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Sample records for arterial wall dynamics

  1. Identification of arterial wall dynamics in conscious dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero, L G; Armentano, R L; Barra, J G; Simon, A; Levenson, J

    2001-07-01

    Viscoelastic properties determine the dynamic behaviour of the arterial wall under pulsatile pressure and flow, suggesting time- or frequency-dependent responses to changes in wall stress and strain. The objectives of the present study were: (i) to develop a simplified model to derive simultaneously the elastic, viscous and inertial wall moduli; (ii) to assess Young's modulus as a function of frequency, in conscious, chronically instrumented dogs. Parametric discrete time models were used to characterise the dynamics of the arterial system based on thoracic aortic pressure (microtransducer) and diameter (sonomicrometry) measurements in control steady state and during activation of smooth muscle with the alpha-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine (5 microg kg(-1) min(-1), I.V.), in eight conscious dogs. The linear autoregressive model and a physically motivated non-linear model were fitted to the input-output (stress-strain) relationship. The aortic buffering function (complex Young's modulus) was obtained in vivo from the identified linear model. Elastic, viscous and inertial moduli were significantly increased from control state ((44.5 +/- 7.7) x 10(4) Pa; (12.3 +/- 4.7) x 10(4) Pa s; (0.048 +/- 0.028) x 10(4) Pa s(2) ) to active state ((85.3 +/- 29.5) x 10(4) Pa, P model, did not present significant differences compared with those derived using the non-linear model. In control conditions, the magnitude of the normalised complex Young's modulus was found to be similar to that reported in previous animal studies ranging from 1 to 10 Hz. During vascular smooth muscle activation, this modulus was found to be increased with regard to control conditions (P parametric modelling approach allows us to verify that vascular smooth muscle activation increases the elastic, viscous and inertial moduli with the advantage of being able to track their time evolution. Furthermore, under activation, the aortic wall remains stiff in the physiological frequency range, suggesting the

  2. Wall shear stress in intracranial aneurysms and adjacent arteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuyu Wang; Bainan Xu; Zhenghui Sun; Chen Wu; Xiaojun Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Hemodynamic parameters play an important role in aneurysm formation and growth. However, it is difficult to directly observe a rapidly growing de novo aneurysm in a patient. To investigate possible associations between hemodynamic parameters and the formation and growth of intracranial aneurysms, the present study constructed a computational model of a case with an internal carotid artery aneurysm and an anterior communicating artery aneurysm, based on the CT angiography findings of a patient. To simulate the formation of the anterior communicating artery aneurysm and the growth of the internal carotid artery aneurysm, we then constructed a model that virtually removed the anterior communicating artery aneurysm, and a further two models that also progressively decreased the size of the internal carotid artery aneurysm. Computational simulations of the fluid dynamics of the four models were performed under pulsatile flow conditions, and wall shear stress was compared among the different models. In the three aneurysm growth models, increasing size of the aneurysm was associated with an increased area of low wall shear stress, a significant decrease in wall shear stress at the dome of the aneurysm, and a significant change in the wall shear stress of the parent artery. The wall shear stress of the anterior communicating artery remained low, and was significantly lower than the wall shear stress at the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery or the bifurcation of the middle cerebral artery. After formation of the anterior communicating artery aneurysm, the wall shear stress at the dome of the internal carotid artery aneurysm increased significantly, and the wall shear stress in the upstream arteries also changed significantly. These findings indicate that low wall shear stress may be associated with the initiation and growth of aneurysms, and that aneurysm formation and growth may influence hemodynamic parameters in the local and adjacent arteries.

  3. Determination of arterial wall shear stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The arteries can remodel their structure and function to adapt themselves to the mechanical environment. In various factors that lead to vascular remodeling, the shear stress on the arterial wall induced by the blood flow is of great importance. However, there are many technique difficulties in measuring the wall shear stress directly at present. In this paper, through analyzing the pulsatile blood flow in arteries, a method has been proposed that can determine the wall shear stress quantitatively by measuring the velocity on the arterial axis, and that provides a necessary means to discuss the influence of arterial wall shear stress on vascular remodeling.

  4. The influence of artery wall curvature on the anatomical assessment of stenosis severity derived from fractional flow reserve: a computational fluid dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraju, Kalimuthu; Viswanathan, Girish N; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Salman Ahmed, N J; Al-Rashed, Abdullah A A A

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to investigate the influence of artery wall curvature on the anatomical assessment of stenosis severity and to identify a region of misinterpretation in the assessment of per cent area stenosis (AS) for functionally significant stenosis using fractional flow reserve (FFR) as standard. Five artery models of different per cent AS severity (70, 75, 80, 85 and 90%) were considered. For each per cent AS severity, the angle of curvature of the arterial wall varied from straight to an increasingly curved model (0°, 30°, 60°, 90° and 120°). Computational fluid dynamics was performed under transient physiologic hyperemic flow conditions to investigate the influence of artery wall curvature on the pressure drop and the FFR. The findings in this study may be useful in in vitro anatomical assessment of functionally significant stenosis. The FFR decreased with increasing stenosis severity for a given curvature of the artery wall. Moreover, a significant decrease in FFR was found between straight and curved models discussed for a given severity condition. These findings indicate that the curvature effect was included in the FFR assessment in contrast to minimum lumen area (MLA) or per cent AS assessment. The MLA or per cent AS assessment may lead to underestimation of stenosis severity. From this numerical study, an uncertainty region could be evaluated using the clinical FFR cutoff value of 0.8. This value was observed at 81.98 and 79.10% AS for arteries with curvature angles of 0° and 120° respectively. In conclusion, the curvature of the artery should not be neglected in in vitro anatomical assessment. PMID:27052093

  5. ON WALL SHEAR STRESS OF ARTERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhao-rong; Liu Bao-yu; Qin Kai-rong

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a method was proposed that the wall shear stress of artery could be determined by measuring the centerline axial velocity and radial motion of arterial wall simultaneously.The method is simple in application and can get higher precision when it is used to determine the shear stress of arterial wall in vivo.As an example, the shear stress distribution in periodic oscillatory flow of human carotid was calculated and discussed.The computed results show that the shear stress distribution at any given instant is almost uniform and will be zero at the centerline and tends to maximum at the vessel wall.

  6. A Probabilistic Approach to Computerized Tracking of Arterial Walls in Ultrasound Image Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Baris Kanber; Kumar Vids Ramnarine

    2012-01-01

    Tracking of arterial walls in ultrasound image sequences is useful for studying the dynamics of arteries. Manual delineation is prohibitively labour intensive and existing methods of computerized segmentation are limited in terms of applicability and availability. This paper presents a probabilistic approach to the computerized tracking of arterial walls that is effective and easy to implement. In the probabilistic approach, given a point B with a probability Pb of being in an arterial lumen ...

  7. Dynamics of monopole walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, R., E-mail: rafael.maldonado@durham.ac.uk; Ward, R.S., E-mail: richard.ward@durham.ac.uk

    2014-06-27

    The moduli space of centred Bogomolny–Prasad–Sommerfield 2-monopole fields is a 4-dimensional manifold M with a natural metric, and the geodesics on M correspond to slow-motion monopole dynamics. The best-known case is that of monopoles on R{sup 3}, where M is the Atiyah–Hitchin space. More recently, the case of monopoles periodic in one direction (monopole chains) was studied a few years ago. Our aim in this note is to investigate M for doubly-periodic fields, which may be visualized as monopole walls. We identify some of the geodesics on M as fixed-point sets of discrete symmetries, and interpret these in terms of monopole scattering and bound orbits, concentrating on novel features that arise as a consequence of the periodicity.

  8. Dynamics of monopole walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The moduli space of centred Bogomolny–Prasad–Sommerfield 2-monopole fields is a 4-dimensional manifold M with a natural metric, and the geodesics on M correspond to slow-motion monopole dynamics. The best-known case is that of monopoles on R3, where M is the Atiyah–Hitchin space. More recently, the case of monopoles periodic in one direction (monopole chains) was studied a few years ago. Our aim in this note is to investigate M for doubly-periodic fields, which may be visualized as monopole walls. We identify some of the geodesics on M as fixed-point sets of discrete symmetries, and interpret these in terms of monopole scattering and bound orbits, concentrating on novel features that arise as a consequence of the periodicity

  9. Dynamics of monopole walls

    CERN Document Server

    Maldonado, R

    2014-01-01

    The moduli space of centred Bogomolny-Prasad-Sommmerfield 2-monopole fields is a 4-dimensional manifold M with a natural metric, and the geodesics on M correspond to slow-motion monopole dynamics. The best-known case is that of monopoles on R^3, where M is the Atiyah-Hitchin space. More recently, the case of monopoles periodic in one direction (monopole chains) was studied a few years ago. Our aim in this note is to investigate M for doubly-periodic fields, which may be visualized as monopole walls. We identify some of the geodesics on M as fixed-point sets of discrete symmetries, and interpret these in terms of monopole scattering and bound orbits, concentrating on novel features that arise as a consequence of the periodicity.

  10. Determination of arterial wall shear stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Zhaorong

    2001-01-01

    [1]Langille, B. L., 7Donnell, F., Reductions in arterial diameter produced by chronic decreases in blood flow are endothelium-dependent, Science, 1986, 231: 405—407.[2]Langer, R., Vacanti, J. P., Tissue engineering, Science, 1993, 260: 920—926.[3]Kamiya, A., Togawa, T., Adaptive regulation of wall shear stress to flow change in the canine carotid artery, Am. J. Physiol. (Heart Circ. Physiol.), 1980, 239: H14—H21.[4]Fung, Y. C., Biomechanics: Motion, Flow, Stress, and Growth, New York: Springer-Verlag, 1990.[5]Liu, S. Q., Biomechanical basis of vascular tissue engineering, Critical Reviews in Biomedical Engineering, 1999, 27: 75—148.[6]Ando, J., Kamiya, A., Blood flow and vascular endothelium cell function, Frontiers Med. Biological Eng., 1993, 5: 245—264.[7]Ku, D. N., Giddens, D. P., Zarins, D. K. et al., Pulsatile flow and atherosclerosis in the human carotid bifurcation-positive correlation between plaque location and low and oscillating shear stress, Atherosclerosis, 1985, 5: 293—302.[8]Liu Zhaorong, Li Xixi, Theory and Method on Hemodynamics (in Chinese), Shanghai: Fudan University Press, 1997.

  11. Diabetes Mellitus, ArterialWall, and Cardiovascular Risk Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Michaela Kozakova; Carlo Palombo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop heart disease or stroke than adults without diabetes. The two major features of diabetes, i.e., hyperglycemia and insulin-resistance, trigger arterial stiffening and increase the susceptibility of the arterial wall to atherosclerosis at any given age. These pathological changes in the arterial wall may provide a functional and structura...

  12. Arterial Wall Properties and Womersley Flow in Fabry Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitriadis Emilios

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disease resulting in the cellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide particularly globotriaosylceramide. The disease is characterized by a dilated vasculopathy with arterial ectasia in muscular arteries and arterioles. Previous venous plethysomographic studies suggest enhanced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in Fabry disease indicating a functional abnormality of resistance vessels. Methods We examined the mechanical properties of the radial artery in Fabry disease, a typical fibro-muscular artery. Eight control subjects and seven patients with Fabry disease had a right brachial arterial line placed allowing real time recording of intra-arterial blood pressure. Real time B-mode ultrasound recordings of the right radial artery were obtained simultaneously allowing calculation of the vessel wall internal and external diameter, the incremental Young's modulus and arterial wall thickness. By simultaneously measurement of the distal index finger-pulse oximetry the pulse wave speed was calculated. From the wave speed and the internal radial artery diameter the volume flow was calculated by Womersley analysis following truncation of the late diastolic phase. Results No significant difference was found between Fabry patients and controls for internal or external arterial diameters, the incremental Young's modulus, the arterial wall thickness, the pulse wave speed and the basal radial artery blood flow. Further, no significant difference was found for the radial artery blood flow in response to intra-arterial acetylcholine or sodium nitroprusside. Both drugs however, elevated the mean arterial flow. Conclusions The current study suggests that no structural or mechanical abnormality exists in the vessel wall of fibro-muscular arteries in Fabry disease. This may indicate that a functional abnormality downstream to the conductance vessels is the dominant feature in

  13. Dynamic diffuse optical tomography imaging of peripheral arterial disease

    OpenAIRE

    Khalil, Michael A.; Kim, Hyun K.; Kim, In-Kyong; Flexman, Molly; Dayal, Rajeev; Shrikhande, Gautam; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is the narrowing of arteries due to plaque accumulation in the vascular walls. This leads to insufficient blood supply to the extremities and can ultimately cause cell death. Currently available methods are ineffective in diagnosing PAD in patients with calcified arteries, such as those with diabetes. In this paper we investigate the potential of dynamic diffuse optical tomography (DDOT) as an alternative way to assess PAD in the lower extremities. DDOT is a ...

  14. Artery Wall Imaging and Effects of Postmenopausal Estrogen Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Macias Wallberg, Kenny A.

    2005-01-01

    Postmenopausal estrogen therapy, initiated early in the menopause, seems to protect against development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. This thesis concerns studies of artery wall thickness and arterial stiffness estimated by noninvasive ultrasound techniques in long-term estrogen treated postmenopausal women who initiated therapy at the time of the menopause. A noninvasive 25 MHz high-frequency ultrasound technique was validated in the imaging of superficial arteries by using...

  15. Wall Shear Stress Prediction Using Computational Simulation on Patient Specific Artery with Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Muhamad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An aneurysm is formed when a blood vessel becomes dilated or distorted. It will cause the vessel to expand to a size greater than its original diameter. In this study, Wall Shear Stress (WSS of cerebral artery with aneurysm was predicted using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. WSS in the artery is one of the indicators for brain artery disease progression. Based on the results, the maximum value of blood velocity and WSS on patient specific artery with aneurysm are 3.23 m/s and 60.1 Pa, respectively. The location of high WSS is before and after the aneurysm bulge. The WSS is above the normal physiological value where the artery wall is exposed to high stress. Hence, the vessel at this location is anticipated to become weaker and could be further dilated.

  16. Ultrasound settings significantly alter arterial lumen and wall thickness measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flow-mediated dilation (FMD and carotid intima-medial thickness (CIMT, measured by ultrasound, are widely used to test the efficacy of cardioprotective interventions. Although assessment methods vary, automated edge-detecting image analysis software is routinely used to measure changes in FMD and CIMT. We aimed to quantify the effect that commonly adjusted ultrasound settings have on arterial lumen and wall thickness measurements made with CIMT measurement software. Methods We constructed phantom arteries from a tissue-mimicking agar compound and scanned them in a water bath with a 10 MHz multi-frequency linear-array probe attached to a high-resolution ultrasound machine. B-mode images of the phantoms were recorded with dynamic range (DR and gain set at five decibel (dB increments from 40 dB to 60 dB and -10 dB to +10 dB respectively. Lumen diameter and wall-thickness were measured off-line using CIMT measurement software. Results Lumen measurements: there was a strong linear relationship between DR and gain and measured lumen diameter. For a given gain level, a 5 dB increase in DR reduced the measured lumen diameter by 0.02 ± 0.004 mm (p CIMT measurements: For a fixed gain level, a 5 dB increase in DR increased measured wall thickness by 0.003 ± 0.002 mm (p Conclusion DR, gain and probe distance significantly alter lumen diameter and CIMT measurements made using image analysis software. When CIMT and FMD are used to test the efficacy of cardioprotective interventions, the DR, gain and probe position used to record baseline scans should be documented and replicated in post-treatment scans in individual trial subjects. If more than one sonographer or imaging centre is used to collect data, the study protocol should document specific DR and gain settings to be used in all subjects.

  17. Diabetes Mellitus, Arterial Wall, and Cardiovascular Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozakova, Michaela; Palombo, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop heart disease or stroke than adults without diabetes. The two major features of diabetes, i.e., hyperglycemia and insulin-resistance, trigger arterial stiffening and increase the susceptibility of the arterial wall to atherosclerosis at any given age. These pathological changes in the arterial wall may provide a functional and structural background for cardiovascular events. The present paper provides a critical overview of the clinical evidence linking diabetes-related metabolic abnormalities to cardiovascular risk, debates the pathophysiologic mechanisms through which insulin resistance and hyperglycemia may affect the arterial wall, and discusses the associations between vascular biomarkers, metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular events. PMID:26861377

  18. Sonographic assessment of splanchnic arteries and the bowel wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, C.F. [Medical Department II, Caritas-Krankenhaus, Uhlandstr. 7, D-97980 Bad Mergentheim (Germany)], E-mail: Christoph.dietrich@ckbm.de; Jedrzejczyk, M.; Ignee, A. [Medical Department II, Caritas-Krankenhaus, Uhlandstr. 7, D-97980 Bad Mergentheim (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    The intestinal wall can be visualized using high resolution transabdominal ultrasound. The normal intestinal wall thickness in the terminal ileum, cecum, and right and left colon is <2 mm when examined with graded compression. It is important to appreciate that a contracted intestinal segment can be misinterpreted as a thickened wall. Vascularisation can be mainly displayed in the second hyperechoic layer (submucosal layer) as well as vessels penetrating the muscularis propria. Imaging of the gastrointestinal wall is dependent on the experience of the examiner as well dependent on the equipment used. Acute or chronic inflammation of the intestinal wall is accompanied by increased perfusion of the mesentery, which can be displayed non-quantitatively with colour duplex. In contrast, ischemia is characterised by hypoperfusion of the mesenteric arteries and the bowel wall. The most promising sonographic approach in assessing splanchnic arteries and the bowel wall is combining the analysis of superior and inferior mesenteric inflow by pulsed Doppler scanning (systolic and diastolic velocities, resistance index) with the end-organ vascularity by colour Doppler imaging diminishing the influence of examination technique only displaying bowel wall vascularity. Colour Doppler imaging has been described as helpful in a variety of gastrointestinal disorders, particularly in patients with Crohn's disease, celiac disease, mesenteric artery stenosis and other ischemic gastrointestinal diseases, graft versus host disease and hemorrhagic segmental colitis.

  19. Sonographic assessment of splanchnic arteries and the bowel wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intestinal wall can be visualized using high resolution transabdominal ultrasound. The normal intestinal wall thickness in the terminal ileum, cecum, and right and left colon is <2 mm when examined with graded compression. It is important to appreciate that a contracted intestinal segment can be misinterpreted as a thickened wall. Vascularisation can be mainly displayed in the second hyperechoic layer (submucosal layer) as well as vessels penetrating the muscularis propria. Imaging of the gastrointestinal wall is dependent on the experience of the examiner as well dependent on the equipment used. Acute or chronic inflammation of the intestinal wall is accompanied by increased perfusion of the mesentery, which can be displayed non-quantitatively with colour duplex. In contrast, ischemia is characterised by hypoperfusion of the mesenteric arteries and the bowel wall. The most promising sonographic approach in assessing splanchnic arteries and the bowel wall is combining the analysis of superior and inferior mesenteric inflow by pulsed Doppler scanning (systolic and diastolic velocities, resistance index) with the end-organ vascularity by colour Doppler imaging diminishing the influence of examination technique only displaying bowel wall vascularity. Colour Doppler imaging has been described as helpful in a variety of gastrointestinal disorders, particularly in patients with Crohn's disease, celiac disease, mesenteric artery stenosis and other ischemic gastrointestinal diseases, graft versus host disease and hemorrhagic segmental colitis

  20. Dynamics of monopole walls

    OpenAIRE

    Maldonado, R; R. S. Ward

    2014-01-01

    The moduli space of centred Bogomolny–Prasad–Sommerfield 2-monopole fields is a 4-dimensional manifold M with a natural metric, and the geodesics on M correspond to slow-motion monopole dynamics. The best-known case is that of monopoles on R3 , where M is the Atiyah–Hitchin space. More recently, the case of monopoles periodic in one direction (monopole chains) was studied a few years ago. Our aim in this note is to investigate M for doubly-periodic fields, which may be visualized as monopole ...

  1. A discrete mesoscopic particle model of the mechanics of a multi-constituent arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witthoft, Alexandra; Yazdani, Alireza; Peng, Zhangli; Bellini, Chiara; Humphrey, Jay D; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-01-01

    Blood vessels have unique properties that allow them to function together within a complex, self-regulating network. The contractile capacity of the wall combined with complex mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix enables vessels to adapt to changes in haemodynamic loading. Homogenized phenomenological and multi-constituent, structurally motivated continuum models have successfully captured these mechanical properties, but truly describing intricate microstructural details of the arterial wall may require a discrete framework. Such an approach would facilitate modelling interactions between or the separation of layers of the wall and would offer the advantage of seamless integration with discrete models of complex blood flow. We present a discrete particle model of a multi-constituent, nonlinearly elastic, anisotropic arterial wall, which we develop using the dissipative particle dynamics method. Mimicking basic features of the microstructure of the arterial wall, the model comprises an elastin matrix having isotropic nonlinear elastic properties plus anisotropic fibre reinforcement that represents the stiffer collagen fibres of the wall. These collagen fibres are distributed evenly and are oriented in four directions, symmetric to the vessel axis. Experimental results from biaxial mechanical tests of an artery are used for model validation, and a delamination test is simulated to demonstrate the new capabilities of the model. PMID:26790998

  2. Wall Shear Stress Distribution in Patient Specific Coronary Artery Bifurcation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahab Dehlaghi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Atherogenesis is affected by hemodynamic parameters, such as wall shear stress and wall shear stress spatial gradient. These parameters are largely dependent on the geometry of arterial tree. Arterial bifurcations contain significant flow disturbances. Approach: The effects of branch angle and vessel diameter ratio at the bifurcations on the wall shear stress distribution in the coronary arterial tree based on CT images were studied. CT images were digitally processed to extract geometrical contours representing the coronary vessel walls. The lumen of the coronary arteries of the patients was segmented using the open source software package (VMTK. The resulting lumens of coronary arteries were fed into a commercial mesh generator (GAMBIT, Fluent Inc. to generate a volume that was filled with tetrahedral elements. The FIDAP software (Fluent Corp. was used to carry out the simulation by solving Navier-Stokes equations. The FIELDVIEW software (Version 10.0, Intelligent Light, Lyndhurst, NJ was used for the visualization of flow patterns and the quantification of wall shear stress. Post processing was done with VMTK and MATLAB. A parabolic velocity profile was prescribed at the inlets and outlets, except for 1. Stress free outlet was assigned to the remaining outlet. Results: The results show that for angle lower than 90°, low shear stress regions are observed at the non-flow divider and the apex. For angle larger than 90°, low shear stress regions only at the non-flow divider. By increasing of diameter of side branch ratio, low shear stress regions in the side branch appear at the non-flow divider. Conclusion: It is concluded that not only angle and diameter are important, but also the overall 3D shape of the artery. More research is required to further quantify the effects angle and diameter on shear stress patterns in coronaries.

  3. A new high-resolution spectral approach to noninvasively evaluate wall deformations in arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan, Ivonne; Negreira, Carlos; Ramos, Antonio; Brum, Javier; Ramirez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    By locally measuring changes on arterial wall thickness as a function of pressure, the related Young modulus can be evaluated. This physical magnitude has shown to be an important predictive factor for cardiovascular diseases. For evaluating those changes, imaging segmentation or time correlations of ultrasonic echoes, coming from wall interfaces, are usually employed. In this paper, an alternative low-cost technique is proposed to locally evaluate variations on arterial walls, which are dynamically measured with an improved high-resolution calculation of power spectral densities in echo-traces of the wall interfaces, by using a parametric autoregressive processing. Certain wall deformations are finely detected by evaluating the echoes overtones peaks with power spectral estimations that implement Burg and Yule Walker algorithms. Results of this spectral approach are compared with a classical cross-correlation operator, in a tube phantom and "in vitro" carotid tissue. A circulating loop, mimicking heart periods and blood pressure changes, is employed to dynamically inspect each sample with a broadband ultrasonic probe, acquiring multiple A-Scans which are windowed to isolate echo-traces packets coming from distinct walls. Then the new technique and cross-correlation operator are applied to evaluate changing parietal deformations from the detection of displacements registered on the wall faces under periodic regime. PMID:24688596

  4. A New High-Resolution Spectral Approach to Noninvasively Evaluate Wall Deformations in Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivonne Bazan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By locally measuring changes on arterial wall thickness as a function of pressure, the related Young modulus can be evaluated. This physical magnitude has shown to be an important predictive factor for cardiovascular diseases. For evaluating those changes, imaging segmentation or time correlations of ultrasonic echoes, coming from wall interfaces, are usually employed. In this paper, an alternative low-cost technique is proposed to locally evaluate variations on arterial walls, which are dynamically measured with an improved high-resolution calculation of power spectral densities in echo-traces of the wall interfaces, by using a parametric autoregressive processing. Certain wall deformations are finely detected by evaluating the echoes overtones peaks with power spectral estimations that implement Burg and Yule Walker algorithms. Results of this spectral approach are compared with a classical cross-correlation operator, in a tube phantom and “in vitro” carotid tissue. A circulating loop, mimicking heart periods and blood pressure changes, is employed to dynamically inspect each sample with a broadband ultrasonic probe, acquiring multiple A-Scans which are windowed to isolate echo-traces packets coming from distinct walls. Then the new technique and cross-correlation operator are applied to evaluate changing parietal deformations from the detection of displacements registered on the wall faces under periodic regime.

  5. Dynamics of domain wall networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Networks or webs of domain walls are admitted in Abelian or non-Abelian gauge theory coupled to fundamental Higgs fields with complex masses. We examine the dynamics of the domain wall loops by using the moduli approximation and find a phase rotation induces a repulsive force which can be understood as a Noether charge of Q-solitons. Non-Abelian gauge theory allows different types of loops which can be deformed to each other by changing a modulus. This admits the moduli geometry like a sandglass made by gluing the tips of the two cigar-(cone-)like metrics of a single triangle loop. We conclude that the sizes of all loops tend to grow for a late time in general models with complex Higgs masses, while the sizes are stabilized at some values once triplet masses are introduced for the Higgs fields. We also show that the stationary motion on the moduli space of the domain wall webs represents 1/4 Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Q-webs of walls

  6. Constitutive modelling of an arterial wall supported by microscopic measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vychytil J.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An idealized model of an arterial wall is proposed as a two-layer system. Distinct mechanical response of each layer is taken into account considering two types of strain energy functions in the hyperelasticity framework. The outer layer, considered as a fibre-reinforced composite, is modelled using the structural model of Holzapfel. The inner layer, on the other hand, is represented by a two-scale model mimicing smooth muscle tissue. For this model, material parameters such as shape, volume fraction and orientation of smooth muscle cells are determined using the microscopic measurements. The resulting model of an arterial ring is stretched axially and loaded with inner pressure to simulate the mechanical response of a porcine arterial segment during inflation and axial stretching. Good agreement of the model prediction with experimental data is promising for further progress.

  7. Ultrasound settings significantly alter arterial lumen and wall thickness measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Green Daniel J; Reed Christopher J; Potter Kathleen; Hankey Graeme J; Arnolda Leonard F

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and carotid intima-medial thickness (CIMT), measured by ultrasound, are widely used to test the efficacy of cardioprotective interventions. Although assessment methods vary, automated edge-detecting image analysis software is routinely used to measure changes in FMD and CIMT. We aimed to quantify the effect that commonly adjusted ultrasound settings have on arterial lumen and wall thickness measurements made with CIMT measurement software. Meth...

  8. Gelsolin amyloid angiopathy causes severe disruption of the arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskelainen, Susanna; Pihlamaa, Tiia; Suominen, Sinikka; Zhao, Fang; Salo, Tuula; Risteli, Juha; Baumann, Marc; Kalimo, Hannu; Kiuru-Enari, Sari

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary gelsolin amyloidosis (HGA) is a dominantly inherited systemic disease reported worldwide. HGA is characterized by ophthalmological, neurological, and dermatological manifestations. AGel amyloid accumulates at basal lamina of epithelial and muscle cells, thus amyloid angiopathy is encountered in nearly every organ. HGA patients have cardiovascular, hemorrhagic, and potentially vascularly induced neurological problems. To clarify pathomechanisms of AGel angiopathy, we performed histological, immunohistochemical, and electron microscopic analyses on facial temporal artery branches from 8 HGA patients and 13 control subjects. We demonstrate major pathological changes in arteries: disruption of the tunica media, disorganization of vascular smooth muscle cells, and accumulation of AGel fibrils in arterial walls, where they associate with the lamina elastica interna, which becomes fragmented and diminished. We also provide evidence of abnormal accumulation and localization of collagen types I and III and an increase of collagen type I degradation product in the tunica media. Vascular smooth muscle cells appear to be morphologically and semi-quantitatively normal, only their basal lamina is often thickened. In conclusion, angiopathy in HGA results in severe disruption of arterial walls, characterized by prominent AGel deposition, collagen derangement and severe elastolysis, and it may be responsible for several, particularly hemorrhagic, disease manifestations in HGA. PMID:27198069

  9. Shape dynamics of growing cell walls

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Scherer, Norbert F.; Dinner, Aaron R.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a general theoretical framework to study the shape dynamics of actively growing and remodeling surfaces. Using this framework we develop a physical model for growing bacterial cell walls and study the interplay of cell shape with the dynamics of growth and constriction. The model allows us to derive constraints on cell wall mechanical energy based on the observed dynamics of cell shape. We predict that exponential growth in cell size requires a constant amount of cell wall energy...

  10. Wall morphology, blood flow and wall shear stress: MR findings in patients with peripheral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galizia, Mauricio S.; Barker, Alex; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Liao, Yihua [Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); McDermott, Mary M. [Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-04-15

    To investigate the influence of atherosclerotic plaques on femoral haemodynamics assessed by two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with three-directional velocity encoding. During 1 year, patients with peripheral artery disease and an ankle brachial index <1.00 were enrolled. After institutional review board approval and written informed consent, 44 patients (age, 70 ± 12 years) underwent common femoral artery MRI. Patients with contra-indications for MRI were excluded. Sequences included 2D time-of-flight, proton-density, T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated 2D PC-MRI with 3D velocity encoding was acquired. A radiologist classified images in five categories. Blood flow, velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) along the vessel circumference were quantified from the PC-MRI data. The acquired images were of good quality for interpretation. There were no image quality problems related to poor ECG-gating or slice positioning. Velocities, oscillatory shear stress and total flow were similar between patients with normal arteries and wall thickening/plaque. Patients with plaques demonstrated regionally increased peak systolic WSS and enhanced WSS eccentricity. Combined multi-contrast morphological imaging of the peripheral arterial wall with PC-MRI with three-directional velocity encoding is a feasible technique. Further study is needed to determine whether flow is an appropriate marker for altered endothelial cell function, vascular remodelling and plaque progression. (orig.)

  11. Wall morphology, blood flow and wall shear stress: MR findings in patients with peripheral artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the influence of atherosclerotic plaques on femoral haemodynamics assessed by two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with three-directional velocity encoding. During 1 year, patients with peripheral artery disease and an ankle brachial index <1.00 were enrolled. After institutional review board approval and written informed consent, 44 patients (age, 70 ± 12 years) underwent common femoral artery MRI. Patients with contra-indications for MRI were excluded. Sequences included 2D time-of-flight, proton-density, T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated 2D PC-MRI with 3D velocity encoding was acquired. A radiologist classified images in five categories. Blood flow, velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) along the vessel circumference were quantified from the PC-MRI data. The acquired images were of good quality for interpretation. There were no image quality problems related to poor ECG-gating or slice positioning. Velocities, oscillatory shear stress and total flow were similar between patients with normal arteries and wall thickening/plaque. Patients with plaques demonstrated regionally increased peak systolic WSS and enhanced WSS eccentricity. Combined multi-contrast morphological imaging of the peripheral arterial wall with PC-MRI with three-directional velocity encoding is a feasible technique. Further study is needed to determine whether flow is an appropriate marker for altered endothelial cell function, vascular remodelling and plaque progression. (orig.)

  12. Shape dynamics of growing cell walls

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a general theoretical framework to study the shape dynamics of actively growing and remodeling surfaces. Using this framework we develop a physical model for growing bacterial cell walls and study the interplay of cell shape with the dynamics of growth and constriction. The model allows us to derive constraints on cell wall mechanical energy based on the observed dynamics of cell shape. We predict that exponential growth in cell size requires a constant amount of cell wall energy to be dissipated per unit volume. We use the model to understand and contrast growth in bacteria with different shapes such as spherical, ellipsoidal, cylindrical and toroidal morphologies. Coupling growth to cell wall constriction, we predict a discontinuous shape transformation, from partial constriction to cell division, as a function of the chemical potential driving cell-wall synthesis. Our model for cell wall energy and shape dynamics relates growth kinetics with cell geometry, and provides a unified framework to d...

  13. Passive cigarette smoking induces inflammatory injury in human arterial walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Ni; HONG Jiang; DAI Qiu-yan

    2009-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have shown that both active and passive cigarette smoking increase the risk of atherosclerosis. But very little is known about the biological processes induced by passive cigarette smoking that contribute to atheresclerosis. We observe the expression of a few of biological and inflammatory markers in human arterial walls in vitro which were treated with the second-hand smoke solution (sidestream whole, SSW), and discuss the possible mechanism of inflammatory injury induced by second-hand smoke.Methods The biological markers (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1, PECAM-1; α-smooth muscle actin, α-SMA; collagen Ⅳ, Col Ⅳ) and inflammatory markers (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, VCAM-1; monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, MCP-1; interleukin-8, IL-8) of human aortal wall were tested by immunofluorescence staining. The levels of MCP-1 and IL-8 mRNA expression were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results No distinct difference was observed between SSW and the control group on the expression of biological markers as assessed by the light microscope. But the inflammatory markers VCAM-1, MCP-1 and IL-8 on the subendothelial layer and smooth muscle cell layers, which are near the endothelium of arterial wall, were strongly stained in the SSW group compared with the control group. Their fluorescence intensities in the 1:40 SSW group (VCAM-1: 0.35±0.04, MCP-1: 0.34±0.05, IL-8: 0.37±0.05) and the 1:20 SSW group (VCAM-1: 0.40±0.04, MCP-1: 0.52±0.09, IL-8: 0.51±0.07) were significantly stronger than the control group (VCAM-1: 0.12±0.04, MCP-1: 0.06±0.02, IL-8: 0.24±0.03) by semi-quantitative analysis of immunofluorescence (P <0.001 vs control). MCP-1 mRNA expression in the 1:40 SSW (0.15±0.04) and the 1:20 SSW (0.19±0.06) group was significantly higher than in the control group (0.09±0.03) (P <0.05, P <0.01 vs control); IL-8 mRNA expression in the 1:40 SSW (0.64±0.12) and 1

  14. Relationship of sonographic wall components of the brachial artery to hypertension and coronary atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Frick, Matthias; Alber, Hannes F; Rinner, Alexander; Suessenbacher, Alois; Ulmer, Hanno; Schwarzacher, Severin P; Pachinger, Otmar; Weidinger, Franz

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine whether sonographically assessed intimal (echodense, ED) or medial (echolucent, EL) thickening of the brachial artery is associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) and/or arterial hypertension (HT). In 201 patients the ED and EL wall components, as well as the total wall thickness of the brachial artery, were measured with high-resolution ultrasound (13 MHz). According to the presence or absence of CAD and HT, the patients were div...

  15. Linear and nonlinear viscoelastic arterial wall models: application on animals

    CERN Document Server

    Ghigo, Arthur; Armentano, Ricardo; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Fullana, Jose-Maria

    2016-01-01

    This work deals with the viscoelasticity of the arterial wall and its influence on the pulse waves. We describe the viscoelasticity by a non-linear Kelvin-Voigt model in which the coefficients are fitted using experimental time series of pressure and radius measured on a sheep's arterial network. We obtained a good agreement between the results of the nonlinear Kelvin-Voigt model and the experimental measurements. We found that the viscoelastic relaxation time-defined by the ratio between the viscoelastic coefficient and the Young's modulus-is nearly constant throughout the network. Therefore, as it is well known that smaller arteries are stiffer, the viscoelastic coefficient rises when approaching the peripheral sites to compensate the rise of the Young's modulus, resulting in a higher damping effect. We incorporated the fitted viscoelastic coefficients in a nonlinear 1D fluid model to compute the pulse waves in the network. The damping effect of viscoelasticity on the high frequency waves is clear especiall...

  16. Calculation of arterial wall temperature in atherosclerotic arteries: effect of pulsatile flow, arterial geometry, and plaque structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Taehong

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper presents calculations of the temperature distribution in an atherosclerotic plaque experiencing an inflammatory process; it analyzes the presence of hot spots in the plaque region and their relationship to blood flow, arterial geometry, and inflammatory cell distribution. Determination of the plaque temperature has become an important topic because plaques showing a temperature inhomogeneity have a higher likelihood of rupture. As a result, monitoring plaque temperature and knowing the factors affecting it can help in the prevention of sudden rupture. Methods The transient temperature profile in inflamed atherosclerotic plaques is calculated by solving an energy equation and the Navier-Stokes equations in 2D idealized arterial models of a bending artery and an arterial bifurcation. For obtaining the numerical solution, the commercial package COMSOL 3.2 was used. The calculations correspond to a parametric study where arterial type and size, as well as plaque geometry and composition, are varied. These calculations are used to analyze the contribution of different factors affecting arterial wall temperature measurements. The main factors considered are the metabolic heat production of inflammatory cells, atherosclerotic plaque length lp, inflammatory cell layer length lmp, and inflammatory cell layer thickness dmp. Results The calculations indicate that the best location to perform the temperature measurement is at the back region of the plaque (0.5 ≤ l/lp ≤ 0.7. The location of the maximum temperature, or hot spot, at the plaque surface can move during the cardiac cycle depending on the arterial geometry and is a direct result of the blood flow pattern. For the bending artery, the hot spot moves 0.6 millimeters along the longitudinal direction; for the arterial bifurcation, the hot spot is concentrated at a single location due to the flow recirculation observed at both ends of the plaque. Focusing on the

  17. Quantifying [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the arterial wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn Alexander; Bashyam, A.; Ramachandran, A.;

    2015-01-01

    with contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) assistance on quantification of arterial wall F-18-FDG uptake at different imaging time-points. Methods Ten subjects were assessed by CECT imaging and dual time-point PET/CT imaging at approximately 60 and 180 min after F-18-FDG administration. For both time......-points, uptake of F-18-FDG was determined in the aortic wall by calculating the blood pool-corrected maximum standardized uptake value (cSUV(MAX)) and cSUV(MEAN). The PVE-corrected SUVMEAN (pvcSUV(MEAN)) was also calculated using F-18-FDG PET/CT and CECT images. Finally, corresponding target-to-background ratios...... (TBR) were calculated. Results At 60 min, pvcSUV(MEAN) was on average 3.1 times greater than cSUV(MAX) (P <.0001) and 8.5 times greater than cSUV(MEAN) (P <.0001). At 180 min, pvcSUV(MEAN) was on average 2.6 times greater than cSUV(MAX) (P <.0001) and 6.6 times greater than cSUV(MEAN) (P <.0001...

  18. A New High-Resolution Spectral Approach to Noninvasively Evaluate Wall Deformations in Arteries

    OpenAIRE

    Ivonne Bazan; Carlos Negreira; Antonio Ramos; Javier Brum; Alfredo Ramirez

    2014-01-01

    By locally measuring changes on arterial wall thickness as a function of pressure, the related Young modulus can be evaluated. This physical magnitude has shown to be an important predictive factor for cardiovascular diseases. For evaluating those changes, imaging segmentation or time correlations of ultrasonic echoes, coming from wall interfaces, are usually employed. In this paper, an alternative low-cost technique is proposed to locally evaluate variations on arterial walls, which are dyna...

  19. Optimization of Condition of Ultrasonic Beam for Measurement of Small Change in Thickness of Arterial Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masaru; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2002-05-01

    We previously developed a method for measuring small changes in thickness of the arterial wall during one cardiac cycle. Knowledge of this change in thickness is useful for in vivo assessment of the regional elasticity of the arterial wall. In this study, from computer simulations, it is found that measurement error depends on the distance of the ultrasonic beam from the center of the artery and it can be reduced by optimally setting the focal position. In basic experiments using a silicone rubber tube and in in vivo experiments with a human carotid artery, it is found that by optimizing the focal position, measurement of the change in thickness becomes more robust against mispositioning of the ultrasonic beam. From these results, it is demonstrated that optimum focal positioning provides more robustness in measurement, even if there is arterial wall motion causing the position of the ultrasonic beam to deviate from the center of the artery.

  20. Effect of cigarette smoke, nicotine, and carbon monoxide on the permeability of the arterial wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The association between cigarette smoking and the development of atherosclerosis is well established, but the mechanism that makes cigarettes such a potent risk factor is not understood. There is normally a constant insudation of plasma macromolecules into the arterial wall. Fibrinogen and lipids are two of the large molecules involved in atherosclerosis. Therefore, we studied the effect of cigarette smoke, nicotine, and carbon monoxide on the permeability of the canine arterial wall to 125I-labeled fibrinogen. The results show that inhaled cigarette smoke significantly and rapidly increases the permeability of the arterial wall to fibrinogen and that this effect can be produced with carbon monoxide alone but not with intravenous nicotine

  1. Dynamic response of flexible retaining walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younan, A.H.; Veletsos, A.S.; Bandyopadhyay, K.

    1997-01-01

    Making use of an extension of a recently proposed, relatively simple, approximate method of analysis, a critical evaluation is made of the response to horizontal ground shaking of flexible walls retaining a uniform, linear, viscoelastic stratum of constant thickness and semiinfinite extent in the horizontal direction. Both cantilever and top-supported walls are examined. Following a detailed description of the method and of its rate of convergence, comprehensive numerical solutions are presented that elucidate the action of the system and the effects of the various parameters involved. The parameters varied include the flexibility of the wall, the condition of top support, and the characteristics of the ground motion. The effects of both harmonic base motions and an actual earthquake record are examined. Special attention is paid to the effects of long-period, effectively static excitations. A maximum dynamic response is then expressed as the product of the corresponding static response and an appropriate amplification or deamplification factor. The response quantities examined include the displacements of the wall relative to the moving base, the dynamic wall pressures, and the total wall force, base shear and base moment.

  2. Ultrasonic Estimation of Mechanical Properties of Pulmonary Arterial Wall Under Normoxic and Hypoxic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Kendall R.; Mukdadi, Osama M.

    2005-04-01

    Secondary pediatric pulmonary hypertension is a disease that could benefit from improved ultrasonic diagnostic techniques. We perform high-frequency in vitro ultrasound measurements (25 MHz to 100 MHz) on fresh and fixed pulmonary arterial walls excised from normoxic and hypoxic Long-Evans rat models. Estimates of the elastic stiffness coefficients are determined from measurements of the speed of sound. Preliminary results indicate that hypoxia leads to up to increase of 20 % in stiffening of the pulmonary arterial wall.

  3. Assessment of normal and atherosclerotic arterial wall thickness with an intravascular ultrasound imaging catheter.

    OpenAIRE

    Mallery, JA; Tobis, JM; Griffith, J.; Gessert, J; McRae, M; Moussabeck, O; Bessen, M; Moriuchi, M; Henry, WL

    1990-01-01

    A prototype intravascular ultrasound imaging catheter with a 20 MHz transducer was used to obtain 59 cross-sectional images in 14 segments of human atherosclerotic arteries. Three distinct components of the arterial wall were visualized on the ultrasound images: a highly reflective intima, an echolucent media, and a moderately reflective adventitia. Images were obtained at 1 mm increments in vitro and were compared with histologic sections at the same levels. Measurements of the arterial laye...

  4. Determination of wall tension in cerebral artery aneurysms by numerical simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksen, J.G.; Bazilevs, Y.; Kvamsdal, T.; Zhang, Y.; Kaspersen, J.H.; Waterloo, K.; Ingebrigtsen, T.; Rommer, Bertil Roland

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cerebral artery aneurysms rupture when wall tension exceeds the strength of the wall tissue. At present, risk-assessment of unruptured aneurysms does not include evaluation of the lesions shape, yet clinical experience suggests that this is of importance. We aimed to devel...

  5. Quantification of pulmonary arterial wall distensibility using parameters extracted from volumetric micro-CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roger H.; Karau, Kelly L.; Molthen, Robert C.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    1999-09-01

    Stiffening, or loss of distensibility, of arterial vessel walls is among the manifestations of a number of vascular diseases including pulmonary arterial hypertension. We are attempting to quantify the mechanical properties of vessel walls of the pulmonary arterial tree using parameters derived from high-resolution volumetric x-ray CT images of rat lungs. The pulmonary arterial trees of the excised lungs are filled with a contrast agent. The lungs are imaged with arterial pressures spanning the physiological range. Vessel segment diameters are measured from the inlet to the periphery, and distensibilities calculated from diameters as a function of pressure. The method shows promise as an adjunct to other morphometric techniques such as histology and corrosion casting. It possesses the advantages of being nondestructive, characterizing the vascular structures while the lungs are imaged rapidly and in a near-physiological state, and providing the ability to associate mechanical properties with vessel location in the intact tree hierarchy.

  6. CARDIAC TRANSPLANT REJECTION AND NON-INVASIVE COMON CAROTID ARTERY WALL FUNCTIONAL INDICES

    OpenAIRE

    A. O. Shevchenko; I. U. Tunjaieva; A. A. Nasyrova; B. L. Mironkov; I. M. Ilinsky; N. P. Mozhejko; I. I. Muminov; O. P. Shevchenko

    2015-01-01

    Allograft rejection would entail an increase in certain blood biomarkers and active substances derived from activated inflammatory cells which could influence entire vascular endothelial function and deteriorate arterial wall stiffness. We propose that carotid wall functional indices measured with non-invasive ultrasound could we valuable markers of the subclinical cardiac allograft rejection. Aim. Our goal was to analyze the clinical utility of functional common carotid wall (CCW) variables ...

  7. MR imaging of the arterial wall in normal volunteers and arteriosclerotic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MR angiography is based on the signal characteristics of flowing blood, whereas the arterial wall is not delineated. Its visualization requires maximal spatial resolution and reliable compensation for moving spins. Presaturation and rephasing gradients were applied to spin-echo and fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequences combined with a reduction of the field of view to approximately 10 cm. Three-dimensional FLASH sequences demonstrated spin saturation within the imaging volume without additional radio-frequency pulses and was sensitive to alterations in the arterial wall. CHESS techniques (fat sensitive) suppressed signal from the normal arterial wall. Small fatty or sclerotic deposits in the femoral, popliteal, and carotid walls were detected prior to marked stenosis

  8. Lateral abdominal wall hematoma as a rare complication after carotid artery stenting: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satomi Jyunichiro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Abdominal wall hematoma is a rare and life-threatening complication after carotid artery stenting (CAS, but it can occur when activated clotting time is prolonged. We report a right lateral abdominal wall hematoma caused by rupture of the superficial circumflex iliac artery after CAS in a 72-year-old man with severe stenosis of the origin of the right internal carotid artery. We performed CAS for the targeted lesion while activated clotting time exceeded 300 seconds. After 2 hours, he complained of right lateral abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography revealed an extensive hematoma in the right lateral abdominal wall. Activated clotting time was 180 seconds at this point. Seven hours later, he developed hypotension and hemoglobin level dropped to 11.3 g/dl. Subsequent computed tomography showed enlargement of the hematoma. Emergent selective angiography of the external iliac artery revealed active bleeding from the right superficial circumflex iliac artery. Transcatheter arterial embolization with Gelfoam and microcoils was performed successfully. With more CAS procedures being performed, it is important for endovascular surgeons and radiologists to consider the possibility of abdominal wall hematoma in this situation.

  9. Cell-wall dynamics in growing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furchtgott, Leon; Wingreen, Ned; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial cells come in a large variety of shapes, and cell shape plays an important role in the regulation of many biological functions. Cell shape in bacterial cells is dictated by a cell wall composed of peptidoglycan, a polymer made up of long, stiff glycan strands and flexible peptide crosslinks. Although much is understood about the structural properties of peptidoglycan, little is known about the dynamics of cell wall organization in bacterial cells. In particular, during cell growth, how does the bacterial cell wall continuously expand and reorganize while maintaining cell shape? In order to investigate this question quantitatively, we model the cell wall of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli using a simple elastic model, in which glycan and peptide subunits are treated as springs with different spring constants and relaxed lengths. We consider the peptidoglycan network as a single-layered network of these springs under tension due to an internal osmotic pressure. Within this model, we simulate possible hypotheses for cell growth as different combinations of addition of new springs and breakage of old springs.

  10. Artery buckling analysis using a two-layered wall model with collagen dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottahedi, Mohammad; Han, Hai-Chao

    2016-07-01

    Artery buckling has been proposed as a possible cause for artery tortuosity associated with various vascular diseases. Since microstructure of arterial wall changes with aging and diseases, it is essential to establish the relationship between microscopic wall structure and artery buckling behavior. The objective of this study was to developed arterial buckling equations to incorporate the two-layered wall structure with dispersed collagen fiber distribution. Seven porcine carotid arteries were tested for buckling to determine their critical buckling pressures at different axial stretch ratios. The mechanical properties of these intact arteries and their intima-media layer were determined via pressurized inflation test. Collagen alignment was measured from histological sections and modeled by a modified von-Mises distribution. Buckling equations were developed accordingly using microstructure-motivated strain energy function. Our results demonstrated that collagen fibers disperse around two mean orientations symmetrically to the circumferential direction (39.02°±3.04°) in the adventitia layer; while aligning closely in the circumferential direction (2.06°±3.88°) in the media layer. The microstructure based two-layered model with collagen fiber dispersion described the buckling behavior of arteries well with the model predicted critical pressures match well with the experimental measurement. Parametric studies showed that with increasing fiber dispersion parameter, the predicted critical buckling pressure increases. These results validate the microstructure-based model equations for artery buckling and set a base for further studies to predict the stability of arteries due to microstructural changes associated with vascular diseases and aging. PMID:27031686

  11. Dynamic exercise enhances regional cerebral artery mean flow velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linkis, P; Jørgensen, L G; Olesen, H L;

    1995-01-01

    Dynamic exercise enhances regional cerebral artery mean flow velocity. J. Appl. Physiol. 78(1): 12-16, 1995.--Anterior (ACA) and middle (MCA) cerebral artery mean flow velocities (Vmean) and pulsatility indexes were determined using transcranial Doppler in 14 subjects during dynamic exercise afte...

  12. Dynamic damping of domain walls in weak ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microscopic theory is developed for the energy dissipation of a moving domain wall of a weak ferromagnetic by interaction between the wall and thermal magnons. Different dynamic regimes are considered - translational wall motion and propagation of flexure waves along the wall. The special roles of small system-energy terms that disturb the soliton character of the domain wall, and of the fact that the wall does not reflect the magnons with which it interacts, are pointed out. A phenomenological equation that describes consistently the domain-wall dynamics and relaxation is proposed on the basis of the microscopic calculations

  13. Lipogenesis in arterial wall and vascular smooth muscular cells: regulation and abnormalities in insulin-resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feugier Patrick

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular smooth muscular cells (VSMC express lipogenic genes. Therefore in situ lipogenesis could provide fatty acids for triglycerides synthesis and cholesterol esterification and contribute to lipid accumulation in arterial wall with aging and during atheroma. Methods We investigated expression of lipogenic genes in human and rat arterial walls, its regulation in cultured VSMC and determined if it is modified during insulin-resistance and diabetes, situations with increased risk for atheroma. Results Zucker obese (ZO and diabetic (ZDF rats accumulated more triglycerides in their aortas than their respective control rats, and this triglycerides content increased with age in ZDF and control rats. However the expression in aortas of lipogenic genes, or of genes involved in fatty acids uptake, was not higher in ZDF and ZO rats and did not increase with age. Expression of lipogenesis-related genes was not increased in human arterial wall (carotid endarterectomy of diabetic compared to non-diabetic patients. In vitro, glucose and adipogenic medium (ADM stimulated moderately the expression and activity of lipogenesis in VSMC from control rats. LXR agonists, but not PXR agonist, stimulated also lipogenesis in VSMC but not in arterial wall in vivo. Lipogenic genes expression was lower in VSMC from ZO rats and not stimulated by glucose or ADM. Conclusion Lipogenic genes are expressed in arterial wall and VSMC; this expression is stimulated (VSMC by glucose, ADM and LXR agonists. During insulin-resistance and diabetes, this expression is not increased and resists to the actions of glucose and ADM. It is unlikely that this metabolic pathway contribute to lipid accumulation of arterial wall during insulin-resistance and diabetes and thus to the increased risk of atheroma observed in these situations.

  14. Quantification of cross-sectional artery wall motion with IVUS image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakeson, Kevin D.; Zhu, Hui; Friedman, Morton H.

    2004-04-01

    Atherosclerotic lesions have been shown to have different mechanical properties than the non-diseased artery. Calculating vessel wall strain from cross-sectional vessel wall motions allows for the measurement of local stiffness. In this paper, a robust method is developed to track cross-sectional displacements of an artery wall using two different intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images acquired at two different pressure levels respectively. First, the vessel wall region in one image is segmented semi-automatically by refining two spline-based contours to the locations of inner and outer vessel wall borders. Then the ringlike wall region in one image is registered to its counterpart in the other image in polar coordinates. The registration is performed by minimizing an energy function of the 2D motion field based on a spline-deformable-model. Both intensity and gradient information of the images are used to construct the energy function so that an accurate registration can be achieved. Registration accuracy was tested on simulated motions using IVUS images of a human coronary artery and a porcine carotid. The wall displacement fields calculated from real motion images are also demonstrated.

  15. Hemodynamics in stented vertebral artery ostial stenosis based on computational fluid dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Aike; Dai, Xuan; Niu, Jing; Jiao, Liqun

    2016-08-01

    Hemodynamic factors may affect the potential occurrence of in-stent restenosis (ISR) after intervention procedure of vertebral artery ostial stenosis (VAOS). The purpose of the present study is to investigate the influence of stent protrusion length in implantation strategy on the local hemodynamics of the VAOS. CTA images of a 58-year-old female patient with posterior circulation transient ischemic attack were used to perform a 3D reconstruction of the vertebral artery. Five models of the vertebral artery before and after the stent implantation were established. Model 1 was without stent implantation, Model 2-5 was with stent protruding into the subclavian artery for 0, 1, 2, 3 mm, respectively. Computational fluid dynamics simulations based on finite element analysis were employed to mimic the blood flow in arteries and to assess hemodynamic conditions, particularly the blood flow velocity and wall shear stress (WSS). The WSS and the blood flow velocity at the vertebral artery ostium were reduced by 85.33 and 35.36% respectively after stents implantation. The phenomenon of helical flow disappeared. Hemodynamics comparison showed that stent struts that protruded 1 mm into the subclavian artery induced the least decrease in blood speed and WSS. The results suggest that stent implantation can improve the hemodynamics of VAOS, while stent struts that had protruded 1 mm into the subclavian artery would result in less thrombogenesis and neointimal hyperplasia and most likely decrease the risk of ISR. PMID:26691981

  16. Fluorescent tags to explore cell wall structure and dynamics.

    OpenAIRE

    Martine eGonneau; Herman eHöfte; Samantha eVernhettes

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell walls are highly dynamic and heterogeneic structures, which vary between celltypes, growth stages but also between microdomains within a single cell wall. In this review, we summarize the imaging techniques using fluorescent tags that are currently being used and which should in the coming years revolutionize our understanding of the dynamics of cell wall architecture and the cellular processes involved in synthesis of cell wall components.

  17. Fluorescent tags to explore cell wall structure and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Gonneau, Martine; Höfte, Herman; Vernhettes, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    Plant cell walls are highly dynamic and heterogeneous structures, which vary between cell types, growth stages but also between microdomains within a single cell wall. In this review, we summarize the imaging techniques using fluorescent tags that are currently being used and which should in the coming years revolutionize our understanding of the dynamics of cell wall architecture and the cellular processes involved in the synthesis of cell wall components.

  18. An experimental study on the effect of fluorouracil of two preparations on target arterial wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To probe into the influence of 5-Fu polyphase liposome and 5-Fu solution injection on a target artery. Methods: Fourteen rabbits were divided into the group A of 5-Fu polyphase liposome and group B of 5-Fu injection. Of 7 cases per group, 5 cases had a femoral artery approach and 2 cases via an ear artery. Angiography and pathological examinations under light microscope of the femoral artery were made 7 days after administration via femoral artery and pathological examination under electron microscope of the ear artery 24 hours after administration via ear artery. Results: In group B, the local narrowing was clearly shown in 4 of 5 cases of femoral arteriography. Denudation and fragmentation of hyperplastic endothelial cells, rupture and discontinuity of internal elastic membrane were seen under light microscope in the stenotic vessels. Fragmentation of endothelial cell membrane, vacuolization of cytoplasm and hazy mitochondrial structures were seen under electron microscope. In group A, femoral arteriography was normal, and only mild degree of exfoliation and hyperplasia of endothelium were seen under light microscope. Integrity of endothelial cell membrane, vacuoles in cytoplasm, swollen mitochondria with visible ridge and irregular nucleus were seen under electron microscope. Conclusions: The stimulation and injury to target arterial wall by 5-Fu polyphase liposome was obviously milder than that of 5-Fu solution injection

  19. A NEW UNSTEADY THREE DIMENSIONAL MODEL FOR MACROMOLECULAR TRANSPORT AND WATER FILTRATION ACROSS THE ARTERIAL WALL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄浩; 温功碧

    2001-01-01

    A new unsteady three-dimensional convective-diffusive mathematical model for the transportation of macromolecules and water across the arterial wall was proposed . After the formation of leaky junctions due to the mitosis of endothelial cell of the arterial wall, the macromolecular transport happens surrounding the leaky cells. The arterial wall was divided into four layers: the endothelial layer, the subendothelial intima, the internal elastic lamina and the media for the convenience of research. The time-dependent concentration growth,the effect of the shape of endothelial cell and the effect of physiological parameters were analyzed. The analytical solution of velocity field and pressure field of water flow across the arterial wall were obtained; and concentration distribution of three macromolecules ; LDL,HRP and Albumin, were calculated with numerical simulation method. The new theory predicts, the maximum and distribution areas of time dependent concentration with round shape endothelial cell are both larger than that with ellipse-shape endothelial cell. The model also predicts the concentration growth is much alike that of a two-dimensional model and it shows that the concentration reaches its peak at the leaky junction where atherosclerotic formation frequently occurs and falls down rapidly in a limited area beginning from its earlier time growth to the state when macromolecular transfer approaches steadily. These predictions of the new model are in agreement with the experimental observation for the growth and concentration distribution of LDL and Albumin.

  20. PREFACE: Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrows, C. H.; Meier, G.

    2012-01-01

    Domain structures in magnetic materials are ubiquitous and have been studied for decades. The walls that separate them are topological defects in the magnetic order parameter and have a wide variety of complex forms. In general, their investigation is difficult in bulk materials since only the domain structure on the surface of a specimen is visible. Cutting the sample to reveal the interior causes a rearrangement of the domains into a new form. As with many other areas of magnetism, the study of domain wall physics has been revitalised by the advent of nanotechnology. The ability to fabricate nanoscale structures has permitted the formation of simplified and controlled domain patterns; the development of advanced microscopy methods has permitted them to be imaged and then modelled; subjecting them to ultrashort field and current pulses has permitted their dynamics to be explored. The latest results from all of these advances are described in this special issue. Not only has this led to results of great scientific beauty, but also to concepts of great applicability to future information technologies. In this issue the reader will find the latest results for these domain wall dynamics and the high-speed processes of topological structures such as domain walls and magnetic vortices. These dynamics can be driven by the application of magnetic fields, or by flowing currents through spintronic devices using the novel physics of spin-transfer torque. This complexity has been studied using a wide variety of experimental techniques at the edge of the spatial and temporal resolution currently available, and can be described using sophisticated analytical theory and computational modelling. As a result, the dynamics can be engineered to give rise to finely controlled memory and logic devices with new functionality. Moreover, the field is moving to study not only the conventional transition metal ferromagnets, but also complex heterostructures, novel magnets and even other

  1. Regional calcium distribution and ultrasound images of the vessel wall in human carotid arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szikszai, Z.; Kertész, Zs.; Uzonyi, I.; Szíki, G. Á.; Magyar, M. T.; Molnár, S.; Ida, Y.; Csiba, L.

    2005-04-01

    Arterial calcification can take place at two sites in the vessel wall: the intima and the media. Intimal calcification occurs exclusively within atherosclerotic plaques, while medial calcification may develop independently. Extensive calcified plaques in the carotid arteries can be easily detected by B-mode ultrasonic imaging. The calcium content might correlate with the ultrasound reflectance of the vessel wall, and could be a surrogate marker for arteriosclerosis. In this study, segments of human carotid arteries collected at autopsy were examined by ultrasonography in vitro and calcium distributional maps of sections from the same segments were determined by particle induced X-ray emission. Our aim was to make a first step towards investigating the relationship between the calcium distributional maps and the respective ultrasound images.

  2. Accurate evaluation of viscoelasticity of radial artery wall during flow-mediated dilation in ultrasound measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yasumasa; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    In our previous study, the viscoelasticity of the radial artery wall was estimated to diagnose endothelial dysfunction using a high-frequency (22 MHz) ultrasound device. In the present study, we employed a commercial ultrasound device (7.5 MHz) and estimated the viscoelasticity using arterial pressure and diameter, both of which were measured at the same position. In a phantom experiment, the proposed method successfully estimated the elasticity and viscosity of the phantom with errors of 1.8 and 30.3%, respectively. In an in vivo measurement, the transient change in the viscoelasticity was measured for three healthy subjects during flow-mediated dilation (FMD). The proposed method revealed the softening of the arterial wall originating from the FMD reaction within 100 s after avascularization. These results indicate the high performance of the proposed method in evaluating vascular endothelial function just after avascularization, where the function is difficult to be estimated by a conventional FMD measurement.

  3. Influence of the myocardial bridging phenomenon on the myocardial structure and the coronary arteries wall structure changes

    OpenAIRE

    Tomanović-Koković Jelena; Teofilovski-Parapid Gordana; Oklobdžija Mirjana; Kanjuh Vladimir; Kovačević Slobodan; Parapid Biljana; Koković Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    Background/Aim. Our research was performed to evaluate the influences of the myocardial bridging of coronary arteries on the myocardial and coronary arteries wall structure changes, that could be a reason for multiple heart malfunctions. Methods. We analyzed the autopsy material, collected during a five-years period, and especially the group of 575 cases with the major aim to diagnose mors naturalis. In all cases with the presence of myocardial bridge over the arterial coronary wall revealed ...

  4. Optimization of Focal Position of Ultrasonic Beam in Measurement of Small Change in Arterial Wall Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masaru; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2001-05-01

    We have previously developed a method for measurement of a small change in thickness of the arterial wall during a single cardiac cycle [H. Kanai, M. Sato, Y. Koiwa and N. Chubachi: IEEE Trans. UFFC 43 (1996) 791]. The resultant change in thickness is shown to be useful for the in vivo assessment of the regional elasticity of the arterial wall. Although the accuracy of the measurement of the change in thickness is found to be within 1 μm, it is affected by the interference of ultrasonic pulses. In this study, we simulate the propagation of ultrasonic pulses transmitted and received by a linear probe. In the simulation experiments, the ultrasonic pulses generated by a computer are reflected by a tube, which has a small change in wall thickness of 10 μm. The optimum focal position of the ultrasonic beam is determined by evaluating the root-mean-square (rms) error in the measured change in thickness.

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound and transient arterial occlusion for quantification of arterial perfusion reserve in peripheral arterial disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To quantify muscular micro-perfusion and arterial perfusion reserve in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) with dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and transient arterial occlusion. Materials and methods: This study had local institutional review board approval and written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. We examined the dominant lower leg of 40 PAD Fontaine stage IIb patients (mean age, 65 years) and 40 healthy volunteers (mean age, 54 years) with CEUS (7 MHz; MI, 0.28) during continuous intravenous infusion of 4.8 mL microbubbles. Transient arterial occlusion at mid-thigh level simulated physical exercise. With time–CEUS–intensity curves obtained from regions of interest within calf muscles, we derived the maximum CEUS signal after occlusion (max) and its time (tmax), slope to maximum (m), vascular response after occlusion (AUCpost), and analysed accuracy, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, and correlations with ankle-brachial index (ABI) and walking distance. Results: All parameters differed in PAD and volunteers (p max was delayed (31.2 ± 13.6 vs. 16.7 ± 8.5 s, p post as optimal parameter combination for diagnosing PAD and therefore impaired arterial perfusion reserve. Conclusions: Dynamic CEUS with transient arterial occlusion quantifies muscular micro-perfusion and arterial perfusion reserve. The technique is accurate to diagnose PAD.

  6. Serum carotenoids reduce progression of early atherosclerosis in the carotid artery wall among Eastern Finnish men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouni Karppi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several previous epidemiologic studies have shown that high blood levels of carotenoids may be protective against early atherosclerosis, but results have been inconsistent. We assessed the association between atherosclerotic progression, measured by intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery wall, and serum levels of carotenoids. METHODS: We studied the effect of carotenoids on progression of early atherosclerosis in a population-based study. The association between concentrations of serum carotenoids, and intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery wall was explored in 840 middle-aged men (aged 46-65 years from Eastern Finland. Ultrasonography of the common carotid arteries were performed at baseline and 7-year follow-up. Serum levels of carotenoids were analyzed at baseline. Changes in mean and maximum intima media thickness of carotid artery wall were related to baseline serum carotenoid levels in covariance analyses adjusted for covariates. RESULTS: In a covariance analysis with adjustment for age, ultrasound sonographer, maximum intima media thickness, examination year, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, smoking, physical activity, serum LDL cholesterol, family history of coronary heart disease, antihypertensive medication and serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein, 7-year change in maximum intima media thickness was inversely associated with lycopene (p = 0.005, α-carotene (p = 0.002 and β-carotene (p = 0.019, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows that high serum concentrations of carotenoids may be protective against early atherosclerosis.

  7. Reduction in arterial wall strain with aggressive lipid-lowering therapy in patients with carotid artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inflammation and biomechanical factors have been associated with the development of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. Lipid-lowering therapy has been shown to be effective in stabilizing them by reducing plaque inflammation. Its effect on arterial wall strain, however, remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of high- and low-dose lipid-lowering therapy using an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, atorvastatin, on arterial wall strain. Forty patients with carotid stenosis >40% were successfully followed up during the Atorvastatin Therapy: Effects on Reduction Of Macrophage Activity (ATHEROMA; ISRCTN64894118) Trial. All patients had plaque inflammation as shown by intraplaque accumulation of ultrasmall super paramagnetic particles of iron oxide on magnetic resonance imaging at baseline. Structural analysis was performed and change of strain was compared between high- and low-dose statin at 0 and 12 weeks. There was no significant difference in strain between the 2 groups at baseline (P=0.6). At 12 weeks, the maximum strain was significantly lower in the 80-mg group than in the 10-mg group (0.085±0.033 vs. 0.169±0.084; P=0.001). A significant reduction (26%) of maximum strain was observed in the 80-mg group at 12 weeks (0.018±0.02; P=0.01). Aggressive lipid-lowering therapy is associated with a significant reduction in arterial wall strain. The reduction in biomechanical strain may be associated with reductions in plaque inflammatory burden. (author)

  8. Targeting novel antigens in the arterial wall in thromboangiitis obliterans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Akkus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Thromboangiitis obliterans is an inflammatory disease possibly resulting from cigarette smoking as a primary etiologic factor, perhaps as a delayed type of hypersensitivity or toxic angiitis. As little is known about the pathogenesis of the disease, we aimed to determine novel antigens that might be responsible from the local inflammatory reactions and structural changes observed in this disease. An indirect immunoperoxidase technique is used to examine the tissue samples obtained from the dorsalis pedis artery of affected individuals with twenty monoclonal antibodies. Among these several antigens which are not previously reported in TAO like CD34, CD44 and CD90 were determined in the tissue samples examined. On the other hand, many other antigens like cytokine/chemokine receptors, several enzymes and leukocyte/lymphocyte antigens were lacking giving some clues about the local pathological reactions. We briefly discussed our findings for several critical antigens those first described in the present work, possibly having roles in the development of the disease. Expression of the CD90/CD11c receptor/ligand pair seems to play an important role in mononuclear cell recruitment to the damage site. Vascular invasion of not only tunica intima but also the tunica media in affected vessels is clearly demonstrated using endothelial cell specific antigens.

  9. Multiscale, structure-based modeling for the elastic mechanical behavior of arterial walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos; Barocas, Victor H

    2007-08-01

    Passive elastic behavior of arterial wall remains difficult to model. Although phenomenological and structural models exist, the question of how the three-dimensional network structure of the collagen in the artery determines its mechanical properties is still open. A model is presented that incorporates a collagen network as well as the noncollagenous material that comprise the artery. The collagen architecture is represented as a network of interconnected fibers, and a neo-Hookean constitutive equation is used to describe the contribution of the noncollagenous matrix. The model is multiscale in that volume-averaging theory is applied to the collagen network, and it is structural in that parameters of the microstructure of the collagen network were considered instead of a macroscopic constitutive law. The computational results provided a good fit to published experimental data for decellularized porcine carotid arteries. The model predicted increased circumferential compliance for increased axial stretch, consistent with previously published reports, and a relatively small sensitivity to open angle. Even at large extensions, the model predicted that the noncollagenous matrix would be in compression, preventing collapse of the collagen network. The incorporation of fiber-fiber interactions led to an accurate model of artery wall behavior with relatively few parameters. The counterintuitive result that the noncollagenous component is in compression during extension and inflation of the tissue suggests that the collagen is important even at small strains, with the noncollagenous components supporting the network, but not resisting the load directly. More accurate representation of the microstructure of the artery wall is needed to explore this issue further. PMID:17655483

  10. Coronary Artery Calcium, Carotid Artery Wall Thickness and Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in Adults 70 to 99 Years Old

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Anne B; Naydeck, Barbara L.; Ives, Diane G.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; O Leary, Daniel H.; Kuller, Lewis H.

    2008-01-01

    Few population studies have evaluated the associations of both coronary artery calcium (CAC) and carotid ultrasound with cardiovascular events, especially in adults > 70 years of age. At the Pittsburgh Field Center of the Cardiovascular Health Study, 559 men and women, mean age 80.2 (SD 4.1) years had CAC score assessed by electron beam computerized tomography scan and common and internal carotid intimal-medial wall thickness (CCA-IMT and ICA-IMT) by carotid ultrasound between 1998−2000 and w...

  11. Fast domain wall dynamics in amorphous and nanocrystalline magnetic microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, R., E-mail: rvarga@upjs.sk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54, Kosice (Slovakia); Klein, P.; Richter, K. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54, Kosice (Slovakia); Zhukov, A. [Dept. Fisica de Materiales, Fac. Quimica, UPV/EHU, San Sebastian (Spain); Vazquez, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    We have studied the effect of thermal treatment on the domain wall dynamics of FeSiB and FeCoMoB microwires. It was shown that annealing in transversal magnetic field increases the domain wall mobility as well as the domain wall velocity. Annealing under the tensile stress hinders the appearance of the monodomain structure but application of tensile stress leads to the magnetic bistability having the domain wall mobility twice higher that in as-cast state. Further increase of the tensile stress reduces the domain wall mobility but the domain wall velocity increases as a result of the decrease of critical propagation field. Annealing of the FeCoMoB microwire by Joule heating leads to introduction of the circular anisotropy that favors the vortex domain wall. Such treatment increases the domain wall mobility as well as the maximum domain wall velocity.

  12. Magnetic domain-wall dynamics in wide permalloy strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estévez, Virginia; Laurson, Lasse

    2016-02-01

    Domain walls in soft permalloy strips may exhibit various equilibrium micromagnetic structures depending on the width and thickness of the strip, ranging from the well-known transverse and vortex walls in narrow and thin strips to double and triple vortex walls recently reported in wider strips [V. Estévez and L. Laurson, Phys. Rev. B 91, 054407 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.054407]. Here, we analyze the field driven dynamics of such domain walls in permalloy strips of widths from 240 nm up to 6 μ m , using the known equilibrium domain wall structures as initial configurations. Our micromagnetic simulations show that the domain wall dynamics in wide strips is very complex, and depends strongly on the geometry of the system, as well as on the magnitude of the driving field. We discuss in detail the rich variety of the dynamical behaviors found, including dynamic transitions between different domain wall structures, periodic dynamics of a vortex core close to the strip edge, transitions towards simpler domain wall structures of the multi-vortex domain walls controlled by vortex polarity, and the fact that for some combinations of the strip geometry and the driving field the system cannot support a compact domain wall.

  13. Dual stack black blood carotid artery CMR at 3T: Application to wall thickness visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Nikolaus

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing understanding of atherosclerosis as an important risk factor for the development of acute ischemic events like ischemic stroke has stimulated increasing interest in non-invasive assessment of the structure, composition and burden of plaque depositions in the carotid artery wall. Vessel wall imaging by means of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is conventionally done by 2D dual inversion recovery (DIR techniques, which often fail in covering large volumes of interest as required in plaque burden assessment. Although the technique has been extended to 2D multislice imaging, its straight extension to 3D protocols is still limited by the prolonged acquisition times and incomplete blood suppression. A novel approach for rapid overview imaging of large sections of the carotid artery wall at isotropic spatial resolutions is presented, which omits excitation of the epiglottis. By the interleaved acquisition of two 3D stacks with the proposed motion sensitized segmented steady-state black-blood gradient echo technique (MSDS the coverage of the carotid artery trees on both sides in reasonable scan times is enabled. Results 10 patients were investigated with the proposed technique and compared to conventional transversal DIR turbo spin and gradient echo approaches centered at the height of the carotid bifurcation. In all MSDS experiments sufficient black-blood contrast could be obtained over the entire covered volumes. The contrast to noise ratio between vessel and suppressed blood was improved by 73% applying the motion sensitizing technique. In all patients the suspicious areas of vessel wall thickening could be clearly identified and validated by the conventional local imaging approach. The average assessable vessel wall segment length was evaluated to be 18 cm. While in 50% of the cases motion artifacts could be appreciated in the conventional images, none were detected for the MSDS technique. Conclusion The

  14. Age dependent dynamics of intima-media complex thickness in elderly patients with arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadjaya L.A.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To estimate the dynamics of intima-media complex in elderly patients with arterial hypertension. Materials: 179 elderly patients with arterial hypertension were involved in the study. Mean intima-media wall thickness (IMT of common carotid arteries in plaque-free sites and prevalence of plaques were evaluated by B-mode ultrasound investigation (Philips Envisor HD, USA. Results: IMT changing was of nonlinear character, remained stable up to 74 years. Mean rate of the following IMT augmentation was 0.157 mm per year. Frequency of atherosclerotic plaque revealing was significantly increased since the 7th decade. Significant correlation between IMT and systolic, diastolic, mean blood pressure levels or medication spectrum was not revealed. Conclusion: Received data proved significant influence of aging upon IMT enlargement

  15. Automated image segmentation and registration of vessel wall MRI for quantitative assessment of carotid artery vessel wall dimensions and plaque composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooster, Ronald van 't

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to develop methods for automated segmentation, registration and classification of the carotid artery vessel wall and plaque components using multi-sequence MR vessel wall images to assess atherosclerosis. First, a general introduction into atherosclerosis and differe

  16. A Crucial Role of Glycoprotein VI for Platelet Recruitment to the Injured Arterial Wall In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Massberg, Steffen; Gawaz, Meinrad; Grüner, Sabine; Schulte, Valerie; Konrad, Ildiko; Zohlnhöfer, Dietlind; Heinzmann, Ulrich; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    Platelet adhesion and aggregation at sites of vascular injury is crucial for hemostasis but may lead to arterial occlusion in the setting of atherosclerosis and precipitate diseases such as myocardial infarction. A current hypothesis suggests that platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ib interaction with von Willebrand factor recruits flowing platelets to the injured vessel wall, where subendothelial fibrillar collagens support their firm adhesion and activation. However, so far this hypothesis has not ...

  17. Serum Carotenoids Reduce Progression of Early Atherosclerosis in the Carotid Artery Wall among Eastern Finnish Men

    OpenAIRE

    Jouni Karppi; Sudhir Kurl; Kimmo Ronkainen; Jussi Kauhanen; Laukkanen, Jari A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several previous epidemiologic studies have shown that high blood levels of carotenoids may be protective against early atherosclerosis, but results have been inconsistent. We assessed the association between atherosclerotic progression, measured by intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery wall, and serum levels of carotenoids. METHODS: We studied the effect of carotenoids on progression of early atherosclerosis in a population-based study. The association between conce...

  18. Arterial wall stiffness in patients with essential hypertension at young age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolesnik E.L.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Research objective was investigating arterial wall stiffness in patients with hypertension at young age and assessing the relationship between subclinical target organs damage and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM parameters. 30 male patients aged 18-35 years with essential hypertension stage I and II, hypertension 1 and 2nd grade were surveyed. The examination included general clinical methods, echocardiography, ABPM and suprasystolic sfigmography. It was found that the pulse wave velocity (PWVao (r = 0,557 p <0,01, central aortic blood pressure (SBPao (r = 0,492 p <0,01 and augmentation index (AIxao (r = 0,489 p <0.01 significantly increased with the pa¬tients’ age. Abdominal obesity (r = 0,566 p <0,01 and BMI (r = 0,599 p <0,01 impacted on the PWVao acceleration. Increasing of the left ventricular mass index (LVMI is highly associated with SBPao (r = 0,506 p <0,05 and PWVao (r = 0,434 p <0,05. According to ABPM the most significant correlation with arterial wall stiffness parameters demon¬strated diastolic blood pressure (DBP daytime level (AIxao (r = 0,418 p <0,01, with PWVao (r = 0,699 p <0.01 and SBPao (r = 0,695 p <0,01. Thus, age, excessive body weight and obesity should be considered as unfavorable factors that worsen arterial wall stiffness in patients with hypertension at the age before 35 years. Increase of DBP levels especially during the day causes maximum negative impact on the arterial wall stiffness parameters according to ABPM. Increased SBPao and PWVao in patients with hypertension at a young age are associated with increased left ventricular mass index.

  19. Relaxed incremental variational approach for the modeling of damage-induced stress hysteresis in arterial walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Balzani, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional relaxed incremental variational damage model is proposed, which enables the description of complex softening hysteresis as observed in supra-physiologically loaded arterial tissues, and which thereby avoids a loss of convexity of the underlying formulation. The proposed model extends the relaxed formulation of Balzani and Ortiz [2012. Relaxed incremental variational formulation for damage at large strains with application to fiber-reinforced materials and materials with truss-like microstructures. Int. J. Numer. Methods Eng. 92, 551-570], such that the typical stress-hysteresis observed in arterial tissues under cyclic loading can be described. This is mainly achieved by constructing a modified one-dimensional model accounting for cyclic loading in the individual fiber direction and numerically homogenizing the response taking into account a fiber orientation distribution function. A new solution strategy for the identification of the convexified stress potential is proposed based on an evolutionary algorithm which leads to an improved robustness compared to solely Newton-based optimization schemes. In order to enable an efficient adjustment of the new model to experimentally observed softening hysteresis, an adjustment scheme using a surrogate model is proposed. Therewith, the relaxed formulation is adjusted to experimental data in the supra-physiological domain of the media and adventitia of a human carotid artery. The performance of the model is then demonstrated in a finite element example of an overstretched artery. Although here three-dimensional thick-walled atherosclerotic arteries are considered, it is emphasized that the formulation can also directly be applied to thin-walled simulations of arteries using shell elements or other fiber-reinforced biomembranes. PMID:26341795

  20. Changes in pulmonary arterial wall mechanical properties and lumenal architecture with induced vascular remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthen, Robert C.; Heinrich, Amy E.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2004-04-01

    To explore and quantify pulmonary arterial remodeling we used various methods including micro-CT, high-resolution 3-dimensional x-ray imaging, to examine the structure and function of intact pulmonary vessels in isolated rat lungs. The rat is commonly used as an animal model for studies of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and the accompanying vascular remodeling, where vascular remodeling has been defined primarily by changes in the vessel wall composition in response to hypertension inducing stimuli such as chronic hypoxic exposure (CHE) or monocrotaline (MCT) injection. Little information has been provided as to how such changes affect the vessel wall mechanical properties or the lumenal architecture of the pulmonary arterial system that actually account for the hemodynamic consequences of the remodeling. In addition, although the link between primary forms of pulmonary hypertension and inherited genetics is well established, the role that genetic coding plays in hemodynamics and vascular remodeling is not. Therefore, we are utilizing Fawn-Hooded (FH), Sprague-Dawley (SD) and Brown Norway (BN)rat strains along with unique imaging methods to parameterize both vessel distensibility and lumenal morphometry using a principal pulmonary arterial pathway analysis based on self-consistency. We have found for the hypoxia model, in addition to decreased body weight, increased hematocrit, increased right ventricular hypertrophy, the distensibility of the pulmonary arteries is shown to decrease significantly in the presence of remodeling.

  1. [Hematoma of the abdominal wall. A case report: pitfall of Seldinger method via femoral artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Hisaya; Sugiura, Yasushi; Takeda, Ririko; Nanba, Hiroki

    2009-02-01

    We reported a case of an abdominal wall hematoma which caused by Seldinger method via the femoral artery. A 48-year-old female, suffered from direct carotid cavernous fistula, was treated by transfemoral transvenous embolization (TVE). The whole procedure was completed without difficulty except minor resistance of guide wire manipulation during left femoral artery catheterization. Four hours later, the patient became hypotensive and showed the sign of impending shock without definitive causes. Nine hours after the embolization a huge hematoma of the abdominal wall was found. It required the total 1200 m/ of blood transfusion before her blood pressure returned to normal. She recovered fully from this event and discharged uneventfully. There is a speculation that a deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) was injured with an angle-shaped guide wire and bled into the abdominal wall. And subsequent systemic heparinization prevented the coagulation process, resulting a large hematoma. Anatomically, an angle-shaped guide wire is easily able to migrate into DCIA. To prevent a vascular injury, it is very important to manipulate a guide wire under fluoroscopic control and to select a J-shaped guide wire instead of an angle-shaped one. PMID:19227158

  2. Plant cell wall dynamics and wall-related susceptibility in plant–pathogen interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Bellincampi, Daniela; Cervone, Felice; Lionetti, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall is a dynamic structure that often determines the outcome of the interactions between plants and pathogens. It is a barrier that pathogens need to breach to colonize the plant tissue. While fungal necrotrophs extensively destroy the integrity of the cell wall through the combined action of degrading enzymes, biotrophic fungi require a more localized and controlled degradation of the cell wall in order to keep the host cells alive and utilize their feeding structures. Also bacteri...

  3. Plant cell wall dynamics and wall-related susceptibility in plant-pathogen interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela eBellincampi; Felice eCervone; Vincenzo eLionetti

    2014-01-01

    The cell wall is a dynamic structure that often determines the outcome of the interactions between plants and pathogens. It is a barrier that pathogens need to breach to colonize the plant tissue. While fungal necrotrophs extensively destroy the integrity of the cell wall through the combined action of degrading enzymes, biotrophic fungi require a more localized and controlled degradation of the cell wall in order to keep the host cells alive and utilize their feeding structures. Also bacteri...

  4. Non-Newtonian effects of blood on LDL transport inside the arterial lumen and across multi-layered arterial wall with and without stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyranlou, Amin; Niazmand, Hamid; Sadeghi, Mahmood-Reza; Mesri, Yaser

    2016-06-01

    Blood non-Newtonian behavior on low-density lipoproteins (LDL) accumulation is analyzed numerically, while fluid-multilayered arteries are adopted for nonstenotic and 30%-60% symmetrical stenosed models. Present model considers non-Newtonian effects inside the lumen and within arterial layers simultaneously, which has not been examined in previous studies. Navier-Stokes equations are solved along with the mass transport convection-diffusion equations and Darcy’s model for species transport inside the luminal flow and across wall layers, respectively. Carreau model for the luminal flow and the modified Darcy equation for the power-law fluid within arterial layers are employed to model blood rheological characteristics, appropriately. Results indicate that in large arteries with relatively high Reynolds number Newtonian model estimates LDL concentration patterns well enough, however, this model seriously incompetent for regions with low WSS. Moreover, Newtonian model for plasma underestimates LDL concentration especially on luminal surface and across arterial wall. Therefore, applying non-Newtonian model seems essential for reaching to a more accurate estimation of LDL distribution in the artery. Finally, blood flow inside constricted arteries demonstrates that LDL concentration patterns along the stenoses inside the luminal flow and across arterial layers are strongly influenced as compared to the nonstenotic arteries. Additionally, among four stenosis severity grades, 40% stenosis is prone to more LDL accumulation along the post-stenotic regions.

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound and transient arterial occlusion for quantification of arterial perfusion reserve in peripheral arterial disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amarteifio, E., E-mail: erick.amarteifio@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wormsbecher, S. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Krix, M. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Bracco Imaging Germany, Konstanz (Germany); Demirel, S. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Braun, S. [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, S. [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Boeckler, D. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, H.-U. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Weber, M.-A. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To quantify muscular micro-perfusion and arterial perfusion reserve in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) with dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and transient arterial occlusion. Materials and methods: This study had local institutional review board approval and written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. We examined the dominant lower leg of 40 PAD Fontaine stage IIb patients (mean age, 65 years) and 40 healthy volunteers (mean age, 54 years) with CEUS (7 MHz; MI, 0.28) during continuous intravenous infusion of 4.8 mL microbubbles. Transient arterial occlusion at mid-thigh level simulated physical exercise. With time-CEUS-intensity curves obtained from regions of interest within calf muscles, we derived the maximum CEUS signal after occlusion (max) and its time (t{sub max}), slope to maximum (m), vascular response after occlusion (AUC{sub post}), and analysed accuracy, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, and correlations with ankle-brachial index (ABI) and walking distance. Results: All parameters differed in PAD and volunteers (p < 0.014). In PAD, t{sub max} was delayed (31.2 {+-} 13.6 vs. 16.7 {+-} 8.5 s, p < 0.0001) and negatively correlated with ankle-brachial-index (r = -0.65). m was decreased in PAD (4.3 {+-} 4.6 mL/s vs. 13.1 {+-} 8.4 mL/s, p < 0.0001) and had highest diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity/specificity, 75%/93%) for detection of diminished muscular micro-perfusion in PAD (cut-off value, m < 5{approx}mL/s). Discriminant analysis and ROC curves revealed m, and AUC{sub post} as optimal parameter combination for diagnosing PAD and therefore impaired arterial perfusion reserve. Conclusions: Dynamic CEUS with transient arterial occlusion quantifies muscular micro-perfusion and arterial perfusion reserve. The technique is accurate to diagnose PAD.

  6. Time course of arterial remodelling in diameter and wall thickness above and below the lesion after a spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Dick H J Thijssen; de Groot, Patricia C. E.; van den Bogerd, Arne; Veltmeijer, Matthijs; Cable, N. Timothy; Green, Daniel J.; Hopman, Maria T. E.

    2012-01-01

    Physical inactivity in response to a spinal cord injury (SCI) represents a potent stimulus for conduit artery remodelling. Changes in conduit artery characteristics may be induced by the local effects of denervation (and consequent extreme inactivity below the level of the lesion), and also by systemic adaptations due to whole body inactivity. Therefore, we assessed the time course of carotid (i.e. above lesion) and common femoral artery (i.e. below lesion) lumen diameter and wall thickness a...

  7. Nonextensive statistical dynamics applied to wall turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, Simen Å

    2014-01-01

    We apply a formalism of nonextensive statistical mechanics to experimental wall turbulence data, for the first time to our knowledge. Wind tunnel data for velocity differences a streamwise distance $r$ apart are compared to the prediction from theory as developed by Beck. The simplest theory, in which all free parameters are removed, is found to reproduce statistics for the wall-normal velocity component remarkably well, even for $r$ well beyond the corresponding integral scale, while the corresponding description of the streamwise velocity fluctuations is reasonable at separations below the integral scale. A least-squares 2-parameter fit is performed, and the dependence of the optimum parameter values on wall separation and $r$ is analysed. Both parameters are found to be approximately independent of wall-separation in the logarithmic sub-layer.

  8. A mathematical model for estimating the axial stress of the common carotid artery wall from ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Effat; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manijhe; Saberi, Hajir; Sharif-Kashani, Shervin

    2016-08-01

    Clarifying the complex interaction between mechanical and biological processes in healthy and diseased conditions requires constitutive models for arterial walls. In this study, a mathematical model for the displacement of the carotid artery wall in the longitudinal direction is defined providing a satisfactory representation of the axial stress applied to the arterial wall. The proposed model was applied to the carotid artery wall motion estimated from ultrasound image sequences of 10 healthy adults, and the axial stress waveform exerted on the artery wall was extracted. Consecutive ultrasonic images (30 frames per second) of the common carotid artery of 10 healthy subjects (age 44 ± 4 year) were recorded and transferred to a personal computer. Longitudinal displacement and acceleration were extracted from ultrasonic image processing using a block-matching algorithm. Furthermore, images were examined using a maximum gradient algorithm and time rate changes of the internal diameter and intima-media thickness were extracted. Finally, axial stress was estimated using an appropriate constitutive equation for thin-walled tubes. Performance of the proposed model was evaluated using goodness of fit between approximated and measured longitudinal displacement statistics. Values of goodness-of-fit statistics indicated high quality of fit for all investigated subjects with the mean adjusted R-square (0.86 ± 0.08) and root mean squared error (0.08 ± 0.04 mm). According to the results of the present study, maximum and minimum axial stresses exerted on the arterial wall are 1.7 ± 0.6 and -1.5 ± 0.5 kPa, respectively. These results reveal the potential of this technique to provide a new method to assess arterial stress from ultrasound images, overcoming the limitations of the finite element and other simulation techniques. PMID:26563198

  9. Magnetic field effects for copper suspended nanofluid venture through a composite stenosed arteries with permeable wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Butt, Adil Wahid, E-mail: adil.maths86@gmail.com

    2015-05-01

    In the present paper magnetic field effects for copper nanoparticles for blood flow through composite stenosis in arteries with permeable wall are discussed. The copper nanoparticles for the blood flow with water as base fluid is not explored yet. The equations for the Cu–water nanofluid are developed first time in the literature and simplified using long wavelength and low Reynolds number assumptions. Exact solutions have been evaluated for velocity, pressure gradient, the solid volume fraction of the nanoparticles and temperature profile. The effect of various flow parameters on the flow and heat transfer characteristics is utilized. - Highlights: • It is observed that the velocity profile is symmetric for all the parameters and when we increase slip parameter α then there will be more resistance between blood and arteries, hence the blood flow slows down and velocity profile decreases. • It is seen that the velocity field rises due to high electromagnetic forces and buoyancy forces as compared to viscous forces. • It is also noticed that velocity is high for all the parameters in case of pure water as compare to Cu-water because copper makes arteries more flexible that makes the blood flow speed slow. • When we rise heat absorption parameter β then definitely temperature increases rapidly. • The wall shear stress increases for different values of the slip parameter α and the Darcy number D{sub α} with rapid change in copper as compared to pure water.

  10. Detection of Arterial Wall Boundaries Using an Echo Model Composed of Multiple Ultrasonic Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nabilah; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2013-07-01

    The assessment of the intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid arterial wall, which is the most frequently used indicator to diagnose atherosclerosis by ultrasound, involves the measurement of the lumen-intima boundary (LIB) and media-adventitia boundary (MAB). In this study, using the mean squared error (MSE) method and by applying the template matching technique, an adaptive model of an ultrasonic echo, which is obtained from an ultrasonic pulse measured with a hydrophone, was fitted with the measured in vivo RF echo to estimate the boundaries of the carotid arterial wall. In the present study, the frequency and phase of the adaptive model were considered to improve the accuracy in the determination of the LIB and MAB. For a 7.5-mm-long short segment of the carotid artery in the longitudinal direction, the average IMTs estimated by the improved technique and the previous method were 502+/-61 and 558+/-120 µm, respectively, showing a decrease in the standard deviation by the proposed method. Moreover, the result obtained by the improved technique presented only 0.4% difference between the automatically detected boundary and the manually detected boundary, which is smaller than that obtained by the previous method (10.7% difference). These results verified that the boundary detected by the improved technique was more accurate than that detected by the previous method.

  11. Chlamydia pneumoniae and atherosclerosis. Identification of bacterial DNA in the arterial wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coutinho Mário Sérgio Soares de Azeredo

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Chlamydia pneumoniae has been associated with atherosclerosis. The presence of Chlamydia pneumoniae has been investigated in fragments of the arterial wall with a technique for DNA identification. METHODS: Arterial fragments obtained from vascular surgical procedures in 58 patients were analyzed. From these patients, 39 were males and the mean age was 65±6 years. The polymerase chain reaction was used to identify the bacterial DNA with a pair of primers that codify the major outer membrane protein (MOMP of Chlamydia pneumoniae. The amplified product was visualized by electrophoresis in the 2% agarose gel stained with ethidium bromide, and it was considered positive when migrating in the band of molecular weight of the positive controls. RESULTS: Seven (12% out of the 58 patients showed positive results for Chlamydia pneumoniae. CONCLUSION: DNA from Chlamydia pneumoniae was identified in the arterial wall of a substantial number of patients with atherosclerosis. This association, which has already been described in other countries, corroborates the evidence favoring a role played by Chlamydia pneumoniae in atherogenesis.

  12. Original Research: Sickle cell anemia and pediatric strokes: Computational fluid dynamics analysis in the middle cerebral artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Christian P; Veneziani, Alessandro; Ware, Russell E; Platt, Manu O

    2016-04-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) have a high incidence of strokes, and transcranial Doppler (TCD) identifies at-risk patients by measuring blood velocities in large intracerebral arteries; time-averaged mean velocities greater than 200 cm/s confer high stroke risk and warrant therapeutic intervention with blood transfusions. Our objective was to use computational fluid dynamics to alter fluid and artery wall properties, to simulate scenarios causative of significantly elevated arterial blood velocities. Two-dimensional simulations were created and increasing percent stenoses were created in silico, with their locations varied among middle cerebral artery (MCA), internal carotid artery (ICA), and anterior cerebral artery (ACA). Stenoses placed in the MCA, ICA, or ACA generated local increases in velocity, but not sufficient to reach magnitudes > 200 cm/s, even up to 75% stenosis. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the MCA, ICA, and ACA from children with SCA were generated from magnetic resonance angiograms. Using finite element method, blood flow was simulated with realistic velocity waveforms to the ICA inlet. Three-dimensional reconstructions revealed an uneven, internal arterial wall surface in children with SCA and higher mean velocities in the MCA up to 145 cm/s compared to non-SCA reconstructions. There were also greater areas of flow recirculation and larger regions of low wall shear stress. Taken together, these bumps on the internal wall of the cerebral arteries could create local flow disturbances that, in aggregate, could elevate blood velocities in SCA. Identifying cellular causes of these microstructures as adhered blood cells or luminal narrowing due to endothelial hyperplasia induced by disturbed flow would provide new targets to treat children with SCA. The preliminary qualitative results provided here point out the critical role of 3D reconstruction of patient-specific vascular geometries and provide qualitative insight to complex

  13. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Carotid Vessel Wall Inflammation in Coronary Artery Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucerius, Jan; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Mani, Venkatesh; Moncrieff, Colin; Rudd, James H. F.; Calcagno, Claudia; Machac, Josef; Fuster, Valentin; Farkouh, Michael E.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We investigated the prevalence and clinical risk factors of carotid vessel wall inflammation by means of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in a population consisting of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. BACKGROUND The atherosclerotic disease process is characterized by infiltration and retention of oxidized lipids in the artery wall, triggering a disproportionate inflammatory response. Efforts have been made to use noninvasive imaging to quantify this inflammatory response in the vessel wall. Recently, carotid FDG-PET has been shown to reflect the metabolic rate of glucose, a process known to be enhanced in inflamed tissue. METHODS Carotid inflammation was quantified in 82 CAD patients (age 62 ± 10 years) as the maximum target-to-background ratio (wholevesselTBRmax). Furthermore, we assessed the maximal standardized uptake value values (wholevesselSUVmax), the single hottest segment (SHS), and the percent active segments (PAS) of the FDG uptake in the artery wall, measured by FDG-PET. RESULTS Whole-vessel TBRmax > 1.8 was present in 67%, > 2.0 in 39%, > 2.2 in 23%, and > 2.4 in 12% of the population. Multiple linear regression analysis with backward elimination revealed that body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m2 (p 65 years (p = 0.01), smoking (p = 0.02), and hypertension (p = 0.01) were associated with wholevesselTBRmax. The number of components of the metabolic syndrome was also associated with wholevesselTBRmax (p = 0.02). In similar analyses, wholevesselSUVmax was associated with BMI ≥30 kg/m2 (p 65 years (p = 0.004), male gender (p = 0.02), and hypertension (p = 0.04); SHS with BMI ≥30 kg/m2 (p 65 years (p = 0.02), smoking (p = 0.04), and hypertension (p = 0.05); PAS with BMI ≥30 kg/m2 (p = 0.001), smoking (p = 0.03), and hypertension (p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS Carotid inflammation as revealed by FDG-PET is highly prevalent in the CAD population and is associated with obesity, age over 65 years, history of

  14. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography of carotid arterial wall in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, W; Abendschein, D R; Haacke, E M

    1997-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of contrast agents on MR images of balloon-injured carotid arteries containing atherosclerotic-like lesions. We have evaluated an intravascular contrast agent, MS-325 (METASYN INC., Cambridge, MA) and an extravascular contrast agent, Optimark, (Mallinckrodt Medical Inc., St. Louis, MO) on MR angiograms obtained 4 weeks after balloon hyperinflation-induced injury of the left common carotid artery in 12 hypercholesterolemic minipigs. High in-plane resolution (.8 x .4 mm2), thin slice (1 mm) time-of-flight gradient echo sequences were used to acquire the MR angiographic images. Vascular lumen definition was compared before and after a single bolus intravenous injection of a contrast agent. Digital subtraction angiograms were obtained from all pigs after MR imaging. High grade stenosis developed in 1 of the 12 pigs and five pigs had complete occlusion of the injured vessel. The remaining pigs exhibited essentially no visible stenoses as assessed either by MR angiography or digital subtraction angiography. The vessel walls of the stenosed and occluded vessels were visible after the injection of either intravascular or extravascular contrast agent. Histologic analyses showed well developed neovascularization in the neointima or occlusive thrombosis. We conclude that the observed contrast-enhanced vessel wall is caused by an increased vascular supply associated with thrombosis and neointimal thickening that leads to an accumulation of contrast agent in the abnormal vessel walls after the injection of the T1-shortening paramagnetic contrast agent. PMID:9039613

  15. Effect of hypertension on low-density lipoprotein transport within a multi-layered arterial wall: modelling consistent with experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Jesionek, Katarzyna; Kostur, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The influence of hypertension on low-density lipoproteins intake into the arterial wall is an important factor for understanding mechanisms of atherosclerosis. It has been experimentally observed that the increased pressure leads to the higher level of the LDL inside the wall. In this paper we attempt to construct a model of the LDL transport which reproduces quantitatively experimental outcomes. We supplement the well known four-layer arterial wall model to include two pressure induced effects: the compression of the intima tissue and the increase of the fraction of leaky junctions. We demonstrate that such model can reach the very good agreement with experimental data.

  16. CARDIAC TRANSPLANT REJECTION AND NON-INVASIVE COMON CAROTID ARTERY WALL FUNCTIONAL INDICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Shevchenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allograft rejection would entail an increase in certain blood biomarkers and active substances derived from activated inflammatory cells which could influence entire vascular endothelial function and deteriorate arterial wall stiffness. We propose that carotid wall functional indices measured with non-invasive ultrasound could we valuable markers of the subclinical cardiac allograft rejection. Aim. Our goal was to analyze the clinical utility of functional common carotid wall (CCW variables measured with high-resolution Doppler ultrasound as a non-invasive screening tool for allograft rejection in cardiac transplant patients (pts. Methods. One hundred and seventy one pts included 93 cardiac recipients, 30 dilated cardiomyopathy waiting list pts, and 48 stable coronary artery disease (SCAD pts without decompensated heart failure were included. Along with resistive index (Ri, pulsative index (Pi, and CCW intima-media thickness (IMT, CCW rigidity index (iRIG was estimated using empirical equation. Non-invasive evaluation was performed in cardiac transplant recipients prior the endomyo- cardial biopsy. Results. Neither of Ri, Pi, or CCW IMT were different in studied subgroups. iRIG was signifi- cantly lower in SCAD pts when compared to the dilated cardiomyopathy subgroup. The later had similar values with cardiac transplant recipients without rejection. Antibody-mediated and cellular rejection were found in 22 (23.7% and 17 (18.3% cardiac recipients, respectively. Mean iRIG in pts without rejection was significantly lower in comparison to antibody-mediated rejection and cell-mediated (5514.7 ± 2404.0 vs 11856.1 ± 6643.5 and 16071.9 ± 10029.1 cm/sec2, respectively, p = 0.001. Area under ROC for iRIG was 0.90 ± 0.03 units2. Analysis showed that iRIG values above estimated treshold 7172 cm/sec2 suggested relative risk of any type of rejection 17.7 (95%CI = 6.3–49.9 sensitivity 80.5%, specificity – 81.1%, negative predictive value – 84

  17. Automated image segmentation and registration of vessel wall MRI for quantitative assessment of carotid artery vessel wall dimensions and plaque composition

    OpenAIRE

    Klooster, Ronald van 't

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis was to develop methods for automated segmentation, registration and classification of the carotid artery vessel wall and plaque components using multi-sequence MR vessel wall images to assess atherosclerosis. First, a general introduction into atherosclerosis and different stages of the disease were described including the importance to differentiate between stable and vulnerable plaques. Several non-invasive imaging techniques were discussed and the advantages of...

  18. Joint segmentation of lumen and outer wall from femoral artery MR images: Towards 3D imaging measurements of peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukwatta, Eranga; Yuan, Jing; Qiu, Wu; Rajchl, Martin; Chiu, Bernard; Fenster, Aaron

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) measurements of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) plaque burden extracted from fast black-blood magnetic resonance (MR) images have shown to be more predictive of clinical outcomes than PAD stenosis measurements. To this end, accurate segmentation of the femoral artery lumen and outer wall is required for generating volumetric measurements of PAD plaque burden. Here, we propose a semi-automated algorithm to jointly segment the femoral artery lumen and outer wall surfaces from 3D black-blood MR images, which are reoriented and reconstructed along the medial axis of the femoral artery to obtain improved spatial coherence between slices of the long, thin femoral artery and to reduce computation time. The developed segmentation algorithm enforces two priors in a global optimization manner: the spatial consistency between the adjacent 2D slices and the anatomical region order between the femoral artery lumen and outer wall surfaces. The formulated combinatorial optimization problem for segmentation is solved globally and exactly by means of convex relaxation using a coupled continuous max-flow (CCMF) model, which is a dual formulation to the convex relaxed optimization problem. In addition, the CCMF model directly derives an efficient duality-based algorithm based on the modern multiplier augmented optimization scheme, which has been implemented on a GPU for fast computation. The computed segmentations from the developed algorithm were compared to manual delineations from experts using 20 black-blood MR images. The developed algorithm yielded both high accuracy (Dice similarity coefficients ≥ 87% for both the lumen and outer wall surfaces) and high reproducibility (intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.95 for generating vessel wall area), while outperforming the state-of-the-art method in terms of computational time by a factor of ≈ 20. PMID:26387053

  19. Impairment of left ventricular regional wall motion in diabetes mellitus without coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Ken`ya; Shimonagata, Tuyoshi; Nanto, Shinsuke; Kuroda, Akio; Morozumi, Takakazu; Kamado, Kenji; Nagata, Seiki [Kansai Rosai Hospital, Amagasaki, Hyogo (Japan); Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu

    1996-09-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms of diabetic cardiomyopathy, dual SPECT imaging with thallium-201 (Tl-201) and I-123 beta-methyl-p-iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP), a branched analogue of free fatty acid (FFA), and dipyridamole-infusion Tl-201 scintigraphy were performed in 28 NIDDM patients without coronary artery disease. Twenty eight patients were divided into two groups based on the presence of wall motion abnormalities on cineangiographic left ventriculography (LVG). Nineteen patients with normal wall motion documented on LVG (group A) out of 28 evaluated patients demonstrated normal Tl-201 and I-123 BMIPP uptake in dual SPECT imaging, whereas 9 patients with reduced wall motion (group B) demonstrated reduced I-123 BMIPP uptake when compared with Tl-201 uptake. On dipyridamole-infusion Tl-201 scintigraphy, transient perfusion defects were demonstrated in 4 patients of group B and two patients of group A (p<0.05). These results suggest that small vessel disease and the impairment of myocardial free fatty acid metabolism are etiologic or contributory factors for regional wall motion abnormality in diabetic cardiomyopathy. (author)

  20. Theoretical analysis of metallic nanoparticles on blood flow through stenosed artery with permeable walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present analysis deals with the study of physical characteristics of blood flow in the presence of stenosis and nanoparticles through a curved channel with permeable walls. Taking mild stenosis case, the governing equations for anticipated model are solved using the corresponding boundary conditions and close-form solutions have been obtained for temperature, velocity and slip velocity by using Cauchy Euler's method. The expressions for the resistance impedance and pressure gradient in the stenotic region have also been obtained and the existence of various pertinent flow parameters, mainly Darcy number, slip parameter and nanoparticles volume fraction, has been discussed through graphs. - Highlights: • Nanoparticles analysis is discussed for diverging converging and non-tapered arteries. • Resistance impedance decreases with an increase in the nanoparticles volume fraction. • Combination of curvature and stenosis shows stenosis dominant the curvature of artery. • Pressure possesses an inverse variation to the resistance with respect to tapering. • Trapping shows that the symmetry destroys due to increase in curvature of curved artery

  1. Carotid Artery Wall Segmentation in Multispectral MRI by Coupled Optimal Surface Graph Cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Lorza, Andres M; Petersen, Jens; van Engelen, Arna; Selwaness, Mariana; van der Lugt, Aad; Niessen, Wiro J; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2016-03-01

    We present a new three-dimensional coupled optimal surface graph-cut algorithm to segment the wall of the carotid artery bifurcation from Magnetic Resonance (MR) images. The method combines the search for both inner and outer borders into a single graph cut and uses cost functions that integrate information from multiple sequences. Our approach requires manual localization of only three seed points indicating the start and end points of the segmentation in the internal, external, and common carotid artery. We performed a quantitative validation using images of 57 carotid arteries. Dice overlap of 0.86 ± 0.06 for the complete vessel and 0.89 ± 0.05 for the lumen compared to manual annotation were obtained. Reproducibility tests were performed in 60 scans acquired with an interval of 15 ± 9 days, showing good agreement between baseline and follow-up segmentations with intraclass correlations of 0.96 and 0.74 for the lumen and complete vessel volumes respectively. PMID:26595912

  2. Theoretical analysis of metallic nanoparticles on blood flow through stenosed artery with permeable walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadeem, S.; Ijaz, S., E-mail: shaguftaijaz11@yahoo.com

    2015-03-06

    The present analysis deals with the study of physical characteristics of blood flow in the presence of stenosis and nanoparticles through a curved channel with permeable walls. Taking mild stenosis case, the governing equations for anticipated model are solved using the corresponding boundary conditions and close-form solutions have been obtained for temperature, velocity and slip velocity by using Cauchy Euler's method. The expressions for the resistance impedance and pressure gradient in the stenotic region have also been obtained and the existence of various pertinent flow parameters, mainly Darcy number, slip parameter and nanoparticles volume fraction, has been discussed through graphs. - Highlights: • Nanoparticles analysis is discussed for diverging converging and non-tapered arteries. • Resistance impedance decreases with an increase in the nanoparticles volume fraction. • Combination of curvature and stenosis shows stenosis dominant the curvature of artery. • Pressure possesses an inverse variation to the resistance with respect to tapering. • Trapping shows that the symmetry destroys due to increase in curvature of curved artery.

  3. Positive association between increased popliteal artery vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis: is OA also part of the metabolic syndrome?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study was to determine if a positive association exists between arterial vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis (OA). Our hypothesis is that generalized OA is another facet of the metabolic syndrome. The medical ethical review board of our institution approved the study. Written informed consent was obtained from each patient prior to the study. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee were obtained in 42 patients who had been diagnosed with generalized OA at multiple joint sites. Another 27 MR images of the knee were obtained from a matched normal (non-OA) reference population. Vessel wall thickness of the popliteal artery was quantitatively measured by dedicated software. Linear regression models were used to investigate the association between vessel wall thickness and generalized OA. Adjustments were made for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Confidence intervals (CI) were computed at the 95% level and a significance level of α = 0.05 was used. Patients in the generalized OA population had a significant higher average vessel wall thickness than persons from the normal reference population (p ≤ α), even when correction was made for sex, age, and BMI. The average vessel wall thickness of the popliteal artery was 1.09 mm in patients with generalized OA, and 0.96 mm in the matched normal reference population. The association found between increased popliteal artery vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis suggests that generalized OA might be another facet of the metabolic syndrome. (orig.)

  4. Mean dynamics of a turbulent plane wall jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Faraz; Klewicki, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Experimental and large-eddy simulation data are used to investigate the balances between viscous and inertial forces in plane turbulent wall jets. In recent years, analysis of the mean momentum balance in its unintegrated form has been shown to provide a mathematically and physically useful means for clarifying the leading order mean dynamics as a function of the transverse coordinate. Distinct from its laminar counterpart, each of the terms in the appropriately simplified form of the mean dynamical equation for the planar turbulent wall jet is leading order somewhere, but not everywhere, across the flow domain. Similar to what is observed in the canonical turbulent wall-flows, there is a wall region where the mean viscous force retains leading order. The wall jet, however, contains two peaks of opposite sign in its Reynolds stress profile. With distance from the wall, the first peak is associated with the loss of a leading order viscous force, while the outer peak is akin to the wholly inertial balance exchange that occurs in shear-wake flows. The physics of these balances exchanges are described, the scaling behaviors of the leading order balance layers are estimated, and the present findings are compared with previous models of planar wall jet structure.

  5. Portal venous arterialization resulting in increased portal inflow and portal vein wall thickness in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Gang Li; Yong-Liang Chen; Jing-Xi Chen; Lei Qu; Bin-Dang Xue; Zhi-Hai Peng; Zhi-Qiang Huang

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To explore the influence of portal vein hemodynamic changes after portal venous arterialization(PVA) on peribiliary vascular plexus (PVP)morphological structure and hepatic pathology,and to establish a theoretical basis for the clinical application of PVA.METHODS:Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control and PVA groups.After PVA,hemodynamic changes of the portal vein and morphological structure of hepatohilar PVP were observed using Doppler ultrasound,liver function tests,ink perfusion transparency management and three-dimensional reconstruction of computer microvisualization,and pathological examination was performed on tissue from the bile duct wall and the liver.RESULTS:After PVA,the cross-sectional area and blood flow of the portal vein were increased,and the increase became more significant over time,in a certain range.If the measure to limit the flow in PVA was not adopted,the high blood flow would lead to dilatation of intrahepatic portal vein and its branches,increase in collagen and fiber degeneration in tunica intima.Except glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT),other liver function tests were normal.CONCLUSION:Blood with a certain flow and oxygen content is important for filling the PVP and meeting the oxygen requirement of the bile duct wall.After PVA,It is the anatomic basis to maintain normal morphology of hepatohilar bile duct wall that the blood with high oxygen content and high flow in arterialized portal vein may fill PVP by collateral vessel reflux.A adequate measure to limit blood flow is necessary in PVA.

  6. Changes in Water Filtration Velocity and Wall Structure of the Rabbit Common Carotid Artery after Removal of the Adventitia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Shigeo; Kaichi, Masashi; Karino, Takeshi

    To investigate the effect of the changes in water filtration velocity on the structure of an arterial wall, measurements of water filtration velocity and microscopic observation of histological specimens of the rabbit common carotid arteries were carried out by surgically removing the adventitia of the arteries and harvesting them at different times postoperatively. It was found that by removal of the adventitia, water filtration velocity at the arterial wall increased temporarily, and then as healing of the adventitia progressed, it decreased gradually until water filtration velocity attained almost the same value as that obtained with intact arteries. Intimal thickening was observed in those vessels harvested at 7 and 14 days postoperatively. Furthermore, it was shown by theoretical calculations that the concentration of low-density lipoprotein, which is a main carrier of cholesterol in blood, was locally elevated at the luminal surface of the segment where water filtration velocity was increased by removal of the adventitia. These results indicate that the change in water filtration velocity at the vessel wall brings about certain changes in the structure of the vessel wall.

  7. Influence of the myocardial bridging phenomenon on the myocardial structure and the coronary arteries wall structure changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomanović-Koković Jelena

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Our research was performed to evaluate the influences of the myocardial bridging of coronary arteries on the myocardial and coronary arteries wall structure changes, that could be a reason for multiple heart malfunctions. Methods. We analyzed the autopsy material, collected during a five-years period, and especially the group of 575 cases with the major aim to diagnose mors naturalis. In all cases with the presence of myocardial bridge over the arterial coronary wall revealed at autopsy, samples were taken for microscopic verification and examination. Results. We found myocardial bridges over the coronary arteries or their major branches in 27 of the cases (4.70%. We believe that myocardial bridges compromise coronary perfusion by cyclic compression of the overbridged vessels, and that it could be the initial factor in the pathogenesis of arteriosclerotic degeneration processes on the coronary artery wall. We found different grades of arteriosclerotic changes in 88.89% of the cases, as well as fibrosis of myocardium in 88.89% and lipomatosis in 66.67% of the cases with the present myocardial bridges. Conclusion. Our results suggested that myocardial bridging of coronary arteries and/or their branches was the pathological and even lethal phenomenon that deserves more intensive clinical evaluation.

  8. Low-density lipoprotein transport through an arterial wall under hyperthermia and hypertension conditions--An analytical solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasiello, Marcello; Vafai, Kambiz; Andreozzi, Assunta; Bianco, Nicola

    2016-01-25

    An analytical solution for Low-Density Lipoprotein transport through an arterial wall under hyperthermia conditions is established in this work. A four-layer model is used to characterize the arterial wall. Transport governing equations are obtained as a combination between Staverman-Kedem-Katchalsky membrane equations and volume-averaged porous media equations. Temperature and solute transport fields are coupled by means of Ludwig-Soret effect. Results are in excellent agreement with numerical and analytical literature data under isothermal conditions, and with numerical literature data for the hyperthermia case. Effects of hypertension combined with hyperthermia, are also analyzed in this work. PMID:26806687

  9. Cross-Sectional Elasticity Imaging of Carotid Arterial Wall in Short-Axis Plane by Transcutaneous Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Nozomi; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2004-05-01

    We have developed the phased tracking method [H. Kanai, M. Sato, Y. Koiwa and N. Chubachi: IEEE Trans. UFFC 43 (1996) 791.] for measuring the minute change in thickness during one heartbeat and the elasticity of the arterial wall with transcutaneous ultrasound. When this method is applied to a plane perpendicular to the axis of the artery (short-axis plane) using a linear-type probe, only an ultrasonic beam which passes through the center of the artery coincides with the direction of the change in thickness. At other beam positions, the wall motion cannot be accurately tracked because the direction of wall expansion slips off the beam. To obtain the cross-sectional image of elasticity in the short-axis plane using transcutaneous ultrasound, in this paper, the directions of ultrasonic beams are designed so that each beam always passes through the center of the artery; thus, they always coincide with the direction of the wall expansion. In basic experiments, the accuracy in elasticity measurement was evaluated using a silicone rubber tube. In in vivo experiments, the minute change in wall thickness was measured along each ultrasonic beam, and the cross-sectional image of elasticity was obtained in the short-axis plane with transcutaneous ultrasound.

  10. Fluid-structure interaction analysis on the effect of vessel wall hypertrophy and stiffness on the blood flow in carotid artery bifurcation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Choi, Hyoung Gwon; Yoo, Jung Yul

    2012-11-01

    The effect of artery wall hypertrophy and stiffness on the flow field is investigated using three-dimensional finite element method for simulating the blood flow. To avoid the complexity due to the necessity of additional mechanical constraints, we use the combined formulation which includes both the fluid and structural equations of motion into single coupled variational equation. A P2P1 Galerkin finite element method is used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations for fluid flow and arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is used to achieve mesh movement. The Newmark method is employed for solving the dynamic equilibrium equations for linear elastic solid mechanics. The pulsatile, incompressible flows of Newtonian fluids constrained in the flexible wall are analyzed with Womersley velocity profile at the inlet and constant pressure at the outlet. The study shows that the stiffness of carotid artery wall affects significantly the flow phenomena during the pulse cycle. Similarly, it is found that the flow field is also strongly influenced by wall hypertrophy. This work was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program and Priority Research Centers Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2009-0079936 & 2011-0029613).

  11. Detection of Boundaries of Carotid Arterial Wall by Analyzing Ultrasonic RF Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nabilah; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2012-07-01

    In line with the fact that the intima-media thickness (IMT) of the carotid arterial wall is the most frequently used indicator to diagnose atherosclerosis by ultrasound, it is essential to accurately estimate the thickness of the intima-media complex (IMC) boundaries, i.e., the lumen-intima boundary (LIB) and media-adventitia boundary (MAB). In this study, an improved adaptive model of an ultrasonic echo was developed for the model to realize better fitting to the reference RF echo, which is measured from a glass plate, using a Gaussian window for the envelope function of the adaptive model. Using the mean squared error (MSE) method, the envelope of the improved adaptive model (multiply the sinusoidal wave with the Gaussian window) was fitted with the envelope of an RF echo measured in vivo to estimate the boundaries of the carotid arterial wall. Firstly, a computer simulation of the carotid arterial wall was conducted to evaluate the accuracy of boundary detection using the envelope of the improved adaptive model. In the simulation, IMT was set at 0.50 mm in a 7.2-mm-long short segment in the longitudinal direction. The IMT estimated by the proposed method was 0.54 mm. The 8% error between the true and detected IMTs showed the high accuracy of the envelope of the improved adaptive model in boundary detection. In the in vivo measurement, for the 4.8-mm-long short segment in the longitudinal direction, the average IMT automatically estimated by the proposed method was 0.57 mm. The result was compared with those obtained by the previous method and manually. The IMT estimated by the previous method, which uses an RF adaptive model, was 0.59 mm and the manually determined IMT was 0.56 mm. The smaller difference between the results obtained by the proposed method and manually verified that boundary detection by the proposed method was better than that by the previous method.

  12. Impact of competitive flow on wall shear stress in coronary surgery: computational fluid dynamics of a LIMA-LAD model

    OpenAIRE

    Nordgaard, Havard; Swillens, Abigaïl; Nordhaug, Dag; Kirkeby-Garstad, Idar; Van Loo, Denis; Vitale, Nicola; Segers, Patrick; Haverstaad, Rune; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2010-01-01

    Competitive flow from native coronary vessels is considered a major factor in the failure of coronary bypass grafts. However, the pathophysiological effects are not fully understood. Low and oscillatory wall shear stress (WSS) is known to induce endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease, like atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia. The aim was to investigate the impact of competitive flow on WSS in mammary artery bypass grafts. Using computational fluid dynamics, WSS was calculated in ...

  13. Prevalence and prognosis of myocardial scar in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease and normal wall motion

    OpenAIRE

    Boonyasirinant Thananya; Saiviroonporn Pairash; Krittayaphong Rungroj; Udompunturak Suthipol

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Some patients may have normal wall motion after myocardial infarction. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and prognosis of patients with myocardial scar in the absence of abnormal wall motion. We studied patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease (CAD) who were referred for cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) for the assessment of global and regional cardiac function and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and had normal left ventricular ...

  14. DYNAMIC CRUSHING TESTS OF THIN-WALLED MEMBERS UNDER COMPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Kotełko; Sebastian Lipa; Radosław J. Mania

    2009-01-01

    The paper deals with the experimental investigation into crushing collapse behaviour of two types of thin-walled structural members: tubular multi-member element subject to lateral crushing load and top hat-section column under axial compression. Especially designed experimental stand, in which a dynamical crushing load is realized by means of hydraulic system, is presented. Experimental, dynamical load-deformation curves are compared with those obtained from FE simulations and obtained from ...

  15. Ultrasonic Measurement of Transient Change in Stress-Strain Property of Radial Arterial Wall Caused by Endothelium-Dependent Vasodilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeshita, Kazuki; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2008-05-01

    The endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step of atherosclerosis. Additionally, it was reported that the smooth muscle, which constructs the media of the artery, changes its characteristics owing to atherosclerosis. Therefore, it is essential to develop a method for assessing the regional endothelial function and mechanical property of the arterial wall. There is a conventional technique of measuring the transient change in the diameter of the brachial artery caused by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) after the release of avascularization. For more sensitive and regional evaluation, we developed a method of measuring the change in the elasticity of the radial artery due to FMD. In this study, the transient change in the mechanical property of the arterial wall was further revealed by measuring the stress-strain relationship during each heartbeat. The minute change in the thickness (strain) of the radial arterial wall during a cardiac cycle was measured by the phased tracking method, together with the waveform of blood pressure which was continuously measured with a sphygmometer at the radial artery. The transient change in stress-strain relationship during a cardiac cycle was obtained from the measured changes in wall thickness and blood pressure to show the transient change in instantaneous viscoelasticity. From the in vivo experimental results, the stress-strain relationship shows the hysteresis loop. The slope of the loop decreased owing to FMD, which shows that the elastic modulus decreased, and the increasing area of the loop depends on the ratio of the loss modulus (depends on viscosity) to the elastic modulus when the Voigt model is assumed. These results show a potential of the proposed method for the thorough analysis of the transient change in viscoelasticity due to FMD.

  16. Cross-Sectional Elasticity Imaging of Arterial Wall by Comparing Measured Change in Thickness with Model Waveform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jiang; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2005-06-01

    For the assessment of the elasticity of the arterial wall, we have developed the phased tracking method [H. Kanai et al.: IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 43 (1996) 791] for measuring the minute change in thickness due to heartbeats and the elasticity of the arterial wall with transcutaneous ultrasound. For various reasons, for example, an extremely small deformation of the wall, the minute change in wall thickness during one heartbeat is largely influenced by noise in these cases and the reliability of the elasticity distribution obtained from the maximum change in thickness deteriorates because the maximum value estimation is largely influenced by noise. To obtain a more reliable cross-sectional image of the elasticity of the arterial wall, in this paper, a matching method is proposed to evaluate the waveform of the measured change in wall thickness by comparing the measured waveform with a template waveform. The maximum deformation, which is used in the calculation of elasticity, was determined from the amplitude of the matched model waveform to reduce the influence of noise. The matched model waveform was obtained by minimizing the difference between the measured and template waveforms. Furthermore, a random error, which was obtained from the reproducibility among the heartbeats of the measured waveform, was considered useful for the evaluation of the reliability of the measured waveform.

  17. Altered Metabolism of LDL in the Arterial Wall Precedes Atherosclerosis Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D.; Christoffersen, Christina; Lindholm, Marie W.;

    2015-01-01

    % already after 1 week of treatment despite an unchanged pool size of aortic iodinated LDL particles. In contrast, the size, foam cell content, and aortic pool size of iodinated LDL particles of aortic atherosclerotic plaques were not reduced until after 4 weeks of treatment with the anti-Apob antisense...... and degradation of LDL particles in atherosclerotic aortas of mice by measuring the accumulation of iodinated LDL particles in the arterial wall. Methods and Results: Cholesterol-fed, LDL receptor–deficient mice were treated with either an anti-Apob antisense oligonucleotide or a mismatch control...... antisense oligonucleotide once a week for 1 or 4 weeks before injection with preparations of iodinated LDL particles. The anti-Apob antisense oligonucleotide reduced plasma cholesterol by ≈90%. The aortic LDL permeability and degradation rates of newly entered LDL particles were reduced by ≈50% and ≈85...

  18. [The age-specific changes in the wall of the arterial circle of Willis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushel', N A; Pivchenko, P G; Bel'chikov, E I

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to create the database of morphometric and morphological characteristics of the wall of the vessels of the Willis arterial circle at the site of their bifurcation throughout the period of postnatal ontogenesis in man to be used for the postmortem determination of human age. Preparations of vascular cross sections were used to measure the intima thickness (intimal pads) in the region of lateral bifurcation angles on the terminal branch of the internal carotid and basilar arteries obtained from 130 corpses of the subjects aged between 0 and 75 years. The histological preparations were stained with hematoxylin/eosin and van Gieson's pyrofuchsin or by the Unnar-Tenzer method. Morphometry was performed using a Bioscan image analyser and the Scion Image v.402 software. The Microsoft Excel 2003 package was used for the primary treatment of the data obtained. They were used to draw the table of intimal pads developing throughout the period of postnatal ontogenesis in man that allows for the postmortem determination of approximate human age. The study showed that the thickening of intimal pads and concomitant thinning of the underlying muscular layer during the postnatal ontogenesis should be regarded as being normal age-related changes. PMID:23802302

  19. Model of bound interface dynamics for coupled magnetic domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Politi, P.; Metaxas, P. J.; Jamet, J.-P.; Stamps, R. L.; Ferré, J.

    2011-08-01

    A domain wall in a ferromagnetic system will move under the action of an external magnetic field. Ultrathin Co layers sandwiched between Pt have been shown to be a suitable experimental realization of a weakly disordered 2D medium in which to study the dynamics of 1D interfaces (magnetic domain walls). The behavior of these systems is encapsulated in the velocity-field response v(H) of the domain walls. In a recent paper [P. J. Metaxas , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.237206 104, 237206 (2010)] we studied the effect of ferromagnetic coupling between two such ultrathin layers, each exhibiting different v(H) characteristics. The main result was the existence of bound states over finite-width field ranges, wherein walls in the two layers moved together at the same speed. Here we discuss in detail the theory of domain wall dynamics in coupled systems. In particular, we show that a bound creep state is expected for vanishing H and we give the analytical, parameter free expression for its velocity which agrees well with experimental results.

  20. Numerical study of wall shear stress-based descriptors in the human left coronary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, S I S; Campos, J B L M

    2016-10-01

    The present work is about the application of wall shear stress descriptors - time averaged wall shear stress (TAWSS), oscillating shear index (OSI) and relative residence time (RRT) - to the study of blood flow in the left coronary artery (LCA). These descriptors aid the prediction of disturbed flow conditions in the vessels and play a significant role in the detection of potential zones of atherosclerosis development. Hemodynamic descriptors data were obtained, numerically, through ANSYS® software, for the LCA of a patient-specific geometry and for a 3D idealized model. Comparing both cases, the results are coherent, in terms of location and magnitude. Low TAWSS, high OSI and high RRT values are observed in the bifurcation - potential zone of atherosclerosis appearance. The dissimilarities observed in the TAWSS values, considering blood as a Newtonian or non-Newtonian fluid, releases the importance of the correct blood rheologic caracterization. Moreover, for a higher Reynolds number, the TAWSS values decrease in the bifurcation and along the LAD branch, increasing the probability of plaques deposition. Furthermore, for a stenotic LCA model, very low TAWSS and high RRT values in front and behind the stenosis are observed, indicating the probable extension, in the flow direction, of the lesion. PMID:26883291

  1. Set up of a cardiovascular simulator: application to the evaluation of the dynamical behavior of atheroma plaques in human arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, J.; Bia, D.; Benech, N.; Balay, G.; Armentano, R.; Negreira, C.

    2010-01-01

    In this work a circulating loop capable of mimicking the physiological pressure and flow conditions inside a vessel is set up. The circulating loop consists of an artificial heart coupled to a perfusion line made of polyethylene and silicon. The artificial heart is driven by a pneumatic pump which provides the desired heart rate, pressure values and length of the systolic and diastolic period of each cycle. To measure the changes in diameter of the segment under study, an ultrasonic probe in pulse eco mode is used. For pressure monitoring a pressure sensor is positioned inside the sample. Pressure-diameter loops were obtained for characterization of the dynamical properties of the arterial wall. In vitro measurements were made on three different conduits: 1) Calibrated tubes made of latex: these phantoms were characterized by the presented method, 2) Non-atherosclerotic human carotid arteries obtained from donors and 3) Atherosclerotic human carotid arteries with atheroma plaques. In the three cases, under physiological simulated conditions, the mechanical properties of the conduit were obtained. We conclude that atheroma plaques were successfully detected and its dynamical properties characterized. This method could be used in the experimental and clinical field to characterize the effects of atheroma plaques on the arterial wall biomechanics.

  2. Automatic plaque characterization and vessel wall segmentation in magnetic resonance images of atherosclerotic carotid arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adame, Isabel M.; van der Geest, Rob J.; Wasserman, Bruce A.; Mohamed, Mona; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P. F.

    2004-05-01

    Composition and structure of atherosclerotic plaque is a primary focus of cardiovascular research. In vivo MRI provides a meanse to non-invasively image and assess the morphological features of athersclerotic and normal human carotid arteries. To quantitatively assess the vulnerability and the type of plaque, the contours of the lumen, outer boundary of the vessel wall and plaque components, need to be traced. To achieve this goal, we have developed an automated contou detection technique, which consists of three consecutive steps: firstly, the outer boundary of the vessel wall is detected by means of an ellipse-fitting procedure in order to obtain smoothed shapes; secondly, the lumen is segnented using fuzzy clustering. Thre region to be classified is that within the outer vessel wall boundary obtained from the previous step; finally, for plaque detection we follow the same approach as for lumen segmentation: fuzzy clustering. However, plaque is more difficult to segment, as the pixel gray value can differ considerably from one region to another, even when it corresponds to the same type of tissue. That makes further processing necessary. All these three steps might be carried out combining information from different sequences (PD-, T2-, T1-weighted images, pre- and post-contrast), to improve the contour detection. The algorithm has been validated in vivo on 58 high-resolution PD and T1 weighted MR images (19 patients). The results demonstrate excellent correspondence between automatic and manual area measurements: lumen (r=0.94), outer (r=0.92), and acceptable for fibrous cap thickness (r=0.76).

  3. Arterial stick

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the main arteries in the forearm (radial and ulnar arteries). The procedure is done as follows: The ... Arteries also have thicker walls and have more nerves. When the needle is inserted, there may be ...

  4. Measurement of Elastic Moduli of the Arterial Wall at Multiple Frequencies by Remote Actuation for Assessment of Viscoelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2004-05-01

    To characterize tissues in atherosclerotic plaques, we have developed a method, the phased tracking method, for measuring the strain (change in wall thickness) and elasticity of the arterial wall. However, some types of tissue, such as lipids and blood clots, cannot be discriminated from each other based only on elasticity due to the small difference in their elasticity. For more precise tissue characterization, we have measured the regional viscoelasticity. To obtain the viscoelasticity, in this study, elastic moduli at multiple frequencies were measured with ultrasound by generating the change in internal pressure due to remote cyclic actuation. Furthermore, the viscoelasticity of the arterial wall was estimated from the measured elastic moduli at multiple actuation frequencies.

  5. Mathematical modeling of coupled drug and drug-encapsulated nanoparticle transport in patient-specific coronary artery walls

    KAUST Repository

    Hossain, Shaolie S.

    2011-08-20

    The majority of heart attacks occur when there is a sudden rupture of atherosclerotic plaque, exposing prothrombotic emboli to coronary blood flow, forming clots that can cause blockages of the arterial lumen. Diseased arteries can be treated with drugs delivered locally to vulnerable plaques. The objective of this work was to develop a computational tool-set to support the design and analysis of a catheter-based nanoparticulate drug delivery system to treat vulnerable plaques and diffuse atherosclerosis. A threedimensional mathematical model of coupled mass transport of drug and drug-encapsulated nanoparticles was developed and solved numerically utilizing isogeometric finite element analysis. Simulations were run on a patient-specific multilayered coronary artery wall segment with a vulnerable plaque and the effect of artery and plaque inhomogeneity was analyzed. The method captured trends observed in local drug delivery and demonstrated potential for optimizing drug design parameters, including delivery location, nanoparticle surface properties, and drug release rate. © Springer-Verlag 2011.

  6. Automated registration of multispectral MR vessel wall images of the carotid artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klooster, R. van ' t; Staring, M.; Reiber, J. H. C.; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Geest, R. J. van der, E-mail: rvdgeest@lumc.nl [Department of Radiology, Division of Image Processing, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Klein, S. [Department of Radiology and Department of Medical Informatics, Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam 3015 GE (Netherlands); Kwee, R. M.; Kooi, M. E. [Department of Radiology, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6202 AZ (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of heart disease and stroke. The detailed assessment of atherosclerosis of the carotid artery requires high resolution imaging of the vessel wall using multiple MR sequences with different contrast weightings. These images allow manual or automated classification of plaque components inside the vessel wall. Automated classification requires all sequences to be in alignment, which is hampered by patient motion. In clinical practice, correction of this motion is performed manually. Previous studies applied automated image registration to correct for motion using only nondeformable transformation models and did not perform a detailed quantitative validation. The purpose of this study is to develop an automated accurate 3D registration method, and to extensively validate this method on a large set of patient data. In addition, the authors quantified patient motion during scanning to investigate the need for correction. Methods: MR imaging studies (1.5T, dedicated carotid surface coil, Philips) from 55 TIA/stroke patients with ipsilateral <70% carotid artery stenosis were randomly selected from a larger cohort. Five MR pulse sequences were acquired around the carotid bifurcation, each containing nine transverse slices: T1-weighted turbo field echo, time of flight, T2-weighted turbo spin-echo, and pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted turbo spin-echo images (T1W TSE). The images were manually segmented by delineating the lumen contour in each vessel wall sequence and were manually aligned by applying throughplane and inplane translations to the images. To find the optimal automatic image registration method, different masks, choice of the fixed image, different types of the mutual information image similarity metric, and transformation models including 3D deformable transformation models, were evaluated. Evaluation of the automatic registration results was performed by comparing the lumen segmentations of the fixed image and

  7. Automated registration of multispectral MR vessel wall images of the carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of heart disease and stroke. The detailed assessment of atherosclerosis of the carotid artery requires high resolution imaging of the vessel wall using multiple MR sequences with different contrast weightings. These images allow manual or automated classification of plaque components inside the vessel wall. Automated classification requires all sequences to be in alignment, which is hampered by patient motion. In clinical practice, correction of this motion is performed manually. Previous studies applied automated image registration to correct for motion using only nondeformable transformation models and did not perform a detailed quantitative validation. The purpose of this study is to develop an automated accurate 3D registration method, and to extensively validate this method on a large set of patient data. In addition, the authors quantified patient motion during scanning to investigate the need for correction. Methods: MR imaging studies (1.5T, dedicated carotid surface coil, Philips) from 55 TIA/stroke patients with ipsilateral <70% carotid artery stenosis were randomly selected from a larger cohort. Five MR pulse sequences were acquired around the carotid bifurcation, each containing nine transverse slices: T1-weighted turbo field echo, time of flight, T2-weighted turbo spin-echo, and pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted turbo spin-echo images (T1W TSE). The images were manually segmented by delineating the lumen contour in each vessel wall sequence and were manually aligned by applying throughplane and inplane translations to the images. To find the optimal automatic image registration method, different masks, choice of the fixed image, different types of the mutual information image similarity metric, and transformation models including 3D deformable transformation models, were evaluated. Evaluation of the automatic registration results was performed by comparing the lumen segmentations of the fixed image and

  8. Structural alterations of the coronary arterial wall are associated with myocardial flow heterogeneity in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Thomas H. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Moelecular and Medical Pharmacology, Radiological Science]|[University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Center, Nuclear Cardiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Facta, Alvaro D.; Prior, John O.; Cadenas, Jerson; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Sayre, James; Goldin, Jonathan; Schelbert, Heinrich R. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Moelecular and Medical Pharmacology, Radiological Science; Li, Yanjie [University of Southern California, Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2009-02-15

    To determine the relationship between carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), coronary artery calcification (CAC), and myocardial blood flow (MBF) at rest and during vasomotor stress in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). In 68 individuals, carotid IMT was measured using high-resolution vascular ultrasound, while the presence of CAC was determined with electron beam tomography (EBT). Global and regional MBF was determined in milliliters per gram per minute with {sup 13}N-ammonia and positron emission tomography (PET) at rest, during cold pressor testing (CPT), and during adenosine (ADO) stimulation. There was neither a relationship between carotid IMT and CAC (r = 0.10, p = 0.32) nor between carotid IMT and coronary circulatory function in response to CPT and during ADO (r = -0.18, p = 0.25 and r = 0.10, p = 0.54, respectively). In 33 individuals, EBT detected CAC with a mean Agatston-derived calcium score of 44 {+-} 18. There was a significant difference in regional MBFs between territories with and without CAC at rest and during ADO-stimulated hyperemia (0.69 {+-} 0.24 vs. 0.74 {+-} 0.23 and 1.82 {+-} 0.50 vs. 1.95 {+-} 0.51 ml/g/min; p {<=} 0.05, respectively) and also during CPT in DM but less pronounced (0.81 {+-} 0.24 vs. 0.83 {+-} 0.23 ml/g/min; p = ns). The increase in CAC was paralleled with a progressive regional decrease in resting as well as in CPT- and ADO-related MBFs (r = -0.36, p {<=} 0.014; r = -0.46, p {<=} 0.007; and r = -0.33, p {<=} 0.041, respectively). The absence of any correlation between carotid IMT and coronary circulatory function in type 2 DM suggests different features and stages of early atherosclerosis in the peripheral and coronary circulation. PET-measured MBF heterogeneity at rest and during vasomotor stress may reflect downstream fluid dynamic effects of coronary artery disease (CAD)-related early structural alterations of the arterial wall. (orig.)

  9. Structural alterations of the coronary arterial wall are associated with myocardial flow heterogeneity in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the relationship between carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), coronary artery calcification (CAC), and myocardial blood flow (MBF) at rest and during vasomotor stress in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). In 68 individuals, carotid IMT was measured using high-resolution vascular ultrasound, while the presence of CAC was determined with electron beam tomography (EBT). Global and regional MBF was determined in milliliters per gram per minute with 13N-ammonia and positron emission tomography (PET) at rest, during cold pressor testing (CPT), and during adenosine (ADO) stimulation. There was neither a relationship between carotid IMT and CAC (r = 0.10, p = 0.32) nor between carotid IMT and coronary circulatory function in response to CPT and during ADO (r = -0.18, p = 0.25 and r = 0.10, p = 0.54, respectively). In 33 individuals, EBT detected CAC with a mean Agatston-derived calcium score of 44 ± 18. There was a significant difference in regional MBFs between territories with and without CAC at rest and during ADO-stimulated hyperemia (0.69 ± 0.24 vs. 0.74 ± 0.23 and 1.82 ± 0.50 vs. 1.95 ± 0.51 ml/g/min; p ≤ 0.05, respectively) and also during CPT in DM but less pronounced (0.81 ± 0.24 vs. 0.83 ± 0.23 ml/g/min; p = ns). The increase in CAC was paralleled with a progressive regional decrease in resting as well as in CPT- and ADO-related MBFs (r = -0.36, p ≤ 0.014; r = -0.46, p ≤ 0.007; and r = -0.33, p ≤ 0.041, respectively). The absence of any correlation between carotid IMT and coronary circulatory function in type 2 DM suggests different features and stages of early atherosclerosis in the peripheral and coronary circulation. PET-measured MBF heterogeneity at rest and during vasomotor stress may reflect downstream fluid dynamic effects of coronary artery disease (CAD)-related early structural alterations of the arterial wall. (orig.)

  10. Low-density lipoprotein accumulation within a carotid artery with multilayer elastic porous wall: fluid-structure interaction and non-Newtonian considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyranlou, Amin; Niazmand, Hamid; Sadeghi, Mahmood-Reza

    2015-09-18

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), which is recognized as bad cholesterol, typically has been regarded as a main cause of atherosclerosis. LDL infiltration across arterial wall and subsequent formation of Ox-LDL could lead to atherogenesis. In the present study, combined effects of non-Newtonian fluid behavior and fluid-structure interaction (FSI) on LDL mass transfer inside an artery and through its multilayer arterial wall are examined numerically. Navier-Stokes equations for the blood flow inside the lumen and modified Darcy's model for the power-law fluid through the porous arterial wall are coupled with the equations of mass transfer to describe LDL distributions in various segments of the artery. In addition, the arterial wall is considered as a heterogeneous permeable elastic medium. Thus, elastodynamics equation is invoked to examine effects of different wall elasticity on LDL distribution in the artery. Findings suggest that non-Newtonian behavior of filtrated plasma within the wall enhances LDL accumulation meaningfully. Moreover, results demonstrate that at high blood pressure and due to the wall elasticity, endothelium pores expand, which cause significant variations on endothelium physiological properties in a way that lead to higher LDL accumulation. Additionally, results describe that under hypertension, by increasing angular strain, endothelial junctions especially at leaky sites expand more dramatic for the high elastic model, which in turn causes higher LDL accumulation across the intima layer and elevates atherogenesis risk. PMID:26300402

  11. Measurement of Change in Wall Thickness of Cylindrical Shell Due to Cyclic Remote Actuation for Assessment of Viscoelasticity of Arterial Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi; Koiwa, Yoshiro; Butler, James P.

    2003-05-01

    To characterize tissues in atherosclerotic plaques, we have developed a method, the phased tracking method, for measuring the strain (change in wall thickness) and elasticity of the arterial wall. However, some types of tissue, such as lipids and blood clots, cannot be discriminated from each other based only on elasticity because of the small difference in their elasticity. For more precise tissue characterization, we are attempting to measure the regional viscoelasticity. To determine viscoelastic properties, elastic moduli at multiple frequencies were obtained by generating the change in internal pressure due to remote cyclic actuation. From basic experiments using a silicone rubber tube, it was found that the change in internal pressure at the ultrasonic beam position (for measurement of the elastic modulus) can be generated by remotely applied actuation. Furthermore, from the resultant minute changes in wall thickness of less than 10 μm measured by the phased tracking method, elastic moduli were obtained at multiple actuation frequencies.

  12. Mechanical Interaction of an Expanding Coiled Stent with a Plaque-Containing Arterial Wall: A Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Tré R; Eberhart, Robert C; Banerjee, Subhash; Chuong, Cheng-Jen

    2016-03-01

    Wall injury is observed during stent expansion within atherosclerotic arteries, related in part to stimulation of the inflammatory process. Wall stress and strain induced by stent expansion can be closely examined by finite element analysis (FEA), thus shedding light on procedure-induced sources of inflammation. The purpose of this work was to use FEA to examine the interaction of a coiled polymer stent with a plaque-containing arterial wall during stent expansion. An asymmetric fibrotic plaque-containing arterial wall model was created from intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images of a diseased artery. A 3D model for a coil stent at unexpanded state was generated in SolidWorks. They were imported into ANSYS for FEA of combined stent expansion and fibrotic plaque-distortion. We simulated the stent expansion in the plaqued lumen by increasing balloon pressure from 0 to 12 atm in 1 atm step. At increasing pressure, we examined how the expanding stent exerts forces on the fibrotic plaque and vascular wall components, and how the latter collectively resist and balance the expansive forces from the stent. Results show the expanding coiled stent creates high stresses within the plaque and the surrounding fibrotic capsule. Lower stresses were observed in adjacent medial and adventitial layers. High principal strains were observed in plaque and fibrotic capsule. The results suggest fibrotic capsule rupture might occur at localized regions. The FEA/IVUS method can be adapted for routine examination of the effects of the expansion of selected furled stents against IVUS-reconstructed diseased vessels, to improve stent deployment practices. PMID:26621671

  13. Carotid artery wall thickness: comparison between sonography and multi-detector row CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saba, Luca [University of Cagliari, Department of Radiology, Policlinico Universitario, Cagliari (Italy); Sanfilippo, Roberto; Montisci, Roberto [Policlinico Universitario, Department of Vascular Surgery, Cagliari (Italy); Mallarini, Giorgio [University of Cagliari, Department of Radiology, Policlinico Universitario, Cagliari (Italy); Ospedale San Giovanni di Dio, Institute of Radiology, Cagliari (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    Prospective studies have shown that an increased thickness of the carotid wall is a significant predictor of coronary and cerebrovascular complications. Our purpose was to assess the agreement between multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) angiography (MDCTA) and colour Doppler ultrasound (CD-US) in measuring carotid artery wall thickness (CAWT) and the intima-media thickness (IMT). Altogether, 97 subjects (age range 64-84 years) were prospectively analysed using a four-detector row CT and a sonographic scanner. In total, 46 subjects had shown cerebral ischaemic symptoms. CAWT and IMT were measured in each patient using MDCTA and CD-US (by applying a digital calliper), respectively. Continuous data were described as the mean value {+-} standard deviation and were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. A p value <0.05 was considered significant. Bland-Altman statistics was employed to measure the agreement between MDCTA and CD-US. CAWT ranged from 0.5 to 1.53 mm, with a mean value of 0.9072 mm. IMT ranged from 0.46 to 1.5 mm, with a mean value of 0.8839 mm. By analysing the Bland-Altman plot, we observed an excellent agreement between CD-US and MDCTA with a bias between methods of 0.023 {+-} 0.0424 mm. A limit of agreement from -0.06 to 0.106 was recorded. Correlation coefficient r was 0.9855 (95% confidence interval 0.9808-0.989). Mann-Whitney U test indicated a p value of 0.377. Obtained results indicated a significant agreement between MDCTA and CD-US in the measurement of CAWT and IMT. (orig.)

  14. Carotid artery wall thickness: comparison between sonography and multi-detector row CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prospective studies have shown that an increased thickness of the carotid wall is a significant predictor of coronary and cerebrovascular complications. Our purpose was to assess the agreement between multi-detector row computed tomography (CT) angiography (MDCTA) and colour Doppler ultrasound (CD-US) in measuring carotid artery wall thickness (CAWT) and the intima-media thickness (IMT). Altogether, 97 subjects (age range 64-84 years) were prospectively analysed using a four-detector row CT and a sonographic scanner. In total, 46 subjects had shown cerebral ischaemic symptoms. CAWT and IMT were measured in each patient using MDCTA and CD-US (by applying a digital calliper), respectively. Continuous data were described as the mean value ± standard deviation and were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. A p value <0.05 was considered significant. Bland-Altman statistics was employed to measure the agreement between MDCTA and CD-US. CAWT ranged from 0.5 to 1.53 mm, with a mean value of 0.9072 mm. IMT ranged from 0.46 to 1.5 mm, with a mean value of 0.8839 mm. By analysing the Bland-Altman plot, we observed an excellent agreement between CD-US and MDCTA with a bias between methods of 0.023 ± 0.0424 mm. A limit of agreement from -0.06 to 0.106 was recorded. Correlation coefficient r was 0.9855 (95% confidence interval 0.9808-0.989). Mann-Whitney U test indicated a p value of 0.377. Obtained results indicated a significant agreement between MDCTA and CD-US in the measurement of CAWT and IMT. (orig.)

  15. Comparative measurement of silicon and major elements (P,S,Cl,K,Ca) in arterial walls using macro and microbeam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are few techniques available for the measurement of silicon at trace levels in biological materials. PIXE and prompt nuclear reaction analysis were used to locate and measure silicon and major elements in arterial walls. Macrobeam analysis, carried out by the Van de Graaff accelerator at CENBG, enabled measurement of mean tissue levels. Microbeam analysis, using the nuclear microprobe at Karlsruhe, yielded the distribution of these elements through the thickness of the arterial wall. The microanalyses were performed on arterial walls from healthy rabbits and the macrobeam study was carried out on the same samples and also on human aorta specimens

  16. Nanochannel flow past permeable walls via molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jian-Fei; Cao, Bing-Yang

    2016-07-01

    The nanochannel flow past permeable walls with nanopores is investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, including the density distribution, velocity field, molecular penetration mechanism and surface friction coefficient. A low density distribution has been found at the gas-wall interface demonstrating the low pressure region. In addition, there exists a jump of the gas density on the permeable surface, which indicates the discontinuity of the density distribution across the permeable surface. On the other hand, the nanoscale vortices are observed in nanopores of the permeable wall, and the reduced mass flux of the flow in nanopores results in a shifted hydrodynamic boundary above the permeable surface. Particularly the slip length of the gas flow on the permeable surface is pronounced a non-linear function of the molecular mean free path, which produces a large value of the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient (TMAC) and a big portion of the diffusive refection. Moreover, the gas-gas interaction and multi-collision among gas molecules may take place in nanopores, which contribute to large values of TMAC. Consequently the boundary friction coefficient on the permeable surface is increased because of the energy dissipation consumed by the nanoscale vortices in nanopores. The molecular boundary condition provides us with a new picture of the nanochannel flow past the permeable wall with nanopores.

  17. Diffusion capacity and CT measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness – relation to arterial oxygen tension in COPD patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saure, Eirunn Waatevik; Bakke, Per Sigvald; Eagan, Tomas Mikal Lind; Aanerud, Marianne; Jensen, Robert Leroy; Grydeland, Thomas Blix; Johannessen, Ane; Nilsen, Roy Miodini; Thorsen, Einar; Hardie, Jon Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background Decreased diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) is associated with emphysema. DLCO is also related to decreased arterial oxygen tension (PaO2), but there are limited data on associations between PaO2 and computed tomography (CT) derived measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness. Objective To examine whether CT measures of emphysema and airway wall thickness are associated with level of arterial oxygen tension beyond that provided by measurements of diffusion capacity and spirometry. Methods The study sample consisted of 271 smoking or ex-smoking COPD patients from the Bergen COPD Cohort Study examined in 2007–2008. Emphysema was assessed as percent of low-attenuation areasCOPD patients. Emphysema score measured by chest CT, is related to decreased PaO2, but cannot replace measurements of diffusion capacity in the clinical evaluation of hypoxaemia. PMID:27178139

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of myocardial deformation indices for detecting high risk coronary artery disease in patients without regional wall motion abnormality

    OpenAIRE

    Rostamzadeh, Alireza; Shojaeifard, Maryam; Rezaei, Yousef; Dehghan, Kasra

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prediction of coronary artery disease (CAD) by conventional echocardiographic measurements is principally based on the estimation of ejection fraction and regional wall motion abnormality (RWMA). This study aimed to determine whether strain echocardiography of left ventricle measured by velocity vector imaging (VVI) method could detect patients with a high-risk CAD. Methods: In a prospective study, a total of 119 consecutive patients who were assessed for eligibility were cate...

  19. Characterizaton of the Vessel Geometry, Flow Mechanics and Wall Shear Stress in the Great Arteries of Wildtype Prenatal Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Choon Hwai Yap; Xiaoqin Liu; Kerem Pekkan

    2014-01-01

    Characterizaton of the Vessel Geometry, Flow Mechanics and Wall Shear Stress in the Great Arteries of Wildtype Prenatal Mouse Choon Hwai Yap1, Xiaoqin Liu2, Kerem Pekkan3* 1 Department of Biomedical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore, 2 Department of Developmental Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America, 3 Department of Biomedical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh...

  20. Characterization of the vessel geometry, flow mechanics and wall shear stress in the great arteries of wildtype prenetal mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Pekkan, Kerem; Yap, C.H.; Liu, X.

    2014-01-01

    Characterizaton of the Vessel Geometry, Flow Mechanics and Wall Shear Stress in the Great Arteries of Wildtype Prenatal Mouse Choon Hwai Yap1, Xiaoqin Liu2, Kerem Pekkan3* 1 Department of Biomedical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore, 2 Department of Developmental Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America, 3 Department of Biomedical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh...

  1. Ultrasonic Measurement of Change in Elasticity due to Endothelium Dependent Relaxation Response by Accurate Detection of Artery-Wall Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Takuya; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    Ross hypothesized that an endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step in atherosclerosis. Endothelial cells, which release nitric oxide (NO) in response to shear stress from blood flow, have a function of relaxing smooth muscle in the media of the arterial wall. For the assessment of the endothelial function, there is a conventional method in which the change in the diameter of the brachial artery caused by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is measured with ultrasound. However, despite the fact that the collagen-rich hard adventitia does not respond to NO, the conventional method measures the change in diameter depending on the mechanical property of the entire wall including the adventitia. Therefore, we developed a method of measuring the change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial artery during a cardiac cycle using the phased tracking method for the evaluation of the mechanical property of only the intima-media region. In this study, the initial positions of echoes from the lumen-intima and media-adventitia boundaries are determined using complex template matching to accurately estimate the minute change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial and radial arteries. The ambiguity in the determination of such boundaries was eliminated using complex template matching, and the change in elasticity measured by the proposed method was larger than the change in inner diameter obtained by the conventional method.

  2. Measurement of the 3D arterial wall strain tensor using intravascular B-mode ultrasound images: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yun; Zhu, Hui; Friedman, Morton H.

    2010-11-01

    Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) elastography is a promising tool for studying atherosclerotic plaque composition and assessing plaque vulnerability. Current IVUS elastography techniques can measure the 1D or 2D strain of the vessel wall using various motion tracking algorithms. Since biological soft tissue tends to deform non-uniformly in 3D, measurement of the complete 3D strain tensor is desirable for more rigorous analysis of arterial wall mechanics. In this paper, we extend our previously developed method of 2D arterial wall strain measurement based on non-rigid image registration into 3D strain measurement. The new technique registers two image volumes acquired from the same vessel segment under different levels of luminal pressure and longitudinal stress. The 3D displacement field obtained from the image registration is used to calculate the local 3D strain tensor. From the 3D strain tensor, radial, circumferential and longitudinal strain distributions can be obtained and displayed. This strain tensor measurement method is validated and evaluated using IVUS images of healthy porcine carotid arteries subjected to a luminal pressure increase and longitudinal stretch. The ability of the algorithm to overcome systematic noise was tested, as well as the consistency of the results under different longitudinal frame resolutions.

  3. A new non-invasive ultrasonic method for simultaneous measurements of longitudinal and radial arterial wall movements: first in vivo trial.

    OpenAIRE

    Persson, Magnus; Rydén Ahlgren, Åsa; Jansson, Tomas; Eriksson, Anders; Persson, Hans W; Lindström, Kjell

    2003-01-01

    During recent years, the radial movement of the arterial wall has been extensively studied, and measurements of the radial movement are now an important tool in cardiovascular research for characterizing the mechanical properties of the arterial wall. In contrast, the longitudinal movement of vessels has gained little or no attention as it has been presumed that this movement is negligible. With modern high-resolution ultrasound, it can, however, be seen that the intima-media complex of the a...

  4. Dynamic modeling and response of soil-wall systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study reported herein is the third in a series of investigations motivated by need to gain improved understanding of the responses to earthquakes of deeply embedded and underground tanks storing radioactive wastes, and to develop rational but simple methods of analysis and design for such systems. Following a brief review of the errors that may result from the use of a popular model for evaluating the dynamic soil forces induced in a base-excited rigid wall retaining an elastic stratum, the sources of the errors are identified and a modification is proposed which defines correctly the action of the system. In the proposed modification, the stratum is modeled by a series of elastically supported, semi-infinite horizontal bars with distributed mass instead of massless springs. The concepts involved are introduced by reference to a system composed of a fixed-based wall and a homogeneous elastic stratum, and are then applied to the analysis of more complex soil-wall systems. Both harmonic and transient excitations are considered, and comprehensive numerical solutions are presented which elucidate the actions involved and the effects and relative importance of the relevant parameters

  5. Heterogeneity and weak coupling may explain the synchronization characteristics of cells in the arterial wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; Aalkjær, Christian; Matchkov, Vladimir V; Nilsson, Holger; Holstein-Rathlou, N.-H.; Freiberg, Jacob J

    2008-01-01

    development of force known as vasomotion. We present experimental data showing a considerable heterogeneity in cellular calcium dynamics in the vascular wall. In stimulated vessels, some SMCs remain quiescent, whereas others display waves of variable frequency. At the onset of vasomotion, all SMCs are...... enrolled into synchronized oscillation.Simulations of coupled SMCs show that the experimentally observed cellular recruitment, the presence of quiescent cells and the variation in oscillation frequency may arise if the cell population is phenotypically heterogeneous. In this case, quiescent cells can be...... entrained at the onset of vasomotion by the collective driving force from the synchronized oscillations in the membrane potential of the surrounding cells. Partial synchronization arises with an increase in the concentration of cyclic guanosine monophosphate, but in a heterogeneous cell population complete...

  6. Nuclear microprobe investigation into the trace elemental contents of carotid artery walls of apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease that causes lesions in large and medium-sized arteries. There is increasing evidence that the function of vascular endothelial cells is impaired by oxidation reactions, and that metal ions may participate in these processes. The nuclear microscopy facility in NUS, which has the ability to focus a 2 MeV proton beam down to sub micron spot sizes, was used to investigate the trace elemental changes (e.g. Zn and Fe) in atherosclerotic lesions in the common carotid artery of apolipoprotein E deficient mice fed a high fat diet. In this preliminary study, which is part of a larger study to investigate the effects of probucol on carotid artery atherosclerosis, two sets of mice were used; a test set fed a high fat diet +1% probucol, and a control set which was fed a high fat diet only. The results show that the Zn/Fe ratio was significantly higher in the media of arteries of probucol treated animals without overlying lesion (4.3) compared to the media with overlying lesion (1.3) (p = 0.004) for test mice. For the control mice, the arterial Zn/Fe ratio was 1.8 for media without overlying lesion, compared with 1.0 for media with overlying lesion (p = 0.1). Thus, for media without overlying lesion, the Zn/Fe ratio was significantly higher (p = 0.009) in probucol-treated (4.3) than control mice (1.8), whereas there was little difference in the ratios between the two groups in media with overlying lesion (1.3 compared with 1.0). These preliminary results are consistent with the idea that the levels of iron and zinc concentrations within the artery wall may influence the formation of atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid artery

  7. Analysis of haemodynamic disturbance in the atherosclerotic carotid artery using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchall, Daniel; Zaman, Azfar; Hacker, Jacob; Davies, Gavin; Mendelow, David

    2006-05-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) provides a means for the quantitative analysis of haemodynamic disturbances in vivo, but most work has used phantoms or idealised geometry. Our purpose was to use CFD to analyse flow in carotid atherosclerosis using patient-specific geometry and flow data. Eight atherosclerotic carotid arteries and one healthy control artery were imaged with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and duplex ultrasound, and the data used to construct patient-specific computational models used for CFD and wall shear stress (WSS) analysis. There is a progressive change in three-dimensional (3-D) velocity profile and WSS profile with increasing severity of stenosis, characterised by increasing restriction of areas of low WSS, change in oscillation patterns, and progressive rise in WSS within stenoses and downstream jets. Areas of turbulent, retrograde flow and of low WSS are demonstrated in the lee of the stenoses. This study presents the largest CFD analysis of abnormal haemodynamics at the atheromatous carotid bifurcation using patient-specific data and provides the basis for further investigation of causal links between haemodynamic variables and atherogenesis and formation of unstable plaque. We propose that this provides a means for the prospective assessment of relative stroke risk in patients with carotid atherosclerosis. PMID:16402252

  8. Analysis of haemodynamic disturbance in the atherosclerotic carotid artery using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) provides a means for the quantitative analysis of haemodynamic disturbances in vivo, but most work has used phantoms or idealised geometry. Our purpose was to use CFD to analyse flow in carotid atherosclerosis using patient-specific geometry and flow data. Eight atherosclerotic carotid arteries and one healthy control artery were imaged with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and duplex ultrasound, and the data used to construct patient-specific computational models used for CFD and wall shear stress (WSS) analysis. There is a progressive change in three-dimensional (3-D) velocity profile and WSS profile with increasing severity of stenosis, characterised by increasing restriction of areas of low WSS, change in oscillation patterns, and progressive rise in WSS within stenoses and downstream jets. Areas of turbulent, retrograde flow and of low WSS are demonstrated in the lee of the stenoses. This study presents the largest CFD analysis of abnormal haemodynamics at the atheromatous carotid bifurcation using patient-specific data and provides the basis for further investigation of causal links between haemodynamic variables and atherogenesis and formation of unstable plaque. We propose that this provides a means for the prospective assessment of relative stroke risk in patients with carotid atherosclerosis. (orig.)

  9. Analysis of haemodynamic disturbance in the atherosclerotic carotid artery using computational fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birchall, Daniel [Newcastle General Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Regional Neurosciences Centre, Newcastle-upon-Tyne (United Kingdom); Zaman, Azfar [Regional Cardiothoracic Centre, Division of Cardiology, Newcastle-upon-Tyne (United Kingdom); Hacker, Jacob; Davies, Gavin [Arup Research and Development, London (United Kingdom); Mendelow, David [Regional Neurosciences Centre, Divisions of Neurosurgery, Newcastle-upon-Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) provides a means for the quantitative analysis of haemodynamic disturbances in vivo, but most work has used phantoms or idealised geometry. Our purpose was to use CFD to analyse flow in carotid atherosclerosis using patient-specific geometry and flow data. Eight atherosclerotic carotid arteries and one healthy control artery were imaged with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and duplex ultrasound, and the data used to construct patient-specific computational models used for CFD and wall shear stress (WSS) analysis. There is a progressive change in three-dimensional (3-D) velocity profile and WSS profile with increasing severity of stenosis, characterised by increasing restriction of areas of low WSS, change in oscillation patterns, and progressive rise in WSS within stenoses and downstream jets. Areas of turbulent, retrograde flow and of low WSS are demonstrated in the lee of the stenoses. This study presents the largest CFD analysis of abnormal haemodynamics at the atheromatous carotid bifurcation using patient-specific data and provides the basis for further investigation of causal links between haemodynamic variables and atherogenesis and formation of unstable plaque. We propose that this provides a means for the prospective assessment of relative stroke risk in patients with carotid atherosclerosis. (orig.)

  10. Segmentation of the Common Carotid Artery Walls Based on a Frequency Implementation of Active Contours: Segmentation of the Common Carotid Artery Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Bastida-Jumilla, M Consuelo; Menchón-Lara, Rosa M; Morales-Sánchez, Juan; Verdú-Monedero, Rafael; Larrey-Ruiz, Jorge; Sancho-Gómez, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the most extended cardiovascular diseases nowadays. Although it may be unnoticed during years, it also may suddenly trigger severe illnesses such as stroke, embolisms or ischemia. Therefore, an early detection of atherosclerosis can prevent adult population from suffering more serious pathologies. The intima–media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery (CCA) has been used as an early and reliable indicator of atherosclerosis for years. The IMT is manually compu...

  11. Dynamics and Friction in Double Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Servantie, J

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this PhD thesis was to characterize the properties of friction in nanotubes and from a more general point of view the understanding of the microscopic origin of friction. Indeed, the relative simplicity of the system allows us to interpret more easily the physical phenomenon observed than in larger systems. In order to achieve this goal, non-equilibrium statistical mechanics permitted first to develop models based on Langevin equations describing the dynamics of rotation and translation in double walled nanotubes. The molecular dynamics simulations then permitted to validate these analytical models, and thus to study general properties of friction such as the dependence on area of contact, temperature and the geometry of the nanotubes. The results obtained shows that friction increases linearly with the sliding velocity or the angular velocity until very high values beyond which non-linearities appear enhancing dissipation. In the linear regime, it is shown that the proportionality factor between ...

  12. Domain-wall dynamics in glass-coated magnetic microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, R. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54 Kosice (Slovakia) and Dpto. Fisica Aplicada I, EUPDS, UPV/EHU, Plaza Europa 1, San Sebastian 20018 (Spain)]. E-mail: rvarga@upjs.sk; Zhukov, A. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada I, EUPDS, UPV/EHU, Plaza Europa 1, San Sebastian 20018 (Spain); Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Fac. de Quimica, UPV/EHU 1072, San Sebastian 20080 (Spain); Usov, N. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada I, EUPDS, UPV/EHU, Plaza Europa 1, San Sebastian 20018 (Spain); Blanco, J.M. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada I, EUPDS, UPV/EHU, Plaza Europa 1, San Sebastian 20018 (Spain); Gonzalez, J. [Dpto. Fisica de Materiales, Fac. de Quimica, UPV/EHU 1072, San Sebastian 20080 (Spain); Zhukova, V. [' TAMag Iberica' S.L., Parque Tecnologico de Miramon, Paseo Mikeletegi 56, 1a Planta, San Sebastian (Spain); Vojtanik, P. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54 Kosice (Slovakia)

    2007-09-15

    Glass-coated magnetic microwires with positive magnetostriction show peculiar domain structure that consists mostly of one large domain with magnetization-oriented axially. It was shown that small closure domains appear at the end of the microwire in order to decrease the stray fields. As a result of such domain structure, the magnetization reversal in axial direction runs through the depinning of one of such closure domains and subsequent propagation of the corresponding domain wall. Quite unusual domain-wall (DW) dynamics of the DW propagation predicted previously from the theory has been found in such amorphous microwires. In this paper, we are dealing with the DW dynamics of glass-coated microwires with small positive magnetostriction. The DW damping coming from the structural relaxation dominates at low temperatures as a result of the decrease of the mobility of the structural atomic-level defects. Negative critical propagation field points to the possible DW propagation without applied magnetic field. Probable explanation could be in terms of the effective mass of the DW.

  13. Domain-wall dynamics in glass-coated magnetic microwires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass-coated magnetic microwires with positive magnetostriction show peculiar domain structure that consists mostly of one large domain with magnetization-oriented axially. It was shown that small closure domains appear at the end of the microwire in order to decrease the stray fields. As a result of such domain structure, the magnetization reversal in axial direction runs through the depinning of one of such closure domains and subsequent propagation of the corresponding domain wall. Quite unusual domain-wall (DW) dynamics of the DW propagation predicted previously from the theory has been found in such amorphous microwires. In this paper, we are dealing with the DW dynamics of glass-coated microwires with small positive magnetostriction. The DW damping coming from the structural relaxation dominates at low temperatures as a result of the decrease of the mobility of the structural atomic-level defects. Negative critical propagation field points to the possible DW propagation without applied magnetic field. Probable explanation could be in terms of the effective mass of the DW

  14. Domain wall dynamics in ultra thin manganite film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uspenskaya, Ludmila [Institute of Solid State Physics RAS, Chernogolovka, 142432 (Russian Federation); Nurgaliev, Timur; Miteva, S, E-mail: uspenska@issp.ac.r [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (BAS), 72 Tsarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-01-01

    Kinetics of magnetization reversal and dynamics of domain walls in thin La{sub 0:7}Sr{sub 0:3}MnO{sub 3} manganite films are studied by magnetooptic visualization technique. Two types of magnetic domain structure are revealed in 20 nm thin film, namely, the small-scale patched domains with perpendicular magnetization, which are formed after zero field cooling, and wide macro-domains with an in-plane magnetization, which appear as a remnant state after saturation by the field of any orientation. The following magnetization reversal is found to occur via the nucleation and thermoactivated motion of the 180{sup 0} domain walls. Strong temperature dependence of dynamic parameters is established near the room temperature. A heating of 10 K above 294 K results in 1.5 reduction of coercivity, in alteration of magnetic permeability, magnetic viscosity and activation volume by order of magnitude. The obtained results could be explained taking into account magnetic after-effects specific for materials with the magnetic ions of transient valence.

  15. Hemodynamic analysis in an idealized artery tree: differences in wall shear stress between Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared C Weddell

    Full Text Available Development of many conditions and disorders, such as atherosclerosis and stroke, are dependent upon hemodynamic forces. To accurately predict and prevent these conditions and disorders hemodynamic forces must be properly mapped. Here we compare a shear-rate dependent fluid (SDF constitutive model, based on the works by Yasuda et al in 1981, against a Newtonian model of blood. We verify our stabilized finite element numerical method with the benchmark lid-driven cavity flow problem. Numerical simulations show that the Newtonian model gives similar velocity profiles in the 2-dimensional cavity given different height and width dimensions, given the same Reynolds number. Conversely, the SDF model gave dissimilar velocity profiles, differing from the Newtonian velocity profiles by up to 25% in velocity magnitudes. This difference can affect estimation in platelet distribution within blood vessels or magnetic nanoparticle delivery. Wall shear stress (WSS is an important quantity involved in vascular remodeling through integrin and adhesion molecule mechanotransduction. The SDF model gave a 7.3-fold greater WSS than the Newtonian model at the top of the 3-dimensional cavity. The SDF model gave a 37.7-fold greater WSS than the Newtonian model at artery walls located immediately after bifurcations in the idealized femoral artery tree. The pressure drop across arteries reveals arterial sections highly resistive to flow which correlates with stenosis formation. Numerical simulations give the pressure drop across the idealized femoral artery tree with the SDF model which is approximately 2.3-fold higher than with the Newtonian model. In atherosclerotic lesion models, the SDF model gives over 1 Pa higher WSS than the Newtonian model, a difference correlated with over twice as many adherent monocytes to endothelial cells from the Newtonian model compared to the SDF model.

  16. Hemodynamic analysis in an idealized artery tree: differences in wall shear stress between Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weddell, Jared C; Kwack, JaeHyuk; Imoukhuede, P I; Masud, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Development of many conditions and disorders, such as atherosclerosis and stroke, are dependent upon hemodynamic forces. To accurately predict and prevent these conditions and disorders hemodynamic forces must be properly mapped. Here we compare a shear-rate dependent fluid (SDF) constitutive model, based on the works by Yasuda et al in 1981, against a Newtonian model of blood. We verify our stabilized finite element numerical method with the benchmark lid-driven cavity flow problem. Numerical simulations show that the Newtonian model gives similar velocity profiles in the 2-dimensional cavity given different height and width dimensions, given the same Reynolds number. Conversely, the SDF model gave dissimilar velocity profiles, differing from the Newtonian velocity profiles by up to 25% in velocity magnitudes. This difference can affect estimation in platelet distribution within blood vessels or magnetic nanoparticle delivery. Wall shear stress (WSS) is an important quantity involved in vascular remodeling through integrin and adhesion molecule mechanotransduction. The SDF model gave a 7.3-fold greater WSS than the Newtonian model at the top of the 3-dimensional cavity. The SDF model gave a 37.7-fold greater WSS than the Newtonian model at artery walls located immediately after bifurcations in the idealized femoral artery tree. The pressure drop across arteries reveals arterial sections highly resistive to flow which correlates with stenosis formation. Numerical simulations give the pressure drop across the idealized femoral artery tree with the SDF model which is approximately 2.3-fold higher than with the Newtonian model. In atherosclerotic lesion models, the SDF model gives over 1 Pa higher WSS than the Newtonian model, a difference correlated with over twice as many adherent monocytes to endothelial cells from the Newtonian model compared to the SDF model. PMID:25897758

  17. The Dynamic Similitude Design Method of Thin Walled Structures and Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the applicability of dynamic similitude models of thin walled structures, such as engine blades, turbine discs, and cylindrical shells, the dynamic similitude design of typical thin walled structures is investigated. The governing equation of typical thin walled structures is firstly unified, which guides to establishing dynamic scaling laws of typical thin walled structures. Based on the governing equation, geometrically complete scaling law of the typical thin walled structure is derived. In order to determine accurate distorted scaling laws of typical thin walled structures, three principles are proposed and theoretically proved by combining the sensitivity analysis and governing equation. Taking the thin walled annular plate as an example, geometrically complete and distorted scaling laws can be obtained based on the principles of determining dynamic scaling laws. Furthermore, the previous five orders’ accurate distorted scaling laws of thin walled annular plates are presented and numerically validated. Finally, the effectiveness of the similitude design method is validated by experimental annular plates.

  18. The influence of anatomic variance in the coronary artery on cardiac function with PCI after acute inferior wall myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To analyze the influence in anatomic variance of coronary artery on function of left and right ventricles after acute inferior myocardial infarction (AIMI) treated with percutaneous coronary intervention therapy (PCI). Methods: Forty-seven inferior AIMI patients were divided into 2 groups: 12 left dominant group [including equipollent case, i.e. inferior wall of left ventricle supplied by left circumflex coronary artery (LCX), right ventricle by right coronary artery (RCA)] and 35 right dominant group (both inferior wall and right ventricle were supplied by RCA). Equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography (ERNA) and myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) were used for comparing the influence between different coronary artery flow patterns on biventricular hemodynamics, blood supply and prognosis of PCI after 3 months. Results: Comparison of ventricular function in left and right dominant coronal artery type groups discharged 7- 10 d after PCI, there were differences in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) [(63.03 ± 5.64)% vs (57.67 ± 7.35)%, P=0.012], peak ejection rate (PER) [(3.52 ± 0.66) end-diastolic volume (EDV)/s vs (2.93 ± 0.73) EDV/s, P =0.011], peak filling rate (PFR) [(2.71 ± 0.88) EDV/s vs (2.11 ± 0.45 ) EDV/s, P=0.004], left free-wall regional ejection fraction [(81.94 ± 20.75)% vs (67.25 ± 16.54)%, P = O.032], and right free-wall regional ejection fraction [(57.86 ± 11.77)% vs (67.83 ± 10.38)%, P=0.012], right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) [(37.89 ± 3.86)% vs (41.67 ± 4.81)%, P=0.09]. After 3 months,there was difference only in RVEF [(44.60 ± 5.29)% vs (48.00 ± 3.30)%, P=0.043], but no difference in myocardial perfusion of left ventricle (P=0.357). Conclusions: In acute stage of AIMI right dominant group, there was more severe injury of right ventricle, in convalescent stage most of the right ventricular function resumed. The sustained right ventricular function in part of the patients can be demonstrated by ERNA

  19. Arterial wall rigidity in active and standard therapy of patients with chronic heart failure (three-year investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebrov A.P.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to evaluate arterial wall rigidity, clinical condition and prognosis in active and standard therapy of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF. Materials and methods. A total of 211 patients with CHF experienced Q-wave myocardial infarction was enrolled in the study. At admission to the hospital all patients were randomized into two groups. Patients of the first group (n=106 were managed actively after discharge from the hospital, patients of the second group (n=105 were managed conventionally after discharge from the hospital. Patients were observed for three years. Re-sults. Over three year-investigation actively managed patients demonstrated significant (p<0,05 decrease in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, blood serum levels of total cholesterol, N-terminal cerebral natriuretic peptide, increase of 6-minute walk-test, left ventricle ejection fraction reduction and decrease in number hospitalization of patients with CHF as compared to those who were conventionally managed. At patients of II group pulse wave speed in aorta (PWVA since the first year, an index of augmentation of brachial artery and systolic pressure in aorta in three years of supervision above (p<0,05 in comparison with patients of group I. Conclusion. One of deterioration factors of systolic functions of the left ventricle and the prognosis in patients with CHF of group of standard therapy was progressing of arterial wall rigidity pathology

  20. Impaired Arterial Elasticity Identified by Pulse Waveform Analysis as a Marker for Vascular Wall Damage in Humans With Aging and Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yan; Tao Jun; Tu Chang; Yang Zhen; Xu Mingguo; Wang Jiemei; Jin Yafei; Ma Hong

    2005-01-01

    Objectives Cardiovascular risk factors lead to pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and its clinical events by impairing vascular wall. Endothelial dysfunction is the earliest marker for vascular wall injuries. Development of new method to detect early vascular wall damage has an important clinical implication for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, the present study was performed to evaluate effect of aging and hypertension, two independent risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, on arterial elasticity by using pulse waveform analysis and investigate whether the changes in arterial elasticity can be used as a risk marker for vascular structural and functional abnormalities. Methods Using modified Windkessel model of the circulation and pulse waveform analysis,C 1 large artery and C2 small artery elasticity indices of 204 Chinese normal healthy subjects ( age 15-80years) and 46 Chinese essential hypertensive patients (age 35-70 years) were measured. Age- and hypertension-related arterial elasticity changes were examined. Results C1 large artery and C2 small artery elasticity indices were reduced with advancing age in healthy subjects. C1 large artery and C2 small artery elasticity indices were negatively correlated with age (r=-0.628, P<0.001; r=-0.595, P<0.001). C1 large artery and C2 small artery elasticity indices in patients with essential hypertension compared with the agematched healthy subjects were (9.31±3.85 ml/mm Hg x 10 versus 15.13±4.14 ml/mmHg x 10, P<0.001) and (3.57± 1.62 ml/mm Hg x 100 versus 7.89±2.91 ml/mmHg ×100 P <0.001), respectively, and were significantly lower than the corresponding healthy subjects. There were negative association between C1large artery and C2 small artery elasticity indices and systolic blood pressure (r=-0.37, P<0.05; r=-0.39,P<0.05) and pulse pressure (r=-0.39, P<0.05; r=0.43,P<0.05) in patients with essential hypertension.Conclusions Advancing age and essential

  1. Do the cardiovascular risk profile and the degree of arterial wall calcification influence the performance of MDCT angiography of lower extremity arteries?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To retrospectively assess the influence of arterial wall calcifications on the accuracy of run-off computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and to analyse whether cardiovascular risk factors are predictors of compromising calcifications. In 200 consecutive patients who underwent run-off CTA, calcifications were assessed in pelvic, thigh and calf arteries using a four-point scale. Fifty-nine patients with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were assessed by both techniques to estimate a threshold of compromising calcifications, defined as a decrease of sensitivity, specificity, PPV or NPV below the lower 95% confidence interval of overall results. Regression analysis was performed to investigate a potential relationship between compromising calcifications and presence of cardiovascular risk factors, advanced patient age and severe peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The highest Ca++-score was chosen as the cut-off for the regression analysis, as a relevant decrease of specificity (0.91; overall: 0.95) above the knee and of sensitivity (0.66; overall: 0.83), specificity (0.65; overall: 0.93), positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) below the knee was observed. In the pelvic and thigh arteries, severe PAD (Fontaine Stage ≥III) showed the highest odds ratio for compromising calcifications (2.9), followed by diabetes mellitus (2.4), renal failure (2.1) and smoking (1.7). In the calf, renal failure (12.2) and diabetes mellitus (3.3) were the strongest predictors. Patients with diabetes and renal failure should be considered as candidates for alternative vessel imaging in order to avoid inconclusive examination results. (orig.)

  2. Do the cardiovascular risk profile and the degree of arterial wall calcification influence the performance of MDCT angiography of lower extremity arteries?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, B.C.; Werncke, T.; Foert, E.; Ribbe, C.; Wolf, K.J. [Charite-University Medicine, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Kruschewski, M. [Charite-University Medicine, Department of Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Hopfenmueller, W. [Charite-University Medicine, Department of Biometry and Clinical Epidemiology, Berlin (Germany); Albrecht, T. [Charite-University Medicine, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Vivantes Klinikum Neukoelln, Department of Radiology and Interventional Therapy, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    To retrospectively assess the influence of arterial wall calcifications on the accuracy of run-off computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and to analyse whether cardiovascular risk factors are predictors of compromising calcifications. In 200 consecutive patients who underwent run-off CTA, calcifications were assessed in pelvic, thigh and calf arteries using a four-point scale. Fifty-nine patients with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were assessed by both techniques to estimate a threshold of compromising calcifications, defined as a decrease of sensitivity, specificity, PPV or NPV below the lower 95% confidence interval of overall results. Regression analysis was performed to investigate a potential relationship between compromising calcifications and presence of cardiovascular risk factors, advanced patient age and severe peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The highest Ca{sup ++}-score was chosen as the cut-off for the regression analysis, as a relevant decrease of specificity (0.91; overall: 0.95) above the knee and of sensitivity (0.66; overall: 0.83), specificity (0.65; overall: 0.93), positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) below the knee was observed. In the pelvic and thigh arteries, severe PAD (Fontaine Stage {>=}III) showed the highest odds ratio for compromising calcifications (2.9), followed by diabetes mellitus (2.4), renal failure (2.1) and smoking (1.7). In the calf, renal failure (12.2) and diabetes mellitus (3.3) were the strongest predictors. Patients with diabetes and renal failure should be considered as candidates for alternative vessel imaging in order to avoid inconclusive examination results. (orig.)

  3. Large Artery Remodeling and Dynamics following Simulated Microgravity by Prolonged Head-Down Tilt Bed Rest in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Palombo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of simulated microgravity on the static and dynamic properties of large arteries are still mostly unknown. The present study evaluated, using an integrated vascular approach, changes in structure and function of the common carotid and femoral arteries (CCA and CFA after prolonged head-down tilt bed rest (HDTBR. Ten healthy men were enrolled in a 5-week HDTBR study endorsed by the Italian Space Agency (ASI. Arterial geometry, flow, stiffness, and shear rate were evaluated by ultrasound. Local carotid pulse pressure and wave reflection were studied by applanation tonometry. After five weeks of HDTBR, CFA showed a decrease in lumen diameter without significant changes in wall thickness (IMT, resulting in an inward remodeling. Local carotid pulse pressure decreased and carotid-to-brachial pressure amplification increased. The ratio of systolic-to-diastolic volumetric flow in CFA decreased, whereas in CCA it tended to increase. Indices of arterial stiffness and shear rate did not change during HDTBR, either in CCA or CFA. In summary, prolonged HDTBR has a different impact on CCA and CFA structure and flow, probably depending on the characteristics of the vascular bed perfused.

  4. Algisyl-LVR™ with coronary artery bypass grafting reduces left ventricular wall stress and improves function in the failing human heart

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, LC; Wall, ST; Klepach, D; Ge, L; Zhang, Z.; Lee, RJ; Hinson, A; Gorman, JH; Gorman, RC; Guccione, JM

    2013-01-01

    Background Left ventricular (LV) wall stress reduction is a cornerstone in treating heart failure. Large animal models and computer simulations indicate that adding non-contractile material to the damaged LV wall can potentially reduce myofiber stress. We sought to quantify the effects of a novel implantable hydrogel (Algisyl-LVR™) treatment in combination with coronary artery bypass grafting (i.e. Algisyl-LVR™ + CABG) on both LV function and wall stress in heart failure patients. Methods and...

  5. Arterial bending angle and wall morphology correlate with slow coronary flow: Determination with multidetector CT coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess angulations and vessel wall morphology that could lead to bending head loss in the RCA and LMCA arteries of patients with slow coronary flow (SCF) evaluated by MDCT coronary angiography. Methods: The study involved 51 patients (45 males, mean age: 59.6 years) who were diagnosed with SCF by coronary angiography. Diagnosis of SCF was based on thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) frame count. Fifty-one patients with absence of slow flow were selected as the control group. The angulations of the main coronary arteries with the aorta were measured from the axial images obtained through MDCT coronary angiography, and the findings were recorded. In addition, the coronary artery walls of these patients were evaluated. For statistical analysis, SPSS for Windows 10.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) was used. For comparisons of the angles, either independent samples t test or the Mann-Whitney U test was used where appropriate. Results: The results of the study indicated that 38 patients had SCF in the LAD. Comparisons of patients with SCF with the controls revealed that in the patients with SCF, the mean angle of the LMCA with the aorta (40.9 ± 20.5o) was statistically significantly smaller than the mean angle of the LMCA with the aorta in the control cases (71.8 ± 11o). In 12 patients, slow flow was detected in the RCA. Those with slow flow in the RCA had significantly smaller angles (mean: 33.2 ± 20.4o) than the other cases (mean: 78.9 ± 10.7o). Conclusion: A small angle of origin of the main coronary arteries from the aorta, measured on MDCT examinations is correlated with slow blood flow in those vessels, as calculated by the TIMI frame count in catheter coronary angiography.

  6. A theory for water and macromolecular transport in the pulmonary artery wall with a detailed comparison to the aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhongqing; Jan, Kung-Ming; Rumschitzki, David S

    2012-04-15

    The pulmonary artery (PA) wall, which has much higher hydraulic conductivity and albumin void space and approximately one-sixth the normal transmural pressure of systemic arteries (e.g, aorta, carotid arteries), is rarely atherosclerotic, except under pulmonary hypertension. This study constructs a detailed, two-dimensional, wall-structure-based filtration and macromolecular transport model for the PA to investigate differences in prelesion transport processes between the disease-susceptible aorta and the relatively resistant PA. The PA and aorta models are similar in wall structure, but very different in parameter values, many of which have been measured (and therefore modified) since the original aorta model of Huang et al. (23). Both PA and aortic model simulations fit experimental data on transwall LDL concentration profiles and on the growth of isolated endothelial (horseradish peroxidase) tracer spots with circulation time very well. They reveal that lipid entering the aorta attains a much higher intima than media concentration but distributes better between these regions in the PA than aorta and that tracer in both regions contributes to observed tracer spots. Solutions show why both the overall transmural water flow and spot growth rates are similar in these vessels despite very different material transport parameters. Since early lipid accumulation occurs in the subendothelial intima and since (matrix binding) reaction kinetics depend on reactant concentrations, the lower intima lipid concentrations in the PA vs. aorta likely lead to slower accumulation of bound lipid in the PA. These findings may be relevant to understanding the different atherosusceptibilities of these vessels. PMID:22198178

  7. Dynamic respiratory mechanics and exertional dyspnoea in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laveneziana, Pierantonio; Garcia, Gilles; Joureau, Barbara; Nicolas-Jilwan, Fadia; Brahimi, Toufik; Laviolette, Louis; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc; Similowski, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may exhibit reduced expiratory flows at low lung volumes, which could promote exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation (DH). This study aimed to examine the impact of a potential exercise-related DH on the intensity of dyspnoea in patients with PAH undergoing symptom-limited incremental cardiopulmonary cycle exercise testing (CPET). 25 young (aged mean±sd 38±12 yrs) nonsmoking PAH patients with no evidence of spirometric obstruction and 10 age-matched nonsmoking healthy subjects performed CPET to the limit of tolerance. Ventilatory pattern, operating lung volumes (derived from inspiratory capacity (IC) measurements) and dyspnoea intensity (Borg scale) were assessed throughout CPET. IC decreased (i.e. DH) progressively throughout CPET in PAH patients (average 0.15 L), whereas it increased in all the healthy subjects (0.45 L). Among PAH patients, 15 (60%) exhibited a decrease in IC throughout exercise (average 0.50 L), whereas in the remaining 10 (40%) patients IC increased (average 0.36 L). Dyspnoea intensity and ventilation were greater in PAH patients than in controls at any stage of CPET, whereas inspiratory reserve volume was lower. We conclude that DH-induced mechanical constraints and excessive ventilatory demand occurred in these young nonsmoking PAH patients with no spirometric obstruction and was associated with exertional dyspnoea. PMID:22790921

  8. Adenosine concentration in the porcine coronary artery wall and A2A receptor involvement in hypoxia-induced vasodilatation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frøbert, Ole; Haink, Gesine; Simonsen, Ulf; Gravholt, Claus H; Levin, Max; Deussen, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    We tested whether hypoxia-induced coronary artery dilatation could be mediated by an increase in adenosine concentration within the coronary artery wall or by an increase in adenosine sensitivity. Porcine left anterior descendent coronary arteries, precontracted with prostaglandin F2α (10−5m), were mounted in a pressure myograph and microdialysis catheters were inserted into the tunica media. Dialysate adenosine concentrations were analysed by HPLC. Glucose, lactate and pyruvate were measured by an automated spectrophotometric kinetic enzymatic analyser. The exchange fraction of [14C]adenosine over the microdialysis membrane increased from 0.32 ± 0.02 to 0.46 ± 0.02 (n = 4, P < 0.01) during the study period. At baseline, interstitial adenosine was in the region of 10 nm which is significantly less than previously found myocardial concentrations. Hypoxia (PO2 30 mmHg for 60 min, n = 5) increased coronary diameters by 20.0 ± 2.6% (versus continuous oxygenation −3.1 ± 2.4%, n = 6, P < 0.001) but interstitial adenosine concentration fell. Blockade of adenosine deaminase (with erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl-)-adenine, 5 μm), adenosine kinase (with iodotubericidine, 10 μm) and adenosine transport (with n-nitrobenzylthioinosine, 1 μm) increased interstitial adenosine but the increase was unrelated to hypoxia or diameter. A coronary dilatation similar to that during hypoxia could be obtained with 30 μm of adenosine in the organ bath and the resulting interstitial adenosine concentrations (n = 5) were 20 times higher than the adenosine concentration measured during hypoxia. Adenosine concentration–response experiments showed vasodilatation to be more pronounced during hypoxia (n = 9) than during normoxia (n = 9, P < 0.001) and the A2A receptor antagonist ZM241385 (20 nm, n = 5), attenuated hypoxia-induced vasodilatation while the selective A2B receptor antagonist MRS1754 (20 nm, n = 4), had no effect. The lactate/pyruvate ratio was significantly increased in

  9. Fluid–structure interaction analysis of bioprosthetic heart valves: Significance of arterial wall deformation

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Ming-Chen; Kamensky, David; Bazilevs, Yuri; Sacks, Michael S; Hughes, Thomas J. R.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a framework that combines variational immersed-boundary and arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian (ALE) methods for fluid–structure interaction (FSI) simulation of a bioprosthetic heart valve implanted in an artery that is allowed to deform in the model. We find that the variational immersed-boundary method for FSI remains robust and effective for heart valve analysis when the background fluid mesh undergoes deformations corresponding to the expansion and contraction of the elastic artery....

  10. The effect of wall mechanical properties on patency of arterial grafts.

    OpenAIRE

    Kidson, I. G.

    1983-01-01

    Normal arteries have properties which match the low output impedance of the heart to the high peripheral impedance. These properties can be assessed in terms of compliance (% diameter change per unit pressure change) as well as by other haemodynamic parameters. Experiments were designed using vein, Dacron and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) in a low flow canine femoral artery bypass model. No graft group achieved perfect patency. At twelve weeks 80% of vein grafts, 30% of Dacron graft...

  11. AdaBoost classification for model-based segmentation of the outer wall of the common carotid artery in CTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukadinovic, D.; van Walsum, T.; Manniesing, R.; van der Lugt, A.; de Weert, T. T.; Niessen, W. J.

    2008-03-01

    A novel 2D slice based fully automatic method for model based segmentation of the outer vessel wall of the common carotid artery in CTA data set is introduced. The method utilizes a lumen segmentation and AdaBoost, a fast and robust machine learning algorithm, to initially classify (mark) regions outside and inside the vessel wall using the distance from the lumen and intensity profiles sampled radially from the gravity center of the lumen. A similar method using the distance from the lumen and the image intensity as features is used to classify calcium regions. Subsequently, an ellipse shaped deformable model is fitted to the classification result. The method achieves smaller detection error than the inter observer variability, and the method is robust against variation of the training data sets.

  12. Examination of nanoparticles as a drug carrier on blood flow through catheterized composite stenosed artery with permeable walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijaz, S; Nadeem, S

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we have discussed the influence of copper nanoparticles on a blood flow through composite stenosed artery with permeable walls. The nature of blood is discussed mathematically by considering it as viscous nanofluid. The study is carried out for a blood vessel under mild stenosis approximations and expressions of the temperature, velocity, resistance impedance to flow, wall shear stress and the pressure gradient is obtained by using corresponding boundary conditions. Results for the effects of permeability on blood flow through composite stenosis have been discussed graphically. The considered analysis also summarizes that the drug copper nanoparticles are efficient to reduce hemodynamics of stenosis and could be helpful to predict important uses for biomedical applications. Results indicate that nanoparticles are helpful as drug carriers to minimize the effects of resistance impedance to blood flow or coagulation factors due to stenosis. PMID:27393802

  13. A control systems approach to quantify wall shear stress normalization by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank C G van Bussel

    Full Text Available Flow-mediated dilation is aimed at normalization of local wall shear stress under varying blood flow conditions. Blood flow velocity and vessel diameter are continuous and opposing influences that modulate wall shear stress. We derived an index FMDv to quantify wall shear stress normalization performance by flow-mediated dilation in the brachial artery. In 22 fasting presumed healthy men, we first assessed intra- and inter-session reproducibilities of two indices pFMDv and mFMDv, which consider the relative peak and relative mean hyperemic change in flow velocity, respectively. Second, utilizing oral glucose loading, we evaluated the tracking performance of both FMDv indices, in comparison with existing indices [i.e., the relative peak diameter increase (%FMD, the peak to baseline diameter ratio (Dpeak/Dbase, and the relative peak diameter increase normalized to the full area under the curve of blood flow velocity with hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC or with area integrated to peak hyperemia (FMD/shearAUC_peak]. Inter-session and intra-session reproducibilities for pFMDv, mFMDv and %FMD were comparable (intra-class correlation coefficients within 0.521-0.677 range. Both pFMDv and mFMDv showed more clearly a reduction after glucose loading (reduction of ~45%, p≤0.001 than the other indices (% given are relative reductions: %FMD (~11%, p≥0.074; Dpeak/Dbase (~11%, p≥0.074; FMD/shearAUC_peak (~20%, p≥0.016 and FMD/shearAUC (~38%, p≤0.038. Further analysis indicated that wall shear stress normalization under normal (fasting conditions is already far from ideal (FMDv << 1, which (therefore does not materially change with glucose loading. Our approach might be useful in intervention studies to detect intrinsic changes in shear stress normalization performance in conduit arteries.

  14. Segmentation of the common carotid artery walls based on a frequency implementation of active contours: segmentation of the common carotid artery walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastida-Jumilla, M Consuelo; Menchón-Lara, Rosa M; Morales-Sánchez, Juan; Verdú-Monedero, Rafael; Larrey-Ruiz, Jorge; Sancho-Gómez, José Luis

    2013-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the most extended cardiovascular diseases nowadays. Although it may be unnoticed during years, it also may suddenly trigger severe illnesses such as stroke, embolisms or ischemia. Therefore, an early detection of atherosclerosis can prevent adult population from suffering more serious pathologies. The intima-media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery (CCA) has been used as an early and reliable indicator of atherosclerosis for years. The IMT is manually computed from ultrasound images, a process that can be repeated as many times as necessary (over different ultrasound images of the same patient), but also prone to errors. With the aim to reduce the inter-observer variability and the subjectivity of the measurement, a fully automatic computer-based method based on ultrasound image processing and a frequency-domain implementation of active contours is proposed. The images used in this work were obtained with the same ultrasound scanner (Philips iU22 Ultrasound System) but with different spatial resolutions. The proposed solution does not extract only the IMT but also the CCA diameter, which is not as relevant as the IMT to predict future atherosclerosis evolution but it is a statistically interesting piece of information for the doctors to determine the cardiovascular risk. The results of the proposed method have been validated by doctors, and these results are visually and numerically satisfactory when considering the medical measurements as ground truth, with a maximum deviation of only 3.4 pixels (0.0248 mm) for IMT. PMID:22552539

  15. Deposition of amyloid β in the walls of human leptomeningeal arteries in relation to perivascular drainage pathways in cerebral amyloid angiopathy☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keable, Abby; Fenna, Kate; Yuen, Ho Ming; Johnston, David A.; Smyth, Neil R.; Smith, Colin; Salman, Rustam Al-Shahi; Samarasekera, Neshika; Nicoll, James A.R.; Attems, Johannes; Kalaria, Rajesh N.; Weller, Roy O.; Carare, Roxana O.

    2016-01-01

    Deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) in the walls of cerebral arteries as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) suggests an age-related failure of perivascular drainage of soluble Aβ from the brain. As CAA is associated with Alzheimer's disease and with intracerebral haemorrhage, the present study determines the unique sequence of changes that occur as Aβ accumulates in artery walls. Paraffin sections of post-mortem human occipital cortex were immunostained for collagen IV, fibronectin, nidogen 2, Aβ and smooth muscle actin and the immunostaining was analysed using Image J and confocal microscopy. Results showed that nidogen 2 (entactin) increases with age and decreases in CAA. Confocal microscopy revealed stages in the progression of CAA: Aβ initially deposits in basement membranes in the tunica media, replaces first the smooth muscle cells and then the connective tissue elements to leave artery walls completely or focally replaced by Aβ. The pattern of development of CAA in the human brain suggests expansion of Aβ from the basement membranes to progressively replace all tissue elements in the artery wall. Establishing this full picture of the development of CAA is pivotal in understanding the clinical presentation of CAA and for developing therapies to prevent accumulation of Aβ in artery walls. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26327684

  16. Deposition of amyloid β in the walls of human leptomeningeal arteries in relation to perivascular drainage pathways in cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keable, Abby; Fenna, Kate; Yuen, Ho Ming; Johnston, David A; Smyth, Neil R; Smith, Colin; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam; Samarasekera, Neshika; Nicoll, James A R; Attems, Johannes; Kalaria, Rajesh N; Weller, Roy O; Carare, Roxana O

    2016-05-01

    Deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) in the walls of cerebral arteries as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) suggests an age-related failure of perivascular drainage of soluble Aβ from the brain. As CAA is associated with Alzheimer's disease and with intracerebral haemorrhage, the present study determines the unique sequence of changes that occur as Aβ accumulates in artery walls. Paraffin sections of post-mortem human occipital cortex were immunostained for collagen IV, fibronectin, nidogen 2, Aβ and smooth muscle actin and the immunostaining was analysed using Image J and confocal microscopy. Results showed that nidogen 2 (entactin) increases with age and decreases in CAA. Confocal microscopy revealed stages in the progression of CAA: Aβ initially deposits in basement membranes in the tunica media, replaces first the smooth muscle cells and then the connective tissue elements to leave artery walls completely or focally replaced by Aβ. The pattern of development of CAA in the human brain suggests expansion of Aβ from the basement membranes to progressively replace all tissue elements in the artery wall. Establishing this full picture of the development of CAA is pivotal in understanding the clinical presentation of CAA and for developing therapies to prevent accumulation of Aβ in artery walls. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26327684

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation for flow characteristics in nanochannels and single walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flows in graphite-, diamond- and silicon-walled nanochannels are discussed by performing molecular dynamics simulations. Flows in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene- walled nanochannels are also investigated. It is found that the flow rate in the graphite-walled channel tends to be the largest because of its slippery wall structure by the short bond length and the high molecular density of the CNTs. The flow rate in the single walled CNT at a very narrow diameter tends to increase although such a tendency is not seen in the graphene-walled channel.

  18. Roles of membrane trafficking in plant cell wall dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ebine, Kazuo; Ueda, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The cell wall is one of the characteristic components of plant cells. The cell wall composition differs among cell types and is modified in response to various environmental conditions. To properly generate and modify the cell wall, many proteins are transported to the plasma membrane or extracellular space through membrane trafficking, which is one of the key protein transport mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Given the diverse composition and functions of the cell wall in plants, the transpor...

  19. Smooth Muscle Specific Overexpression of p22phox Potentiates Carotid Artery Wall Thickening in Response to Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Manogue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that transgenic mice overexpressing the p22phox subunit of the NADPH oxidase selectively in smooth muscle (Tgp22smc would exhibit an exacerbated response to transluminal carotid injury compared to wild-type mice. To examine the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS as a mediator of vascular injury, the injury response was quantified by measuring wall thickness (WT and cross-sectional wall area (CSWA of the injured and noninjured arteries in both Tgp22smc and wild-type animals at days 3, 7, and 14 after injury. Akt, p38 MAPK, and Src activation were evaluated at the same time points using Western blotting. WT and CSWA following injury were significantly greater in Tgp22smc mice at both 7 and 14 days after injury while noninjured contralateral carotids were similar between groups. Apocynin treatment attenuated the injury response in both groups and rendered the response similar between Tgp22smc mice and wild-type mice. Following injury, carotid arteries from Tgp22smc mice demonstrated elevated activation of Akt at day 3, while p38 MAPK and Src activation was elevated at day 7 compared to wild-type mice. Both increased activation and temporal regulation of these signaling pathways may contribute to enhanced vascular growth in response to injury in this transgenic model of elevated vascular ROS.

  20. A novel computerized tool to stratify risk in carotid atherosclerosis using kinematic features of the arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastounioti, Aimilia; Makrodimitris, Stavros; Golemati, Spyretta; Kadoglou, Nikolaos P E; Liapis, Christos D; Nikita, Konstantina S

    2015-05-01

    Valid characterization of carotid atherosclerosis (CA) is a crucial public health issue, which would limit the major risks held by CA for both patient safety and state economies. This paper investigated the unexplored potential of kinematic features in assisting the diagnostic decision for CA in the framework of a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) tool. To this end, 15 CAD schemes were designed and were fed with a wide variety of kinematic features of the atherosclerotic plaque and the arterial wall adjacent to the plaque for 56 patients from two different hospitals. The CAD schemes were benchmarked in terms of their ability to discriminate between symptomatic and asymptomatic patients and the combination of the Fisher discriminant ratio, as a feature-selection strategy, and support vector machines, in the classification module, was revealed as the optimal motion-based CAD tool. The particular CAD tool was evaluated with several cross-validation strategies and yielded higher than 88% classification accuracy; the texture-based CAD performance in the same dataset was 80%. The incorporation of kinematic features of the arterial wall in CAD seems to have a particularly favorable impact on the performance of image-data-driven diagnosis for CA, which remains to be further elucidated in future prospective studies on large datasets. PMID:24951709

  1. Penium margaritaceum: A Unicellular Model Organism for Studying Plant Cell Wall Architecture and Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Domozych, David S

    2014-01-01

    Penium margaritaceum is a new and valuable unicellular model organism for studying plant cell wall structure and developmental dynamics. This charophyte has a cell wall composition remarkably similar to the primary cell wall of many higher plants and clearly-defined inclusive zones containing specific polymers. Penium has a simple cylindrical phenotype with a distinct region of focused wall synthesis. Specific polymers, particularly pectins, can be identified using monoclonal antibodies rais...

  2. Automatic detection of the carotid artery boundary on cross-sectional MR image sequences using a circle model guided dynamic programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brambs Hans

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systematic aerobe training has positive effects on the compliance of dedicated arterial walls. The adaptations of the arterial structure and function are associated with the blood flow-induced changes of the wall shear stress which induced vascular remodelling via nitric oxide delivered from the endothelial cell. In order to assess functional changes of the common carotid artery over time in these processes, a precise measurement technique is necessary. Before this study, a reliable, precise, and quick method to perform this work is not present. Methods We propose a fully automated algorithm to analyze the cross-sectional area of the carotid artery in MR image sequences. It contains two phases: (1 position detection of the carotid artery, (2 accurate boundary identification of the carotid artery. In the first phase, we use intensity, area size and shape as features to discriminate the carotid artery from other tissues and vessels. In the second phase, the directional gradient, Hough transform, and circle model guided dynamic programming are used to identify the boundary accurately. Results We test the system stability using contrast degraded images (contrast resolutions range from 50% to 90%. The unsigned error ranges from 2.86% ± 2.24% to 3.03% ± 2.40%. The test of noise degraded images (SNRs range from 16 to 20 dB shows the unsigned error ranging from 2.63% ± 2.06% to 3.12% ± 2.11%. The test of raw images has an unsigned error 2.56% ± 2.10% compared to the manual tracings. Conclusions We have proposed an automated system which is able to detect carotid artery cross sectional boundary in MRI sequences during heart cycles. The accuracy reaches 2.56% ± 2.10% compared to the manual tracings. The system is stable, reliable and results are reproducible.

  3. Comparison of Kalman-filter-based approaches for block matching in arterial wall motion analysis from B-mode ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastounioti, A.; Golemati, S.; Stoitsis, J.; Nikita, K. S.

    2011-11-01

    Block matching (BM) has been previously used to estimate motion of the carotid artery from B-mode ultrasound image sequences. In this paper, Kalman filtering (KF) was incorporated in this conventional method in two distinct scenarios: (a) as an adaptive strategy, by renewing the reference block and (b) by renewing the displacements estimated by BM or adaptive BM. All methods resulting from combinations of BM and KF with the two scenarios were evaluated on synthetic image sequences by computing the warping index, defined as the mean squared error between the real and estimated displacements. Adaptive BM, followed by an update through the second scenario at the end of tracking, ABM_KF-K2, minimized the warping index and yielded average displacement error reductions of 24% with respect to BM. The same method decreased estimation bias and jitter over varying center frequencies by 30% and 64%, respectively, with respect to BM. These results demonstrated the increased accuracy and robustness of ABM_KF-K2 in motion tracking of the arterial wall from B-mode ultrasound images, which is crucial in the study of mechanical properties of normal and diseased arterial segments.

  4. Comparison of Kalman-filter-based approaches for block matching in arterial wall motion analysis from B-mode ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block matching (BM) has been previously used to estimate motion of the carotid artery from B-mode ultrasound image sequences. In this paper, Kalman filtering (KF) was incorporated in this conventional method in two distinct scenarios: (a) as an adaptive strategy, by renewing the reference block and (b) by renewing the displacements estimated by BM or adaptive BM. All methods resulting from combinations of BM and KF with the two scenarios were evaluated on synthetic image sequences by computing the warping index, defined as the mean squared error between the real and estimated displacements. Adaptive BM, followed by an update through the second scenario at the end of tracking, ABMKF-K2, minimized the warping index and yielded average displacement error reductions of 24% with respect to BM. The same method decreased estimation bias and jitter over varying center frequencies by 30% and 64%, respectively, with respect to BM. These results demonstrated the increased accuracy and robustness of ABMKF-K2 in motion tracking of the arterial wall from B-mode ultrasound images, which is crucial in the study of mechanical properties of normal and diseased arterial segments

  5. Flow and wall shear stress in end-to-side and side-to-side anastomosis of venous coronary artery bypass grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulikakos Dimos

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery represents the standard treatment of advanced coronary artery disease. Two major types of anastomosis exist to connect the graft to the coronary artery, i.e., by using an end-to-side or a side-to-side anastomosis. There is still controversy because of the differences in the patency rates of the two types of anastomosis. The purpose of this paper is to non-invasively quantify hemodynamic parameters, such as mass flow and wall shear stress (WSS, in end-to-side and side-to-side anastomoses of patients with CABG using computational fluid dynamics (CFD. Methods One patient with saphenous CABG and end-to-side anastomosis and one patient with saphenous CABG and side-to-side anastomosis underwent 16-detector row computed tomography (CT. Geometric models of coronary arteries and bypasses were reconstructed for CFD analysis. Blood flow was considered pulsatile, laminar, incompressible and Newtonian. Peri-anastomotic mass flow and WSS were quantified and flow patterns visualized. Results CFD analysis based on in-vivo CT coronary angiography data was feasible in both patients. For both types of CABG, flow patterns were characterized by a retrograde flow into the native coronary artery. WSS variations were found in both anastomoses types, with highest WSS values at the heel and lowest WSS values at the floor of the end-to-side anastomosis. In contrast, the highest WSS values of the side-to-side anastomosis configuration were found in stenotic vessel segments and not in the close vicinity of the anastomosis. Flow stagnation zones were found in end-to-side but not in side-to-side anastomosis, the latter also demonstrating a smoother stream division throughout the cardiac cycle. Conclusion CFD analysis of venous CABG based on in-vivo CT datasets in patients was feasible producing qualitative and quantitative information on mass flow and WSS. Differences were found between the two types of anastomosis

  6. Three dimensional level set based semiautomatic segmentation of atherosclerotic carotid artery wall volume using 3D ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md. Murad; AlMuhanna, Khalid; Zhao, Limin; Lal, Brajesh K.; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2014-03-01

    3D segmentation of carotid plaque from ultrasound (US) images is challenging due to image artifacts and poor boundary definition. Semiautomatic segmentation algorithms for calculating vessel wall volume (VWV) have been proposed for the common carotid artery (CCA) but they have not been applied on plaques in the internal carotid artery (ICA). In this work, we describe a 3D segmentation algorithm that is robust to shadowing and missing boundaries. Our algorithm uses distance regularized level set method with edge and region based energy to segment the adventitial wall boundary (AWB) and lumen-intima boundary (LIB) of plaques in the CCA, ICA and external carotid artery (ECA). The algorithm is initialized by manually placing points on the boundary of a subset of transverse slices with an interslice distance of 4mm. We propose a novel user defined stopping surface based energy to prevent leaking of evolving surface across poorly defined boundaries. Validation was performed against manual segmentation using 3D US volumes acquired from five asymptomatic patients with carotid stenosis using a linear 4D probe. A pseudo gold-standard boundary was formed from manual segmentation by three observers. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), Hausdor distance (HD) and modified HD (MHD) were used to compare the algorithm results against the pseudo gold-standard on 1205 cross sectional slices of 5 3D US image sets. The algorithm showed good agreement with the pseudo gold standard boundary with mean DSC of 93.3% (AWB) and 89.82% (LIB); mean MHD of 0.34 mm (AWB) and 0.24 mm (LIB); mean HD of 1.27 mm (AWB) and 0.72 mm (LIB). The proposed 3D semiautomatic segmentation is the first step towards full characterization of 3D plaque progression and longitudinal monitoring.

  7. Endotoxemia reduces cerebral perfusion but enhances dynamic cerebrovascular autoregulation at reduced arterial carbon dioxide tension*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, Patrice; Kim, Yu-Sok; van Lieshout, Johannes;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: The administration of endotoxin to healthy humans reduces cerebral blood flow but its influence on dynamic cerebral autoregulation remains unknown. We considered that a reduction in arterial carbon dioxide tension would attenuate cerebral perfusion and improve dynamic cerebral...... in arterial carbon dioxide tension explains the improved dynamic cerebral autoregulation and the reduced cerebral perfusion encountered in healthy subjects during endotoxemia.......-104] mm Hg; p = .75), but increased cardiac output (8.3 [6.1-9.5] L·min vs. 6.0 [4.5-8.2] L·min; p = .02) through an elevation in heart rate (82 ± 9 beats·min vs. 63 ± 10 beats·min; p <.001), whereas arterial carbon dioxide tension (37 ± 5 mm Hg vs. 41 ± 2 mm Hg; p <.05) and middle cerebral artery mean...

  8. Breast arterial calcification and risk of carotid atherosclerosis: Focusing on the preferentially affected layer of the vessel wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedighi, Nahid, E-mail: nsedighi@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radmard, Amir Reza, E-mail: radmard@ams.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radmehr, Ali, E-mail: radmehr@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Pari, E-mail: phtums@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hajizadeh, Abdolmahmoud, E-mail: mroomezi@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taheri, Amir Pejman Hashemi, E-mail: hashemip@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Objective: To assess the relationship between breast arterial calcification (BAC) detected on screening mammography and atherosclerosis of carotid arteries considering the most likely involved layer of the arterial wall. Materials and methods: A total of 537 consecutive women who underwent screening mammography were enrolled in this study. Seventy-nine subjects having BAC, aged 46-75 years, and 125 age-matched controls from those without BAC were selected for ultrasound examination of carotid arteries assessing intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaque presence. Participants were divided into three groups of risk including, low-risk: IMT < 0.6 mm without plaque, medium-risk: 0.6 mm {<=} IMT {<=} 0.8 mm without plaque and high-risk: IMT > 0.8 mm and/or plaque. Risk factors for atherosclerosis were obtained from medical records for independent effects. Results: BAC was present in 14.7% of mammograms. According to multivariable logistic regression analyses, significant association was identified between the carotid atherosclerosis risk and presence of BAC. Compared to women with IMT < 0.6 mm, those with 0.6 mm {<=} IMT{<=} 0.8 mm and IMT > 0.8 mm had OR (95% CI) of 4.88 (1.47-16.16) and 23.36 (4.54-120.14), respectively. The OR (95% CI) for carotid plaque was 3.13 (1.3-7.57). There was no interaction between IMT category and plaque. Significant associations were also detected with postmenopausal duration (P = 0.02) and hypertension (P = 0.004). Conclusion: The risk of carotid atherosclerosis increases with the presence of BAC. Women with BAC are more likely to have thicker IMT than plaque, which could be attributed to the preferentially similar affected layer of media causing thick IMT rather than plaque.

  9. Breast arterial calcification and risk of carotid atherosclerosis: Focusing on the preferentially affected layer of the vessel wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess the relationship between breast arterial calcification (BAC) detected on screening mammography and atherosclerosis of carotid arteries considering the most likely involved layer of the arterial wall. Materials and methods: A total of 537 consecutive women who underwent screening mammography were enrolled in this study. Seventy-nine subjects having BAC, aged 46-75 years, and 125 age-matched controls from those without BAC were selected for ultrasound examination of carotid arteries assessing intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaque presence. Participants were divided into three groups of risk including, low-risk: IMT 0.8 mm and/or plaque. Risk factors for atherosclerosis were obtained from medical records for independent effects. Results: BAC was present in 14.7% of mammograms. According to multivariable logistic regression analyses, significant association was identified between the carotid atherosclerosis risk and presence of BAC. Compared to women with IMT 0.8 mm had OR (95% CI) of 4.88 (1.47-16.16) and 23.36 (4.54-120.14), respectively. The OR (95% CI) for carotid plaque was 3.13 (1.3-7.57). There was no interaction between IMT category and plaque. Significant associations were also detected with postmenopausal duration (P = 0.02) and hypertension (P = 0.004). Conclusion: The risk of carotid atherosclerosis increases with the presence of BAC. Women with BAC are more likely to have thicker IMT than plaque, which could be attributed to the preferentially similar affected layer of media causing thick IMT rather than plaque.

  10. Smooth muscle cell function and organization of the resistance artery wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Güvenç Tuna

    2014-01-01

    Remodeling of the vascular wall occurs in several cardiovascular pathologies. A structural change in diameter necessarily involves reorganization in both cellular and extracellular matrix components. The significance of matrix remodeling in vascular pathologies is well appreciated, while plasticity

  11. Swimming Dynamics Near a Wall in a Weakly Elastic Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, S.; Ardekani, A. M.; Borhan, A.

    2015-10-01

    We present a fully resolved solution of a low-Reynolds-number two-dimensional microswimmer in a weakly elastic fluid near a no-slip surface. The results illustrate that elastic properties of the background fluid dramatically alter the swimming hydrodynamics and, depending on the initial position and orientation of the microswimmer, its residence time near the surface can increase by an order of magnitude. Elasticity of the extracellular polymeric substance secreted by microorganisms can therefore enhance their adhesion rate. The dynamical system is examined through a phase portrait in the swimming orientation and distance from the wall for four types of self-propulsion mechanisms, namely: neutral swimmers, pullers, pushers, and stirrers. The time-reversibility of the phase portraits breaks down in the presence of polymeric materials. The elasticity of the fluid leads to the emergence of a limit cycle for pullers and pushers and the change in type of fixed points from center to unstable foci for a microswimmer adjacent to a no-slip boundary.

  12. Mechanical properties of the aortic arterial wall during 24 hours: a preliminary study in conscious sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous experiences in animals showed a different behavior between the variability of pressure, arterial diameter and elasticity when they were registered for a couple of hours. To better understand arterial mechanics variability, we propose to measure simultaneously aortic pressure and diameter during 24 hours in a sheep. For that purpose, we developed a portable prototype device. It allows continuously recording physiological signals throughout the day and storing them in a solid state memory for later analysis. Pulse wave velocity and Peterson modulus were assessed beat-to-beat as arterial stiffness indexes. We identified 53,762 heart beats during 24 hours that were separated into 2 groups: below or above median mean pressure (71 mmHg). Mean diameter, pulse wave velocity and Peterson modulus increased for higher pressure values (p<0.05) whereas heart rate slowed down (p<0.05). Pressure-diameter loops were successfully recreated all along the experience. This new methodology sets the basis for further experiences involving the estimation of 24 hours arterial mechanics variability.

  13. CORRELATIONS OF DIFFERENT STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ARTERIAL WALL WITH TRADITIONAL CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN HEALTHY PEOPLE OF DIFFERENT AGE. PART 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Strazhesko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Arterial wall status is determined by several characteristics, the main of them are as follows: pulse wave velocity (PWV, carotid arteries intima-media thickness (IMT, the presence of atherosclerotic plaques, endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDVD. When these parameters change, the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD grows. The nature of relationship between these indices in people without CVD clinical signs is understudied, especially in those of older age.Aim. To estimate correlations between different parameters of arterial wall in patients of different age without CVD.Material and methods. A total of 303 people aged 25-91 years without any manifestations of CVD or other chronic diseases and without regular medical treatment were examined. PWV estimation, carotid ultrasound with IMT measurement and atherosclerotic plaques amount calculation and EDVD estimation using reactive hyperemia test were performed. Results. Patients without CVD clinical signs rather often reveal arterial wall lesions already in the younger age group (mean age 40.9±8.7: reduced EDVD – in 26% of the cases, the presence of atherosclerotic plaques – in 22%, increased PWV – in 15%, increased IMT – in 8%. The prevalence of arterial wall alterations in the older age group (mean age 61.19±8.5 increase many-fold. All arterial wall parameters correlate with age. The stronger correlation was revealed between IMT and the amount of atherosclerotic plaques: r=0.46 (р<0.001 in the younger group and r=0.47 (р<0.001 in the older one. We didn’t find any relationship between PWV and EDVD in the younger group and between PWV and the amount of atherosclerotic plaques in the older one. Thickened carotid intima-media increases the risk of arterial stiffness by 2.3 times.Conclusion. Estimation of the state of arterial wall in people of young age without CVD allows detecting individuals who require active CVD prevention. Increased stiffness of arterial wall and the development

  14. Non-Newtonian models for molecular viscosity and wall shear stress in a 3D reconstructed human left coronary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulis, Johannes V; Giannoglou, George D; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S; Seralidou, Kypriani V; Parcharidis, George E; Louridas, George E

    2008-01-01

    The capabilities and limitations of various molecular viscosity models, in the left coronary arterial tree, were analyzed via: molecular viscosity, local and global non-Newtonian importance factors, wall shear stress (WSS) and wall shear stress gradient (WSSG). The vessel geometry was acquired using geometrically correct 3D intravascular ultrasound (3D IVUS). Seven non-Newtonian molecular viscosity models, plus the Newtonian one, were compared. The WSS distribution yielded a consistent LCA pattern for nearly all non-Newtonian models. High molecular viscosity, low WSS and low WSSG values occurred at the outer walls of the major bifurcation in proximal LCA regions. The Newtonian blood flow was found to be a good approximation at mid- and high-strain rates. The non-Newtonian Power Law, Generalized Power Law, Carreau and Casson and Modified Cross blood viscosity models gave comparable molecular viscosity, WSS and WSSG values. The Power Law and Walburn-Schneck models over-estimated the non-Newtonian global importance factor I(G) and under-estimated the area averaged WSS and WSSG values. The non-Newtonian Power Law and the Generalized Power Law blood viscosity models were found to approximate the molecular viscosity and WSS calculations in a more satisfactory way. PMID:17412633

  15. Non-invasive Ultrasonic Measurements of Small Mechanical Alterations in Sub-millimeter Walls of Arteries and Phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, J.; Ramos, A.; Bazan, I.; Negreira, C.; Ramirez, A.; Diez, L.

    The detection of changes in the properties of the walls in blood vessels (e.g. modifications in thickness or elasticity) is a promising way for the early diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases (e.g. atherosclerosis), and some attempts have been made using classic ultrasonic images. However, to obtain a reliable non-invasive estimation of these changes still presents many challenges that must be overcome, in particular, to achieve an accurate estimation of the vessel wall thickness, which usually is associated to strain and elasticity alterations happening before the cardiovascular disease presents clinical symptom; to solve efficiently these aspects is a very difficult task. In this work, the application to vessels of a recent ultrasonic method developed by the authors for estimating wall thicknesses is described. This method (based on high-resolution power spectral density - PSD) and its algorithmic responses were tested on an arterial phantom under physiological conditions of flow and pressure, and some results are compared to those obtained using a direct-time thickness estimation and with the resolutions related to our alternative cross-correlation option shown in previous papers. A higher spatial resolution is obtained, for experimental multi-pulse ultrasonic echoes, with this PSD method in comparison to those based on conventional echography, cross correlation operators or other spectral options.

  16. Optimizing the imaging protocol for vivo coronary artery wall using high-resolution MIRI: An experimental study on porcine and human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To optimize the MR imaging protocol for coronary arterial wall depiction in vitro and characterize the coronary atherosclerotic plaques. MRI examination was prospectively performed in ten porcine hearts in order to optimize the MR imaging protocol. Various surface coils were used for coronary arterial wall imaging with the same parameters. Then, the image parameters were further optimized for high-resolution coronary wall imaging. The signal-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-noise ratio (CNR) of images were measured. Finally, 8 human cadaver hearts with coronary atherosclerotic plaques were prospectively performed with MRI examination using optimized protocol in order to characterize the coronary atherosclerotic plaques. The SNR and CNR of MR image with temporomandibular coil were the highest of various surface coils. High-resolution and high SNR and CNR for ex vivo coronary artery wall depiction can be achieved using temporomandibular coil with 512 x 512 in matrix. Compared with histopathology, the sensitivity and specificity of MRI for identifying advanced plaques were: type IV-V (lipid, necrosis, fibrosis), 94% and 95%; type VI (hemorrhage), 100% and 98%; type VII (calcification), 91% and 100%; and type VIII (fibrosis without lipid core), 100% and 98%, respectively. Temporomandibular coil appears to be dramatically superior to eight-channel head coil and knee coil for ex vivo coronary artery wall imaging, providing higher spatial resolution and improved the SNR. Ex vivo high-resolution MRI has capability to distinguish human coronary atherosclerotic plaque compositions and accurately classify advanced plaques.

  17. Comparison between Carotid Artery Wall Thickness Measured by Multidetector Row Computed Tomography Angiography and Intimae-Media Thickness Measured by Sonography

    OpenAIRE

    Živorad N. Savić; Ivan I. Soldatović; Milan D. Brajović; Aleksandra M. Pavlović; Dušan R. Mladenović; Vesna D. Škodrić-Trifunović

    2011-01-01

    The increased thickness of the carotid wall >1 mm is a significant predictor of coronary and cerebrovascular diseases. The purpose of our study was to assess the agreement between multidetector row computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) in measuring carotid artery wall thickness (CAWT) and color Doppler ultrasound (CD-US) in measuring intimae-media thickness (IMT). Eighty-nine patients (aged 35–81) were prospectively analyzed using a 64-detector MDCTA and a CD-US scanner. Continuous data wer...

  18. Thermal effects on transverse domain wall dynamics in magnetic nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leliaert, J., E-mail: jonathan.leliaert@ugent.be [Department of Electrical Energy, Systems and Automation, Ghent University, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Van de Wiele, B.; Vandermeulen, J.; Coene, A.; Dupré, L. [Department of Electrical Energy, Systems and Automation, Ghent University, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Vansteenkiste, A.; Waeyenberge, B. Van [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Laurson, L. [COMP Centre of Excellence and Helsinki Institute of Physics, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 11100, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland); Durin, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); ISI Foundation, Via Alassio 11/c, 10126 Torino (Italy)

    2015-05-18

    Magnetic domain walls are proposed as data carriers in future spintronic devices, whose reliability depends on a complete understanding of the domain wall motion. Applications based on an accurate positioning of domain walls are inevitably influenced by thermal fluctuations. In this letter, we present a micromagnetic study of the thermal effects on this motion. As spin-polarized currents are the most used driving mechanism for domain walls, we have included this in our analysis. Our results show that at finite temperatures, the domain wall velocity has a drift and diffusion component, which are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values obtained from a generalized 1D model. The drift and diffusion component are independent of each other in perfect nanowires, and the mean square displacement scales linearly with time and temperature.

  19. Reconstruction of three-dimensional coronary arterial dynamics from multi-view angiogram sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Zheng; YU Dao-yin

    2006-01-01

    A method for reconstructing 3-D motion of coronary arteries from single-plane X-ray angiogram sequences on two approximately orthogonal views is proposed.2-D motion is firstly estimated separately along vascular centerlines extracted from angiographic projection pairs.The 3-D displacement vector of each arterial skeleton point at one instant is then reconstructed by calculating the spatial coordinates of its two ends from corresponding projections.3-D configuration and dynamics of arteries are finally characterized.The effectiveness of the algorithm has been demonstrated on vascular phantom images and clinical angiograms and results are encouraging.

  20. Quantifying [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the arterial wall: the effects of dual time-point imaging and partial volume effect correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, Bjoern A. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark); Bashyam, Arjun; Ramachandran, Abhinay; Gholami, Saeid; Houshmand, Sina; Salavati, Ali; Werner, Tom; Alavi, Abass [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    The human arterial wall is smaller than the spatial resolution of current positron emission tomographs. Therefore, partial volume effects should be considered when quantifying arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. We evaluated the impact of a novel method for partial volume effect (PVE) correction with contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) assistance on quantification of arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake at different imaging time-points. Ten subjects were assessed by CECT imaging and dual time-point PET/CT imaging at approximately 60 and 180 min after {sup 18}F-FDG administration. For both time-points, uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG was determined in the aortic wall by calculating the blood pool-corrected maximum standardized uptake value (cSUV{sub MAX}) and cSUV{sub MEAN}. The PVE-corrected SUV{sub MEAN} (pvcSUV{sub MEAN}) was also calculated using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CECT images. Finally, corresponding target-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated. At 60 min, pvcSUV{sub MEAN} was on average 3.1 times greater than cSUV{sub MAX} (P <.0001) and 8.5 times greater than cSUV{sub MEAN} (P <.0001). At 180 min, pvcSUV{sub MEAN} was on average 2.6 times greater than cSUV{sub MAX} (P <.0001) and 6.6 times greater than cSUV{sub MEAN} (P <.0001). This study demonstrated that CECT-assisted PVE correction significantly influences quantification of arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. Therefore, partial volume effects should be considered when quantifying arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake with PET. (orig.)

  1. Quantifying [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the arterial wall: the effects of dual time-point imaging and partial volume effect correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human arterial wall is smaller than the spatial resolution of current positron emission tomographs. Therefore, partial volume effects should be considered when quantifying arterial wall 18F-FDG uptake. We evaluated the impact of a novel method for partial volume effect (PVE) correction with contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) assistance on quantification of arterial wall 18F-FDG uptake at different imaging time-points. Ten subjects were assessed by CECT imaging and dual time-point PET/CT imaging at approximately 60 and 180 min after 18F-FDG administration. For both time-points, uptake of 18F-FDG was determined in the aortic wall by calculating the blood pool-corrected maximum standardized uptake value (cSUVMAX) and cSUVMEAN. The PVE-corrected SUVMEAN (pvcSUVMEAN) was also calculated using 18F-FDG PET/CT and CECT images. Finally, corresponding target-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated. At 60 min, pvcSUVMEAN was on average 3.1 times greater than cSUVMAX (P <.0001) and 8.5 times greater than cSUVMEAN (P <.0001). At 180 min, pvcSUVMEAN was on average 2.6 times greater than cSUVMAX (P <.0001) and 6.6 times greater than cSUVMEAN (P <.0001). This study demonstrated that CECT-assisted PVE correction significantly influences quantification of arterial wall 18F-FDG uptake. Therefore, partial volume effects should be considered when quantifying arterial wall 18F-FDG uptake with PET. (orig.)

  2. Quantitative analysis of left ventricular wall motion at exercise stress in myocardial infarction with single vessel coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wall site involved by myocardial infarction (MI) is one of major factors to determine a cardiac pump function of the patient. Generally, anterior MI has a lower cardiac function at rest than inferior MI. However, the difference in cardiac function during exercise between anterior MI and inferior MI is controversial. To clarify the difference, regional wall motion at infarcted area and noninfarcted area were examined quantitatively by exercise radionuclide ventriculography in 23 patients with MI. MI group consisted of 13 patients with isolated left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) lesion and 10 patients with isolated right coronary artery (RCA) lesion without residual ischemia, and was compared to 12 normal controls (NC) and also to 12 patients with multivessel (MV) lesions. Left ventricular ejection fraction (EF) and regional EF (REF) as parameters of amplitude, and standard deviation (SD) of mean of left ventricular phase angle, regional SD (RSD) as parameters of asynchrony were obtained. At rest, infarcted area showed significant decrease in REF and increase in RSD but non-infarcted area in LAD group showed significant decrease in REF. MI group revealed increase in EF and REF, even at infarcted area significantly during exercise, but LAD group showed less increase in EF than RCA group. MI group had no significant changes in SD and RSD during exercise. MV group had significant increase in SD but no significant changes in EF during exercise. At peak exercise, non-infarcted area in RCA group showed the same degree of increase in REF as the same segments in NC. But non-infarcted area in LAD group showed significantly less increase in REF than the same segments in NC. In conclusion, the difference in response of EF between anterior MI and inferior MI was greatly related with REF at non-infarcted area rather than infarcted area. (author)

  3. Arterialization and anomalous vein wall remodeling in varicose veins is associated with upregulated FoxC2-Dll4 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, Sumi; S Ramegowda, Kalpana; Suresh, Aarcha; Binil Raj, S S; Lakkappa, Ravi Kumar B; Kamalapurkar, Giridhar; Radhakrishnan, N; C Kartha, Chandrasekharan

    2016-04-01

    Varicose veins of lower extremities are a heritable common disorder. Mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis are still vague. Structural failures such as valve weakness and wall dilatation in saphenous vein result in venous retrograde flow in lower extremities of body. Reflux of blood leads to distal high venous pressure resulting in distended veins. In an earlier study, we observed a positive association between c.-512C>T FoxC2 gene polymorphism and upregulated FoxC2 expression in varicose vein specimens. FoxC2 overexpression in vitro in venous endothelial cells resulted in the elevated mRNA expression of arterial endothelial markers such as Delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4) and Hairy/enhancer-of-split related with YRPW motif protein 2 (Hey2). We hypothesized that an altered FoxC2-Dll4 signaling underlies saphenous vein wall remodeling in patients with varicose veins. Saphenous veins specimens were collected from 22 patients with varicose veins and 20 control subjects who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. Tissues were processed for paraffin embedding and sections were immunostained for Dll4, Hey2, EphrinB2, α-SMA, Vimentin, and CD31 antigens and examined under microscope. These observations were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis. An examination of varicose vein tissue specimens by immunohistochemistry indicated an elevated expression of Notch pathway components, such as Dll4, Hey2, and EphrinB2, and smooth muscle markers, which was further confirmed by gene and protein expression analyses. We conclude that the molecular alterations in Dll4-Hey2 signaling are associated with smooth muscle cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia in varicose veins. Our observations substantiate a significant role for altered FoxC2-Dll4 signaling in structural alterations of saphenous veins in patients with varicose veins. PMID:26808710

  4. 18F-fluoroethylcholine uptake in arterial vessel walls and cardiovascular risk factors. Correlation in a PET-CT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorine-labelled choline derivatives were recently suggested as agents for visualizing vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. We therefore aimed to evaluate the association between 18F-fluorethylcholine (FEC) uptake in the wall of large arteries, where calcification was also measured, with the presence of cardiovascular risk factors and occurrence of prior cardiovascular events. Detailed clinical information, including common cardiovascular risk factors, was obtained retrospectively in 60 prostate cancer patients examined with whole-body FEC PET-CT. In each patient, we calculated the mean blood pool-corrected SUV, as well as the mean target-to-background ratio (TBR), in addition to the sum of calcified plaques (CPsum) from six major vessels: ascending and descending aorta, aortic arch, abdominal aorta, and both iliac arteries. As reported previously, the CPsum correlated significantly with cardiovascular risk factors, in contrast to mean SUV or TBR scores, which did not show any significance with the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. There was no correlation between CPsum, mean TBR or SUV, nor was there any significant association of CPsum, mean TBR or SUV with the prior occurrence of cardio- or cerebrovascular events. Contrary to a recent report, we found in our rather large cohort of elderly prostate cancer patients no significant association between FEC uptake in large vessels and atherosclerotic plaque burden, or the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. In line with prior reports on structural changes in vessels, increased calcified atherosclerotic plaque burden was strongly associated with the occurrence of common cardiovascular risk factors. (orig.)

  5. Dynamical lattice QCD thermodynamics with domain wall fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Fleming, G T

    2000-01-01

    We present results from simulations of two flavor QCD thermodynamics at N_t=4 with domain wall fermions. In contrast to other lattice fermion formulations, domain wall fermions preserve the full chiral symmetry of the continuum at finite lattice spacing (up to terms exponentially small in an extra parameter). Just above the phase transition, we find that the axial U(1) symmetry is broken only by a small amount. We discuss an ongoing calculation to determine the order and properties of the phase transition using domain wall fermions, since the global symmetries of the theory are expected to be important here.

  6. Asymmetric driven dynamics of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez-Tejerina, L.; Alejos, Ó.; Martínez, E.; Muñoz, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is studied from both numerical and analytical micromagnetics. The influence of the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction associated to a bi-layer strip arrangement has been considered, giving rise to the formation of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls. Such walls possess under equilibrium conditions an inner magnetization structure defined by a certain orientation angle that make them to be ...

  7. Experimental investigation of the wall shear stress and the vortex dynamics in a circular impinging jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Hassan, Mouhammad; Vetel, Jerome; Garon, Andre [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Department of Mechanical Engineering, LADYF, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Assoum, Hassan Hassan; Sobolik, Vaclav; Abed-Meraim, Kamel; Sakout, Anas [LaSIE, Universite de La Rochelle, La Rochelle (France)

    2012-06-15

    The wall shear stress and the vortex dynamics in a circular impinging jet are investigated experimentally for Re = 1,260 and 2,450. The wall shear stress is obtained at different radial locations from the stagnation point using the polarographic method. The velocity field is given from the time resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) technique in both the free jet region and near the wall in the impinging region. The distribution of the momentum thickness is also inspected from the jet exit toward the impinged wall. It is found that the wall shear stress is correlated with the large-scale vortex passing. Both the primary vortices and the secondary structures strongly affect the variation of the wall shear stress. The maximum mean wall shear stress is obtained just upstream from the secondary vortex generation where the primary structures impinge the wall. Spectral analysis and cross-correlations between the wall shear stress fluctuations show that the vortex passing influences the wall shear stress at different locations simultaneously. Analysis of cross-correlations between temporal fluctuations of the wall shear stress and the transverse vorticity brings out the role of different vortical structures on the wall shear stress distribution for the two Reynolds numbers. (orig.)

  8. Experimental investigation of the wall shear stress and the vortex dynamics in a circular impinging jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hassan, Mouhammad; Assoum, Hassan Hassan; Sobolik, Vaclav; Vétel, Jérôme; Abed-Meraim, Kamel; Garon, André; Sakout, Anas

    2012-06-01

    The wall shear stress and the vortex dynamics in a circular impinging jet are investigated experimentally for Re = 1,260 and 2,450. The wall shear stress is obtained at different radial locations from the stagnation point using the polarographic method. The velocity field is given from the time resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) technique in both the free jet region and near the wall in the impinging region. The distribution of the momentum thickness is also inspected from the jet exit toward the impinged wall. It is found that the wall shear stress is correlated with the large-scale vortex passing. Both the primary vortices and the secondary structures strongly affect the variation of the wall shear stress. The maximum mean wall shear stress is obtained just upstream from the secondary vortex generation where the primary structures impinge the wall. Spectral analysis and cross-correlations between the wall shear stress fluctuations show that the vortex passing influences the wall shear stress at different locations simultaneously. Analysis of cross-correlations between temporal fluctuations of the wall shear stress and the transverse vorticity brings out the role of different vortical structures on the wall shear stress distribution for the two Reynolds numbers.

  9. Effects of External and Internal Hyperthermia on LDL Transport and Accumulation Within an Arterial Wall in the Presence of a Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasiello, Marcello; Vafai, Kambiz; Andreozzi, Assunta; Bianco, Nicola; Tavakkoli, Fatemeh

    2015-07-01

    Effects of hyperthermia on transport of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) through a stenosed arterial wall are analyzed comprehensively in the present work. The realistic and pertinent aspects of an arterial wall is represented by a multi-layer model, with a proper representation of the thickened intima region due to the atherosclerotic plaque formation. Effects of external and internal hyperthermia on LDL concentration levels are established along with the range of influence of these effects. Various modules of the current work are comprehensively compared with pertinent literature and are found to be in excellent agreement. The effects of external and internal hyperthermia as well as the load level and the axial location of the plaque formation on LDL transport and accumulation for a stenosed artery are established in this work. PMID:25520050

  10. Automatic Generation of Individual Finite-Element Models for Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Structure Mechanics Simulations in the Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazer, D.; Schmidt, E.; Unterhinninghofen, R.; Richter, G. M.; Dillmann, R.

    2009-08-01

    Abnormal hemodynamics and biomechanics of blood flow and vessel wall conditions in the arteries may result in severe cardiovascular diseases. Cardiovascular diseases result from complex flow pattern and fatigue of the vessel wall and are prevalent causes leading to high mortality each year. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Structure Mechanics (CSM) and Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) have become efficient tools in modeling the individual hemodynamics and biomechanics as well as their interaction in the human arteries. The computations allow non-invasively simulating patient-specific physical parameters of the blood flow and the vessel wall needed for an efficient minimally invasive treatment. The numerical simulations are based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) and require exact and individual mesh models to be provided. In the present study, we developed a numerical tool to automatically generate complex patient-specific Finite Element (FE) mesh models from image-based geometries of healthy and diseased vessels. The mesh generation is optimized based on the integration of mesh control functions for curvature, boundary layers and mesh distribution inside the computational domain. The needed mesh parameters are acquired from a computational grid analysis which ensures mesh-independent and stable simulations. Further, the generated models include appropriate FE sets necessary for the definition of individual boundary conditions, required to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations governed by the fluid and solid domains. Based on the results, we have performed computational blood flow and vessel wall simulations in patient-specific aortic models providing a physical insight into the pathological vessel parameters. Automatic mesh generation with individual awareness in terms of geometry and conditions is a prerequisite for performing fast, accurate and realistic FEM-based computations of hemodynamics and biomechanics in the

  11. Parameter sensitivity analysis: application to model predictions of transport parameters governing arterial wall uptake of 14C-4 cholesterol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have applied nonlinear (Marquardt) regression techniques to concentration profiles of 14C-4 cholesterol within the arterial wall of excised canine carotids perfused for two hours under various hemodynamic conditions. The resulting estimates of the transport parameters of Peclet number (Pe), effective diffusivity (D), endothelial vesicular Biot number (Be), and endothelial phenomenological rejection coefficient (Re) serve as input to a sensitivity analysis of the inter-dependence of model parameters. Here the best-fit value of each parameter estimate is perturbed by 10% and the resulting change in the predicted concentration profile used to calculate individual parameter sensitivities according to algorithms defined in the text authored by P.M. Frank. Their results indicate that the parameters Be and Re are indistinguishable at all locations within the wall substance (x/L) except the endothelial cell border (x/L=0). A similar finding is true for the parameter pair Pe-D when x/L > 0.4, i.e. beyond the medial-adventitial junction. The implications are that the present mathematical model be modified to exclude an assessment of Be, especially when the anatomic integrity of the endothelial layer is compromised, and that perfusion times be extended to allow advancement of convective and diffusive fronts into the adventitia

  12. Dynamic CT brain scanning in the haemodynamic evaluation of cerebral arterial occlusive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic cerebral CT scanning (DCT) was used to quantitatively analyse the haemodynamic effects of extracranial and intracranial arterial occlusive lesions in 17 patients with TIA's or minor cerebral infarcts. Using DCT and gamma variate curve fitting, mean transit times were determined for the terminal internal carotid arteries, middle cerebral arteries and middle cerebral-supplied Sylvian cortex at the level of the Circle of Willis. Six patients were studied sequentially, four before and after transcranial bypass surgery. No arterial or tissue delays were found in patients without haemodynamic arterial lesions or cortical infarcts. Seven of nine patients with haemodynamic, extracranial carotid lesions showed ipsilateral delays in arterial or tissue transit times. Tissue delays usually correlated with CT or clinical evidence of infarction. Improved haemodynamics in patients re-studied correlated with the effects of surgery or clinical recovery. DCT has several important limitations but has the potential to provide additional haemodynamic information about the cerebral circulation in selected patients with cerebral arterial occlusive disease. (orig.)

  13. Carotid thin fluttering bands: A new element of arterial wall remodelling? An ultrasound study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Luca; Sole, Andrea; Tamburino, Corrado; Di Pino, Luigi

    2015-10-01

    Carotid artery ultrasound is a non-invasive and reproducible technique used for early atherosclerotic assessment. Intimal flap has been described in the presence of dissection or mobile plaque rupture, however presence of carotid thin fluttering bands (TFBs) have not been described yet. To investigate frequency, characteristics and impact of TFBs in carotid lumen of patients who underwent carotid ultrasound scan (CUS). 3341 patients were admitted from January 2009 to January 2014. Patients with history of cerebral ischemia (CI) were excluded. In the cases in which TFBs were observed, a 3-months clinical and CUS follow-up (FU) was performed. TFBs were found in 71 patients (2.1%). The mean age was 63.41 ± 11.20 years (range 42-89). All patients showed a mean increase in intima-media thickness. We identified two subgroups: in 22 patients the TFB was related to a carotid plaque while in 49 no carotid plaque was found. TFB mostly originated in the carotid bulb (88.7%) and was similarly located in carotid arteries (49.3% left-side and 50.7% right-side). CUS and clinical FU were available for all patients (mean duration 25.34 months, median 19). CI occurred in none of the patients. TFB disappeared in 13 patients (18.3%) with no sign or symptoms of CI. In 3 of 49 patients without carotid plaque (6.1%), progressive thickening beneath TFB was observed. TFB is a rare finding. Longer FU is needed to evaluate its prognosis. To date, the pathophysiology is unknown, however it could be related to vascular remodeling. PMID:26179862

  14. Thermal conductivity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes: Molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat conduction in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been investigated by using various methods, while less work has been focused on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The thermal conductivities of the double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with two different temperature control methods are studied by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. One case is that the heat baths (HBs) are imposed only on the outer wall, while the other is that the HBs are imposed on both the two walls. The results show that the ratio of the thermal conductivity of DWCNTs in the first case to that in the second case is inversely proportional to the ratio of the cross-sectional area of the DWCNT to that of its outer wall. In order to interpret the results and explore the heat conduction mechanisms, the inter-wall thermal transport of DWCNTs is simulated. Analyses of the temperature profiles of a DWCNT and its two walls in the two cases and the inter-wall thermal resistance show that in the first case heat is almost transported only along the outer wall, while in the second case a DWCNT behaves like parallel heat transport channels in which heat is transported along each wall independently. This gives a good explanation of our results and presents the heat conduction mechanisms of MWCNTs. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  15. Microemulsions as model fluids for enhanced oil recovery: dynamics adjacent to planar hydrophilic walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frielinghaus, H.; Holderer, O.; Lipfert, F.; Kerscher, M.; Mattauch, S.; Richter, D.

    2012-10-01

    After the dynamics of microemulsions adjacent to a planar hydrophilic wall have been characterized using grazing incidence neutron spin echo spectroscopy, the model of Seifert was employed to explain the discovered acceleration for the surface near lamellar ordered membranes. Reflections of hydrodynamic waves by the wall - or the volume conservation between the membrane and the wall - explain faster relaxations and, therefore, a lubrication effect that is important for flow fields in narrow pores. The whole scenery is now spectated by using different scenarios of a bicontinuous microemulsion exposed to clay particles and of a lamellar microemulsion adjacent to a planar wall. The Seifert concept could successfully be transferred to the new problems.

  16. Stiffness Indices and Fractal Dimension relationship in Arterial Pressure and Diameter Time Series in-Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cymberknop, L.; Legnani, W.; Pessana, F.; Bia, D.; Zócalo, Y.; Armentano, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    The advent of vascular diseases, such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, is associated to significant alterations in the physical properties of arterial vessels. Evaluation of arterial biomechanical behaviour is related to the assessment of three representative indices: arterial compliance, arterial distensibility and arterial stiffness index. Elasticity is the most important mechanical property of the arterial wall, whose natures is strictly non-linear. Intervention of elastin and collagen fibres, passive constituent elements of the arterial wall, is related to the applied wall stress level. Concerning this, appropriate tools are required to analyse the temporal dynamics of the signals involved, in order to characterize the whole phenomenon. Fractal geometry can be mentioned as one of those techniques. The aim of this study consisted on arterial pressure and diameter signals processing, by means of nonlinear techniques based on fractal geometry. Time series morphology was related to different arterial stiffness states, generated by means of blood flow variations, during experiences performed in vitro.

  17. A model of smooth muscle cell synchronization in the arterial wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; Aalkjær, Christian; Nilsson, Holger;

    2007-01-01

    Vasomotion is a rhythmic variation in microvascular diameter. Although known for more than 150 years, the cellular processes underlying the initiation of vasomotion are not fully understood. In the present study a model of a single cell is extended by coupling a number of cells into a tube. The...... membrane potential and flow of current through gap junctions. The amplitude of these oscillations in potential grows with increasing [cGMP], and, past a certain threshold, they become strong enough to entrain all cells in the vascular wall, thereby initiating sustained vasomotion. In this state there is a...... rhythmic flow of calcium through voltage-sensitive calcium channels into the cytoplasm, making the frequency of established vasomotion sensitive to membrane potential. It is concluded that electrical coupling through gap junctions is likely to be responsible for the rapid synchronization across a large...

  18. A model of smooth muscle cell synchronization in the arterial wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian; Aalkjær, Christian; Nilsson, Holger;

    2007-01-01

    Vasomotion is a rhythmic variation in microvascular diameter. Although known for more than 150 years, the cellular processes underlying initiation of vasomotion are not fully understood. In the present study a model of a single cell is extended by coupling a number of cells into a tube. The...... associated with rhythmic variation in membrane potential and flow of current through gap junctions. The amplitude of these oscillations in potential grows with increasing [cGMP], and, past a certain threshold, they become strong enough to entrain all cells in the vascular wall, thereby initiating sustained...... vasomotion. In this state there is a rhythmic flow of calcium through voltage-sensitive calcium channels into the cytoplasm, making the frequency of established vasomotion sensitive to membrane potential. It is concluded that electrical coupling through gap junctions is likely to be responsible for the rapid...

  19. Computational fluid dynamics study of commercially available stents inside an idealised curved coronary artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Winson Xiao; Ooi, Andrew; Hutchins, Nicholas; Poon, Eric; Thondapu, Vikas; Barlis, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Stent placement restores blood flow in diseased coronary arteries and is the standard treatment for obstructive coronary atherosclerosis. Analysis of the hemodynamic characteristics of stented arteries is essential for better understanding of the relationship between key fluid dynamic variables and stent designs. Previous computational studies have been limited to idealised stents in curved arterial segments or more realistic stents in straight segments. In clinical practice, however, it is often necessary to place stents in geometrically complex arterial curvatures. Thus, numerical simulations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are carried out to investigate the effects of curvature on hemodynamics using detailed, commercially available coronary stents. The computational domain is a 3mm curved coronary artery model and simulations are conducted using a physiologically realistic inlet condition. The averaged flow rate is about 80 mL/min, similar to the normal human resting condition. The examination of hemodynamic parameters will assess the performance of several commercially available stents in curved arteries and identify regions that may be at risk for restenosis. It is anticipated that this information will lead to improvements in future stent design and deployment.

  20. The subpetrous carotid wall hematoma. A sign of spontaneous dissection of the internal carotid artery on non-enhanced computed tomography. A retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen-Kondering, U. [Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Neuroradiology; Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Neurology; Huhndorf, M.; Madjidyar, J.; Jansen, O. [Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Neuroradiology

    2015-03-15

    Spontaneous dissection of the internal carotid artery (CAD) is an increasingly recognized cause for stroke especially in young and middle-aged patients. We hypothesized that non-enhanced cranial computed tomography (NECCT) can visualize the subpetrous carotid wall hematoma and thus enable identification of patients with CAD. We retrospectively reviewed patients with confirmed CAD (n=21) and a control group with ischemic symptoms but without CAD (n=42) who received NECCT at admission. Two independent neuroradiologists rated the presence and shape of SPH, density and diameter of the subpetrous internal carotid artery. Additionally, we correlated the shape of the subpetrous carotid wall hematoma with the grade of stenosis on subsequent angiographic imaging. The subpetrous carotid wall hematoma was present in 14 of 21 patients (Cohen's k = 0.67). Mean diameter was 6.95 ± 1.05 mm in dissected vessels and 5.71 ± 1.52 mm in the contralateral vessel (p<0.05). Mean difference in vessel density was 15.05 ± 8.01 HU (p<0.01). Median grade of stenosis was significantly higher in patients with a full moon- shaped (n=11) than crescent-shaped (n=3) subpetrous carotid wall hematoma (21% vs. 80%, p<0.05). Two-thirds of patients with CAD were correctly identified on NECCT. The extracranial carotid artery should be evaluated in patients with symptoms of cerebral ischemia.

  1. Estimation of the bi-dimensional motion of the arterial wall in ultrasound imaging with a combined approach of segmentation and speckle tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Zahnd, Guillaume

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the domain of bio-medical image processing. The aim of our study is to assess in vivo the parameters traducing the mechanical properties of the carotid artery in ultrasound imaging, for early detection of cardiovascular diseases. The analysis of the longitudinal motion of the arterial wall tissues, i.e. in the same direction as the blood flow, represents the principal motivation of this work. The three main contributions proposed in this work are i) the development o...

  2. Randomised comparison of the effects of nicardipine and esmolol on coronary artery wall stress: implications for the risk of plaque rupture

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, M.; Low, C.; Wilkins, G; Stewart, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether the β blocker esmolol reduces coronary artery wall stress more than the short acting dihydropyridine calcium antagonist nicardipine.
DESIGN—Randomised double blind placebo controlled trial.
SETTING—Tertiary cardiology centre.
PATIENTS—Patients with coronary artery disease.
INTERVENTIONS—20 patients were randomised double blind to an infusion of nicardipine (n = 10) or esmolol (n = 10) titrated to reduce systolic blood pressure by 20 mm Hg.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—...

  3. EFFECTS OF PARENT ARTERY SEGMENTATION AND ANEURISMALWALL ELASTICITY ON PATIENT-SPECIFIC HEMODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jia-liang; DING Guang-hong; YANG Xin-jian; LI Hai-yun

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that hemodynamics and wall tension play an important role in the formation,growth and rupture of aneurysms.In the present study,the authors investigated the influence of parent artery segmentation and aneurismal-wall elasticity on patient-specific hemodynamic simulations with two patient-specific eases of cerebral aneurysms.Realistic models of the aneurysms were constructed from 3-D angiography images and blood flow dynamics was studied under physiologically representative waveform of inflow.For each aneurysm three computational models were constructed:Model 1 with more extensive upstream parent artery with the rigid arterial and aneurismal wall,Model 2 with the partial upstream parent artery with the elastic arterial and aneurismal wall,Model 3 with more extensive upstream parent artery with the rigid wall for arterial wall far from the aneurysm and the elastic wall for arterial wall near the aneurysm.The results show that Model 1 could predict complex intra-aneurismal flow patterns and wall shear stress distribution in the aneurysm,but is unable to give aneurismal wall deformation and tension,Model 2 demonstrates aneurismal wall deformation and tension,but fails to properly model inflow pattern contributed by the upstream parent artery,resulting in local misunderstanding Wall Shear Stress (WSS) distribution,Model 3 can overcome limitations of the former two models,and give an overall and accurate analysis on intra-aneurismal flow patterns,wall shear stress distribution,aneurismal-wall deformation and tension.Therefore we suggest that the proper length of extensive upstream parent artery and aneuri-smal-wall elasticity should be considered carefully in establishing computational model to predict the intra-aneurismal hemodynamic and wall tension.

  4. Electric-field-driven dynamics of magnetic domain walls in magnetic nanowires patterned on ferroelectric domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Leliaert, Jonathan; Franke, Kévin J. A.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-03-01

    Strong coupling of magnetic domain walls onto straight ferroelastic boundaries of a ferroelectric layer enables full and reversible electric-field control of magnetic domain wall motion. In this paper, the dynamics of this new driving mechanism is analyzed using micromagnetic simulations. We show that transverse domain walls with a near-180° spin structure are stabilized in magnetic nanowires and that electric fields can move these walls with high velocities. Above a critical velocity, which depends on material parameters, nanowire geometry and the direction of domain wall motion, the magnetic domain walls depin abruptly from the ferroelastic boundaries. Depinning evolves either smoothly or via the emission and annihilation of a vortex or antivortex core (Walker breakdown). In both cases, the magnetic domain wall slows down after depinning in an oscillatory fashion and eventually comes to a halt. The simulations provide design rules for hybrid ferromagnetic-ferroelectric domain-wall-based devices and indicate that material disorder and structural imperfections only influence Walker-breakdown-like depinning at high domain wall velocities.

  5. Feasibility Study of Ex Ovo Chick Chorioallantoic Artery Model for Investigating Pulsatile Variation of Arterial Geometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kweon-Ho Nam

    Full Text Available Despite considerable research efforts on the relationship between arterial geometry and cardiovascular pathology, information is lacking on the pulsatile geometrical variation caused by arterial distensibility and cardiomotility because of the lack of suitable in vivo experimental models and the methodological difficulties in examining the arterial dynamics. We aimed to investigate the feasibility of using a chick embryo system as an experimental model for basic research on the pulsatile variation of arterial geometry. Optical microscope video images of various arterial shapes in chick chorioallantoic circulation were recorded from different locations and different embryo samples. The high optical transparency of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM allowed clear observation of tiny vessels and their movements. Systolic and diastolic changes in arterial geometry were visualized by detecting the wall boundaries from binary images. Several to hundreds of microns of wall displacement variations were recognized during a pulsatile cycle. The spatial maps of the wall motion harmonics and magnitude ratio of harmonic components were obtained by analyzing the temporal brightness variation at each pixel in sequential grayscale images using spectral analysis techniques. The local variations in the spectral characteristics of the arterial wall motion were reflected well in the analysis results. In addition, mapping the phase angle of the fundamental frequency identified the regional variations in the wall motion directivity and phase shift. Regional variations in wall motion phase angle and fundamental-to-second harmonic ratio were remarkable near the bifurcation area. In summary, wall motion in various arterial geometry including straight, curved and bifurcated shapes was well observed in the CAM artery model, and their local and cyclic variations could be characterized by Fourier and wavelet transforms of the acquired video images. The CAM artery model with

  6. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  7. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity and cerebral blood flow and O2 uptake during dynamic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Sperling, B K; Warming, T; Schmidt, J F; Secher, N H; Wildschiødtz, Gordon; Holm, S; Lassen, N A

    1993-01-01

    Results obtained by the 133Xe clearance method with external detectors and by transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) suggest that dynamic exercise causes an increase of global average cerebral blood flow (CBF). These data are contradicted by earlier data obtained during less-well-defined conditions....... To investigate this controversy, we applied the Kety-Schmidt technique to measure the global average levels of CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during rest and dynamic exercise. Simultaneously with the determination of CBF and CMRO2, we used TCD to determine mean maximal flow...... velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA Vmean). For values of CBF and MCA Vmean a correction for an observed small drop in arterial PCO2 was carried out. Baseline values for global CBF and CMRO2 were 50.7 and 3.63 ml.100 g-1.min-1, respectively. The same values were found during dynamic exercise...

  8. Coupled Dzyaloshinskii walls and their current-induced dynamics by the spin Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, Eduardo, E-mail: edumartinez@usal.es [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de los Caídos s/n, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Alejos, Óscar [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electrónica, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo de Belén, 7, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2014-07-14

    The nucleation of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic/heavy-metal bilayers is studied by means of micromagnetic simulations. In the presence of interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, the nucleated walls naturally adopt a homochiral configuration with internal magnetization pointing antiparallely. The interaction between these walls was analyzed and described in terms of a classical dipolar force between the magnetic moments of the walls, which couples their dynamics. Additionally, the current-induced motion of two homochiral walls in the presence of longitudinal fields was also studied by means of a simple one-dimensional model and micromagnetic modeling, considering both one free-defect strip and another one with random edge roughness. It is evidenced that in the presence of pinning due to edge roughness, the in-plane longitudinal field introduces an asymmetry in the current-induced depinning, in agreement with recent experimental results.

  9. Dynamic Insulation Systems: Experimental Analysis on a Parietodynamic Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Serra, Valentina; Fantucci, Stefano; Perino, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows the results of an extensive experimental campaign on a ventilated opaque double skin façade based on hollow clay bricks. The winter thermal performances of the dynamic insulated systems were investigated on two different full scale façade configurations through an experimental campaign in double climatic chamber and guarded heat flow meter apparatus. The laboratory tests on dynamic insulated façade (DIF) in both exhaust and supply configurations show respectively an effective...

  10. Imaging of vascular dynamics within the foot using dynamic diffuse optical tomography to diagnose peripheral arterial disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Hoi, J. W.; Kim, I.; Dayal, R.; Shrikande, G.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is the narrowing of the functional area of the artery generally due to atherosclerosis. It affects between 8-12 million people in the United States and if untreated this can lead to ulceration, gangrene and ultimately amputation. The current diagnostic method for PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The ABI is a ratio of the patient's systolic blood pressure in the foot to that of the brachial artery in the arm, a ratio below 0.9 is indicative of affected vasculature. However, this method is ineffective in patients with calcified arteries (diabetic and end-stage renal failure patients), which falsely elevates the ABI recording resulting in a false negative reading. In this paper we present our results in a pilot study to deduce optical tomography's ability to detect poor blood perfusion in the foot. We performed an IRB approved 30 patient study, where we imaged the feet of the enrolled patients during a five stage dynamic imaging sequence. The patients were split up into three groups: 10 healthy subjects, 10 PAD patients and 10 PAD patients with diabetes and they were imaged while applying a pressure cuff to their thigh. Differences in the magnitude of blood pooling in the foot and rate at which the blood pools in the foot are all indicative of arterial disease.

  11. Charge, junctions and the scaling dynamics of domain wall networks

    CERN Document Server

    Battye, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that superconducting domain walls in a model with U(1) x Z2 symmetry can form long-lived loops called kinky vortons from random initial conditions in the broken field and a uniform charged background in (2+1) dimensions. In this paper we investigate a similar model with a hyper-cubic symmetry coupled to an unbroken U(1) in which the domain walls can form junctions and hence a lattice. We call this model the charge-coupled cubic-anisotropy (CCCA) model. First, we present a detailed parametric study of the U(1) x Z2 model; features which we vary include the nature of the initial conditions and the coupling constants. This allows us to identify interesting parameters to vary in the more complicated, and hence more computationally intensive, CCCA models. In particular we find that the coefficient of the interaction term can be used to engineer three separate regimes: phase mixing, condensation and phase separation with the condensation regime corresponding to a single value of the coupling const...

  12. Effects of dynamic compression on lentiviral transduction in an in vitro airway wall model

    OpenAIRE

    Tomei, A. A.; Choe, M. M.; Swartz, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    Asthmatic patients are more susceptible to viral infection, and we asked whether dynamic strain on the airway wall (such as that associated with bronchoconstriction) would influence the rate of viral infection of the epithelial and subepithelial cells. To address this, we characterized the barrier function of a three-dimensional culture model of the bronchial airway wall mucosa, modified the culture conditions for optimization of ciliogenesis, and compared epithelial and subepithelial green f...

  13. Renal dynamic imaging for the treatment assessment of renal artery angioplasty and stenting in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the value of renal dynamic imaging with 99Tcm-DTPA on the evaluation and prediction of the outcome after percutaneous transluminal renal artery angioplasty and stenting (PTRAS) in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS). Methods: Seventy-six patients with unilateral ARAS underwent PTRAS successfully. All the patients received baseline renal dynamic imaging within 2 weeks before the surgery and follow-up imaging 6 months after PTRAS. GFR (per 1.73 m2 of body surface area) of kidney with ARAS was measured with the Gates method. ARAS was classified as mild (50%-69%),moderate (70%-89%), and severe (≥90%) stenosis according to the results of renoarteriography before the surgery. GFR was graded as Ⅰ (GFR≥30 ml · min-1), Ⅱ (15 ml · min-1 ≤GFR <30 ml · min-1) and Ⅲ (GFR < 15 ml · min-1), on the baseline dynamic imaging.Blood pressure was also measured before and after the surgery. The t test, χ2 test, Fisher exact test and multiple logistic regression analysis were used for statistical analysis with SPSS 13.0. Results: The baseline GFR of kidney with mild and moderate ARAS was significant higher than that with severe stenosis ((26.79 ± 15.34) vs (19.48 ±11.56) ml · min-1, t=2.262, P=0.027). The blood pressure was improved in 32% (24/75), and not changed in 68% (51/75) of patients.Improvement of blood pressure was observed in 39.62% (21/53) of patients with a baseline GFR≥ 15 ml · min-1, and in 13.64% (3/22) of patients with a baseline GFR <15 ml · min-1 (χ2=4.825, P=0.028). Using multivariate analysis, baseline GFR ≥ 15 ml · min-1 was the only predictor of blood pressure improvement (OR=0.465, P=0.032). GFR in kidney with ARAS was improved in 22.37% (17/76), stable in 68.42% (52/76), and worse in 9.21% (7/76) of patients. The 33.33% (8/24) and 17.65% (9/51) of patients with and without blood pressure improvement, respectively, achieved GFR improvement. However, the difference was not statistically

  14. Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Railway Wagon End Wall under the Action of Granular Media

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Wang; Qichang Zhang; Yuebin Yu; Jianxin Han; Dong Li

    2015-01-01

    In wagon end wall system under the action of granular media, the model of the wall is the result of multiple factors. To figure out how the key factors act, the large amplitude vibration together with the contribution from the action of granular media to build the nonlinear dynamics equation of the wagon end wall has been taken into account. In this paper, the effects of varying damping, added mass, and force due to the action of granular media on the patterns of movement and response perform...

  15. Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Railway Wagon End Wall under the Action of Granular Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In wagon end wall system under the action of granular media, the model of the wall is the result of multiple factors. To figure out how the key factors act, the large amplitude vibration together with the contribution from the action of granular media to build the nonlinear dynamics equation of the wagon end wall has been taken into account. In this paper, the effects of varying damping, added mass, and force due to the action of granular media on the patterns of movement and response performance were discussed in detail. Furthermore, the finite element model of end wall-granular media was established. It proves that the theoretical result is correct compared with the FEM results. It indicates that the resonance frequency of the wall declines with the increase of the height of granular media, while the frequency increases with the increase of the particle size of granular media. The nonlinear dynamics of the wall is less affected by the height ratio and particle size of granular media, while it is greatly affected by the height and the thickness of wall, which should be seriously considered in structural design of the wagon.

  16. Plasma levels of the arterial wall protein fibulin-1 are associated with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Esben; Høyem, Pernille; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl;

    2013-01-01

    The arterial system in diabetic patients is characterized by generalized non-atherosclerotic alterations in the vascular extracellular matrix causing increased arterial stiffness compared with subjects without diabetes. The underlying pathophysiology remains elusive. The elastin-associated extrac......The arterial system in diabetic patients is characterized by generalized non-atherosclerotic alterations in the vascular extracellular matrix causing increased arterial stiffness compared with subjects without diabetes. The underlying pathophysiology remains elusive. The elastin...... stiffness. Whether plasma fibulin-1 is associated with arterial stiffness at earlier phases of type 2 diabetes has not been determined....

  17. Combined use of intraoperative indocyanine green and dynamic angiography in rotational vertebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Nauman S; Ambekar, Sudheer; Elhammady, Mohamed Samy; Riley, Jonathan P; Pradilla, Gustavo; Nogueira, Raul G; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2016-08-01

    Rotational vertebral artery occlusion, also known as bow hunter's syndrome, is a well-documented surgically amenable cause of vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Traditionally, patients have been imaged using dynamic rotational angiography. The authors sought to determine whether intraoperative indocyanine green (ICG) angiography could reliably assess the adequacy of surgical decompression of the vertebral artery (VA). The authors report two patients who presented with multiple transient episodes of syncope provoked by turning their head to the right. Rotational dynamic angiography revealed a dominant VA that became occluded with head rotation to the right side. The patients underwent successful surgical decompression of the VA via an anterior cervical approach. Intraoperative ICG angiography demonstrated patency of the VA with head rotation. This was further confirmed by intraoperative dynamic catheter angiography. To our knowledge, we present the first two cases of the use of ICG combined with intraoperative dynamic rotational angiography to document the adequacy of surgical decompression of the VA in a patient with rotational vertebral artery occlusion. Intraoperative ICG angiography is a useful adjunct and may potentially supplant the need for intraoperative catheter angiography. PMID:27041076

  18. Influence on fluid dynamics of coronary artery outlet angle variation in artificial aortic root prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhey Janko F

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because of higher life expectancy, the number of elderly patients today with degenerative aortic diseases is on the increase. Often artificial aortic roots are needed to replace the native tissue. This surgical procedure requires re-implantation of the previous separated coronary arteries into the wall of the prosthesis. Regardless of the prosthesis type, changes in the reinsertion technique, e.g., the variation of the outlet angle of the coronary arteries, could influence the coronary blood flow. Whether the prosthesis type or the outlet angle variation significantly improves the blood circulation and lowers the risk of coronary insufficiency is still an open question. The numerical calculations presented can help to clear up these disputable questions. Methods Two simplified base geometries are used for simulating the blood flow in order to determine velocity and pressure distributions. One model uses a straight cylindrical tube to approximate the aortic root geometry; the other uses a sinus design with pseudosinuses of Valsalva. The coronary outlet angle of the right coronary artery was discretely modified in both models in the range from 60° to 120°. The pressure and velocity distributions of both models are compared in the ascending aorta as well as in the right and the left coronary artery. Results The potentially allowed and anatomic limited variation of the outlet angle influences the pressure only a little bit and shows a very slight relative maximum between 70° and 90°. The sinus design and variations of the outlet angle of the coronary arteries were able to minimally optimize the perfusion pressure and the velocities in the coronary circulation, although the degree of such changes is rather low and would probably not achieve any clinical influence. Conclusion Our results show that surgeons should feel relatively free to vary the outlet angle within the anatomic structural conditions when employing the technique

  19. Dynamic characteristics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under a transverse magnetic field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Li; H J Xie; X Wang

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation into the effect of transverse magnetic fields on dynamic characteristics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Couple dynamic equations of MWNTs subjected to a transverse magnetic field are derived and solved by considering the Lorentz magnetic forces induced by a transverse magnetic field exerted on MWCNTs. Results show that the transverse magnetic field exerted on MWNTs makes the lowest frequency of the MWNTs nonlinearly decrease and the highest frequency, changeless. When the strength of applied transverse magnetic fields is larger than a given value the two walls of MWNTs appear in the radial and axial coaxial vibration phenomena.

  20. PUVB-mediated prevention of luminal narrowing after arterial wall injury: modulation of mechanical arterial properties as a putative mechanism of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perree, Jop; Kerindongo, Raphaela P.; van Leeuwen, Ton G. J. M.

    2001-10-01

    In a previous study we have found that the photodynamic modality PUVB (8-methoxy-Psoralen + UVB) reduces luminal narrowing after arterial endovascular injury. We hypothesized that PUVB may modulate the arterial mechanical properties and tested this hypothesis by measuring the stress as a function of the strain in segments of carotid artery. Furthermore, we have investigated the potential for PUVB-induced cross-linking of extracellular matrix proteins by gel electrophoresis. It was found that both techniques were suitable for testing our hypotheses as evidenced by a statistically significant difference for the positive control. However, no differences between A) control, B) sensitizer only, C) light only and D) PUVB-treated samples could be found with respect to macro- and micro-mechanical properties. Therefore, the hypothesis that PUVB mediates its luminal narrowing reduction effect by directly changing the arterial mechanical properties should be rejected.

  1. Diagnostic accuracy of myocardial deformation indices for detecting high risk coronary artery disease in patients without regional wall motion abnormality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamzadeh, Alireza; Shojaeifard, Maryam; Rezaei, Yousef; Dehghan, Kasra

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prediction of coronary artery disease (CAD) by conventional echocardiographic measurements is principally based on the estimation of ejection fraction and regional wall motion abnormality (RWMA). This study aimed to determine whether strain echocardiography of left ventricle measured by velocity vector imaging (VVI) method could detect patients with a high-risk CAD. Methods: In a prospective study, a total of 119 consecutive patients who were assessed for eligibility were categorized into three groups: (1) without CAD as normal (n=59), (2) 1- or 2-vessel disease as low-risk (n=29), and (3) left main and/or 3-vessel disease as high-risk (n=31). The peaks of systolic strain and strain rate from 18 curves of apical views were averaged as global longitudinal strain and strain rate (GLS and GLSR), respectively; the 6 systolic peaks of strain and strain rate at base- and mid-ventricular of short axis views were averaged as mean radial strain rate (MRSR). Results: GLS, GLSR, and basal MRSR of left ventricle were significantly lower in the high-risk group (P=0.047, P=0.004 and P=0.030, respectively). Receiver operating characteristics curve showed that the optimal values of GLS, GLSR, and basal MRSR for detecting the severe CAD were -17%, -1 s-1, and 1.45 s-1 with the sensitivities of 77%, 71%, and 71% and the specificities of 63%, 67%, and 62%, respectively. Conclusion: Decrements in the GLS, GLSR, and basal MRSR of the left ventricle can detect the high-risk CAD cases among patients without RWMA at rest. PMID:26309603

  2. The Effect of Varied Support Models of BJUT-IIVAD on Coronary Arterial blood flow and wall shear stress: A Primary CFD Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Gao, Bin; Gu, Kaiyun; Chang, Yu; Xu, Jinchao; Deuflhard, Peter

    2014-09-17

    BJUT-II VAD is a novel left ventricular assist devices. Because of the special connection between the pump and native heart, the hemodynamic effects of BJTU-II VAD on coronary artery are still unclear. Hence, numerical simulations have conducted to clarify changes in hemodynamic effects of different support modes. A patient specific left coronary arterial geometric model is reconstructed based on the CT data. And 3 support modes, "constant speed mode", "co-pulse modes" and "counter pulse mode" are used in this study. The wall shear stress (WSS), wall shear stress gradient (WSSG), cycle averaged wall shear stress (avWSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI) and the flow pattern are calculated to evaluate the hemodynamic states of coronary artery. The computational results demonstrate that the hemodynamic states of coronary artery are directly affected by the support modes. The co-pulse modes could achieve the highest blood perfusion (constant speed: 153ml/min vs. co-pulse: 775ml/min vs. counter pulse: 140ml/min) and the highest avWSS (constant speed: 18.1Pa vs. co-pulse: 42.6Pa vs. counter pulse: 22.6Pa). In addition, the WSS and WSSG at the time of peak blood velocity under the constant speed mode are both lower than those under other two support modes. In contrast, the counter pulse mode generates the highest OSI value (constant speed: 0.365 vs. co-pulse: 0.379 vs. counter pulse: 0.426). In brief, BJUT-II VAD under co-pulse mode may have benefits for improving coronary perfusion and preventing the development of atherosclerosis, however, the constant speed mode may have benefit for preventing the development of plaque vulnerability. PMID:25232766

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of hollow thick-walled cylinder collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The generation and evolution of plastic deformation in a hollow single-crystal cylinder under high-rate axisymmetric loading were studied. An advantage of the proposed loading scheme is that all loading modes are applied simultaneously within the chosen crystallographic plane of the cylinder base and different strain degrees are achieved along the specimen cross section. Molecular dynamics simulation was performed to show that the achievement of a certain strain causes the formation of structural defects on the inner surface of the specimen. The obtained results can be used to explain the main plastic deformation mechanisms of crystalline solids

  4. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties. PMID:27487941

  5. Microemulsions as model fluids for enhanced oil recovery: dynamics adjacent to planar hydrophilic walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattauch S.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available After the dynamics of microemulsions adjacent to a planar hydrophilic wall have been characterized using grazing incidence neutron spin echo spectroscopy, the model of Seifert was employed to explain the discovered acceleration for the surface near lamellar ordered membranes. Reflections of hydrodynamic waves by the wall – or the volume conservation between the membrane and the wall – explain faster relaxations and, therefore, a lubrication effect that is important for flow fields in narrow pores. The whole scenery is now spectated by using different scenarios of a bicontinuous microemulsion exposed to clay particles and of a lamellar microemulsion adjacent to a planar wall. The Seifert concept could successfully be transferred to the new problems.

  6. Dynamics of premixed flames in a narrow channel with a step-wise wall temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurdyumov, Vadim N. [Department of Energy, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pizza, Gianmarco [Aerothermochemistry and Combustion Systems Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich CH-8092 (Switzerland); Combustion Research, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen CH-5232 (Switzerland); Frouzakis, Christos E. [Aerothermochemistry and Combustion Systems Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich CH-8092 (Switzerland); Mantzaras, John [Combustion Research, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen CH-5232 (Switzerland)

    2009-11-15

    The effect of channel height, inflow velocity and wall temperature on the dynamics and stability of unity Lewis number premixed flames in channels with specified wall temperature is investigated with steady and transient numerical simulations using a two-dimensional thermo-diffusive model. The simplified model is capable of capturing many of the transitions and the combustion modes observed experimentally and in direct numerical simulations in micro- and meso-scale channels, and indicates that the thermal flame/wall interaction is the mechanism leading to the observed flame instabilities. Finally, an ad-hoc one-dimensional model based on the flame-sheet approximation is tested in its capacity to reproduce some of the flame dynamics of the two-dimensional thermo-diffusive model. (author)

  7. The dynamics simulation of Ne atom injected into single-wall carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamical processes of Ne atom injected into single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) are modeled with molecular dynamics simulations. The threshold energies to encapsulate rare-gas atoms in SWCNT are presented. The range of tube radius for stable oscillation is revealed, which is independent of the type of carbon nanotubes. And the oscillatory frequency is sensitive to the change in the diameter, the length and chirality of the tube

  8. Dynamics and Rheology of Vesicle Suspensions in Wall-Bounded Shear Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Lamura, A.; Gompper, G.

    2013-01-01

    The dynamics and rheology of suspensions of fluid vesicles or red blood cells is investigated by a combination of molecular dynamics and mesoscale hydrodynamics simulations in two dimensions. The vesicle suspension is confined between two no-slip walls, which are driven externally to generate a shear flow with shear rate $\\dot\\gamma$. The flow behavior is studied as a function of $\\dot\\gamma$, the volume fraction of vesicles, and the viscosity contrast between inside and outside fluids. Resul...

  9. Diameter-dependent bending dynamics of single-walled carbon nanotubes in liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Fakhri, Nikta; Tsyboulski, Dmitri A.; Cognet, Laurent; Weisman, R. Bruce; Pasquali, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    By relating nanotechnology to soft condensed matter, understanding the mechanics and dynamics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in fluids is crucial for both fundamental and applied science. Here, we study the Brownian bending dynamics of individual chirality-assigned SWCNTs in water by fluorescence microscopy. The bending stiffness scales as the cube of the nanotube diameter and the shape relaxation times agree with the semiflexible chain model. This suggests that SWCNTs may be the ...

  10. The impact of exercise training on conduit artery wall thickness and remodeling in chronic heart failure patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maiorana, A.J.; Naylor, L.H.; Exterkate, A.; Swart, A.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Lam, K.; O'Driscoll, G.; Green, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Exercise training is an important adjunct to medical therapy in chronic heart failure, but the extent to which exercise impacts on conduit artery remodeling is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of aerobic and resistance exercise training modalities on arterial remodeling in p

  11. Experimental studies of tearing mode and resistive wall mode dynamics in the reversed field pinch configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is relatively straightforward to establish equilibrium in magnetically confined plasmas, but the plasma is frequently susceptible to a variety of instabilities that are driven by the free energy in the magnetic field or in the pressure gradient. These unstable modes exhibit effects that affect the particle, momentum and heat confinement properties of the configuration. Studies of the dynamics of several of the most important modes are the subject of this thesis. The studies are carried out on plasmas in the reversed field pinch (RFP) configuration. One phenomenon commonly observed in RFPs is mode wall locking. The localized nature of these phase- and wall locked structures results in localized power loads on the wall which are detrimental for confinement. A detailed study of the wall locked mode phenomenon is performed based on magnetic measurements from three RFP devices. The two possible mechanisms for wall locking are investigated. Locking as a result of tearing modes interacting with a static field error and locking due to the presence of a non-ideal boundary. The characteristics of the wall locked mode are qualitatively similar in a device with a conducting shell system (TPE-RX) compared to a device with a resistive shell (Extrap T2). A theoretical model is used for evaluating the threshold values for wall locking due to eddy currents in the vacuum vessel in these devices. A good correlation with experiment is observed for the conducting shell device. The possibility of successfully sustaining discharges in a resistive shell RFP is introduced in the recently rebuilt device Extrap T2R. Fast spontaneous mode rotation is observed, resulting in low magnetic fluctuations, low loop voltage and improved confinement. Wall locking is rarely observed. The low tearing mode amplitudes allow for the theoretically predicted internal non-resonant on-axis resistive wall modes to be observed. These modes have not previously been distinguished due to the formation of wall

  12. How fast can the wall move? a study of the electroweak phase transition dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, G D; Moore, Guy D; Prokopec, Tomislav

    1995-01-01

    We consider the dynamics of bubble growth in the Minimal Standard Model at the electroweak phase transition and determine the shape and the velocity of the phase boundary, or bubble wall. We show that in the semiclassical approximation the friction on the wall arises from the deviation of massive particle populations from thermal equilibrium. We treat these with Boltzmann equations in a fluid approximation. This approximation is reasonable for the top quarks and the light species while it may underestimate the friction from the infrared W bosons and Higgs particles. We use the two-loop finite temperature effective potential and find a subsonic bubble wall for the whole range of Higgs masses 0 L T > 22 . The wall is thicker than the phase equilibrium value because out of equilibrium particles exert more friction on the back than on the base of a moving wall. We also consider the effect of an infrared gauge condensate which may exist in the symmetric phase; modelling it simplemindedly, we find that the wall may...

  13. Dynamic elastic modulus of single-walled carbon nanotubes in different thermal environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Letter reports the result of investigation on the effect of loading rate (strain rate) on mechanical properties of armchair and zigzag nanotubes in different thermal environments, based on the molecular structural mechanics model in which the primary bonds between two nearest-neighboring carbon atoms are treaded as dimensional 2-node Euler-Bernoulli beam considering the effect of environmental temperature on force constant values of the bonds stretching, bonds angle bending and torsional resistance. Nanoscale finite element simulations of the dynamic Young's modulus of single-walled carbon nanotubes under different strain rates and environmental temperatures reveal that the dynamic Young's modulus of the single-walled carbon nanotubes increases with the increase of strain rate, and decreases significantly with the increase of environment temperature. It is significant that the dynamic Young's modulus of zigzag nanotubes is more sensitive to strain rate and environmental temperature due to the tube chirality

  14. Universal magnetic domain wall dynamics in the presence of weak disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Jacques; Metaxas, Peter J.; Mougin, Alexandra; Jamet, Jean-Pierre; Gorchon, Jon; Jeudy, Vincent

    2013-10-01

    The motion of elastic interfaces in disordered media is a broad topic relevant to many branches of physics. Field-driven magnetic domain wall motion in ultrathin ferromagnetic Pt/Co/Pt films can be well interpreted within the framework of theories developed to describe elastic interface dynamics in the presence of weak disorder. Indeed, the three theoretically predicted dynamic regimes of creep, depinning, and flow have all been directly evidenced in this model experimental system. We discuss these dynamic regimes and demonstrate how field-driven creep can be controlled not only by temperature and pinning, but also via interactions with magnetic entities located inside or outside the magnetic layer. Consequences of confinement effects in nano-devices are briefly reviewed, as some recent results on domain wall motion driven by an electric current or assisted by an electric field. Finally new theoretical developments and perspectives are discussed.

  15. Femtosecond Dynamics in Single Wall Carbon Nanotube/Poly(3-Hexylthiophene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandrou Ioannis

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractFemtosecond transient absorption measurements on single wall carbon nanotube/poly(3-hexylthiophene composites are used to investigate the relaxation dynamics of this blended material. The influence of the addition of nanotubes in polymer matrix on the ultrashort relaxation dynamics is examined in detail. The introduction of nanotube/polymer heterojunctions enhances the exciton dissociation and quenches the radiative recombination of composites. The relaxation dynamics of these composites are compared with the fullerene derivative-polymer composites with the same matrix. These results provide explanation to the observed photovoltaic performance of two types of composites.

  16. Reduction of ringing artifacts in the arterial phase of gadoxetic acid-enhanced dynamic MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We assessed what MR imaging parameters affected ringing artifacts during the arterial phase of gadoxetic acid-enhanced dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We tested various parameters, including imaging matrices, choice of either sequential or elliptical centric phase-encoding scheme, scanning time, and contrast injection rate using new simulation software on a personal computer and visually evaluated clinical MR images retrospectively using a 4-point scale to assess ringing artifacts. The simulation study revealed that square matrices, short scanning time, slow injection rate, and sequential view ordering effectively reduced ringing artifacts, findings confirmed in clinical practice using gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging. Significantly fewer artifacts resulted using a slow injection rate (P<0.05) and using square matrices in the arterial (P<0.05), portal (P<0.01), and hepatocytic (P<0.05) phases. Choice of square matrix, slower injection rate, shorter scanning time, and sequential view ordering could reduce ringing artifacts. (author)

  17. Neuropsychological dynamics in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus undergone coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ol'ga Aleksandrovna Trubnikova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The study was aimed at evaluation of hospital neuropsychological dynamics in ischemic heart disease patients with comorbid type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM undergone on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.Materials and methods. 14 from a total of 37 examined patients had T2DM. Diabetic patients were found to have lower attention parameters prior to the intervention in comparison to non-diabetic controls. At days 7-10 after the surgery all patients demonstrated deterioration of cognitive functions.Results. We observed deeper deterioration in diabetic patients, regarding attention, memory, sensorimotor speed and quantity of erroneous test responses, as measured against individuals with normal glucose tolerance.Conclusion. Diabetic patients undergone coronary artery bypass surgery show lower cognitive characteristics when compared to controls without T2DM, suggesting this cohort to be a high-risk group for further cognitive decline.

  18. Dynamics and control of resistive wall modes with magnetic feedback control coils: Experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fundamental theory, experimental observations, and modeling of resistive wall mode (RWM) dynamics and active feedback control are reported. In the RWM, the plasma responds to and interacts with external current-carrying conductors. Although this response is complex, it is still possible to construct simple but accurate models for kink dynamics by combining separate determinations for the external currents, using the VALEN code, and for the plasma's inductance matrix, using an MHD code such as DCON. These computations have been performed for wall-stabilized kink modes in the HBT-EP device, and they illustrate a remarkable feature of the theory: when the plasma's inductance matrix is dominated by a single eigenmode and when the surrounding current-carrying structures are properly characterized, then the resonant kink response is represented by a small number of parameters. In HBT-EP, RWM dynamics are studied by programming quasi-static and rapid 'phase-flip' changes of the external magnetic perturbation and directly measuring the plasma response as a function of kink stability and plasma rotation. The response evolves in time, is easily measured, and involves excitation of both the wall-stabilized kink and the RWM. High-speed, active feedback control of the RWM using VALEN-optimized mode control techniques and high-throughput digital processors is also reported. Using newly-installed control coils that directly couple to the plasma surface, experiments demonstrate feedback mode suppression in rapidly rotating plasmas near the ideal wall stability limit. (author)

  19. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Growth from Graphite Layers-a Tight Binding Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuntuan FANG; Min ZHU; Yongshun WANG

    2003-01-01

    The growth of single-wall carbon nanotube from graphite layers is studied by tight binding molecular dynamics simulation. Given temperature of 2500 K or 3500 K and an interval of 0.25 nm for the two layers of graphite, a single-wall carbon nanotube with a zigzag shell will be produced. On the other conditions the carbon nanotube cannot grow or grows with too many defects. All carbon nanotube ends have pentagons which play an important role during the tube ends closing.

  20. Molecular dynamics investigation into the oscillatory behavior of double-walled boron-nitride nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, R.; Ajori, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the oscillatory behavior of double-walled boron-nitride nanotubes is investigated based on the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The MD simulations are performed using the Lennard-Jones and Tersoff-like potential functions. The influences of friction between the walls of inner and outer tubes, flexibility, velocity and outer length-to-inner length ratio on the frequency of oscillations are studied. The results show that the flexibility increases the frequency during the simulation. Furthermore, it is observed that by increasing the initial velocity, the frequency decreases.

  1. Evolución de los modelos constitutivos de respuesta pasiva para paredes arteriales//Evolution of constitutive models for passive response of the arterial walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Fernández‐Collazo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available La respuesta mecánica de las paredes arteriales se modifica como consecuencia del envejecimiento y el desarrollo de enfermedades. Estos cambios se ven reflejados en modificaciones en su estructura, composición, resistencia y forma. La predicción de su comportamiento en dependencia de su estado fisiológico usando modelos biomecánicos se muestra como una potente herramienta en el tratamiento y diagnóstico de aneurismas, ateroesclerosis, hipertensión arterial entre otras. Realizando un profundo análisis de la literatura consultada se presenta un estudio bibliográfico de los modelos constitutivos de paredes arteriales en su respuesta pasiva, clasificándolos y destacando sus principales ventajas, desventajas y la evolución de estos desde los puramente fenomenológicos hasta los más complejos.Palabras claves: modelos, arterias, respuesta pasiva, biomecánica._______________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe mechanical response of arterial walls is modified as a result of aging and disease development. These changes are reflected in changes in its composition, strength, shape and structure. The prediction of their behavior, depending on their physiological state used biomechanical models is shown as a powerful tool in the treatment and diagnosis of aneurysms, atherosclerosis, hypertensionand others. It´s presented in its passive response, a profound analysis of the literature and the bibliographic review of the constitutive models of arterial walls, classifying and highlighting their main advantages, disadvantages and the  volution from purely phenomenological to the most complex response.Key words: models, artery, passive response, biomechanics.

  2. Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Weixing; Zhao Binghui; Conover, David; Liu Jiangkun; Ning Ruola [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Radiology, Shanghai 6th People' s Hospital, 600 Yishan Road, Xuhui, Shanghai (China); Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States) and Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

  3. Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

  4. Differential Associations of Weight Dynamics With Coronary Artery Calcium Versus Common Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness: The CARDIA Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Duk-Hee; Steffes, Michael W.; Gross, Myron; Park, Kyong; Holvoet, Paul; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Lewis, Cora E.; Jacobs, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Change and fluctuation in body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)2) may be associated differently with coronary artery calcification (CAC) than with carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT). The authors analyzed data on 2,243 participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study, initially aged 18–30 years, who were examined every 2–5 years over a 20-year period (1985–2006). BMI at year 0 was associated positively and linearly with CAC at year 20; however...

  5. Dynamic polarization effects in ion channeling through single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Da-Peng; Wang, You-Nian; Wei, Li; Mišković, Z. L.

    2005-08-01

    Ion channeling through a single-wall carbon nanotube is simulated by solving Newton’s equations for ion motion at intermediate energies, under the action of both the surface-atom repulsive forces and the polarization forces due to the dynamic perturbation of the nanotube electrons. The atomic repulsion is described by a continuum potential based on the Thomas-Fermi-Moliere model, whereas the dynamic polarization of the nanotube electrons is described by a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model, giving rise to the transverse dynamic image force and the longitudinal stopping force. In the absence of centrifugal forces, a balance between the image force and the atomic repulsion is found to give rise to ion trajectories which oscillate over peripheral radial regions in the nanotube, provided the ion impact position is not too close to the nanotube wall, the impact angle is sufficiently small, and the incident speed is not too high. Otherwise, the ion is found to oscillate between the nanotube walls, passing over a local maximum of the potential in the center of the nanotube, which results from the image interaction. The full statistical analysis of 103 ion trajectories has been made to further demonstrate the actual effect of dynamic polarization on the ion channeling.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Formaldehyde Adsorption and Diffusion in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pin Lv; Zhenan Tang; Jun Yu; Yanbing Xue

    2006-01-01

    For gas sensor application, adsorption and diffusion of formaldehyde gas in single-wall carbon nanotube were investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation. The conformations of formaldehyde molecule adsorbed in carbon nanotube were optimized according to principle of minimum energy. The axis of conformatiot is parallel to the axis of carbon nanotube and about 0.3 nm~0.4 nm away from carbon nanotube wall. The conformation, which is different from that of the formaldehyde molecule in the gas-phase, rotates around carbon nanotube axis. The adsorption energy and diffusivity of formaldehyde molecule in single-wall carbon nanotube is of-56.2 kJ/mol and of 0.2× 10-4 cm2/s, respectively.

  7. Predicting the elastic properties of double-walled carbon nanotubes by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulation is performed on a double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) to predict its elastic properties based on a double-walled shear deformable shell model. By direct buckling measurement, we present here a method for uniquely determining the effective wall thickness for the shell model. Accounting for two different kinds of DWCNTs by adding an inner or outer tube to a fiducial tube, the mechanical properties of DWCNTs are carefully investigated as compared with those of the fiducial tube. It is found that the predicted values of Young's and shear moduli depend strongly on the construction and helicity of DWCNTs, while the dependence on nanotube length is relatively small. The results also confirm that the temperature variation has a significant effect on the elastic properties of DWCNTs

  8. Relativistic dynamics of domain wall in one-dimensional SQUID array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the dynamics of a domain wall in a one-dimensional array of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) composed of three conventional Josephson junctions and a π-junction. The domain wall is formed between two domains with oppositely circulating current through the SQUID loop. It is shown that the SQUIDs in this array can be approximately described by a double sine-Gordon (DSG) model which obeys Einstein's special theory of relativity. We conduct numerical simulations of a discrete DSG equation and show that the domain wall propagates solitonically through the SQUID array and exhibits quasi-relativistic behavior, such as the Lorentz contraction and the relativistic time dilation, which agrees reasonably well with the predictions from a relativistic equation of motion of a particle, whose rest mass is extremely small compared to that of a single electron.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Thermal Conductivity of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, M.; Srivastava, Deepak; Govindan,T. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have very attractive electronic, mechanical. and thermal properties. Recently, measurements of thermal conductivity in single wall CNT mats showed estimated thermal conductivity magnitudes ranging from 17.5 to 58 W/cm-K at room temperature. which are better than bulk graphite. The cylinderical symmetry of CNT leads to large thermal conductivity along the tube axis, additionally, unlike graphite. CNTs can be made into ropes that can be used as heat conducting pipes for nanoscale applications. The thermal conductivity of several single wall carbon nanotubes has been calculated over temperature range from l00 K to 600 K using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics using Tersoff-Brenner potential for C-C interactions. Thermal conductivity of single wall CNTs shows a peaking behavior as a function of temperature. Dependence of the peak position on the chirality and radius of the tube will be discussed and explained in this presentation.

  10. Carotid artery wall stiffness is increased in patients with small vessel disease: A case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Salihović-Hajdarević Denisa; Pavlović Aleksandra M.; Smajlović Dževdet; Podgorac Ana; Jovanović Zagorka; Švabić-Međedović Tamara; Čovičković-Šternić Nadežda

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Cerebral ischemic small-vessel disease (SVD), causing lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is a progressive disease associated with an increased risk of stroke, dementia and death. Increased arterial stiffness has been associated with ischemic stroke and cerebral SVD independently of common vascular risk factors. Objective. The aim of the study was to analyze arterial stiffness in our pa...

  11. Evaluation of the impact of carotid artery bifurcation angle on hemodynamics by use of computational fluid dynamics: a simulation and volunteer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saho, Tatsunori; Onishi, Hideo

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the hemodynamics of carotid artery bifurcation with various geometries using simulated and volunteer models based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was analyzed by use of OpenFOAM. The velocity distribution, streamline, and wall shear stress (WSS) were evaluated in a simulated model with known bifurcation angles (30°, 40°, 50°, 60°, derived from patients' data) and in three-dimensional (3D) healthy volunteer models. Separated flow was observed at the outer side of the bifurcation, and large bifurcation models represented upstream transfer of the point. Local WSS values at the outer bifurcation [both simulated (100 Pa). The bifurcation angle had a significant negative correlation with the WSS value (p<0.05). The results of this study show that the carotid artery bifurcation angle is related to the WSS value. This suggests that hemodynamic stress can be estimated based on the carotid artery geometry. The construction of a clinical database for estimation of developing atherosclerosis is warranted. PMID:27255300

  12. On the routes to inertial mean dynamics in smooth- and rough-wall turbulent boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klewicki, Joseph; Mehdi, Faraz

    2012-11-01

    Connections between the structure of smooth- and rough-wall turbulent boundary layers are established within the context of the order of magnitude properties exhibited by the terms in the mean momentum equation. These properties are shown to be associated with the processes by which inertial mean dynamics emerge with distance from the wall. A key element is the process by which the vorticity field becomes three-dimensional. In the smooth-wall case, vorticity stretching leads to the three-dimensionalization of the vorticity field in the region where the mean viscous force retains leading order. This underlies the well-established Reynolds number scaling behaviors exhibited by smooth-wall flows. Roughness modifies (generally augments) the process by which the vorticity field becomes three dimensional, rendering scalings for the route to inertial mean dynamics that depend on the relative scale separations between the inner, roughness, and outer scales. Evidence (from existing and recent experiments) of these combined scaling regimes is presented. The present analyses provide a basis for predicting where and physically why Townsend's similarity hypothesis should hold, as well as under what conditions outer similarity loses validity. The support of the ONR (N000140810836, grant monitor Ronald Joslin) is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. High precision Compton backscatter maps of myocardial wall dynamics. Theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, J J; Copenhaver, G L; Herr, M D; Morris, D L; Zelis, R

    1989-09-01

    Compton backscatter imaging (CBI) is a technique that uses x-rays scattered from the closed-chest surface of the heart to obtain high frequency (5 msec) and high precision (+/- 0.1 mm SD) measurements of regional surface displacements and velocities. These measurements are acquired in a three-dimensional format that allows the reconstruction of the epicardial surface and the creation of color coded displacement and velocity maps at many time points during the cardiac cycle. Applications of the technique are shown to characterize detailed regional normal wall displacement and velocity patterns, and the significant alteration of those patterns after coronary embolization. The technique is also applied to the characterization of early diastolic wall dynamics. CBI measurements show that a brief and somewhat paradoxical inward displacement of the anterior ventricular wall occurs during early diastole in normal canines. The wall dynamics associated with this inward displacement suggest a brief collapse of the ventricle subsequent to aortic valve closure. Diastolic collapse velocities and displacements are significantly altered subsequent to coronary occlusion with mean and maximum collapse velocities decreasing by 50% and concomitant inward displacements decreasing by 40%. Data acquisition with CBI is non-invasive, does not require contrast agents or radioisotopes, and uses low irradiation levels (125 kVp, 3-5 ma). The average radiation dose to the heart for a typical study is 250 mrem, significantly lower than that of other radiation based imaging techniques. PMID:2807818

  14. Average arterial input function for quantitative dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of neck nodal metastases

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla-Dave, Amita; Lee, Nancy; Stambuk, Hilda; Wang, YA; Huang, Wei; Howard T Thaler; Patel, Snehal G.; Shah, Jatin P.; Koutcher, Jason A

    2009-01-01

    Background The present study determines the feasibility of generating an average arterial input function (Avg-AIF) from a limited population of patients with neck nodal metastases to be used for pharmacokinetic modeling of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data in clinical trials of larger populations. Methods Twenty patients (mean age 50 years [range 27–77 years]) with neck nodal metastases underwent pretreatment DCE-MRI studies with a temporal resolution of 3.75 to 7.5 sec on a 1.5T c...

  15. Dynamic response of a pair of walls retaining a viscoelastic solid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veletsos, A.S.; Parikh, V.H.; Younan, A.H.; Bandyopadhyay, K.

    1995-01-01

    Making use of a previously reported, simple, approximate method of analysis, a critical evaluation is made of the dynamic pressures and forces induced by horizontal ground shaking on a pair of infinitely long, parallel walls retaining a uniform viscoelastic solid. The walls are presumed to be rigid but elastically constrained against rotation at their base. The effects of both harmonic and earthquake-induced excitations are examined. The accuracy of the method is assessed by comparing its predictions for the special case of fixed-based walls with those obtained by an exact method, and comprehensive numerical data are presented which elucidate the underlying response mechanisms, and the effects and relative importance of the parameters involved. The parameters examined include the characteristics of the ground motion, the ratio of the distance between walls to the height of the contained material, and the flexibility of the rotational wall constraints. In addition to valuable insights into the responses of the systems investigated, the results presented provide a convenient framework for the analysis of more complex systems as well.

  16. Three-dimensional simulation of irregular dynamics of topological solitons in moving magnetic domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zverev, V. V.; Filippov, B. N.

    2016-03-01

    A three-dimensional computer simulation of dynamic processes occurring in a domain wall moving in a soft-magnetic uniaxial film with in-plane anisotropy has been performed based on the micromagnetic approach. It has been shown that the domain wall motion is accompanied by topological transformations of the magnetization distribution, or, more specifically, by "fast" processes associated with the creation and annihilation of vortices, antivortices, and singular (Bloch) points. The method used for visualizing the topological structure of magnetization distributions is based on the numerical determination of topological charges of two types by means of the integration over the contours and surfaces with variable geometry. The obtained data indicate that the choice of the initial configuration predetermines the dynamic scenario of topological transformations.

  17. Polyclonal 111In-IgG, 125I-LDL and 125I-endothelin-1 accumulation in experimental arterial wall injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To test iodine-125 labelled low-density lipoprotein (125I-LDL), polyclonal indium-111 labelled immunoglobulin G(111In-IgG) and iodine-125 labelled endothelin-1 uptake in metabolically active atheromatous plaques after arterial wall injury, we performed balloon de-endothelialization of carotid arteries or abdominal aortas in 24 New Zealand male rabbits which were fed with a normal diet (n=14) or a hypercholesterolaemic diet (n=10) after surgery. Six weeks later the animals were injected with 200 μCi of 125I-LDL and/or with 100 μCi of 111In-IgG or with 9 μCi of 125I-endothelin-1. Forty-eight hours later the animals were sacrificed. Carotid arteries and aortas were removed, counted and fixed for autoradiography and light microscopic examination. Contralateral carotid arteries and thoracic aortas served as controls. Significant 111In-IgG uptake was observed in the injured arteries at autoradiography, with localization mainly in the healing edges, and at well counting. The percentage of the injected dose per gram (%D.inj/g) was 0.0188±0.06 versus 0.0059±0.003 in controls (P111In-IgG uptake between arteries with injury alone and those with active atheroma formation at the site of the injury. Significant 125I-LDL uptake was observed only when lipid deposition was present at light microscopy (%D.inj/g of 0.0024±0.0005 vs 0.0010±0.0003 in controls, P125I-endothelin-1 accumulation was observed in four of five injured aortas both at autoradiography, with diffuse localization, and at well couting (%D.inj/g of 0.0012±0.0004 in the abdominal aortas vs 0.0008±0.0003 in the thoracic aortas). Polyclonal IgG may accumulate in injured arteries without active atheroma formation. Inflammatory reaction at the site of the injury may cause 111In-IgG uptake independently of atheromatous plaque formation. LDL accumulation takes place only with active atheroma formation at the site of the injury. Use of labelled peptides such as endothelin-1 may provide further insight into the

  18. Thermal rectification of a single-wall carbon nanotube: a molecular dynamics study

    OpenAIRE

    Foulaadvand, M. Ebrahim; Saeedi, Azadeh; Yousefi, Farrokh; Khadesadr, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the thermal rectification phenomenon in a single-wall mass graded carbon nanotube by molecular dynamics simulation. Second generation Brenner potential has been used to model the inter atomic carbon interaction. Fixed boundary condition has been taken into account. We compare our findings to a previous study by Alaghemandi et al which has been done with a different potential and boundary condition. The dependence of the rectification factor $R$ on temperature, nanotube di...

  19. Effect of cholesterol lowering on stiffness of aortic and femoral arterial walls in rabbits on a high fat diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Li; XU Wan-hai; XU Jin-zhi; ZHANG Tong; BI Hong-yuan; SHEN Bao-zhong

    2009-01-01

    Background Researches in arterial elasticity have increased over the past few years. We investigated the effects of simvastatin on vascular stiffness in fat fed rabbits by ultrasonography.Methods Thirty rabbits were assigned randomly to 3 groups: normal control group (A), the cholesterol group (B), simvastatin group (C: high fat diet for 4 weeks and high fat diet + simvastatin for further 4 weeks). Stiffness coefficient, pressure strain elastic modulus and velocity of pulse waves in abdominal aorta and femoral artery were measured by ultrasonographic echo tracking at the end of the 4th and the 8th weeks.Results At the end of the 4th week, stiffness coefficient, pressure strain elastic modulus and pulse wave velocity of femoral artery were significantly increased in group B compared with those in group A. Similarly, at the end of the 8th week, the same parameters of abdominal aorta were significantly increased in group B compared with those in group A. In contrast, stiffness coefficient, pressure strain elastic modulus and pulse wave velocity of femoral artery were significantly decreased in group C compared with those in group B, however, there was no significant difference in parameters of abdominal aorta between groups B and C.Conclusion Short term administration of simvastatin can improve the elasticity of femoral artery but not abdominal aorta.

  20. Experimental study of the pathogenesis of moyamoya disease: histological changes in the arterial wall caused by immunological reactions in monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terai Y

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease is a progressive vascular disorder of unknown etiology. Theories of inflammatory and immunologic mechanisms have been proposed as the pathogeneses. We have designed a new method of administering N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP for experimental induction of moyamoya disease using an intravascular interventional technique combined with rod-shaped embolic materials made from lactic acid-glycolic acid copolymer. The embolic materials containing MDP were repeatedly injected into the right internal carotid artery of monkeys in the embolic group. Intravenous injections of MDP solution alone were performed in the intravenous group. Histological examination of the arteries demonstrated reduplication and lamination of the internal elastic laminae, which corresponded with findings of moyamoya disease in both groups. These histological changes occurred not only in the intracranial arteries on the embolization side, but also in the contralateral intracranial and even extracranial arteries. The changes were more prominent in the intravenous group than in the embolic group. We conclude that the systemic humoral factors induced by MDP in this study may be important in the pathogeneses of moyamoya disease. Our observations suggest that moyamoya disease is a systemic vascular disease and has an etiologic factor affecting both intracranial and extracranial arteries

  1. Diameter-dependent bending dynamics of single-walled carbon nanotubes in liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Nikta; Tsyboulski, Dmitri A.; Cognet, Laurent; Weisman, R. Bruce; Pasquali, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    By relating nanotechnology to soft condensed matter, understanding the mechanics and dynamics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in fluids is crucial for both fundamental and applied science. Here, we study the Brownian bending dynamics of individual chirality-assigned SWCNTs in water by fluorescence microscopy. The bending stiffness scales as the cube of the nanotube diameter and the shape relaxation times agree with the semiflexible chain model. This suggests that SWCNTs may be the archetypal semiflexible filaments, highly suited to act as nanoprobes in complex fluids or biological systems. PMID:19706503

  2. Continuous estimates of dynamic cerebral autoregulation: influence of non-invasive arterial blood pressure measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temporal variability of parameters which describe dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA), usually quantified by the short-term relationship between arterial blood pressure (BP) and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV), could result from continuous adjustments in physiological regulatory mechanisms or could be the result of artefacts in methods of measurement, such as the use of non-invasive measurements of BP in the finger. In 27 subjects (61 ± 11 years old) undergoing coronary artery angioplasty, BP was continuously recorded at rest with the Finapres device and in the ascending aorta (Millar catheter, BPAO), together with bilateral transcranial Doppler ultrasound in the middle cerebral artery, surface ECG and transcutaneous CO2. Dynamic CA was expressed by the autoregulation index (ARI), ranging from 0 (absence of CA) to 9 (best CA). Time-varying, continuous estimates of ARI (ARI(t)) were obtained with an autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) model applied to a 60 s sliding data window. No significant differences were observed in the accuracy and precision of ARI(t) between estimates derived from the Finapres and BPAO. Highly significant correlations were obtained between ARI(t) estimates from the right and left middle cerebral artery (MCA) (Finapres r = 0.60 ± 0.20; BPAO r = 0.56 ± 0.22) and also between the ARI(t) estimates from the Finapres and BPAO (right MCA r = 0.70 ± 0.22; left MCA r = 0.74 ± 0.22). Surrogate data showed that ARI(t) was highly sensitive to the presence of noise in the CBFV signal, with both the bias and dispersion of estimates increasing for lower values of ARI(t). This effect could explain the sudden drops of ARI(t) to zero as reported previously. Simulated sudden changes in ARI(t) can be detected by the Finapres, but the bias and variability of estimates also increase for lower values of ARI. In summary, the Finapres does not distort time-varying estimates of dynamic CA obtained with a sliding window combined with an ARMA model, but

  3. Flow Velocities After Carotid Artery Stenting: Impact of Stent Design. A Fluid Dynamics Study in a Carotid Artery Model with Laser Doppler Anemometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. To study the influence of a newly developed membrane stent design on flow patterns in a physiologic carotid artery model. Methods. Three different stents were positioned in silicone models of the carotid artery: a stainless steel stent (Wall-stent), a nitinol stent (SelfX), and a nitinol stent with a semipermeable membrane (MembraX). To increase the contact area of the membrane with the vessel wall, another MembranX model was modified at the outflow tract. The membrane consists of a biocompatible silicone-polyurethane copolymer (Elast-Eon) with a pore size of 100 μm. All stents were deployed across the bifurcation and the external carotid artery origin. Flow velocity measurements were performed with laser Doppler anemometry (LDA), using pulsatile flow conditions (Re = 220; flow 0.39 l/min; flow rate ratio ICA:ECA = 70:30) in hemodynamically relevant cross-sections. The hemodynamic changes were analyzed by comparing velocity fluctuations of corresponding flow profiles. Results. The flow rate ratio ICA:ECA shifted significantly from 70/30 to 73.9/26.1 in the MembraX and remained nearly unchanged in the SelfX and Wallstent. There were no changes in the flow patterns at the inflow proximal to the stents. In the stent no relevant changes were found in the SelfX. In the Wallstent the separation zone shifted from the orifice of the ICA to the distal end of the stent. Four millimeters distal to the SelfX and the Wallstent the flow profile returned to normal. In the MembraX an increase in the central slipstreams was found with creation of a flow separation distal to the stent. With a modification of the membrane this flow separation vanished. In the ECA flow disturbances were seen at the inner wall distal to the stent struts in the SelfX and the Wallstent. With the MembraX a calming of flow could be observed in the ECA with a slight loss of flow volume. Conclusions. Stent placement across the carotid artery bifurcation induces alterations of the physiologic flow

  4. How Can a Radiologist Reveal More Practical Information Using Dynamic Study of Cavernosal Artery After Injection of Vasoactive Agents?

    OpenAIRE

    Bagheri, Seyyed Morteza; Gharib, Mohammad Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Erection is a dynamic multi-stage neurovascular phenomenon consisting of 4 phases. Conventional protocol of color Doppler study can easily overlook these ongoing dynamic events. Objectives: Here, we tried to designate patterns for these dynamic spectral waveform changes of cavernosal arteries in patients with erectile dysfunction and subsequently better describe the extent of their underlying problem. Patients and Methods: We evaluated 59 men who were referred for post-intracavern...

  5. Micro-CT image-derived metrics quantify arterial wall distensibility reduction in a rat model of pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roger H.; Karau, Kelly L.; Molthen, Robert C.; Haworth, Steven T.; Dawson, Christopher A.

    2000-04-01

    We developed methods to quantify arterial structural and mechanical properties in excised rat lungs and applied them to investigate the distensibility decrease accompanying chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Lungs of control and hypertensive (three weeks 11% O2) animals were excised and a contrast agent introduced before micro-CT imaging with a special purpose scanner. For each lung, four 3D image data sets were obtained, each at a different intra-arterial contrast agent pressure. Vessel segment diameters and lengths were measured at all levels in the arterial tree hierarchy, and these data used to generate features sensitive to distensibility changes. Results indicate that measurements obtained from 3D micro-CT images can be used to quantify vessel biomechanical properties in this rat model of pulmonary hypertension and that distensibility is reduced by exposure to chronic hypoxia. Mechanical properties can be assessed in a localized fashion and quantified in a spatially-resolved way or as a single parameter describing the tree as a whole. Micro-CT is a nondestructive way to rapidly assess structural and mechanical properties of arteries in small animal organs maintained in a physiological state. Quantitative features measured by this method may provide valuable insights into the mechanisms causing the elevated pressures in pulmonary hypertension of differing etiologies and should become increasingly valuable tools in the study of complex phenotypes in small-animal models of important diseases such as hypertension.

  6. Dissipative Particle Dynamics Simulation of Polymer- and Cell-Wall Depletion in Micro-Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Caswell, Bruce; Em Karniadakis, George

    2008-07-01

    A rising interest in physics of biological systems stimulates a great number of experiments and numerical simulations involving a variety of biological entities. These include bio-polymers and bio-molecules, real organism vesicles and capsules, artificial vesicles used in drug delivery and cells. Macromolecules, vesicles and cells are subject to wall depletion layers observed near solid-fluid interfaces. In the case of red blood cells depletion is often called the cell-free layer and is observed near blood vessel walls. We employ Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) to model depletion layers in biological systems. In case of bio-polymers the simulated depletion layers compare well with the asymptotic lattice theory solution of depletion near a repulsive wall. Vesicles and cells are modeled as coarse-grained cell membranes described by in-plane viscoelastic energy, bending energy, area and volume constraints. We investigate cell-wall depletion for cells having vesicle-like shape and red blood cells, and we correlate our results with membrane coarse-graining and with material properties such as membrane stretching and bending stiffness.

  7. Soft Walls in Dynamic AdS/QCD and the Techni-dilaton

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Nick; Scott, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic AdS/QCD is a modification of AdS/QCD that includes the running of the anomalous dimension of the q-bar q quark bilinear and in which the generation of the constituent quark mass plays the role of an IR wall. The model allows one to move away smoothly from the controlled spectrum of the N=2 super Yang-Mills theory of the D3/probe-D7 system to more QCD-like theories with chiral symmetry breaking. We investigate soft wall behaviour in the model that gives Regge trajectories with M_{n,s}^2 ~ n,s. To achieve these behaviours requires the quark's constituent mass to fall peculiarly sharply in the IR so that meson physics is sensitive to RG scales well below the quark's on-shell mass. Including soft wall behaviour in models of walking gauge dynamics breaks the near conformal symmetry which is present above the quark on-shell mass which can generate a large mass for the techni-dilaton like state. We conclude that the meson spectrum is rather sensitive to the IR decoupling.

  8. Is prophylactic embolization of the hepatic falciform artery needed before radioembolization in patients with {sup 99m}Tc-MAA accumulation in the anterior abdominal wall?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Sabet, Amir; Muckle, Marianne; Haslerud, Torjan; Biersack, Hans Juergen; Ezziddin, Samer [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Moehlenbruch, Markus; Meyer, Carsten; Wilhelm, Kai; Schild, Hans Heinz [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    While influx of chemoembolic agents into the hepatic falciform artery (HFA) from the hepatic artery can cause supraumbilical skin rash, epigastric pain and even skin necrosis, the significance of a patent HFA in patients undergoing radioembolization is not completely clear. Furthermore, the presence of tracer in the anterior abdominal wall seen in {sup 99m}Tc-macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) images, which is generally performed prior to radioembolization, has been described as a sign of a patent HFA. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the incidence and consequences of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA accumulation in the anterior abdominal wall, indicating a patent HFA, in patients undergoing radioembolization of liver tumours. A total of 224 diagnostic hepatic angiograms combined with {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT were acquired in 192 patients with different types of cancer, of whom 142 were treated with a total of 214 radioembolization procedures. All patients received a whole-body scan, and planar and SPECT/CT scans of the abdomen. Only patients with extrahepatic {sup 99m}Tc-MAA accumulation in the anterior abdominal wall were included in this study. Posttreatment bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT and follow-up results for at least 3 months served as reference standards. Tracer accumulation in the anterior abdominal wall was present in pretreatment {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT images of 18 patients (9.3%). The HFA was found and embolized by radiologists before treatment in one patient. In the remaining patients radioembolization was performed without any modification in the treatment plan despite the previously mentioned extrahepatic accumulation. Only one patient experienced abdominal muscle pain above the navel, which started 24 h after treatment and lasted for 48 h without any skin changes. The remaining patients did not experience any relevant side effects during the follow-up period. Side effects after radioembolization in patients with tracer accumulation in the

  9. Effect of the hydroaffinity and topology of pore walls on the structure and dynamics of confined water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrach, Michael F., E-mail: harrach@fkp.tu-darmstadt.de; Klameth, Felix; Drossel, Barbara; Vogel, Michael, E-mail: michael.vogel@physik.tu-darmstadt.de [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Hochschulstr. 6, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-01-21

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to observe the structure and dynamics of SPC/E water in amorphous silica pores and amorphous ice pores with radii slightly larger than 10 Å. In addition to atomically rough pores, we construct completely smooth pores such that the potential felt at a given distance from the pore wall is an averaged atomic potential. As compared to rough walls, smooth walls induce stronger distortions of water structure for both silica and ice confinements. On the other hand, unlike the smooth pores, the rough pores strongly slow down water dynamics at the pore wall. The slowdown vanishes when reducing the atomic charges in the wall, i.e., when varying the hydroaffinity, while keeping the surface topology, indicating that it is not a geometric effect. Rather, it is due to the fact that the wall atoms provide a static energy landscape along the surface, e.g., fixed anchor-points for hydrogen bonds, to which the water molecules need to adapt, blocking channels for structural rearrangement. In the smooth pores, water dynamics can be faster than in the bulk liquid not only at the pore wall but also in the pore center. Changes in the tetrahedral order rather than in the local density are identified as the main cause for this change of the dynamical behavior in the center of smooth pores.

  10. On the Dynamic Behavior of a Liquid Droplet Impacting upon a Wall Having Obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boseon Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effects of a step edge and a stationary droplet on the dynamic behavior of a droplet impacting upon a wall are experimentally studied. The main parameters were the distance from the step edge to the center of the impacting droplet and the center-to-center distance between the stationary and impacting droplets. Photographic images showed the coalescence dynamics, shape evolution and contact line movement of the impacting droplet. The spread length is presented for the step edge and two coalescing droplets. The droplets exhibited much different dynamic behavior depending on the location of the step edge. The momentum of the impacting droplet was better transferred to the stationary droplet as the center-to-center distance between the two droplets was reduced, resulting in more spreading of the coalescing droplet.

  11. Ultimate seismic loading test on RC shear wall by applying multi-axes dynamic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current seismic design of nuclear power plant (NPP) buildings in Japan, seismic design loads in the two orthogonal, horizontal directions are obtained independently by seismic response analyses, whereas actual seismic forces jolt the buildings in three directions simultaneously. Therefore, it is important to grasp the seismic response characteristics of an NPP building for three-dimensional earthquake excitation up to the ultimate state of the building to evaluate the seismic margin properly. Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has therefore been conducting a project entitled 'Model Tests of Multi-Axis Loading on RC Shear Walls' since 1994 to clarify the effects of multi-directional forces on the ultimate strength of reinforced concrete (RC) seismic shear walls under multi-directional seismic loading conditions. The paper introduces outlines of the whole project and currently on-going dynamic loading test. (author)

  12. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS (CFD) SIMULATIONS OF DRAG REDUCTION WITH PERIODIC MICRO-STRUCTURED WALL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHOU Ming; WU Bo; YE Xia; CAI Lan

    2008-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics(CFD) simulations are adopted to investigate rectangular microchannel flows with various periodic micro-structured wall by introducing velocity slip boundary condition at low Reynolds number. The purpose of the current study is to numerically find out the effects of periodic micro-structured wall on the flow resistance in rectangular microchannel with the different spacings between microridges ranging from 15 to 60 μm. The simulative results indicate that pressure drop with different spacing between microridges increases linearly with flow velocity and decreases monotonically with slip velocity; Pressure drop reduction also increases with the spacing between microridges at the same condition of slip velocity and flow velocity. The results of numerical simulation are compared with theoretical predictions and experimental results in the literatures. It is found that there is qualitative agreement between them.

  13. Titanium coverage on a single-wall carbon nanotube: molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The minimum energy structures of Ti covered (8,0) single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) have been investigated theoretically. Using available experimental data and the results of density functional theory calculations, we first parametrized a reliable empirical many-body potential energy function (PEF) for the CTi binary system. The PEF used in the calculations includes two- and three-body atomic interactions. Then performing molecular dynamics simulations at 1 and 300 K, we obtained the minimum-energy configurations for Ti covered (8,0)-SWNT. The configurations reported here include low and high coverage of Ti on nanotubes. We have found that one layer of Ti did not distort the nanotube significantly, whereas two-layer coverage showed an interesting feature: the second layer of Ti pushed the first layer inside the wall of nanotube, but the general shape of the nanotube was not affected so much

  14. Spatio-temporal patterns in ultra-slow domain wall creep dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrero, Ezequiel E; Giamarchi, Thierry; Kolton, Alejandro B; Rosso, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    In presence of impurities, ferromagnetic and ferroelectric domain walls slide only above a finite external field. Close to this depinning threshold, the wall proceeds by large and abrupt jumps, called avalanches, while, at much smaller field, it creeps by thermal activation. In this work we develop a novel numerical technique that captures the ultra-slow creep regime over huge time scales. We point out the existence of activated events that involve collective reorganizations similar to avalanches, but, at variance with them, display correlated spatio-temporal patterns that resemble the complex sequence of aftershocks observed after a large earthquake. Remarkably, we show that events assembly in independent clusters owning the same scale-free statistics as critical depinning avalanches. This correlated dynamics should be experimentally accessible by magneto-optical imaging of ferro- magnetic films.

  15. Low field domain wall dynamics in artificial spin-ice basis structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, J. [School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Goolaup, S.; Lim, G. J.; Kerk, I. S.; Lew, W. S., E-mail: wensiang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Chang, C. H., E-mail: echchang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Roy, K. [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Artificial magnetic spin-ice nanostructures provide an ideal platform for the observation of magnetic monopoles. The formation of a magnetic monopole is governed by the motion of a magnetic charge carrier via the propagation of domain walls (DWs) in a lattice. To date, most experiments have been on the static visualization of DW propagation in the lattice. In this paper, we report on the low field dynamics of DW in a unit spin-ice structure measured by magnetoresistance changes. Our results show that reversible DW propagation can be initiated within the spin-ice basis. The initial magnetization configuration of the unit structure strongly influences the direction of DW motion in the branches. Single or multiple domain wall nucleation can be induced in the respective branches of the unit spin ice by the direction of the applied field.

  16. Low field domain wall dynamics in artificial spin-ice basis structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificial magnetic spin-ice nanostructures provide an ideal platform for the observation of magnetic monopoles. The formation of a magnetic monopole is governed by the motion of a magnetic charge carrier via the propagation of domain walls (DWs) in a lattice. To date, most experiments have been on the static visualization of DW propagation in the lattice. In this paper, we report on the low field dynamics of DW in a unit spin-ice structure measured by magnetoresistance changes. Our results show that reversible DW propagation can be initiated within the spin-ice basis. The initial magnetization configuration of the unit structure strongly influences the direction of DW motion in the branches. Single or multiple domain wall nucleation can be induced in the respective branches of the unit spin ice by the direction of the applied field

  17. Cell wall dynamics modulate acetic acid-induced apoptotic cell death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Rego

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid triggers apoptotic cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, similar to mammalian apoptosis. To uncover novel regulators of this process, we analyzed whether impairing MAPK signaling affected acetic acid-induced apoptosis and found the mating-pheromone response and, especially, the cell wall integrity pathways were the major mediators, especially the latter, which we characterized further. Screening downstream effectors of this pathway, namely targets of the transcription factor Rlm1p, highlighted decreased cell wall remodeling as particularly important for acetic acid resistance. Modulation of cell surface dynamics therefore emerges as a powerful strategy to increase acetic acid resistance, with potential application in industrial fermentations using yeast, and in biomedicine to exploit the higher sensitivity of colorectal carcinoma cells to apoptosis induced by acetate produced by intestinal propionibacteria.

  18. Estimation of Carotid Artery Pulse Wave Velocity by Doppler Ultrasonography

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi Maerefat; Manijhe Mokhtari Dizaji; Saeed Rahgozar

    2009-01-01

    Background: Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is widely used for estimating the stiffness of an artery. Various invasive and non-invasive methods have been developed to determine PWV over the years. In the present research, the non-invasive estimation of the PWV of large arteries was used as an index for arterial stiffness. Methods: A dynamic model based on the Navier-Stokes equations coupled to elasticity equations was introduced for the PWV in arteries with elastic walls. This system of equations w...

  19. The prevalence of Chlamydia pneumoniae in the aortic wall and in peripheral blood of patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczaj, A; Stryjewski, P J; Fudal, M; Domal-Kwiatkowska, D; Ryfiński, B; Sliupkas-Dyrda, E; Smolik, S; Węglarz, L; Mazurek, U; Nowalany-Kozielska, E

    2016-01-01

    Some reports confirm a potential role of Chlamydia pneumoniae (ChP) in atherogenesis. In order to explore possible association between ChP and atherosclerosis, investigations were carried out in which the frequency of ChP in the arterial wall and peripheral blood was assessed in a group of patients with chronic coronary artery disease (CAD). Fifty-seven patients were enrolled in the study, 13 women and 44 men aged 61.8±6.5 (47-74), with previously diagnosed CAD, scheduled for planned coronary artery bypass grafting due to clinical indications. Vessel specimens retrieved from the ascending aorta (as a part of routine proximal venous graft development procedure) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from venous blood were evaluated for the presence of ChP DNA. Genomic DNA was extracted from PBMCs and vessel specimens. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to detect ChP DNA. A statistically more frequent occurrence of ChP was observed in aortic tissues compared to blood samples (70.2% vs 56.1%, respectively). Similarly, the number of ChP DNA genomic copies [n/1μg genomic DNA] was significantly higher in tissue specimens compared to blood samples (89±91 vs 41±77, respectively; p=0.0046). In patients without ChP in blood specimens, we observed significantly higher amounts of ChP in tissue specimens compared to patients with ChP in blood specimens (156±71 vs 107±88, respectively; p=0.0453). No correlation was found between the number of ChP DNA copies [n/1μg genomic DNA] in blood and in aortic specimens. The infection of ChP in the aortic wall was connected with hypercholesterolemia (p=0.029) and diabetes (p=0.03). We conclude that Chlamydia pneumoniae is a pathogen frequently occurring in the aortic wall of patients with CAD. The occurrence of ChP DNA in the aortic tissue is related to classic CAD risk factors such as diabetes and dyslipidemia. PMID:27358129

  20. Plaque development, vessel curvature, and wall shear stress in coronary arteries assessed by X-ray angiography and intravascular ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Wahle, Andreas; Lopez, John J.; Olszewski, Mark E.; Vigmostad, Sarah C.; Chandran, Krishnan B.; Rossen, James D.; Sonka, Milan

    2006-01-01

    The relationships among vascular geometry, hemodynamics, and plaque development in the coronary arteries are complex and not yet well understood. This paper reports a methodology for the quantitative analysis of in vivo coronary morphology and hemodynamics, with particular emphasis placed on the critical issues of image segmentation and the automated classification of disease severity. We were motivated by the observation that plaque more often developed at the inner curvature of a vessel, pr...

  1. Anisotropic diffusion of concentrated hard-sphere colloids near a hard wall studied by evanescent wave dynamic light scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Michailidou, V. N.; Swan, J. W.; Brady, J. F.; Petekidis, G.

    2013-01-01

    Evanescent wave dynamic light scattering and Stokesian dynamics simulations were employed to study the dynamics of hard-sphere colloidal particles near a hard wall in concentrated suspensions. The evanescent wave averaged short-time diffusion coefficients were determined from experimental correlation functions over a range of scattering wave vectors and penetration depths. Stokesian dynamics simulations performed for similar conditions allow a direct comparison of both the short-time self- an...

  2. Study of the influence of simultaneous variation of magnetic material microstructural features on domain wall dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) is a phenomenon sensitive to several kinds of magnetic material microstructure changes, as well as to variations in material plastic deformation and stress. This fact stimulates the development of MBN-based non-destructive testing (NDT) techniques for analyzing magnetic materials, being the proposition of such a method, the main objective of the present study. The behavior of the MBN signal envelope, under simultaneous variations of carbon content and plastic deformation, is explained by the domain wall dynamics. Additionally, a non-destructive parameter for the characterization of each of these factors is proposed and validated through the experimental results.

  3. The Environmental Effect on the Dynamical Behaviors of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube in Water

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Yan; Weizhong Li; Wenquan Wang

    2014-01-01

    The paper investigates the dynamical behaviors of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) in water, focusing on the effect of external environment (i.e., water) on SWCNT. The SWCNT-water system comprises three constituent parts, that is, the SWCNT, the absorbed layer of water molecules, and the water flow around the water layer. The SWCNT and the absorbed layer of water are modeled as two-layer thin shells coupled via the interlayer vdW interaction, and the water surrounding the absorbed water ...

  4. A New Boundary Model for Simulating Complex and Flexible Wall Bounded Domain in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Mokhtarian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive area of applications, simulation of complex wall bounded problems or any deformable boundary is still a challenge in a Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation. This limitation is rooted in the soft force nature of DPD and the fact that we need to use an antipenetration model for escaped particles. In the present paper, we propose a new model of antipenetration which preserves the conservation of linear momentum on the boundaries and enables us to simulate complex and flexible boundaries. Finally by performing numerical simulations, we demonstrate the validity of our new model.

  5. IFE thick liquid wall chamber dynamics: Governing mechanisms andmodeling and experimental capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffray, A.R.; Meier, W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.; Bonazza, R.; Calderoni, P.; Debonnel, C.S.; Dragojlovic, Z.; El-Guebaly, L.; Haynes,D.; Latkowski, J.; Olson, C.; Peterson, P.F.; Reyes, S.; Sharpe, P.; Tillack, M.S.; Zaghloul, M.

    2005-01-24

    For thick liquid wall concepts, it is important to understand the different mechanisms affecting the chamber dynamics and the state of the chamber prior to each shot a compared with requirements from the driver and target. These include ablation mechanisms, vapor transport and control, possible aerosol formation, as well as protective jet behavior. This paper was motivated by a town meeting on this subject which helped identify the major issues, assess the latest results, review the capabilities of existing modeling and experimental facilities with respect to addressing remaining issues, and helping guide future analysis and R&D efforts; the paper covers these exact points.

  6. Numerical simulation on dynamic response of the chest wall loaded by the blast wave

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Jianyi; Yu, Chunxiang; Li, Huimin; Chen, Jing; Liu, Hai

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional finite element model of the human thorax was constructed using Mimics software and Icem CFD software. This model was loaded with a 100-kPa blast wave and constructed to analyze the dynamic response of the chest wall. The simulation results have shown that a blast wave can cause stress concentration on the ribs and ribs inward movement. The third, fourth, and fifth ribs have the maximum inward moving velocity of 1.6 m / s without any injury for the human body...

  7. Dynamic Mechanism of Single-Stranded DNA Encapsulated into Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yan-Fei; Yang, Chuan-Lu; Mo, Yong-Fang; Wang, Mei-Shan; Ma, Xiao-Guang

    2014-02-01

    Hybrids of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and biological molecules have been utilized for numerous applications in sensing, imaging, and drug delivery. By molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate the encapsulation of single-strand DNA (ssDNA) containing eight adenine bases with (17,17)-(12,12) SWCNTs. The effects of the diameter and length of SWCNTs on the encapsulation process are explored with the calculated curves of the center-of-mass distance, the van der Waals interaction between the ssDNA and SWCNT, the root-mean-square deviation of the ssDNA, and the radius of gyration of the ssDNA. The free energy of the encapsulated ssDNA for each SWCNT is also obtained via steered molecular dynamics simulation. The most suitable SWCNT for encapsulating the ssDNA is also suggested.

  8. The Plant Cell Wall: A Complex and Dynamic Structure As Revealed by the Responses of Genes under Stress Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Kelly; Tucker, Matthew R.; Chowdhury, Jamil; Shirley, Neil; Little, Alan

    2016-01-01

    The plant cell wall has a diversity of functions. It provides a structural framework to support plant growth and acts as the first line of defense when the plant encounters pathogens. The cell wall must also retain some flexibility, such that when subjected to developmental, biotic, or abiotic stimuli it can be rapidly remodeled in response. Genes encoding enzymes capable of synthesizing or hydrolyzing components of the plant cell wall show differential expression when subjected to different stresses, suggesting they may facilitate stress tolerance through changes in cell wall composition. In this review we summarize recent genetic and transcriptomic data from the literature supporting a role for specific cell wall-related genes in stress responses, in both dicot and monocot systems. These studies highlight that the molecular signatures of cell wall modification are often complex and dynamic, with multiple genes appearing to respond to a given stimulus. Despite this, comparisons between publically available datasets indicate that in many instances cell wall-related genes respond similarly to different pathogens and abiotic stresses, even across the monocot-dicot boundary. We propose that the emerging picture of cell wall remodeling during stress is one that utilizes a common toolkit of cell wall-related genes, multiple modifications to cell wall structure, and a defined set of stress-responsive transcription factors that regulate them. PMID:27559336

  9. Comparison between Carotid Artery Wall Thickness Measured by Multidetector Row Computed Tomography Angiography and Intimae-Media Thickness Measured by Sonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živorad N. Savić

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased thickness of the carotid wall >1 mm is a significant predictor of coronary and cerebrovascular diseases. The purpose of our study was to assess the agreement between multidetector row computed tomography angiography (MDCTA in measuring carotid artery wall thickness (CAWT and color Doppler ultrasound (CD-US in measuring intimae-media thickness (IMT. Eighty-nine patients (aged 35–81 were prospectively analyzed using a 64-detector MDCTA and a CD-US scanner. Continuous data were described as the mean value ± standard deviation, and were compared using the Mann–Whitney U test. A p value <0.05 was considered significant. Bland–Altman statistics were employed to measure the agreement between MDCTA and CD-US. CAWT ranged from 0.62 to 1.60 mm, with a mean value of 1.09 mm. IMT ranged from 0.60 to 1.55 mm, with a mean value of 1.06 mm. We observed an excellent agreement between CD-US and MDCTA in the evaluation of the common carotid artery thickness, with a bias between methods of 0.029 mm (which is a highly statistically important difference of absolute values [t = 43.289; p < 0.01] obtained by paired T test, and limits of agreement from 0.04 to 0.104. Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.9997 (95% CI 0.9996–0.9998; p < 0.01. We conclude that there is an excellent correlation between CAWT and IMT measurements obtained with the MDCTA and CD-US.

  10. Reversible wall motion abnormality on adenosine stress/rest thallium-201 gated myocardial SPECT is an independent predictor of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As early as 10 minutes after adenosine stress, immediate post-stress wall motion (ipsWM) can be evaluated on adenosine stress/rest TI-201 gated SPECT (gSPECT). To widen application of TI-201 in gated SPECT, we investigated image quality, LV parameters (EF, EDV, and ESV) reproducibility, and diagnostic competency of gSPECT regarding ipsWM evaluation Myocardial perfusion and wall motion were evaluated by 5-point scoring system in 20-segment model. Image quality was assessed using weighted Kappa (Kw) for inter-and intra-observer agreements of wall motion scores (n=49). Reproducibility was examined through repeated acquisition (n=31). Diagnostic competency was evaluated versus coronary angiography (CAG) and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify significant predictors of coronary artery disease (CAD) among stress abnormal perfusion (SSSp), stress abnormal wall motion (SSSwm), and reversible abnormal wall motion (SDSwm) (n=60). Kw for ipsWM was significantly better than that for rest regarding inter- (0.717 vs 0.489) and intra-observer agreements (0.792 vs 0.688) (p<0.05). 2SD for ipsWM was smaller than that for rest at EF (8.6% vs 10.7%) and ESV (6.0ml vs 8.4ml). Sensitivities of SSSp, SSSwm, and SDSwm were 63.3% (19/30), 63.3% (19/30), and 43.3% (13/30) and specificities 83.3% (25/30), 83.3% (25/30), and 86.7% (26/30), respectively. By multivariate analysis, SSSp (p=0.013) and SDSwm (p=0.039) remained significant predictors. Additionally, SSSwm or SDSwm could find undetected CAD in 54.5% (6/11) of patients with normal perfusion. TI-201 can be successfully applied to gated SPECT for ipsWM evaluation. Moreover, reversible wall motion abnormality on gSPECT is an independent predictor of significant CAD

  11. A dynamic wall model for Large-Eddy simulations of wind turbine dedicated airfoils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work aims at modelling the flow behavior past a wind turbine dedicated airfoil at high Reynolds number and large angle of attack (AoA). The DU-93-W-210 airfoil has been selected. To do this, Large Eddy Simulations (LES) have been performed. Momentum equations have been solved with a parallel unstructured symmetry preserving formulation while the wall-adapting local-eddy viscosity model within a variational multi-scale framework (VMS- WALE) is used as the subgrid-scales model. Since LES calculations are still very expensive at high Reynolds Number, specially at the near-wall region, a dynamic wall model has been implemented in order to overcome this limitation. The model has been validated with a very unresolved Channel Flow case at Reτ = 2000. Afterwards, the model is also tested with the Ahmed Car case, that from the flow physics point of view is more similar to an stalled airfoil than the Channel Flow is, including flow features as boundary layer detachment and recirculations. This case has been selected because experimental results of mean velocity profiles are available. Finally, a flow around a DU-93-W-210 airfoil is computed at Re = 3 x 106 and with an AoA of 15°. Numerical results are presented in comparison with Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) or experimental data for all cases

  12. Dynamic CT imaging of intrahepatic arterial blood flow in patients with chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using dynamic CT, the parenchymal hemodynamics of the livers was studied in patients with chronic liver disease. Dynamic CT was performed on 34 patients: 8 cases of chronic inactive hepatitis (CIH), 15 cases of chronic active hepatitis (CAH) and 11 cases of liver cirrhosis (LC). After rapid intravenous administration of contrast medium (61.2% iopamidol, 20 ml), 25 consecutive scans of the liver and spleen were performed and imaged on a single slice. The single scan time was one sec. Then, the following program was performed: 15 scans at 2 sec intervals, 7 scans at 15 sec intervals and 3 scans at 20 sec intervals. The fit curve for a single pass of the medium was obtained from the analysis of time-density curves in the right and left lobes of the liver and the spleen using a gamma variate function and the least square method. Three parameters were measured on the fit curve: the peak time (PT) was defined as the time to peak enhancement, the total volume component (TVC) was defined as the area beneath the curve between the rise point and the PT point for each lobe of the liver, and the arterial flow volume component (AVC) was defined as the area beneath the curve between the rise point and the PT point of the spleen. AVC in the right liver lobe did not significantly differ between groups, but significantly differed in the manner of CIH< CAH< LC (p<0.05) in the left lobe of the liver. The ratio of intrahepatic arterial blood flow to total hepatic blood flow (AVC/TVC) did not significantly differ between groups in the right lobe. In the left liver lobe, however, AVC/TVC significantly differed in the manner of CIH≤CAH< LC (p<0.01), and was significantly higher in LC patients than in CIH or CAH patients. These results suggest that the ratio of intrahepatic arterial blood flow in the left liver lobe increases as chronic liver disease progresses. (author)

  13. Dynamic Behavior of Nanocomposites Reinforced with Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yu Lai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT on the structural dynamic behavior of MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposites was investigated. Two different types of MWCNTs, pristine MWCNT and functionalized MWCNT, were used in this study. Carboxylic acid-functionalized MWCNTs (MWCNT-COOH were obtained by oxidation pristine MWCNTs via sonication in sulfuric-nitric acid and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Dynamic behaviors of the MWCNT reinforced nanocomposite including the natural frequency and damping ratio were determined using free vibration test. Experimental results showed that the damping ratio of the nanocomposite decreases with the increase of the MWCNT addition, while the natural frequency is increasing with the increase of the MWCNT addition. Functionalized MWCNTs improved the interfacial bonding between the nanotubes and epoxy resin resulting in the reduction of the interfacial energy dissipation ability and enhancement of the stiffness.

  14. Radius dependence of the melting temperature of single-walled carbon nanotubes: molecular-dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the radius dependence of the melting temperature of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by classical molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations using the environment-dependent interatomic potential (EDIP) proposed by Marks. Here we define the 'melting temperature' as a temperature at which there occurs a thermal instability of SWCNTs. We have carried out molecular-dynamics simulations at several temperatures for carbon nanotubes with various radii and estimated the 'melting temperature' based on the temperature dependence of the radial distribution functions, mean-square displacements and atomic configurations. It is shown that the 'melting temperature' of SWCNTs decreases with decreasing radius. The origin of this radius dependence of the melting temperature of SWCNTs is discussed in relation to the stability of SWCNTs energetically based on the strain energy of carbon nanotubes

  15. Molecular dynamics simulation of thermal conductivity of single-wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulation method, the thermal conductivity of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dependent on tube length and temperature is investigated. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations are also carried out as comparison at 1000 K. Through extrapolation to an infinite system size, the data from the NEMD method are in the same order of the simulated results calculated from the EMD model. The effects of isotopic atom and vacancy on the thermal conductivity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are also investigated from EMD simulation results. It is demonstrated that the vacancy scattering on phonons is stronger than the isotopic atom doing at the same concentration, which causes more reduction on lattice thermal conductivity of CNTs

  16. Transport dynamics of superparamagnetic microbeads trapped by mobile magnetic domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, E.; Beach, G. S. D.

    2013-05-01

    The dynamics of fluid-borne superparamagnetic bead transport by field-driven domain walls (DWs) in submicrometer ferromagnetic tracks is studied experimentally together with numerical and analytical modeling. A combination of micromagnetic modeling and numerical calculation is used to determine the strength of bead-DW interaction for a range of track geometries and bead sizes. The maximum DW velocity for continuous bead transport is predicted from these results and shown to be supported by experimental measurements. Enhancement of the maximum velocity by appropriate material selection or field application is demonstrated, and an analysis of the source of statistical variation is presented. Finally, the dynamics of bead-DW interaction and bead transport above the maximum DW velocity for continuous DW-mediated bead transport is characterized.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF CALCULATING MODEL APPLICABLE FOR CYLINDER WALL DYNAMIC HEAT TRANSFER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Minjun; SHI Tielin

    2007-01-01

    In the calculation of submarine air conditioning load of the early stage, the obtained heat is regarded as cooling load. The confusion of the two words causing the cooling load figured out is abnormally high, and the change of air conditioning cooling load can not be indicated. In accordance with submarine structure and heat transfer characteristics of its inner components, Laplace transformation to heat conduction differential equation of cylinder wall is carried out. The dynamic calculation of submarine conditioning load based on this model is also conducted, and the results of calculation are compared with those of static cooling load calculation. It is concluded that the dynamic cooling load calculation methods can illustrate the change of submarine air conditioning cooling load more accurate than the static one.

  18. Monitoring of gadolinium-BOPTA uptake into the vessel wall during magnetic resonance (MR)-guided angioplasty of the peripheral arteries with a paclitaxel/gadolinium-BOPTA-coated balloon. An experimental study at 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The success of paclitaxel distribution within the vessel wall during paclitaxel-coated balloon angioplasty to prevent restenosis cannot be monitored under X-ray guidance. The aim of this pilot study was to demonstrate the feasibility of monitoring Gadolinium-BOPTA delivery within the vessel wall during magnetic resonance (MR)-guided paclitaxel/Gadolinium-BOPTA-coated balloon angioplasty of the peripheral arteries. Materials and methods: 6 pigs (47 ± 2 kg) were investigated. All experiments were performed using a 3 Tesla MR scanner. MR-guided bilaterial angioplasty of the iliac arteries was performed using a paclitaxel/MR contrast agent-coated balloon catheter. The feasibility of monitoring the delivery of Gadolinium-BOPTA to the vessel was assessed in 4 animals. In two additional animals, bilateral stenosis was surgically induced in the iliac arteries. Delivery of paclitaxel to the vessel wall was monitored using a 3 D T1-weighted gradient echo (GE) sequence for delineation of the vessel wall. Normalized signal intensity (SI) of the vessel wall was measured before and repeatedly after the intervention for 45 min. in all animals. Results: Paclitaxel/gadolinium-BOPTA-coated balloon angioplasty was successfully accomplished in all iliac arteries (n = 12). In animals with stenosis MR-angiography demonstrated successful dilatation (n = 4). The normalized SI of the vessel wall on T1-weighted GE images significantly increased after the intervention in all animals with and without stenosis for more than 45 min. (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Monitoring of Gadolinium-BOPTA into the vessel wall during MR-guided coated balloon angioplasty is feasible. This is a first step towards providing a tool for the online control of homogenous drug delivery after paclitaxel-coated balloon angioplasty. (orig.)

  19. Monitoring of gadolinium-BOPTA uptake into the vessel wall during magnetic resonance (MR)-guided angioplasty of the peripheral arteries with a paclitaxel/gadolinium-BOPTA-coated balloon. An experimental study at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neizel, M.; Kelm, M. [University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology, Pneumology and Angiology; Ruebben, A.; Weiss, N. [Aachen Resonance, Aachen (Germany); Guenther, R.W. [University Hospital Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Krombach, G.A. [University Hospital Giessen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: The success of paclitaxel distribution within the vessel wall during paclitaxel-coated balloon angioplasty to prevent restenosis cannot be monitored under X-ray guidance. The aim of this pilot study was to demonstrate the feasibility of monitoring Gadolinium-BOPTA delivery within the vessel wall during magnetic resonance (MR)-guided paclitaxel/Gadolinium-BOPTA-coated balloon angioplasty of the peripheral arteries. Materials and methods: 6 pigs (47 ± 2 kg) were investigated. All experiments were performed using a 3 Tesla MR scanner. MR-guided bilaterial angioplasty of the iliac arteries was performed using a paclitaxel/MR contrast agent-coated balloon catheter. The feasibility of monitoring the delivery of Gadolinium-BOPTA to the vessel was assessed in 4 animals. In two additional animals, bilateral stenosis was surgically induced in the iliac arteries. Delivery of paclitaxel to the vessel wall was monitored using a 3 D T1-weighted gradient echo (GE) sequence for delineation of the vessel wall. Normalized signal intensity (SI) of the vessel wall was measured before and repeatedly after the intervention for 45 min. in all animals. Results: Paclitaxel/gadolinium-BOPTA-coated balloon angioplasty was successfully accomplished in all iliac arteries (n = 12). In animals with stenosis MR-angiography demonstrated successful dilatation (n = 4). The normalized SI of the vessel wall on T1-weighted GE images significantly increased after the intervention in all animals with and without stenosis for more than 45 min. (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Monitoring of Gadolinium-BOPTA into the vessel wall during MR-guided coated balloon angioplasty is feasible. This is a first step towards providing a tool for the online control of homogenous drug delivery after paclitaxel-coated balloon angioplasty. (orig.)

  20. Dynamic stiffness matrix of thin-walled composite I-beam with symmetric and arbitrary laminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Il; Shin, Dong Ku; Park, Young-Suk

    2008-11-01

    For the spatially coupled free vibration analysis of thin-walled composite I-beam with symmetric and arbitrary laminations, the exact dynamic stiffness matrix based on the solution of the simultaneous ordinary differential equations is presented. For this, a general theory for the vibration analysis of composite beam with arbitrary lamination including the restrained warping torsion is developed by introducing Vlasov's assumption. Next, the equations of motion and force-displacement relationships are derived from the energy principle and the first order of transformed simultaneous differential equations are constructed by using the displacement state vector consisting of 14 displacement parameters. Then explicit expressions for displacement parameters are derived and the exact dynamic stiffness matrix is determined using force-displacement relationships. In addition, the finite-element (FE) procedure based on Hermitian interpolation polynomials is developed. To verify the validity and the accuracy of this study, the numerical solutions are presented and compared with analytical solutions, the results from available references and the FE analysis using the thin-walled Hermitian beam elements. Particular emphasis is given in showing the phenomenon of vibrational mode change, the effects of increase of the modulus and the bending-twisting coupling stiffness for beams with various boundary conditions.

  1. Dynamic Response of High Rise Structures Under The Influence of Shear Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Khasim Mutwalli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the procedure for seismic performance estimation of high-rise buildings based on a concept of the capacity spectrum method. In 3D analytical model of thirty storied buildings have been generated for symmetric buildings Models and analyzed using structural analysis tool ETABS. The analytical model of the building includes all important components that influence the mass, strength, stiffness and deformability of the structure. To study the effect of concrete core wall & shear wall at different positions during earthquake, seismic analysis using both linear static, linear dynamic and non-linear static procedure has been performed. The deflections at each storey level has been compared by performing Equivalent static, response spectrum method as well as pushover method has also been performed to determine capacity, demand and performance level of the considered building models. From the below studies it has been observed that non-linear pushover analysis provide good estimate of global as well as local inelastic deformation demands and also reveals design weakness that may remain hidden in an elastic analysis and also the performance level of the structure. Storey drifts are found within the limit as specified by code (IS: 1893-2002 in Equivalent static, linear dynamic & non-linear static analysis.

  2. Modelos constitutivos para paredes arteriales, descripción del movimiento y estado de deformación//Constitutive models for arterial walls, description of movement and state of deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Otero‐Martínez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Las paredes arteriales son uno de los tejidos blandos encontrados en los seres vivos. Tienen como características ser no lineales, incompresibles y anisotrópicos. En los últimos años se han desarrollado un conjunto de modelos constitutivos que consideran un material hiperelástico. Algunos de estos modelos consideran isotropía del material pero han demostrado no ser adecuados paramodelar el comportamiento de arterias sanas. Los modelos más difundidos en este sentido consideran el material anisotrópico debido a la organización de las fibras de colágeno y a pesar de haber sido formulados para describir la conducta arterial pueden ser utilizados para representar el comportamiento de otros tejidos blandos como la vena cava infra-renal, la pared intestinal, las propiedades mecánicas del esófago, entre otros. Algunos autores incluso los han utilizado para modelar también el daño en las arterias.Palabras claves: modelo constitutivo, tejido arterial, elasticidad, pared aortica, análisis de tensiones, respuesta pasiva._________________________________________________________________________________AbstractArterial walls are one of the soft tissues found in living organism. They are non lineal, incompressible and anisotropic. A set of constitutive models have been developed considering a hyperelastic material. Some of these models consider material isotropy but they have proved to be inadequate for modeling healthy arterial behavior. Mostly used models consider the anisotropic material due to the collagens fibers and nevertheless they have been created to describe arterial behavior can be also used for modeling different soft tissue behavior as infrarenal vena cava, intestine wall, mechanical properties of the esophagus, among others. General author have used them for modeling arterial damage.Key words: constitutive modelling, arterial tissue, elasticity, aortic wall, stress análisis, passive response.

  3. Probing nuclear dynamics and architecture using single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon; Li, Junang; Fakhri, Nikta

    Chromatin is a multiscale dynamic architecture that acts as a template for many biochemical processes such as transcription and DNA replication. Recent developments such as Hi-C technology enable an identification of chromatin interactions across an entire genome. However, a single cell dynamic view of chromatin organization is far from understood. We discuss a new live cell imaging technique to probe the dynamics of the nucleus at a single cell level using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNTs are non-perturbing rigid rods (diameter of 1 nm and length of roughly 100 nm) that fluoresce in the near infrared region. Due to their high aspect ratio, they can diffuse in tight spaces and report on the architecture and dynamics of the nucleoplasm. We develop 3D imaging and tracking of SWNTs in the volume of the nucleus using double helix point spread function microscopy (DH-PSF) and discuss the capabilities of the DH-PSF for inferring the 3D orientation of nanotubes based on vectorial diffraction theory.

  4. Assesment of perfusion in glial tumors with arterial spin labeling; comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebeci, H, E-mail: hcebeci16@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical School, Bursa (Turkey); Aydin, O [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical School, Bursa (Turkey); Ozturk-Isik, E; Gumus, C [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yeditepe University, Istanbul (Turkey); Inecikli, F [Department of Radiology, Kanuni Sultan Suleyman Educational and Research Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Bekar, A; Kocaeli, H [Department of Neurosurgery, Uludag University Medical School, Bursa (Turkey); Hakyemez, B [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical School, Bursa (Turkey)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We compared the perfusion parameters obtained with both DSC and ASL perfusion imaging methods. • In ASL perfusion imaging, we also created quantitative CBF maps. • All patients included in the study had histopathological diagnose. • All MR examinations are done with 3T MR imaging system. - Abstract: Purpose: Arterial spin labeling perfusion imaging (ASL-PI) is a non-invasive perfusion imaging method that can be used for evaluation and quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Aim of our study was to evaluating the efficiency of ASL in histopathological grade estimation of glial tumors and comparing findings with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion imaging (DSC-PI) method. Methods: This study involved 33 patients (20 high-grade and 13 low-grade gliomas). Multiphase multislice pulsed ASL MRI sequence and a first-passage gadopentetate dimeglumine T2*-weighted gradient-echo single-shot echo-planar sequence were acquired for all the patients. For each patient, perfusion relative signal intensity (rSI), CBF and relative CBF (rCBF) on ASL-PI and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) values on DSC-PI were determined. The relative signal intensity of each tumor was determined as the maximal SI within the tumor divided by SI within symetric region in the contralateral hemisphere on ASL-PI. rCBV and rCBF were calculated by deconvolution of an arterial input function. Relative values of the lesions were obtained by dividing the values to the normal appearing symmetric region on the contralateral hemisphere. For statistical analysis, Mann–Whitney ranksum test was carried out. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the relationship between the rCBF-ASL, rSI-ASL, rCBV and rCBF ratios and grade of gliomas. Their cut-off values permitting best discrimination was calculated. The correlation between rCBV, rCBF, rSI-ASL and rCBF-ASL and glioma grade was assessed using

  5. Assesment of perfusion in glial tumors with arterial spin labeling; comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We compared the perfusion parameters obtained with both DSC and ASL perfusion imaging methods. • In ASL perfusion imaging, we also created quantitative CBF maps. • All patients included in the study had histopathological diagnose. • All MR examinations are done with 3T MR imaging system. - Abstract: Purpose: Arterial spin labeling perfusion imaging (ASL-PI) is a non-invasive perfusion imaging method that can be used for evaluation and quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Aim of our study was to evaluating the efficiency of ASL in histopathological grade estimation of glial tumors and comparing findings with dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion imaging (DSC-PI) method. Methods: This study involved 33 patients (20 high-grade and 13 low-grade gliomas). Multiphase multislice pulsed ASL MRI sequence and a first-passage gadopentetate dimeglumine T2*-weighted gradient-echo single-shot echo-planar sequence were acquired for all the patients. For each patient, perfusion relative signal intensity (rSI), CBF and relative CBF (rCBF) on ASL-PI and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) values on DSC-PI were determined. The relative signal intensity of each tumor was determined as the maximal SI within the tumor divided by SI within symetric region in the contralateral hemisphere on ASL-PI. rCBV and rCBF were calculated by deconvolution of an arterial input function. Relative values of the lesions were obtained by dividing the values to the normal appearing symmetric region on the contralateral hemisphere. For statistical analysis, Mann–Whitney ranksum test was carried out. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was performed to assess the relationship between the rCBF-ASL, rSI-ASL, rCBV and rCBF ratios and grade of gliomas. Their cut-off values permitting best discrimination was calculated. The correlation between rCBV, rCBF, rSI-ASL and rCBF-ASL and glioma grade was assessed using

  6. Influence of atomic vacancies on the dynamic characteristics of nanoresonators based on double walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ajay M.; Joshi, Anand Y.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic analysis of double walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with different boundary conditions has been performed using atomistic finite element method. The double walled carbon nanotube is modeled considering it as a space frame structure similar to a three dimensional beam. The elastic properties of beam element are calculated by considering mechanical characteristics of covalent bonds between the carbon atoms in the hexagonal lattice. Spring elements are used to describe the interlayer interactions between the inner and outer tubes caused due to the van der Waals forces. The mass of each beam element is assumed as point mass at nodes coinciding with carbon atoms at inner and outer wall of DWCNT. It has been reported that atomic vacancies are formed during the manufacturing process in DWCNT which tend to migrate leading to a change in the mechanical characteristics of the same. Simulations have been carried out to visualize the behavior of such defective DWCNTs subjected to different boundary conditions and when used as mass sensing devices. The variation of such atomic vacancies in outer wall of Zigzag and Armchair DWCNT is performed along the length and the change in response is noted. Moreover, as CNTs have been used as mass sensors extensively, the present approach is focused to explore the use of zigzag and armchair DWCNT as sensing device with a mono-atomic vacancy in it. The results clearly state that the dynamic characteristics are greatly influenced by defects like vacancies in it. A higher frequency shift is observed when the vacancy is located away from the fixed end for both Armchair as well as zigzag type of CNTs. A higher frequency shift is reported for armchair CNT for a mass of 10-22 g which remains constant for 10-21 g and then decreases gradually. Comparison with the other experimental and theoretical studies exhibits good association which suggests that defective DWCNTs can further be explored for mass sensing. This investigation is helpful

  7. Cell Wall Nonlinear Elasticity and Growth Dynamics: How Do Bacterial Cells Regulate Pressure and Growth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi

    In my thesis, I study intact and bulging Escherichia coli cells using atomic force microscopy to separate the contributions of the cell wall and turgor pressure to the overall cell stiffness. I find strong evidence of power--law stress--stiffening in the E. coli cell wall, with an exponent of 1.22±0.12, such that the wall is significantly stiffer in intact cells (E = 23±8 MPa and 49±20 MPa in the axial and circumferential directions) than in unpressurized sacculi. These measurements also indicate that the turgor pressure in living cells E. coli is 29±3 kPa. The nonlinearity in cell elasticity serves as a plausible mechanism to balance the mechanical protection and tension measurement sensitivity of the cell envelope. I also study the growth dynamics of the Bacillus subtilis cell wall to help understand the mechanism of the spatiotemporal order of inserting new cell wall material. High density fluorescent markers are used to label the entire cell surface to capture the morphological changes of the cell surface at sub-cellular to diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-minute temporal resolution. This approach reveals that rod-shaped chaining B. subtilis cells grow and twist in a highly heterogeneous fashion both spatially and temporally. Regions of high growth and twisting activity have a typical length scale of 5 μm, and last for 10-40 minutes. Motivated by the quantification of the cell wall growth dynamics, two microscopy and image analysis techniques are developed and applied to broader applications beyond resolving bacterial growth. To resolve densely distributed quantum dots, we present a fast and efficient image analysis algorithm, namely Spatial Covariance Reconstruction (SCORE) microscopy that takes into account the blinking statistics of the fluorescence emitters. We achieve sub-diffraction lateral resolution of 100 nm from 5 to 7 seconds of imaging, which is at least an order of magnitude faster than single-particle localization based methods

  8. Anisotropic diffusion of concentrated hard-sphere colloids near a hard wall studied by evanescent wave dynamic light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, V. N.; Swan, J. W.; Brady, J. F.; Petekidis, G.

    2013-10-01

    Evanescent wave dynamic light scattering and Stokesian dynamics simulations were employed to study the dynamics of hard-sphere colloidal particles near a hard wall in concentrated suspensions. The evanescent wave averaged short-time diffusion coefficients were determined from experimental correlation functions over a range of scattering wave vectors and penetration depths. Stokesian dynamics simulations performed for similar conditions allow a direct comparison of both the short-time self- and collective diffusivity. As seen earlier [V. N. Michailidou, G. Petekidis, J. W. Swan, and J. F. Brady, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 068302 (2009)] while the near wall dynamics in the dilute regime slow down compared to the free bulk diffusion, the reduction is negligible at higher volume fractions due to an interplay between the particle-wall and particle-particle hydrodynamic interactions. Here, we provide a comprehensive comparison between experiments and simulations and discuss the interplay of particle-wall and particle-particle hydrodynamics in the self- and cooperative dynamics determined at different scattering wave vectors and penetration depths.

  9. Dynamic Analysis of Horizontally Curved Thin-Walled Box-Girder Bridge due to Moving Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nallasivam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact on curved box-girder bridges due to vehicle moving across rough bridge deck have been analyzed using bridge-vehicle coupled dynamics. The bridge deck unevenness has been assumed to be a homogeneous random process in space specified by a PSD function. The analysis incorporates the effect of centrifugal forces due to vehicle moving on curved bridge. The curved box-girder bridge has been numerically modeled using computationally efficient thin-walled box-beam finite elements which take into account the torsional warping, distortion and distortional warping, that are important features of thin-walled box girders. Rigid vehicle with longitudinal and transverse input to the wheels giving rise to heave-pitch-roll degrees of freedom has been considered. The theoretical bridge model used in simulation study has been validated by a free vibration experiment using impact excitation. The impact factors for several response parameters such as bending moment, shear force, torsional moment, torsional bi-moment, distortional moment, distortional bi-moment and vertical deflections have been obtained for various bridge-vehicle parameters. Both constant velocity and forward acceleration of the vehicle have been considered to examine impact factor. The results highlighted that the impact factors of a curved box girder bridge corresponding to torsion, distortion and their corresponding bimoments have been observed to be generally very high, while those of the other responses are also relatively higher than that of corresponding straight box girder bridge.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of non-covalent single-walled carbon nanotube functionalization with surfactant peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar, Abolfazl; Mansouri, Alireza; Azamat, Jafar

    2016-03-01

    Non-covalent functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with improved solubility and biocompatibility can successfully transfer drugs, DNA, RNA, and proteins into the target cells. Theoretical studies such as molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations in fully atomistic scale were used to investigate the hydrophobic and aromatic π-π-stacking interaction of designing four novel surfactant peptides for non-covalent functionalization of SWCNTs. The results indicated that the designed peptides have binding affinity towards SWCNT with constant interactions during MD simulation times, and it can even be improved by increasing the number of tryptophan residues. The aromatic content of the peptides plays a significant role in their adsorption in SWCNT wall. The data suggest that π-π stacking interaction between the aromatic rings of tryptophan and π electrons of SWCNTs is more important than hydrophobic effects for dispersing carbon nanotubes; nevertheless SWCNTs are strongly hydrophobic in front of smooth surfaces. The usage of aromatic content of peptides for forming SWCNT/peptide complex was proved successfully, providing new insight into peptide design strategies for future nano-biomedical applications. PMID:26811869

  11. Impact of flame-wall interaction on premixed flame dynamics and transfer function characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Kedia, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we numerically investigate the response of a perforated-plate stabilized laminar methane-air premixed flame to imposed inlet velocity perturbations. A flame model using detailed chemical kinetics mechanism is applied and heat exchange between the burner plate and the gas mixture is incorporated. Linear transfer functions, for low mean inlet velocity oscillations, are analyzed for different equivalence ratio, mean inlet velocity, plate thermal conductivity and distance between adjacent holes. The oscillations of the heat exchange rate at the top of the burner surface plays a critical role in driving the growth of the perturbations over a wide range of conditions, including resonance. The flame response to the perturbations at its base takes the form of consumption speed oscillations in this region. Flame stand-off distance increases/decreases when the flame-wall interaction strengthens/weakens, impacting the overall dynamics of the heat release. The convective lag between the perturbations and the flame base response govern the phase of heat release rate oscillations. There is an additional convective lag between the perturbations at the flame base and the flame tip which has a weaker impact on the heat release rate oscillations. At higher frequencies, the flame-wall interaction is weaker and the heat release oscillations are driven by the flame area oscillations. The response of the flame to higher amplitude oscillations are used to gain further insight into the mechanisms. © 2010 Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of The Combustion Institute. All rights reserved.

  12. Design and validation of a system to simulate coronary flexure dynamics on arterial segments perfused ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanEpps, J Scott; Londono, Ricardo; Nieponice, Alejandro; Vorp, David A

    2009-02-01

    Cyclic flexure of the coronary arteries can lead to spatially varying fluid and solid stress patterns. These patterns may explain the heterogenous distribution of atherosclerotic lesions. Here we describe the design and validation of an experimental system to simulate coronary-like flexure dynamics on intact arterial segments ex vivo. Our previously described ex vivo perfusion system was modified with a polymer flexure membrane controlled by a custom data acquisition/motion control system. The system was validated by perfusing arterial segments with pulsatile hemodynamics with or without cyclic flexure. Digital images were obtained to quantify dynamic vessel curvature and arc length. Tissue integrity was assessed by histology. The device generated physiologic curvatures (0-1.8 cm(-1)) at 1 Hz with a physiologic phase relationship with the pressure waveform. Additionally, the in vivo longitudinal extension ratio (40%) was maintained within 2.3% during the flexure cycle. Twelve hours of cyclic contact with the membrane did not compromise arterial segment integrity. This device provides a novel method to examine how the local biomechanical milieu could impact atherosclerotic lesion localization. PMID:18297319

  13. Reptation dynamics of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a permanent network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Nikta; Mackintosh, Fred; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim; Pasquali, Matteo

    2010-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are an ideal system of semiflexible filaments with tunable bending stiffness. By exploiting their near-infrared fluorescence, we image directly the motion of SWCNTs in a network (agarose gel). We determine the SWCNT diameter (and bending stiffness) spectroscopically, and we control the network pore size by changing the agarose concentration. Image analysis shows clearly that SWCNTs move by reptation through the pore network. We quantify the dependence of SWCNTs mobility on SWCNT bending stiffness, length and pore sizes. Our results show conclusively that, even when the SWCNT length is much smaller than the persistence length, the flexibility of filaments enhances rotational diffusion. These results confirm earlier predictions of Odijk (1983), and show that the Doi-Edwards scaling fails to capture the filaments' motion. This study provides a fundamental understanding of reptation dynamics of semiflexible filaments.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of the test of single-walled carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to do the test of sin-gle-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) under tensile loading with the use of Bren-ner potential to describe the interactions of atoms in SWCNTs. The Young’s modulus and tensile strength for SWCNTs were calculated and the values found are 4.2 TPa and 1.40―1.77 TPa, respectively. During the simulation, it was found that if the SWCNTs are unloaded prior to the maximum stress, the stress-strain curve for unloading process overlaps with the loading one, showing that the SWCNT’s de-formation up to its fracture point is completely elastic. The MD simulation also demonstrates the fracture process for several types of SWCNT and the breaking mechanisms for SWCNTs were analyzed based on the energy and structure be-havior.

  15. Torsional responses of double-walled carbon nanotubes via molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The buckling behaviors of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) under torsion are investigated by using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effect of length on the torsional buckling behaviors of DWCNTs is examined for the first time. The simulation results show that the DWCNTs experience gradual or simultaneous buckling deformations depending on their lengths. In addition, the effect of the inner tube in a DWCNT on its torsional buckling behavior is also examined. The presence of the inner tube triggers van der Waals (vdW) interactions between it and the outer tube and thus leads to a stiffening effect of the DWCNT against torsional deformation. Whether the ends of the inner tube are free or fixed and whether it is subject to a torque or not, the critical torque and the critical torsional angle of the outer tube are only marginally affected.

  16. Simulation of Young's modulus of single-walled carbon nanotubes by molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, the Young's moduli of carbon nanotubes are studied. The inter-atomic short-range interaction and long-range interaction of carbon nanotubes are represented by a second generation reactive empirical bond order (REBO) potential and Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential, respectively. The obtained potential expression is used to calculate the total potential energies of carbon nanotubes. Three types of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), armchair, zigzag and chiral tubules, are calculated, respectively. The computational results show that the Young's moduli of SWCNTs are in the range of 929.8±11.5 GPa. From the simulation, the Young's moduli of SWCNTs are weakly affected by the tube chirality and tube radius. The numeric results are in good agreement with the existing experimental results

  17. Compressive characteristics of single walled carbon nanotube with water interactions investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elastic properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with surrounding water interactions are studied using molecular dynamics simulation technique. The compressive loading characteristic of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a fluidic medium such as water is critical for its role in determining the lifetime and stability of CNT based nano-fluidic devices. In this paper, we conducted a comprehensive analysis on the effect of geometry, chirality and density of encapsulated water on the elastic properties of SWCNT. Our studies show that defect density and distribution can strongly impact the compressive resistance of SWCNTs in water. Further studies were conducted on capped SWCNTs with varying densities of encapsulated water, which is necessary to understand the strength of CNT as a potential drug carrier. The results obtained from this paper will help determining the potential applications of CNTs in the field of nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) such as nano-biological and nano-fluidic devices.

  18. Dynamics of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes in water by real-time visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Rajat; Pasquali, Matteo

    2006-06-23

    Individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in aqueous suspension are visualized directly by fluorescence video microscopy. The fluorescent tagging is simple, biocompatible, and does not modify the SWNTs. The dynamics of individual SWNTs in water are observed and quantified for the first time. We measure the confined rotational diffusion coefficient and find it in reasonable agreement with predictions based on confined diffusion of dilute Brownian rods. We determine the critical concentration at which SWNTs in suspensions start interacting. By analyzing the fluctuating shape of SWNTs in the 3 to 5 microm range, we determine that their persistence length ranges between 32 and 174 microm, in agreement with theoretical estimates; thus, commonly available SWNTs in liquids can be considered as rigid Brownian rods in the absence of imposed external fields or self-attractive forces. PMID:16907258

  19. Visualizing the growth dynamics of individual single-wall carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Zhang, Lili; He, Maoshuai;

    In order to meet the increasing demand of faster and more flexible electronics and optical devices and at the same time decrease the use of the critical metals, carbon based devices are in fast development. Single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based electronics is a way of addressing the...... environment friendly approach of faster and better electronics. In order to exploit the potential of SWCNTs in the electronic industry fully, selective growth of either conducting or semiconducting tubes is of high importance. Understanding the mechanism for growth of SWCNTs is of great importance for...... around the studied sample at elevated temperature gives a unique way of monitoring gas-solid interactions such as CNT growth. Here we show the direct experimental evidence on the growth dynamics of SW-CNTs from Co/MgO catalysts using CO as carbon source inside the environmental TEM. The evolution of the...

  20. Compressive characteristics of single walled carbon nanotube with water interactions investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.H., E-mail: chwong@ntu.edu.sg; Vijayaraghavan, V.

    2014-01-24

    The elastic properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with surrounding water interactions are studied using molecular dynamics simulation technique. The compressive loading characteristic of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a fluidic medium such as water is critical for its role in determining the lifetime and stability of CNT based nano-fluidic devices. In this paper, we conducted a comprehensive analysis on the effect of geometry, chirality and density of encapsulated water on the elastic properties of SWCNT. Our studies show that defect density and distribution can strongly impact the compressive resistance of SWCNTs in water. Further studies were conducted on capped SWCNTs with varying densities of encapsulated water, which is necessary to understand the strength of CNT as a potential drug carrier. The results obtained from this paper will help determining the potential applications of CNTs in the field of nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) such as nano-biological and nano-fluidic devices.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of the test of single-walled carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU ChenXin; CHEN YunFei; JIAO JiWei

    2007-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to do the test of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) under tensile loading with the use of Brenner potential to describe the interactions of atoms in SWCNTs. The Young's modulus and tensile strength for SWCNTs were calculated and the values found are 4.2 TPa and 1.40―1.77 TPa, respectively. During the simulation, it was found that if the SWCNTs are unloaded prior to the maximum stress, the stress-strain curve for unloading process overlaps with the loading one, showing that the SWCNT's deformation up to its fracture point is completely elastic. The MD simulation also demonstrates the fracture process for several types of SWCNT and the breaking mechanisms for SWCNTs were analyzed based on the energy and structure behavior.

  2. Molecular Dynamics for Elastic and Plastic Deformation of a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Under Nanoindentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Te-Hua; JIAN Sheng-Rui; CHUU Der-San

    2004-01-01

    @@ Mechanical characteristics of a suspended (10, 10) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) during atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation are investigated at different temperatures by molecular dynamics simulations.The results indicate that the Young modulus of the (10, 10) SWCNT under temperatures of 300-600K is 1.2-1.3 TPa. As the temperature increases, the Young modulus of the SWCNT increases, but the axial strain of the SWCNT decreases. The strain-induced spontaneous formation of the Stone-Wales defects and the rippled behaviour under inhomogeneous stress are studied. The rippled behaviour of the SWCNT is enhanced with the increasing axial strain. The adhesive phenomenon between the probe and the nanotube and the elastic recovery of the nanotube during the retraction are also investigated.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Study of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Nano-Mechanical Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Yoshihisa; Mori, Hideki; Mikami, Tomohito; Akita, Seiji; Nakayama, Yoshikazu; Higashi, Kenji; Hirai, Yoshihiko

    2005-04-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) are expected to be useful as elements in nano-mechanical systems such as nanobearings and nanosliders. A molecular dynamics simulation is carried out to estimate the relative motion between the inner and outer tubes. The force required to pull the inner tube out of the outer tube is evaluated quantitatively by pulling the inner tube under a constant velocity for DWNTs with various inter-tube spacings and chiralities. When the inner tube is pulled under smaller constant force, the inner tube vibrates inside the outer tube without being pulled out, and an energetics is applied to explain the critical force and vibrational amplitude. The constant force induces not only vibration along the tube axis but also rotation around the tube axis, which indicates the possibility of creating a slider crank mechanism using a DWNT.

  4. Bifurcation of resistive wall mode dynamics predicted by magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid theory has been extensively and successfully applied for interpreting experimental observations of macroscopic, low frequency instabilities, such as the resistive wall mode, in fusion plasmas. In this work, it is discovered that an analytic version of the hybrid formulation predicts a bifurcation of the mode dynamics while varying certain physical parameters of the plasma, such as the thermal particle collisionality or the ratio of the thermal ion to electron temperatures. This bifurcation can robustly occur under reasonably large parameter spaces as well as with different assumptions, for instance, on the particle collision model. Qualitatively similar bifurcation features are also observed in full toroidal computations presented in this work, based on a non-perturbative hybrid formulation

  5. Bifurcation of resistive wall mode dynamics predicted by magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S. X.; Wang, Z. X., E-mail: zxwang@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Beams of the Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, S.; Hao, G. Z., E-mail: haogz@swip.ac.cn; Song, X. M.; Wang, A. K. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O.Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O.Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2015-09-15

    The magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid theory has been extensively and successfully applied for interpreting experimental observations of macroscopic, low frequency instabilities, such as the resistive wall mode, in fusion plasmas. In this work, it is discovered that an analytic version of the hybrid formulation predicts a bifurcation of the mode dynamics while varying certain physical parameters of the plasma, such as the thermal particle collisionality or the ratio of the thermal ion to electron temperatures. This bifurcation can robustly occur under reasonably large parameter spaces as well as with different assumptions, for instance, on the particle collision model. Qualitatively similar bifurcation features are also observed in full toroidal computations presented in this work, based on a non-perturbative hybrid formulation.

  6. "Sausage-string" appearance of arteries and arterioles can be caused by an instability of the blood vessel wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; Beierholm, Ulrik; Mikkelsen, Rene;

    2002-01-01

    observed experimentally. Most importantly, it suggests that the "sausaging" phenomenon is neither caused by a mechanical failure of the vessel wall due to a high blood pressure nor is it due to standing pressure waves caused by the beating of the heart. Rather, it is the expression of a general instability......Vascular damage induced by acute hypertension is preceded by a peculiar pattern where blood vessels show alternating regions of constrictions and dilations ("sausages on a string"). The pattern occurs in the smaller blood vessels, and it plays a central role in causing the vascular damage. A...... related vascular pattern has been observed in larger vessels from several organs during angiography. In the larger vessels the occurrence of the pattern does not appear to be related to acute hypertension. A unifying feature between the phenomenon in large and small vessels seems to be an increase in...

  7. Estimation of Carotid Artery Pulse Wave Velocity by Doppler Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Maerefat

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulse wave velocity (PWV is widely used for estimating the stiffness of an artery. Various invasive and non-invasive methods have been developed to determine PWV over the years. In the present research, the non-invasive estimation of the PWV of large arteries was used as an index for arterial stiffness. Methods: A dynamic model based on the Navier-Stokes equations coupled to elasticity equations was introduced for the PWV in arteries with elastic walls. This system of equations was completed by clinical information obtained from the Doppler ultrasound images of the carotid artery of 40 healthy male volunteers. For this purpose, the Doppler ultrasound images were recorded and saved in a computer; and subsequently center-line blood velocity, arterial wall thickness, and arterial radius were measured by offline processing. Results: The results from the analytic solution of the completed equations showed that the mean value of PWV for the group of healthy volunteers was 2.35 m/s when the mean arterial radius was used as the neutral radius and 5.00 m/s when the end-diastole radius was used as the neutral radius. It is noteworthy that the latter value closely complies with that reported by other researchers. Conclusion: By applying this method, a non-invasive clinical and local evaluation of the common carotid artery stiffness via a Doppler ultrasound measurement will be possible.

  8. Real-time ultrasound-tagging to track the 2D motion of the common carotid artery wall in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahnd, Guillaume, E-mail: g.zahnd@erasmusmc.nl [Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam 3000 CA (Netherlands); Salles, Sébastien; Liebgott, Hervé; Vray, Didier [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Lyon 69100 (France); Sérusclat, André [Department of Radiology, Louis Pradel Hospital, Lyon 69500 (France); Moulin, Philippe [Department of Endocrinology, Louis Pradel Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Lyon 69100, France and INSERM UMR 1060, Lyon 69500 (France)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Tracking the motion of biological tissues represents an important issue in the field of medical ultrasound imaging. However, the longitudinal component of the motion (i.e., perpendicular to the beam axis) remains more challenging to extract due to the rather coarse resolution cell of ultrasound scanners along this direction. The aim of this study is to introduce a real-time beamforming strategy dedicated to acquire tagged images featuring a distinct pattern in the objective to ease the tracking. Methods: Under the conditions of the Fraunhofer approximation, a specific apodization function was applied to the received raw channel data, in real-time during image acquisition, in order to introduce a periodic oscillations pattern along the longitudinal direction of the radio frequency signal. Analytic signals were then extracted from the tagged images, and subpixel motion tracking of the intima–media complex was subsequently performed offline, by means of a previously introduced bidimensional analytic phase-based estimator. Results: The authors’ framework was applied in vivo on the common carotid artery from 20 young healthy volunteers and 6 elderly patients with high atherosclerosis risk. Cine-loops of tagged images were acquired during three cardiac cycles. Evaluated against reference trajectories manually generated by three experienced analysts, the mean absolute tracking error was 98 ± 84 μm and 55 ± 44 μm in the longitudinal and axial directions, respectively. These errors corresponded to 28% ± 23% and 13% ± 9% of the longitudinal and axial amplitude of the assessed motion, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed framework enables tagged ultrasound images of in vivo tissues to be acquired in real-time. Such unconventional beamforming strategy contributes to improve tracking accuracy and could potentially benefit to the interpretation and diagnosis of biomedical images.

  9. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Assessment of Hyperemic Fractional Microvascular Blood Plasma Volume in Peripheral Arterial Disease: Initial Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Bas Versluis; Marjolein H G Dremmen; Nelemans, Patty J; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Geert-Willem Schurink; Tim Leiner; Walter H Backes

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the current study was to describe a method that assesses the hyperemic microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. The reversibly albumin binding contrast agent gadofosveset was used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI) to assess the microvascular status in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and healthy controls. In addition, the reproducibility of this method in healthy controls was determined. MATERIALS AND METH...

  10. Dynamic lift measurements on a FX79W151A airfoil via pressure distribution on the wind tunnel walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on an experimental setup for measurements of dynamic stall for airfoils via the pressure distribution over wind tunnel walls. This measuring technique, hitherto used for lift measurements under static conditions, is also an adequate method for dynamic conditions until stall occurs. A step motor is used, allowing for sinusoidal as well as non-sinusoidal and stochastic pitching to simulate fast fluctuating flow conditions. Measurements with sinusoidal pitching and constant angular velocities were done and show dynamic stall characteristics. Under dynamic stall conditions, maximum lift coefficients were up to 80% higher than the maximum for static lift

  11. A new picture of cell wall protein dynamics in elongating cells of Arabidopsis thaliana: Confirmed actors and newcomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamet Elisabeth

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell elongation in plants requires addition and re-arrangements of cell wall components. Even if some protein families have been shown to play roles in these events, a global picture of proteins present in cell walls of elongating cells is still missing. A proteomic study was performed on etiolated hypocotyls of Arabidopsis used as model of cells undergoing elongation followed by growth arrest within a short time. Results Two developmental stages (active growth and after growth arrest were compared. A new strategy consisting of high performance cation exchange chromatography and mono-dimensional electrophoresis was established for separation of cell wall proteins. This work allowed identification of 137 predicted secreted proteins, among which 51 had not been identified previously. Apart from expected proteins known to be involved in cell wall extension such as xyloglucan endotransglucosylase-hydrolases, expansins, polygalacturonases, pectin methylesterases and peroxidases, new proteins were identified such as proteases, proteins related to lipid metabolism and proteins of unknown function. Conclusion This work highlights the CWP dynamics that takes place between the two developmental stages. The presence of proteins known to be related to cell wall extension after growth arrest showed that these proteins may play other roles in cell walls. Finally, putative regulatory mechanisms of protein biological activity are discussed from this global view of cell wall proteins.

  12. Current-induced domain wall motion and magnetization dynamics in CoFeB/Cu/Co nanostripes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current-induced domain wall motion and magnetization dynamics in the CoFeB layer of CoFeB/Cu/Co nanostripes were studied using photoemission electron microscopy combined with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD-PEEM). Quasi-static measurements show that current-induced domain wall motion in the CoFeB layer is similar to the one observed in the NiFe layer of NiFe/Cu/Co trilayers, although the threshold current densities for domain wall depinning are lower. Time-resolved XMCD-PEEM measurements are used as an efficient probe of domain wall depinning statistics. They also reveal that, during the application of current pulses, the CoFeB magnetization rotates in the direction transverse to the nanostripe. The corresponding tilt angles have been quantified and compared to analytical and micromagnetic calculations, highlighting the influence of magnetostatic interactions between the two magnetic layers on the magnetization rotation. (paper)

  13. Magneto-dynamic properties of CoFeB thin film elements: The role of magnetic domain walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the role of the magnetic domain structure on the magneto-dynamic properties of patterned thin film structures is crucial for the optimization of high frequency devices, e.g. recording heads, integrated inductors and filters. We show that a controllable domain design offers the advantage of tuning the ferromagnetic zero and low field resonance frequency. Therefore we studied the dynamic response of closure domain structures in patterned amorphous Co40Fe40B20 stripe arrays with varying domain wall density using pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry. We show that the domain resonance frequency increases significantly the more neighboured crosstie walls interact with each other. A qualitative concept of dynamic magnetic charges is discussed as the origin of such a resonance frequency increase. The dynamic charge concept also allows the explanation of a pronounced resonance frequency increase in concertina domain structures that develop in lens shaped elements.

  14. Dynamic mechanical analysis of single walled carbon nanotubes/polymethyl methacrylate nanocomposite films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Badawi; N. Al-Hosiny

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical properties of nanocomposite films with different ratios of single walled carbon nan-otubes/polymethyl methacrylate (SWCNTs/PMMA) are studied. Nanocomposite films of different ratios (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 weight percent (wt%)) of SWCNTs/PMMA are fabricated by using a casting technique. The morphological and struc-tural properties of both SWCNT powder and SWCNTs/PMMA nanocomposite films are investigated by using a high resolution transmission electron microscope and x-ray diffractometer respectively. The mechanical properties including the storage modulus, loss modulus, loss factor (tanδ) and stiffness of the nanocomposite film as a function of tempera-ture are recorded by using a dynamic mechanical analyzer at a frequency of 1 Hz. Compared with pure PMMA film, the nanocomposite films with different ratios of SWCNTs/PMMA are observed to have enhanced storage moduli, loss moduli and high stiffness, each of which is a function of temperature. The intensity of the tanδ peak for pure PMMA film is larger than those of the nanocomposite films. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of SWCNTs/PMMA nanocomposite film shifts towards the higher temperature side with respect to pure PMMA film from 91.2 ◦C to 99.5 ◦C as the ratio of SWCNTs/PMMA increases from 0 to 2.0 wt%.

  15. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T M; Barbosa, P.; M.K. Rodrigues; Oliveira, M. F.; Nery, L E; J.A. Neder

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(VCW) = rib cage (VRC) + abdomen (VAB)] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinf...

  16. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T M; Barbosa, P.; M.K. Rodrigues; Oliveira, M. F.; Nery, L E; J.A. Neder

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V CW) = rib cage (V RC) + abdomen (V AB)] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyper...

  17. Link between deviations from Murray's Law and occurrence of low wall shear stress regions in the left coronary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doutel, E; Pinto, S I S; Campos, J B L M; Miranda, J M

    2016-08-01

    Murray developed two laws for the geometry of bifurcations in the circulatory system. Based on the principle of energy minimization, Murray found restrictions for the relation between the diameters and also between the angles of the branches. It is known that bifurcations are prone to the development of atherosclerosis, in regions associated to low wall shear stresses (WSS) and high oscillatory shear index (OSI). These indicators (size of low WSS regions, size of high OSI regions and size of high helicity regions) were evaluated in this work. All of them were normalized by the size of the outflow branches. The relation between Murray's laws and the size of low WSS regions was analysed in detail. It was found that the main factor leading to large regions of low WSS is the so called expansion ratio, a relation between the cross section areas of the outflow branches and the cross section area of the main branch. Large regions of low WSS appear for high expansion ratios. Furthermore, the size of low WSS regions is independent of the ratio between the diameters of the outflow branches. Since the expansion ratio in bifurcations following Murray's law is kept in a small range (1 and 1.25), all of them have regions of low WSS with similar size. However, the expansion ratio is not small enough to completely prevent regions with low WSS values and, therefore, Murray's law does not lead to atherosclerosis minimization. A study on the effect of the angulation of the bifurcation suggests that the Murray's law for the angles does not minimize the size of low WSS regions. PMID:27157126

  18. Nucleon structure in lattice QCD with dynamical domain-wall fermions quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huey-Wen Lin; Shigemi Ohta

    2006-07-23

    We report RBC and RBC/UKQCD lattice QCD numerical calculations of nucleon electroweak matrix elements with dynamical domain-wall fermions (DWF) quarks. The first, RBC, set of dynamical DWF ensembles employs two degenerate flavors of DWF quarks and the DBW2 gauge action. Three sea quark mass values of 0.04, 0.03 and 0.02 in lattice units are used with about 200 gauge configurations each. The lattice cutoff is about 1.7 GeV and the spatial volume is about (1.9 fm){sup 3}. Despite the small volume, the ratio of the isovector vector and axial charges g{sub A}/g{sub V} and that of structure function moments {sub u-d}/{sub {Delta} u - {Delta} d} are in agreement with experiment, and show only very mild quark mass dependence. The second, RBC/UK, set of ensembles employs one strange and two degenerate (up and down) dynamical DWF quarks and Iwasaki gauge action. The strange quark mass is set at 0.04, and three up/down mass values of 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 in lattice units are used. The lattice cutoff is about 1.6 GeV and the spatial volume is about (3.0 fm){sup 3}. Even with preliminary statistics of 25-30 gauge configurations, the ratios g{sub A}/g{sub V} and {sub u-d}/{sub {Delta} u - {Delta} d} are consistent with experiment and show only very mild quark mass dependence. Another structure function moment, d{sub 1}, though yet to be renormalized, appears small in both sets.

  19. NUCLEON STRUCTURE IN LATTICE QCD WITH DYNAMICAL DOMAIN--WALL FERMIONS QUARKS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIN H.-W.; OHTA, S.

    2006-10-02

    We report RBC and RBC/UKQCD lattice QCD numerical calculations of nucleon electroweak matrix elements with dynamical domain-wall fermions (DWF) quarks. The first, RBC, set of dynamical DWF ensembles employs two degenerate flavors of DWF quarks and the DBW2 gauge action. Three sea quark mass values of 0.04, 0.03 and 0.02 in lattice units are used with 220 gauge configurations each. The lattice cutoff is a{sup -1} {approx} 1.7GeV and the spatial volume is about (1.9fm){sup 3}. Despite the small volume, the ratio of the isovector vector and axial charges g{sub A}/g{sub V} and that of structure function moments {sub u-d}/{sub {Delta}u-{Delta}d} are in agreement with experiment, and show only very mild quark mass dependence. The second, RBC/UK, set of ensembles employs one strange and two degenerate (up and down) dynamical DWF quarks and Iwasaki gauge action. The strange quark mass is set at 0.04, and three up/down mass values of 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 in lattice units are used. The lattice cutoff is a{sup -1} {approx} 1.6GeV and the spatial volume is about (3.0fm){sup 3}. Even with preliminary statistics of 25-30 gauge configurations, the ratios g{sub A}/g{sub V} and {sub u-d}/{sub {Delta}u-{Delta}d} are consistent with experiment and show only very mild quark mass dependence. Another structure function moment, d{sub 1}, though yet to be renormalized, appears small in both sets.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Based Gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Srivastava, Deepak; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties of a multi-walled carbon nanotube based gear. Previous work computationally suggested that molecular gears fashioned from (14,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes operate well at 50-100 gigahertz. The gears were formed from nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. The gear in this study was based on the smallest multi-walled nanotube supported by some experimental evidence. Each gear was a (52,0) nanotube surrounding a (37,10) nanotube with approximate 20.4 and 16,8 A radii respectively. These sizes were chosen to be consistent with inter-tube spacing observed by and were slightly larger than graphite inter-layer spacings. The benzyne teeth were attached via 2+4 cycloaddition to exterior of the (52,0) tube. 2+4 bonds were used rather than the 2+2 bonds observed by Hoke since 2+4 bonds are preferred by naphthalene and quantum calculations by Jaffe suggest that 2+4 bonds are preferred on carbon nanotubes of sufficient diameter. One gear was 'powered' by forcing the atoms near the end of the outside buckytube to rotate to simulate a motor. A second gear was allowed to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its outside buckytube on a cylinder. The ends of both gears were constrained to stay in an approximately constant position relative to each other, simulating a casing, to insure that the gear teeth meshed. The stiff meshing aromatic gear teeth transferred angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. The simulation was performed in a vacuum and with a software thermostat. Preliminary results suggest that the powered gear had trouble turning the driven gear without slip. The larger radius and greater mass of these gears relative to the (14,0) gears previously studied requires a

  1. DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF HIGH RISE STRUCTURES UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DISCRETE STAGGERED SHEAR WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. B. KAMESHWARI

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well-established fact that shear walls are quite effective in lateral load resistance of low-rise to medium-rise reinforced concrete buildings. Restriction in the architectural design by the presence of the shear walls may contribute to discourage the engineers from adopting the shear walls. Due to this a new concept ofproviding storey deep and bay wide discrete staggered shear wall panels have been introduced. In this study, the effect of various configurations of shear walls on high-rise structure is analysed. The drift and inter-storey drift of the structure in the following configurations of shear wall panels is studied and is compared with that of bare frame: (1 Conventional shear walls. (2 Alternate arrangement of shear walls. (3 Diagonal arrangement of shear walls. (4 Zigzag arrangement of shear walls. (5 Influence of lift core walls. Of the configurations studied, the zigzag shear wall configuration is found to be better than the other systems studied in controlling the response to earthquake loading. The diagonal configuration is found to be having significant role in controlling the response of structures to earthquake.

  2. Comparison of arterial spin labeling and dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI in patients with acute stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chu Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether arterial spin labeling (ASL perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can reliably quantify perfusion deficit as compared to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC perfusion MRI. METHODS: Thirty-nine patients with acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation territory were recruited. All underwent ASL and DSC MRI perfusion scans within 30 hours after stroke onset and 31 patients underwent follow-up MRI scans. ASL cerebral blood flow (CBF and DSC time to maximum (T(max maps were used to calculate the perfusion defects. The ASL CBF lesion volume was compared to the DSC Tmax lesion volume by Pearson's correlation coefficient and likewise the ASL CBF and DSC T(max lesion volumes were compared to the final infarct sizes respectively. A repeated measures analysis of variance and least significant difference post hoc test was used to compare the mean lesion volumes among ASL CBF, DSC T(max >4-6 s and final infarct. RESULTS: Mean patient age was 72.6 years. The average time from stroke onset to MRI was 13.9 hours. The ASL lesion volume showed significant correlation with the DSC lesion volume for T(max >4, 5 and 6 s (r = 0.81, 0.82 and 0.80; p5 s (29.2 ml, p6 s (21.8 ml, p5 or 6 s were close to mean final infarct size. CONCLUSION: Quantitative measurement of ASL perfusion is well correlated with DSC perfusion. However, ASL perfusion may overestimate the perfusion defects and therefore further refinement of the true penumbra threshold and improved ASL technique are necessary before applying ASL in therapeutic trials.

  3. Common carotid artery wall thickness and external diameter as predictors of prevalent and incident cardiac events in a large population study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bursac Zoran

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arterial diameters enlarge in response to wall thickening, plaques, and many atherosclerotic risk factors. We hypothesized that right common carotid artery (RCCA diameter would be independently associated with cardiac disease and improve risk discrimination. Methods In a middle-aged, biracial population (baseline n = 11225, we examined associations between 1 standard deviation increments of baseline RCCA diameter with prevalent myocardial infarction (MI and incident cardiac events (MI or cardiac death using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models, respectively. Areas under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC were used to estimate model discrimination. Results MI was present in 451 (4% participants at baseline (1987–89, and incident cardiac events occurred among 646 (6% others through 1999. Adjusting for IMT, RCCA diameter was associated with prevalent MI (female OR = 2.0, 95%CI = 1.61–2.49; male OR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.04–1.30 and incident cardiac events (female HR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.51–2.02; male HR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.15–1.40. Associations were attenuated but persisted after adjustment for risk factors (not including IMT (prevalent MI: female OR = 1.73, 95% CI = 1.40–2.14; male OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.02–1.28, and incident cardiac events: female HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.08–1.48; male HR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.08–1.32. After additional adjustment for IMT, diameter was associated with incident cardiac events in women (HR = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.00–1.40 and men (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.06–1.29, and with prevalent MI only in women (OR = 1.73; 95% CI = 1.37–2.17. In women, when adjustment was limited, diameter models had larger AUC than other models. Conclusion RCCA diameter is an important correlate of cardiac events, independent of IMT, but adds little to overall risk discrimination after risk factor adjustment.

  4. NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR DYNAMIC INITIAL SHOCK PARAMETERS OF COUPLING CHARGE ON BOREHOLE WALL UNDER THE ACTION OF HIGH EXPLOSIVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪芝芳; 李玉民

    1996-01-01

    According to detonation theory and hydrodynamic principle, a physical model has been set up in this paper. Based on the model a methodology for calculating dynamic initial shock parameters such as shock pressure p,,, shock wave velosity Dm etc. of coupling charge on borehole wall has ben developed. The shock parameters have been calculated when high explosives works on granite, limestone and marble respectively. The magnitude of every parameter on borehole wall has been obtained from ignited dot to the end of borehole along axial direction. Some important conclusions are also gained.

  5. Topology density correlator on dynamical domain-wall ensembles with nearly frozen topological charge

    CERN Document Server

    Fukaya, H; Cossu, G; Hashimoto, S; Kaneko, T; Noaki, J

    2014-01-01

    Global topological charge decorrelates very slowly or even freezes in fine lattice simulations. On the other hand, its local fluctuations are expected to survive and lead to the correct physical results as long as the volume is large enough. We investigate this issue on recently generated configurations including dynamical domain-wall fermions at lattice spacings a = 0.08 fm and finer. We utilize the Yang-Mills gradient flow to define the topological charge density operator and calculate its long-distance correlation, through which we propose a new method for extracting the topological susceptibility in a sub-volume. This method takes care of the finite volume correction, which reduces the bias caused by the global topological charge. Our lattice data clearly show a shorter auto-correlation time than that of the naive definition using the whole lattice, and are less sensitive to the global topological history. Numerical results show a clear sea-quark mass dependence, which agrees well with the prediction of c...

  6. Effects of carrier gas dynamics on single wall carbon nanotube chiral distributions during laser vaporization synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Brian J; Raffaelle, Ryne P

    2007-03-01

    We report on the utility of modifying the carrier gas dynamics during laser vaporization synthesis to alter the single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) chiral distribution. SWNTs produced from an Alexandrite laser using conventional Ni/Co catalysts demonstrate marked differences in chiral distributions due to effects of helium gas and reactor chamber pressure, in comparison to conventional subambient pressures and argon gas. Optical absorption and Raman spectroscopies confirm that the SWNT diameter distribution decreases under higher pressure and with helium gas as opposed to argon. Fluorescence mapping of the raw soots in sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS)-D2O was used to estimate the relative (n, m)-SWNT content of the semiconducting types. A predominance of type II structures for each synthesis condition was observed. The distribution of SWNT chiral angles was observed to shift away from near-armchair configurations under higher pressure and with helium gas. These results illustrate the importance of gas type and pressure on the condensation/cooling rate, which allows for synthesis of specific SWNT chiral distributions. PMID:17450850

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation on adsorption of pyrene-polyethylene onto ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lu; Lv, Wenzhen; Zhu, Hong; Xu, Qun

    2016-07-01

    The mechanism of the adsorption of pyrene-polyethylene (Py-PE) onto ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) was studied by using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We found that solvent polarity and pyrene group are two critical factors in the Py-PE decoration on ultrathin SWNT. Combined MD simulations with free energy calculations, our results indicate that larger solvent polarity can decrease the contribution of conformation entropy, but contributes little to the interaction energy, moreover, larger SWNT diameter can decrease the contribution of conformation entropy but lead to the increasing of the interaction energy. In polar organic solvent (N, N-Dimethylacetamide), the pyrene group plays a key role in the adsorption of Py-PE onto ultrathin SWNT, not only facilitates the spontaneous adsorption of Py-PE onto ultrathin SWNT, but also helps to form compact structure between themselves in the final adsorption states. While in aqueous solution, pyrene group no longer works as an anchor, but still affects a lot to the final adsorption conformation. Our present work provides detailed theoretical clue to understand the noncovalent interaction between aromatic segment appended polymer and ultrathin SWNT, and helps to explore the potential application of ultrathin SWNT in the fields of hybrid material, biomedical and electronic materials.

  8. Molecular dynamics study on heat transport from single-walled carbon nanotubes to Si substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Ya; Zhu, Jie, E-mail: zhujie@iet.cn; Tang, Da-Wei

    2015-02-06

    In this paper, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the heat transport between a vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and Si substrate, to find out the influence of temperature and system sizes, including diameter and length of SWNT and measurements of substrate. Results revealed that high temperature hindered heat transport in SWNT itself but was a beneficial stimulus for heat transport at interface of SWNT and Si. Furthermore, the system sizes strongly affected the peaks in vibrational density of states of Si, which led to interfacial thermal conductance dependent on system sizes. - Highlights: • NEMD is performed to simulate the heat transport from SWNT to Si substrate. • We analyze both interfacial thermal conductance and thermal conductivity of SWNT. • High temperature is a beneficial stimulus for heat transport at the interface. • Interfacial thermal conductance strongly depends on the sizes of SWNT and substrate. • We calculate VDOS of C and Si atoms to analyze phonon couplings between them.

  9. Non-Fourier heat conduction in a single-walled carbon nanotube: Classical molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonstationary heat conduction in a single-walled carbon nanotube was investigated by applying a local heat pulse with duration of subpicoseconds. The investigation was based on classical molecular dynamics simulations, where the heat pulse was generated as coherent fluctuations by connecting a thermostat to the local cell for a short duration. The heat conduction through the nanotube was observed in terms of spatiotemporal temperature profiles. Results of the simulations exhibit non-Fourier heat conduction where a distinct amount of heat is transported in a wavelike form. The geometry of carbon nanotubes allows us to observe such a phenomenon in the actual scale of the material. The resulting spatiotemporal profile was compared with the available macroscopic equations, the so-called non-Fourier heat conduction equations, in order to investigate the applicability of the phenomenological models to a quasi-one-dimensional system. The conventional hyperbolic diffusion equation fails to predict the heat conduction due to the lack of local diffusion. It is shown that this can be remedied by adopting a model with dual relaxation time. Further modal analyses using wavelet transformations reveal a significant contribution of the optical phonon modes to the observed wavelike heat conduction. The result suggests that, in carbon nanotubes with finite length where the long-wavelength acoustic phonons behave ballistically, even optical phonons can play a major role in the non-Fourier heat conduction

  10. Dynamics of functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes in solution studied by incoherent neutron scattering experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied, by incoherent neutron scattering experiments, the dynamics of a colloidal suspension of functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The nanotubes have been functionalized with pentyl ester groups attached at the ends and suspended in deuterated toluene with a concentration of 2.6 mg SWNT/1 ml of deuterated toluene. The experimental techniques were incoherent elastic neutron scattering (IENS) and incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering (IQNS). In the temperature range between 4 K and 300 K, three phases were observed by IENS measurements: a solid phase for Tg, an undercooled liquid phase for Tgm and a liquid phase for T>Tm. Furthermore, in the high temperature range of the undercooled liquid phase, hysteresis loops in the heating and cooling scans were observed. The lower limit of the hysteresis loop defines the critical crossover temperature Tc. IQNS measurements in the liquid phase and a cooling scan of the undercooled liquid phase were performed. Three different quasielastic peaks were identified, two in the liquid phase and another one in the undercooled liquid phase. The widths of the quasielastic peaks are discussed as a generalized diffusion function which can be factorized as a temperature dependent diffusion function and a Q dependent structure function. From the comparison of the diffusion function with the viscosity of toluene, we conclude that two components are in the long-time range Brownian motion and the other one in the short-time range Brownian motion

  11. Molecular dynamics study on heat transport from single-walled carbon nanotubes to Si substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the heat transport between a vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and Si substrate, to find out the influence of temperature and system sizes, including diameter and length of SWNT and measurements of substrate. Results revealed that high temperature hindered heat transport in SWNT itself but was a beneficial stimulus for heat transport at interface of SWNT and Si. Furthermore, the system sizes strongly affected the peaks in vibrational density of states of Si, which led to interfacial thermal conductance dependent on system sizes. - Highlights: • NEMD is performed to simulate the heat transport from SWNT to Si substrate. • We analyze both interfacial thermal conductance and thermal conductivity of SWNT. • High temperature is a beneficial stimulus for heat transport at the interface. • Interfacial thermal conductance strongly depends on the sizes of SWNT and substrate. • We calculate VDOS of C and Si atoms to analyze phonon couplings between them

  12. Motion and energy dissipation of single-walled carbon nanotube on graphite by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The motion and energy dissipation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have important influence on their application. This paper investigated the sliding of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on a graphite substrate using molecular dynamics simulation. An interesting phenomenon was observed in the commensurate interface. The carbon nanotube slid in not only the initial velocity direction but also perpendicular to the initial velocity with only a slight rolling in the later stage of motion. The direction and distance of motion were related to the initial interfacial configuration when the CNT started to slide and presented a certain degree of randomness. This phenomenon could be attributed to the SWCNT not having a platform on the bottom, which caused a low interfacial potential barrier. Therefore, no obvious ‘stick-slip’ occurred. In the incommensurate state, the SWCNT slid on the graphite substrate in the initial direction for the process, and the velocity slowly decreased. The temperature slightly influenced the carbon nanotube’s motion mainly because of random thermal fluctuations. (papers)

  13. Spin wave dynamics in Heisenberg ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Bin-Zhou

    2016-09-01

    The spin wave dynamics, including the magnetization, spin wave dispersion relation, and energy level splitting, of Heisenberg ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes are systematically calculated by use of the double-time Green's function method within the random phase approximation. The role of temperature, diameter of the tube, and wave vector on spin wave energy spectrum and energy level splitting are carefully analyzed. There are two categories of spin wave modes, which are quantized and degenerate, and the total number of independent magnon branches is dependent on diameter of the tube, caused by the physical symmetry of nanotubes. Moreover, the number of flat spin wave modes increases with diameter of the tube rising. The spin wave energy and the energy level splitting decrease with temperature rising, and become zero as temperature reaches the critical point. At any temperature, the energy level splitting varies with wave vector, and for a larger wave vector it is smaller. When pb=π, the boundary of first Brillouin zone, spin wave energies are degenerate, and the energy level splittings are zero.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics of bi-layered graphene sheet, double-walled carbon nanotube and nanotube bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajbhiye, Sachin O.; Singh, S. P.

    2016-05-01

    Due to strong van der Waals (vdW) interactions, the graphene sheets and nanotubes stick to each other and form clusters of these corresponding nanostructures, viz. bi-layered graphene sheet (BLGS), double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) and nanotube bundle (NB) or ropes. This research work is concerned with the study of nonlinear dynamics of BLGS, DWCNT and NB due to nonlinear interlayer vdW forces using multiscale atomistic finite element method. The energy between two adjacent carbon atoms is represented by the multibody interatomic Tersoff-Brenner potential, whereas the nonlinear interlayer vdW forces are represented by Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential function. The equivalent nonlinear material model of carbon-carbon bond is used to model it based on its force-deflection relation. Newmark's algorithm is used to solve the nonlinear matrix equation governing the motion of the BLGS, DWCNT and NB. An impulse and harmonic excitations are used to excite these nanostructures under cantilevered, bridged and clamped boundary conditions. The frequency responses of these nanostructures are computed, and the dominant resonant frequencies are identified. Along with the forced vibration of these structures, the eigenvalue extraction problem of armchair and zigzag NB is also considered. The natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes are extracted for the different length and boundary conditions of the nanotube bundle.

  15. Modeling of the blood flow in the lower extremities for dynamic diffuse optical tomography of peripheral artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, A.; Hoi, J. W.; Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Shrikhande, G.; Dayal, R.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2015-07-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is caused by a reduction of the internal diameters of the arteries in the upper or lower extremities mainly due to atherosclerosis. If not treated, its worsening may led to a complete occlusion, causing the death of the cells lacking proper blood supply, followed by gangrene that may require chirurgical amputation. We have recently performed a clinical study in which good sensitivities and specificities were achieved with dynamic diffuse optical tomography. To gain a better understanding of the physiological foundations of many of the observed effects, we started to develop a mathematical model for PAD. The model presented in this work is based on a multi-compartment Windkessel model, where the vasculature in the leg and foot is represented by resistors and capacitors, the blood pressure with a voltage drop, and the blood flow with a current. Unlike existing models, the dynamics induced by a thigh-pressure-cuff inflation and deflation during the measurements are taken into consideration. This is achieved by dynamically varying the resistances of the large veins and arteries. By including the effects of the thigh-pressure cuff, we were able to explain many of the effects observed during our dynamic DOT measurements, including the hemodynamics of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration changes. The model was implemented in MATLAB and the simulations were normalized and compared with the blood perfusion obtained from healthy, PAD and diabetic patients. Our preliminary results show that in unhealthy patients the total system resistance is sensibly higher than in healthy patients.

  16. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Dynamics in Simple and Complex Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Nikta

    Understanding the dynamics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in simple and complex environments is crucial for establishing potential application of nanotube architectures for materials and biosciences. In this thesis we employ the visualization and analysis tools to image and quantify and the Brownian bending and diffusion of SWNTs in different media in order to understand and eventually to tailor nanotube mobility in confined environments. We image Brownian bending dynamics of SWNTs in water using Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence microscopy. The bending stiffness of each chirality-assigned SWNT is extracted from the variance of the curvature fluctuations. Relaxation times of the bending fluctuations are measured from the autocorrelation of SWNT shapes. We find that the bending stiffness scales as the cube of the nanotube diameter, in agreement with an elastic continuum model. The measured shape relaxation times are in excellent agreement with the semiflexible chain model, showing that SWNTs may truly be considered as the ideal model semiflexible filaments. The motion of stiff objects in crowded environments has been investigated for more than three decades in polymer science and biophysics; yet, theory and experiments have not established whether a minute amount of flexibility affects the mobility of stiff slender filaments. We image the Brownian motion of SWNTs in a network by NIR fluorescence microscopy. We show direct evidence of SWNTs reptating in the network, and confirm that their small flexibility enhances significantly their rotational diffusion. Our results establish the reptation dynamics of stiff filaments and provide a framework to tailor SWNTs mobility in confined media. By varying SWNT surface modifications, we can selectively tune the sensitivity of the carbon nanotubes to the different physical properties of the porous media for sensing applications, We introduce a simple procedure for dispersion of SWNTs in aqueous solutions using

  17. Domain wall dynamics in Fe-rich glass covered amorphous microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Jesus Daniel [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Oviedo (Spain); Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, UPJS, Kosice (Slovakia); Ruiz, Alvaro; Cobos, Raul F.; Ribot, Ivan; Vega, Victor; Alvarez, Pablo; Sanchez, Maria Luisa; Sanchez Ll., Jose Luis; Prida, Victor M. de la; Hernando, Blanca [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Oviedo (Spain)

    2009-04-15

    The influence of glass covering on domain wall propagation in Fe{sub 65}B{sub 15}Si{sub 15}C{sub 5} amorphous microwires is studied, before and after glass removal. High values of domain wall velocity and mobility have been obtained. The domain wall velocity depends linearly on the driving magnetic field. However, the mobility of the domain wall is very different in both situations studied. The results are explained due to the modification of internal stress distribution after glass removing, that change the domain structure of the sample. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Computer modeling of tasks in dynamics of viscoelastic thin-walled elements in structures of variable thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A. Abdikarimov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a numerical method and algorithm for solving tasks in dynamics of viscoelastic thin-walled elements in structures of variable thickness. The equations of motion concerning deflections are described by partial integro-differential equations (PIDE. Using Bubnov-Galerkin’s method, based on the polynomial approximation of deflections, the task is limited to the study of the system of ordinary IDEs, where the independent variable is time. The solution to the system of IDEs is obtained by the offered numerical method, which results into the algorithm of the numerical solution and the program in the Delphi algorithmic language. The study of nonlinear vibrations of thin-walled elements in structures, allowing for variable thickness in the geometrical nonlinear statement, has enabled revealing a number of mechanical effects. Depending on physico-mechanical and geometrical parameters of the considered viscoelastic thin-walled elements in structures, the authors reccommend how to use the rigidity of the system.

  19. Average arterial input function for quantitative dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of neck nodal metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study determines the feasibility of generating an average arterial input function (Avg-AIF) from a limited population of patients with neck nodal metastases to be used for pharmacokinetic modeling of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data in clinical trials of larger populations. Twenty patients (mean age 50 years [range 27–77 years]) with neck nodal metastases underwent pretreatment DCE-MRI studies with a temporal resolution of 3.75 to 7.5 sec on a 1.5T clinical MRI scanner. Eleven individual AIFs (Ind-AIFs) met the criteria of expected enhancement pattern and were used to generate Avg-AIF. Tofts model was used to calculate pharmacokinetic DCE-MRI parameters. Bland-Altman plots and paired Student t-tests were used to describe significant differences between the pharmacokinetic parameters obtained from individual and average AIFs. Ind-AIFs obtained from eleven patients were used to calculate the Avg-AIF. No overall significant difference (bias) was observed for the transfer constant (Ktrans) measured with Ind-AIFs compared to Avg-AIF (p = 0.20 for region-of-interest (ROI) analysis and p = 0.18 for histogram median analysis). Similarly, no overall significant difference was observed for interstitial fluid space volume fraction (ve) measured with Ind-AIFs compared to Avg-AIF (p = 0.48 for ROI analysis and p = 0.93 for histogram median analysis). However, the Bland-Altman plot suggests that as Ktrans increases, the Ind-AIF estimates tend to become proportionally higher than the Avg-AIF estimates. We found no statistically significant overall bias in Ktrans or ve estimates derived from Avg-AIF, generated from a limited population, as compared with Ind-AIFs. However, further study is needed to determine whether calibration is needed across the range of Ktrans. The Avg-AIF obtained from a limited population may be used for pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI data in larger population studies with neck nodal metastases. Further validation of the Avg

  20. Solid-State NMR on bacterial cells: selective cell wall signal enhancement and resolution improvement using dynamic nuclear polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has recently emerged as a powerful technique for the study of material surfaces. In this study, we demonstrate its potential to investigate cell surface in intact cells. Using Bacillus subtilis bacterial cells as an example, it is shown that the polarizing agent 1-(TEMPO-4-oxy)-3-(TEMPO-4-amino)propan-2-ol (TOTAPOL) has a strong binding affinity to cell wall polymers (peptidoglycan). This particular interaction is thoroughly investigated with a systematic study on extracted cell wall materials, disrupted cells, and entire cells, which proved that TOTAPOL is mainly accumulating in the cell wall. This property is used on one hand to selectively enhance or suppress cell wall signals by controlling radical concentrations and on the other hand to improve spectral resolution by means of a difference spectrum. Comparing DNP-enhanced and conventional solid-state NMR, an absolute sensitivity ratio of 24 was obtained on the entire cell sample. This important increase in sensitivity together with the possibility of enhancing specifically cell wall signals and improving resolution really opens new avenues for the use of DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR as an on-cell investigation tool. (authors)

  1. The carotid artery as an alternative site for dynamic autoregulation measurement: an inter-observer reproducibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, R C; Saeed, N P; Bor-Seng-Shu, E; Teixeira, M J; Robinson, T G; Panerai, R B

    2016-07-01

    The internal carotid artery (ICA) has been proposed as an alternative site to the middle cerebral artery (MCA) to measure dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA) using transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD). Our aim was to test the inter-operator reproducibility of dCA assessment in the ICA and the effect of interaction amongst different variables (artery source × operator × intra-subject variability). Two operators measured blood flow velocity using TCD at the ICA and MCA simultaneously on each side in 12 healthy volunteers. The autoregulation index (ARI) was estimated by transfer function analysis. A two-way repeated measurements ANOVA with post-hoc Tukey tested the difference between ARI by different operators and interaction effects were analysed based on the generalized linear model. In this healthy population, no significant differences between operator and no interaction effects were identified amongst the different variables. This study reinforced the validity of using the ICA as an alternative site for the assessment of dCA. Further work is needed to confirm and extend our findings, particularly to disease populations. PMID:27134150

  2. Numerical distortion and effects of thermostat in molecular dynamics simulations of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are studied through molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The simulations are performed at temperatures of 1 and 300 K separately, with atomic interactions characterized by the second Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) potential, and temperature controlled by a certain thermostat, i.e. by separately using the velocity scaling, the Berendsen scheme, the Nose–Hoover scheme, and the generalized Langevin scheme. Results for a (5,5) SWCNT with a length of 24.5 nm show apparent distortions in nanotube configuration, which can further enter into periodic vibrations, except in simulations using the generalized Langevin thermostat, which is ascribed to periodic boundary conditions used in simulation. The periodic boundary conditions may implicitly be applied in the form of an inconsistent constraint along the axis of the nanotube. The combination of the inconsistent constraint with the cumulative errors in calculation causes the distortions of nanotubes. When the generalized Langevin thermostat is applied, inconsistently distributed errors are dispersed by the random forces, and so the distortions and vibrations disappear. This speculation is confirmed by simulation in the case without periodic boundary conditions, where no apparent distortion and vibration occur. It is also revealed that numerically induced distortions and vibrations occur only in simulation of nanotubes with a small diameter and a large length-to-diameter ratio. When MD simulation is applied to a system with a particular geometry, attention should be paid to avoiding the numerical distortion and the result infidelity. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  3. Extracellular Matrix Remodeling by Dynamic Strain in a Three-Dimensional Tissue-Engineered Human Airway Wall Model

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, Melanie M.; Sporn, Peter H. S.; Swartz, Melody A.

    2006-01-01

    Airway wall remodeling is a hallmark of asthma, characterized by subepithelial thickening and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Mechanical stress due to hyperresponsive smooth muscle cells may contribute to this remodeling, but its relevance in a three-dimensional environment (where the ECM plays an important role in modulating stresses felt by cells) is unclear. To characterize the effects of dynamic compression in ECM remodeling in a physiologically relevant three-dimensional environme...

  4. Dynamic modeling of the vascular system in the state-space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzon, Jorge E; Pisarello, Maria I; Alvarez Picaza, Carlos; Veglia, Julian I

    2010-01-01

    Modern control theory allows the representation of cardiac dynamics in the state-space, describing the operation of the vascular systems in terms of the cushioning effect of the arterial wall facing compliance changes. In this paper we use state equations to modeling the effect of the compliance variations on the arterial wall. The characteristics of the dynamics and of the calculated parameters of the model allow the distinction of hypertensive and normotensive subjects, in accordance to real clinical data. PMID:21096181

  5. Correlations of coronary plaque wall thickness with wall pressure and wall pressure gradient: a representative case study

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Biyue; Zheng Jie; Bach Richard; Tang Dalin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background There are two major hemodynamic stresses imposed at the blood arterial wall interface by flowing blood: the wall shear stress (WSS) acting tangentially to the wall, and the wall pressure (WP) acting normally to the wall. The role of flow wall shear stress in atherosclerosis progression has been under intensive investigation, while the impact of blood pressure on plaque progression has been under-studied. Method The correlations of wall thickness (WT) with wall pressure (WP...

  6. Powell dynamic identification of displacement parameters of indeterminate thin-walled curve box based on FCSE theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zhang; Chu-Wei Zhou; Jia-Shou Zhuo

    2011-01-01

    The FCSE controlling equation of pinned thinwalled curve box was derived and the indeterminate problem of continuous thin-walled curve box with diaphragm was solved based on flexibility theory. With Bayesian statistical theory, dynamic Bayesian error function of displacement parameters of indeterminate curve box was founded. The corresponding formulas of dynamic Bayesian expectation and variance were deduced. Combined with one-dimensional Fibonacci automatic search scheme of optimal step size,the Powell optimization theory was utilized to research the stochastic identification of displacement parameters of indeterminate thin-walled curve box. Then the identification steps were presented in detail and the corresponding calculation procedure was compiled. Through some classic examples, it is obtained that stochastic performances of systematic parameters and systematic responses are simultaneously deliberated in dynamic Bayesian error function. The one-dimensional optimization problem of the optimal step size is solved by adopting Fibonacci search method. And the Powell identification of displacement parameters of indeterminate thin-walled curve box has satisfied numerical stability and convergence, which demonstrates that the presented method and the compiled procedure are correct and reliable.The project was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China ( 10472045.10772078 and 11072108 and the Science Foundation of NUAA(S0851-013).During parameters' iterative processes, the Powell theory is irrelevant with the calculation of finite curve strip element (FCSE) partial differentiation, which proves high computation efficiency of the studied method.

  7. Heat stress redistributes blood flow in arteries of the brain during dynamic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kohei; Oue, Anna; Yoneya, Marina; Sadamoto, Tomoko; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesized that heat stress would decrease anterior and posterior cerebral blood flow (CBF) during exercise, and the reduction in anterior CBF would be partly associated with large increase in extracranial blood flow (BF). Nine subjects performed 40 min of semirecumbent cycling at 60% of the peak oxygen uptake in hot (35°C; Heat) and thermoneutral environments (25°C; Control). We evaluated BF and conductance (COND) in the external carotid artery (ECA), internal carotid artery (ICA), and vertebral artery (VA) using ultrasonography. During the Heat condition, ICA and VA BF were significantly increased 10 min after the start of exercise (PECA BF and COND at the end of Heat were both higher than levels in the Control condition (PECA BF during Heat was negatively correlated with a change in ICA BF (r= -0.75). Heat stress resulted in modification of the vascular response of head and brain arteries to exercise, which resulted in an alteration in the distribution of cardiac output. Moreover, a hyperthermia-induced increase in extracranial BF might compromise anterior CBF during exercise with heat stress. PMID:26846548

  8. Detailed Dynamic Heat Transfer in Thick Brick Walls Typical of Lille Metropolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antczak E.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of thermal transfer in old houses massive walls offers a big interest permitting the understanding of their specificities and the choice of a suitable material for their eventual insulation. We propose to study the thermal transfer in massive brick walls that characterize the Northern Europe old houses. To do so, we will begin by defining the thermal transfer mode: we proved that the transfer mode can be reduced to a unidirectional transfer. Then, an experimental wall is built and submitted to two different solicitation types (constant temperature in steady state mode and sinusoidal temperature through a wooden insulated box containing a radiator. The interest of these solicitations is to determine the thermal properties of the wall: the steady-state regime permits to determine the thermal resistances of the system when the harmonic regime permits to determine the thermal capacities of the system.

  9. Fungal Cell Wall Dynamics and Infection Site Microenvironments: Signal Integration and Infection Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Shepardson, Kelly M.; Cramer, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Upon entrance into the host, fungi encounter a myriad of host effector products and microenvironments that they sense and adapt to for survival. Alterations of the structure and composition of the cell wall is a major fungal adaptation mechanism to evade these environments. Here we discuss recent findings of host-microenvironmental induced fungal cell wall changes, including structure, composition, and protein content, and their effects on host immune responses. A take home message from these...

  10. Coupling between Current and Dynamic Magnetization : from Domain Walls to Spin Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucassen, M. E.

    2012-05-01

    So far, we have derived some general expressions for domain-wall motion and the spin motive force. We have seen that the β parameter plays a large role in both subjects. In all chapters of this thesis, there is an emphasis on the determination of this parameter. We also know how to incorporate thermal fluctuations for rigid domain walls, as shown above. In Chapter 2, we study a different kind of fluctuations: shot noise. This noise is caused by the fact that an electric current consists of electrons, and therefore has fluctuations. In the process, we also compute transmission and reflection coefficients for a rigid domain wall, and from them the linear momentum transfer. More work on fluctuations is done in Chapter 3. Here, we consider a (extrinsically pinned) rigid domain wall under the influence of thermal fluctuations that induces a current via spin motive force. We compute how the resulting noise in the current is related to the β parameter. In Chapter 4 we look into in more detail into the spin motive forces from field driven domain walls. Using micro magnetic simulations, we compute the spin motive force due to vortex domain walls explicitly. As mentioned before, this gives qualitatively different results than for a rigid domain wall. The final subject in Chapter 5 is the application of the general expression for spin motive forces to magnons. Although this might seem to be unrelated to domain-wall motion, this calculation allows us to relate the β parameter to macroscopic transport coefficients. This work was supported by Stichting voor Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM), the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO), and by the European Research Council (ERC) under the Seventh Framework Program (FP7).

  11. Dynamic Response and Signal to Noise Ratio Investigation of NIR-FBG Dynamic Sensing System for Monitoring Thin- walled Composite Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafizi, Z. M.; Epaarachchi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Optical fiber systems for dynamic response measurement become an attractive study nowadays especially in the field of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). This work presents the investigation of an optical fiber sensor system utilizing Near Infra-Red Fiber Bragg Grating (NIR-FBG) sensor for SHM of a thin-walled composite structure. In this study, a comparison between the experimental result and simulation study using finite element analysis has been presented. By comparing both results, the FBG dynamic sensing system was shown to have an excellent capability in acquiring dynamic response due to flexural wave propagations. In the meantime, a signal to noise ratio (SNR) study was also performed to several FBG dynamic sensor systems; particularly to see the comparison between NIR-FBG sensor and 1550 nm FBG sensor. Furthermore, with a proper configuration, an NIR-FBG system was proved to have better performance than the 1550 nm based FBG sensor.

  12. Correlation between arterial wall stiffness, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide, functional and structural myocardial abnormalities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiac autonomic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriya Aleksandrovna Serhiyenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess arterial wall stiffness, plasma levels of of N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, as well as functional state and structure of the myocardium in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN.Materials and Methods. The study involved a total of 65 patients with T2DM. 12 had no evidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD or CAN, 14 were diagnosed with subclinical stage of CAN, 18 – with functional stage, and 21 – with organic stage. We measured aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV, aortic augmentation index (AIx, brachial artery AIx, ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI and plasma levels of NT-proBNP. Clinical examination included ECG, Holter monitoring, ambulatory BP measurement and echocardiography.Results. Patients with isolated T2DM showed a trend for increased vascular wall stiffness. PWV was increased in patients with subclinical stage of CAN. Aortic and brachial AIx, PWV and AASI were elevated in patients with functional stage of CAN, PWV being significantly higher vs. subclinical CAN subgroup. Organic stage was characterized by pathologically increased values of all primary parameters; PWV and AASI were significantly higher compared with other groups. Development and progression of CAN was accompanied by an increase in NT-proBNP plasma levels. Concentration of NT-proBNP was in direct correlation with left ventricular mass (LVM and PWV. PWV and LVM values also directly correlated between themselves.Conclusion. Development and progression of CAN in patients with T2DM is accompanied by an increase in vascular wall stiffness. The elevation of plasma NT-proBNP in patients with T2DM correlates with the development of CAN and is significantly and independently associated with an increase in LVM and PWV. Our data suggests the pathophysiological interconnection between metabolic, functional and structural myocardial abnormalities in patients with T2DM and CAN.

  13. Dynamical scaling, domain-growth kinetics, and domain-wall shapes of quenched two-dimensional anisotropic XY models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Praestgaard, Eigil

    1988-01-01

    infinite to zero temperature as well as to nonzero temperatures below the ordering transition. The continuous nature of the spin variables causes the domain walls to be ‘‘soft’’ and characterized by a finite thickness. The steady-state thickness of the walls can be varied by a model parameter, P. At zero...... obeys dynamical scaling and the shape of the dynamical scaling function pertaining to the structure factor is found to depend on P. Specifically, this function is described by a Porod-law behavior, q-ω, where ω increases with the wall softness. The kinetic exponent, which describes how the linear domain...... size varies with time, R(t)∼tn, is for both models at zero temperature determined to be n≃0.25, independent of P. At finite temperatures, the growth kinetics is found to cross over to the Lifshitz-Allen-Cahn law characterized by n≃0.50. The results support the idea of two separate zero...

  14. Synthetic reconstruction of dynamic blood flow in cortical arteries using optical coherence tomography for the evaluation of vessel compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraghis, Edward; Bolduc, Virginie; Gillis, Marc-Antoine; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Thorin, Éric; Boudoux, Caroline; Lesage, Frédéric

    2011-03-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has recently been used to produce 3D angiography of microvasculature in the rodent brain in-vivo and blood flow maps of large vessels. Key enabling developments were novel algorithms for detecting Doppler shifts produced by moving scatterers and new scanning protocols tailored to increase sensitivity to small flow speeds. These progresses were pushed by the need for a non invasive imaging modality to monitor quantitative blood flow at a higher resolution and a greater depth than could be achieved by other means. The rationale for this work originates from new hypotheses regarding the role of blood regulation in neurodegenerative diseases and from current investigations of animal models of vascular degeneration. In this work we demonstrate the synthetic reconstruction of dynamic blood flow in mice over the course of a single cardiac cycle in an 800μm wide by ~ 3mm deep B-Frame slice with a lateral resolution of 10μm and a depth resolution of 7μm. Images were taken using a cranial window over the exposed parietal bone of mice skull. Electrocardiography (ECG) recordings were co registered with the OCT A lines at high temporal resolution. QRS peak detection was then used to locate the time value of each A-line in the cardiac cycle and to reconstruct a synthetic temporal frame over one cardiac cycle. Doppler speed in this cardiac cycle was used to measure temporal variations of flow inside arteries and of their area. Three dimensional volume scans yielded measurements of quantitative blood flow on the same arteries. Using these informations a measure of compliance could be established. Comparing measures between atherosclerotic (ATX) and wild type (WT) mice revealed higher blood flow in WT mice, suggested lower systemic compliance in the ATX group but higher compliance of cerebral vasculature on these mice. These results are consistent with expectations showing that OCT is a potential tool for in-vivo arterial compliance evaluation.

  15. Noninvasive Monitoring of Arterial Viscoelastic Indices Using a Foil-type Pressure Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Hiromi; Hirano, Harutoyo; Kutluk, Abdugheni; Tsuji, Toshio; Fukuda, Osamu; Ueno, Naohiro; Ukawa, Teiji; Nakamura, Ryuji; Saeki, Noboru; Kawamoto, Masashi; Yoshizumi, Masao

    This paper proposes a noninvasive method for estimating the dynamic characteristics of arterial walls using pulse waves measured in various parts of the body by a foil-type pressure sensor. The sensor not only has high sensitivity and flexibility but also features the ability to continuously measure the alternating-current component of pulse waves. These capabilities make it suitable for estimating the dynamic characteristics of arterial walls. In this paper, a foil-type pressure sensor was employed to measure pulse waves based on the tonometry approach, and a method of estimating changes in arterial viscoelastic indices was proposed based on the measured pulse waves and photoplethysmograms. In order to accurately measure blood pressure, first, we examined suitable mechanical forces to the sensor, and found that values of 5-25[N] yielded the best performance. We then estimated the arterial viscoelastic indices of a radial artery and a dorsal pedis artery when mechanical pain stimuli were applied to the subjects. The results suggested that the estimated indices can be used to quantitatively assess vascular response caused by sympathicotonia. We thus concluded that the proposed method enabled noninvasive measurement of pulse waves in the dorsal pedis artery and estimation of arterial viscoelastic indices.

  16. Single-walled gold nanotubes grown in carbon nanotubes: Molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The single-walled gold nanotubes (SWGNT), grown in the confined small diameter (ds depends on both of the gold tube's length and diameter, which is greatly different from the multi-layer gold nanowires (GNWs). Our simulation results present a new way to produce efficiently the SWGNTs, which could be very useful in the nanoelectronic devices if confirmed by future experiments.

  17. Some factors affecting the dynamics of a plasma-wall interaction simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope mixing and thermal desorption from samples exposed in a glow discharge apparatus were used to study the factors affecting hydrogen recycle and wall inventory. Conditions were chosen to be similar to those expected at the walls in today's experimental fusion devices. The size and nature of the hydrogen reservoir in the wall after plasma pulses was investigated by thermal desorption techniques. Large amounts of deuterium, i.e., 5 x 1015 D cm-2 remain in the sample 4 min after a single 200 ms plasma pulse. While this result may be explained by a model using bulk diffusion and traps, it is suggested that either a spectrum of desorption energies, or a concentration dependent recombination coefficient, may also be useful in describing the thermal desorption processes. Experiments with various pumping conditions show that readsorption of molecular hydrogen isotopes on the wall should be considered in modeling hydrogen recycle and isotope changeover processes. HD formation without plasmas confirms the role readsorption plays. (orig.)

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation for nanoscale deep indentation of a copper substrate by single-walled carbon nanotube tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep nanoindentation of a copper substrate by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been analyzed using molecular dynamics simulations. Three categories of SWCNTs and their relationship with temperature and nanotube length have been extensively investigated. The results of this comprehensive quantitative analysis for deep indentation demonstrate that only SWCNTs with relatively short lengths can indent into a substrate up to a desired depth without buckling. Most notably, a permanent hollow hole with a high aspect ratio will be produced on the copper substrate, while copper atoms in close proximity to the hole are only slightly disordered

  19. Charm spectroscopy on dynamical 2+1 flavor domain wall fermion lattices with a relativistic heavy quark action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min Li; Huey-Wen Lin

    2007-10-01

    We present a preliminary calculation of the charmonium spectrum using the dynamical 2+1 flavor $24^3\\times 64$ domain wall fermion lattice configurations generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations. We use the relativistic heavy quark action with 3 parameters non-perturbatively determined by matching to experimental quantities. Chiral extrapolation is done on four light sea quark masses from 0.005 to 0.03, with $m_s=0.04$ and $m_{res}=0.003$. We can either predict meson masses assuming the lattice spacing is known from other methods, or calculate the lattice spacing using those quantities.

  20. A Computational Fluid Dynamic Study of Blood Flow Within the Coiled Umbilical Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, David; Denier, James; Mattner, Trent; Khong, Yee

    2013-11-01

    The umbilical cord is the lifeline of the fetus throughout gestation. In a normal pregnancy it facilitates the supply of oxygen and nutrients from the placenta via a single vein, in addition to the return of deoxygenated blood from the developing embryo or fetus via two umbilical arteries. Despite the major role it plays in the growth of the fetus, pathologies of the umbilical cord are poorly understood. In particular, variations in the cord geometry, which typically forms a helical arrangement, have been correlated with adverse outcomes in pregnancy. Cords exhibiting either abnormally low or high levels of coiling have been associated with pathological results including growth-restriction and fetal demise. Despite this, the methodology currently employed by clinicians to characterize umbilical pathologies can misdiagnose cords and is prone to error. In this talk a computational model of blood flow within rigid three-dimensional structures representative of the umbilical arteries will be presented. This study determined that the current characterization was unable to differentiate between cords which exhibited clinically distinguishable flow properties, including the cord pressure drop, which provides a measure of the loading on the fetal heart.

  1. Low frequency arterial wall movements for indirect blood pressure measurement in man. Validation of a method for non-invasive assessment of blood pressure under the influence of isoprenaline and angiotensin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, U; Belz, G G

    1991-05-01

    In order to measure blood pressure noninvasively, the second derivative of the low frequency wall movements of the brachial artery were registered with a piezo-electric pressure probe during deflation of a Riva-Rocci cuff along with the actual cuff pressure. Two characteristic phenomena of this signal have been suggested to reflect systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Appearance of a positive spike phenomenon (S) was suggested to indicate systolic blood pressure and disappearance of a negative preanacrotic notch (D) to indicate diastolic blood pressure. To prove the validity of these suggestions, these phenomena were assessed in 10 young healthy males during isoprenaline and angiotensin induced changes of blood pressure. Intraarterial (A. radialis) and auscultatory (A. brachialis) blood pressures were recorded simultaneously. Determination of systolic blood pressure with the S phenomenon agreed well with invasive and auscultatory results. Invasive diastolic values agreed well with the cuff pressure at the last signal before disappearance of the preanacrotic notch (D1). Data from auscultation agreed less well with the D1 phenomenon. With increasing doses of isoprenaline, the diastolic measurements (D1) tended to be lower than the invasive ones. However, this discrepancy was far discreeter than that seen with ordinary auscultatory blood pressure measurement. We therefore conclude that registrations of low frequency arterial wall movements yield distinct characteristic spike phenomena useful for measurement of blood pressure in good agreement with the invasive method. In addition, the method provides clearly documented records and should be useful in situations which rely on a valid indirect method. PMID:1898428

  2. Detection of the posterior superior alveolar artery in the lateral sinus wall using computed tomography/cone beam computed tomography: a prevalence meta-analysis study and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Centelles, P; Loira-Gago, M; Seoane-Romero, J M; Takkouche, B; Monteiro, L; Seoane, J

    2015-11-01

    A systematic search of MEDLINE, Embase, and Proceedings Web of Science was undertaken to assess the prevalence of the posterior superior alveolar artery (PSAA) in the lateral sinus wall in sinus lift patients, as identified using computed tomography (CT)/cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). For inclusion, the article had to report PSAA detection in the bony wall using CT and/or CBCT in patients with subsinus edentulism. Studies on post-mortem findings, mixed samples (living and cadaveric), those presenting pooled results only, or studies performed for a sinus pathology were excluded. Heterogeneity was checked using an adapted version of the DerSimonian and Laird Q test, and quantified by calculating the proportion of the total variance due to between-study variance (Ri statistic). Eight hundred and eleven single papers were reviewed and filtered according to the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Ten studies were selected (1647 patients and 2740 maxillary sinuses (study unit)). The pooled prevalence of PSAA was 62.02 (95% confidence interval (CI) 46.33-77.71). CBCT studies detected PSAA more frequently (78.12, 95% CI 61.25-94.98) than CT studies (51.19, 95% CI 42.33-60.05). Conventional CT revealed thicker arteries than CBCT. It is concluded that PSAA detection is more frequent when CBCT explorations are used. Additional comparative studies controlling for potential confounding factors are needed to ascertain the actual diagnostic value of radiographic explorations for assessing the PSAA prior to sinus floor elevation procedures. PMID:26215383

  3. Arterial Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version AMERICAN THORACIC SOCIETY Patient Information Series Arterial Catheterization An arterial catheter is a thin, hollow tube ... PHYSICIANS: AND COPY Why Do I Need Arterial Catheterization? Common reasons an arterial catheterization is done include: ■ ...

  4. Theoretical study of hydrogen adsorption in single-walled carbon nanotubes by first principles molecular dynamics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adsorption of hydrogen molecules in finite chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was presented using the first-principles plane-wave pseudopotential molecular dynamics simulations method. The hydrogen storages of different diameter nanotubes were studied. The simulation results of hydrogen storage in SWCNTs show that: (1) When the physisorption happens, the H2 can adsorb in both the cavity of tube and the crevice between tubes. The hydrogen adsorption energy of SWCNTs inner is all higher than that outside of the tube, but the intact H2 molecules can't go through the tube wall and enter tube inner. (2) When the chemisorption happens, the hydrogen adsorption first appears at the edge of SWCNTs. C atoms bonded with H atoms result in the structural deformation in parts of tube wall and tension of SWCNTs would aggrandize with the increment of the C-H bonds, so the system is unsteady. (3) Along with the increment of the diameter, the difference of hydrogen adsorption capability between the inside and outside of each SWCNT drops off. (authors)

  5. Growth dynamics of inner tubes inside cobaltocene-filled single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharlamova, M. V.; Kramberger, Christian; Saito, Takeshi; Shiozawa, Hidetsugu; Pichler, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We have synthesized cobaltocene-filled 1.7-nm-mean diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and transformed them into double-walled carbon nanotubes by annealing at temperatures between 500 and 1000 °C for 2 h in vacuum. We analyze the temperature-dependent inner tube growth inside the filled SWCNTs by Raman spectroscopy. The changes in intensity of the Raman peaks of inner tubes with the diameters ranging from 0.832 to 1.321 nm with increasing annealing temperature are traced. It is revealed that the growth temperatures of larger diameter inner tubes are higher than the ones of smaller diameter tubes. A decrease in the diameter of the inner tubes by ~0.4 nm leads to a decrease in the growth temperature by ~200 °C.

  6. Statics and field-driven dynamics of transverse domain walls in biaxial nanowires under uniform transverse magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we report analytical results on transverse domain wall (TDW) statics and field-driven dynamics in quasi-one-dimensional biaxial nanowires under arbitrary uniform transverse magnetic fields (TMFs) based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. Without axial driving fields, the static TDW should be symmetric about its center while twisted in its azimuthal angle distribution. By decoupling polar and azimuthal degrees of freedom, an approximate solution is provided which reproduces these features to a great extent. When an axial driving field is applied, the dynamical behavior of a TDW is viewed as the response of its static profile to external excitations. By means of the asymptotic expansion method, the TDW velocity in the traveling-wave mode is obtained, which provides the extent and boundary of the "velocity-enhancement" effect of TMFs on TDWs in biaxial nanowires. Finally, numerical simulations are performed and strongly support our analytics.

  7. Diffusion of H2 and D2 Confined in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Quantum Dynamics and Confinement Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondelo-Martell, Manel; Huarte-Larrañaga, Fermín

    2016-08-25

    We present quantum dynamics calculations of the diffusion constant of H2 and D2 along a single-walled carbon nanotube at temperatures between 50 and 150 K. We calculate the respective diffusion rates in the low-pressure limit by adapting well-known approaches and methods from the chemical dynamics field using two different potential energy surfaces to model the C-H interaction. Our results predict a usual kinetic isotope effect, with H2 diffusing faster than D2 in the higher temperature range but a reverse trend at temperatures below 50-70 K. These findings are consistent with experimental observation in similar systems and can be explained by the different effective size of both isotopes resulting from their different zero-point energy. PMID:27459476

  8. Thermal Conductivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube with Internal Heat Source Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan-Wei; Cao, Bing-Yang

    2013-12-01

    The thermal conductivity of (5, 5) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with an internal heat source is investigated by using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulation incorporating uniform heat source and heat source-and-sink schemes. Compared with SWNTs without an internal heat source, i.e., by a fixed-temperature difference scheme, the thermal conductivity of SWNTs with an internal heat source is much lower, by as much as half in some cases, though it still increases with an increase of the tube length. Based on the theory of phonon dynamics, a function called the phonon free path distribution is defined to develop a simple one-dimensional heat conduction model considering an internal heat source, which can explain diffusive-ballistic heat transport in carbon nanotubes well.

  9. Hierarchical structure and dynamics of plant cell wall studied using x-rays

    OpenAIRE

    Svedström, Kirsi

    2012-01-01

    The interest in wood and its main constituent, cellulose, is growing continuously. This can be explained by the demands of sustainable development and the extending scope of applications enabled by novel materials like nanocrystalline cellulose. Outstanding mechanical properties are one of the main reasons for the usability of wood. However, details on the ultrastructure of wood cell wall are still lacking, and thus also the origin for the mechanical properties is partly unknown. The various ...

  10. Dynamic Response of High Rise Structures Under The Influence of Shear Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Khasim Mutwalli; Dr. Shaik Kamal Mohammed Azam

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the procedure for seismic performance estimation of high-rise buildings based on a concept of the capacity spectrum method. In 3D analytical model of thirty storied buildings have been generated for symmetric buildings Models and analyzed using structural analysis tool ETABS. The analytical model of the building includes all important components that influence the mass, strength, stiffness and deformability of the structure. To study the effect of concrete core wall & shea...

  11. The dynamics of a capsule in a wall-bounded oscillating shear flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, LaiLai; Brandt, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The motion of an initially spherical capsule in a wall-bounded oscillating shear flow is investigated via an accelerated boundary integral implementation. The neo-Hookean model is used as the constitutive law of the capsule membrane. The maximum wall-normal migration is observed when the oscillation period of the imposed shear is of the order of the relaxation time of the elastic membrane; hence, the optimal capillary number scales with the inverse of the oscillation frequency and the ratio agrees well with the theoretical prediction in the limit of high-frequency oscillation. The migration velocity decreases monotonically with the frequency of the applied shear and the capsule-wall distance. We report a significant correlation between the capsule lateral migration and the normal stress difference induced in the flow. The periodic variation of the capsule deformation is roughly in phase with that of the migration velocity and normal stress difference, with twice the frequency of the imposed shear. The maximum...

  12. The Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Soft-Wall AdS/QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    Gauge/Gravity dualities open the non-perturbative realms of strongly-coupled gauge theories to analytic treatment. Anti-de Sitter Space/Conformal Field The- ory, one way of connecting gravity dual models to gauge theories, is a correspon- dence between a ten-dimensional Type IIB superstring theory in AdS5 \\times S 5 and a N = 4 super Yang Mills theory. To describe systems that are experimentally ac- cessible, however, the formal correspondence is modified into a phenomenological duality between a five-dimensional gravity model and a strongly coupled QCD-like gauge theory. This duality is referred to as AdS/QCD. This work explores aspects of the soft-wall AdS/QCD model. The phrase 'soft wall' refers to the means of breaking the conformal symmetry and introducing a mass scale to the gauge side of the duality. We add higher-order terms to the soft-wall Lagrangian and calculate the effect on physical observables. Meson mass spectra gain a more complex structure, exhibiting a better match with the experimental val...

  13. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Takara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V CW = rib cage (V RC + abdomen (V AB] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE V CW increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V CW regulation as EEV CW increased non-linearly in 17/30 "hyperinflators" and decreased in 13/30 "non-hyperinflators" (P < 0.05. EEV AB decreased slightly in 8 of the "hyperinflators", thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI V CW (P < 0.05. In contrast, decreases in EEV CW in the "non-hyperinflators" were due to the combination of stable EEV RC with marked reductions in EEV AB. These patients showed lower EIV CW and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05. Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV CW regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001. However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  14. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T.M.; Barbosa, P.; Rodrigues, M.K.; Oliveira, M.F.; Nery, L.E. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neder, J.A. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V{sub CW}) = rib cage (V{sub RC}) + abdomen (V{sub AB})] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) V{sub CW} increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V{sub CW} regulation as EEV{sub CW} increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEV{sub AB} decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) V{sub CW} (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEV{sub CW} in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEV{sub RC} with marked reductions in EEV{sub AB}. These patients showed lower EIV{sub CW} and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV{sub CW} regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  15. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(VCW) = rib cage (VRC) + abdomen (VAB)] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) VCW increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of VCW regulation as EEVCW increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEVAB decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) VCW (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEVCW in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEVRC with marked reductions in EEVAB. These patients showed lower EIVCW and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIVCW regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment

  16. Vortex dynamics and wall shear stress behaviour associated with an elliptic jet impinging upon a flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J.; New, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Vortical structures and dynamics of a Re h = 2100 elliptic jet impinging upon a flat plate were studied at H/ d h = 1, 2 and 4 jet-to-plate separation distances. Flow investigations were conducted along both its major and minor planes using laser-induced fluorescence and digital particle image velocimetry techniques. Results show that the impingement process along the major plane largely consists of primary jet ring-vortex and wall-separated secondary vortex formations, where they subsequently separate from the flat plate at smaller H/ d h = 1 and 2 separation distances. Key vortex formation locations occur closer to the impingement point as the separation distance increases. Interestingly, braid vortices and rib structures begin to take part in the impingement process at H/ d h = 4 and wave instabilities dominate the flow field. In contrast, significantly more coherent primary and secondary vortices with physically larger vortex core sizes and higher vortex strengths are observed along the minor plane, with no signs of braid vortices and rib structures. Lastly, influences of these different flow dynamics on the major and minor plane instantaneous and mean skin friction coefficient levels are investigated to shed light on the effects of separation distance on the wall shear stress distributions.

  17. Medullary hemangioblastoma in a child with von Hippel-Lindau disease: vascular tumor perfusion depicted by arterial spin labeling and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Ra, Young-Shin

    2015-07-01

    Medullary hemangioblastoma is very rare in children. Based on small nodular enhancement with peritumoral edema and without dilated feeding arteries on conventional MRI, hemangioblastoma, pilocytic astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, and ganglioglioma were included in the differential diagnosis of the medullary tumor. In this case report, the authors emphasize the diagnostic value of arterial spin labeling and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in demonstrating vascular tumor perfusion of hemangioblastoma in a 12-year-old boy who was later found to have von Hippel-Lindau disease. PMID:25885801

  18. Pharmacological modulation of arterial stiffness.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2011-09-10

    Arterial stiffness has emerged as an important marker of cardiovascular risk in various populations and reflects the cumulative effect of cardiovascular risk factors on large arteries, which in turn is modulated by genetic background. Arterial stiffness is determined by the composition of the arterial wall and the arrangement of these components, and can be studied in humans non-invasively. Age and distending pressure are two major factors influencing large artery stiffness. Change in arterial stiffness with drugs is an important endpoint in clinical trials, although evidence for arterial stiffness as a therapeutic target still needs to be confirmed. Drugs that independently affect arterial stiffness include antihypertensive drugs, mostly blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, hormone replacement therapy and some antidiabetic drugs such as glitazones. While the quest continues for \\'de-stiffening drugs\\

  19. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in purified and as-grown single-walled carbon nanotube films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Yong-Bing; Song Li; Zhang Chun-Yu; Wang Li; Fu Pan-Ming; Zhang Zhi-Guo; Xie Si-Shen; Wang Guo-Ping

    2005-01-01

    Ultrafast time-resolved optical transmissions in purified and as-grown single-walled carbon nanotube films are measured at a temperature of 200K. The signal of the purified sample shows a crossover from photobleaching to photoabsorption. The former and the latter are interpreted as the state filling and the red shift of the π-plasmon,respectively. The signal of the as-grown sample can be perfectly fitted by a single-exponential with a time constant of 232fs. The disappearance of the negative component in the as-grown sample is attributed to the charge transfer between the semiconducting nanotubes and the impurities.

  20. Terahertz response in single-walled carbon nanotube transistor: a real-time quantum dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use time-dependent quantum wavepacket methods to simulate ballistic electron transport in a single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistor at terahertz frequencies (∼100 GHz-10 THz). We observe an electron resonance phenomenon in a sub-picosecond-scale time domain. Our simulation results clearly show that the electron resonance corresponds to the formation of the resonance cavity and the interference of the electron wavepackets, which is directly supported by recent experimental measurements (Zhong et al 2008 Nat. Nanotechnol. 3 201).

  1. Time-resolved magnetization dynamics of cross-tie domain walls in permalloy microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel, J; Kurde, J; Piantek, M; Kuch, W [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Sanchez-Barriga, J; Heitkamp, B; Kronast, F; Duerr, H A [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Elektronenspeicherring BESSY II, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Bayer, D; Aeschlimann, M, E-mail: jorge.miguel@fu-berlin.d [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger Strasse 46, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2009-12-02

    We report on a picosecond time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroic-photoelectron emission microscopy study of the evolution of the magnetization components of a microstructured permalloy platelet comprising three cross-tie domain walls. A laser-excited photoswitch has been used to apply a triangular 80 Oe, 160 ps magnetic pulse. Micromagnetic calculations agree well with the experimental results, both in time and frequency, illustrating the large angle precession in the magnetic domains with magnetization perpendicular to the applied pulse, and showing how the magnetic vortices revert their core magnetization while the antivortices remain unaffected.

  2. Domain-wall dynamics at micropatterned constrictions in ferromagnetic (Ga,Mn)As epilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Honolka, J.; Masmanidis, S.; Tang, H. X.; Roukes, M.L.; Awschalom, D. D.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of sub-µm geometric constrictions on 90° magnetic domain-wall nucleation and propagation in stripes of ferromagnetic (Ga0.95,Mn0.05)As was explored. Measurements of the magnetic switching behavior were performed during ramping of an external magnetic field at constant rate and at constant field in the time domain. Demagnetizing fields are found to play a crucial role in the switching behavior around the region of the constriction. Depending on the sample's initial magnetization ...

  3. Test of the diffusing-diffusivity mechanism using near-wall colloidal dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Matse, Mpumelelo

    2016-01-01

    The diffusing-diffusivity mechanism proposed by Chubynsky and Slater [PRL 113, 098302, 2014] predicts that, in environments where the diffusivity changes gradually, the displacement distribution becomes non-Gaussian, even though the mean-squared displacement (MSD) grows linearly with time. Here, we report single-particle tracking measurements of the diffusion of colloidal spheres near a planar wall. Because the local effective diffusivity is known, we have been able to carry out the first direct test of this mechanism for diffusion in inhomogeneous media.

  4. Seismic shear wall ISP NUPEC's seismic ultimate dynamic response test. Comparison report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the seismic design of a nuclear power plant, evaluation of the ultimate strength of the nuclear reactor building is an important subject for assessment of seismic reliability of the plant. In order to carry out the evaluation, the response characteristics of reinforced concrete seismic shear walls up to their ultimate state have to be understood. For this purpose, there is a need to develop reliable non-linear response analysis methods which enables the reliable ultimate strength evaluation of nuclear reactor buildings. Along with this need, many computer codes have been developed. These computer codes are compared. (K.A.)

  5. Hemodynamics in Idealized Stented Coronary Arteries: Important Stent Design Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Beier, Susann; Ormiston, John; Webster, Mark; Cater, John; Norris, Stuart; Medrano-Gracia, Pau; Young, Alistair; Cowan, Brett

    2015-01-01

    Stent induced hemodynamic changes in the coronary arteries are associated with higher risk of adverse clinical outcome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of stent design on wall shear stress (WSS), time average WSS, and WSS gradient (WSSG), in idealized stent geometries using computational fluid dynamics. Strut spacing, thickness, luminal protrusion, and malapposition were systematically investigated and a comparison made between two commercially available stents (Omega and...

  6. Dynamics of fragmentation and multiple vacancy generation in irradiated single-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results from mass spectrometry of clusters sputtered from Cs+ irradiated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a function of energy and dose identify the nature of the resulting damage in the form of multiple vacancy generation. For pristine SWCNTs at all Cs+ energies, C2 is the most dominant species, followed by C3, C4 and C1. The experiments were performed in three stages: in the first stage, Cs+ energy E(Cs+) was varied. During the second stage, the nanotubes were irradiated continuously at E(Cs+) = 5 keV for 1,800 s. Afterwards, the entire sequence of irradiation energies was repeated to differentiate between the fragmentation patterns of the pristine and of heavily irradiated SWCNTs. The sputtering and normalized yields identify the quantitative and relative extent of the ion-induced damage by creating double, triple and quadruple vacancies; the single vacancies are least favored. Sputtering from the heavily irradiated SWCNTs occurs not only from the damaged and fragmented nanotubes, but also from the inter-nanotube structures that are grown due to the accumulation of the sputtered clusters. Similar irradiation experiments were performed with the multi-walled carbon nanotubes; the results confirmed the dominant C2 followed by C3, C4 and C1

  7. Dual anterior descending coronary artery associated with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siqueira Luciane da L. V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The patient is a male with risk factors for coronary artery disease, who was referred for cardiac catheterization after acute myocardial infarction in the inferior wall. The patient underwent transluminal coronary angioplasty in the right coronary artery with successful stent implantation.

  8. Random perturbations of arterial blood pressure for the assessment of dynamic cerebral autoregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of cerebral autoregulation (CA) relies mostly on methods that modulate arterial blood pressure (ABP). Despite advances, the gold standard of assessment remains elusive and clinical practicality is limited. We investigate a novel approach of assessing CA, consisting of the intermittent application of thigh cuffs using square wave sequences. Our aim was to increase ABP variability whilst minimizing volunteer discomfort, thus improving assessment acceptability. Two random square wave sequences and two maximum pressure settings (80 and 150 mmHg) were used, corresponding to four manoeuvres that were conducted in random order after a baseline recording. The intermittent application of thigh cuffs resulted in an amplitude dependent increase in ABP (p = 0.001) and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) variability (p = 0.026) compared to baseline. No statistically significant differences in mean heart rate or heart rate variability were observed (p = 0.108 and p = 0.350, respectively), suggesting that no significant sympathetic response was elicited. No significant differences in the CBFV step response were observed, suggesting no distortion of autoregulatory parameters resulted from the use of thigh cuffs. We conclude that pseudorandom binary sequences are an effective and safe alternative for increasing ABP variability. This new approach shows great promise as a tool for the robust assessment of CA. (paper)

  9. Oxidant injury and dynamics or vitamin E incorporation in pulmonary artery endothelial cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2), an environmental oxidant, is known to cause peroxidative injury to pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAEC). Vitamin E (E), a dietary antioxidant, protects against free-radical-initiated injury and stabilizes cell membrane structure. Because E represents the only known hydrophobic antioxidant in the lipid bilayer, we hypothesize that site-specific injury from NO2 may differentially influence the incorporation of E and the stabilization of membrane structure in PAEC. To test this, confluent porcine PAEC were exposed to 5 ppm NO2 in 5% CO2 or air (control) for 24 hr. After exposure, cells were incubated wither with labeled (3H), unlabeled E, or with vehicle alone (control) for 24 hr. After incubation, incorporation of E was measured in mitochondrial (MT), microsomal (MS), and plasma membranes (PM). Alterations in physical state of these membranes were measured by monitoring fluorescence anisotrophy (rs) of diphenylhexatriene (DPH). Increases in rs represent decreases in fluidity. E incorporation in control MT, MS, and PM was 7.2, 5.3, and 21.8 nmol/mg protein, respectively. In NO2-exposed cells, E incorporation was increased in PM only (31.6 nmol/mg protein). As a result of increased E incorporation, rs values for DPH were significantly increased in PM. These results indicate that site-specific injury and the physical state of membrane lipids are determinants of E incorporation and the stability of membrane structure

  10. Renal blood flow regulation and arterial pressure fluctuations: a case study in nonlinear dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Marsh, D J

    1994-01-01

    approximately 35 mHz; all these variables are synchronized when the measurements are made in a single tubule. The autonomous nature of the oscillation is supported by simulations of the nephron and its vasculature, which show that for a reasonable representation of the dynamics of these structures and of the...... the feedback system, and the various delays in the system of which convective transport in the axis of the thick ascending limb and signal transmission between the macula densa and the afferent arteriole are the most important. The oscillation in TGF is an example of nonlinear dynamical behavior and...

  11. Dynamic pulmonary perfusion imaging in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the value of dynamic PPI in patients with IPAH. Methods: Twenty consecutive patients with IPAH underwent dynamic PPI and right ventricular catheterization. Ten healthy volunteers were also recruited in this study as control. Total lung ROI was drawn to calculate time-activity curves from dynamic PPI. Lung equilibrium time (LET), the duration from 99Tcm-MAA entering the lungs to equilibrium, was measured. Comparisons between two groups were carried out using t-test. Correlations between LET and hemodynamic parameters were determined by Pearson correlation analysis. Results: LET was significantly prolonged in IPAH patients over the control group ((33.9 ± 15.5) s vs (14.4 ± 3.7) s, t=5.340, P<0.001). Significant correlations were found between LET and mPAP (r=0.566, P<0.01) and between LET and total pulmonary resistance (TPR) measured by right heart catheterization (r=0.688, P<0.05). LET had a negative linear relationship with CI (r=-0.480, P<0.05). Conclusion: Dynamic PPI is a practical and noninvasive method for evaluating the haemodynamic function of right heart in patients with IPAH. (authors)

  12. Sustained hypoxia leads to the emergence of cells with enhanced growth, migratory, and promitogenic potentials within the distal pulmonary artery wall

    OpenAIRE

    Frid, Maria G.; Li, Min; Gnanasekharan, Meena; Burke, Danielle L.; Fragoso, Miguel; Strassheim, Derek; Sylman, Joanna L.; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2009-01-01

    All forms of chronic pulmonary hypertension (PH) are characterized by structural remodeling of the pulmonary artery (PA) media, a process previously attributed solely to changes in the phenotype of resident smooth muscle cells (SMC). However, recent experimental evidence in both systemic and pulmonary circulations suggests that other cell types, including circulating and local progenitors, contribute significantly to this process. The goal of this study was to determine if hypoxia-induced rem...

  13. Carotid Artery Wall Layer Dimensions during and after Pre-eclampsia : An investigation using non-invasive high-frequency ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Akhter, Tansim

    2013-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) later in life. The ‘gold standard’ for estimating cardiovascular risk - ultrasound assessment of the common carotid artery intima-media thickness (CCA-IMT) - does not convincingly demonstrate this increased risk. The aim of this thesis was to examine whether high-frequency (22 MHz) ultrasound assessment of the individual CCA intima and media layers and calculation of the intima/media (I/M) ratio - can indicate the...

  14. The dynamics of plant cell-wall polysaccharide decomposition in leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Isabel Eva; de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Harholt, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    The degradation of live plant biomass in fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants is poorly characterised but fundamental for understanding the mutual advantages and efficiency of this obligate nutritional symbiosis. Controversies about the extent to which the garden-symbiont Leucocoprinus gongylophorus...... map the occurrence of cell wall polymers in consecutive sections of the fungus garden of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior. We show that pectin, xyloglucan and some xylan epitopes are degraded, whereas more highly substituted xylan and cellulose epitopes remain as residuals in the waste...... material that the ants remove from their fungus garden. These results demonstrate that biomass entering leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens is only partially utilized and explain why disproportionally large amounts of plant material are needed to sustain colony growth. They also explain why substantial...

  15. The Effect of Shear Wall Distribution on the Dynamics of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inclusion of a soft storey in multistory concrete buildings is a feature gaining popularity in urban areas where land is of exorbitant cost. In earthquake prone zones, this feature has been observed in post earthquake investigations. Although engineers are prepared to accept the notion that a soft storey poses a weak link in Seismic Design, yet the idea demands better understanding. The following study illustrates the importance of the judicious distribution of shear walls. The selected building is analyzed through nine numerical models which address the behavior of framed structures. The parameters discussed include, inter alias, the fundamental period of vibration, lateral displacements, axial and shear forces. It is noticed that an abrupt change in stiffness between the soft storey and the level above is responsible for increasing the strength demand on first storey columns. Extending the elevator shafts throughout the soft storey is strongly recommended

  16. Detection of a coronary artery vessel wall: performance of 0.3 mm fine-cell detector computed tomography-a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Minoru [Multi-dimension Biomedical Imaging and Information Laboratory in Research Park, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Jinzaki, Masahiro; Tanami, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Kazuhiro; Ueno, Akihisa; Kuribayashi, Sachio [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nukui, Masatake; Imai, Yasuhiro; Ishihara, Yotaro; Nishide, Akihiko; Sasaki, Kosuke, E-mail: jinzaki@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [CT Engineering, GE Healthcare Japan, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-08-21

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether experimental fine-cell detector computed tomography with a 0.3125 mm cell (0.3 mm cell CT) can improve the detection of coronary vessel walls compared with conventional 64-slice computed tomography with a 0.625 mm cell (0.6 mm cell CT). A coronary vessel wall phantom was scanned using 0.6 mm cell CT and 0.3 mm cell CT. The data for 0.3 mm cell CT were obtained using four protocols: a radiation dose equal, double, triple or quadruple that were used in the 0.6 mm cell CT protocol. The detectable size of the vessel wall was assessed based on the first and second derivative functions, and the minimum measurable values were compared using a paired t-test. As a result, the minimum detectable wall thickness of 0.6 mm cell CT (1.5 mm) was significantly larger than that of 0.3 mm cell CT performed using the triple- and quadruple-dose protocols (0.9 mm) and the double-dose protocol (1.1 mm). The difference in the minimum detectable vessel wall thickness measured using 0.6 mm cell CT (1.5 {+-} 0.1 mm) and 0.3 mm cell CT (0.9 {+-} 0.1 mm, 1.1 {+-} 0.2 mm) was significant (p < 0.01). We concluded that 0.3 mm cell CT improved the detection of coronary vessel walls when a more than double-dose protocol was used compared with 0.6 mm cell CT.

  17. FE-analysis of dynamic creep-damage in thin-walled structures

    OpenAIRE

    Morachkovsky, Oleg; Breslavsky, Dmitry; Burlayenko, Vyacheslav

    2002-01-01

    The models for description of creep-damage behaviour in materials and thin shallow shells and plates deforming in conditions of joint action of static and fast cyclic load are given. The properties of the proposed material model were established by comparison of experimental and numerical data. The method for numerical simulation by in-house code of a dynamic creep and long-term strength of shallow shells and plates is created on the basis of the FEM. New laws of dynamic creep influence on st...

  18. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI assessment of hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume in peripheral arterial disease: initial findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas Versluis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the current study was to describe a method that assesses the hyperemic microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. The reversibly albumin binding contrast agent gadofosveset was used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI to assess the microvascular status in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD and healthy controls. In addition, the reproducibility of this method in healthy controls was determined. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten PAD patients with intermittent claudication and 10 healthy control subjects were included. Patients underwent contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the peripheral arteries, followed by one DCE MRI examination of the musculature of the calf. Healthy control subjects were examined twice on different days to determine normative values and the interreader and interscan reproducibility of the technique. The MRI protocol comprised dynamic imaging of contrast agent wash-in under reactive hyperemia conditions of the calf musculature. Using pharmacokinetic modeling the hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume (V(p, unit: % of the anterior tibial, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles was calculated. RESULTS: V(p was significantly lower for all muscle groups in PAD patients (4.3±1.6%, 5.0±3.3% and 6.1±3.6% for anterior tibial, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, respectively compared to healthy control subjects (9.1±2.0%, 8.9±1.9% and 9.3±2.1%. Differences in V(p between muscle groups were not significant. The coefficient of variation of V(p varied from 10-14% and 11-16% at interscan and interreader level, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Using DCE MRI after contrast-enhanced MR angiography with gadofosveset enables reproducible assessment of hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. V(p was lower in PAD patients than in healthy controls, which reflects a promising functional (hemodynamic biomarker for the

  19. Comparison of technetium-99m sestamibi left ventricular wall motion and perfusion studies with thallium-201 perfusion imaging: in search of the combination of variables with the highest accuracy in predicting coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of myocardial perfusion and ventricular function are expected to provide additional information in the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) To determine to what extent technetium-99m sestamibi wall motion yields different information compared with 99mTc-sestamibi and thallium-201 perfusion; (2) to test which information unique to either study is of value in diagnosing CAD; and (3) to assess the combination of variables with the highest diagnostic accuracy. Perfusion and wall motion scores (at rest and during exercise) obtained from visual and quantitative planar 201Tl and 99mTc-sestamibi scintigraphy of 60 patients with suspected CAD were compared with the angiographic results by means of a polytomous logistic regression model and the diagnostic values were compared with one another. All univariate variables were significantly related to the probability of CAD and its extent. Comparative studies revealed a large degree of correlation between 201Tl stress and redistribution variables. The rest 99mTc-sestamibi and wall motion studies contained partially different information. Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed the strongest diagnostic power for the combination of 201Tl visual analysis of the stress images with quantitative redistribution images (sensitivity 93%, specificity 71%). The diagnostic power was similar for all combinations of visual and quantitative analyses of the exercise and redistribution images. The strongest diagnostic power of the 99mTc-sestamibi variables was the score of the diastolic stress image (senstivity 91%, specificity 79%). Comparable sensitivity and specificity estimates were found when both optimal models were compared. Wall motion studies did not have additional diagnostic power. (orig./MG)

  20. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes with selected properties for dynamic filtration of pharmaceuticals and personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifei; Ma, Jing; Zhu, Jiaxin; Ye, Ning; Zhang, Xiaolei; Huang, Haiou

    2016-04-01

    In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with selected properties, including pristine MWCNT, hydroxylated MWCNT (H-MWCNT), thin-walled MWCNT with large inner diameter (L-MWCNT), aminated MWCNT, and high-purity MWCNT were investigated for dynamic removal of eight pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCP). The removal ratios of different PPCP by the pristine MWCNT followed a decreasing order of triclosan (0.93) > prometryn (0.71) > 4-acetylamino-antipyrine (0.67) > carbendazim (0.65) > caffeine (0.42) > ibuprofen (0.34) > acetaminophen (0.29) at 100 min of filtration. Similar or even higher PPCP removals were obtained for all PPCP as the influent concentration decreased, suggesting potential consistent PPCP removals at environmental PPCP concentrations. The removal ratio of acetaminophen was increased to 0.74 by using H-MWCNT. SRFA (Suwannee River fulvic acid) suppressed PPCP adsorption to MWCNT, to greater extents with increasing SRFA concentrations. The L-MWCNT, despite a large inner diameter of 52 ± 3 nm, did not provide better resistance to the competitive adsorption of SRFA than MWCNT with a small inner diameter of 10 ± 2 nm. Future research will be conducted to minimize the effect of SRFA and facilitate application of MWCNT to the treatment of PPCP-contaminated water. PMID:26845455

  1. Dynamic analysis of moisture transport through walls and associated cooling loads in the hot/humid climate of Florianopolis, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, N.; Winkelmann, F.C. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.; Lamberts, R.; Philippi, P.C.; Da Cunha Neto, J.A.B. [Federal Univ. of Santa Catarina, Florianopolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil). Mechanical Engineering Dept.

    1996-04-01

    The authors describe the use of a dynamic model of combined heat and mass transfer to analyze the effects on cooling loads of transient moisture storage and transport through walls with porous building materials, under varying boundary conditions. The materials studied were brick, lime mortar and autoclaved cellular concrete. The physical properties of these materials, such as mass transport coefficients, thermal conductivity and specific heat, were taken to be functions of moisture content. The simulation results were compared to those obtained by pure conduction heat transfer without moisture effects. Also analyzed were the influence on cooling loads of high moisture content due to rain soaking of materials, and the influence of solar radiation on sunny and cloudy days. The weather used was a hot/humid summer period in Florianopolis (South Brazil). It is shown that neglecting moisture migration or assuming that the physical properties of wall materials do not depend on moisture content can result in large errors in sensible and latent heat transfer.

  2. Gas dynamic and time resolved imaging studies of single-wall carbon nanotubes growth in the laser ablation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Rahul; Suzuki, S.; Kataura, H.; Achiba, Y.

    2001-10-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized by laser ablation of Ni-Co-graphite composite targets at 1200 °C under flowing argon. The effects of the temperature gradient near the target and the gas flow rate on the diameter distribution of SWNTs were studied in order to understand their growth dynamics. The diameter distribution of the SWNTs, analyzed by Raman spectroscopy, was dependent on the gas flow rate when there was a temperature gradient around the target. Time resolved scattering images from the ablated species at different flow rates indicated that velocities of backward moving species increased with increasing flow rate. These findings are used to estimate the time required for nucleation and the growth of SWNTs.

  3. STUDY OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC STABILITY OF THIN-WALLED BARS EXCITED BY PERIODICAL AXIAL EXTERNAL FORCES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minodora Maria PASĂRE

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In these paper, starting from the relations for the displacements and spinning the transversal section of a bar with thin walls of sections opened expressed by the corresponding influence functions and introducing the components of the exterior forces distributed and the moments of the exterior forces distributed due to the inertia forces, the exciting axial forces together with the following effect of these and of the reaction forces of the elastic environment for leaning it may reach to the system of the equations of parametric vibrations under the form of three integral equation These equations may serve for the study of vibrations of the bars, to study the static stability and to study the dynamic stability

  4. MR imaging of hepatocellular carcinoma: usefulness of four-phase dynamic imaging including early arterial phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Guk; Yu, Jeong Sik; Kim, Ki Whang; Kim, Tae Hoon; Jo, Byung June; Kim, Jai Keun; Oh, Sei Jung; Ahn, Chang Soo; Kim, Ji Hyung [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of four-phase dynamic MR imaging technique by analyzing the imaging features of hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC). We reviewed four-phase dynamic MR images of 63 lesions in 38 patients. MR imaging of the whole liver on gradient T1-weighted sequence was obtained at 10 seconds(phase 1), 35 seconds(phase 2), 60 seconds(phase 3), and 5 minutes(phase 4) after the start of Gd-DTPA(0.1 mmol/kg) hand injection(3-4cc/sec) through the vein. We evaluated the degree of lesional contrast enhancement during each phase by comparing surrounding liver parenchyma, and analyzed signal intensity in lesions over and less than 2cm, respectively. The number of lesions showing high signal intensity compared with surrounding liver parenchyma was 52(83%) during phase 1, 30(48%) during phase 2, 12(19%) during phase 3, and 4(6%) during phase 4. During each phase, the number of lesions with signal intensity lower than that of surrounding liver parenchyma was 7(11%), 2(3%), 7(11%) and 21(33%), respectively. Thirty-four lesions were enhanced only during phase 1 and eleven during only phase 2. In tumors less than 2cm(n=40), more enhanced lesions were during phase 1(n=33) than more during phase 2(n=16)(p=0.0020). During each phase, four-phase dynamic MR imaging is useful for the effective detection of HCC showing varying degrees of contrast enhancement.

  5. Effects of an impermeable wall in dissipative dynamics of saturated porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Pietro Artale

    2016-01-01

    A phase transition model for porous media in consolidation is studied. The model is able to describe the phenomenon of fluid-segregation during the consolidation process, i.e., the coexistence of two phases di?ering from fluid content inside the porous medium under static load. Considering pure Darcy dissipation, the dynamics is described by a Cahn-Hilliard-like system of partial differential equations (PDE). The goal, here, is to study the dynamics of the formation of stationary fluid-rich bubbles. The evolution of the strain and fluid density pro?files of the porous medium is analyzed in two physical situation: fluid free to flow through the boundaries of the medium and fluid flow prevented at one of the two boundaries. Morover, an analytic result on the position of the interface between the two phases is provided.

  6. The dynamics of plant cell-wall polysaccharide decomposition in leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel E Moller

    Full Text Available The degradation of live plant biomass in fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants is poorly characterised but fundamental for understanding the mutual advantages and efficiency of this obligate nutritional symbiosis. Controversies about the extent to which the garden-symbiont Leucocoprinus gongylophorus degrades cellulose have hampered our understanding of the selection forces that induced large scale herbivory and of the ensuing ecological footprint of these ants. Here we use a recently established technique, based on polysaccharide microarrays probed with antibodies and carbohydrate binding modules, to map the occurrence of cell wall polymers in consecutive sections of the fungus garden of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior. We show that pectin, xyloglucan and some xylan epitopes are degraded, whereas more highly substituted xylan and cellulose epitopes remain as residuals in the waste material that the ants remove from their fungus garden. These results demonstrate that biomass entering leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens is only partially utilized and explain why disproportionally large amounts of plant material are needed to sustain colony growth. They also explain why substantial communities of microbial and invertebrate symbionts have evolved associations with the dump material from leaf-cutting ant nests, to exploit decomposition niches that the ant garden-fungus does not utilize. Our approach thus provides detailed insight into the nutritional benefits and shortcomings associated with fungus-farming in ants.

  7. Dynamic interactions between poly(3-hexylthiophene) and single-walled carbon nanotubes in marginal solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanqi; Santos, Franceska A; Wagner, Taylor W; Tsoi, Eric; Zhang, Shanju

    2014-06-01

    Interfacial interactions between conjugated polymers and carbon nanotubes are pivotal in determining the device performance of nanotube-based polymer electronic devices. Here, we report on interfacial structures and crystallization kinetics of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) in the presence of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in anisole by means of transmission electron microscope (TEM) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy. Confined on SWNT surfaces, the P3HT forms nanofibril crystals perpendicular to the long axis of SWNTs. The equilibrium dissolution temperature of the P3HT crystals in anisole is determined to be 381 ± 10 K according to the Hoffman-Weeks extrapolation approach. Upon cooling, the polymer solution spontaneously undergoes a time-dependent chromism. Various kinetics factors such as crystallization temperature, concentration, and SWNT loading have been investigated. It is found that the growth rate (G) of the crystals scales with concentration (C) as G ∝ C(1.70±0.16). The Avrami model is utilized to analyze the nucleation mechanism and the Avrami exponents vary between 1.0 and 1.3. The Lauritzen-Hoffman theory is applied to study the chain-folding process. The fold surface free energy is calculated to be (5.28-11.9) × 10(-2) J m(-2). It is evident that the addition of 0.30 wt % SWNTs reduces the fold surface free energy by 55.6%. PMID:24856901

  8. Dynamic analysis with a fractional-order chaotic system for estimation of peripheral arterial disease in diabetic foot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lower-extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is caused by narrowing or occlusion of vessels in patients like type 2 diabetes mellitus, the elderly and smokers. Patients with PAD are mostly asymptomatic; typical early symptoms of this limb-threatening disorder are intermittent claudication and leg pain, suggesting the necessity for accurate diagnosis by invasive angiography and ankle-brachial pressure index. This index acts as a gold standard reference for PAD diagnosis and categorizes its severity into normal, low-grade and high-grade, with respective cut-off points of ≥0.9, 0.9–0.5 and <0.5. PAD can be assessed using photoplethysmography as a diagnostic screening tool, displaying changes in pulse transit time and shape, and dissimilarities of these changes between lower limbs. The present report proposed photoplethysmogram with fractional-order chaotic system to assess PAD in 14 diabetics and 11 healthy adults, with analysis of dynamic errors based on various butterfly motion patterns, and color relational analysis as classifier for pattern recognition. The results show that the classification of PAD severity among these testees was achieved with high accuracy and efficiency. This noninvasive methodology potentially provides timing and accessible feedback to patients with asymptomatic PAD and their physicians for further invasive diagnosis or strict management of risk factors to intervene in the disease progression. (paper)

  9. Dynamic analysis with a fractional-order chaotic system for estimation of peripheral arterial disease in diabetic foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chien-Ming; Du, Yi-Chun; Wu, Jian-Xing; Lin, Chia-Hung; Ho, Yueh-Ren; Chen, Tainsong

    2013-08-01

    Lower-extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is caused by narrowing or occlusion of vessels in patients like type 2 diabetes mellitus, the elderly and smokers. Patients with PAD are mostly asymptomatic; typical early symptoms of this limb-threatening disorder are intermittent claudication and leg pain, suggesting the necessity for accurate diagnosis by invasive angiography and ankle-brachial pressure index. This index acts as a gold standard reference for PAD diagnosis and categorizes its severity into normal, low-grade and high-grade, with respective cut-off points of ≥0.9, 0.9-0.5 and diabetics and 11 healthy adults, with analysis of dynamic errors based on various butterfly motion patterns, and color relational analysis as classifier for pattern recognition. The results show that the classification of PAD severity among these testees was achieved with high accuracy and efficiency. This noninvasive methodology potentially provides timing and accessible feedback to patients with asymptomatic PAD and their physicians for further invasive diagnosis or strict management of risk factors to intervene in the disease progression.

  10. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winant, Celeste D.; Aparici, Carina Mari; Zelnik, Yuval R.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bacharach, Stephen L.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomography (PET)) and SPECT/D (dynamic SPECT from database of SPECT phantom projections). SPECT/P simulated SPECT-like dynamic projections using reprojections of reconstructed dynamic 94Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (94Tc-MIBI) PET images acquired in three human subjects (1 min infusion). This approach was used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in rate parameters K1 for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 or 54 s. Blood input and myocardium tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K1. For the second method (SPECT/D), an anthropomorphic cardiac torso phantom was used to create real SPECT dynamic projection data of a tracer distribution derived from 94Tc-MIBI PET scans in the blood pool, myocardium, liver and background. This method introduced attenuation, collimation and scatter into the modeling of dynamic SPECT projections. Both approaches were used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in parameters for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 and 54 s. Dynamic cardiac SPECT was also performed in a human subject at rest using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of 99mTc-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 min. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using the same spatiotemporal splines. The spatiotemporal maximum

  11. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomography (PET)) and SPECT/D (dynamic SPECT from database of SPECT phantom projections). SPECT/P simulated SPECT-like dynamic projections using reprojections of reconstructed dynamic 94Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (94Tc-MIBI) PET images acquired in three human subjects (1 min infusion). This approach was used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in rate parameters K1 for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 or 54 s. Blood input and myocardium tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K1. For the second method (SPECT/D), an anthropomorphic cardiac torso phantom was used to create real SPECT dynamic projection data of a tracer distribution derived from 94Tc-MIBI PET scans in the blood pool, myocardium, liver and background. This method introduced attenuation, collimation and scatter into the modeling of dynamic SPECT projections. Both approaches were used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in parameters for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 and 54 s. Dynamic cardiac SPECT was also performed in a human subject at rest using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of 99mTc-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 min. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using the same spatiotemporal splines. The spatiotemporal maximum

  12. Statical and dynamical soil-structure interaction between diaphragm wall and its surrounding soil in the embankment dam with diaphragm wall under soil core. Renzoku chichuheki wo yusuru firu dam no chichuheki to jiban tono seiteki doteki sogo sayo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanazawa, K.; Nishigori, T. (Electric Power Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)); Watanabe, H. (Saitama University, Saitama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering); Takada, M. (Chiba Prefectural Government, Chiba (Japan))

    1992-12-15

    In case of applying the diaphragm cutoff wall to the foundation treatment of embankment dam to be constructed on the alluvial deposit, it is indispensable to take the seismic influence into consideration for the design. In the present paper, study was made of statical and dynamical soil-structure interaction between the diaphragm wall and its surrounding soil. Study through numerical analysis was also made of dam stability for the dams typified by Tadami's which was taken as an example. The influence of rigidity was particularly studied of diaphragm wall through comparison between the ordinary concrete (A) and bentonite concrete (B), and the dynamical characteristics were confirmed through in-situ vibration test. For example, the following was elucidated as a result of test: As for the state of stress at the time of embankment completion, the diaphragm wall which uses high rigidity A gives a strong stress concentration on its top and tends to simultaneously generate a weak point in stress distribution due to the arch action on the lateral surface near its top. However in case of using low rigidity B, it is considerably improved. 16 refs., 22 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Sex differences in intracranial arterial bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon M; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Morgan, Michael K; Mardal, Kent-Andre; Faulder, Kenneth; Magnus, Jeanette H; Waterloo, Knut; Romner, Bertil; Ingebrigtsen, Tor

    2010-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious condition, occurring more frequently in females than in males. SAH is mainly caused by rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which is formed by localized dilation of the intracranial arterial vessel wall, usually at the apex of the arterial bifurcation. T...... female preponderance is usually explained by systemic factors (hormonal influences and intrinsic wall weakness); however, the uneven sex distribution of intracranial aneurysms suggests a possible physiologic factor-a local sex difference in the intracranial arteries....

  14. Modelling the performance of the tapered artery heat pipe design for use in the radiator of the solar dynamic power system of the NASA Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Austin Lewis

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents a computer program developed to model the steady-state performance of the tapered artery heat pipe for use in the radiator of the solar dynamic power system of the NASA Space Station. The program solves six governing equations to ascertain which one is limiting the maximum heat transfer rate of the heat pipe. The present model appeared to be slightly better than the LTV model in matching the 1-g data for the standard 15-ft test heat pipe.

  15. Feasibility of Using Limited-Population-Based Arterial Input Function for Pharmacokinetic Modeling of Osteosarcoma Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI Data

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, YA; Huang, Wei; Panicek, David M.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Koutcher, Jason A

    2008-01-01

    For clinical dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI studies, it is often not possible to obtain reliable arterial input function (AIF) in each measurement. Thus, it is important to find a representative AIF for pharmacokinetic modeling of DCE-MRI data when individual AIF (Ind-AIF) measurements are not available. A total of 16 patients with osteosarcomas in the lower extremity (knee region) underwent multislice DCE-MRI. Reliable Ind-AIFs were obtained in five patients with a contrast injection ra...

  16. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of ethanol steam reforming in catalytic wall microchannels

    OpenAIRE

    Uriz, I.; Arzamendi, G.; López, E.; Llorca Piqué, Jordi; Gandía, L.M.

    2011-01-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation study of the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) in microreactors with square channels has been carried out. A phenomenological kinetic model describing the ESR on a Co3O4–ZnO catalyst has been established and implemented in the CFD codes. This model includes the ethanol dehydrogenation to acetaldehyde, ethanol decomposition to CO and CH4, acetaldehyde steam reforming to H2 and CO2 and water–gas shift as the reactions des...

  17. Dynamical Casimir-Polder force on a partially dressed atom near a conducting wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the time evolution of the Casimir-Polder force acting on a neutral atom in front of a perfectly conducting plate, when the system starts its unitary evolution from a partially dressed state. We solve the Heisenberg equations for both atomic and field quantum operators, exploiting a series expansion with respect to the electric charge and an iterative technique. After discussing the behavior of the time-dependent force on an initially partially dressed atom, we analyze a possible experimental scheme to prepare the partially dressed state and the observability of this new dynamical effect.

  18. Dynamical Casimir-Polder force on a partially dressed atom near a conducting wall

    CERN Document Server

    Messina, Riccardo; Passante, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    We study the time evolution of the Casimir-Polder force acting on a neutral atom in front of a perfectly conducting plate, when the system starts its unitary evolution from a partially dressed state. We solve the Heisenberg equations for both atomic and field quantum operators, exploiting a series expansion with respect to the electric charge and an iterative technique. After discussing the behaviour of the time-dependent force on an initially partially-dressed atom, we analyze a possible experimental scheme to prepare the partially dressed state and the observability of this new dynamical effect.

  19. 3D Discrete Dislocation Dynamics Applied to Interactions between Dislocation Walls and Particles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Záležák, Tomáš; Dlouhý, Antonín

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 3 (2012), s. 450-452. ISSN 0587-4246. [ International Symposium on Physics of Materials /12./ - ISPMA 12. Prague, 04.09.2011-08.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GD106/09/H035; GA ČR GA202/09/2073; GA MŠk OC 162 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : 3D discrete dislocation dynamics * tilt boundary * migration * diffusion * pecipitation hardening Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.531, year: 2012

  20. Automatic recognition and validation of the common carotid artery wall segmentation in 100 longitudinal ultrasound images: an integrated approach using feature selection, fitting and classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Filippo; Zeng, Guang; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2010-03-01

    Most of the algorithms for the common carotid artery (CCA) segmentation require human interaction. The aim of this study is to show a novel accurate algorithm for the computer-based automated tracing of CCA in longitudinal B-Mode ultrasound images. One hundred ultrasound B-Mode longitudinal images of the CCA were processed to delineate the region of interest containing the artery. The algorithm is based on geometric feature extraction, line fitting, and classification. Output of the algorithm is the tracings of the near and far adventitia layers. Performance of the algorithm was validated against human tracings (ground truth) and benchmarked with a previously developed automated technique. Ninety-eight images were correctly processed, resulting in an overall system error (with respect to ground truth) equal to 0.18 +/- 0.17 mm (near adventitia) and 0.17 +/- 0.24 mm (far adventitia). In far adventitia detection, our novel technique outperformed the current standard method, which showed overall system errors equal to 0.07 +/- 0.07 mm and 0.49 +/- 0.27 mm for near and far adventitia, respectively. We also showed that our new technique is quite insensitive to noise and has performance independent on the subset of images used for training the classifiers. Superior architecture of this methodology could constitute a general basis for the development of completely automatic CCA segmentation strategies.

  1. Thermal stability of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes: an O(N) tight-binding molecular dynamics simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Order(N) tight-binding molecular dynamics (TBMD) simulations are performed to investigate the thermal stability of (10,10) metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Periodic boundary conditions (PBCs) are applied in the axial direction. The velocity Verlet algorithm along with the canonical ensemble molecular dynamics (NVT) is used to simulate the tubes at the targeted temperatures. The effects of slow and rapid temperature increases on the physical characteristics, structural stability and the energetics of the tube are investigated and compared. Simulations are carried out starting from room temperature and the temperature is raised in steps of 300 K. The stability of the simulated metallic SWCNT is examined at each step before it is heated to higher temperatures. The first indication of structural deformation is observed at 600 K. For higher heat treatments the deformations are more pronounced and the bond-breaking temperature is reached around 2500 K. Gradual (slow) heating and thermal equilibrium (fast heating) methods give the value of radial thermal expansion coefficient in the temperature range between 300 and 600 K as 0.31 x 10-5 and 0.089 x 10-5 K-1, respectively. After 600 K, both methods give the same value of 0.089 x 10-5 K-1. The ratio of the total energy per atom with respect to temperature is found to be 3 x 10-4 eV K-1

  2. Dynamics of charge migration in poly(para-phenylene vinylene) films and nanocomposites with single walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulazzi, E; Galli, D E; Lefrant, S; Wéry, J; Massuyeau, F; Faulques, E

    2016-02-01

    We present in this paper a comprehensive study of the migration dynamics of the charges underlying transient photoluminescence (PL) processes in poly(para-phenylene vinylene) (PPV) samples from room temperature to 13 K. In order to interpret experimental data, we have modelled the long-time PL decays (from 100 to 1000 ps) using a time function proportional to [Formula: see text] in which the parameter α is evaluated in a Monte Carlo simulation on polymeric chains. The one dimensional chains (2000 sites long) are formed by random sequences of long and short conjugated segments whose bimodal distributions have been elaborated in previous works in order to reproduce the PL band shapes and peak positions. Intra-chain and inter-chain dynamics are taken into account in the migration of the photogenerated charges from short to long conjugated segments. The statistical analysis is performed by averaging over a total of 10(6) trials for each initial conditions. The values of α have been determined for pristine PPV films and PPV composite films with single-walled carbon nanotubes. This theoretical analysis is in good agreement with experimental data and provides a coherent description for the migration of the photogenerated charges in such inhomogeneous polymeric systems. PMID:26744381

  3. Molecular dynamics for lateral surface adhesion and peeling behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes on gold surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Adhesion and peeling behaviors of SWCNTs are investigated by detailed, fully atomistic MD simulations. ► Adhesion energy of SWCNTs are discussed. ► Dynamical behaviors of SWCNTs in low temperature adhesion are analyzed. ► Adhesion strengths of SWCNTs obtained from MD simulations are compared with the predictions of Hamaker theory and JKR model. - Abstract: Functional gecko-inspired adhesives have attracted a lot of research attention in the last decade. In this work, the lateral surface adhesion and normal peeling-off behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on gold substrates are investigated by performing detailed, fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effects of the diameter and adhered length of CNTs on the adhesive properties were systematically examined. The simulation results indicate that adhesion energies between the SWCNTs and the Au surface varied from 220 to 320 mJ m−2 over the reported chirality range. The adhesion forces on the lateral surface and the tip of the nanotubes obtained from MD simulations agree very well with the predictions of Hamaker theory and Johnson–Kendall–Roberts (JKR) model. The analyses of covalent bonds indicate that the SWCNTs exhibited excellent flexibility and extensibility when adhering at low temperatures (∼100 K). This mechanism substantially increases adhesion time compared to that obtained at higher temperatures (300–700 K), which makes SWCNTs promising for biomimetic adhesives in ultra-low temperature surroundings.

  4. Molecular dynamics for lateral surface adhesion and peeling behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes on gold surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Pei-Hsing, E-mail: phh@mail.npust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Pingtung 912, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adhesion and peeling behaviors of SWCNTs are investigated by detailed, fully atomistic MD simulations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adhesion energy of SWCNTs are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamical behaviors of SWCNTs in low temperature adhesion are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adhesion strengths of SWCNTs obtained from MD simulations are compared with the predictions of Hamaker theory and JKR model. - Abstract: Functional gecko-inspired adhesives have attracted a lot of research attention in the last decade. In this work, the lateral surface adhesion and normal peeling-off behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on gold substrates are investigated by performing detailed, fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The effects of the diameter and adhered length of CNTs on the adhesive properties were systematically examined. The simulation results indicate that adhesion energies between the SWCNTs and the Au surface varied from 220 to 320 mJ m{sup -2} over the reported chirality range. The adhesion forces on the lateral surface and the tip of the nanotubes obtained from MD simulations agree very well with the predictions of Hamaker theory and Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model. The analyses of covalent bonds indicate that the SWCNTs exhibited excellent flexibility and extensibility when adhering at low temperatures ({approx}100 K). This mechanism substantially increases adhesion time compared to that obtained at higher temperatures (300-700 K), which makes SWCNTs promising for biomimetic adhesives in ultra-low temperature surroundings.

  5. Characteristic dynamic modes and domain-wall motion in magnetic nanotubes excited by resonant rotating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jaehak; Kim, Junhoe; Kim, Bosung; Cho, Young-Jun; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2016-07-01

    We performed micromagnetic numerical calculations to explore a cylindrical nanotube's magnetization dynamics and domain-wall (DW) motions driven by eigen-circular-rotating magnetic fields of different frequencies. We discovered the presence of two different localized DW oscillations as well as asymmetric ferromagnetic resonance precession and azimuthal spin-wave modes at the corresponding resonant frequencies of the circular-rotating fields. Associated with these intrinsic modes, there exist very contrasting DW motions of different speed and propagation direction for a given DW chirality. The direction and speed of the DW propagation were found to be controllable according to the rotation sense and frequency of noncontact circular-rotating fields. Furthermore, spin-wave emissions from the moving DW were observed at a specific field frequency along with their Doppler effect. This work furthers the fundamental understanding of soft magnetic nanotubes' intrinsic dynamic modes and spin-wave emissions and offers an efficient means of manipulating the speed and direction of their DW propagations.

  6. An aberrant right lateral branch from right internal thoracic artery

    OpenAIRE

    Salve VM; Ratnaprabha C

    2010-01-01

    The internal thoracic artery is the largest artery of the thoracic wall. The internal thoracic artery is often mobilized for coronary artery bypass grafting. During routine dissection (MBBS Batch 2009-2010) of a middle aged male cadaver at Dr. Pinnamaneni Siddhartha Institute of Medical Sciences & Research Foundation, Gannavaram, (INDIA); an aberrant right lateral branch from right internal thoracic artery was found. It arose from right internal thoracic artery behind right first rib. It ran ...

  7. The effect of the conductivity of drift chamber walls on the dynamics of a relativistic electron beam with a virtual cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badarin, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Koronovskii, A. A.; Hramov, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of conductivity of walls of a drift chamber of the axial vircator on the behavior of a relativistic electron beam with a supercritical current was investigated. The dynamics of a relativistic electron beam is shown to be characterized by the formation of a virtual cathode of complex structure with two or three potential minima in the azimuthal direction, which rotate around the drift space axis. It is established that variation in the conductivity of drift chamber walls leads to stepwise switching of the generation frequency and a sharp change in the output power. Dependences of the output radiation power of the investigated vircator system on the conductivity of drift chamber walls for two characteristic regimes of the dynamics of a relativistic electron beam were obtained.

  8. Enhancement of heterogeneous electron transfer dynamics tuning single-walled carbon nanotube forest height and density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical sensors are growing in number and importance. Surface modifications could enhance charge transfer properties occurring at the interfaces and carbon nanoassemblies is one of the most used strategy to improve sensitivity to measurements. However, well defined protocols of surface modification are needed in order to fabricate electrochemically effective nanostructured sensors. Therefore, we aim at investigating the electrochemical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) forests as a function of height and nanotube surface density. Height of the forests is accurately controlled tuning the oxidation temperatures in the range of 293–313 K of SWCNTs. The surface density of carbon nanotubes was adjusted developing cysteamine/2-mercaptoethanol (CYS/ME) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold surfaces at different ratios (1:0, 1:3, 1:10, 1:100, 0:1). Apparent electron transfer rate was analyzed with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and experimental data show that transfer rate constant, kapp, increases from 1 × 10−4 cm/s to 6 × 10−4 cm/s rising oxidation temperatures (i.e. lowering forest height); therefore forests with reduced height show higher electron transfer rate without significant difference in electrodic reversibility. On the other hand, tuning SWCNT surface density, forests obtained with no ME show optimal Δpeak value of 0.087 ± 0.015 V and highest kapp value of 9.15 × 10−3 cm/s. Surprisingly, electrochemical surface area analysis shows that samples with lower amount of cysteamine have an active surface area three times bigger than samples with 1:3 CYS/ME ratio. Low electrochemical efficiency associated with high active surface may be related to unwanted SWCNT bundles adsorbed on the surface for 1:10 and 1:100 CYS/ME ratio samples as confirmed by AFM morphological characterization. Further investigation shows that a transition from a semi-infinite planar diffusion mechanism to a radial diffusion one takes place

  9. Binding of single walled carbon nanotube to WT and mutant HIV-1 proteases: analysis of flap dynamics and binding mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Wang, Yixuan

    2012-09-01

    Most of the currently treated HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR) inhibitors have been prone to suffer from the mutations associated drug resistance. Therefore, it is necessary to search for potent alternatives against the drug resistance. In the current study we have tested the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as an inhibitor in wild type (WT) as well as in three primary mutants (I50V(PR), V82A(PR) and I84V(PR)) of the HIV-1-PR through docking the SWCNT in the active site region, and then performed all-atom MD simulations for the complexes. The conformational dynamics of HIV-PR with a 20 ns trajectory reveals that the SWCNT can effectively bind to the HIV-1-PR active site and regulate the flap dynamics such as maintaining the flap-flap closed. To gain an insight into the binding affinity, we also performed the MM-PBSA based binding free energy calculations for the four HIV-PR/SWCNT complexes. It was observed that, although the binding between the SWCNT and the HIV-PR decreases due to the mutations, the SWCNTs bind to the HIV-PRs 3-5 folds stronger than the most potent HIV-1-PR inhibitor, TMC114. Remarkably, the significant interactions with binding energy higher than 1kcal/mol focus on the flap and active regions, which favors closing flap-flap and deactivating the active residues of the HIV-PR. The flap dynamics and binding strength information for HIV-PR and SWCNTs can help design SWCNT-based HIV-1-PR inhibitors. PMID:23142620

  10. Computational fluid dynamics study of liquid droplet impingement erosion in the inner wall of a bent pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bent pipe wall thinning phenomenon has been often found at the elbow of pipelines in the power engineering industry. Liquid droplet impingement (LDI) erosion could be regarded to be one of the major causes of unexpected troubles occasionally occurred in the inner bent pipe surface. In this paper, three-dimensional numerical simulations are conducted for a bent pipe. Typically the pipe diameter is 170mm and the bending angle is 90 degree, the mass flow rate of droplet is 4.5 x 10-3 kg/s with the velocity of 280m/s at the entry. The calculations employ a two-phase flow model. A computational fluid dynamic tool has been adopted by using one-way and two-way fluid-droplet coupled system in high Reynolds number regions. This computational fluid model is built up by incompressible Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations using different turbulent flow computational models and the SIMPLE algorithm, and the numerical droplet model adopts the Lagrangian approach. The momentum transfers between droplet and carrier fluid are calculated by using two different fluid-droplet coupled methods. The interactional force between carrier and droplet are taken into account by momentum transfer in Eulerian-Lagrangian approaches. Based on the carrier streamlines and droplet trajectories, the two-way calculation using the interactional momentum transfer calculations could be a more appropriate model to simulate the bent pipe wall thinning phenomena, the effects of droplet size are also demonstrated numerically. Finally, it is shown that turbulence models are not sensitive to the involved droplets. (author)

  11. Analysis of carotid artery plaque and wall boundaries on CT images by using a semi-automatic method based on level set model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potentialities of a semi-automated technique in the detection and measurement of the carotid artery plaque. Twenty-two consecutive patients (18 males, 4 females; mean age 62 years) examined with MDCTA from January 2011 to March 2011 were included in this retrospective study. Carotid arteries are examined with a 16-multi-detector-row CT system, and for each patient, the most diseased carotid was selected. In the first phase, the carotid plaque was identified and one experienced radiologist manually traced the inner and outer boundaries by using polyline and radial distance method (PDM and RDM, respectively). In the second phase, the carotid inner and outer boundaries were traced with an automated algorithm: level-set-method (LSM). Data were compared by using Pearson rho correlation, Bland-Altman, and regression. A total of 715 slices were analyzed. The mean thickness of the plaque using the reference PDM was 1.86 mm whereas using the LSM-PDM was 1.96 mm; using the reference RDM was 2.06 mm whereas using the LSM-RDM was 2.03 mm. The correlation values between the references, the LSM, the PDM and the RDM were 0.8428, 0.9921, 0.745 and 0.6425. Bland-Altman demonstrated a very good agreement in particular with the RDM method. Results of our study indicate that LSM method can automatically measure the thickness of the plaque and that the best results are obtained with the RDM. Our results suggest that advanced computer-based algorithms can identify and trace the plaque boundaries like an experienced human reader. (orig.)

  12. Arterial spin labelling MRI for assessment of cerebral perfusion in children with moyamoya disease: comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetti, Robert [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); O' Gorman, Ruth [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Center for MR Research, Zurich (Switzerland); Khan, Nadia [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Moyamoya Center, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Kellenberger, Christian J.; Scheer, Ianina [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-05-15

    This study seeks to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of cerebral perfusion imaging with arterial spin labelling (ASL) MR imaging in children with moyamoya disease compared to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) imaging. Ten children (7 females; age, 9.2 {+-} 5.4 years) with moyamoya disease underwent cerebral perfusion imaging with ASL and DSC on a 3-T MRI scanner in the same session. Cerebral perfusion images were acquired with ASL (pulsed continuous 3D ASL sequence, 32 axial slices, TR = 5.5 s, TE = 25 ms, FOV = 24 cm, matrix = 128 x 128) and DSC (gradient echo EPI sequence, 35 volumes of 28 axial slices, TR = 2,000 ms, TE = 36 ms, FOV = 24 cm, matrix = 96 x 96, 0.2 ml/kg Gd-DOTA). Cerebral blood flow maps were generated. ASL and DSC images were qualitatively assessed regarding perfusion of left and right ACA, MCA, and PCA territories by two independent readers using a 3-point-Likert scale and quantitative relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was calculated. Correlation between ASL and DSC for qualitative and quantitative assessment and the accuracy of ASL for the detection of reduced perfusion per territory with DSC serving as the standard of reference were calculated. With a good interreader agreement ({kappa} = 0.62) qualitative perfusion assessment with ASL and DSC showed a strong and significant correlation ({rho} = 0.77; p < 0.001), as did quantitative rCBF (r = 0.79; p < 0.001). ASL showed a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 94 %, 93 %, and 93 % for the detection of reduced perfusion per territory. In children with moyamoya disease, unenhanced ASL enables the detection of reduced perfusion per vascular territory with a good accuracy compared to contrast-enhanced DSC. (orig.)

  13. Arterial spin labelling MRI for assessment of cerebral perfusion in children with moyamoya disease: comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study seeks to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of cerebral perfusion imaging with arterial spin labelling (ASL) MR imaging in children with moyamoya disease compared to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) imaging. Ten children (7 females; age, 9.2 ± 5.4 years) with moyamoya disease underwent cerebral perfusion imaging with ASL and DSC on a 3-T MRI scanner in the same session. Cerebral perfusion images were acquired with ASL (pulsed continuous 3D ASL sequence, 32 axial slices, TR = 5.5 s, TE = 25 ms, FOV = 24 cm, matrix = 128 x 128) and DSC (gradient echo EPI sequence, 35 volumes of 28 axial slices, TR = 2,000 ms, TE = 36 ms, FOV = 24 cm, matrix = 96 x 96, 0.2 ml/kg Gd-DOTA). Cerebral blood flow maps were generated. ASL and DSC images were qualitatively assessed regarding perfusion of left and right ACA, MCA, and PCA territories by two independent readers using a 3-point-Likert scale and quantitative relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was calculated. Correlation between ASL and DSC for qualitative and quantitative assessment and the accuracy of ASL for the detection of reduced perfusion per territory with DSC serving as the standard of reference were calculated. With a good interreader agreement (κ = 0.62) qualitative perfusion assessment with ASL and DSC showed a strong and significant correlation (ρ = 0.77; p < 0.001), as did quantitative rCBF (r = 0.79; p < 0.001). ASL showed a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 94 %, 93 %, and 93 % for the detection of reduced perfusion per territory. In children with moyamoya disease, unenhanced ASL enables the detection of reduced perfusion per vascular territory with a good accuracy compared to contrast-enhanced DSC. (orig.)

  14. Assessment of the dynamic interactions between heart rate and arterial pressure by the cross time–frequency analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a framework for the characterization of the dynamic interactions between RR variability (RRV) and systolic arterial pressure variability (SAPV) is proposed. The methodology accounts for the intrinsic non-stationarity of the cardiovascular system and includes the assessment of both the strength and the prevalent direction of local coupling. The smoothed pseudo-Wigner–Ville distribution (SPWVD) is used to estimate the time–frequency (TF) power, coherence, and phase-difference spectra with fine TF resolution. The interactions between the signals are quantified by time-varying indices, including the local coupling, phase differences, time delay, and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Every index is extracted from a specific TF region, localized by combining information from the different spectra. In 14 healthy subjects, a head-up tilt provoked an abrupt decrease in the cardiovascular coupling; a rapid change in the phase difference (from 0.37 ± 0.23 to −0.27 ± 0.22 rad) and time delay (from 0.26 ± 0.14 to −0.16 ± 0.16 s) in the high-frequency band; and a decrease in the BRS (from 23.72 ± 7.66 to 6.92 ± 2.51 ms mmHg−1). In the low-frequency range, during a head-up tilt, restoration of the baseline level of cardiovascular coupling took about 2 min and SAPV preceded RRV by about 0.85 s during the whole test. The analysis of the Eurobavar data set, which includes subjects with intact as well as impaired baroreflex, showed that the presented methodology represents an improved TF generalization of traditional time-invariant methodologies and can reveal dysfunctions in subjects with baroreflex impairment. Additionally, the results also suggest the use of non-stationary signal-processing techniques to analyze signals recorded under conditions that are usually supposed to be stationary. (paper)

  15. Flow Instability Detected by High-Resolution Computational Fluid Dynamics in Fifty-Six Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varble, Nicole; Xiang, Jianping; Lin, Ning; Levy, Elad; Meng, Hui

    2016-06-01

    Recent high-resolution computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies have detected persistent flow instability in intracranial aneurysms (IAs) that was not observed in previous in silico studies. These flow fluctuations have shown incidental association with rupture in a small aneurysm dataset. The aims of this study are to explore the capabilities and limitations of a commercial cfd solver in capturing such velocity fluctuations, whether fluctuation kinetic energy (fKE) as a marker to quantify such instability could be a potential parameter to predict aneurysm rupture, and what geometric parameters might be associated with such fluctuations. First, we confirmed that the second-order discretization schemes and high spatial and temporal resolutions are required to capture these aneurysmal flow fluctuations. Next, we analyzed 56 patient-specific middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms (12 ruptured) by transient, high-resolution CFD simulations with a cycle-averaged, constant inflow boundary condition. Finally, to explore the mechanism by which such flow instabilities might arise, we investigated correlations between fKE and several aneurysm geometrical parameters. Our results show that flow instabilities were present in 8 of 56 MCA aneurysms, all of which were unruptured bifurcation aneurysms. Statistical analysis revealed that fKE could not differentiate ruptured from unruptured aneurysms. Thus, our study does not lend support to these flow instabilities (based on a cycle-averaged constant inflow as opposed to peak velocity) being a marker for rupture. We found a positive correlation between fKE and aneurysm size as well as size ratio. This suggests that the intrinsic flow instability may be associated with the breakdown of an inflow jet penetrating the aneurysm space. PMID:27109451

  16. Elastic-plastic dynamic behavior of guard pipes due to sudden opening of longitudinal cracks in the inner pipe and crash to the guard pipe wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Integrity of guard pipes is an important parameter in the design of nuclear steam supply systems. A guard pipe shall withstand all kinds of postulated inner pipe breaks without failure. Sudden opening of a crack in the inner pipe and crash of crack borders to the guard pipe wall represent a shock problem where complex phenomena of dynamic plastification as well as dynamic behavior of the entire system have to be taken in consideration. The problem was analyzed by means of Finite Element computation using the general purpose program MARC. Equation of motion was resolved by direct integration using the Newmark β-operator. Analysis shows that after 1,2 m sec crack borders touch the guard pipe wall for the first time. At this moment a considerable amount of local plastification appears in the inner pipe wall, while the guard pipe is nearly unstressed. After initial touching, the crack borders begin to slip along the guard pipe wall. Subsequently, a short withdrawal of the crack borders and a new crash occur, while the inner pipe rolls along the guard pipe wall. The analysis procedure described is suitable for designing numerous guard pipe geometries as well as U-Bolt restraint systems which have to withstand high-energy pipe rupture impact. (orig.)

  17. Additional value of adenosine-stress dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging in the reclassification of severity of coronary artery stenosis at coronary CT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To assess the additional value of adenosine-stress dynamic computed tomography (CT) perfusion (ASDCTP) imaging compared with coronary CT angiography (CCTA) alone to detect significant coronary artery stenosis for each threshold of 50% and 70% diameter stenosis. Materials and methods: The study included 34 patients (65 ± 11 years, 79% men) with suspected coronary artery diseases who underwent ASDCTP imaging using a 128-section dual-source CT (DSCT) and invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Two investigators classified coronary artery stenosis on CCTA as severe or not. If appropriate image quality could not be acquired due to artefacts, the segment was classified as a lesion with significant stenosis. After the interpretation of ASDCTP imaging, the degree of stenosis was reclassified. All parameters of diagnostic accuracy were calculated before and after ASDCTP analysis for detection of significant coronary artery stenosis with ICA as the reference standard. Results: The diagnostic accuracy parameters per vessel for the detection of ≥50% stenosis before and after ASDCTP analysis changed as follows: sensitivity, from 80% to 83%; specificity, from 83% to 98%; positive predictive value (PPV), from 87% to 98%; and negative predictive value (NPV), from 75% to 80%. The addition of ASDCTP resulted in reclassification from one class of stenosis severity to another in a significant number of vessels with threshold of 50% stenosis [net reclassification improvement (NRI), 0.176; p < 0.01]. Conversely, the addition of ASDCTP did not result in significant reclassification of stenosis severity in vessels with threshold of 70% stenosis (NRI, 0.034; p = 0.51). Conclusions: ASDCTP imaging provides incremental value in the detection of significant coronary artery stenosis using a threshold of 50%

  18. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian; Chen, Da

    2016-07-01

    The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  19. Outcomes of Small Coronary Artery Stenting with Bare-Metal Stents vs. Drug-Eluting Stents: Results from the NHLBI Dynamic Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Shailja V.; Luna, Michael; Selzer, Faith; Marroquin, Oscar C.; Mulukutla, Suresh R.; Abbott, J. Dawn; Holper, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Examine one year outcomes of patients with small coronary arteries in the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Dynamic Registry (NHLBI) undergoing drug-eluting stent (DES) vs. bare-metal stent (BMS) placement. Background While randomized trials of DES vs. BMS demonstrate reduced target vessel revascularization, it is unclear if similar outcomes are seen in unselected patients after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for small coronary arteries. Methods Utilizing patients from the NHLBI Registry Waves 1–3 for BMS (1997–2002) and Waves 4–5 for DES (2004 and 2006), demographic, angiographic, in-hospital and one-year outcome data of patients with small coronary arteries treated with BMS (n= 686) vs. DES (n= 669) were evaluated. Small coronary artery was defined as 2.50 – 3.00 mm in diameter. Results Compared to BMS-treated patients, the mean lesion length of treated lesions was longer in the DES treated group (16.7 vs. 13.1 mm, p<0.001) and the mean reference vessel size of attempted lesions was smaller (2.6 vs. 2.7 mm, p<0.001). Adjusted analyses of one year outcomes revealed that DES patients were at lower risk to undergo coronary artery bypass graft surgery (Hazard Ratio [HR] 0.40, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.17–0.95, p=0.04), repeat PCI (HR 0.53, 95% CI 0.35–0.82, p=0.004), and experience the combined major adverse cardiovascular event rate (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.42–0.83, p=0.002). There was no difference in the risk of death and myocardial infarction (MI) (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.46–1.35, p=0.38). Conclusions In this real-world registry, patients with small coronary arteries treated with DES had significantly lower rates of repeat revascularization and major adverse cardiovascular events at one year compared to patients treated with BMS, with no increase in the risk of death and MI. These data confirm the efficacy and safety of DES over BMS in the treatment of small coronary arteries in routine clinical practice. PMID:21735515

  20. On the study of elastic and plastic properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under axial tension using molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we examine the elastic and plastic properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) under axial tension using the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation performed in the microcanonical ensemble. The interaction force between atoms is modeled using the second-generation of reactive empirical bond-order (REBO) potential coupled with the Lennard-Jones potential. In our simulations, we obtain the stress-strain responses to describe the elastic and plastic behaviors of single and multi-walled CNTs. The mechanical properties, such as Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, Yield stress, ultimate stress and maximum strain, are determined and presented for single to four-walled armchair CNTs. The plastic deformation due to the formation of the Stone-Wales defects and the brittle fracture due to the bond breaking are also presented and discussed. This MD simulation reveals that the fracture damage of multi-walled CNTs initially takes place in the outermost layer, and subsequently occurring in the inner layers

  1. In-vitro validation of a novel model-based approach to the measurement of arterial blood flow waveforms from dynamic digital x-ray images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode, Kawal; Lambrou, Tryphon; Seifalian, Alexander M.; Hawkes, David J.

    2002-04-01

    We have developed a waveform shape model-based algorithm for the extraction of blood flow from dynamic arterial x-ray angiographic images. We have carried out in-vitro validation of this technique. A pulsatile physiological blood flow circuit was constructed using an anthropomorphic cerebral vascular phantom to simulate the cerebral arterial circulation with whole blood as the fluid. Instantaneous recording of flow from an electromagnetic flow meter (EMF) provided the gold standard measurement. Biplane dynamic digital x-ray images of the vascular phantom with injection of contrast medium were acquired at 25 fps using a PC frame capture card with calibration using a Perspex cube. Principal component analysis was used to construct a shape model by collecting 434 flow waveforms from the EMF under varying flow conditions. Blood flow waveforms were calculated from the angiographic data by using our previous concentration-distance curve matching (ORG) algorithm and by using the new model-based (MB) algorithm. Both instantaneous and mean flow values calculated using the MB algorithm showed greater correlation, less bias, and lower variability than those calculated using the ORG algorithm when compared to the EMF values. We have successfully demonstrated that use of a priori waveform shape information can improve flow measurements from dynamic x-ray angiograms.

  2. Evaluating bowel wall vascularity in Crohn's disease: a comparison of dynamic MRI and wideband harmonic imaging contrast-enhanced low MI ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This was a prospective comparison of dynamic MRI (1.5 T) and echo-signal enhanced ultrasound in evaluating vascularization in thickened bowel walls cases of Crohn's disease. Twenty-one patients with histologically confirmed Crohn's disease and bowel wall diameters >5 mm were examined by MRI and ultrasound (US). MR sequences: T1w fl2D, T2w, FLASH T1w post-contrast media (CM) applications with fat saturation were used. Dynamic Turbo-FLASH T1w sequences were acquired in the area of maximal thickening of the ileal wall every 1.5 s post-CM application for a total duration of 1 min. US was performed after the application of 1.2 ml of echo-signal enhancer. Contrast uptake was measured by the semiquantitative score and brightness analysis in regions of interest (ROI). Clinical and laboratory findings including Crohn's disease activity indices were documented; MRI and US parameters were correlated. The length of sonographically documented lesions (122±75 mm) correlated significantly with the length of thickened bowel segments in MRI (128±76 mm; r=0.466; P=0.033). The maximum percent signal enhancement in the terminal ileum at ultrasound (217.5±100.1%) showed a high correlation with the findings of MRI (262±108%; r=0.623; P=0.003). With both methods, a plateau phase was observed. US and MRI are capable of evaluating local vascularization in the bowel wall objectively. (orig.)

  3. Selective delineation of pelvic arteries and veins using three-dimensional gadolinium-enhanced dynamic MR angiography with fat-suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A T1-TFE sequence with a spectral selective fat saturation pulse was used for three-dimensional gadolinium enhanced dynamic MR angiography of the pelvis. MIP postprocessing was used to obtain MR angiographic images. The pulse sequence parameters were: TR/TE/flip angle=7.7 ms/2.5 ms/20deg, matrix of 179 x 256, 40 cmFOV (RFOV 80%), slab thickness of 84 mm, slab partition of 14, and slice thickness of 12 mm. The scan time per sequence was 14 seconds. After the Gd-DTPA bolus injection, eight consecutive scans were performed. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the aorta, the common iliac artery and vein, and the IVC were plotted as a function of time. The signal enhancement of the aorta and the common iliac artery was its maximum in the third scan (24-38 seconds after the Gd-DTPA injection). The SNR of the IVC and the common iliac vein increased gradually after 52 seconds. In seven cases the IVC was already clearly visualized in the MIP images from the fifth scan (52-66 seconds after the Gd-DTPA injection). Preliminary results suggest that the central lines of the k-space should be acquired within 52 seconds after the Gd-DTPA injection to obtain MR angiograms without signal contribution from the vein. In addition, our methods allowed to image arteries and veins separately in all but three cases. (author)

  4. Arterial Ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seung-Jun; Park, Sung-Ha

    2013-01-01

    Arterial ageing is characterized by age associated degeneration and sclerosis of the media layer of the large arteries. However, besides ageing, clinical conditions, which enhance oxidative stress and inflammation act to accelerate the degree of arterial ageing. In this review, we summarized the pathophysiology and contributing factors that accelerate arterial ageing. Among them, we focused on hypertension, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and vascular inflammation which are modifiabl...

  5. Evaluation of neutron energy spectrum effects and RPV thru-wall attenuation based on molecular dynamics cascade simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Displacement cascade formation in iron has been investigated by the method of molecular dynamics (MD) for cascade energies up to 40 keV. The results of these simulations have been used in the specomp code to obtain effective, energy-dependent cross sections for two measures of primary damage production: (1) the number of surviving point defects expressed as a fraction of the those predicted by the standard secondary displacement model by Norgett et al., 1975 [M.J. Norgett, M.T. Robinson, and I.M. Torrens (1975)] and (2) the fraction of the surviving interstitials contained in clusters that formed during the cascade event. The primary knock-on atom (PKA) spectra for iron obtained from the specter code have been used to weight these MD-based damage production cross sections in order to obtain spectrally-averaged values for several locations in commercial fission reactors and test reactors. An evaluation of these results indicates that neutron energy spectrum differences between the various environments do not lead to significant differences between the average primary damage formation parameters. In particular, spectrum-averaged defect production cross sections obtained for PWR and BWR neutron spectra were not significantly different. A representative application of the new defect production cross sections is provided by examining how they vary as a function of depth into the reactor pressure vessel wall. A slight difference was noted between the damage attenuation in a PWR vessel and a BWR vessel. This observation could be explained by a subtle difference in the energy dependence of the neutron spectra. Overall, the simulations indicate that spectrum-averaged defect production cross sections do not vary much among the various environments in light-water moderated fission reactors

  6. Structure and Dynamics of Brachypodium Primary Cell Wall Polysaccharides from Two-Dimensional 13C Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tuo [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Salazar, Andre [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Zabotina, Olga A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Hong, Mei [Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-04-10

    The polysaccharide structure and dynamics in the primary cell wall of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon are investigated for the first time using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). While both grass and non-grass cell walls contain cellulose as the main structural scaffold, the former contains xylan with arabinose and glucuronic acid substitutions as the main hemicellulose, with a small amount of xyloglucan (XyG) and pectins, while the latter contains XyG as the main hemicellulose and significant amounts of pectins. We labeled the Brachypodium cell wall with 13C to allow two-dimensional (2D) 13C correlation NMR experiments under magic-angle spinning. Well-resolved 2D spectra are obtained in which the 13C signals of cellulose, glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX), and other matrix polysaccharides can be assigned. The assigned 13C chemical shifts indicate that there are a large number of arabinose and xylose linkages in the wall, and GAX is significantly branched at the developmental stage of 2 weeks. 2D 13C–13C correlation spectra measured with long spin diffusion mixing times indicate that the branched GAX approaches cellulose microfibrils on the nanometer scale, contrary to the conventional model in which only unbranched GAX can bind cellulose. The GAX chains are highly dynamic, with average order parameters of 0.4. Biexponential 13C T1 and 1H T relaxation indicates that there are two dynamically distinct domains in GAX: the more rigid domain may be responsible for cross-linking cellulose microfibrils, while the more mobile domain may fill the interfibrillar space. This dynamic heterogeneity is more pronounced than that of the non-grass hemicellulose, XyG, suggesting that GAX adopts the mixed characteristics of XyG and pectins. Moderate differences in cellulose rigidity are observed between the Brachypodium and Arabidopsis cell walls

  7. Blood serum atherogenicity and coronary artery calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobenin, Igor A; Myasoedova, Veronica A; Anisimova, Elena V; Pavlova, Xenia N; Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Schmermund, Axel; Seibel, Rainer; Berenbein, Sina; Lehmann, Nils; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, KarlHeinz; Orekhov, Alexander N; Erbel, Raimund

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of blood serum atherogenicity was described as the ability of human serum to induce lipid accumulation in cultured cells. The results of recent two-year prospective study in asymptomatic men provided the evidence for association between the changes in serum atherogenicity and dynamics of carotid intima-media thickness progression. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that blood serum atherogenicity and its changes in dynamics may be associated with accumulation of coronary calcium in subclinical atherosclerosis. It was performed in 782 CHD-free participants of The Heinz Nixdorf RECALL (Risk Factors, Evaluation of Coronary Calcium and Lifestyle) Study, in whom blood samples have been taken at the baseline and at the end of 5-year follow-up. Opposite to the previous findings, the changes in serum atherogenicity did not correlate neither with the extent of coronary artery calcification, nor with the changes in Agatston CAC score. There was a moderate but significant rise in serum atherogenicity after 5-year followup period, and the same dynamics was observed for Agatston CAC score, but not for convenient lipid-related risk factors. The absence of association of the changes in serum atherogenicity with the changes in Agatston CAC score, along with previous findings, provides a point of view that serum-induced intracellular cholesterol accumulation is not related to the processes of calcium deposition in arterial wall, since the last one reflects the progression of already existing subclinical atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:24533940

  8. Influência do treino fisico moderado sobre a estrutura da parede arterial de ratos submetidos à desnutrição proteica gestacional e neonatal Influence of moderate physical training on the artery wall structure of rats submitted to gestational and neonatal protein malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Augusta De Sá Xerita Maux

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Avaliamos o efeito do treinamento físico moderado (TFM associado à reposição nutricional na parede das artérias carótida comum esquerda e aorta horizontal em 24 ratos Wistar machos adultos jovens, submetidos à desnutição proteica nas fases gestacional e neonatal. Os animais foram divididos em grupos Nutrido (N, n = 12, caseína 17% e Desnutrido (D, n = 12, caseína 8%. Após o desmame, todos os animais receberam dieta padrão (Labina® e aos 60 dias de vida, os dois grupos foram subdivididos em quatro com seis animais cada: Nutrido Não Treinado (NNT, Nutrido Treinado (NT, Reposição Não Treinado (RNT e Reposição Treinado (RT. O TFM foi realizado em esteira durante oito semanas, cinco dias por semana, 60 minutos por dia. A histomorfometria de ambas as artérias foi realizada com o programa Scion Image for Windows (Beta 4.0.2. A espessura das paredes das artérias foi obtida a partir da média de aferição de quatro pontos diferentes (0°, 90°, 180°, 270° e o diâmetro do lúmen dos vasos, a partir da média de aferição de dois valores, partindo de quatro pontos diametralmente opostos. Para a comparação entre os grupos utilizou-se o teste t de Student com os dados apresentados em média ± desvio padrão. A espessura média das artérias carótida comum esquerda (µm e aorta horizontal (mm foi menor no grupo RNT (32,51 ± 5,54; 0,11 ± 0,02, respectivamente, comparado com o NNT (40,91 ± 3,56; 0,15 ± 0,01. O diâmetro (µm da artéria carótida comum esquerda foi maior nos animais RT (724 ± 44,64 do que nos RNT (630,73 ± 79,67. Conclui-se que o TFM associado à reposição nutricional não foi capaz de recuperar as alterações estruturais provocadas pela desnutrição na parede das artérias carótida comum esquerda e aorta horizontal.We evaluated the effects of moderate physical training (MPT associated with nutritional recovery on the left common carotid artery and horizontal carotid walls in 24 male, Wistar adult male

  9. A new picture of cell wall protein dynamics in elongating cells of Arabidopsis thaliana: Confirmed actors and newcomers

    OpenAIRE

    Jamet Elisabeth; Pont-Lezica Rafael; Borderies Gisèle; Canut Hervé; Irshad Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Cell elongation in plants requires addition and re-arrangements of cell wall components. Even if some protein families have been shown to play roles in these events, a global picture of proteins present in cell walls of elongating cells is still missing. A proteomic study was performed on etiolated hypocotyls of Arabidopsis used as model of cells undergoing elongation followed by growth arrest within a short time. Results Two developmental stages (active growth and after g...

  10. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  11. Cell Geometry Guides the Dynamic Targeting of Apoplastic GPI-Linked Lipid Transfer Protein to Cell Wall Elements and Cell Borders in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasteneys, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    During cellular morphogenesis, changes in cell shape and cell junction topology are fundamental to normal tissue and organ development. Here we show that apoplastic Glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored Lipid Transfer Protein (LTPG) is excluded from cell junctions and flat wall regions, and passively accumulates around their borders in the epidermal cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. Beginning with intense accumulation beneath highly curved cell junction borders, this enrichment is gradually lost as cells become more bulbous during their differentiation. In fully mature epidermal cells, YFP-LTPG often shows a fibrous cellulose microfibril-like pattern within the bulging outer faces. Physical contact between a flat glass surface and bulbous cell surface induces rapid and reversible evacuation from contact sites and accumulation to the curved wall regions surrounding the contact borders. Thus, LTPG distribution is dynamic, responding to changes in cell shape and wall curvature during cell growth and differentiation. We hypothesize that this geometry-based mechanism guides wax-carrying LTPG to functional sites, where it may act to “seal” the vulnerable border surrounding cell-cell junctions and assist in cell wall fortification and cuticular wax deposition. PMID:24260561

  12. A novel platelet-rich arterial thrombosis model in rabbits. Simple, reproducible, and dynamic real-time measurement by using double-opposing inverted-sutures model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, S J; Chiu, H Y; Shi, G Y; Wu, C M; Wang, J C; Chen, C H; Wu, H L

    2001-09-01

    Though numerous animal thrombosis models have been introduced, an easy, reliable, and reproducible arterial thrombosis model remains a continuing challenge prior to a thrombolytic study. In an effort to evaluate the efficiency of various recombinant thrombolytic agents with specific affinity to activated platelets in vivo, we developed a novel double-opposing inverted-sutures model to create a platelet-rich thrombus in the femoral artery of rabbits. The arteriotomy was done semicircumferentially, and variously sized microsurgical sutures were introduced intraluminally in a double-opposing inverted manner. The animals were divided into three groups according to the double-opposing inverted-sutures used: Group 1 with 10-0 nylon (n=6), Group 2 with 9-0 nylon (n=6), and Group 3 with 8-0 nylon (n=22). The superficial epigastric branch was cannulated with a thin polyethylene (PE) tube for intraarterial administration of the studied thrombolytic agent. The blood flow was continuously measured with a real-time ultrasonic flow meter. Within 2 h of installation of the sutures, there was no thrombus formation in either Group 1 or 2. In Group 3, the thrombosis rate was 91% (20 of 22) under a steady baseline flow (with an average of 12.23+/-2.40 ml/min). It was highly statistically significant with a P-value of .0000743 using Fisher's Exact Test. The averaged time to thrombosis was 21.8+/-9.8 min. The ultrasonic flow meter to record the dynamic real-time measurement of blood flow was a guideline for thrombus formation or dissolution, which was correlated with the morphological findings of stenotic status of the vessel detected by the Doppler sonography. The components of the thrombus were proven to be platelet-rich predominant by histological examination via hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To confirm that the double-opposing inverted-sutures model would be useful for a study of thrombolytic agents, we evaluated the effects of

  13. The design of a reflectionless arterial prosthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kol, Guy Richard; Woafo, Paul

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new technique to characterize a reflectionless arterial prosthesis. The corresponding transmission and reflection coefficients are determined from the geometric and the elastic properties of the arterial wall, and the interaction between the latter and the prosthesis are studied accordingly.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft with an Assistant Graft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; WANG Feng

    2014-01-01

    The conventional bypass design is to implant a graft on the stenosed host artery allowing blood to flow bypass the stenotic artery. However, restenosis is a challenging problem which finally results in reoperation. The purpose of this paper is to propose a new bypass graft design of coronary artery with an assistant graft for the treatment of coronary artery stenosis. An additional assistant graft was employed in the new design compared with the conventional ETS anastomosis. Numerical simulations were performed by means of finite volume method using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver. Results demonstrated that the new anastomoses model provided a more smooth flow at the distal ETS anastomosis without any stagnation point on anastomotic bed and vortex formation in the heel region. Oscillatory shear index (OSI) and time-averaged wall shear stress gradient (TAWSSG) at the artery bed of the distal ETS anastomosis were reduced. The coronary artery bypass graft with an assistant graft is feasible to improve the local hemodynamics and diminish the probability of restenosis in the treatment of coronary artery stenosis.

  15. Multidimensional solid-state NMR studies of the structure and dynamics of pectic polysaccharides in uniformly 13C-labeled Arabidopsis primary cell walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick-Perez, Marilu; Wang, Tuo; Salazar, Andre; Zabotina, Olga A.; Hong, Mei

    2012-07-08

    Plant cell wall (CW) polysaccharides are responsible for the mechanical strength and growth of plant cells; however, the high-resolution structure and dynamics of the CW polysaccharides are still poorly understood because of the insoluble nature of these molecules. Here, we use 2D and 3D magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to investigate the structural role of pectins in the plant CW. Intact and partially depectinated primary CWs of Arabidopsis thaliana were uniformly labeled with 13C and their NMR spectra were compared. Recent 13C resonance assignment of the major polysaccharides in Arabidopsis thaliana CWs allowed us to determine the effects of depectination on the intermolecular packing and dynamics of the remaining wall polysaccharides. 2D and 3D correlation spectra show the suppression of pectin signals, confirming partial pectin removal by chelating agents and sodium carbonate. Importantly, higher cross peaks are observed in 2D and 3D 13C spectra of the depectinated CW, suggesting higher rigidity and denser packing of the remaining wall polysaccharides compared with the intact CW. 13C spin–lattice relaxation times and 1H rotating-frame spin–lattice relaxation times indicate that the polysaccharides are more rigid on both the nanosecond and microsecond timescales in the depectinated CW. Taken together, these results indicate that pectic polysaccharides are highly dynamic and endow the polysaccharide network of the primary CW with mobility and flexibility, which may be important for pectin functions. This study demonstrates the capability of multidimensional SSNMR to determine the intermolecular interactions and dynamic structures of complex plant materials under near-native conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Steam Condensation on Nuclear Containment Wall Surfaces Based on Semiempirical Generalized Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan K. Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In water-cooled nuclear power reactors, significant quantities of steam and hydrogen could be produced within the primary containment following the postulated design basis accidents (DBA or beyond design basis accidents (BDBA. For accurate calculation of the temperature/pressure rise and hydrogen transport calculation in nuclear reactor containment due to such scenarios, wall condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC is used. In the present work, the adaptation of a commercial CFD code with the implementation of models for steam condensation on wall surfaces in presence of noncondensable gases is explained. Steam condensation has been modeled using the empirical average HTC, which was originally developed to be used for “lumped-parameter” (volume-averaged modeling of steam condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases. The present paper suggests a generalized HTC based on curve fitting of most of the reported semiempirical condensation models, which are valid for specific wall conditions. The present methodology has been validated against limited reported experimental data from the COPAIN experimental facility. This is the first step towards the CFD-based generalized analysis procedure for condensation modeling applicable for containment wall surfaces that is being evolved further for specific wall surfaces within the multicompartment containment atmosphere.

  17. The normal distribution of thoracoabdominal aorta small branch artery ostia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the normal distribution of aortic branch artery ostia. CT scans of 100 subjects were retrospectively reviewed. The angular distributions of the aorta with respect to the center of the T3 to L4 vertebral bodies, and of branch artery origins with respect to the center of the aorta were measured. At each vertebral body level the distribution of intercostal/lumbar arteries and other branch arteries were calculated. The proximal descending aorta is posteriorly placed becoming a midline structure, at the thoracolumbar junction, and remains anterior to the vertebral bodies within the abdomen. The intercostal and lumbar artery ostia have a distinct distribution. At each vertebral level from T3 caudally, one intercostal artery originates from the posterior wall of the aorta throughout the thoracic aorta, while the other intercostal artery originates from the medial wall of the descending thoracic aorta high in the chest, posteromedially from the mid-thoracic aorta, and from the posterior wall of the aorta low in the chest. Mediastinal branches of the thoracic aorta originate from the medial and anterior wall. Lumbar branches originate only from the posterior wall of the abdominal aorta. Aortic branch artery origins arise with a bimodal distribution and have a characteristic location. Mediastinal branches of the thoracic aorta originate from the medial and anterior wall. Knowing the location of aortic branch artery ostia may help distinguish branch artery pseudoaneurysms from penetrating ulcers.

  18. Influence of tissue preservation methods on arterial geometry and echogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H.; Wilhjelm, J; Vogt, Katja;

    1997-01-01

    original, ultrasound, ultrasonic measurement, vessel diameter, wall thickness, measurement of echogenicity, freezing of specimen, formalin fixation, pressurized formalin fixation, porcine artery......original, ultrasound, ultrasonic measurement, vessel diameter, wall thickness, measurement of echogenicity, freezing of specimen, formalin fixation, pressurized formalin fixation, porcine artery...

  19. Cell Wall

    OpenAIRE

    Jamet, Elisabeth; Canut, Hervé; Boudart, Georges; Albenne, Cécile; Pont-Lezica, Rafael F

    2008-01-01

    This chapter covers our present knowledge of cell wall proteomics highlighting the distinctive features of cell walls and cell wall proteins in relation to problems encountered for protein extraction, separation and identification. It provides clues to design strategies for efficient cell wall proteomic studies. It gives an overview of the kinds of proteins that have yet been identified: the expected proteins vs the identified proteins. Finally, the new vision of the cell wall proteome, and t...

  20. Analysis of γ-hydroxy butyrate by combining capillary electrophoresis-indirect detection and wall dynamic coating: application to dried matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracino, Maria A; Catapano, Maria C; Iezzi, Rosa; Somaini, Lorenzo; Gerra, Gilberto; Mercolini, Laura

    2015-11-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a powerful central nervous system depressant, currently used in medicine for the treatment of narcolepsy and alcohol dependence. In recent years, it has gained popularity among illegal club drugs, mainly because of its euphoric effects as well as doping agent and date rape drug. The purpose of the present work was the development of a rapid analytical method for the analysis of GHB in innovative biological matrices, namely dried blood spots (DBSs) and dried urine spots (DUSs). The analytical method is based on capillary zone electrophoresis with indirect UV absorption detection at 210 nm and capillary wall dynamic coating. The background electrolyte is composed of a phosphate buffer containing nicotinic acid (probe for detection) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB, reversal of electroosmosis in wall dynamic coating). The influence of probe and CTAB concentration, together with buffer pH, on migration time and signal response was investigated. Under the optimized conditions, analytical linearity and precision were satisfactory; absolute recovery values were also high (>90 %); the use of dried matrices (DBSs and DUSs) was advantageous as an alternative matrix to classical ones. No interferences were found either from the most common exogenous or from endogenous compounds. This analytical approach can offer a rapid, precise and accurate method for GHB determination in innovative biological samples, which could be important for screening purposes in clinical and forensic toxicology. Graphical Abstract CE method, by combined indirect UV detection and dynamic coating, for GHB determination in DBSs and DUSs. PMID:26427507