells. We provide evidence that ZO-2 mediates specific homotypic cell-to-cell contacts between VSMC. Using mass spectrometry we found that ZO-2 is associated with the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Jak1. By generating specific ZO-2 constructs we further found that the N-terminal fragment of ZO-2 molecule is responsible for this interaction. Adenovirus-based expression of Jak1 inactive mutant demonstrated that Jak1 mediates ZO-2 tyrosine phosphorylation. By means of RNA silencing, expression of Jak1 mutant form and fluorescently labeled ZO-2 fusion protein we further specified that active Jak1, but not Jak1 inactive mutant, mediates ZO-2 localization to the sites of intercellular contacts. We identified the urokinase receptor uPAR as a pre-requisite for these cellular events. Functional requirement of the revealed signaling complex for VSMC network formation was confirmed in experiments using Matrigel and in contraction assay. Our findings imply involvement of the ZO-2 tight junction independent signaling complex containing Jak1 and uPAR in VSMC intercellular communications. This mechanism may contribute to vascular remodeling in occlusive cardiovascular diseases and in arteriogenesis.

  19. Impaired Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor-γ Contributes to Phenotypic Modulation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells during Hypertension*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Xie, Peng; Wang, Jingzhou; Yang, Qingwu; Fang, Chuanqin; Zhou, Shuang; Li, Jingcheng

    2010-01-01

    The phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a pivotal role in hypertension-induced vascular changes including vascular remodeling. The precise mechanisms underlying VSMC phenotypic modulation remain elusive. Here we test the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ in the VSMC phenotypic modulation during hypertension. Both spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) aortas and SHR-derived VSMCs exhibited reduced PPAR-γ expression and excessive VSMC phenotypic modulation identified by reduced contractile proteins, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and smooth muscle 22α (SM22α), and enhanced proliferation and migration. PPAR-γ overexpression rescued the expression of α-SMA and SM22α, and inhibited the proliferation and migration in SHR-derived VSMCs. In contrast, PPAR-γ silencing exerted the opposite effect. Activating PPAR-γ using rosiglitazone in vivo up-regulated aortic α-SMA and SM22α expression and attenuated aortic remodeling in SHRs. Increased activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling was observed in SHR-derived VSMCs. PI3K inhibitor LY294002 rescued the impaired expression of contractile proteins, and inhibited proliferation and migration in VSMCs from SHRs, whereas constitutively active PI3K mutant had the opposite effect. Overexpression or silencing of PPAR-γ inhibited or excited PI3K/Akt activity, respectively. LY294002 counteracted the PPAR-γ silencing induced proliferation and migration in SHR-derived VSMCs, whereas active PI3K mutant had the opposite effect. In contrast, reduced proliferation and migration by PPAR-γ overexpression were reversed by the active PI3K mutant, and further inhibited by LY294002. We conclude that PPAR-γ inhibits VSMC phenotypic modulation through inhibiting PI3K/Akt signaling. Impaired PPAR-γ expression is responsible for VSMC phenotypic modulation during hypertension. These findings highlight an attractive therapeutic target for

  20. Graded effects of unregulated smooth muscle myosin on intestinal architecture, intestinal motility and vascular function in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Joshua; Einhorn, Zev; Seiler, Christoph; Zong, Alan B; Sweeney, H Lee; Pack, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Smooth muscle contraction is controlled by the regulated activity of the myosin heavy chain ATPase (Myh11). Myh11 mutations have diverse effects in the cardiovascular, digestive and genitourinary systems in humans and animal models. We previously reported a recessive missense mutation, meltdown (mlt), which converts a highly conserved tryptophan to arginine (W512R) in the rigid relay loop of zebrafish Myh11. The mlt mutation disrupts myosin regulation and non-autonomously induces invasive expansion of the intestinal epithelium. Here, we report two newly identified missense mutations in the switch-1 (S237Y) and coil-coiled (L1287M) domains of Myh11 that fail to complement mlt Cell invasion was not detected in either homozygous mutant but could be induced by oxidative stress and activation of oncogenic signaling pathways. The smooth muscle defect imparted by the mlt and S237Y mutations also delayed intestinal transit, and altered vascular function, as measured by blood flow in the dorsal aorta. The cell-invasion phenotype induced by the three myh11 mutants correlated with the degree of myosin deregulation. These findings suggest that the vertebrate intestinal epithelium is tuned to the physical state of the surrounding stroma, which, in turn, governs its response to physiologic and pathologic stimuli. Genetic variants that alter the regulation of smooth muscle myosin might be risk factors for diseases affecting the intestine, vasculature, and other tissues that contain smooth muscle or contractile cells that express smooth muscle proteins, particularly in the setting of redox stress. PMID:26893369

  1. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B; Bowman, Frederick P; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Waxman, Aaron B; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A; Maron, Bradley A

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10(-9) to 10(-7) M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor-small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.-Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth

  2. Echocardiographic assessment of pulmonary vascular resistance in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergot Emmanuel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Echocardiographic ratio of peak tricuspid regurgitant velocity to the right ventricular outflow tract time-velocity integral (TRV/TVI rvot was presented as a reliable non-invasive method of estimating pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR. Studies using this technique in patients with moderate to high PVR are scarce. Left ventricular outflow tract time-velocity integral (TVI lvot can be easier to measure than TVI rvot, especially in patients with severe pulmonary hypertension (PH with significant anatomical modifications of the right structures. Aims We wanted to determine whether the TRV/TVI rvot and TRV/TVI lvot ratios would form a reliable non-invasive tool to estimate PVR in a cohort of patients with moderate to severe pulmonary vascular disease. Methods Doppler echocardiographic examination and right heart catheterisation were performed in 37 patients. Invasive PVR was compared with TRV/TVI rvot and TRV/TVI lvot ratios using regression analysis. Two equations were modelled and the results compared with invasive measurements using the Bland-Altman analysis. Using receiver-operating characteristics curve analysis, a cut-off value for the two ratios was generated. Results Correlation coefficients between invasive PVR and TRV/TVI rvot then TRV/TVI lvot were respectively 0.76 and 0.74. Two new equations were found but the Bland-Altman analysis showed wide standard deviations (respectively 3.8 and 3.9 Wood units. A TRV/TVI rvot then TRV/TVI lvot ratio cut-off value of 0.14 had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 57% for the first and a sensitivity of 87% and a specificity of 57% for the second to determine PVR > 2 Wood units. Conclusion Echocardiography is useful for the screening of patients with pulmonary hypertension and PVR > 2 WU. It remains disappointing for accurate assessment of high PVR. TVI lvot may be an alternative to TVI rvot for patients for whom accurate TVI rvot measurement is not possible.

  3. Vascular progenitor cells isolated from human embryonic stem cells give rise to endothelial and smooth muscle like cells and form vascular networks in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Lino S; Gerecht, Sharon; Shieh, Hester F; Watson, Nicki; Rupnick, Maria A; Dallabrida, Susan M; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Langer, Robert

    2007-08-01

    We report that human embryonic stem cells contain a population of vascular progenitor cells that have the ability to differentiate into endothelial-like and smooth muscle (SM)-like cells. Vascular progenitor cells were isolated from EBs grown in suspension for 10 days and were characterized by expression of the endothelial/hematopoietic marker CD34 (CD34+ cells). When these cells are subsequently cultured in EGM-2 (endothelial growth medium) supplemented with vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (50 ng/mL), they give rise to endothelial-like cells characterized by a cobblestone cell morphology, expression of endothelial markers (platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1, CD34, KDR/Flk-1, vascular endothelial cadherin, von Willebrand factor), incorporation of acetylated low-density lipoprotein, and formation of capillary-like structures when placed in Matrigel. In contrast, when CD34+ cells are cultured in EGM-2 supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (50 ng/mL), they give rise to SM-like cells characterized by spindle-shape morphology, expression of SM cell markers (alpha-SM actin, SM myosin heavy chain, calponin, caldesmon, SM alpha-22), and the ability to contract and relax in response to common pharmacological agents such as carbachol and atropine but rarely form capillary-like structures when placed in Matrigel. Implantation studies in nude mice show that both cell types contribute to the formation of human microvasculature. Some microvessels contained mouse blood cells, which indicates functional integration with host vasculature. Therefore, the vascular progenitors isolated from human embryonic stem cells using methods established in the present study could provide a means to examine the mechanisms of endothelial and SM cell development, and they could also provide a potential source of cells for vascular tissue engineering.

  4. Spontaneous Dissection of the Renal Artery in Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS is a rare heterogeneous group of connective tissue disorders. The vascular type (vEDS is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the COL3A1 gene predisposing to premature arterial, intestinal, or uterine rupture. We report a case of a 38-year-old woman with a recent diagnosis of vEDS admitted in the Emergency Department with a suspicion of a pyelonephritis that evolved to a cardiopulmonary arrest. A fatal retroperitoneal hematoma related with a haemorrhagic dissection of the right renal artery was found after emergency surgery. This case highlights the need to be aware of the particular characteristics of vEDS, such as a severe vascular complication that can lead to a fatal outcome.

  5. Effects of high glucose on expression of OPG and RANKL in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Juan Chang; Shao-Jiang Zheng; Tian-Fa Li; Jun-Li Guo; You-Ling Lan; Yue-Qiong Kong; Xin Meng; Xian-Ji Ma; Xiao-Ling Lu; Wei-Ying Lu

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore effect of high glucose on expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of NF-毷B ligand (RANKL) in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. Methods: SD rats were intraperitoneally injected with streptozotocin, OPG and RANKL expression in rat thoracic aortas were detected by immunohistochemical staining. In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) (A7r5), qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis were used to examine the mRNA and protein levels of OPG and RANKL.Results: Our results demonstrated that OPG expression was increased in hyperglycemic rat aortic VSMCs, while RANKL expression was decreased. Besides,in vitroexperiments high glucose induced OPG expression, but depressed RANKL expression by dose- and time-dependent manner in cultured A7r5.Conclusions: Our findings suggested that high glucose could promote the expression of OPG, and inhibit the expression of RANKL in VSMCs, which may be partly be the molecular mechanism of diabetic vascular calcification.

  6. Effects of high glucose on expression of OPG and RANKL in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Juan; Chang; Tian-Fa; Li; Jun-Li; Guo; You-Ling; Lan; Yue-Qiong; Kong; Xin; Meng; Xian-Ji; Ma; Xiao-Ling; Lu; Wei-Ying; Lu; Shao-Jiang; Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To explore effect of high glucose on expression of osteoprotegerin(OPG) and receptor activator of NF- κB ligand(RANKL) in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells.Methods:SD rats were intraperitoneally injected with streptozotocin,OPG and RANKL expression in rat thoracic aortas were detected by immunohistochemical staining.In cultured vascular smooth muscle cells(VSMCs)(A7r5),qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis were used to examine the mRNA and protein levels of OPG and RANKL.Results:Our results demonstrated that OPG expression was increased in hyperglycemic rat aortic VSMCs.while RANKL expression was decreased.Besides,in vitro experiments high glucose induced OPG expression,but depressed RANKL expression by dose- and time-dependent manner in cultured A7r5.Conclusions:Our findings suggested that high glucose could promote the expression of OPG,and inhibit the expression of RANKL in VSMCs,which may be partly be the molecular mechanism of diabetic vascular calcification.

  7. Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate Oxidase-Mediated Redox Signaling and Vascular Remodeling by 16α-Hydroxyestrone in Human Pulmonary Artery Cells: Implications in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Katie Y; Montezano, Augusto C; Harvey, Adam P; Nilsen, Margaret; MacLean, Margaret R; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-09-01

    Estrogen and oxidative stress have been implicated in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Mechanisms linking these systems are elusive. We hypothesized that estrogen metabolite, 16α-hydroxyestrone (16αOHE1), stimulates nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and proliferative responses in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (hPASMCs) and that in PAH aberrant growth signaling promotes vascular remodeling. The pathophysiological significance of estrogen-Nox-dependent processes was studied in female Nox1(-/-) and Nox4(-/-) mice with PAH. PASMCs from control subjects (control hPASMCs) and PAH patients (PAH-hPASMCs) were exposed to estrogen and 16αOHE1 in the presence/absence of inhibitors of Nox, cytochrome P450 1B1, and estrogen receptors. Estrogen, through estrogen receptor-α, increased Nox-derived ROS and redox-sensitive growth in hPASMCs, with greater effects in PAH-hPASMCs versus control hPASMCs. Estrogen effects were inhibited by cytochrome P450 1B1 blockade. 16αOHE1 stimulated transient ROS production in hPASMCs, with sustained responses in PAH-hPASMCs. Basal expression of Nox1/Nox4 was potentiated in PAH-hPASMCs. In hPASMCs, 16αOHE1 increased Nox1 expression, stimulated irreversible oxidation of protein tyrosine phosphatases, decreased nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 activity and expression of nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2-regulated antioxidant genes, and promoted proliferation. This was further amplified in PAH-hPASMCs. Nox1(-/-) but not Nox4(-/-) mice were protected against PAH and vascular remodeling. Our findings demonstrate that in PAH-hPASMCs, 16αOHE1 stimulates redox-sensitive cell growth primarily through Nox1. Supporting this, in vivo studies exhibited protection against pulmonary hypertension and remodeling in Nox1(-/-) mice. This study provides new insights through Nox1/ROS and nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 whereby 16αOHE1 influences

  8. Distinct Effects of Contraction Agonists on the Phosphorylation State of Cofilin in Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Ping Dai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that agonist-induced contraction correlates with the phospho-cofilin/cofilin (P-CF/CF ratio in pulmonary artery (PA rings and cultured smooth muscle cells (PASMCs. PA rings were used for isometric contractions and along with PASMCs for assay of P-CF/CF by isoelectric focusing and immunoblotting. The P-CF/CF measured 22.5% in PA and differentiated PASMCs, but only 14.8% in undifferentiated PASMCs. With comparable contraction responses in PA, endothelin-1 (100 nM and norepinephrine (1 μM induced a 2-fold increase of P-CF/CF, while angiotensin II (1 μM induced none. All agonists activated Rho-kinase and LIMK2, and activation was eliminated by inhibition of Rho-kinase. Microcystin LF (20 nM potentiated the angiotensin II, but not the 5-hydroxytryptamine (1 μM-mediated increase of P-CF/CF. In conclusion, all tested agonists activate the Rho-kinase-LIMK pathway and increase P-CF/CF. Angiotensin II activates PP2A and counteracts the LIMK-mediated CF phosphorylation. CF phosphorylation stabilizes peripheral actin structures and may contribute to the maximal contraction of PA.

  9. Iroquois homeobox transcription factor (Irx5) promotes G1/S-phase transition in vascular smooth muscle cells by CDK2-dependent activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Pattabiraman, Vaishnavi; Bacanamwo, Methode; Anderson, Leonard M

    2016-08-01

    The Iroquois homeobox (Irx5) gene is essential in embryonic development and cardiac electrophysiology. Although recent studies have reported that IRX5 protein is involved in regulation of the cell cycle and apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, little is known about the role of IRX5 in the adult vasculature. Here we report novel observations on the role of IRX5 in adult vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) during proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Comparative studies using primary human endothelial cells, VSMCs, and intact carotid arteries to determine relative expression of Irx5 in the peripheral vasculature demonstrate significantly higher expression in VSMCs. Sprague-Dawley rat carotid arteries were subjected to balloon catherization, and the presence of IRX5 was examined by immunohistochemistry after 2 wk. Results indicate markedly elevated IRX5 signal at 14 days compared with uninjured controls. Total RNA was isolated from injured and uninjured arteries, and Irx5 expression was measured by RT-PCR. Results demonstrate a significant increase in Irx5 expression at 3-14 days postinjury compared with controls. Irx5 genetic gain- and loss-of-function studies using thymidine and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation assays resulted in modulation of DNA synthesis in primary rat aortic VSMCs. Quantitative RT-PCR results revealed modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27(kip1)), E2F transcription factor 1 (E2f1), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) expression in Irx5-transduced VSMCs compared with controls. Subsequently, apoptosis was observed and confirmed by morphological observation, caspase-3 cleavage, and enzymatic activation compared with control conditions. Taken together, these results indicate that Irx5 plays an important role in VSMC G1/S-phase cell cycle checkpoint control and apoptosis. PMID:27170637

  10. Increased shear stress inhibits angiogenesis in veins and not arteries during vascular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard-Pelletier, Guillaume; Jahnsen, Espen D; Jones, Elizabeth A V

    2013-01-01

    Vascular development is believed to occur first by vasculogenesis followed by angiogenesis. Though angiogenesis is the formation of new vessels, we found that vascular density actually decreases during this second stage. The onset of the decrease coincided with the entry of erythroblasts into circulation. We therefore measured the level of shear stress at various developmental stages and found that it was inversely proportional to vascular density. To investigate whether shear stress was inhibitory to angiogenesis, we altered shear stress levels either by preventing erythroblasts from entering circulation ("low" shear stress) or by injection of a starch solution to increase the blood plasma viscosity ("high" shear stress). By time-lapse microscopy, we show that reverse intussusception (merging of two vessels) is inversely proportional to the level of shear stress. We also found that angiogenesis (both sprouting and splitting) was inversely proportional to shear stress levels. These effects were specific to the arterial or venous plexus however, such that the effect on reverse intussusception was present only in the arterial plexus and the effect on sprouting only in the venous plexus. We cultured embryos under altered shear stress in the presence of either DAPT, a Notch inhibitor, or DMH1, an inhibitor of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. DAPT treatment phenocopied the inhibition of erythroblast circulation ("low" shear stress) and the effect of DAPT treatment could be partially rescued by injection of starch. Inhibition of the BMP signaling prevented the reduction in vascular density that was observed when starch was injected to increase shear stress levels.

  11. Precise renal artery segmentation for estimation of renal vascular dominant regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenglong; Kagajo, Mitsuru; Nakamura, Yoshihiko; Oda, Masahiro; Yoshino, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Tokunori; Mori, Kensaku

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel renal artery segmentation method combining graph-cut and template-based tracking methods and its application to estimation of renal vascular dominant region. For the purpose of giving a computer assisted diagnose for kidney surgery planning, it is important to obtain the correct topological structures of renal artery for estimation of renal vascular dominant regions. Renal artery has a low contrast, and its precise extraction is a difficult task. Previous method utilizing vesselness measure based on Hessian analysis, still cannot extract the tiny blood vessels in low-contrast area. Although model-based methods including superellipsoid model or cylindrical intensity model are low-contrast sensitive to the tiny blood vessels, problems including over-segmentation and poor bifurcations detection still remain. In this paper, we propose a novel blood vessel segmentation method combining a new Hessian-based graph-cut and template modeling tracking method. Firstly, graph-cut algorithm is utilized to obtain the rough segmentation result. Then template model tracking method is utilized to improve the accuracy of tiny blood vessel segmentation result. Rough segmentation utilizing graph-cut solves the bifurcations detection problem effectively. Precise segmentation utilizing template model tracking focuses on the segmentation of tiny blood vessels. By combining these two approaches, our proposed method segmented 70% of the renal artery of 1mm in diameter or larger. In addition, we demonstrate such precise segmentation can contribute to divide renal regions into a set of blood vessel dominant regions utilizing Voronoi diagram method.

  12. Andrographolide Inhibits Nuclear Factor-κB Activation through JNK-Akt-p65 Signaling Cascade in Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Stimulated Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Ying Chen; Ming-Jen Hsu; Cheng-Ying Hsieh; Lin-Wen Lee; Zhih-Cherng Chen; Joen-Rong Sheu

    2014-01-01

    Critical vascular inflammation leads to vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases, including abdominal aortic aneurysms, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Andrographolide is the most active and critical constituent isolated from the leaves of Andrographis paniculata, a herbal medicine widely used for treating anti-inflammation in Asia. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of the inhibitory effects of andrographolide in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) exposed to a proinfl...

  13. UDP acts as a growth factor for vascular smooth muscle cells by activation of P2Y(6) receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Mingyan; Harden, T Kendall; Kuhn, Cynthia M;

    2002-01-01

    Mitogenic effects of the extracellular nucleotides ATP and UTP are mediated by P2Y(1), P2Y(2), and P2Y(4) receptors. However, it has not been possible to examine the highly expressed UDP-sensitive P2Y(6) receptor because of the lack of stable, selective agonists. In rat aorta smooth muscle cells...... (vascular smooth muscle cells; VSMC), UDP and UTP stimulated (3)H-labeled thymidine incorporation with similar pEC(50) values (5.96 and 5.69). Addition of hexokinase did not reduce the mitogenic effect of UDP. In cells transfected with P2Y receptors the stable pyrimidine agonist uridine 5'-O-(2...

  14. Effects of 3, 4-Dihydroxyacetophenone on Cytosolic Calcium in Pulmonary Artery Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cells during Acute Hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Farmanullah Wazir; WANG Dixun(王迪浔); HU Qinghua(胡清华)

    2004-01-01

    The effects of 3, 4-Dihydroxyacetophenone (3, 4-DHAP) on cytosolic free calcium[Ca2+ ]i in pulmonary artery endothelia (PAECs) and smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) during acute hypoxia were studied. Porcine pulmonary artery endothelial and smooth muscle cells (PASMCs)were cultured primarily, and they were divided into 4 groups: groups incubated under normoxia or hypoxia and those with or without treatment with 3, 4-DHAP. The [Ca2+ ]i of both PAECs and PASMCs was measured by determining the fluorescence of fura 2 AM on spetrofluorometer. Our results showed that hypoxia caused significant elevation of [Ca2+ ]i, in both PAECs and PASMCs,3, 4-DHAP could attenuate the hypoxic elevation of [Ca2+ ]i only in PASMCs but not in PAECs. It is concluded that 3, 4-DHAP decreases the hypoxic elevation of [Ca2+ ]i in PASMCs. This might contribute to its inhibitory effect on hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

  15. Detection of differentially regulated subsarcolemmal calcium signals activated by vasoactive agonists in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Subedi, Krishna P; Paudel, Omkar; Sham, James S.K.

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) plays pivotal roles in distinct cellular functions through global and local signaling in various subcellular compartments, and subcellular Ca2+ signal is the key factor for independent regulation of different cellular functions. In vascular smooth muscle cells, subsarcolemmal Ca2+ is an important regulator of excitation-contraction coupling, and nucleoplasmic Ca2+ is crucial for excitation-transcription coupling. However, information on Ca2+ signals in these subce...

  16. Endovascular treatment of a ruptured pulmonary artery aneurysm in a patient with Behcet's disease using the amplatzer vascular plug 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pulmonary artery aneurysm is a common manifestation and the leading cause of mortality in Behcet's disease. We describe a case of spontaneous rupture of a pulmonary artery aneurysm that, due to the inadequacy of medical therapy and the disadvantages of surgery, became the ideal candidate for endovascular management and was successfully performed by using the Amplatzer Vascular Plug 4.

  17. Sirolimus blocks the accumulation of hyaluronan (HA) by arterial smooth muscle cells and reduces monocyte adhesion to the ECM

    OpenAIRE

    Gouëffic, Yann; Potter-Perigo, Susan; Chan, Christina K.; Johnson, Pamela Y.; Braun, Kathleen; Evanko, Steven P.; Wight, Thomas N.

    2006-01-01

    Sirolimus (SRL), an inhibitor of human arterial smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation and migration, prevents in-stent restenosis (ISR). Little is known about the effect of SRL on the extracellular matrix (ECM) component, hyaluronan, a key macromolecule in neointimal hyperplasia and inflammation. In this study, we investigated SRL regulation of the synthesis of hyaluronan by cultured human ASMC and the effect of SRL on hyaluronan mediated monocyte adhesion to the ECM. Hyaluronan production ...

  18. Embolization of Life-Threatening Arterial Rupture in Patients with Vascular Ehlers–Danlos Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Takuya, E-mail: okabone@gmail.com [Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Interventional Radiology Department (France); Frank, Michael, E-mail: michael.frank@egp.aphp.fr [Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Rare Vascular Diseases Reference Center (France); Pellerin, Olivier, E-mail: olivier@pellerin.as; Primio, Massimiliano Di, E-mail: massimiliano.di.primio@gmail.com; Angelopoulos, Georgios, E-mail: giorginos78@msn.com [Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Interventional Radiology Department (France); Boughenou, Marie-Fazia, E-mail: marie-fazia.boughenou@egp.aphp.fr [Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Anesthesia and Surgical Intensive Care Unit (France); Pagny, Jean-Yves, E-mail: jean-yves.pagny@egp.aphp.fr [Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Interventional Radiology Department (France); Messas, Emmanuel, E-mail: emmanuel.messas@egp.aphp.fr [Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Rare Vascular Diseases Reference Center (France); Sapoval, Marc, E-mail: marc.sapoval2@egp.aphp.fr [Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, Interventional Radiology Department (France)

    2013-05-09

    PurposeTo evaluate the safety and efficacy of transarterial embolization of life-threatening arterial rupture in patients with vascular Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (vEDS) in a single tertiary referral center.MethodsWe retrospectively analyzed transarterial embolization for vEDS performed at our institution from 2000 to 2012. The indication of embolization was spontaneous arterial rupture or pseudoaneurysm with acute bleeding. All interventions used a percutaneous approach through a 5F or less introducer sheath. Embolic agents were microcoils and glue in 3 procedures, glue alone in 2, and microcoils alone in 2.ResultsFive consecutive vEDS patients were treated by 7 embolization procedures (4 women, mean age 29.8 years). All procedures were successfully performed. Two patients required a second procedure for newly arterial lesions at a different site from the first procedure. Four of the five patients were still alive after a mean follow-up of 19.4 (range 1–74.7) months. One patient died of multiple organ failure 2 days after procedure. Minor procedural complications were observed in 3 procedures (43 %), all directly managed during the same session. Remote arterial lesions occurred after 3 procedures (43 %); one underwent a second embolization, and the other 2 were observed conservatively. Puncture site complication was observed in only one procedure (14 %).ConclusionEmbolization for vEDS is a safe and effective method to manage life-threatening arterial rupture.

  19. Smooth muscle cell function and organization of the resistance artery wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Güvenç Tuna

    2014-01-01

    Remodeling of the vascular wall occurs in several cardiovascular pathologies. A structural change in diameter necessarily involves reorganization in both cellular and extracellular matrix components. The significance of matrix remodeling in vascular pathologies is well appreciated, while plasticity

  20. Adrenomedullin and adrenotensin regulate collagen synthesis and proliferation in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, W. [School of Control Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Kong, Q.Y.; Zhao, C.F. [Department of Pediatrics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Zhao, F. [Department of Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY (United States); Li, F.H.; Xia, W. [Department of Pediatrics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Wang, R. [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Hu, Y.M. [School of Control Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering Institute, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Hua, M. [Shandong Institute of Scientific and Technical Information, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2013-12-10

    To understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation and extracellular-matrix accumulation in the development of pulmonary hypertension and remodeling, this study determined the effects of different doses of adrenomedullin (ADM) and adrenotensin (ADT) on PASMC proliferation and collagen synthesis. The objective was to investigate whether extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signaling was involved in ADM- and ADT-stimulated proliferation of PASMCs in 4-week-old male Wistar rats (body weight: 100-150 g, n=10). The proliferation of PASMCs was examined by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation. A cell growth curve was generated by the Cell Counting Kit-8 method. Expression of collagen I, collagen III, and phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) was evaluated by immunofluorescence. The effects of different concentrations of ADM and ADT on collagen I, collagen III, and p-ERK1/2 protein expression were determined by immunoblotting. We also investigated the effect of PD98059 inhibition on the expression of p-ERK1/2 protein by immunoblotting. ADM dose-dependently decreased cell proliferation, whereas ADT dose-dependently increased it; and ADM and ADT inhibited each other with respect to their effects on the proliferation of PASMCs. Consistent with these results, the expression of collagen I, collagen III, and p-ERK1/2 in rat PASMCs decreased after exposure to ADM but was upregulated after exposure to ADT. PD98059 significantly inhibited the downregulation by ADM and the upregulation by ADT of p-ERK1/2 expression. We conclude that ADM inhibited, and ADT stimulated, ERK1/2 signaling in rat PASMCs to regulate cell proliferation and collagen expression.

  1. Proteomic analysis of the effect of iptakalim on human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingxia YANG; Zhengxia LIU; Shu ZHANG; Yu JING; Shijiang ZHANG; Weiping XIE; Lei MA; Changliang ZHU; Hong WANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the anti-proliferative effect of iptakalim (Ipt),a newly selective KATP channel opener,in endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) using proteomic analysis.Methods: Human PASMCs were incubated with ET-1 (10-8 mol/L) and ETA (10-8 mol/L) plus iptaklim (10-5 mol/L) for 24 h.Analysis via 2-DE gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS was employed to display the different protein profiles of whole-cell protein from cultures of control,ET-1 treatment alone,and treatment with ET-1 and iptaklim combined.Real time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were used to confirm the proteomic analysis.Results: When iptakalim inhibited the proliferative effect of ET-1 in human PASMCs by opening the KATP channels,the expression of different groups of cellular proteins was changed,including cytoskeleton-associated proteins,plasma mem-brane proteins and receptors,chaperone proteins,ion transport-associated proteins,and glycolytic and metabolism-associ-ated proteins.We found that iptakalim could inhibit the proliferation of human PASMCs partly by affecting the expression of Hsp60,vimentin,nucleoporin P54 (NUP54) and Bcl-XL by opening the KATP channel.Conclusion: The data suggest that a wide range of signaling pathways may be involved in abolishing ET-1-induced prolif-eration of human PASMCs following iptakalim treatment.

  2. Adrenomedullin and adrenotensin regulate collagen synthesis and proliferation in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation and extracellular-matrix accumulation in the development of pulmonary hypertension and remodeling, this study determined the effects of different doses of adrenomedullin (ADM) and adrenotensin (ADT) on PASMC proliferation and collagen synthesis. The objective was to investigate whether extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) signaling was involved in ADM- and ADT-stimulated proliferation of PASMCs in 4-week-old male Wistar rats (body weight: 100-150 g, n=10). The proliferation of PASMCs was examined by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine incorporation. A cell growth curve was generated by the Cell Counting Kit-8 method. Expression of collagen I, collagen III, and phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) was evaluated by immunofluorescence. The effects of different concentrations of ADM and ADT on collagen I, collagen III, and p-ERK1/2 protein expression were determined by immunoblotting. We also investigated the effect of PD98059 inhibition on the expression of p-ERK1/2 protein by immunoblotting. ADM dose-dependently decreased cell proliferation, whereas ADT dose-dependently increased it; and ADM and ADT inhibited each other with respect to their effects on the proliferation of PASMCs. Consistent with these results, the expression of collagen I, collagen III, and p-ERK1/2 in rat PASMCs decreased after exposure to ADM but was upregulated after exposure to ADT. PD98059 significantly inhibited the downregulation by ADM and the upregulation by ADT of p-ERK1/2 expression. We conclude that ADM inhibited, and ADT stimulated, ERK1/2 signaling in rat PASMCs to regulate cell proliferation and collagen expression

  3. Screening of Active Compounds from Gastrodia elata Blume for Vascular Smooth Muscle Relaxation%云南昭通天麻松弛血管平滑肌活性成分的筛选

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张维明; 杨莲; 李秀芳; 林青; 李国花; 魏文彬

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To study the vascular smooth muscle relaxation effect and explicit the material base of Gastrodia elata Blume. Method:Tension recording for rat isolated aortic artery was used to study the effect of vascular smooth muscle relaxation. Column chromatography and mass spectrography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry were used to isolate and identify the active compounds of G. elata Blume. Result: G. elata Blume.could significantly inhibit the smooth muscle constriction of isolated aortic artery induced by KCI. Five esterified phenolic compounds ( Ⅰ-Ⅴ ) were isolated from G. elata Blume, such as p-hydroxybenz aldehyde ( Ⅰ ); phydroxybenzyl methylether ( Ⅱ ); p-hydroxybenzyl alcohol ( Ⅲ ); 4,4'-dihydroxydiphenyl methane ( Ⅳ ); 4,4'-dihydroxydibenzyl ether( Ⅴ ). The results showed that the vascular smooth muscle relaxation effects were the result of the role of five compounds. Conclusion: The five esterified phenolic compounds ( Ⅰ - Ⅴ ) from G. elata Blume.play a combined role for vascular smooth muscle relaxation.%目的:观察天麻血管平滑肌松弛作用,明确其作用物质基础.方法:采用大鼠离体胸主动脉环灌流实验方法,对天麻血管平滑肌松弛作用进行考察,采用柱色谱法、光谱法(MS,NMR)对其活性成分进行了分离鉴定.结果:天麻能够显著抑制KCl引起的大鼠胸主动脉环收缩,从天麻乙酸乙酯提取物中分离并鉴定了5个酯溶性酚性成分(Ⅰ~Ⅴ):对羟基苯甲醛(Ⅰ)、对羟苄基甲醚(Ⅱ)、对羟基苯甲醇(Ⅲ)、4,4'-二羟基二苯基甲烷(Ⅳ),4,4-二羟基二苄醚(Ⅴ),明确了天麻的血管平滑肌松弛作用是这5个成分共同作用的结果.结论:天麻具有显著的血管平滑肌松弛作用,其作用主要由5个酯溶性酚性成分共同发挥.

  4. Graded effects of unregulated smooth muscle myosin on intestinal architecture, intestinal motility and vascular function in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Abrams

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle contraction is controlled by the regulated activity of the myosin heavy chain ATPase (Myh11. Myh11 mutations have diverse effects in the cardiovascular, digestive and genitourinary systems in humans and animal models. We previously reported a recessive missense mutation, meltdown (mlt, which converts a highly conserved tryptophan to arginine (W512R in the rigid relay loop of zebrafish Myh11. The mlt mutation disrupts myosin regulation and non-autonomously induces invasive expansion of the intestinal epithelium. Here, we report two newly identified missense mutations in the switch-1 (S237Y and coil-coiled (L1287M domains of Myh11 that fail to complement mlt. Cell invasion was not detected in either homozygous mutant but could be induced by oxidative stress and activation of oncogenic signaling pathways. The smooth muscle defect imparted by the mlt and S237Y mutations also delayed intestinal transit, and altered vascular function, as measured by blood flow in the dorsal aorta. The cell-invasion phenotype induced by the three myh11 mutants correlated with the degree of myosin deregulation. These findings suggest that the vertebrate intestinal epithelium is tuned to the physical state of the surrounding stroma, which, in turn, governs its response to physiologic and pathologic stimuli. Genetic variants that alter the regulation of smooth muscle myosin might be risk factors for diseases affecting the intestine, vasculature, and other tissues that contain smooth muscle or contractile cells that express smooth muscle proteins, particularly in the setting of redox stress.

  5. Involvement of calcium-sensing receptors in hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension by promoting phenotypic modulation of small pulmonary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xue; Li, Hong-Xia; Shao, Hong-Jiang; Li, Guang-Wei; Sun, Jian; Xi, Yu-Hui; Li, Hong-Zhu; Wang, Xin-Yan; Wang, Li-Na; Bai, Shu-Zhi; Zhang, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Li; Yang, Guang-Dong; Wu, Ling-Yun; Wang, Rui; Xu, Chang-Qing

    2014-11-01

    Phenotype modulation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) plays an important role during hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension (PAH). We had previously shown that calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is expressed in rat PASMCs. However, little is known about the role of CaSR in phenotypic modulation of PASMCs in hypoxia-induced PAH as well as the underlying mechanisms. In this study, we investigated whether CaSR induces the proliferation of PASMCs in small pulmonary arteries from both rats and human with PAH. PAH was induced by exposing rats to hypoxia for 7-21 days. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), right ventricular hypertrophy index (RVI), the percentage of medial wall thickness to the external diameter (WT %), and cross-sectional total vessel wall area to the total area (WA %) of small pulmonary arteries were determined by hematoxylin and eosin (HE), masson trichrome and Weigert's staining. The protein expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-3, CaSR, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK), and smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype marker proteins in rat small pulmonary arteries, including calponin, SMα-actin (SMAα), and osteopontin (OPN), were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting, respectively. In addition, immunohistochemistry was applied to paraffin-embedded human tissues from lungs of normal human and PAH patients with chronic heart failure (PAH/CHF). Compared with the control group, mPAP, RVI, WT % and WA % in PAH rats were gradually increased with the prolonged hypoxia. At the same time, the expressions of CaSR, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-3, PCNA, OPN, and p-ERK were markedly increased, while the expressions of SMAα and calponin were significantly reduced in lung tissues or small pulmonary arteries of PAH rats. Neomycin (an agonist of CaSR) enhanced but NPS2390 (an

  6. Modification of intracellular free calcium in cultured A10 vascular smooth muscle cells by exogenous phosphatidic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhugra, Praveen; Xu, Yan-Jun; Rathi, Satyajeet; Dhalla, Naranjan S

    2003-06-15

    Exogenous phosphatidic acid (PA) was observed to produce a concentration-dependent increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in cultured A10 vascular smooth muscle cells. Preincubation of cells with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors (cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin), a phospholipase C inhibitor (2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl-N,N-diphenylcarbamate), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor antagonists (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and xestospongin), and an activator of protein kinase C (PKC) (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) depressed the PA-evoked increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Although EGTA, an extracellular Ca(2+) chelator, decreased the PA-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i), sarcolemmal Ca(2+)-channel blockers (verapamil or diltiazem) did not alter the action of PA. On the other hand, inhibitors of PKC (bisindolylmaleimide I) and G(i)-protein (pertussis toxin) potentiated the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) evoked by PA significantly. These results suggest that the PA-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in vascular smooth muscle cells may occur upon the activation of phospholipase C and the subsequent release of Ca(2+) from the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive Ca(2+) pool in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This action of PA may be mediated through the involvement of PKC. PMID:12787890

  7. Modification of intracellular free calcium in cultured A10 vascular smooth muscle cells by exogenous phosphatidic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhugra, Praveen; Xu, Yan-Jun; Rathi, Satyajeet; Dhalla, Naranjan S

    2003-06-15

    Exogenous phosphatidic acid (PA) was observed to produce a concentration-dependent increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in cultured A10 vascular smooth muscle cells. Preincubation of cells with sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors (cyclopiazonic acid and thapsigargin), a phospholipase C inhibitor (2-nitro-4-carboxyphenyl-N,N-diphenylcarbamate), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor antagonists (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and xestospongin), and an activator of protein kinase C (PKC) (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) depressed the PA-evoked increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Although EGTA, an extracellular Ca(2+) chelator, decreased the PA-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i), sarcolemmal Ca(2+)-channel blockers (verapamil or diltiazem) did not alter the action of PA. On the other hand, inhibitors of PKC (bisindolylmaleimide I) and G(i)-protein (pertussis toxin) potentiated the increase in [Ca(2+)](i) evoked by PA significantly. These results suggest that the PA-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in vascular smooth muscle cells may occur upon the activation of phospholipase C and the subsequent release of Ca(2+) from the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive Ca(2+) pool in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This action of PA may be mediated through the involvement of PKC.

  8. Chinese Yellow Wine Inhibit Production of Homocysteine-induced Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 in Cultured Rat Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Regular consumption of moderate amounts of Chinese yellow wine is associated with a reduced risk of coronary disease.Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that participate in extracellular matrix degradation have been involved in atherosclerotic plaque growth and instability. The present research aimed to study the effects of Chinese yellow wine on the production of homocysteineinduced extracellular MMP-2 in cultured rats' vascular smooth muscle cells. Methods The effects of different homocysteine levels (0-1000 μmol/l) on MMP-2 production, and the effects of Chinese yellow wine with low alcohol concentrations (12-19% ) on homocysteine-induced MMP-2 in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were examined using gelatin zymography and western blotting. The changes of MMP-2 under various treatments for 12h, 24h and 48 h were further compared. Results Homocysteine (50-1000 μmol/l) increased the production of MMP-2 significantly in a dose-dependent manner. Increased production of MMP-2 induced by homocysteine was reduced by extracellularly added Chinese yellow wine.Production of MMP-2 under various treatments for 48 h increased more than 12 h and 24 h. Conclusions Extracellularly added Chinese yellow wine decreased homocysteine-induced MMP-2 secretion. The inhibitory effect of yellow wine on the activation of MMP-2 might contribute to their beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system.

  9. Rosiglitzone suppresses angiotensin II-induced production of KLF5 and cell proliferation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

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    Dengfeng Gao

    Full Text Available Krüppel-like factor (KLF 5, which initiates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC proliferation, also participates in Angiotensin (Ang II-induced vascular remodeling. The protective effect of rosiglitazone on vascular remodeling may be due to their impact on VSMC proliferation. However, the underlying mechanisms involved remain unclear. This study was designed to investigate whether the antiproliferation effects of rosiglitazone are mediated by regulating Ang II/KLF5 response. We found that, in aortas of Ang II-infused rats, vascular remodeling and KLF5 expression were markedly increased, and its target gene cyclin D1 was overexpressed. Co-treatment with rosiglitazone diminished these changes. In growth-arrested VSMCs, PPAR-γ agonists (rosiglitazone and 15d-PGJ2 dose-dependently inhibited Ang II-induced cell proliferation and expression of KLF5 and cyclin D1. Moreover, these effects were attenuated by the PPAR-γ antagonists GW9662, bisphenol A diglycidyl ether and PPAR-γ specific siRNA. Furthermore, rosiglitazone inhibited Ang II-induced phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC ζ and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2 and activation of early growth response protein (Egr. In conclusion, in Ang II-stimulated VSMCs, rosiglitazone might have an antiproliferative effect through mechanisms that include reducing KLF5 expression, and a crosstalk between PPAR-γ and PKCζ/ERK1/2/Egr may be involved in. These findings not only provide a previously unrecognized mechanism by which PPAR-γ agonists inhibit VSMC proliferation, but also document a novel evidence for the beneficial vascular effect of PPAR-γ activation.

  10. Rosiglitzone Suppresses Angiotensin II-Induced Production of KLF5 and Cell Proliferation in Rat Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dengfeng; Hao, Guanghua; Meng, Zhe; Ning, Ning; Yang, Guang; Liu, Zhongwei; Dong, Xin; Niu, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor (KLF) 5, which initiates vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, also participates in Angiotensin (Ang) II-induced vascular remodeling. The protective effect of rosiglitazone on vascular remodeling may be due to their impact on VSMC proliferation. However, the underlying mechanisms involved remain unclear. This study was designed to investigate whether the antiproliferation effects of rosiglitazone are mediated by regulating Ang II/KLF5 response. We found that, in aortas of Ang II-infused rats, vascular remodeling and KLF5 expression were markedly increased, and its target gene cyclin D1 was overexpressed. Co-treatment with rosiglitazone diminished these changes. In growth-arrested VSMCs, PPAR-γ agonists (rosiglitazone and 15d-PGJ2) dose-dependently inhibited Ang II-induced cell proliferation and expression of KLF5 and cyclin D1. Moreover, these effects were attenuated by the PPAR-γ antagonists GW9662, bisphenol A diglycidyl ether and PPAR-γ specific siRNA. Furthermore, rosiglitazone inhibited Ang II-induced phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC) ζ and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and activation of early growth response protein (Egr). In conclusion, in Ang II-stimulated VSMCs, rosiglitazone might have an antiproliferative effect through mechanisms that include reducing KLF5 expression, and a crosstalk between PPAR-γ and PKCζ/ERK1/2/Egr may be involved in. These findings not only provide a previously unrecognized mechanism by which PPAR-γ agonists inhibit VSMC proliferation, but also document a novel evidence for the beneficial vascular effect of PPAR-γ activation. PMID:25874449

  11. Cyclic Stretch Induces Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase and Soluble Guanylate Cyclase in Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells

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    Kathryn N. Farrow

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the pulmonary vasculature, mechanical forces such as cyclic stretch induce changes in vascular signaling, tone and remodeling. Nitric oxide is a potent regulator of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC, which drives cGMP production, causing vasorelaxation. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs express inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, and while iNOS expression increases during late gestation, little is known about how cyclic stretch impacts this pathway. In this study, PASMC were subjected to cyclic stretch of 20% amplitude and frequency of 1 Hz for 24 h and compared to control cells maintained under static conditions. Cyclic stretch significantly increased cytosolic oxidative stress as compared to static cells (62.9 ± 5.9% vs. 33.3 ± 5.7% maximal oxidation, as measured by the intracellular redox sensor roGFP. Cyclic stretch also increased sGCβ protein expression (2.5 ± 0.9-fold, sGC activity (1.5 ± 0.2-fold and cGMP levels (1.8 ± 0.2-fold, as well as iNOS mRNA and protein expression (3.0 ± 0.9 and 2.6 ± 0.7-fold, respectively relative to control cells. An antioxidant, recombinant human superoxide dismutase (rhSOD, significantly decreased stretch-induced cytosolic oxidative stress, but did not block stretch-induced sGC activity. Inhibition of iNOS with 1400 W or an iNOS-specific siRNA inhibited stretch-induced sGC activity by 30% and 68% respectively vs. static controls. In conclusion, cyclic stretch increases sGC expression and activity in an iNOS-dependent manner in PASMC from fetal lambs. The mechanism that produces iNOS and sGC upregulation is not yet known, but we speculate these effects represent an early compensatory mechanism to counteract the effects of stretch-induced oxidative stress. A better understanding of the interplay between these two distinct pathways could provide key insights into future avenues to treat infants with pulmonary hypertension.

  12. Apelin-13 inhibits large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels in cerebral artery smooth muscle cells via a PI3-kinase dependent mechanism.

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    Amit Modgil

    Full Text Available Apelin-13 causes vasoconstriction by acting directly on APJ receptors in vascular smooth muscle (VSM cells; however, the ionic mechanisms underlying this action at the cellular level remain unclear. Large-conductance Ca(2+-activated K(+ (BKCa channels in VSM cells are critical regulators of membrane potential and vascular tone. In the present study, we examined the effect of apelin-13 on BK(Ca channel activity in VSM cells, freshly isolated from rat middle cerebral arteries. In whole-cell patch clamp mode, apelin-13 (0.001-1 μM caused concentration-dependent inhibition of BK(Ca in VSM cells. Apelin-13 (0.1 µM significantly decreased BK(Ca current density from 71.25 ± 8.14 pA/pF to 44.52 ± 7.10 pA/pF (n=14 cells, P<0.05. This inhibitory effect of apelin-13 was confirmed by single channel recording in cell-attached patches, in which extracellular application of apelin-13 (0.1 µM decreased the open-state probability (NPo of BK(Ca channels in freshly isolated VSM cells. However, in inside-out patches, extracellular application of apelin-13 (0.1 µM did not alter the NPo of BK(Ca channels, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of apelin-13 on BKCa is not mediated by a direct action on BK(Ca. In whole cell patches, pretreatment of VSM cells with LY-294002, a PI3-kinase inhibitor, markedly attenuated the apelin-13-induced decrease in BK(Ca current density. In addition, treatment of arteries with apelin-13 (0.1 µM significantly increased the ratio of phosphorylated-Akt/total Akt, indicating that apelin-13 significantly increases PI3-kinase activity. Taken together, the data suggest that apelin-13 inhibits BK(Ca channel via a PI3-kinase-dependent signaling pathway in cerebral artery VSM cells, which may contribute to its regulatory action in the control of vascular tone.

  13. Doxorubicin-induced vasomotion and [Ca~(2+)]_i elevation in vascular smooth muscle cells from C57BL/6 mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing SHEN; Chun-ling YE; Kai-he YE; Lan ZHUANG; Jia-hua JIANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To explore the action of doxorubicin on vascular smooth muscle cells.Methods: Isometric tension of denuded or intact thoracic aortic vessels was recorded and [Ca~(2+)]_i in isolated aortic smooth muscle cells was measured by using Fluo-3.Results: Doxorubicin induced phasic and tonic contractions in denuded vessels and increased levels of [Ca~(2+)]_i in single muscle cells. Treatment with 10 μmol/L ryanodine had no effect on basal tension, but it did abolish doxorubicin-induced phasic contraction. Treatment with 10 mmol/L caffeine induced a transient phasic contraction only, and the effect was not significantly altered by ryanodine, the omission of extracellular Ca~(2+) or both. Phenylephrine induced rhythmic contraction (RC) in intact vessels. Treatment with 100 μmol/L doxorubicin enhanced RC amplitude, but 1 mmol/L doxorubicin abolished RC, with an increase in maximal tension. Caffeine at 100 μmol/L increased the frequency of the RC only. In the presence of 100 μmol/L caffeine, however, 100 μmol/L doxorubicin abolished the RC and decreased its maximal tension. Treatment with 10 μmol/L ryanodine abolished the RC, with an increase in the maximal tension. In Ca~(2+)-free solution, doxorubicin induced a transient [Ca~(2+)]_i increase that could be abolished by ryanodine pretreatment in single muscle cells. The doxorubicin-induced increase in [Ca~(2+)]_i was suppressed by nifedipine and potentiated by ryanodine and cha-rybdotoxin.Conclusion: Doxorubicin not only releases Ca~(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum but also promotes the entry of extracellular Ca~(2+) into vascular smooth muscle cells.

  14. Leptin augments recruitment of IRF-1 and CREB to thrombospondin-1 gene promoter in vascular smooth muscle cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Soumyadip; Ganguly, Rituparna; Raman, Priya

    2016-08-01

    We previously reported that high pathophysiological concentrations of leptin, the adipocyte-secreted peptide, upregulate the expression of a potent proatherogenic matricellular protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), in vascular smooth muscle cells. Moreover, this regulation was found to occur at the level of transcription; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. The goal of the present study was to investigate the specific transcriptional mechanisms that mediate upregulation of TSP-1 expression by leptin. Primary human aortic smooth muscle cell cultures were transiently transfected with different TSP-1 gene (THBS1) promoter-linked luciferase reporter constructs, and luciferase activity in response to leptin (100 ng/ml) was assessed. We identified a long THBS1 promoter (-1270/+750) fragment with specific leptin response elements that are required for increased TSP-1 transcription by leptin. Promoter analyses, protein/DNA array and gel shift assays demonstrated activation and association of transcription factors, interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), to the distal fragment of the THBS1 promoter in response to leptin. Supershift, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and coimmunoprecipitation assays revealed formation of a single complex between IRF-1 and CREB in response to leptin; importantly, recruitment of this complex to the THBS1 promoter mediated leptin-induced TSP-1 transcription. Finally, binding sequence decoy oligomer and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that regulatory elements for both IRF-1 (-1019 to -1016) and CREB (-1198 to -1195), specific to the distal THBS1 promoter, were required for leptin-induced TSP-1 transcription. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that leptin promotes a cooperative association between IRF-1 and CREB on the THBS1 promoter driving TSP-1 transcription in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:27281481

  15. An Egr-1-specific DNAzyme regulates Egr-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, JUNBIAO; GUO, CHANGLEI; WANG, RAN; HUANG, LULI; LIANG, WANQIAN; LIU, RUNNAN; SUN, BING

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to transfect rat aortic smooth muscle cells with an early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1)-specific DNAzyme (ED5), to observe its effect on Egr-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression and to elucidate the mechanism of ED5-mediated inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. VSMCs in primary culture obtained by tissue block adhesion were identified by morphological observation and α smooth muscle actin (α-SM-actin) immunocytochemistry. The cells were then transfected with ED5 or scrambled ED5 (ED5SCR). The three groups of cells used in the present study were the control group, ED5 group and ED5SCR group. The expression levels of Egr-1 and PCNA protein were detected following transfection by analyzing and calculating the integral optical density value in each group. Primary culture of VSMCs and transfection of ED5 and ED5SCR were successfully accomplished. Following stimulation with 10% fetal calf serum, the Egr-1 protein was expressed most strongly at 1 h and demonstrated a declining trend over time; the expression of PCNA protein began at 4 h, peaked at 24 h and then demonstrated a slightly declining trend over time. Compared with the control group and the ED5SCR group, ED5 inhibited the expression of Egr-1 and PCNA (P<0.05). ED5 was able to inhibit the expression of Egr-1 and PCNA proteins in VSMCs to a certain extent and VSMC proliferation in vitro. DNAzyme gene therapy may be useful as a new method for treating vascular proliferative diseases, including atherosclerosis and restenosis. PMID:23737882

  16. Activation of the retinoid X receptor modulates angiotensin II-induced smooth muscle gene expression and inflammation in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Allison M B; Montford, John R; Horita, Henrick; Ostriker, Allison C; Weiser-Evans, Mary C M; Nemenoff, Raphael A; Furgeson, Seth B

    2014-11-01

    The retinoid X receptor (RXR) partners with numerous nuclear receptors, such as the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) family, liver X receptors (LXRs), and farnesoid X receptor (FXR). Although each heterodimer can be activated by specific ligands, a subset of these receptors, defined as permissive nuclear receptors, can also be activated by RXR agonists known as rexinoids. Many individual RXR heterodimers have beneficial effects in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Because rexinoids can potently activate multiple RXR pathways, we hypothesized that treating SMCs with rexinoids would more effectively reverse the pathophysiologic effects of angiotensin II than an individual heterodimer agonist. Cultured rat aortic SMCs were pretreated with either an RXR agonist (bexarotene or 9-cis retinoic acid) or vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide) for 24 hours before stimulation with angiotensin II. Compared with dimethylsulfoxide, bexarotene blocked angiotensin II-induced SM contractile gene induction (calponin and smooth muscle-α-actin) and protein synthesis ([(3)H]leucine incorporation). Bexarotene also decreased angiotensin II-mediated inflammation, as measured by decreased expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase but not extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) or protein kinase B (Akt) was also blunted by bexarotene. We compared bexarotene to five agonists of nuclear receptors (PPARα, PPARγ, PPARδ, LXR, and FXR). Bexarotene had a greater effect on calponin reduction, MCP-1 inhibition, and p38 MAP kinase inhibition than any individual agonist. PPARγ knockout cells demonstrated blunted responses to bexarotene, indicating that PPARγ is necessary for the effects of bexarotene. These data demonstrate that RXR is a potent modulator of angiotensin II-mediated responses in the vasculature, partially through inhibition of p38. PMID:25169989

  17. Intracellular Angiotensin II and cell growth of vascular smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipeanu, CM; Henning, RH; de Zeeuw, D; Nelemans, A

    2001-01-01

    1 We recently demonstrated that intracellular application of Angiotensin II (Angiotensin IIintr) induces rat aorta contraction independent of plasma membrane Angiotensin II receptors. In this study we investigated the effects of Angiotensin IIintr on cell growth in A7r5 smooth muscle cells. 2 DNA-sy

  18. Static pressure drives proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells via caveolin-1/ERK1/2 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Di-xian, E-mail: luodixian_2@163.com [Division of Pharmacoproteomics, Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Research Center of Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); The First People' s Hospital of Chenzhou City, Chenzhou, Hunan 421001 (China); Cheng, Jiming [Internal Medicine and SimmonsCooper Cancer Institute, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 911 N. Rutledge Street, Springfield, IL 62794-9626 (United States); Suzhou Health College of Technology, 20 Shuyuanxiang, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215002 (China); Xiong, Yan [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutics, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Li, Junmo [Division of Pharmacoproteomics, Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Research Center of Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); Xia, Chenglai [Division of Pharmacoproteomics, Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Research Center of Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); School of Pharmaceutics, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515 (China); Xu, Canxin; Wang, Chun; Zhu, Bingyang [Division of Pharmacoproteomics, Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Research Center of Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China); Hu, Zhuowei [Institute of Materia Medical, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China); Liao, Duan-fang, E-mail: dfliao66@yahoo.com.cn [Division of Pharmacoproteomics, Institute of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Research Center of Life Science, University of South China, Hengyang, Hunan 421001 (China)

    2010-01-22

    Intimal hyperplasia plays an important role in various types of vascular remodeling. Mechanical forces derived from blood flow are associated with the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). This contributes to many vascular disorders such as hypertension, atherosclerosis and restenosis after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). In this study, we show that static pressure induces the proliferation of VSMC and activates its related signal pathway. VSMC from a rat aorta were treated with different pressures (0, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 mm Hg) in a custom-made pressure incubator for 24 h. The most active proliferation of VSMC was detected at a pressure of 120 mm Hg. VSMC was also incubated under a static pressure of 120 mm Hg for different time intervals (0, 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h). We found that static pressure significantly stimulates VSMC proliferation. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) activation showed a peak at the pressure of 120 mm Hg at 4-h time point. Moreover, caveolin-1 expression was significantly inhibited by rising static pressure. Downregulation of VSMC proliferation could be found after PD98059 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation inhibitor) treatment. Our data also showed that a siRNA-mediated caveolin-1 knock down increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and VSMC proliferation. These results demonstrate that static pressure promotes VSMC proliferation via the Caveolin-1/ERK1/2 pathway.

  19. Mechanical stretch increases MMP-2 production in vascular smooth muscle cells via activation of PDGFR-β/Akt signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyo Won Seo

    Full Text Available Increased blood pressure, leading to mechanical stress on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC, is a known risk factor for vascular remodeling via increased activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP within the vascular wall. This study aimed to identify cell surface mechanoreceptors and intracellular signaling pathways that influence VSMC to produce MMP in response to mechanical stretch (MS. When VSMC was stimulated with MS (0-10% strain, 60 cycles/min, both production and gelatinolytic activity of MMP-2, but not MMP-9, were increased in a force-dependent manner. MS-enhanced MMP-2 expression and activity were inhibited by molecular inhibition of Akt using Akt siRNA as well as by PI3K/Akt inhibitors, LY293002 and AI, but not by MAPK inhibitors such as PD98059, SP600125 and SB203580. MS also increased Akt phosphorylation in VSMC, which was attenuated by AG1295, a PDGF receptor (PDGFR inhibitor, but not by inhibitors for other receptor tyrosine kinase including EGF, IGF, and FGF receptors. Although MS activated PDGFR-α as well as PDGFR-β in VSMC, MS-induced Akt phosphorylation was inhibited by molecular deletion of PDGFR-β using siRNA, but not by inhibition of PDGFR-α. Collectively, our data indicate that MS induces MMP-2 production in VSMC via activation of Akt pathway, that is mediated by activation of PDGFR-β signaling pathways.

  20. Blockade of L-type calcium channel in myocardium and calcium-induced contractions of vascular smooth muscle by by CPU 86017

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-zai DAI; Hui-juan HU; Jing ZHAO; Xue-mei HAO; Dong-mei YANG; Pei-ai ZHOU; Cai-hong WU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To assess the blockade by CPU 86017 on the L-type calcium channels in the myocardium and on the Ca2+related contractions of vascular smooth muscle. METHODS: The whole-cell patch-clamp was applied to investigate the blocking effect of CPU 86017 on the L-type calcium current in isolated guinea pig myocytes and contractions by KC1 or phenylephrine (Phe) of the isolated rat tail arteries were measured. RESULTS: Suppression of the L-type current of the isolated myocytes by CPU 86017 was moderate, in time- and concentration-dependent manner and with no influence on the activation and inactivation curves. The IC50 was 11.5 μmol/L. Suppressive effect of CPU 86017 on vaso-contractions induced by KC1 100 mmol/L, phenylephrine I μmol/Lin KH solution (phase 1),Ca2+ free KH solution ( phase 2), and by addition of CaCI2 into Ca2+-free KH solution (phase 3) were observed. The IC50 to suppress vaso-contractions by calcium entry via the receptor operated channel (ROC) and Voltage-dependent channel (VDC) was 0.324 μmol/L and 16.3 μmol/L, respectively. The relative potency of CPU 86017 to suppress vascular tone by Ca2+ entry through ROC and VDC is 1/187 of prazosin and 1/37 of verapamil, respectively.CONCLUSION: The blocking effects of CPU 86017 on the L-type calcium channel of myocardium and vessel are moderate and non-selective. CPU 86017 is approximately 50 times more potent in inhibiting ROC than VDC.

  1. Role of Na + -K + ATPase enzyme in vascular response of goat ruminal artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathirvel K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the role of Na + , K + - ATPase enzyme in the vascular response of goat ruminal artery. Materials and Methods: Ruminal artery was obtained in chilled aerated modified Krebs-Henseleit solution (KHS from a local slaughterhouse and transported in ice for further processing. The endothelium intact arterial ring was mounted in a thermostatically controlled (37 ± 0.5°C organ bath containing 20 ml of modified KHS (pH 7.4 bubbled with oxygen (95% and CO 2 (5% under 2g tension. An equilibration of 90 min was allowed before addition of drugs into the bath. The responses were recorded isometrically in an automatic organ bath connected to PowerLab data acquisition system. In order to examine intact functional endothelium, ACh (10µM was added on the 5-HT (1.0µM - induced sustained contractile response. Similarly, functional characterization of Na + , K + -ATPase activity was done by K + -induced relaxation (10µM-10mM in the absence and presence of ouabain (0.1µM/ 0.1mM, digoxin (0.1µM and barium (30µM. Results: ACh (10-5 M did not produce any relaxing effect on 5-HT-induced sustained contractile response suggesting that vascular endothelium has no significant influence on the activation of sodium pump by extracellular K + in ruminal artery. Low concentration of Ba 2+ (30 µM (IC 50 : 0.479mM inhibited K + -induced relaxation suggesting K ir (inward rectifier channel in part had role in K + -induced vasodilatation in ruminal artery. Vasorelaxant effect of KCl (10µM-10mM in K + -free medium is also blocked by ouabain (0.1µM and 0.1mM (IC 50 :0.398mM and IC 35 : 1.36mM, but not by digoxin (0.1µM (IC 50 0.234mM suggesting that ouabain sensitive Na + , K + -ATPase isoform is present in the ruminal artery. Conclusion: In the goat ruminal artery functional regulation of sodium pump is partly mediated by K + channel and ouabain sensitive Na + , K + ATPase.

  2. Regulation of vascular tone in rabbit ophthalmic artery: cross talk of endogenous and exogenous gas mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomone, Salvatore; Foresti, Roberta; Villari, Ambra; Giurdanella, Giovanni; Drago, Filippo; Bucolo, Claudio

    2014-12-15

    Nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulphide (H2S) modulate vascular tone. In view of their therapeutic potential for ocular diseases, we examined the effect of exogenous CO and H2S on tone of isolated rabbit ophthalmic artery and their interaction with endogenous and exogenous NO. Ophthalmic artery segments mounted on a wire myograph were challenged with cumulative concentrations of phenylephrine (PE) in the presence or absence of NG-nitro-L-arginine (LNNA) to inhibit production of NO, the CO-releasing molecules CORMs or the H2S-donor GYY4137. The maximal vasoconstriction elicited by PE reached 20-30% of that induced by KCl but was dramatically increased by incubation with LNNA. GYY4137 significantly raised PE-mediated vasoconstriction, but it did not change the response to PE in the presence of LNNA or the relaxation to sodium nitroprusside (SNP). CORMs concentration-dependently inhibited PE-induced constriction, an effect that was synergistic with endogenous NO (reduced by LNNA), but insensitive to blockade of guanylyl cyclase by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3,-α]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ). In vascular tissues cyclic GMP (cGMP) levels seemed reduced by GYY4137 (not significantly), but were not changed by CORM. These data indicate that CO is able per se to relax isolated ophthalmic artery and to synergize with NO, while H2S counteracts the effect of endogenous NO. CO does not stimulate cGMP production in our system, while H2S may reduce cGMP production stimulated by endogenous NO. These findings provide new insights into the complexities of gas interactions in the control of ophthalmic vascular tone, highlighting potential pharmacological targets for ocular diseases. PMID:25451691

  3. Effect of simvastatin on vascular tone in porcine coronary artery: Potential role of the mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almukhtar, H; Garle, M J; Smith, P A; Roberts, R E

    2016-08-15

    Statins induce acute vasorelaxation which may contribute to the overall benefits of statins in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. The mechanism underlying this relaxation is unknown. As statins have been shown to alter mitochondrial function, in this study we investigated the role of mitochondria in the relaxation to simvastatin. Relaxation of porcine coronary artery segments by statins was measured using isolated tissue baths. Mitochondrial activity was determined by measuring changes in rhodamine 123 fluorescence. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were determined in freshly isolated smooth muscle cells with Fluo-4 using standard epifluorescent imaging techniques. Simvastatin, but not pravastatin, produced a slow relaxation of the coronary artery, which was independent of the endothelium. The relaxation was attenuated by the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor rotenone (10μM) and the complex III inhibitor myxothiazol (10μM), or a combination of the two. The complex III inhibitor antimycin A (10μM) produced a similar time-dependent relaxation of the porcine coronary artery, which was attenuated by rotenone. Changes in rhodamine 123 fluorescence showed that simvastatin (10μM) depolarized the membrane potential of mitochondria in both isolated mitochondria and intact blood vessels. Simvastatin and antimycin A both inhibited calcium-induced contractions in isolated blood vessels and calcium influx in smooth muscle cells and this inhibition was prevented by rotenone. In conclusion, simvastatin produces an endothelium-independent relaxation of the porcine coronary artery which is dependent, in part, upon effects on the mitochondria. The effects on the mitochondria may lead to a reduction in calcium influx and hence relaxation of the blood vessel. PMID:27343404

  4. Ansys Fluent versus Sim Vascular for 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics in renal arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumbaraddi, Avinash; Yu, Huidan (Whitney); Sawchuk, Alan; Dalsing, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this clinical-need driven research is to investigate the effect of renal artery stenosis (RAS) on the blood flow and wall shear stress in renal arteries through 4-D patient-specific computational hemodynamics (PSCH) and search for possible critical RASs that significantly alter the pressure gradient across the stenosis by manually varying the size of RAS from 50% to 95%. The identification of the critical RAS is important to understand the contribution of RAS to the overall renal resistance thus appropriate clinical therapy can be determined in order to reduce the hypertension. Clinical CT angiographic data together with Doppler Ultra sound images of an anonymous patient are used serving as the required inputs of the PSCH. To validate the PSCH, we use both Ansys Fluent and Sim Vascular and compare velocity, pressure, and wall-shear stress under identical conditions. Renal Imaging Technology Development Program (RITDP) Grant.

  5. Detecting lower extremity vascular dynamics in patients with peripheral artery disease using diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Michael A.; Kim, Hyun-Keol K.; Kim, In-Kyong; Dayal, Rajeev; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2011-02-01

    Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) affects over 10 million Americans and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. While in many cases the ankle-brachial index (ABI) can be used for diagnosing the disease, this parameter is not dependable in the diabetic and elderly population. These populations tend to have calcified arteries, which leads to elevated ABI values. Dynamic optical tomography (DDOT) promises to overcome the limitations of the current diagnostic techniques and has the potential to initiate a paradigm shift in the diagnosis of vascular disease. We have performed initial pilot studies involving 5 PAD patients and 3 healthy volunteers. The time traces and tomographic reconstruction obtained from measurements on the feet show significant differences between healthy and affected vasculatures. In addition, we found that DOT is capable of identifying PAD in diabetic patients, who are misdiagnosed by the traditional ABI screening.

  6. Vascular reconstruction of a ruptured and infected aneurysm of extracranial carotid artery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Jin-qiu; ZHANG Jian; YIN Ming-di; SHAN Shao-yin; WU Bin; DUAN Zhi-quan; XIN Shi-jie

    2008-01-01

    @@ Extracranial carotid artery aneurysm represents an uncommon vascular condition with relatively higher incidence in China than in the West.1 The complication with infection and rupture is even rarer,but potentially lethal.Management of mis condition is challenging but urgent because of high risks for embolization,generalized sepsis,further expansion,rupture,and life threatening.1,2 We present an exceptional case of carotid aneurysm at bifurcation complicated with rupture and infection and discuss the Dathogenesis and vailOUS aspects of diagnosis and surgical management.

  7. A tissue engineered renovascular graft composed of proteins, polymers, smooth muscle and endothelial cells for renal artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hao; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Zhu, Xiang-Dong; Han, Huifang; Guo, Wen-Yuan; Ful, Zhi-Ren

    2013-08-01

    Endarterectomy and bypass surgery to treat renal artery stenosis are increasingly shunned these days due to high risks of complications during and after the surgery. Striving to find a sound alternative solution, we pioneered the construction of a tissue engineered renovascular graft that could immediately restore the normal blood flow to kidneys and sustain renal functions without suffering restenosis after the surgery. A highly porous scaffold was first constructed by electrospinning polycaprolactone, poliglecaprone, gelatin and elastin, giving the vast majority of non-woven fibers in the scaffold a diameter below 1200 nm. To recapitulate the anatomical and functional signatures of renal arteries, a bi-layer vasculature comprising a smooth muscle layer topped by an endothelial layer was built on the scaffold. The vasculature witnessed a sustained proliferation for up to 10 days in vitro and robustly secreted prostacyclin and endothelin-1, evidencing that the vasculature was functionally comparable to native renal arteries. After 30 days as a renovascular graft in mice, the luminal diameter of the graft remained clear without a restenosis and an increased confluence of the endothelial layer was observed. The tensile test confirmed that the renovascular graft was mechanically superior to native renal arteries and retained this advantage within 30 days in vivo. Also, this renovascular graft sustained renal functions as evidenced by normal levels of serum creatinine, urine creatinine and serum urea nitrogen and the lack of edema in the kidney cortex. These results demonstrate that this renovascular graft holds a great therapeutic promise for renal artery stenosis.

  8. Relationship of Intracellular Free Ca2+ Concentration and Calcium-activated Chloride Channels of Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells in Rats under Hypoxic Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhao; ZHANG Zhenxiang; XU Yongjian; LI Yaqing; YE Tao

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i)and calcium-activated chloride (Clca) channels of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in rats under acute and chronic hypoxic conditions, acute hypoxia-induced contraction was observed in rat pulmonary artery by using routine blood vascular perfusion in vitro. The fluorescence Ca2+indicator Fura-2/AM was used to observe [Ca2+]i of rat PASMCs under normal and chronic hypoxic condition. The effect of Clca channels on PASMCs proliferation was assessed by MTT assay.The Clca channel blockersniflumic acid (NFA) and indaryloxyacetic acid (IAA-94) exerted inhibitory effects on acute hypoxia-evoked contractions in the pulmonary artery. Under chronic hypoxic condition, [Ca2+ ]i was increased. Under normoxic condition, [Ca2+]i was (123.63±18.98) nmol/L, and in hypoxic condition, [Ca2+]i was (281. 75±16.48) nmol/L (P<0.01). Under normoxic condition, [Ca2+]i showed no significant change and no effect on Clca channels was observed (P>0. 05). Chronic hypoxia increased [Ca2+]i which opened Clca channels. The NFA and IAA-94blocked the channels and decreased [Ca2+]i from (281. 75±16.48) nmol/L to (117.66±15.36)nmol/L (P<0.01). MTT assay showed that under chronic hypoxic condition NFA and IAA-94 decreased the value of absorbency (A value) from 0. 459±0. 058 to 0. 224±0. 025 (P<0.01).Hypoxia increased [Ca2+]i which opened Clca channels and had a positive-feedback in [Ca2+]i. Thismay play an important role in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Under chronic hypoxic condition,Clca channel may play a part in the regulation of proliferation of PASMCs.

  9. Genes involved in systemic and arterial bed dependent atherosclerosis--Tampere Vascular study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Levula

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis is a complex disease with hundreds of genes influencing its progression. In addition, the phenotype of the disease varies significantly depending on the arterial bed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterized the genes generally involved in human advanced atherosclerotic (AHA type V-VI plaques in carotid and femoral arteries as well as aortas from 24 subjects of Tampere Vascular study and compared the results to non-atherosclerotic internal thoracic arteries (n=6 using genome-wide expression array and QRT-PCR. In addition we determined genes that were typical for each arterial plaque studied. To gain a comprehensive insight into the pathologic processes in the plaques we also analyzed pathways and gene sets dysregulated in this disease using gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA. According to the selection criteria used (>3.0 fold change and p-value <0.05, 235 genes were up-regulated and 68 genes down-regulated in the carotid plaques, 242 genes up-regulated and 116 down-regulated in the femoral plaques and 256 genes up-regulated and 49 genes down-regulated in the aortic plaques. Nine genes were found to be specifically induced predominantly in aortic plaques, e.g., lactoferrin, and three genes in femoral plaques, e.g., chondroadherin, whereas no gene was found to be specific for carotid plaques. In pathway analysis, a total of 28 pathways or gene sets were found to be significantly dysregulated in atherosclerotic plaques (false discovery rate [FDR] <0.25. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes comprehensively the gene expression changes that generally prevail in human atherosclerotic plaques. In addition, site specific genes induced only in femoral or aortic plaques were found, reflecting that atherosclerotic process has unique features in different vascular beds.

  10. Genes Involved in Systemic and Arterial Bed Dependent Atherosclerosis - Tampere Vascular Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airla, Nina; Zeitlin, Rainer; Salenius, Juha-Pekka; Järvinen, Otso; Venermo, Maarit; Partio, Teemu; Saarinen, Jukka; Somppi, Taija; Suominen, VeliPekka; Virkkunen, Jyrki; Hautalahti, Juha; Laaksonen, Reijo; Kähönen, Mika; Mennander, Ari; Kytömäki, Leena; Soini, Juhani T.; Parkkinen, Jyrki; Pelto-Huikko, Markku; Lehtimäki, Terho

    2012-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a complex disease with hundreds of genes influencing its progression. In addition, the phenotype of the disease varies significantly depending on the arterial bed. Methodology/Principal Findings We characterized the genes generally involved in human advanced atherosclerotic (AHA type V–VI) plaques in carotid and femoral arteries as well as aortas from 24 subjects of Tampere Vascular study and compared the results to non-atherosclerotic internal thoracic arteries (n=6) using genome-wide expression array and QRT-PCR. In addition we determined genes that were typical for each arterial plaque studied. To gain a comprehensive insight into the pathologic processes in the plaques we also analyzed pathways and gene sets dysregulated in this disease using gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA). According to the selection criteria used (>3.0 fold change and p-value <0.05), 235 genes were up-regulated and 68 genes down-regulated in the carotid plaques, 242 genes up-regulated and 116 down-regulated in the femoral plaques and 256 genes up-regulated and 49 genes down-regulated in the aortic plaques. Nine genes were found to be specifically induced predominantly in aortic plaques, e.g., lactoferrin, and three genes in femoral plaques, e.g., chondroadherin, whereas no gene was found to be specific for carotid plaques. In pathway analysis, a total of 28 pathways or gene sets were found to be significantly dysregulated in atherosclerotic plaques (false discovery rate [FDR] <0.25). Conclusions This study describes comprehensively the gene expression changes that generally prevail in human atherosclerotic plaques. In addition, site specific genes induced only in femoral or aortic plaques were found, reflecting that atherosclerotic process has unique features in different vascular beds. PMID:22509262

  11. Effects of oxidized low density lipoprotein on the growth of human artery smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Gao-feng; SENG Jing-jing; ZHANG Hua; SHE Ming-peng

    2005-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) promotes the pathogenesis and development of atherosclerosis (AS), and that the proliferation, migration and phenotype alteration of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) into foam cells are critical changes in AS. It is proposed that ox-LDL might play a novel role in the pathologic process of vSMCs. The present study was performed ex vivo to investigate the effects of ox-LDL on the growth of cultured human vSMCs.Methods Using NaBr density gradient centrifugation, LDL from human plasma was isolated and purified. ox-LDL was produced from LDL after being incubated with CuSO4. ox-LDL was then added to the culture medium at different concentrations (25 μg/ml, 50 μg/ml, 75 μg/ml, 100 μg/ml, 125 μg/ml, and 150 μg/ml) for 7 days. The influence of ox-LDL on vSMC growth was observed from several aspects as growth curve, mitosis index, lipid staining, and in situ determination of apoptosis. The digital results were analyzed with SPSS 10.0.Results The ox-LDL produced ex vivo had a good purity and optimal oxidative degree, which was similar to the intrinsic ox-LDL in atherosclerotic plaque. ox-LDL at a concentration of 25 μg/ml demonstrated the strongest proliferation. At the concentration of 125 μg/ml, ox-LDL suppressed the growth of vSMCs. At concentrations of 25 μg/ml and 50 μg/ml, ox-LDL presented powerful mitotic trigger. When the concentration of ox-LDL increased, the mitotic index of vSMCs decreased gradually. ox-LDL induced more foam cells from vSMCs with rich intracellular lipid accumulation at concentrations of 25 μg/ml and 50 μg/ml. ox-LDL at higher concentrations induced more apoptotic vSMCs.Conclusions ox-LDL at lower concentrations may trigger proliferation and phenotype alteration into foam cells of vSMCs, and at higher concentrations it may induce apoptosis in vSMCs. ox-LDL plays an important role in the pathogenesis and development of atherosclerosis by its effect on v

  12. Impaired autonomic regulation of resistance arteries in mice with low vascular endothelial growth factor or upon vascular endothelial growth factor trap delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storkebaum, Erik; Ruiz de Almodovar, Carmen; Meens, Merlijn;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Control of peripheral resistance arteries by autonomic nerves is essential for the regulation of blood flow. The signals responsible for the maintenance of vascular neuroeffector mechanisms in the adult, however, remain largely unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Here, we report that VEGF( ...

  13. Eugenol dilates rat cerebral arteries by inhibiting smooth muscle cell voltage-dependent calcium channels

    OpenAIRE

    Peixoto-Neves, Dieniffer; Leal-Cardoso, Jose Henrique; Jaggar, Jonathan H.

    2014-01-01

    Plants high in eugenol, a phenylpropanoid compound, are used as folk medicines to alleviate diseases including hypertension. Eugenol has been demonstrated to relax conduit and ear arteries and reduce systemic blood pressure, but mechanisms involved are unclear. Here, we studied eugenol regulation of resistance-size cerebral arteries that control regional brain blood pressure and flow and investigated mechanisms involved. We demonstrate that eugenol dilates arteries constrict...

  14. Differential Mitochondrial Adaptation in Primary Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from a Diabetic Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Amy C.; Knaub, Leslie A; P. Mason McClatchey; Chelsea A. Connon; Ron Bouchard; Miller, Matthew W.; Kate E. Geary; Walker, Lori A.; Klemm, Dwight J.; Reusch, Jane E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes affects more than 330 million people worldwide and causes elevated cardiovascular disease risk. Mitochondria are critical for vascular function, generate cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and are perturbed by diabetes, representing a novel target for therapeutics. We hypothesized that adaptive mitochondrial plasticity in response to nutrient stress would be impaired in diabetes cellular physiology via a nitric oxide synthase- (NOS-) mediated decrease in mitochondrial function. ...

  15. MAPKK-dependent growth factor-induced upregulation of P2Y2 receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, M; Möller, S; Edvinsson, L;

    1999-01-01

    The ATP- and UTP-sensitive P2Y2 receptor which mediates both contractile and mitogenic effects has recently been shown to be upregulated in the synthetic phenotype of the vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC). Using a competitive RT-PCR we demonstrate that the P2Y2 receptor mRNA is increased by fetal...... calf serum and other growth factors in a MAPKK-dependent way. This was confirmed at the functional level by examining UTP-stimulated release of intracellular Ca2+. Furthermore, the P2Y2 receptor mRNA is positively autoregulated by ATP and the mRNA is rapidly degraded with only 26% remaining after 1 h...... in the presence of actinomycin D. Our results indicate growth factor regulation and rapid turnover of the P2Y2 receptor mRNA, which may be of importance in atherosclerosis and neointima formation after balloon angioplasty....

  16. [Influence of curcumin--loaded poly (lactide-co-glycolide) films on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ling; Wang, Jin; Tang, Jiaju; Pan, Changjiang; Huang, Nan

    2008-08-01

    In-stent restenosis is the major problem of percutaneous coronary interventions. Drug-eluting stent became a landmark in the treatment of coronary disease. Curcumin could be used for drug-eluting stent due to its antithrombogenity and antiproliferative properties. In this paper, 3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays were performed to decide the optimal concentration of curcumin for inhibiting the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). The result disclosed that more than 80% of VSMC were inhibited when the concentration of curcumin ranged from 2.5 microg/ml to 10 microg/ml (P 316 stainless steel (SS). Therefore, these films may be used for stent coating to inhibit the in-stent restenosis induced by VSMC proliferation. PMID:18792454

  17. Inhibitory Effect of Diabetes on Proliferation of Vascular Smooth Muscle After Balloon Injury in Rat Aorta

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlfors, Gunilla; Chen, Yun; Gustafsson, Bertil; Arnqvist, Hans J.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of streptozotocin-induced diabetes on cell proliferation in rat aortic intima-media, as well as on local gene expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) was studied. TGF-β1 mRNA was measured by solution hybridization and TGF-β1 protein by ELISA. Proliferation was measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation into DNA two days after balloon injury. All BrdU-labelled cells observed were smooth muscle cells. After a diabetes duration of 2 and 4 weeks, labelled cells were signi...

  18. Cyclosporin A inhibits PGE2 release from vascular smooth muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtz, Armin; Pfeilschifter, J.; Kühn, K; KOCH, K M

    1987-01-01

    The influence of the fungoid undecapeptide cyclosporin A (CyA) on PGE2 release from cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells was investigated in this study. We found that CyA time and concentration dependently (ED50:500 ng/ml) inhibited PGE2 release from the cells. CyA attenuated both basal and PGE2 release evoked by angiotensin II (10(-10)-10(-6) M), arginine vasopressin (10(-10)-10(-6) M) and ionomycin (10(-9)-10(-6) M). CyA (1 microgram/ml) did not affect the conversion of exogenous arachid...

  19. Andrographolide, a Novel NF-κB Inhibitor, Induces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Apoptosis via a Ceramide-p47phox-ROS Signaling Cascade

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Ying Chen; Ming-Jen Hsu; Joen-Rong Sheu; Lin-Wen Lee; Cheng-Ying Hsieh

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is linked with the development of many cardiovascular complications. Abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a crucial role in the development of atherosclerosis. Accordingly, the apoptosis of VSMCs, which occurs in the progression of vascular proliferation, may provide a beneficial strategy for managing cardiovascular diseases. Andrographolide, a novel nuclear factor- κ B inhibitor, is the most active and critical constituent isolated from the lea...

  20. Andrographolide induces vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis through a SHP-1-PP2A-p38MAPK-p53 cascade

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Ying Chen; Cheng-Ying Hsieh; Thanasekaran Jayakumar; Kuan-Hung Lin; Duen-Suey Chou; Wan-Jung Lu; Ming-Jen Hsu; Joen-Rong Sheu

    2014-01-01

    The abnormal growth of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is considered a critical pathogenic process in inflammatory vascular diseases. We have previously demonstrated that protein phosphatase 2 A (PP2A)-mediated NF-κB dephosphorylation contributes to the anti-inflammatory properties of andrographolide, a novel NF-κB inhibitor. In this study, we investigated whether andrographolide causes apoptosis, and characterized its apoptotic mechanisms in rat VSMCs. Andrographolide activated the p38 ...

  1. Potassium channels in vascular smooth muscle and essential hypertension%血管平滑肌钾通道与原发性高血压

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周述芝; 魏宗德

    2003-01-01

    Essential hypertension(EH)is characterized by an increased total peripheral resistance.There are four types of potassium channels in vascular smooth muscle cells,including Kca,Kv,Kir,KATP,which play an important role in regulating the diameter of vascular.The change of potassium channels may have something to do with the pathogenesis of hypertension.This article reviews the characters of potassium channels and their roles in EH.

  2. Significant Association Between Bone-Specific Alkaline Phosphatase and Vascular Calcification of the Hand Arteries in Male Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Ishimura

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP hydrolyzes pyrophosphate, which inhibits vascular calcification. We examined association between serum BAP and vascular calcification of male hemodialysis patients. Methods: Hand roentgenography of 167 male maintenance hemodialysis patients was conducted, and visible vascular calcification of the hand arteries was evaluated. Serum levels of 3 bone formation markers (BAP, osteocalcin, and N-terminal propeptide of type I collagen and 2 bone resorption markers (C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen, and cross-linked N-telopeptide of type I collagen were measured, along with serum intact parathyroid hormone (PTH. Results: Of 167 patients, visible vascular calcification was seen in 37 patients. Among the bone formation and resorption markers, serum BAP was significantly higher in patients with vascular calcification than in those without (pConclusions: Higher serum BAP, but not other bone markers, is significantly associated with the presence of vascular calcification in male hemodialysis patients.

  3. Cigarette smoke extracts promote vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and enhances contractile responses in the vasculature and airway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Cang-Bao; Lei, Ying; Chen, Qingwen;

    2010-01-01

    Cigarette smoke exposure is a strong risk factor for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. However, the knowledge about how cigarette smoke induces damage to vasculature and airway is limited. The present study was designed to examine the effects of cigarette smoke particles extracted by heptane...... (heptane-soluble smoke particles, HSP), by water (water-soluble smoke particles, WSP) and by DMSO (DMSO-soluble smoke particles, DSP), which represent lipophilic, hydrophilic and ambiphoteric constituents from the cigarette smoke, respectively. Human aortic smooth muscle cell (HASMC) proliferation...... responses to sarafotoxin 6c, U46619 or bradykinin in rat mesenteric artery and/or in bronchi. ERK1/2 is activated by HSP and DSP in HASMCs and inhibition of ERK1/2 abrogated the smoke extracts-induced HASMC proliferation, while blockage of nicotinic receptors had no effects, suggesting that the toxic...

  4. Lipid-soluble smoke particles upregulate vascular smooth muscle ETB receptors via activation of mitogen-activating protein kinases and NF-kappaB pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Cang-Bao; Zheng, Jian-Pu; Zhang, Wei;

    2008-01-01

    Cigarette smoke is a strong risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms that lead to cigarette smoke-associated cardiovascular disease remain elusive. With functional and molecular methods, we demonstrate for the first time that lipid-soluble cigarette smoke...... particles (dimethylsulfoxide-soluble cigarette smoke particles; DSP) increased the expression of endothelin type B (ET(B)) receptors in arterial smooth muscle cells. The increased ET(B) receptors in arterial smooth muscle cells was documented as enhanced contractility (sensitive myograph technique...

  5. EFFECT OF STENT ABSORBED c-myc ANTISENSE OLIGODEOXYNUCLEOTIDE ON SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS APOPTOSIS IN RABBIT CAROTID ARTERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张新霞; 崔长琮; 李江; 崔翰斌; 徐仓宝; 朱参战

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of gelatin coated Platinium-Iridium stent absorbed c-myc antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ASODN) on smooth muscle cells apoptosis in a normal rabbit carotid arteries. Methods Gelatin coated Platinium-Iridium stents were implanted in the right carotid arteries of 32 rabbits under vision. Animals were randomly divided into control group and treated group receiving c-myc ASODN (n=16, respectively). On 7, 14, 30 and 90 days following the stenting procedure ,morphometry for caculation of neointimal area and mean neointimal thickness were performed.The expression of c-myc protein was detected by immunohistochemical method. Apoptotic smooth muscle cells was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Results At 7 and 14 days after stenting,there were no detectable apoptotic cells in both groups. The apoptotic cells occurred in the neointima 30 and 90 days after stenting, and the number of apoptotic cells at 30 days were less [4.50±1.29 vs 25.75±1.89 (number/0.1mm2)] than that at 90 days [13.50±1.91 vs 41.50±6.46 (number/0.1mm2)]. Meanwhile c-myc ASODN induced more apoptotic cells than the control group(P<0.0001). c-myc protein expression was weak positive or negative in treated group and positive in control group.Conclusion c-myc ASODN can induce smooth muscle cells apoptosis after stenting in normal rabbit carotid arteries,and it can be used to prevent in-stent restenosis.

  6. Propofol increases the Ca2+ sensitivity of BKca in the cerebral arterial smooth muscle cells of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-ru LIU; Xiao-qiu TAN; Yan YANG; Xiao-rong ZENG; Xian-ling TANG

    2012-01-01

    Propofol has the side effect of hypotension especially in the elderly and patients with hypertension.Previous studies suggest propofol-caused hypotension results from activation of large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K channels (BKCa).In this study,the effects of propofol on the Ca2+ sensitivity of BKCa were investigated in mice cerebral arterial smooth muscle cells.Methods:Single smooth muscle cells were prepared from the cerebral arteries of mice.Perforated whole-cell recoding was conducted to investigate the whole-cell BKCa current and spontaneous transient outward K+ current (STOC).Inside-out patch configuration was used to record the single channel current and to study the Ca2+- and voltage-dependence of BKCa.Results:Propofol (56 and 112 μmol/L) increased the macroscopic BKCa and STOC currents in a concentration-dependent manner.It markedly increased the total open probability (Npo) of single BKCa channel with an EC50 value of 76 μmol/L.Furthermore,propofol significantly decreased the equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of Ca2+ for BKCa channel.The Kd value of Ca2+ was 0.881 μmol/L in control,and decreased to 0.694,0.599,and 0.177 μmol/L,respectively,in the presence of propofol 28,56,and 112 μmol/L.An analysis of the channel kinetics revealed that propofol (112 μmol/L) significantly increased the open dwell time and decreased the closed dwell time,which stabilized BKCa channel in the open state.Conclusion:Propofol increases the Ca2+ sensitivity of BKCa channels,thus lowering the Ca2* threshold of the channel activation in arterial smooth muscle cells,which causes greater vasodilating effects.

  7. Phosphatidylcholine is a major source of phosphatidic acid and diacylglycerol in angiotensin II-stimulated vascular smooth-muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassègue, B; Alexander, R W; Clark, M; Akers, M; Griendling, K K

    1993-06-01

    In cultured vascular smooth-muscle cells, angiotensin II produces a sustained formation of diacylglycerol (DG) and phosphatidic acid (PtdOH). Since the fatty acid composition of these molecules is likely to determine their efficacy as second messengers, it is important to ascertain the phospholipid precursors and the biochemical pathways from which they are produced. Our experiments suggest that phospholipase D (PLD)-mediated phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) hydrolysis is the major source of both DG and PtdOH during the late signalling phase. First, in cells labelled with [3H]myristate, which preferentially labels PtdCho, formation of [3H]PtdOH precedes formation of [3H]DG. Second, in contrast with phospholipase C (PLC) activation, DG mass accumulation is dependent on extracellular Ca2+. Similarly, DG mass accumulation is not attenuated by protein kinase C activation, which we have previously shown to inhibit the phosphoinositide-specific PLC. Third, the fatty acid composition of late-phase DG and PtdOH more closely resembles that of PtdCho than that of phosphatidylinositol. Finally, in cells labelled for a short time with [3H]glycerol, the radioactivity incorporated into [3H]DG and PtdOH was greater than that incorporated into PtdIns, but not into PtdCho. We found no evidence that synthesis de novo or phosphatidylethanolamine breakdown contributes to sustained DG and PtdOH formation. Thus, in angiotensin II-stimulated cultured vascular smooth-muscle cells, PLD-mediated PtdCho hydrolysis is the major source of sustained DG and PtdOH, whereas phosphoinositide breakdown is a minor contributor. Furthermore, PtdOH phosphohydrolase, which determines the relative levels of DG and PtdOH, appears to be regulated by protein kinase C. These results have important implications for the role of these second messengers in growth and contraction.

  8. Preparation of liposome-coated oligonucleotide labeled with 99mTc and its uptake in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To explore the preparation method of liposome-coated 99mTc-labeled antisense oligonucleotide (ASON),targeteing the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and to explore the biological characteristics and the uptake kinetics of a radiolabeled probe in vascular smooth muscle cells, an 18-base single-stranded antisense oligonucleotide targeting PCNA mRNA and the complementary strand (sense oligonucleotide, SON) were synthesized. The ASON (SON) was labeled with 99mTc, by conjugating the bifunctional chelator (hydrazino nicotinamide, HYNIC), and purified through a gel filtration column of Sephadex G-25. The product was then encapsulated in cationic liposome (oligofectamineTM). The radiolabeling efficiency, radiochemical purity, stability of the liposome-coated 99mTc-HYNIC-ASON in a phosphate buffered solution (PBS), and fresh human serum and its uptake rate were studied. There was no significant difference between the 99mTc radiolabeling efficiencies of HYNIC-ASON and HYNIC-SON, which were 60.04% ± 1.92% and 59.60% ± 2.53%, respectively (P > 0.05, n = 5). The radiochemical purity of the liposome-coated 99mTc-HYNIC-ASON was 94.70% ± 1.90% (n = 5). And after incubation with PBS and fresh human seAt 90 min after transfection, the uptake rate of the liposome-coated 99mTc-HYNIC-ASON reached its peak of 83.8% ±5.92% in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and was much higher than that of the nonliposome-coated 99mTc-HYNIC-ASON, which was 11.16% ± 0.54% (P < 0.01, n = 4). The labeling method of PCNA ASON (SON) conjugated by HYNIC has been proved successful. The liposome was able to enhance the ASON (SON) uptake in VSMCs,and could be widely used as a safe, convenient, effective gene transfer carrier.

  9. YAP is oppositely regulated in iPSC-induced cardiovascular progenitor cell and vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong-yu; FAN Xiao-fang; DING Lu; CHEN Dan-yang; ZHAO Ru; LI Lan; GONG Yong-sheng

    2016-01-01

    AIM:To explore whether YAP protein is important in induced pluripotent stem cell ( iPSC)-induced cardiovascular progenitor cell and/or vascular smooth muscle differentiation .METHODS:Using episomal vector based reprogramming , we generated human iPSCs from donor fibroblasts .We used both this iPSCs and human H 1 embryonic stem cells to differentiate into vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) through cardiovascular progenitor cells (CVPC).Western blotting, qPCR and immunofluorescence microscopy were used to check the expression of YAP and related genes during this differentiation process .RESULTS:The results showed that iPSCs expressed pluripotent stem cell markers, such as Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, TRA-1-60 and SSEA3, and could form teratoma in SCID mice.YAP was highly expressed in pluripotent stem cells , but dramatically decreased when CVPC differentiation started .YAP gradually increased dur-ing CVPC three-day differentiation.The TAZ and YAP binding partner TEAD1, but not TEAD2 and TEAD4, have similar expression pattern in CVPC differentiation .Immunofluorescence result confirmed that YAP was activated and accumulated in nucleus .Interesting-ly, both YAP and phosphorylated YAP expression decreased to very low level after CVPC differentiated into VSMCs in 7 days.TEAD4 and TAZ also decreased, while TEAD1, TEAD2 and TEAD3 expression did not change during VSMC differentiation .CONCLU-SION:YAP and TEAD1 expression increased during CVPC differentiation , while YAP and TEAD4 expression decreased from CVPC to VSMCs differentiation , which suggested YAP might have different function during diverse cell differentiation .

  10. Arterial vascularization of the uropygial glands (Gl. uropygialis) in the rock partridge (Alectoris graeca) living in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, S; Aslan, K; Aksoy, G; Kürtül, I

    2004-06-01

    This study aims to observe the morphological characteristics of the uropygial gland (Glandula uropygialis), specifically the arterial vascularization, in rock partridges (Alectoris graeca) living in Turkey. Coloured-latex-injected animals were dissected and the gland and related arteries were observed. Mostly, the fourth paired caudal segmental arteries (Aa. segmentales caudales) arising from the median caudal artery (A. mediana caudae) were specified as the uropygial gland arteries. These arteries, in turn, gave the following rami: the muscular ramus (Ramus muscularis) to the levator coccygeus and lateral caudal muscles, the lateral ramus (Ramus lateralis) to the lateral coccygeus muscle and a small ventro-lateral division of the caudal component of the gland, and the medial rami (Ramus medialis) to the dorsal surface of the gland. PMID:15144283

  11. An electrophysiological study of excitatory purinergic neuromuscular transmission in longitudinal smooth muscle of chicken anterior mesenteric artery

    OpenAIRE

    Khalifa, Maisa; El-Mahmoudy, AbuBakr; SHIINA, Takahiko; Shimizu, Yasutake; NIKAMI, Hideki; El-Sayed, Mossad; Kobayashi, Haruo; TAKEWAKI, Tadashi

    2005-01-01

    The object of the present study was to clarify the neurotransmitters controlling membrane responses to electrical field stimulation (EFS) in the longitudinal smooth muscle cells of the chicken anterior mesenteric artery.EFS (5 pulses at 20 Hz) evoked a depolarization of amplitude 19.7±2.1 mV, total duration 29.6±3.1 s and latency 413.0±67.8 ms. This depolarization was tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive and its amplitude was partially decreased by atropine (0.5 μM); however, its duration was shorten...

  12. A Study of Vascular Clamps on Crush Injury of Common Carotid Arteries in Rats%血管夹对大鼠颈总动脉挤压损伤的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余宽宽; 梁向党; 孙赓; 郭占芳; 邹秀强; 房卓群

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨血管夹对大鼠颈总动脉的挤压损伤。方法将40只雄性SD大鼠随机分为两组,每组各20只,用改进后的血管夹分别对两组大鼠的左侧颈总动脉给予30 g和90 g的压力进行15 min的夹闭,右侧颈总动脉作为对照,术后正常饮食喂养3周。通过大体观察、超声血流检测、组织形态学观察、血管创伤评分对血管损伤情况进行评估。结果两组大鼠左侧颈总动脉损伤修复完好,超声血流通畅,HE染色内膜无明显损伤增生,与右侧颈总动脉比较血管创伤评分差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论血管夹在血管吻合的过程中对血管的损伤不可避免,但这种仅因夹闭造成的暂时性损伤可通过自身修复。%Objective To explore vascular clamps on crush injury of common carotid arteries in rats. Methods A total of 40 SD male rats were randomly divided into group A and B ( n=20 for each group) , and left common carotid arteries of rats in group A and B were occluded using improved vascular clamps respectively under 30 g and 90 g pressure for 15 min, while the right common carotid arteries were used as comparison, all the rats were give normal postoperative feeding for 3 weeks. Conditions of vascular injuries were evaluated with general observation of clamping arteries, vascular ultrasound for blood flow, histomorphology observation and vascular traumatic scores. Results The clamping arteries of rats in the two groups recovered well with smooth blood flow, and there was no neointimal formation in the inner layer by HE ( hematoxylin and eosin) staining, and there were no statistically significant differences in vascular traumatic scores between left and right common carotid arteries (P>0. 05). Conclusion Vascular injuries by vascular clamps during the process of vascular anastomosis are inevitable, but the impermanent injures can be repaired by itself.

  13. EXPRESSION OF TISSUE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR IN SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS OF INJURED ILIAC ARTERIES IN RABBITS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马晓莉; 黄文英; 佘铭鹏; 李晓惠; 笪冀平

    1996-01-01

    In this experiment, expression of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) in smooth muscle cells(SMCs) was measured at different iutervals after the arterial injury. In the normal lilac arteries, only low levels of t-PA activity were estimated, t-PA activity in extracts of the iliac arteries increased significantly at the 4th day after the injury, equivalent to the process that SMCs migrated from the media to the intima,and the t-PA activity was then decreased approximately to the normal level at the 7th day. Coexistent to the above data, results from in situ hybridization showed that the expression of t-PA mRNA in the intimaas well as media increased also significantly nr the 4th day after the arterial injury, and at the 7th day, t-PA mRNA was detected only in those SMCs locating closely adjacent to the internal elastic lamina. These results suggest that t-PA might play an important role in SMC migration following endothelial injury, and antagcaaism of t-PA expression and/or activity within the vessel wall might be helpful in intervening the devnlopment of restenosis following angioplasty.

  14. Monomethylarsonous acid, but not inorganic arsenic, is a mitochondria-specific toxicant in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Clare; Banerjee, Tania Das; Welch, Barrett; Khalili, Roxana; Dagda, Ruben K; Angermann, Jeff

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic exposure has been implicated as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, metabolic disorders, and cancer, yet the role mitochondrial dysfunction plays in the cellular mechanisms of pathology is largely unknown. To investigate arsenic-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), we exposed rat aortic smooth muscle cells (A7r5) to inorganic arsenic (iAs(III)) and its metabolite monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and compared their effects on mitochondrial function and oxidative stress. Our results indicate that MMA(III) is significantly more toxic to mitochondria than iAs(III). Exposure of VSMCs to MMA(III), but not iAs(III), significantly decreased basal and maximal oxygen consumption rates and concomitantly increased compensatory extracellular acidification rates, a proxy for glycolysis. Treatment with MMA(III) significantly increased hydrogen peroxide and superoxide levels compared to iAs(III). Exposure to MMA(III) resulted in significant decreases in mitochondrial ATP, aberrant perinuclear clustering of mitochondria, and decreased mitochondrial content. Mechanistically, we observed that mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide contribute to mitochondrial toxicity, as treatment of cells with MnTBAP (a mitochondrial superoxide dismutase mimetic) and catalase significantly reduced mitochondrial respiration deficits and cell death induced by both arsenic compounds. Overall, our data demonstrates that MMA(III) is a mitochondria-specific toxicant that elevates mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial sources of ROS. PMID:27327130

  15. Monomethylarsonous acid, but not inorganic arsenic, is a mitochondria-specific toxicant in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Clare; Banerjee, Tania Das; Welch, Barrett; Khalili, Roxana; Dagda, Ruben K; Angermann, Jeff

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic exposure has been implicated as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, metabolic disorders, and cancer, yet the role mitochondrial dysfunction plays in the cellular mechanisms of pathology is largely unknown. To investigate arsenic-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), we exposed rat aortic smooth muscle cells (A7r5) to inorganic arsenic (iAs(III)) and its metabolite monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and compared their effects on mitochondrial function and oxidative stress. Our results indicate that MMA(III) is significantly more toxic to mitochondria than iAs(III). Exposure of VSMCs to MMA(III), but not iAs(III), significantly decreased basal and maximal oxygen consumption rates and concomitantly increased compensatory extracellular acidification rates, a proxy for glycolysis. Treatment with MMA(III) significantly increased hydrogen peroxide and superoxide levels compared to iAs(III). Exposure to MMA(III) resulted in significant decreases in mitochondrial ATP, aberrant perinuclear clustering of mitochondria, and decreased mitochondrial content. Mechanistically, we observed that mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide contribute to mitochondrial toxicity, as treatment of cells with MnTBAP (a mitochondrial superoxide dismutase mimetic) and catalase significantly reduced mitochondrial respiration deficits and cell death induced by both arsenic compounds. Overall, our data demonstrates that MMA(III) is a mitochondria-specific toxicant that elevates mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial sources of ROS.

  16. Eukaryotic Expression of Human Arresten Gene and Its Effect on the Proliferation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Dan; ZHENG Qichang; SONG Zifang; LI Yiqing; WANG Xiedan; GUO Xingjun

    2006-01-01

    The eukaryotic expression of human arresten geneand its effect on the proliferation of in vitro cultured vascular smooth cells (VSMCs) in vitro were investigated. COS-7 cells were transfected with recombinant eukaryotic expression plasmid pSecTag2-AT or control plasmid pSecTag2 mediated by liposome. Forty-eight h after transfection, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to detect the expression of arresten mRNA in the cells,while Western blot assay was applied to detect the expression of arresten protein in concentrated supernatant. Primary VSMCs from thoracic aorta of male Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured using the tissue explant method, and identified by immunohistochemical staining with a smooth muscle-specific anti-αactin monoclonal antibody before serial subcultivation. VSMCs were then co-cultured with the concentrated supernatant and their proliferation was detected using Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) in vitro. The results showed that RT-PCR revealed that the genome of arresten-transfected cells contained a 449 bp specific fragment of arresten gene, suggesting the successful transfection. Successful protein expression in supernatants was confirmed by Western blot. CCK-8 assay showed that the proliferation of VSMCs were inhibited significantly by arresten protein as compared with control cells (F=40.154, P<0.01). It was concluded that arresten protein expressed in eukaryotic cells can inhibit proliferation of VSMCs effectively in vitro, which would provide possibility to the animal experiments.

  17. Effects of rosiglitazone on contralateral iliac artery after vascular injury in hypercholesterolemic rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baroncini Liz

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective was to evaluate the effects of rosiglitazone on iliac arteries of hypercholesterolemic rabbits undergoing balloon catheter injury in the contralateral iliac arteries. Methods White male rabbits were fed a hypercholesterolemic diet for 6 weeks and divided into two groups as follows: rosiglitazone group, 14 rabbits treated with rosiglitazone (3 mg/Kg body weight/day during 6 weeks; and control group, 18 rabbits without rosiglitazone treatment. All animals underwent balloon catheter injury of the right iliac artery on the fourteenth day of the experiment. Results There was no significant difference in intima/media layer area ratio between the control group and the rosiglitazone group. Rosiglitazone did not reduce the probability of lesions types I, II, or III (72.73% vs. 92.31%; p = 0.30 and types IV or V (27.27% vs. 7.69%; p = 0.30. There were no differences in the extent of collagen type I and III deposition or in the percentage of animals with macrophages in the intima layer. The percentage of rabbits with smooth muscle cells in the intima layer was higher in rosiglitazone group (p = 0.011. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that rosiglitazone given for 6 weeks did not prevent atherogenesis at a vessel distant from the injury site.

  18. Influence of oxygen tension of the metabolism of vascular smooth muscle: demonstration of a Pasteur effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnqvist, H J; Lundholm, L

    1976-01-01

    The influence of variations of oxygen tension on the metabolism of bovine mesenteric arteries was studied in vitro. Glucose uptake, lactate production, glycogen content, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), creatine phosphate (CrP) and incorporation of [14C]leucine into protein were determined. The mesenteric arteries were suspended in Krebs-Henseleit bicarbonate buffer which was aerated with a gas mixture containing 5% CO2,O-95% O2 and N2 to 100%. Reduction of the O2 concentration of the gas phase from 95-20% resulted in little metabolic change. A further reduction from 20-0% O2 increased the lactate production 4-fold, indicating a marked Pasteur effect. At 0% O2 the glucose uptake was moderately increased and the glycogen content was decreased. The tissue level of CrP was reduced at a low oxygen tension and at 0% O2 the ATP content was also lowered. The incorporation of leucine into proteins was reduced at 0% O2.

  19. Retinoid-induced expression and activity of an immediate early tumor suppressor gene in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Streb

    Full Text Available Retinoids are used clinically to treat a number of hyper-proliferative disorders and have been shown in experimental animals to attenuate vascular occlusive diseases, presumably through nuclear receptors bound to retinoic acid response elements (RARE located in target genes. Here, we show that natural or synthetic retinoids rapidly induce mRNA and protein expression of a specific isoform of A-Kinase Anchoring Protein 12 (AKAP12β in cultured smooth muscle cells (SMC as well as the intact vessel wall. Expression kinetics and actinomycin D studies indicate Akap12β is a retinoid-induced, immediate-early gene. Akap12β promoter analyses reveal a conserved RARE mildly induced with atRA in a region that exhibits hyper-acetylation. Immunofluorescence microscopy and protein kinase A (PKA regulatory subunit overlay assays in SMC suggest a physical association between AKAP12β and PKA following retinoid treatment. Consistent with its designation as a tumor suppressor, inducible expression of AKAP12β attenuates SMC growth in vitro. Further, immunohistochemistry studies establish marked decreases in AKAP12 expression in experimentally-injured vessels of mice as well as atheromatous lesions in humans. Collectively, these results demonstrate a novel role for retinoids in the induction of an AKAP tumor suppressor that blocks vascular SMC growth thus providing new molecular insight into how retiniods may exert their anti-proliferative effects in the injured vessel wall.

  20. Synthesis and Protective Effects of Kaempferol-3'-sulfonate on Hydrogen Peroxide-induced injury in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinbin; Wang, Qin; Wang, Chunmei; Qin, Xiaolin; Huang, Yu; Zeng, Renquan

    2016-06-01

    A novel water-soluble sulfated derivative, kaempferol-3'-sulfonate acid sodium (KS) with the composition of [C15 H9 O9 SNa]·2.5H2 O, was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, (1) H NMR, (13) C NMR, and HRMS. Its protective effects on human vascular smooth muscle cells injured by hydrogen peroxide were evaluated by CCK-8 method, flow cytometry, and Western blotting. The experimental results indicated that the KS can significantly increase cell viability and reduce apoptosis on H2 O2 -injured VSMCs, as well as reverse the effects of H2 O2 on Bcl-2, Bad, and caspase-3 expressions. In addition, LDH leakage, MDA levels, and SOD and GSH activities were also measured with spectrophotometry. The results indicated that the KS acted as antioxidant preventing LDH leakage and MDA production, while increasing intracellular SOD and GSH activities. These findings revealed that KS might potentially serve as an effective antioxidant agent for prevention and treatment of vascular disease caused by H2 O2 -injured VSMCs. PMID:26706847

  1. Biomimetic control of vascular smooth muscle cell morphology and phenotype for functional tissue-engineered small-diameter blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan-Park, Mary B; Shen, Jin Ye; Cao, Ye; Xiong, Yun; Liu, Yunxiao; Rayatpisheh, Shahrzad; Kang, Gavin Chun-Wei; Greisler, Howard P

    2009-03-15

    Small-diameter blood vessel substitutes are urgently needed for patients requiring replacements of their coronary and below-the-knee vessels and for better arteriovenous dialysis shunts. Circulatory diseases, especially those arising from atherosclerosis, are the predominant cause of mortality and morbidity in the developed world. Current therapies include the use of autologous vessels or synthetic materials as vessel replacements. The limited availability of healthy vessels for use as bypass grafts and the failure of purely synthetic materials in small-diameter sites necessitate the development of a biological substitute. Tissue engineering is such an approach and has achieved promising results, but reconstruction of a functional vascular tunica media, with circumferentially oriented contractile smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and extracellular matrix, appropriate mechanical properties, and vasoactivity has yet to be demonstrated. This review focuses on strategies to effect the switch of SMC phenotype from synthetic to contractile, which is regarded as crucial for the engineering of a functional vascular media. The synthetic SMC phenotype is desired initially for cell proliferation and tissue remodeling, but the contractile phenotype is then necessary for sufficient vasoactivity and inhibition of neointima formation. The factors governing the switch to a more contractile phenotype with in vitro culture are reviewed.

  2. N-Cadherin Induction by ECM Stiffness and FAK Overrides the Spreading Requirement for Proliferation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keeley L. Mui

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the accepted pro-proliferative effect of cell-matrix adhesion, the proliferative effect of cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion remains unresolved. Here, we studied the effect of N-cadherin on cell proliferation in the vasculature. We show that N-cadherin is induced in smooth muscle cells (SMCs in response to vascular injury, an in vivo model of tissue stiffening and proliferation. Complementary experiments performed with deformable substrata demonstrated that stiffness-mediated activation of a focal adhesion kinase (FAK-p130Cas-Rac signaling pathway induces N-cadherin. Additionally, by culturing paired and unpaired SMCs on microfabricated adhesive islands of different areas, we found that N-cadherin relaxes the spreading requirement for SMC proliferation. In vivo SMC deletion of N-cadherin strongly reduced injury-induced cycling. Finally, SMC-specific deletion of FAK inhibited proliferation after vascular injury, and this was accompanied by reduced induction of N-cadherin. Thus, a stiffness- and FAK-dependent induction of N-cadherin connects cell-matrix to cell-cell adhesion and regulates the degree of cell spreading needed for cycling.

  3. [Therapy of arterial vascular occlusions of retinal and optic nerve (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küchle, H J; Richard, G

    1979-01-01

    The authors report on 136 cases of arterial occlusion (80 patients suffering from occlusion of the retinal vessels and 56 patients with vascular occlusion in the optic nerve) who were treated with the vasoactive xanthic substance Pentoxifylline (Trental). A part from its positive effect on the vascular circulation, Trental also helps to improve microcirculation in the retinal and optic nerve tissue damaged by hypoxia. After a 2-week infusion therapy with additional digitalisation, treatment was continued for another 3-6 months with oral administration of Trental 400. In 50 cases therapy was combined with the systemic administration of corticosteroids. Under the mentioned therapy a definitely improved visual acuity (at least 3 lines on the eye charts) was achieved in 56% of the cases with occlusion of the retinal vessels and in 51% of the cases with vascular occlusion in the optic nerve, i.e., in 54% of the total number of patients. Whether or not the additional administration of corticosteroids helped to this effect was not proved. PMID:545196

  4. Closure of digital arteries in high vascular tone states as demonstrated by measurement of systolic blood pressure in the fingers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krähenbühl, B; Nielsen, S L; Lassen, N A

    1977-01-01

    Finger systolic blood pressure (FSP) was measured indirectly in normal subjects and patients with primary Raynaud phenomenon by applying a thin-walled plastic cuff around the finger and a strain gauge more distally to detect volume changes. Inducing a high vascular tone in one or more fingers...... also remained normal. In the high vascular tone state, a large transmural pressure difference must apparently be established before the digital arteries are forced open. The lowered opening pressure constitutes a manifestation of the closure phenomenon of the digital arteries described in patients...

  5. The persistent trigeminal artery: development, imaging anatomy, variants, and associated vascular pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckel, Stephan; Spittau, Bjoern; McAuliffe, William

    2013-01-01

    The persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is the most common and most cephalad-located embryological anastomosis between the developing carotid artery and vertebrobasilar system to persist into adulthood. As such, it is frequently reported as an incidental finding in computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance angiography studies. Here, we review the embryology, anatomy, and angiographic imaging findings, including important variants of this commonly encountered cerebrovascular anomaly (reported incidence of PTA/PTA variants ranges from 0.1% to 0.76%). Further, the aim is to present the range of associated arterial anomalies or syndromes, as well as pathologies that are associated with a PTA: aneurysms, trigeminal cavernous fistulas, and trigeminal nerve compression. Besides summarizing the risks and clinical presentation of such pathologies, their management is discussed with endovascular strategies mostly being the primary choice for aneurysms and trigeminal cavernous fistulas. Symptomatic trigeminal nerve compression can be treated with microvascular decompression surgery. As an illustrative example, a case of a trigeminal cavernous fistula on a PTA variant is included, mainly to emphasize the importance of understanding the variant anatomy for treatment planning in such pathologies. Finally, recommendations on how to manage patients with PTA-associated vascular pathologies are advanced. PMID:22170080

  6. The vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator for reconstruction of the inferior alveolar nerve defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Kenji; Hiroto, Saijo; Morooka, Shin; Kuwabara, Kaoru; Fujioka, Masaki

    2015-03-01

    The sural nerve has been described for nerve reconstruction of the maxillofacial region since it provides many advantages. We report a case of a vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator for immediate reconstruction after the removal of intraosseous neuroma originating in the inferior alveolar nerve. The patient had a neuroma caused by iatrogenic injury to the inferior alveolar nerve. A 4-cm long neuroma existed in the inferior alveolar nerve and was resected. A peroneal perforator was chosen as the pedicle of the vascularized sural nerve graft for the nerve gap. The graft including the skin paddle for monitoring the perfusion supplied by this perforator was transferred to the lesion. The nerve gap between the two stumps of the inferior alveolar nerve was repaired using the 6-cm long vascularized sural nerve. The perforator of the peroneal artery was anastomosed to the branch of the facial artery in a perforator-to-perforator fashion. There was no need to sacrifice any main arteries. The skin paddle with 1 cm × 3 cm in size was inset into the incised medial neck. Perceptual function tests with a Semmes-Weinstein pressure esthesiometer and two-point discrimination in the lower lip and chin at 10 months after surgery showed recovery almost to the level of the normal side. This free vascularized sural nerve graft based on a peroneal artery perforator may be a good alternative for reconstruction of inferior alveolar nerve defects. PMID:25346479

  7. Cigarette smoke exposure induced pulmonary artery pressure increase through inhibiting Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 mRNA expression in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林纯意

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of cigarette smoke exposure on Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 mRNA expression in rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells(PASMCs), and further to clarify the possible mechanism of cigarette smoking induced pulmonary arterial hypertension. Methods Primary

  8. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin resistance and hypertension have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease; however, little is known about the roles of insulin and mechanical force in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) remodeling. We investigated the contribution of mechanical stretch to insulin-induced VSMC proliferation. Thymidine incorporation was stimulated by insulin in stretched VSMCs, but not in un-stretched VSMCs. Insulin increased 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation in both stretched and un-stretched VSMCs. Mechanical stretch augmented insulin-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt phosphorylation. Inhibitors of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase and Src attenuated insulin-induced ERK and Akt phosphorylation, as well as thymidine incorporation, whereas 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation was not affected by these inhibitors. Moreover, stretch augmented insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor expression, although it did not alter the expression of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1. Insulin-induced ERK and Akt activation, and thymidine incorporation were inhibited by siRNA for the IGF-1 receptor. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via upregulation of IGF-1 receptor, and downstream Src/EGF receptor-mediated ERK and Akt activation. Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor expression was also augmented in hypertensive rats. These results provide a basis for clarifying the molecular mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertensive patients with hyperinsulinemia. -- Highlights: → Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via IGF-1 receptor. → Src/EGFR-mediated ERK and Akt phosphorylation are augmented in stretched VSMCs. → Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor is increased in hypertensive rats. → Results provide possible mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertension with DM.

  9. WISP1 overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of human vascular smooth muscle cells via AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shun; Liu, Hao; Lu, Lihe; Wan, Heng; Lin, Zhiqi; Qian, Kai; Yao, Xingxing; Chen, Qing; Liu, Wenjun; Yan, Jianyun; Liu, Zhengjun

    2016-10-01

    Proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) play crucial roles in the development of vascular restenosis. Our previous study showed that CCN4, namely Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (WISP1), significantly promotes proliferation and migration of rat VSMCs, but its mechanism remains unclear. This study aims to investigate whether and how WISP1 stimulates proliferation and migration of human VSMCs. Western blot analysis showed that FBS treatment increased WISP1 protein levels in human VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner. Overexpression of WISP1 using adenovirus encoding WISP1 (AD-WISP1) significantly increased proliferation rate of human VSMCs by 2.98-fold compared with empty virus (EV)-transfected cells, shown by EdU incorporation assay. Additionally, Scratch-induced wound healing assay revealed that adenovirus-mediated overexpression of WISP1 significantly increased cell migration compared with EV-transfected cells from 6h (4.56±1.14% vs. 11.23±2.25%, PMigration Assay confirmed that WISP1 overexpression significantly promoted human VSMC migration by 2.25-fold compared with EV. Furthermore, WISP1 overexpression stimulated Akt signaling activation in human VSMCs. Blockage of Akt signaling by Akt inhibitor AZD5363 or PI3K inhibitor LY294002, led to an inhibitory effect of WISP1-induced proliferation and migration in human VSMCs. Moreover, we found that WISP1 overexpression stimulated GSK3α/β phosphorylation, and increased expression of cyclin D1 and MMP9 in human VSMCs, and this effect was abolished by AZD5363. Collectively, we demonstrated that Akt signaling pathway mediates WISP1-induced migration and proliferation of human VSMCs, suggesting that WISP1 may act as a novel potential therapeutic target for vascular restenosis.

  10. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Gang [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Department of Anesthesiology, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Hitomi, Hirofumi, E-mail: hitomi@kms.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Hosomi, Naohisa [Department of Cardiorenal and Cerebrovascular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Lei, Bai; Nakano, Daisuke [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Deguchi, Kazushi; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu [Department of Gastroenterology and Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan); Ma, Hong [Department of Anesthesiology, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Griendling, Kathy K. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Nishiyama, Akira [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa University, Kagawa (Japan)

    2011-10-15

    Insulin resistance and hypertension have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease; however, little is known about the roles of insulin and mechanical force in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) remodeling. We investigated the contribution of mechanical stretch to insulin-induced VSMC proliferation. Thymidine incorporation was stimulated by insulin in stretched VSMCs, but not in un-stretched VSMCs. Insulin increased 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation in both stretched and un-stretched VSMCs. Mechanical stretch augmented insulin-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt phosphorylation. Inhibitors of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase and Src attenuated insulin-induced ERK and Akt phosphorylation, as well as thymidine incorporation, whereas 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation was not affected by these inhibitors. Moreover, stretch augmented insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor expression, although it did not alter the expression of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1. Insulin-induced ERK and Akt activation, and thymidine incorporation were inhibited by siRNA for the IGF-1 receptor. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via upregulation of IGF-1 receptor, and downstream Src/EGF receptor-mediated ERK and Akt activation. Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor expression was also augmented in hypertensive rats. These results provide a basis for clarifying the molecular mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertensive patients with hyperinsulinemia. -- Highlights: {yields} Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via IGF-1 receptor. {yields} Src/EGFR-mediated ERK and Akt phosphorylation are augmented in stretched VSMCs. {yields} Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor is increased in hypertensive rats. {yields} Results provide possible mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertension with DM.

  11. Testosterone delays vascular smooth muscle cell senescence and inhibits collagen synthesis via the Gas6/Axl signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Qing; Zhao, Jing; Jin, Cheng-Wei; Li, Yi-Hui; Tang, Meng-Xiong; Wang, Zhi-Hao; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yun; Li, Li; Zhong, Ming

    2016-06-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular diseases in men. However, its effect on cell senescence, which plays a causal role in vascular aging, remains unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that testosterone alleviated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) senescence and collagen synthesis via growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6)/Axl- and Akt/FoxO1a-dependent pathways. Testosterone significantly ameliorated angiotensin II-induced VSMC senescence and collagen overexpression. In addition, testosterone inhibited angiotensin II-induced matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity, which played a pivotal role in facilitating age-related collagen deposition. Testosterone increased the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 but decreased the expression of MMP-2 and membrane type-1 metalloproteinase which contributed to increase MMP-2 activity. The effects on VSMCs senescence and collagen synthesis were mediated by restoration of angiotensin II-induced downregulation of Gas6 and Axl expression and a subsequent reduction of Akt and FoxO1a phosphorylation. The effects of testosterone were reversed by a Gas6 blocker, Axl-Fc, and a specific inhibitor of Axl, R428. Treatment of VSMCs with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 abrogated the downregulating effect of testosterone on MMP-2 activity. Furthermore, when FoxO1a expression was silenced by using a specific siRNA, the inhibitory effect of testosterone on MMP-2 activity was revered as well, that indicated this process was Akt/FoxO1a dependence. Taken together, Gas6/Axl and Akt/FoxO1a were involved in protective effects of testosterone on VSMCs senescence and collagen synthesis. Our results provide a novel mechanism underlying the protective effect of testosterone on vascular aging and may serve as a theoretical basis for testosterone replacement therapy. PMID:27206970

  12. Influence of cholesterol and fish oil dietary intake on nitric oxide-induced apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Sonia; Alejandre, Ma José; Palomino-Morales, Rogelio; Torres, Carolina; Linares, Ana

    2010-04-01

    Apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) is critically involved in the progression of atherosclerosis. We previously reported that dietary cholesterol intake induces changes in SMC at molecular and gene expression levels. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the differential response to nitric oxide of vascular SMC obtained from chicks after cholesterol and fish oil dietary intake and to examine effects on the main pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes. Dietary cholesterol intake reduced the Bcl-2/Bax (anti-apoptotic/pro-apoptotic) protein ratio in SMC, making them more susceptible to apoptosis. When cholesterol was withdrawn and replaced with a fish oil-enriched diet, the Bcl-xl/Bax protein ratio significantly increased, reversing the changes induced by cholesterol. The decrease in c-myc gene expression after apoptotic stimuli and the increase in Bcl-xl/Bax ratio indicate that fish oil has a protective role against apoptosis in SMC. Nitroprussiate-like nitric oxide donors exerted an intensive action on vascular SMC cultures. However, SMC-C (isolated from animals fed with control diet) and SMC-Ch (isolated from animals fed with cholesterol-enriched diet) responded differently to nitric oxide, especially in their bcl-2 and bcl-xl gene expression. SMC isolated from animals fed with cholesterol-enriched and then fish oil-enriched diet (SMC-Ch-FO cultures) showed an intermediate apoptosis level (Bcl-2/Bax ratio) between SMC-C and SMC-Ch, induction of c-myc expression and elevated p53 expression. These findings indicate that fish oil protects SMC against apoptosis.

  13. Piperine inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-BB-induced proliferation and migration in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang Pa; Lee, Kwan; Park, Won-Hwan; Kim, Hyuck; Hong, Heeok

    2015-02-01

    The proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in blood vessels are important in the pathogenesis of vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. Piperine, a major component of black pepper, has antioxidant, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory activity. However, the antiatherosclerotic effects of piperine have not been investigated. In this study, the effects of piperine on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs were investigated. The antiproliferative effects of piperine were determined using MTT assays, cell counting, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and western blots. Our results showed that piperine significantly attenuated the proliferation of VSMCs by increasing the expression of p27(kip1), regulating the mRNA expression of cell cycle enzymes (cyclin D, cyclin E, and PCNA), and decreasing the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 in a noncytotoxic concentration-dependent manner (30-100 μM). Moreover, we examined the effects of piperine on the migration of PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs, as determined by the Boyden chamber assay, H2DCFDA staining, and western blots. Our results showed that 100 μM piperine decreased cell migration, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and phosphorylation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Taken together, our results suggest that piperine inhibits PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and the migration of VSMCs by inducing cell cycle arrest and suppressing MAPK phosphorylation and ROS. These findings suggest that piperine may be beneficial for the treatment of vascular-related disorders and diseases.

  14. Comparison of MEK/ERK pathway inhibitors on the upregulation of vascular G-protein coupled receptors in rat cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, Hardip; Ansar, Saema; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    on translational level and increased respective contractions. The prostanoid TP receptor mediated contraction curve was left-wards shifted by organ culture. Organ culture was associated with elevated pERK1/2 in the vascular smooth muscle cells: the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 attenuated the endothelin ET(B) receptor......Organ culture is an in vitro method for investigating cellular mechanisms involved in upregulation of vasocontractile G-protein coupled receptors. We hypothesize that mitogen-activated-protein kinase (MEK) and/or extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) specific inhibitors will attenuate the G......-protein coupled receptor expression following organ culture. Rat cerebral arteries were incubated 48h in the presence of MEK/ERK specific inhibitors U0126, PD98059, SL327, or AG126 for different time periods. Contractile responses by activation of endothelin receptor type A and type B, serotonin receptor 5-HT(1B...

  15. Role of Hypoxia-Induced Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Hartman, William; Helan, Martin; Smelter, Dan; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Thompson, Michael; Pabelick, Christina M.; Johnson, Bruce; Y S Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypoxia effects on pulmonary artery structure and function are key to diseases such as pulmonary hypertension. Recent studies suggest that growth factors called neurotrophins, particularly brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), can influence lung structure and function, and their role in the pulmonary artery warrants further investigation. In this study, we examined the effect of hypoxia on BDNF in humans, and the influence of hypoxia-enhanced BDNF expression and signaling in hu...

  16. Fenfluramine-induced gene dysregulation in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle and endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Weijuan; Mu, Wenbo; Zeifman, Amy; Lofti, Michelle; Remillard, Carmelle V.; Makino, Ayako; Perkins, David L.; Garcia, Joe G.; Yuan, Jason X. J.; Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Fenfluramine is prescribed either alone or in combination with phentermine as part of Fen-Phen, an anti-obesity medication. Fenfluramine was withdrawn from the US market in 1997 due to reports of heart valvular disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and cardiac fibrosis. Particularly, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), previously referred to as primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH), was found to be associated with the use of Fen-Phen, fenfluramine, and fenfluramine derivativ...

  17. Effects of High Glucose on Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Synthesis and Secretion in Aortic Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells from Obese and Lean Zucker Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariella Trovati

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes is characterized by insulin deficiency, type 2 by both insulin deficiency and insulin resistance: in both conditions, hyperglycaemia is accompanied by an increased cardiovascular risk, due to increased atherosclerotic plaque formation/instabilization and impaired collateral vessel formation. An important factor in these phenomena is the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF, a molecule produced also by Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells (VSMC. We aimed at evaluating the role of high glucose on VEGF-A164 synthesis and secretion in VSMC from lean insulin-sensitive and obese insulin-resistant Zucker rats (LZR and OZR. In cultured aortic VSMC from LZR and OZR incubated for 24 h with D-glucose (5.5, 15 and 25 mM or with the osmotic controls L-glucose and mannitol, we measured VEGF-A164 synthesis (western, blotting and secretion (western blotting and ELISA. We observed that: (i D-glucose dose-dependently increases VEGF-A164 synthesis and secretion in VSMC from LZR and OZR (n = 6, ANOVA p = 0.002–0.0001; (ii all the effects of 15 and 25 mM D-glucose are attenuated in VSMC from OZR vs. LZR (p = 0.0001; (iii L-glucose and mannitol reproduce the VEGF-A164 modulation induced by D-glucose in VSMC from both LZR and OZR. Thus, glucose increases via an osmotic mechanism VEGF synthesis and secretion in VSMC, an effect attenuated in the presence of insulin resistance.

  18. Comparison of the effects of elevated inorganic phosphate on primary human vascular smooth muscle cells and the pre-osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup

    into the role of Pi on vascular mineralization has revealed that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) mineralize in vitro when cultured in hyperphosphatemic media in a manner that is dependent on the type III sodium-dependent Pi transporter, PiT1, and that Pi causes regulation of gene expression, e...... the existence of various inhibitors of vascular mineralization, which are expressed by VSMCs. Together these observations suggest that vascular mineralization is not a passive deposition of calcium-phosphate, as believed for many years, but that VSMCs play a role in the process. In this thesis, I have.......g., upregulation of the osteoblastic transcription factor Runx2, demonstrating that Pi is a signaling molecule. Other similarities with mineralizing osteoblasts have also often been observed in vascular mineralization. In addition, in the past two decades, a number of studies on knockout mice have demonstrated...

  19. Inhibition of Collagen Synthesis and Regulation of Cell Motility in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells by Suppression of Connective Tissue growth Factor Expression Using RNA Interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Jing LIU; Huai-Qing CHEN

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) hyperplasia plays an important role in both chronic and acute pathologies including atherosclerosis and restenosis. Recent studies have shown that connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a novel growth factor involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis.

  20. Preeclampsia serum-induced collagen I expression and intracellular calcium levels in arterial smooth muscle cells are mediated by the PLC-γ1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rongzhen; Teng, Yincheng; Huang, Yajuan; Gu, Jinghong; Ma, Li; Li, Ming; Zhou, Yuedi

    2014-09-26

    In women with preeclampsia (PE), endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction can lead to altered secretion of paracrine factors that induce peripheral vasoconstriction and proteinuria. This study examined the hypothesis that PE sera may directly or indirectly, through human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs), stimulate phospholipase C-γ1-1,4,5-trisphosphate (PLC-γ1-IP3) signaling, thereby increasing protein kinase C-α (PKC-α) activity, collagen I expression and intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs). HUASMCs and HUVECs were cocultured with normal or PE sera before PLC-γ1 silencing. Increased PLC-γ1 and IP3 receptor (IP3R) phosphorylation was observed in cocultured HUASMCs stimulated with PE sera (PPLC-γ1 silencing. Compared with normal sera, PE sera increased [Ca(2+)]i in cocultured HUASMCs (PPLC-γ1 and IP3R silencing. Finally, PE sera-induced PKC-α activity and collagen I expression was inhibited by PLC-γ1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) (PPLC-γ1, which may in turn result in thickening and hardening of the placental vascular wall, placental blood supply shortage, fetal hypoxia-ischemia and intrauterine growth retardation or intrauterine fetal death. PE sera increased [Ca(2+)]i and induced PKC-α activation and collagen I expression in cocultured HUASMCs via the PLC-γ1 pathway.

  1. Conjugated agent insulin-antisense-c-myb-PS-ODN enhances the inhibitory effect on proliferation of rat aortic artery smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM:Vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and migration from the arterial wall media into the intima are believed to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of restenosis. Several studies have demonstrated that phosphothioate (PS) oligodeoxynucleotides targeted against genes involved in SMC proliferation inhibits in vitro SMC proliferation and migration. However, the therapeutic effect of antisense ODN on the individual who receives the treatment of delivery of the agent depends on the efficacy of this agent in great degree. We investigated the inhibition effect of a novel agent, insulin-antisense-c-myb-PS-ODN on SMC proliferation in vitro. METHODS:The rat aortic artery SMCs were cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagel's medium. The passage 8 to 13 were used as the experiment. Cell surface receptor binding assay was quantified through counting gamma particles emitted from 125    I labeled insulin. SMC rapid proliferation was brought by stimulation of high concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS). The novel agent of insulin conjugated to the antisense-c-myb-PS-ODN was obtained via incubation of both in condition of certain reagents, pH, temperature, and ion concentration. The characterization and purification of the agent was performed through HPLC. Inhibition of SMC proliferation was reflected by incorporation rate of trillium labeled thymidine deoxyribonucleotide.RESULTS:The binding efficacy of insulin to the receptor was remarkably increased in SMC cultured in supplement of 20% FBS. The inhibition effect of conjugator insulin-c-myb-antisense-PS-ODN was stronger than that of the simple c-myb-antisense-PS-ODN. The inhibition rate of conjugator and simple form on SMC proliferation were 48.34% and 29.54%, respectively. CONCLUSION:The binding efficacy and specificity of c-myb-antisense-PS-ODN to SMC may be enhanced by the insulin receptor mediation through the insulin-insulin receptor interaction. The insulin-receptor targeted method may be a

  2. MARCKS Signaling Differentially Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Cell Proliferation through a KIS-, p27kip1- Dependent Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Yu

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the myristolated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS occurs in vascular proliferative diseases such as restenosis after bypass surgery. MARCKS knockdown results in arrest of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC proliferation with little effect on endothelial cell (EC proliferation. We sought to identify the mechanism of differential regulation by MARCKS of VSMC and EC proliferation in vitro and in vivo.siRNA-mediated MARCKS knockdown in VSMCs inhibited proliferation and prevented progression from phase G0/G1 to S. Protein expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27kip1, but not p21cip1 was increased by MARCKS knockdown. MARCKS knockdown did not affect proliferation in VSMCs derived from p27kip1-/- mice indicating that the effect of MARCKS is p27kip1-dependent. MARCKS knockdown resulted in decreased phosphorylation of p27kip1 at threonine 187 and serine 10 as well as, kinase interacting with stathmin (KIS, cyclin D1, and Skp2 expression. Phosphorylation of p27kip1 at serine 10 by KIS is required for nuclear export and degradation of p27kip1. MARCKS knockdown caused nuclear trapping of p27kip1. Both p27kip1 nuclear trapping and cell cycle arrest were released by overexpression of KIS, but not catalytically inactive KIS. In ECs, MARCKS knockdown paradoxically increased KIS expression and cell proliferation. MARCKS knockdown in a murine aortic injury model resulted in decreased VSMC proliferation determined by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU integration assay, and inhibition of vascular wall thickening. MARCKS knockdown increased the rate of re-endothelialization.MARCKS knockdown arrested VSMC cell cycle by decreasing KIS expression. Decreased KIS expression resulted in nuclear trapping of p27kip1 in VSMCs. MARCKS knockdown paradoxically increased KIS expression in ECs resulting in increased EC proliferation. MARCKS knockdown significantly attenuated the VSMC proliferative response to vascular injury, but accelerated

  3. Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 by insulin in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong-tao; PAN Xiao-ming; FAN Min; WU Zong-gui; LU Hui-qi; TU Xiao-qing; GAO Chun-fang

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression induced by insulin in cultured rat vascularmuscle smooth cells (VSMCs). Methods: The rat VSMCs were isolated and cultured in 60 mm plates, pre-treated with in-sulin 10, 100, 500, 1 000 mU/L for 6 h, and 100 mU/L for 3, 6, 12, and 24 h, respectively. RT-PCR was performed tomeasure COX-2 mRNA induction, and Western-blot was used to measure protein expression. In regard to the COX-2 enzymeactivity, after stimulation for a specified duration, the culture medium was collected; Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) released byVSMCs was measured with an EIA kit. Results: Three hours after insulin (100 mU/L) stimulation, the induction of COX-2mRNA was detectable and increased with the time and dosage of insulin. Insulin induced COX-2 protein expression occurredin a time- and dose-dependent manner. In rat VSMCs, COX-2 induced by insulin resulted in PGE2 production, which wasincreased with insulin action. Conclusion: Insulin could induce COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in VSMCs in time-and dose-dependent manners.

  4. Combined vascular reconstruction and free flap transfer in diabetic arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermassen, F E; van Landuyt, K

    2000-01-01

    Gangrenous lesions of the foot or lower leg due to severe diabetic arterial disease resulting in extensive soft tissue defects with exposed bones or tendons often result, even after successful revascularisation, in staged or primary amputation. We present our experience with 45 such patients treated with combined arterial reconstruction and free tissue transfer for limb-salvage. All presented with peripheral vascular disease of diabetic origin, and extensive gangrenous lesions that could not be treated by simple wound closure or skin-grafting without major amputation. A total of 53 arterial reconstructions and 47 free-flap transfers were performed. In the majority of patients, the distal anastomosis was on a pedal or tibial vessel. These bypass grafts or a native revascularized artery served as the inflow tract for the free flap which was anastomosed using microsurgical techniques. Venous anastomoses were preferentially performed on the deep venous system. Donor muscles were Musculus rectus abdominis (n=37), Musculus latissimus dorsi (n=5), Musculus serratus anterior (n=3), and a perforator flap (n=2) tailored to the size of the defect and covered with a split thickness graft (STG). The operation was set up as a combined procedure in 39/45 patients, two teams working simultaneously, limiting the mean operative time to 6 h. Early reinterventions had to be performed in 14 patients resulting in five flap losses of which two could be treated with a new free flap transfer and three were amputated. Three other patients died in the postoperative period, leaving us with a total of 39/45 patients leaving the hospital with a full-length limb. Independent ambulation was achieved in 32 of these 39 patients. During late follow-up (mean 26 months) eight bypasses occluded resulting in two amputations and two new vascular reconstructions. Combined survival and limb-salvage rate was 84% after 1 year, 77% after 2 years and 65% after 3 years. The advantages of this combined technique

  5. New Insights into Dialysis Vascular Access: Impact of Preexisting Arterial and Venous Pathology on AVF and AVG Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Padron, Roberto I; Allon, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Despite significant improvements in preoperative patient evaluation and surgical planning, vascular access failure in patients on hemodialysis remains a frequent and often unforeseeable complication. Our inability to prevent this complication is, in part, because of an incomplete understanding of how preexisting venous and arterial conditions influence the function of newly created arteriovenous fistulas and grafts. This article reviews the relationship between three preexisting vascular pathologies associated with CKD (intimal hyperplasia, vascular calcification, and medial fibrosis) and hemodialysis access outcomes. The published literature indicates that the pathogenesis of vascular access failure is multifactorial and not determined by any of these pathologies individually. Keeping this observation in mind should help focus our research on the true causes responsible for vascular access failure and the much needed therapies to prevent it. PMID:27401525

  6. Effect of endothelin-1 on calcium channel gating by agonists in vascular smooth muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat isolated aorta was more sensitive to the contractile effect of endothelin-1 (ET-1) when the endothelium was removed. ET-1 was more potent on mesenteric resistance arteries than on aorta. A threshold concentration of ET-1 (100 pM) enhanced the contractile responses of aortic rings to Bay K 8644 and clonidine, especially in the absence of endothelium. Potentiation of clonidine-evoked contraction was accompanied by an enhancement of 45Ca influx and was abolished by nifedipine. These actions of ET-1 (100 pM) could not be attributed to a decrease in membrane potential or in cAMP levels. ET-1 (100 pM) decreased cGMP in intact aortic rings, which could contribute to its actions in the presence of endothelium. Removal of endothelium reduced cGMP levels and these were not further decreased by ET-1. Since ET-1 exerted a pronounced potentiating effect in the absence of endothelium, it is likely that ET-1 modulates calcium channels by an additional mechanism, unrelated to cyclic nucleotides

  7. Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula of an Adult-Type Persistent Primitive Trigeminal Artery with Multiple Vascular Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sung-Chul; Park, Hyun; Choi, Choong-Gon

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous right carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) in a proximal segment of persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) and combined vascular anomalies such as left duplicated hypoplastic proximal posterior cerebral arteries and a variation of anterior choroidal artery supplying temporal and occipital lobe. A 45-year-old male presented with progressive right exophthalmos, diplopia, and ocular pain. With manual compression of the internal carotid artery, a cerebral angiography revealed a right CCF from a PPTA. Treatment involved the placement of detachable non-fibered and fibered coils, and use of a hyperglide balloon to protect against coil herniation into the internal carotid artery. A final angiograph revealed complete occlusion of PPTA resulted in no contrast filling of CCF. PMID:21607181

  8. Direct carotid cavernous fistula of an adult-type persistent primitive trigeminal artery with multiple vascular variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sung-Chul; Park, Hyun; Kwon, Do Hoon; Choi, Choong-Gon

    2011-04-01

    We report a case of spontaneous right carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) in a proximal segment of persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) and combined vascular anomalies such as left duplicated hypoplastic proximal posterior cerebral arteries and a variation of anterior choroidal artery supplying temporal and occipital lobe. A 45-year-old male presented with progressive right exophthalmos, diplopia, and ocular pain. With manual compression of the internal carotid artery, a cerebral angiography revealed a right CCF from a PPTA. Treatment involved the placement of detachable non-fibered and fibered coils, and use of a hyperglide balloon to protect against coil herniation into the internal carotid artery. A final angiograph revealed complete occlusion of PPTA resulted in no contrast filling of CCF. PMID:21607181

  9. Messenger molecules of the phospholipase signaling system have dual effects on vascular smooth muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidulescu, Cristina; Mironneau, J.; Mironneau, Chantal; Popescu, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    Background and methods. In order to investigate the role of phospholipases and their immediately derived messengers in agonist-induced contraction of portal vein smooth muscle, we used the addition in the organ bath of exogenous molecules such as: phospholipases C, A(2), and D, diacylglycerol, arachidonic acid, phosphatidic acid, choline. We also used substances modulating activity of downstream molecules like protein kinase C, phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, or cyclooxygenase. Results. a) Exogenous phospholipases C or A(2), respectively, induced small agonist-like contractions, while exogenous phospholipase D did not. Moreover, phospholipase D inhibited spontaneous contractions. However, when added during noradrenaline-induced plateau, phospholipase D shortly potentiated it. b) The protein kinase C activator, phorbol dibutyrate potentiated both the exogenous phospholipase C-induced contraction and the noradrenaline-induced plateau, while the protein kinase C inhibitor 1-(-5-isoquinolinesulfonyl)-2-methyl-piperazine relaxed the plateau. c) When added before noradrenaline, indomethacin inhibited both phasic and tonic contractions, but when added during the tonic contraction shortly potentiated it. Arachidonic acid strongly potentiated both spontaneous and noradrenaline-induced contractions, irrespective of the moment of its addition. d) In contrast, phosphatidic acid inhibited spontaneous contractile activity, nevertheless it was occasionally capable of inducing small contractions, and when repetitively added during the agonist-induced tonic contraction, produced short potentiations of the plateau. Pretreatment with propranolol inhibited noradrenaline-induced contractions and further addition of phosphatidic acid augmented this inhibition. Choline augmented the duration and amplitude of noradrenaline-induced tonic contraction and final contractile oscillations. Conclusions. These data suggest that messengers produced by phospholipase C and phospholipase A(2

  10. Effect of 103Pd on proliferation and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Quan-Yong; ZHU Jun; LU Han-Kui; ZHU Rui-Sen

    2003-01-01

    This study aimed at the effect of γ -emitting radionuclide 103Pd on the proliferation and apoptosis ofvascular SMCs (smooth muscle cells) in vitro. The cavy aortic SMCs were cultured with culture medium M-199. Theexperiments were carried out in two groups, one for proliferation test and the other for apoptosis test. In each group,103Pd solutions with various radioactivities were respectively added to the culture solution to irradiate SMCs for 72 h,while non-radioactive palladium solution was added to the control. 3H-thymidine incorporation test and liquid scin-tillator were used to detect the effect of 103Pd on the proliferation of SMCs. Flow cytometer was used to detect theapoptotic SMCs. The inhibition rate of SMCs proliferation by 1.85 MBq 103Pd solution was 2.3%, which was not sig-nificant, while the inhibition rate increased from 41.6% to 91.3% as the 103Pd activity increased from 7.40 MBq to 37MBq. The apoptosis rate of SMCs was extremely low (less than 4.0%) by 103Pd with activity from 1.85 MBq to 37MBq. The results suggest that the proliferation of SMCs can be repressed effectively in a dose-dependent fashion by103Pd in vitro. The mechanism of its inhibiting over neointima proliferation is likely to inhibite SMCs proliferationrather than to induce its apoptosis by 103Pd. 103Pd can be used as a γ -emitting intravascular brachytherapy radionu-clide to inhibit SMCs proliferation.

  11. Impaired sodium-dependent adaptation of arterial stiffness in formerly preeclamptic women : the RETAP-vascular study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, Anne Marijn; Paauw, Nina D.; Toering, Tsjitske J.; Feelisch, Martin; Faas, Marijke M.; Sutton, Thomas R.; Minnion, Magdalena; Lefrandt, Joop. D.; Scherjon, Sicco A.; Franx, Arie; Navis, Gerjan; Lely, A. Titia

    2016-01-01

    Women with a history of preeclampsia have an increased risk for cardiovascular diseases later in life. Persistent vascular alterations in the postpartum period might contribute to this increased risk. The current study assessed arterial stiffness under low sodium (LS) and high sodium (HS) conditions

  12. Intra-arterial papaverine and leg vascular resistance during in situ bypass surgery with high or low epidural anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørdam, Peter; Jensen, Leif Panduro; Schroeder, T V;

    1993-01-01

    patients were operated during high epidural anaesthesia (> Th. 10). Flow increased and arterial pressure decreased after i.a. papaverine in all patients. When compared with patients operated during high epidural anaesthesia, flow increase and decrease in vascular resistance took place in patients operated...

  13. Phenylacetic acid and arterial vascular properties in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Jankowski, Vera; Henning, Lars;

    2007-01-01

    Phenylacetic acid (PAA) is a recently described uremic toxin that inhibits inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and plasma membrane calcium ATPase and may therefore also be involved in remodeling of arteries. Such vascular effects have not been evaluated yet in patients with chronic kidney ...

  14. Polyclonal antibody production and expression of CREG protein in human vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaling HAN; Haiwei LIU; Jian KANG; Xiaozeng WANG; Ye HU; Lianyou ZHAO; Shaohua LI

    2005-01-01

    Objectives The cellular repressor of E1A-activated genes (CREG), a novel gene, was recently found to play a role in inhibiting cell growth and promoting cell differentiation. The purpose of this study was to obtain antibody against CREG protein and to study the expression of CREG protein in human internal thoracic artery cells (HITASY) which express different patterns of differentiation markers after serum withdrawal. Methods The open reading frame of CREG gene sequence was amplified by PCR and cloned into the pGEX-4T-1 vector. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-CREG fusion protein was expressed in E. Coli BL21 and purified from inclusion bodies by Sephacryl S-200 chromatography. Rabbits were immunized with the purified GST-CREG protein. Western blot examined with immunohistochemistry staining and the protein expression level was analyzed by Western blot in HITASY cells after serum removal. Results It was confirmed by using endonuclease digesting and DNA sequencing that the PCR product of CREG was correctly inserted into the vector. The GST-CREG protein was purified with gel filtration chromatography. Polyclonal antibody against GST-CREG was obtained from rabbits. CREG protein immunohistochemistry staining displayed a perinuclear distribution in the cytoplasm of HITASY cells. Results from Western blot suggested that comparing with the untreated cells upregulation of CREG polyclonal antibody against CREG was comfirmed. Using this antibody, the changes of CREG protein expression was observed in the process of phenotypic modulation of HITASY cells. These results provide basic understanding on the relationship of CREG gene with the cell phenotypic conversion.

  15. Vascular growth responses to chronic arterial occlusion are unaffected by myeloid specific focal adhesion kinase (FAK) deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuslein, Joshua L; Murrell, Kelsey P; Leiphart, Ryan J; Llewellyn, Ryan A; Meisner, Joshua K; Price, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Arteriogenesis, or the lumenal expansion of pre-existing arterioles in the presence of an upstream occlusion, is a fundamental vascular growth response. Though alterations in shear stress stimulate arteriogenesis, the migration of monocytes into the perivascular space surrounding collateral arteries and their differentiation into macrophages is critical for this vascular growth response to occur. Focal adhesion kinase's (FAK) role in regulating cell migration has recently been expanded to primary macrophages. We therefore investigated the effect of the myeloid-specific conditional deletion of FAK on vascular remodeling in the mouse femoral arterial ligation (FAL) model. Using laser Doppler perfusion imaging, whole mount imaging of vascular casted gracilis muscles, and immunostaining for CD31 in gastrocnemius muscles cross-sections, we found that there were no statistical differences in perfusion recovery, arteriogenesis, or angiogenesis 28 days after FAL. We therefore sought to determine FAK expression in different myeloid cell populations. We found that FAK is expressed at equally low levels in Ly6C(hi) and Ly6C(lo) blood monocytes, however expression is increased over 2-fold in bone marrow derived macrophages. Ultimately, these results suggest that FAK is not required for monocyte migration to the perivascular space and that vascular remodeling following arterial occlusion occurs independently of myeloid specific FAK. PMID:27244251

  16. Vascular growth responses to chronic arterial occlusion are unaffected by myeloid specific focal adhesion kinase (FAK) deletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuslein, Joshua L.; Murrell, Kelsey P.; Leiphart, Ryan J.; Llewellyn, Ryan A.; Meisner, Joshua K.; Price, Richard J.

    2016-05-01

    Arteriogenesis, or the lumenal expansion of pre-existing arterioles in the presence of an upstream occlusion, is a fundamental vascular growth response. Though alterations in shear stress stimulate arteriogenesis, the migration of monocytes into the perivascular space surrounding collateral arteries and their differentiation into macrophages is critical for this vascular growth response to occur. Focal adhesion kinase’s (FAK) role in regulating cell migration has recently been expanded to primary macrophages. We therefore investigated the effect of the myeloid-specific conditional deletion of FAK on vascular remodeling in the mouse femoral arterial ligation (FAL) model. Using laser Doppler perfusion imaging, whole mount imaging of vascular casted gracilis muscles, and immunostaining for CD31 in gastrocnemius muscles cross-sections, we found that there were no statistical differences in perfusion recovery, arteriogenesis, or angiogenesis 28 days after FAL. We therefore sought to determine FAK expression in different myeloid cell populations. We found that FAK is expressed at equally low levels in Ly6Chi and Ly6Clo blood monocytes, however expression is increased over 2-fold in bone marrow derived macrophages. Ultimately, these results suggest that FAK is not required for monocyte migration to the perivascular space and that vascular remodeling following arterial occlusion occurs independently of myeloid specific FAK.

  17. Spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in subcellular compartments of vascular smooth muscle cells rely on different Ca2+ pools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in vascular smooth muscle cells have been modeled using a single Ca2+ pool. This report describes spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations dependent on two separate Ca2+ sources for the nuclear versus cytoplasmic compartments. Changes in free intracellular Ca2+ were monitored with ratiometric Ca2+- fluorophores using confocal microscopy. On average, spontaneous oscillations developed in 79% of rat aortic smooth muscle cells that were synchronous between the cytoplasm and nucleus. Reduction of extracellular Ca2+ (< 1 μM) decreased the frequency and amplitude of the cytoplasmic oscillations with 48% of the oscillations asynchronous between the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. Similar results were obtained with the Ca2+ channel blockers, nimodipine and diltiazem.Arg-vasopressin (AVP) induced a rapid release of intracellular Ca2+ stores that was greater in the nuclear compartment (4.20 ± 0.23 ratio units, n = 56) than cytoplasm (2.54 ± 0.28) in cells that had spontaneously developed prior oscillations.Conversely, cells in the same conditions lacking oscillations had a greater AVP-induced Ca2+ transient in the cytoplasm (4.99 ± 0.66, n = 17) than in the nucleus (2.67 ± 0.29). Pre-treatment with Ca2+ channel blockers depressed the AVP responses in both compartments with the cytoplasmic Ca2+ most diminished. Depletion of internal Ca2+ stores prior to AVP exposure blunted the nuclear response, mimicking the response of cells that lacked prior oscillations. Spontaneous oscillating cells had a greater sarcoplasmic reticulum network than cells that did not oscillate. We propose that spontaneous nuclear oscillations rely on perinuclear sarcoplasmic reticulum stores, while the cytoplasmic oscillations rely on Ca2+ influx.

  18. K channel activation by nucleotide diphosphates and its inhibition by glibenclamide in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, D J; Zhang, H; Nakao, K; Bolton, T B

    1993-10-01

    1. Whole-cell and inside-out patch recordings were made from single smooth muscle cells that had been isolated enzymatically and mechanically from the rabbit portal vein. 2. In whole-cells the inclusion in the recording pipette solution of nucleotide diphosphates (NDPs), but not tri- or monophosphates, induced a K-current that developed gradually over 5 to 15 min. Intracellular 1 mM guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP) induced a slowly developing outward K-current at -37 mV that reached a maximum on average of 72 +/- 4 pA (n = 40). Half maximal effect was estimated to occur with about 0.2 mM GDP. Except for ADP, other NDPs had comparable effects. At 0.1 mM, ADP was equivalent to GDP but at higher concentration ADP was less effective. ADP induced its maximum effect at 1 mM but had almost no effect at 10 mM. 3. In 14% of inside-out patches exposed to 1 mM GDP at the intracellular surface, characteristic K channel activity was observed which showed long (> 1 s) bursts of openings separated by longer closed periods. The current-voltage relationship for the channel was linear in a 60 mM:130 mM K-gradient and the unitary conductance was 24 pS. 4. Glibenclamide applied via the extracellular solution was found to be a potent inhibitor of GDP-induced K-current (IK(GDP)) in the whole-cell. The Kd was 25 nM and the inhibition was fully reversible on wash-out. 5. IK(GDP) was not evoked if Mg ions were absent from the pipette solution. In contrast the omission of extracellular Mg ions had no effect on outward or inward IK(GDP). 6. Inclusion of 1 mM ATP in the recording pipette solution reduced IK(GDP) and also attenuated its decline during long (25 min) recordings. 7. When perforated-patch whole-cell recording was used, metabolic poisoning with cyanide and 2-deoxy-D-glucose induced a glibenclamide-sensitive K-current. This current was not observed when conventional whole-cell recording was used. Possible reasons for this difference are discussed. 8. These K channels appear similar to

  19. c-Ski inhibits autophagy of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by oxLDL and PDGF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    Full Text Available Autophagy is increasingly being recognized as a critical determinant of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC biology. Previously, we have demonstrated that c-Ski inhibits VSMC proliferation stimulated by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β, but it is not clear whether c-Ski has the similar protective role against other vascular injury factors and whether regulation of autophagy is involved in its protective effects on VSMC. Accordingly, in this study, rat aortic A10 VSMCs were treated with 40 µg/ml oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL or 20 ng/ml platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, both of which were autophagy inducers and closely related to the abnormal proliferation of VSMCs. Overexpression of c-Ski in A10 cells significantly suppressed the oxLDL- and PDGF- induced autophagy. This action of c-Ski resulted in inhibiting the cell proliferation, the decrease of contractile phenotype marker α-SMA expression while the increase of synthetic phenotype marker osteopontin expression stimulated by oxLDL or PDGF. Inversely, knockdown of c-Ski by RNAi enhanced the stimulatory effects of oxLDL or PDGF on A10 cell growth and phenotype transition. And further investigation found that inhibition of AKT phosphorylation to downregulate proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA expression, was involved in the regulation of autophagy and associated functions by c-Ski in the oxLDL- and PDGF-stimulated VSMCs. Collectively, c-Ski may play an important role in inhibiting autophagy to protect VSMCs against some harsh stress including oxLDL and PDGF.

  20. c-Ski inhibits autophagy of vascular smooth muscle cells induced by oxLDL and PDGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Li; Yang, Ting; Zeng, Yi-Jun; Yang, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is increasingly being recognized as a critical determinant of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) biology. Previously, we have demonstrated that c-Ski inhibits VSMC proliferation stimulated by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), but it is not clear whether c-Ski has the similar protective role against other vascular injury factors and whether regulation of autophagy is involved in its protective effects on VSMC. Accordingly, in this study, rat aortic A10 VSMCs were treated with 40 µg/ml oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) or 20 ng/ml platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), both of which were autophagy inducers and closely related to the abnormal proliferation of VSMCs. Overexpression of c-Ski in A10 cells significantly suppressed the oxLDL- and PDGF- induced autophagy. This action of c-Ski resulted in inhibiting the cell proliferation, the decrease of contractile phenotype marker α-SMA expression while the increase of synthetic phenotype marker osteopontin expression stimulated by oxLDL or PDGF. Inversely, knockdown of c-Ski by RNAi enhanced the stimulatory effects of oxLDL or PDGF on A10 cell growth and phenotype transition. And further investigation found that inhibition of AKT phosphorylation to downregulate proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression, was involved in the regulation of autophagy and associated functions by c-Ski in the oxLDL- and PDGF-stimulated VSMCs. Collectively, c-Ski may play an important role in inhibiting autophagy to protect VSMCs against some harsh stress including oxLDL and PDGF.

  1. Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-Products Signaling Interferes with the Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Contractile Phenotype and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Simard

    Full Text Available Increased blood glucose concentrations promote reactions between glucose and proteins to form advanced glycation end-products (AGE. Circulating AGE in the blood plasma can activate the receptor for advanced end-products (RAGE, which is present on both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC. RAGE exhibits a complex signaling that involves small G-proteins and mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK, which lead to increased nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB activity. While RAGE signaling has been previously addressed in endothelial cells, little is known regarding its impact on the function of VSMC. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAGE signaling leads to alterations in the mechanical and functional properties of VSMC, which could contribute to complications associated with diabetes. We demonstrated that RAGE is expressed and functional in the A7r5 VSMC model, and its activation by AGE significantly increased NF-κB activity, which is known to interfere with the contractile phenotype of VSMC. The protein levels of the contraction-related transcription factor myocardin were also decreased by RAGE activation with a concomitant decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of transgelin (SM-22α, a regulator of VSMC contraction. Interestingly, we demonstrated that RAGE activation increased the overall cell rigidity, an effect that can be related to an increase in myosin activity. Finally, although RAGE stimulation amplified calcium signaling and slightly myosin activity in VSMC challenged with vasopressin, their contractile capacity was negatively affected. Overall, RAGE activation in VSMC could represent a keystone in the development of vascular diseases associated with diabetes by interfering with the contractile phenotype of VSMC through the modification of their mechanical and functional properties.

  2. Fetuin-A and albumin alter cytotoxic effects of calcium phosphate nanoparticles on human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Dautova

    Full Text Available Calcification is a detrimental process in vascular ageing and in diseases such as atherosclerosis and arthritis. In particular, small calcium phosphate (CaP crystal deposits are associated with inflammation and atherosclerotic plaque de-stabilisation. We previously reported that CaP particles caused human vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC death and that serum reduced the toxic effects of the particles. Here, we found that the serum proteins fetuin-A and albumin (≥ 1 µM reduced intracellular Ca2+ elevations and cell death in VSMCs in response to CaP particles. In addition, CaP particles functionalised with fetuin-A, but not albumin, were less toxic than naked CaP particles. Electron microscopic studies revealed that CaP particles were internalised in different ways; via macropinocytosis, membrane invagination or plasma membrane damage, which occurred within 10 minutes of exposure to particles. However, cell death did not occur until approximately 30 minutes, suggesting that plasma membrane repair and survival mechanisms were activated. In the presence of fetuin-A, CaP particle-induced damage was inhibited and CaP/plasma membrane interactions and particle uptake were delayed. Fetuin-A also reduced dissolution of CaP particles under acidic conditions, which may contribute to its cytoprotective effects after CaP particle exposure to VSMCs. These studies are particularly relevant to the calcification observed in blood vessels in patients with kidney disease, where circulating levels of fetuin-A and albumin are low, and in pathological situations where CaP crystal formation outweighs calcification-inhibitory mechanisms.

  3. Aldosterone increases oxidant stress to impair guanylyl cyclase activity by cysteinyl thiol oxidation in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Bradley A; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Handy, Diane E; Beuve, Annie; Tang, Shiow-Shih; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A

    2009-03-20

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent vascular reactivity owing to increased reactive oxygen species and decreased bioavailable nitric oxide (NO(.)); however, the effects of aldosterone on vasodilatory signaling pathways in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) remain unknown. Soluble guanylyl cyclase (GC) is a heterodimer that is activated by NO(.) to convert cytosolic GTP to cGMP, a second messenger required for normal VSMC relaxation. Here, we show that aldosterone (10(-9)-10(-7) mol/liter) diminishes GC activity by activating NADPH oxidase in bovine aortic VSMC to increase reactive oxygen species levels and induce oxidative posttranslational modification(s) of Cys-122, a beta(1)-subunit cysteinyl residue demonstrated previously to modulate NO(.) sensing by GC. In VSMC treated with aldosterone, Western immunoblotting detected evidence of GC beta(1)-subunit disulfide bonding, whereas mass spectrometry analysis of a homologous peptide containing the Cys-122-bearing sequence exposed to conditions of increased oxidant stress confirmed cysteinyl sulfinic acid (m/z 435), sulfonic acid (m/z 443), and disulfide (m/z 836) bond formation. The functional effect of these modifications was examined by transfecting COS-7 cells with wild-type GC or mutant GC containing an alanine substitution at Cys-122 (C122A). Exposure to aldosterone or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) significantly decreased cGMP levels in cells expressing wild-type GC. In contrast, aldosterone or H(2)O(2) did not influence cGMP levels in cells expressing the mutant C122A GC, confirming that oxidative modification of Cys-122 specifically impairs GC activity. These findings demonstrate that pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of aldosterone increase oxidant stress to convert GC to an NO(.)-insensitive state, resulting in disruption of normal vasodilatory signaling pathways in VSMC.

  4. Neuronal chemorepellent Slit2 inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell migration by suppressing small GTPase Rac1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Hou, Jie; Hu, Xing; Wang, Xuerong; Xiao, Yan; Mou, Yongshan; De Leon, Hector

    2006-03-01

    The Slits are secreted proteins with roles in axonal guidance and leukocyte migration. On binding to Robo receptors, Slit2 repels developing axons and inhibits leukocyte chemotaxis. Slit2 is cleaved into Slit2-N, a protein tightly binding to cell membranes, and Slit2-C, a diffusible fragment. In the present study, we characterized the functional role of Slit2-N in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the cell association properties of 2 truncated versions of Slit2-N. Here, we document for the first time that Slit2-N is a chemorepellent of VSMCs. Intact blood vessels expressed Slit2 and Robo receptors as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real time PCR. Recombinant Slit2-N prevented the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated migration of VSMCs. Slit2-N also abrogated PDGF-mediated activation of small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Rac1, a member of the Rho GTPase superfamily of proteins involved in regulating the actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, Slit2-N inhibited the PDGF-induced formation of lamellipodia, a crucial cytoskeletal reorganization event for cell motility. Slit2-N had no effect on the PDGF-mediated increase in DNA synthesis determined by [3H]thymidine uptake, suggesting that VSMC growth is unaffected by Slit2. Analysis of 2 engineered Slit2-N fragments (Slit2-N/1118 and Slit2-N/1121) indicated that 3 amino acids upstream of the putative cleavage site (Arg1121, Thr1122) are involved in the association of Slit2-N to the cell membrane. Our data assign a novel functional role to Slit2 in vascular function and show that cell guidance mechanisms that operate in the developing central nervous system are conserved in VSMCs.

  5. Magnesium inhibits Wnt/β-catenin activity and reverses the osteogenic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes de Oca, Addy; Guerrero, Fatima; Martinez-Moreno, Julio M; Madueño, Juan A; Herencia, Carmen; Peralta, Alan; Almaden, Yolanda; Lopez, Ignacio; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolastico; Gundlach, Kristina; Büchel, Janine; Peter, Mirjam E; Passlick-Deetjen, Jutta; Rodriguez, Mariano; Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan R

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium reduces vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification in vitro but the mechanism has not been revealed so far. This work used only slightly increased magnesium levels and aimed at determining: a) whether inhibition of magnesium transport into the cell influences VSMC calcification, b) whether Wnt/β-catenin signaling, a key mediator of osteogenic differentiation, is modified by magnesium and c) whether magnesium can influence already established vascular calcification. Human VSMC incubated with high phosphate (3.3 mM) and moderately elevated magnesium (1.4 mM) significantly reduced VSMC calcification and expression of the osteogenic transcription factors Cbfa-1 and osterix, and up-regulated expression of the natural calcification inhibitors matrix Gla protein (MGP) and osteoprotegerin (OPG). The protective effects of magnesium on calcification and expression of osteogenic markers were no longer observed in VSMC cultured with an inhibitor of cellular magnesium transport (2-aminoethoxy-diphenylborate [2-APB]). High phosphate induced activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway as demonstrated by the translocation of β-catenin into the nucleus, increased expression of the frizzled-3 gene, and downregulation of Dkk-1 gene, a specific antagonist of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. The addition of magnesium however inhibited phosphate-induced activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Furthermore, TRPM7 silencing using siRNA resulted in activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Additional experiments were performed to test the ability of magnesium to halt the progression of already established VSMC calcification in vitro. The delayed addition of magnesium decreased calcium content, down-regulated Cbfa-1 and osterix and up-regulated MGP and OPG, when compared with a control group. This effect was not observed when 2-APB was added. In conclusion, magnesium transport through the cell membrane is important to inhibit VSMC calcification in vitro

  6. The influence of vascular anatomy on carotid artery stenting: a parametric study for damage assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannaccone, F; Debusschere, N; De Bock, S; De Beule, M; Van Loo, D; Vermassen, F; Segers, P; Verhegghe, B

    2014-03-01

    Carotid artery stenting is emerging as an alternative technique to surgery for the treatment of symptomatic severe carotid stenosis. Clinical and experimental evidence demonstrates that both plaque morphology and biomechanical changes due to the device implantation can be possible causes of an unsuccessful treatment. In order to gain further insights of the endovascular intervention, a virtual environment based on structural finite element simulations was built to emulate the stenting procedure on generalized atherosclerotic carotid geometries which included a damage model to quantify the injury of the vessel. Five possible lesion scenarios were simulated by changing both material properties and vascular geometrical features to cover both presumed vulnerable and stable plaques. The results were analyzed with respect to lumen gain and wall stresses which are potentially related to the failure of the procedure according to previous studies. Our findings show that an elliptic lumen shape and a thinner fibrous cap with an underlying lipid pool result in higher stenosis reduction, while large calcifications and fibrotic tissue are more prone to recoil. The shielding effect of a thicker fibrous cap helps to reduce local compressive stresses in the soft plaque. The presence of a soft plaque reduces the damage in the healthy vascular structures. Contrarily, the presence of hard plaque promotes less damage volume in the fibrous cap and reduces stress peaks in this region, but they seem to increase stresses in the media-intima layer. Finally the reliability of the achieved results was put into clinical perspective.

  7. Smooth Muscle Proliferation and Role of the Prostacyclin (IP) Receptor in Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Falcetti, Emilia; Hall, Susan M.; Phillips, Peter G.; Patel, Jigisha; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Haworth, Sheila G; Clapp, Lucie H.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Prostacyclin analogs, used to treat idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), are assumed to work through prostacyclin (IP) receptors linked to cyclic AMP (cAMP) generation, although the potential to signal through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) exists.

  8. Flow Structures in a Healthy and Plaqued Artificial Artery using Fully Index Matched Vascular Flow Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Faraz; Jain, Akash; Sheng, Jian

    2014-11-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry measurements are made in a closed loop fully index matched flow facility to study the flow structures and flow wall interactions in healthy and diseased model arteries. The test section is 0.63 m long and the facility is capable of emulating both steady and pulsatile flows under physiologically relevant conditions. The model arteries are in-house developed compliant polymer (PDMS) tubes with 1 cm diameter and 1 mm wall thickness. The Reynolds numbers of flows vary up to 20,000. The plaque is simulated by introducing a radially asymmetric bump that can be varied in shape, size and compliancy. The overall compliancy of the model can be also controlled by varying ratio between the elastomer and the curing agent. The tubes are doped with particles allowing the simultaneous measurements of wall deformation and flows over it. The working fluid in the facility is NaI and is refractive index matched to the PDMS model. This allows flow measurement very close to the wall and measurement of wall shear stress. The aim of this study is to characterize the changes in flow as the compliancy and geometry of blood vessels change due to age or disease. These differences can be used to develop a diagnostic tool to detect early onset of vascular diseases.

  9. Time-Series Interactions of Gene Expression, Vascular Growth and Hemodynamics during Early Embryonic Arterial Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goktas, Selda; Uslu, Fazil E; Kowalski, William J; Ermek, Erhan; Keller, Bradley B; Pekkan, Kerem

    2016-01-01

    The role of hemodynamic forces within the embryo as biomechanical regulators for cardiovascular morphogenesis, growth, and remodeling is well supported through the experimental studies. Furthermore, clinical experience suggests that perturbed flow disrupts the normal vascular growth process as one etiology for congenital heart diseases (CHD) and for fetal adaptation to CHD. However, the relationships between hemodynamics, gene expression and embryonic vascular growth are poorly defined due to the lack of concurrent, sequential in vivo data. In this study, a long-term, time-lapse optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging campaign was conducted to acquire simultaneous blood velocity, pulsatile micro-pressure and morphometric data for 3 consecutive early embryonic stages in the chick embryo. In conjunction with the in vivo growth and hemodynamics data, in vitro reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was performed to track changes in transcript expression relevant to histogenesis and remodeling of the embryonic arterial wall. Our non-invasive extended OCT imaging technique for the microstructural data showed continuous vessel growth. OCT data coupled with the PIV technique revealed significant but intermitted increases in wall shear stress (WSS) between first and second assigned stages and a noticeable decrease afterwards. Growth rate, however, did not vary significantly throughout the embryonic period. Among all the genes studied, only the MMP-2 and CASP-3 expression levels remained unchanged during the time course. Concurrent relationships were obtained among the transcriptional modulation of the genes, vascular growth and hemodynamics-related changes. Further studies are indicated to determine cause and effect relationships and reversibility between mechanical and molecular regulation of vasculogenesis. PMID:27552150

  10. Camptothecin inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-BB-induced proliferation of rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells through inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eun-Seok [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Division of Life Science, College of Health and Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Chungju, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Shin-il [College of Pharmacy Medical Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Kyu-dong [Hazardous Substances Analysis Division, Gwangju Regional Food and Drug Administration, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi-Yea [Department of Nursing Kyungbok University, Pocheon (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Hwan-Soo; Hong, Jin-Tae [College of Pharmacy Medical Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hwa-Sup [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Division of Life Science, College of Health and Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Chungju, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bokyung [Department of Physiology, Konkuk Medical School, Konkuk University, Chungju, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Yeo-Pyo, E-mail: ypyun@chungbuk.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy Medical Research Center, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    The abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in arterial wall is a major cause of vascular disorders such as atherosclerosis and restenosis after angioplasty. In this study, we investigated not only the inhibitory effects of camptothecin (CPT) on PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation, but also its molecular mechanism of this inhibition. CPT significantly inhibited proliferation with IC50 value of 0.58 μM and the DNA synthesis of PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner (0.5–2 μM ) without any cytotoxicity. CPT induced the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Also, CPT decreased the expressions of G0/G1-specific regulatory proteins including cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2, cyclin D1 and PCNA in PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs. Pre-incubation of VSMCs with CPT significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced Akt activation, whereas CPT did not affect PDGF-receptor beta phosphorylation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation and phospholipase C (PLC)-γ1 phosphorylation in PDGF-BB signaling pathway. Our data showed that CPT pre-treatment inhibited VSMC proliferation, and that the inhibitory effect of CPT was enhanced by LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, on PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation. In addition, inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway by LY294002 significantly enhanced the suppression of PCNA expression and Akt activation by CPT. These results suggest that the anti-proliferative activity of CPT is mediated in part by downregulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. - Highlights: ► CPT inhibits proliferation of PDGF-BB-induced VSMC without cytotoxicity. ► CPT arrests the cell cycle in G0/G1 phase by downregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK2. ► CPT significantly attenuates Akt phosphorylation in PDGF-BB signaling pathway. ► LY294002 enhanced the inhibitory effect of CPT on VSMC proliferation. ► Thus, CPT is mediated by downregulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  11. The combination of lanthanum chloride and the calcimimetic calindol delays the progression of vascular smooth muscle cells calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciceri, Paola; Volpi, Elisa; Brenna, Irene; Elli, Francesca [Renal Division and Laboratory of Experimental Nephrology, Dipartimento di Medicina e Chirurgia, Universita di Milano, Milan (Italy); Borghi, Elisa [Dipartimento di Salute Pubblica, Microbiologia e Virologia, Universita di Milano, Milan (Italy); Brancaccio, Diego [Renal Division and Laboratory of Experimental Nephrology, Dipartimento di Medicina e Chirurgia, Universita di Milano, Milan (Italy); Cozzolino, Mario, E-mail: mario.cozzolino@unimi.it [Renal Division and Laboratory of Experimental Nephrology, Dipartimento di Medicina e Chirurgia, Universita di Milano, Milan (Italy)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lanthanum reduces the progression of high phosphate-induced calcium deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcium receptor agonists and the calcimimetic calindol reduce calcium deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lanthanum and calindol cooperate on reducing calcium deposition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lanthanum and calindol may interact with the same receptor. -- Abstract: Phosphate (Pi)-binders are commonly used in dialysis patients to control high Pi levels, that associated with vascular calcification (VC). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of lanthanum chloride (LaCl{sub 3}) on the progression of high Pi-induced VC, in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Pi-induced Ca deposition was inhibited by LaCl{sub 3}, with a maximal effect at 100 {mu}M (59.0 {+-} 2.5% inhibition). Furthermore, we studied the effects on VC of calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) agonists. Gadolinium chloride, neomycin, spermine, and the calcimimetic calindol significantly inhibited Pi-induced VC (55.9 {+-} 2.2%, 37.3 {+-} 4.7%, 30.2 {+-} 5.7%, and 63.8 {+-} 5.7%, respectively). To investigate the hypothesis that LaCl{sub 3} reduces the progression of VC by interacting with the CaSR, we performed a concentration-response curve of LaCl{sub 3} in presence of a sub-effective concentration of calindol (10 nM). Interestingly, this curve was shifted to the left (IC{sub 50} 9.6 {+-} 2.6 {mu}M), compared to the curve in the presence of LaCl{sub 3} alone (IC{sub 50} 19.0 {+-} 4.8 {mu}M). In conclusion, we demonstrated that lanthanum chloride effectively reduces the progression of high phosphate-induced vascular calcification. In addition, LaCl{sub 3} cooperates with the calcimimetic calindol in decreasing Ca deposition in this in vitro model. These results suggest the potential role of lanthanum in the treatment of VC induced by high Pi.

  12. High sodium augments angiotensin II-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through the ERK 1/2-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Rahman, Asadur; Nakano, Daisuke; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Ma, Hong; Iwamoto, Takahiro; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced vascular injury is exacerbated by high-salt diets. This study examined the effects of high-sodium level on Ang II-induced cell proliferation in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The cells were cultured in a standard medium containing 137.5 mmol l(-1) of sodium. The high-sodium medium (140 mmol l(-1)) contained additional sodium chloride. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation was determined by western blot analysis. Cell proliferation was evaluated by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation. Ang II (100 nmol l(-1)) significantly increased ERK 1/2 phosphorylation and cell proliferation in the both medium containing standard sodium and high sodium. High-sodium level augmented Ang II-induced ERK 1/2 phosphorylation and cell proliferation compared with standard sodium. Pre-treatment with candesartan (1 μmol l(-1), Ang II type 1 receptor blocker) or PD98095 (10 μmol l(-1), ERK kinase iinhibitor) abolished the proliferative effect induced by high sodium/Ang II. Pre-treatment with 5-N,N-hexamethylene amiloride (30 μmol l(-1), Na(+)/H(+) exchanger type 1 (NHE-1) inhibitor), but not SN-6 (10 μmol l(-1), Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger inhibitor) or ouabain (1 mmol l(-1), Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor) attenuated ERK 1/2 phosphorylation or cell proliferation. Osmotic pressure or chloride had no effect on Ang II-induced proliferative changes. High-sodium level did not affect Ang II receptor expression. Ang II increased intracellular pH via NHE-1 activation, and high-sodium level augmented the pH increase induced by Ang II. These data suggest that high-sodium level directly augments Ang II-induced VSMC proliferation through NHE-1- and ERK 1/2-dependent pathways and may offer new insights into the mechanisms of vascular remodeling by high-sodium/Ang II.

  13. NONINVASIVE EVALUATION OF VASCULAR WALL STIFFNESSIN HEALTHY ADOLESCENTS, THE RISK FACTORS FOR ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

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    G. P. Filippov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the main indicators characterizing the rigidity of the vascular wall in healthy ado-lescents with such risk factors (RF for arterial hypertension (AH as a family history on hypertension and smoking. Identify changes in the initial elastic-elastic properties of the arteries at the preclinical stage of development of hypertension.Material and methods. It was formed two groups of comparison. Age studied from 13 to 17 years (mean age (15.00 ± 0.31 years. The first group consisted of 30 healthy adolescents whose parents suffer from hypertension from a young age. The second group consisted of 30 healthy smokers teenager from healthy parents. The control group consisted of 30 healthy adolescents from healthy parents. Determines the basic stiffness of the vascular wall: PWV, CAVI, SAI.Results. A significant in crease in the indicators characterizing the rigidity of the vascular wall in the two comparison groups relative to the control. PWV: 6,89 ± 0,56 (first group, 7.13 ± 0.55 (second group and 5.5 ± 0.41 (control, p < 0.05.L-CAVI: 5,46 ± 0,39 (first group, 5.84 ± 0.61 (second group and 4.32 ± 0.41 (control, p < 0.05.R-CAVI: 5,63 ± 0,39 (first group, 5.89 ± 0.56 (second group and 4.49 ± 0.41(control, p < 0.05. R-AI: 0,89 ± 0,09 (first group, 0.95 ± 0.12 (second group and 0.62 ± 0.1 (control, p < 0.05.Smoking teenagers and adolescents with family history of hypertension, there are changes in the initial stiffness of the vessel wall, which requires the allocation of at-riskfor the development of hypertension and prevention activities at the preclinical stage of development ofthe disease.

  14. Ginsenoside Rg1 inhibits proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells stimulated by tumor necrosis factor-α

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng-chun MA; Yue GAO; Yu-guang WANG; Hong-ling TAN; Cheng-rong XIAO; Sheng-qi WANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) affected by ginsenoside Rg1 and further explore the molecular mechanism of ginsenoside Rg1 using proteomics. Methods: The proliferation of VSMC was measured by MTS assay kit and flow cytometry. Proteomic alterations were analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis and peptide mass fingerprinting. Differential proteins found in proteomics were confirmed by RT-PCR. Results: The proliferation of VSMC was enhanced significantly after tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) treatment, and ginsenoside Rg1 treatment inhibited proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Proteomic analysis showed 24 protein spots were changed, including 17 spots that were increased and 7 spots that were decreased. Ginsenoside Rg1 could restore the expression levels of these proteins, at least partly, to basic levels of untreated cells. The expression of G-protein coupled receptor kinase, protein kinase C (PKC)-ζ, N-ras protein were decreased, while cycle related protein p21 was increased by ginsenoside Rg1 in TNF-α treated VSMC. Conclusion: PKC-ζ, and p21 pathway might be the mechanism for inhibitory effects of ginsenoside Rg1 on proliferation of VSMC.

  15. Effect of hammerhead ribozyme that specifically cleaves c-myc mRNA on proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栾荣华; 贾国良; 李伟; 贾战生; 连建奇

    2003-01-01

    Ojective: To investigate the effect of hammerhead ribozyme that specifically cleaves c-myc mRNA on the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Methods: Based on the computer analysis of the secondary structure of c-myc mRNA, nt 2029 in rat c-myc oncogene was selected as a cleaving site for hammerhead ribozyme and the ribozyme was designed. With automatic DNA synthesizer, the two complementary DNA strands of the ribozyme were synthesized. The ribozyme gene was cloned into pGEM3Zf (+) vector and subcloned into eukaryotic expression pcDNA3 vector. The recombinant pcDNA-Rz was transfected into the cultured rat VSMCs by lipofectAMINE mediated DNA transfection protocol and individual cell clones were selected by G418. Results: The sequence of ribozyme gene inserted in pGEM3Zf (+) vector was proved to be perfectly correct. In VSMCs transfected with recombinant pcDNA-Rz, flow cytometry analysis showed that the S phase and G2/M fractions were decreased significantly and cell proliferation stagnated in the G0/G1 phase. Conclusion: The results suggest that hammerhead ribozyme that specifically cleaves c-myc mRNA can significantly inhibit the proliferation of VSMCs.

  16. Diminished Lipid Raft SNAP23 Increases Blood Pressure by Inhibiting the Membrane Fluidity of Vascular Smooth-Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Mi So; Won, Kyung-Jong; Kim, Do-Yoon; Hwang, Dae Il; Yoon, Seok Won; Jung, Seung Hyo; Lee, Kang Pa; Jung, Dongju; Choi, Wahn Soo; Kim, Bokyung; Lee, Hwan Myung

    2015-01-01

    Synaptosomal-associated protein 23 (SNAP23) is involved in microvesicle trafficking and exocytosis in various cell types, but its functional role in blood pressure (BP) regulation has not yet been defined. Here, we found that lipid raft SNAP23 expression was much lower in vascular smooth-muscle cells (VSMCs) from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) than in those from normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. This led us to investigate the hypothesis that this lower expression may be linked to the spontaneous hypertension found in SHR. The expression level of lipid raft SNAP23 and the fluidity in the plasma membrane of VSMCs were lower in SHR than in WKY rats. Cholesterol content in the VSMC membrane was higher, but the secreted cholesterols found in VSMC-conditioned medium and in the blood serum were lower in SHR than in WKY rats. SNAP23 knockdown in WKY rat VSMCs reduced the membrane fluidity and increased the membrane cholesterol level. Systemic overexpression of SNAP23 in SHR resulted in an increase of cholesterol content in their serum, a decrease in cholesterol in their aorta and the reduction of their BP. Our findings suggest that the low expression of the lipid raft SNAP23 in VSMCs might be a potential cause for the characteristic hypertension of SHR.

  17. Erk1/2 MAPK and caldesmon differentially regulate podosome dynamics in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We tested the hypothesis that the MEK/Erk/caldesmon phosphorylation cascade regulates PKC-mediated podosome dynamics in A7r5 cells. We observed the phosphorylation of MEK, Erk and caldesmon, and