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Sample records for arterial wall dynamics

  1. Effects of wall condition on flow distributions in arterial modeling: comparison of rigid, dynamic, and compliant walls

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    He, Fan [Beijing University of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Beijing (China); Hua, Lu; Gao, Li jian [Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China)

    2016-03-15

    Blood flow distributions were evaluated using various computational strategies. Three commonly used wall conditions in arterial modeling were employed, namely rigid, dynamic and compliant walls. The results show that the velocity distributions are similar under rigid and dynamic walls, developing into the Poiseuille flow, but they are blunt under compliant walls. The peak pressure under rigid walls is highest, but the model of dynamic walls has a good approximation of pressure against the model of compliant walls. The results indicate that a model of compliant walls appears to be a computationally and reasonably accurate approximation of blood velocity distributions compared with the analysis under rigid or dynamic walls. Introducing fluid-structure interaction into arterial modeling is necessary to ensure reliable results and information. However, a model of dynamic walls seems to be a computationally inexpensive yet reasonably accurate approximation for pressure.

  2. Automated Detection of the Arterial Inner Walls of the Common Carotid Artery Based on Dynamic B-Mode Signals

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    Shing-Hong Liu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a novel scheme able to automatically detect the intima and adventitia of both near and far walls of the common carotid artery in dynamic B-mode RF (radiofrequency image sequences, with and without plaques. Via this automated system the lumen diameter changes along the heart cycle can be detected. Three image sequences have been tested and all results are compared to manual tracings made by two professional experts. The average errors for near and far wall detection are 0.058 mm and 0.067 mm, respectively. This system is able to analyze arterial plaques dynamically which is impossible to do manually due to the tremendous human workload involved.

  3. Development of novel short-term heating angioplasty: thermal denaturation dynamics of collagen in artery wall

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    Shimazaki, N.; Tokunaga, H.; Katou, Y.; Hayashi, T.; Arai, T.

    2009-02-01

    We have studied to develop the new thermal angioplasty methodology, photo-thermo dynamic balloon angioplasty (PTDBA), which provides artery dilatation with short-term (collagen in artery media may be the important factor to attain sufficient artery dilatation for the PTDBA. In order to predict the optimum heating condition i.e. the balloon temperature and heating duration, we investigated the thermal denaturation dynamics of artery collagen in ex vivo. The extracted fresh porcine carotid artery was used. The temperature-dependent light scattering property and mechanical property of the artery specimen were simultaneously measured during artery temperature rising by specially made setup to assess the denaturation of arterial collagen. The change rate of the backscattered light intensity from the artery specimen; I(T)/I0 with 633nm was measured to evaluate the artery scattering property change with the thermal denaturation. The artery specimen was heated from 25°C to 80°C with constant temperature rising rate of 3°C/min. The measured I(T)/I0 was suddenly increased over 48°C. This boundary temperature might be the initiation temperature of the arterial collagen denaturation. We defined the variation of the I(T)/I0 as the collagen denaturation ratio, and calculated the reactive enthalpy by the chemical equilibrium theory. Since the calculated enthalpy was similar to the enthalpy in literature report, the variety of I(T)/I0 during the temperature rising might be attributed to the collagen conformational change due to the denaturation. In terms of the artery internal force measurement, the artery force was decreased with increasing of the artery temperature up to 65°C (i.e. softening), and increased over 65°C (i.e. shrinkage). We confirmed that the changes of the backscattered light (at 633nm in wavelength) from the artery might represent the artery collagen thermal denaturation degree.

  4. Computational fluid dynamics comparisons of wall shear stress in patient-specific coronary artery bifurcation using coronary angiography and optical coherence tomography

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    Poon, Eric; Thondapu, Vikas; Chin, Cheng; Scheerlinck, Cedric; Zahtila, Tony; Mamon, Chris; Nguyen, Wilson; Ooi, Andrew; Barlis, Peter

    2016-11-01

    Blood flow dynamics directly influence biology of the arterial wall, and are closely linked with the development of coronary artery disease. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solvers may be employed to analyze the hemodynamic environment in patient-specific reconstructions of coronary arteries. Although coronary X-ray angiography (CA) is the most common medical imaging modality for 3D arterial reconstruction, models reconstructed from CA assume a circular or elliptical cross-sectional area. This limitation can be overcome with a reconstruction technique fusing CA with intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT scans the interior of an artery using near-infrared light, achieving a 10-micron resolution and providing unprecedented detail of vessel geometry. We compared 3D coronary artery bifurcation models generated using CA alone versus OCT-angiography fusion. The model reconstructed from CA alone is unable to identify the detailed geometrical variations of diseased arteries, and also under-estimates the cross-sectional vessel area compared to OCT-angiography fusion. CFD was performed in both models under pulsatile flow in order to identify and compare regions of low wall shear stress, a hemodynamic parameter directly linked with progression of atherosclerosis. Supported by ARC LP150100233 and VLSCI VR0210.

  5. Wall shear stress in intracranial aneurysms and adjacent arteries

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    Fuyu Wang; Bainan Xu; Zhenghui Sun; Chen Wu; Xiaojun Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Hemodynamic parameters play an important role in aneurysm formation and growth. However, it is difficult to directly observe a rapidly growing de novo aneurysm in a patient. To investigate possible associations between hemodynamic parameters and the formation and growth of intracranial aneurysms, the present study constructed a computational model of a case with an internal carotid artery aneurysm and an anterior communicating artery aneurysm, based on the CT angiography findings of a patient. To simulate the formation of the anterior communicating artery aneurysm and the growth of the internal carotid artery aneurysm, we then constructed a model that virtually removed the anterior communicating artery aneurysm, and a further two models that also progressively decreased the size of the internal carotid artery aneurysm. Computational simulations of the fluid dynamics of the four models were performed under pulsatile flow conditions, and wall shear stress was compared among the different models. In the three aneurysm growth models, increasing size of the aneurysm was associated with an increased area of low wall shear stress, a significant decrease in wall shear stress at the dome of the aneurysm, and a significant change in the wall shear stress of the parent artery. The wall shear stress of the anterior communicating artery remained low, and was significantly lower than the wall shear stress at the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery or the bifurcation of the middle cerebral artery. After formation of the anterior communicating artery aneurysm, the wall shear stress at the dome of the internal carotid artery aneurysm increased significantly, and the wall shear stress in the upstream arteries also changed significantly. These findings indicate that low wall shear stress may be associated with the initiation and growth of aneurysms, and that aneurysm formation and growth may influence hemodynamic parameters in the local and adjacent arteries.

  6. Determination of arterial wall shear stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The arteries can remodel their structure and function to adapt themselves to the mechanical environment. In various factors that lead to vascular remodeling, the shear stress on the arterial wall induced by the blood flow is of great importance. However, there are many technique difficulties in measuring the wall shear stress directly at present. In this paper, through analyzing the pulsatile blood flow in arteries, a method has been proposed that can determine the wall shear stress quantitatively by measuring the velocity on the arterial axis, and that provides a necessary means to discuss the influence of arterial wall shear stress on vascular remodeling.

  7. The influence of artery wall curvature on the anatomical assessment of stenosis severity derived from fractional flow reserve: a computational fluid dynamics study.

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    Govindaraju, Kalimuthu; Viswanathan, Girish N; Badruddin, Irfan Anjum; Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Salman Ahmed, N J; Al-Rashed, Abdullah A A A

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to investigate the influence of artery wall curvature on the anatomical assessment of stenosis severity and to identify a region of misinterpretation in the assessment of per cent area stenosis (AS) for functionally significant stenosis using fractional flow reserve (FFR) as standard. Five artery models of different per cent AS severity (70, 75, 80, 85 and 90%) were considered. For each per cent AS severity, the angle of curvature of the arterial wall varied from straight to an increasingly curved model (0°, 30°, 60°, 90° and 120°). Computational fluid dynamics was performed under transient physiologic hyperemic flow conditions to investigate the influence of artery wall curvature on the pressure drop and the FFR. The findings in this study may be useful in in vitro anatomical assessment of functionally significant stenosis. The FFR decreased with increasing stenosis severity for a given curvature of the artery wall. Moreover, a significant decrease in FFR was found between straight and curved models discussed for a given severity condition. These findings indicate that the curvature effect was included in the FFR assessment in contrast to minimum lumen area (MLA) or per cent AS assessment. The MLA or per cent AS assessment may lead to underestimation of stenosis severity. From this numerical study, an uncertainty region could be evaluated using the clinical FFR cutoff value of 0.8. This value was observed at 81.98 and 79.10% AS for arteries with curvature angles of 0° and 120° respectively. In conclusion, the curvature of the artery should not be neglected in in vitro anatomical assessment.

  8. ON WALL SHEAR STRESS OF ARTERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhao-rong; Liu Bao-yu; Qin Kai-rong

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, a method was proposed that the wall shear stress of artery could be determined by measuring the centerline axial velocity and radial motion of arterial wall simultaneously.The method is simple in application and can get higher precision when it is used to determine the shear stress of arterial wall in vivo.As an example, the shear stress distribution in periodic oscillatory flow of human carotid was calculated and discussed.The computed results show that the shear stress distribution at any given instant is almost uniform and will be zero at the centerline and tends to maximum at the vessel wall.

  9. Simulated lipoprotein transport in the wall of branched arteries.

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    Darbeau, M Z; Lutz, R J; Collins, W E

    2000-01-01

    Study of arterial blood flow dynamics improves our understanding of the development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The transport and accumulation of macromolecules in the arterial wall can be influenced by local fluid mechanics. We used numeric simulations to investigate such transport in a T-junction model. Presumably an in vitro experiment would consist of gel segments inserted in the walls of a mechanical flow T-junction model near branch points where separation and recirculation zones are expected. The transport of low density lipoprotein (LDL) was investigated theoretically at these sites in a two dimensional numeric T-branch model. In the numeric model, the hydraulic conductivity of the porous gel wall segments was varied for a fixed species diffusivity to provide simulations with wall transmural Peclet numbers ranging from 0.3 to 30. Steady state flow patterns in the lumen of the two dimensional T-branch were simulated at Reynolds numbers of 250 and 500, using the software package FIDAP 7.61 to implement the finite element method. The simulations demonstrated that wall Peclet numbers greater than 1.0 were needed to achieve species concentration gradients within the wall that varied in the axial direction, thereby reflecting the influence of disturbed flow and pressure patterns in the lumen. As expected, the transmural concentration gradients were steeper when convection predominated. Blood flow in the lumen can influence the distribution of macromolecules in the arterial wall and needs to be investigated for the relevance to atherosclerosis.

  10. Isotropy and anisotropy of the arterial wall.

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    Weizsacker, H W; Pinto, J G

    1988-01-01

    The passive biomechanical response of intact cylindrical rat carotid arteries is studied in vitro and compared with the mechanical response of rubber tubes. Using true stress and natural strain in the definition of the incremental modulus of elasticity, the tissue wall properties are analyzed over wide ranges of simultaneous circumferential and longitudinal deformations. The type of loading chosen is 'physiological' i.e. symmetric: the cylindrical segments are subjected to internal pressure and axial prestretch without torsion or shear. Several aspects pertaining to the choice of parameters characterizing the material are discussed and the analysis pertaining to the deformational behavior of a hypothetical compliant tube with Hookean wall material is presented. The experimental results show that while rubber response can be adequately represented as linearly elastic and isotropic, the overall response of vascular tissue is highly non-linear and anisotropic. However, for states of deformation that occur in vivo, the elasticity of arteries is quite similar to that of rubber tubes and as such the arterial wall may be viewed as incrementally isotropic for the range of deformations that occur in vivo.

  11. Is arterial wall-strain stiffening an additional process responsible for atherosclerosis in coronary bifurcations?: an in vivo study based on dynamic CT and MRI.

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    Ohayon, Jacques; Gharib, Ahmed M; Garcia, Alberto; Heroux, Julie; Yazdani, Saami K; Malvè, Mauro; Tracqui, Philippe; Martinez, Miguel-Angel; Doblare, Manuel; Finet, Gérard; Pettigrew, Roderic I

    2011-09-01

    Coronary bifurcations represent specific regions of the arterial tree that are susceptible to atherosclerotic lesions. While the effects of vessel compliance, curvature, pulsatile blood flow, and cardiac motion on coronary endothelial shear stress have been widely explored, the effects of myocardial contraction on arterial wall stress/strain (WS/S) and vessel stiffness distributions remain unclear. Local increase of vessel stiffness resulting from wall-strain stiffening phenomenon (a local process due to the nonlinear mechanical properties of the arterial wall) may be critical in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify WS/S and stiffness in coronary bifurcations and to investigate correlations with plaque sites. Anatomic coronary geometry and cardiac motion were generated based on both computed tomography and MRI examinations of eight patients with minimal coronary disease. Computational structural analyses using the finite element method were subsequently performed, and spatial luminal arterial wall stretch (LW(Stretch)) and stiffness (LW(Stiff)) distributions in the left main coronary bifurcations were calculated. Our results show that all plaque sites were concomitantly subject to high LW(Stretch) and high LW(Stiff), with mean amplitudes of 34.7 ± 1.6% and 442.4 ± 113.0 kPa, respectively. The mean LW(Stiff) amplitude was found slightly greater at the plaque sites on the left main coronary artery (mean value: 482.2 ± 88.1 kPa) compared with those computed on the left anterior descending and left circumflex coronary arteries (416.3 ± 61.5 and 428.7 ± 181.8 kPa, respectively). These findings suggest that local wall stiffness plays a role in the initiation of atherosclerotic lesions.

  12. Relation between wall shear stress and carotid artery wall thickening MRI versus CFD

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    Cibis, Merih; Potters, Wouter V.; Selwaness, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Wall shear stress (WSS), a parameter associated with endothelial function, is calculated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) or phase-contrast (PC) MRI measurements. Although CFD is common in WSS (WSSCFD) calculations, PC-MRI-based WSS (WSSMRI) is more favorable in population studies; since...... it is straightforward and less time consuming. However, it is not clear if WSSMRI and WSSCFD show similar associations with vascular pathology. Our aim was to test the associations between wall thickness (WT) of the carotid arteries and WSSMRI and WSSCFD. The subjects (n=14) with an asymptomatic carotid plaque who...

  13. Determination of arterial wall shear stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Zhaorong

    2001-01-01

    [1]Langille, B. L., 7Donnell, F., Reductions in arterial diameter produced by chronic decreases in blood flow are endothelium-dependent, Science, 1986, 231: 405—407.[2]Langer, R., Vacanti, J. P., Tissue engineering, Science, 1993, 260: 920—926.[3]Kamiya, A., Togawa, T., Adaptive regulation of wall shear stress to flow change in the canine carotid artery, Am. J. Physiol. (Heart Circ. Physiol.), 1980, 239: H14—H21.[4]Fung, Y. C., Biomechanics: Motion, Flow, Stress, and Growth, New York: Springer-Verlag, 1990.[5]Liu, S. Q., Biomechanical basis of vascular tissue engineering, Critical Reviews in Biomedical Engineering, 1999, 27: 75—148.[6]Ando, J., Kamiya, A., Blood flow and vascular endothelium cell function, Frontiers Med. Biological Eng., 1993, 5: 245—264.[7]Ku, D. N., Giddens, D. P., Zarins, D. K. et al., Pulsatile flow and atherosclerosis in the human carotid bifurcation-positive correlation between plaque location and low and oscillating shear stress, Atherosclerosis, 1985, 5: 293—302.[8]Liu Zhaorong, Li Xixi, Theory and Method on Hemodynamics (in Chinese), Shanghai: Fudan University Press, 1997.

  14. Arterial Wall Properties and Womersley Flow in Fabry Disease

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    Dimitriadis Emilios

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fabry disease is an X-linked recessive lysosomal storage disease resulting in the cellular accumulation of globotriaosylceramide particularly globotriaosylceramide. The disease is characterized by a dilated vasculopathy with arterial ectasia in muscular arteries and arterioles. Previous venous plethysomographic studies suggest enhanced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in Fabry disease indicating a functional abnormality of resistance vessels. Methods We examined the mechanical properties of the radial artery in Fabry disease, a typical fibro-muscular artery. Eight control subjects and seven patients with Fabry disease had a right brachial arterial line placed allowing real time recording of intra-arterial blood pressure. Real time B-mode ultrasound recordings of the right radial artery were obtained simultaneously allowing calculation of the vessel wall internal and external diameter, the incremental Young's modulus and arterial wall thickness. By simultaneously measurement of the distal index finger-pulse oximetry the pulse wave speed was calculated. From the wave speed and the internal radial artery diameter the volume flow was calculated by Womersley analysis following truncation of the late diastolic phase. Results No significant difference was found between Fabry patients and controls for internal or external arterial diameters, the incremental Young's modulus, the arterial wall thickness, the pulse wave speed and the basal radial artery blood flow. Further, no significant difference was found for the radial artery blood flow in response to intra-arterial acetylcholine or sodium nitroprusside. Both drugs however, elevated the mean arterial flow. Conclusions The current study suggests that no structural or mechanical abnormality exists in the vessel wall of fibro-muscular arteries in Fabry disease. This may indicate that a functional abnormality downstream to the conductance vessels is the dominant feature in

  15. Dynamical domain wall and localization

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    Yuta Toyozato

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the previous works (Toyozato et al., 2013 [24]; Higuchi and Nojiri, 2014 [25], we investigate the localization of the fields on the dynamical domain wall, where the four-dimensional FRW universe is realized on the domain wall in the five-dimensional space–time. Especially we show that the chiral spinor can localize on the domain wall, which has not been succeeded in the past works as the seminal work in George et al. (2009 [23].

  16. Asymptotic Dynamics of Monopole Walls

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    Cross, R

    2015-01-01

    We determine the asymptotic dynamics of the U(N) doubly periodic BPS monopole in Yang-Mills-Higgs theory, called a monopole wall, by exploring its Higgs curve using the Newton polytope and amoeba. In particular, we show that the monopole wall splits into subwalls when any of its moduli become large. The long-distance gauge and Higgs field interactions of these subwalls are abelian, allowing us to derive an asymptotic metric for the monopole wall moduli space.

  17. An object-oriented modelling framework for the arterial wall.

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    Balaguera, M I; Briceño, J C; Glazier, J A

    2010-02-01

    An object-oriented modelling framework for the arterial wall is presented. The novelty of the framework is the possibility to generate customizable artery models, taking advantage of imaging technology. In our knowledge, this is the first object-oriented modelling framework for the arterial wall. Existing models do not allow close structural mapping with arterial microstructure as in the object-oriented framework. In the implemented model, passive behaviour of the arterial wall was considered and the tunica adventitia was the objective system. As verification, a model of an arterial segment was generated. In order to simulate its deformation, a matrix structural mechanics simulator was implemented. Two simulations were conducted, one for an axial loading test and other for a pressure-volume test. Each simulation began with a sensitivity analysis in order to determinate the best parameter combination and to compare the results with analogue controls. In both cases, the simulated results closely reproduced qualitatively and quantitatively the analogue control plots.

  18. In vivo hypertensive arterial wall uptake of radiolabeled liposomes

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    Hodis, H.N.; Amartey, J.K.; Crawford, D.W.; Wickham, E.; Blankenhorn, D.H. (Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Using five sham-operated and seven aortic coarctation-induced hypertensive New Zealand White rabbits intravenously injected with neutral small unilamellar vesicles loaded with (111In)nitrilotriacetic acid, we demonstrated in vivo that the normal aortic arterial wall participates in liposome uptake and that this uptake is increased in the hypertensive aortic wall by approximately threefold (p less than or equal to 0.0001). Among the three regions examined, aortic arch, thoracic aorta, and lower abdominal aorta, the difference in uptake between the normotensive and hypertensive arterial walls was significantly different, p less than or equal to 0.05, p less than or equal to 0.0001, and p less than 0.05, respectively. The uptake by the different regions of the hypertensive arterial wall is consistent with the pathological changes present in these areas. Furthermore, the extent of liposome uptake by the aortic wall is strongly correlated with the height of the blood pressure (r = 0.85, p = 0.001, n = 11). We conclude that neutral small unilamellar liposomes can be used to carry agents into the arterial wall in vivo in the study of hypertensive vascular disease and could be especially useful for the delivery of pharmacologically or biologically active agents that would otherwise be inactivated within the circulation or are impermeable to the arterial wall.

  19. Ultrasound settings significantly alter arterial lumen and wall thickness measurements

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    Green Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flow-mediated dilation (FMD and carotid intima-medial thickness (CIMT, measured by ultrasound, are widely used to test the efficacy of cardioprotective interventions. Although assessment methods vary, automated edge-detecting image analysis software is routinely used to measure changes in FMD and CIMT. We aimed to quantify the effect that commonly adjusted ultrasound settings have on arterial lumen and wall thickness measurements made with CIMT measurement software. Methods We constructed phantom arteries from a tissue-mimicking agar compound and scanned them in a water bath with a 10 MHz multi-frequency linear-array probe attached to a high-resolution ultrasound machine. B-mode images of the phantoms were recorded with dynamic range (DR and gain set at five decibel (dB increments from 40 dB to 60 dB and -10 dB to +10 dB respectively. Lumen diameter and wall-thickness were measured off-line using CIMT measurement software. Results Lumen measurements: there was a strong linear relationship between DR and gain and measured lumen diameter. For a given gain level, a 5 dB increase in DR reduced the measured lumen diameter by 0.02 ± 0.004 mm (p CIMT measurements: For a fixed gain level, a 5 dB increase in DR increased measured wall thickness by 0.003 ± 0.002 mm (p Conclusion DR, gain and probe distance significantly alter lumen diameter and CIMT measurements made using image analysis software. When CIMT and FMD are used to test the efficacy of cardioprotective interventions, the DR, gain and probe position used to record baseline scans should be documented and replicated in post-treatment scans in individual trial subjects. If more than one sonographer or imaging centre is used to collect data, the study protocol should document specific DR and gain settings to be used in all subjects.

  20. Wall Shear Stress Prediction Using Computational Simulation on Patient Specific Artery with Aneurysm

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    Yunus Muhamad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An aneurysm is formed when a blood vessel becomes dilated or distorted. It will cause the vessel to expand to a size greater than its original diameter. In this study, Wall Shear Stress (WSS of cerebral artery with aneurysm was predicted using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. WSS in the artery is one of the indicators for brain artery disease progression. Based on the results, the maximum value of blood velocity and WSS on patient specific artery with aneurysm are 3.23 m/s and 60.1 Pa, respectively. The location of high WSS is before and after the aneurysm bulge. The WSS is above the normal physiological value where the artery wall is exposed to high stress. Hence, the vessel at this location is anticipated to become weaker and could be further dilated.

  1. Sonographic assessment of splanchnic arteries and the bowel wall

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    Dietrich, C.F. [Medical Department II, Caritas-Krankenhaus, Uhlandstr. 7, D-97980 Bad Mergentheim (Germany)], E-mail: Christoph.dietrich@ckbm.de; Jedrzejczyk, M.; Ignee, A. [Medical Department II, Caritas-Krankenhaus, Uhlandstr. 7, D-97980 Bad Mergentheim (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    The intestinal wall can be visualized using high resolution transabdominal ultrasound. The normal intestinal wall thickness in the terminal ileum, cecum, and right and left colon is <2 mm when examined with graded compression. It is important to appreciate that a contracted intestinal segment can be misinterpreted as a thickened wall. Vascularisation can be mainly displayed in the second hyperechoic layer (submucosal layer) as well as vessels penetrating the muscularis propria. Imaging of the gastrointestinal wall is dependent on the experience of the examiner as well dependent on the equipment used. Acute or chronic inflammation of the intestinal wall is accompanied by increased perfusion of the mesentery, which can be displayed non-quantitatively with colour duplex. In contrast, ischemia is characterised by hypoperfusion of the mesenteric arteries and the bowel wall. The most promising sonographic approach in assessing splanchnic arteries and the bowel wall is combining the analysis of superior and inferior mesenteric inflow by pulsed Doppler scanning (systolic and diastolic velocities, resistance index) with the end-organ vascularity by colour Doppler imaging diminishing the influence of examination technique only displaying bowel wall vascularity. Colour Doppler imaging has been described as helpful in a variety of gastrointestinal disorders, particularly in patients with Crohn's disease, celiac disease, mesenteric artery stenosis and other ischemic gastrointestinal diseases, graft versus host disease and hemorrhagic segmental colitis.

  2. Solutions of the Maxwell viscoelastic equations for displacement and stress distributions within the arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodis, S; Zamir, M

    2008-08-01

    Mechanical events within the thickness of the vessel wall caused by pulsatile blood flow are considered, with focus on axial dynamics of the wall, driven by the oscillatory drag force exerted by the fluid on the endothelial layer of the wall. It is shown that the focus on the axial direction makes it possible to derive simplified equations of motion which, combined with a viscoelastic model of the wall material, makes it possible in turn to obtain solutions in closed form for the displacement and stress of material elements within the wall. The viscoelastic model allows a study of the dynamics of the wall with different ratios of viscosity to elasticity of the wall material, to mimic changes in the properties of the arterial wall caused by disease or aging. It is found that when the wall is highly viscous the displacements and stresses caused by the flow are confined to a thin layer close to the inner boundary of the wall, while as the wall material becomes less viscous and more rigid the displacements and stresses spread deeper into the thickness of the wall to affect most of its elements.

  3. Effects of the flexibility of the arterial wall on the wall shear stresses and wall tension in Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms.

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    Salsac, Anne-Virginie; Fernandez, Miguel; Chomaz, Jean-Marc

    2005-11-01

    As an abdominal aortic aneurysm develops, large changes occur in the composition and structure of the arterial wall, which result in its stiffening. So far, most studies, whether experimental or numerical, have been conducted assuming the walls to be rigid. A numerical simulation of the fluid structure interactions is performed in different models of aneurysms in order to analyze the effects that the wall compliance might have on the flow topology. Both symmetric and non-symmetric models of aneurysms are considered, all idealistic in shape. The wall mechanical properties are varied in order to simulate the progressive stiffening of the walls. The spatial and temporal distributions of wall tension are calculated for the different values of the wall elasticity and compared to the results for the rigid walls. In the case of rigid walls, the calculation of the wall shear stresses and pressure compare very well with experimental results.

  4. Wall shear stress estimates in coronary artery constrictions

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    Back, L. H.; Crawford, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    Wall shear stress estimates from laminar boundary layer theory were found to agree fairly well with the magnitude of shear stress levels along coronary artery constrictions obtained from solutions of the Navier Stokes equations for both steady and pulsatile flow. The relatively simple method can be used for in vivo estimates of wall shear stress in constrictions by using a vessel shape function determined from a coronary angiogram, along with a knowledge of the flow rate.

  5. Wall Shear Stress Distribution in Patient Specific Coronary Artery Bifurcation

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    Vahab Dehlaghi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Atherogenesis is affected by hemodynamic parameters, such as wall shear stress and wall shear stress spatial gradient. These parameters are largely dependent on the geometry of arterial tree. Arterial bifurcations contain significant flow disturbances. Approach: The effects of branch angle and vessel diameter ratio at the bifurcations on the wall shear stress distribution in the coronary arterial tree based on CT images were studied. CT images were digitally processed to extract geometrical contours representing the coronary vessel walls. The lumen of the coronary arteries of the patients was segmented using the open source software package (VMTK. The resulting lumens of coronary arteries were fed into a commercial mesh generator (GAMBIT, Fluent Inc. to generate a volume that was filled with tetrahedral elements. The FIDAP software (Fluent Corp. was used to carry out the simulation by solving Navier-Stokes equations. The FIELDVIEW software (Version 10.0, Intelligent Light, Lyndhurst, NJ was used for the visualization of flow patterns and the quantification of wall shear stress. Post processing was done with VMTK and MATLAB. A parabolic velocity profile was prescribed at the inlets and outlets, except for 1. Stress free outlet was assigned to the remaining outlet. Results: The results show that for angle lower than 90°, low shear stress regions are observed at the non-flow divider and the apex. For angle larger than 90°, low shear stress regions only at the non-flow divider. By increasing of diameter of side branch ratio, low shear stress regions in the side branch appear at the non-flow divider. Conclusion: It is concluded that not only angle and diameter are important, but also the overall 3D shape of the artery. More research is required to further quantify the effects angle and diameter on shear stress patterns in coronaries.

  6. Surgical management of unruptured posterior carotid artery wall aneurysms.

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    O'Shaughnessy, Brian A; Getch, Christopher C; Bendok, Bernard R; Batjer, H Hunt

    2003-07-15

    Intracranial aneurysms arising from the posterior wall of the supraclinoid carotid artery are extremely common lesions. The aneurysm dilation typically occurs in immediate proximity to the origin of the posterior communicating artery and, less commonly, the anterior choroidal artery (AChA). Because of the increasingly widespread use of noninvasive neuroimaging methods to evaluate patients believed to harbor cerebral lesions, many of these carotid artery aneurysms are now documented in their unruptured state, prior to occurrence of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Based on these factors, the management of unruptured posterior carotid artery (PCA) wall aneurysms is an important element of any neurosurgical practice. Despite impressive recent advances in endovascular therapy, the placement of microsurgical clips to exclude aneurysms with preservation of all afferent and efferent vasculature remains the most efficacious and durable therapy. To date, an optimal outcome is only achieved when the neurosurgeon is able to combine systematic preoperative neurovascular assessment with meticulous operative technique. In this report, the authors review their surgical approach to PCA wall aneurysms, which is greatly based on the extensive neurovascular experience of the senior author. Focus is placed on their methods of preoperative evaluation and operative technique, with emphasis on neurovascular anatomy and the significance of oculomotor nerve compression. They conclude by discussing surgery-related complications, with a particular focus on intraoperative rupture of aneurysms and their management, and the postoperative ischemic AChA syndrome.

  7. Impact of exercise training on arterial wall thickness in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Cable, N.T.; Green, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Thickening of the carotid artery wall has been adopted as a surrogate marker of pre-clinical atherosclerosis, which is strongly related to increased cardiovascular risk. The cardioprotective effects of exercise training, including direct effects on vascular function and lumen dimension, have been co

  8. Diffusion-damped domain wall dynamics

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    Varga, R; Infante, G [Inst. Phys., Fac. Sci., UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 04154 Kosice (Slovakia); Badini-Confalonieri, G A; Vazquez, M, E-mail: rvarga@upjs.s [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-01-01

    In the given work, the influence of diffusional damping on the domain wall dynamics of heat treated FeSiBP microwires is presented. Two regions of the domain wall dynamics have been found. At low applied fields diffusion damping prevails, keeping the domain wall velocity and mobility low. At higher fields, the diffusional effects are overcomed and domain wall velocity increases steeply and so does the domain wall mobility.

  9. High resolution ultrasound and arterial wall changes in early atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renton, Sophie Caroline

    Non-invasive vascular testing evolved initially to meet the needs of the surgeon to identify haemodynamically significant lesions. However, with refinement of techniques and the development of high resolution ultrasound, it has become possible to detect early lesions and to measure the thickness of die arterial wall with an accuracy of 0.2mm. Such measurements have epidemiological and prognostic potential. They may allow the study of progression (or regression) of atherosclerotic disease before symptoms develop. The aim of this thesis was to assess the value of arterial wall measurements of intima-media thickness and compliance of the common carotid artery in the prediction of early atherosclerotic disease. Four different anatomical patterns of carotid bulb morphology have been identified, according to the position of the bulb origin in relation to the flow divider. It has been demonstrated that bulb morphology influences the site of early plaque formation. The presence of plaque at the carotid and femoral bifurcations was found to be associated with increased intima-media thickening of the common carotid artery. Histological analysis of common carotid arteries taken at post-mortem showed that this diffuse intima-media thickening is the result of deposition of cholesterol crystals, medial atrophy, fatty and fibrous change, and accumulation of necrotic debris, the features characteristic of plaques, even though discrete plaques rarely occur at this site. Subsequently, a number of clinical studies were undertaken which demonstrated that the intima-media thickness is increased in diabetics, hypopituitary patients and claudicants as compared to controls. It was found that the intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery could be used to predict the presence of bifurcation plaques and macrovascular disease. The work of this thesis has demonstrated that high resolution ultrasound is a powerful technique for die study of the arterial wall and should be tested in

  10. A New High-Resolution Spectral Approach to Noninvasively Evaluate Wall Deformations in Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan, Ivonne; Negreira, Carlos; Ramos, Antonio; Brum, Javier; Ramirez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    By locally measuring changes on arterial wall thickness as a function of pressure, the related Young modulus can be evaluated. This physical magnitude has shown to be an important predictive factor for cardiovascular diseases. For evaluating those changes, imaging segmentation or time correlations of ultrasonic echoes, coming from wall interfaces, are usually employed. In this paper, an alternative low-cost technique is proposed to locally evaluate variations on arterial walls, which are dynamically measured with an improved high-resolution calculation of power spectral densities in echo-traces of the wall interfaces, by using a parametric autoregressive processing. Certain wall deformations are finely detected by evaluating the echoes overtones peaks with power spectral estimations that implement Burg and Yule Walker algorithms. Results of this spectral approach are compared with a classical cross-correlation operator, in a tube phantom and “in vitro” carotid tissue. A circulating loop, mimicking heart periods and blood pressure changes, is employed to dynamically inspect each sample with a broadband ultrasonic probe, acquiring multiple A-Scans which are windowed to isolate echo-traces packets coming from distinct walls. Then the new technique and cross-correlation operator are applied to evaluate changing parietal deformations from the detection of displacements registered on the wall faces under periodic regime. PMID:24688596

  11. A New High-Resolution Spectral Approach to Noninvasively Evaluate Wall Deformations in Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivonne Bazan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By locally measuring changes on arterial wall thickness as a function of pressure, the related Young modulus can be evaluated. This physical magnitude has shown to be an important predictive factor for cardiovascular diseases. For evaluating those changes, imaging segmentation or time correlations of ultrasonic echoes, coming from wall interfaces, are usually employed. In this paper, an alternative low-cost technique is proposed to locally evaluate variations on arterial walls, which are dynamically measured with an improved high-resolution calculation of power spectral densities in echo-traces of the wall interfaces, by using a parametric autoregressive processing. Certain wall deformations are finely detected by evaluating the echoes overtones peaks with power spectral estimations that implement Burg and Yule Walker algorithms. Results of this spectral approach are compared with a classical cross-correlation operator, in a tube phantom and “in vitro” carotid tissue. A circulating loop, mimicking heart periods and blood pressure changes, is employed to dynamically inspect each sample with a broadband ultrasonic probe, acquiring multiple A-Scans which are windowed to isolate echo-traces packets coming from distinct walls. Then the new technique and cross-correlation operator are applied to evaluate changing parietal deformations from the detection of displacements registered on the wall faces under periodic regime.

  12. Wall tissue remodeling regulates longitudinal tension in arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Zane S; Gotlieb, Avrum I; Langille, B Lowell

    2002-05-03

    Changes in blood pressure or flow induce arterial remodeling that normalizes mechanical loads that are imposed on arterial tissue. Arteries are also under substantial longitudinal stretch (axial strain) that may be altered by growth or atrophy of tissues to which they are attached. We therefore tested whether axial strain is also regulated in a negative feedback manner through arterial remodeling. Axial strain in rabbit carotid arteries was increased from 62+/-2% to 97+/-2% without altering other mechanical loads on wall tissues. Strain was reduced within 3 days and completely normalized by 7 days. Remodeling involved tissue elaboration, endothelial cell replication rates were increased by >50-fold and smooth muscle cell replication rates were increased by >15-fold, and substantially elevated DNA, elastin, and collagen contents were recorded. Also, increased rates of apoptosis were indicated by degradation of DNA into oligonucleosomes, and matrix remodeling was reflected in enlarged fenestrae in the internal elastic lamina and increased expression and activation of gelatinases, especially matrix metalloproteinase-2. Intriguingly, reduced axial strain was not normalized, presumably because remodeling processes, apart from cell contraction, are ineffective in decreasing strain, and arterial smooth muscle orientation precludes large effects of contraction on axial strain.

  13. Constitutive modelling of an arterial wall supported by microscopic measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vychytil J.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available An idealized model of an arterial wall is proposed as a two-layer system. Distinct mechanical response of each layer is taken into account considering two types of strain energy functions in the hyperelasticity framework. The outer layer, considered as a fibre-reinforced composite, is modelled using the structural model of Holzapfel. The inner layer, on the other hand, is represented by a two-scale model mimicing smooth muscle tissue. For this model, material parameters such as shape, volume fraction and orientation of smooth muscle cells are determined using the microscopic measurements. The resulting model of an arterial ring is stretched axially and loaded with inner pressure to simulate the mechanical response of a porcine arterial segment during inflation and axial stretching. Good agreement of the model prediction with experimental data is promising for further progress.

  14. Wall morphology, blood flow and wall shear stress: MR findings in patients with peripheral artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galizia, Mauricio S.; Barker, Alex; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Liao, Yihua [Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); McDermott, Mary M. [Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University' s Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Markl, Michael [Northwestern University, Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL (United States); Northwestern University, Department Biomedical Engineering, McCormick School of Engineering, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-04-15

    To investigate the influence of atherosclerotic plaques on femoral haemodynamics assessed by two-dimensional (2D) phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with three-directional velocity encoding. During 1 year, patients with peripheral artery disease and an ankle brachial index <1.00 were enrolled. After institutional review board approval and written informed consent, 44 patients (age, 70 ± 12 years) underwent common femoral artery MRI. Patients with contra-indications for MRI were excluded. Sequences included 2D time-of-flight, proton-density, T1-weighted and T2-weighted MRI. Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated 2D PC-MRI with 3D velocity encoding was acquired. A radiologist classified images in five categories. Blood flow, velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) along the vessel circumference were quantified from the PC-MRI data. The acquired images were of good quality for interpretation. There were no image quality problems related to poor ECG-gating or slice positioning. Velocities, oscillatory shear stress and total flow were similar between patients with normal arteries and wall thickening/plaque. Patients with plaques demonstrated regionally increased peak systolic WSS and enhanced WSS eccentricity. Combined multi-contrast morphological imaging of the peripheral arterial wall with PC-MRI with three-directional velocity encoding is a feasible technique. Further study is needed to determine whether flow is an appropriate marker for altered endothelial cell function, vascular remodelling and plaque progression. (orig.)

  15. Shape dynamics of growing cell walls

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a general theoretical framework to study the shape dynamics of actively growing and remodeling surfaces. Using this framework we develop a physical model for growing bacterial cell walls and study the interplay of cell shape with the dynamics of growth and constriction. The model allows us to derive constraints on cell wall mechanical energy based on the observed dynamics of cell shape. We predict that exponential growth in cell size requires a constant amount of cell wall energy to be dissipated per unit volume. We use the model to understand and contrast growth in bacteria with different shapes such as spherical, ellipsoidal, cylindrical and toroidal morphologies. Coupling growth to cell wall constriction, we predict a discontinuous shape transformation, from partial constriction to cell division, as a function of the chemical potential driving cell-wall synthesis. Our model for cell wall energy and shape dynamics relates growth kinetics with cell geometry, and provides a unified framework to d...

  16. Passive cigarette smoking induces inflammatory injury in human arterial walls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Ni; HONG Jiang; DAI Qiu-yan

    2009-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have shown that both active and passive cigarette smoking increase the risk of atherosclerosis. But very little is known about the biological processes induced by passive cigarette smoking that contribute to atheresclerosis. We observe the expression of a few of biological and inflammatory markers in human arterial walls in vitro which were treated with the second-hand smoke solution (sidestream whole, SSW), and discuss the possible mechanism of inflammatory injury induced by second-hand smoke.Methods The biological markers (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1, PECAM-1; α-smooth muscle actin, α-SMA; collagen Ⅳ, Col Ⅳ) and inflammatory markers (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, VCAM-1; monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, MCP-1; interleukin-8, IL-8) of human aortal wall were tested by immunofluorescence staining. The levels of MCP-1 and IL-8 mRNA expression were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results No distinct difference was observed between SSW and the control group on the expression of biological markers as assessed by the light microscope. But the inflammatory markers VCAM-1, MCP-1 and IL-8 on the subendothelial layer and smooth muscle cell layers, which are near the endothelium of arterial wall, were strongly stained in the SSW group compared with the control group. Their fluorescence intensities in the 1:40 SSW group (VCAM-1: 0.35±0.04, MCP-1: 0.34±0.05, IL-8: 0.37±0.05) and the 1:20 SSW group (VCAM-1: 0.40±0.04, MCP-1: 0.52±0.09, IL-8: 0.51±0.07) were significantly stronger than the control group (VCAM-1: 0.12±0.04, MCP-1: 0.06±0.02, IL-8: 0.24±0.03) by semi-quantitative analysis of immunofluorescence (P <0.001 vs control). MCP-1 mRNA expression in the 1:40 SSW (0.15±0.04) and the 1:20 SSW (0.19±0.06) group was significantly higher than in the control group (0.09±0.03) (P <0.05, P <0.01 vs control); IL-8 mRNA expression in the 1:40 SSW (0.64±0.12) and 1

  17. Linear and nonlinear viscoelastic arterial wall models: application on animals

    CERN Document Server

    Ghigo, Arthur; Armentano, Ricardo; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Fullana, Jose-Maria

    2016-01-01

    This work deals with the viscoelasticity of the arterial wall and its influence on the pulse waves. We describe the viscoelasticity by a non-linear Kelvin-Voigt model in which the coefficients are fitted using experimental time series of pressure and radius measured on a sheep's arterial network. We obtained a good agreement between the results of the nonlinear Kelvin-Voigt model and the experimental measurements. We found that the viscoelastic relaxation time-defined by the ratio between the viscoelastic coefficient and the Young's modulus-is nearly constant throughout the network. Therefore, as it is well known that smaller arteries are stiffer, the viscoelastic coefficient rises when approaching the peripheral sites to compensate the rise of the Young's modulus, resulting in a higher damping effect. We incorporated the fitted viscoelastic coefficients in a nonlinear 1D fluid model to compute the pulse waves in the network. The damping effect of viscoelasticity on the high frequency waves is clear especiall...

  18. Arterial wall perfusion measured with photon counting spectral x-ray CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Steven M.; Korinek, Mark J.; Vercnocke, Andrew J.; Anderson, Jill L.; Halaweish, Ahmed; Leng, Shuai; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2016-10-01

    Early atherosclerosis changes perfusion of the arterial wall due to localized proliferation of the vasa vasorum. When contrast agent passes through the artery, some enters the vasa vasorum and increases radiopacity of the arterial wall. Technical challenges to detecting changes in vasa vasorum density include the thin arterial wall, partial volume averaging at the arterial lumen/wall interface and calcification within the wall. We used a photon-counting spectral CT scanner to study carotid arteries of anesthetized pigs and micro-CT of these arteries to quantify vasa vasorum density. The left carotid artery wall was injected with autologous blood to stimulate vasa vasorum angiogenesis. The scans were performed at 25-120 keV; the tube-current-time product was 550 mAs. A 60 mL bolus of iodine contrast agent was injected into the femoral vein at 5mL/s. Two seconds post injection, an axial scan was acquired at every 3 s over 60 s (i.e., 20 time points). Each time point acquired 28 contiguous transaxial slices with reconstructed voxels 0.16 x 0.16 x 1 mm3. Regions-of-interest in the outer 2/3 of the arterial wall and in the middle 2/3 of the lumen were drawn and their enhancements plotted versus time. Lumenal CT values peaked several seconds after injection and then returned towards baseline. Arterial wall CT values peaked concurrent to the lumen. The peak arterial wall enhancement in the left carotid arterial wall correlated with increased vasa vasorum density observed in micro-CT images of the isolated arteries.

  19. Interaction of wall shear stress magnitude and gradient in the prediction of arterial macromolecular permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMack, Jeffrey A; Himburg, Heather A; Li, Xue-Mei; Friedman, Morton H

    2005-04-01

    Large spatial shear stress gradients have anecdotally been associated with early atherosclerotic lesion susceptibility in vivo and have been proposed as promoters of endothelial cell dysfunction in vitro. Here, experiments are presented in which several measures of the fluid dynamic shear stress, including its gradient, at the walls of in vivo porcine iliac arteries, are correlated against the transendothelial macromolecular permeability of the vessels. The fluid dynamic measurements are based on postmortem vascular casts, and permeability is measured from Evans blue dye (EBD) uptake. Time-averaged wall shear stress (WSS), as well as a new parameter termed maximum gradient stress (MGS) that describes the spatial shear stress gradient due to flow acceleration at a given point, are mapped for each artery and compared on a point-by-point basis to the corresponding EBD patterns. While there was no apparent relation between MGS and EBD uptake, a composite parameter, WSS(-0.11) MGS(0.044), was highly correlated with permeability. Notwithstanding the small exponents, the parameter varied widely within the region of interest. The results suggest that sites exposed to low wall shear stresses are more likely to exhibit elevated permeability, and that this increase is exacerbated in the presence of large spatial shear stress gradients.

  20. Calculation of arterial wall temperature in atherosclerotic arteries: effect of pulsatile flow, arterial geometry, and plaque structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Taehong

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper presents calculations of the temperature distribution in an atherosclerotic plaque experiencing an inflammatory process; it analyzes the presence of hot spots in the plaque region and their relationship to blood flow, arterial geometry, and inflammatory cell distribution. Determination of the plaque temperature has become an important topic because plaques showing a temperature inhomogeneity have a higher likelihood of rupture. As a result, monitoring plaque temperature and knowing the factors affecting it can help in the prevention of sudden rupture. Methods The transient temperature profile in inflamed atherosclerotic plaques is calculated by solving an energy equation and the Navier-Stokes equations in 2D idealized arterial models of a bending artery and an arterial bifurcation. For obtaining the numerical solution, the commercial package COMSOL 3.2 was used. The calculations correspond to a parametric study where arterial type and size, as well as plaque geometry and composition, are varied. These calculations are used to analyze the contribution of different factors affecting arterial wall temperature measurements. The main factors considered are the metabolic heat production of inflammatory cells, atherosclerotic plaque length lp, inflammatory cell layer length lmp, and inflammatory cell layer thickness dmp. Results The calculations indicate that the best location to perform the temperature measurement is at the back region of the plaque (0.5 ≤ l/lp ≤ 0.7. The location of the maximum temperature, or hot spot, at the plaque surface can move during the cardiac cycle depending on the arterial geometry and is a direct result of the blood flow pattern. For the bending artery, the hot spot moves 0.6 millimeters along the longitudinal direction; for the arterial bifurcation, the hot spot is concentrated at a single location due to the flow recirculation observed at both ends of the plaque. Focusing on the

  1. Wall shear stress and pressure distribution on aneurysms and infundibulae in the posterior communicating artery bifurcation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Hyoungsu; Jayaraman, Mahesh V; Karniadakis, George Em

    2009-12-01

    A growing number of cases of rupture at an infundibulum, progression of infundibulum to a frank aneurysm, and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in the posterior communicating artery (PCoA) have been reported. Using patient-specific geometric models of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) with PCoA infundibulum or aneurysm, high-resolution computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with a spectral/hp element method. Simulation results show that the flow impinges at the distal wall of infundibulum near the outside of the ICA bend and creates a region of higher pressure (4-5 mmHg) surrounded by a band of a high wall shear stress (WSS) (20-30 N/m(2) on average). At the proximal end of the infundibulum, another stagnation area is formed characterized by low WSS (shear index. This impingement region seems to coincide with the locations of the rupture of infundibulae or progression to aneurysms. In addition, the pulsatile flow becomes unstable due to the presence of aneurysms or aneurysm-like infundibulae, and this leads to WSS temporal fluctuations inside the aneurysm, which may accelerate the degenerative processes in the vessel walls.

  2. Effect of Hematocrit on Wall Shear Stress for Blood Flow through Tapered Artery

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, A. K.; Singh, D. P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study to show the effects of Hematocrit (Red blood cells), height of stenosis, porous parameter and velocity of blood on wall shear stress of the flow of blood through tapered artery. The study reveals that wall shear stress reduces for increasing Hematocrit percentage. It is also observed that wall shear stress increases as stenosis height and porous parameter increase whereas it decreases with the increasing values of velocity of blood and slope of tapered artery.

  3. Dynamic response of flexible retaining walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younan, A.H.; Veletsos, A.S.; Bandyopadhyay, K.

    1997-01-01

    Making use of an extension of a recently proposed, relatively simple, approximate method of analysis, a critical evaluation is made of the response to horizontal ground shaking of flexible walls retaining a uniform, linear, viscoelastic stratum of constant thickness and semiinfinite extent in the horizontal direction. Both cantilever and top-supported walls are examined. Following a detailed description of the method and of its rate of convergence, comprehensive numerical solutions are presented that elucidate the action of the system and the effects of the various parameters involved. The parameters varied include the flexibility of the wall, the condition of top support, and the characteristics of the ground motion. The effects of both harmonic base motions and an actual earthquake record are examined. Special attention is paid to the effects of long-period, effectively static excitations. A maximum dynamic response is then expressed as the product of the corresponding static response and an appropriate amplification or deamplification factor. The response quantities examined include the displacements of the wall relative to the moving base, the dynamic wall pressures, and the total wall force, base shear and base moment.

  4. Dynamics of the blood flow in the curved artery with the rolling massage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, H. H.; Wu, X. H.; Yao, Y. L.

    2011-10-01

    Arterial wall shear stress and flow velocity are important factors in the development of some arterial diseases. Here, we aim to investigate the dynamic effect of the rolling massage on the property of the blood flow in the curved artery. The distributions of flow velocity and shear stress for the blood flow are computed by the lattice Boltzmann method, and the dynamic factors under different rolling techniques are studied numerically. The study is helpful to understand the mechanism of the massage and develop the massage techniques.

  5. 3D quantitative visualization of altered LV wall thickening dynamics caused by coronary microembolization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eusemann, Christian D.; Mohlenkamp, Stefan; Ritman, Erik L.; Robb, Richard A.

    2001-05-01

    Regional heart wall dynamics has been shown to be a sensitive indicator of LV wall ischemia. Rates of local LV wall thickening during a cardiac cycle can be measured and illustrated using functional parametric mappings. This display conveys the spatial distribution of dynamic strain in the myocardium and thereby provides a rapid qualitative appreciation of the severity and extent of the ischemic region. 3D reconstructions were obtained in an anesthetized pig from 8 adjacent, shortaxis, slices of the left ventricle imaged with an Electron Beam Computer Tomograph at 11 time points through one complete cardiac cycle. The 3D reconstructions were obtained before and after injection of 100 micrometer microspheres into the Left Anterior Descending (LAD) coronary artery. This injection causes microembolization of LAD artery branches within the heart wall. The image processing involved radially dividing the tomographic images of the myocardium into small subdivisions with color encoding of the local magnitude of regional thickness or regional velocities of LV wall thickening throughout the cardiac cycle. We compared the effectiveness of animation of wall thickness encoded in color versus a static image of computed rate of wall thickness change in color. The location, extent and severity of regional wall akinesis or dyskinesis, as determined from these displays, can then be compared to the region of embolization as indicated by the distribution of altered LV wall perfusion.

  6. Triptans induce vasoconstriction of human arteries and veins from the thoracic wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wackenfors, Angelica; Jarvius, Malin; Ingemansson, Richard;

    2005-01-01

    A common side effect of migraine treatment with triptans is chest symptoms. The origin of these symptoms is not known. The aim of the present study was to examine the vasocontractile effect of triptans in human arteries and veins from the thoracic wall and in coronary artery bypass grafts. In vitro...... detected by real-time PCR in all blood vessels studied. In conclusion, triptans induce vasoconstriction in arteries and veins from the thoracic wall, most likely by activation of 5-HT1B receptors. This response could be observed in only 38% to 57% of the patients, which may provide an explanation for why...

  7. Adult Vascular Wall Resident Multipotent Vascular Stem Cells, Matrix Metalloproteinases, and Arterial Aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Amato

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evidences have shown the presence of multipotent stem cells (SCs at sites of arterial aneurysms: they can differentiate into smooth muscle cells (SMCs and are activated after residing in a quiescent state in the vascular wall. Recent studies have implicated the role of matrix metalloproteinases in the pathogenesis of arterial aneurysms: in fact the increased synthesis of MMPs by arterial SMCs is thought to be a pivotal mechanism in aneurysm formation. The factors and signaling pathways involved in regulating wall resident SC recruitment, survival, proliferation, growth factor production, and differentiation may be also related to selective expression of different MMPs. This review explores the relationship between adult vascular wall resident multipotent vascular SCs, MMPs, and arterial aneurysms.

  8. Arterial embolization for traumatic lethal lateral abdomi-nal wall hemorrhage in a liver cirrhosis patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seiji Morita; Tomoatsu Tsuji; Takeshi Yamagiwa; Hiroyuki Otsuka; Sadaki Inokuchi

    2009-01-01

    @@ B lood loss due to abdominal wall hemorrhage is generally managed conservatively. Further, abdominal wall hemorrhage rarely develops into a life-threatening condition. However, it is difficult to sur-gically achieve hemostasis. We report the case of a liver cirrhosis patient with life-threatening abdominal wall hemorrhage that developed as a result of a minor trauma and was successfully treated with arterial embolization (AE).

  9. A finite element study of balloon expandable stent for plaque and arterial wall vulnerability assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-07-01

    The stresses induced within plaque tissues and arterial layers during stent expansion inside an atherosclerotic artery can be exceeded from the yield stresses of those tissues and, consequently, lead to plaque or arterial layer rupture. The distribution and magnitude of the stresses in each component involved in stenting might be clearly different for different plaque types and different arterial layers. In this study, a nonlinear finite element simulation was employed to investigate the effect of plaque composition (calcified, cellular, and hypocellular) on the stresses induced in the arterial layers (intima, media, and adventitia) during implantation of a balloon expandable coronary stent into a stenosed artery. The atherosclerotic artery was assumed to consist of a plaque and normal/healthy arterial tissues on its outer side. The results indicated a significant influence of plaque types on the maximum stresses induced within the plaque wall and arterial layers during stenting but not when computing maximum stress on the stent. The stress on the stiffest calcified plaque wall was in the fracture level (2.38 MPa), whereas cellular and hypocellular plaques remain stable owing to less stress on their walls. Regardless of plaque types, the highest von Mises stresses were observed on the stiffest intima layer, whereas the lowest stresses were seen to be located in less stiff media layer. The computed stresses on the intima layer were found to be high enough to initiate a rupture in this stiff layer. These findings suggest a higher risk of arterial vascular injury for the intima layer, while a lower risk of arterial injury for the media and adventitia layers.

  10. Lateral abdominal wall hematoma as a rare complication after carotid artery stenting: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satomi Jyunichiro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Abdominal wall hematoma is a rare and life-threatening complication after carotid artery stenting (CAS, but it can occur when activated clotting time is prolonged. We report a right lateral abdominal wall hematoma caused by rupture of the superficial circumflex iliac artery after CAS in a 72-year-old man with severe stenosis of the origin of the right internal carotid artery. We performed CAS for the targeted lesion while activated clotting time exceeded 300 seconds. After 2 hours, he complained of right lateral abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography revealed an extensive hematoma in the right lateral abdominal wall. Activated clotting time was 180 seconds at this point. Seven hours later, he developed hypotension and hemoglobin level dropped to 11.3 g/dl. Subsequent computed tomography showed enlargement of the hematoma. Emergent selective angiography of the external iliac artery revealed active bleeding from the right superficial circumflex iliac artery. Transcatheter arterial embolization with Gelfoam and microcoils was performed successfully. With more CAS procedures being performed, it is important for endovascular surgeons and radiologists to consider the possibility of abdominal wall hematoma in this situation.

  11. Combination treatment of rosuvastatin or atorvastatin, with regular exercise improves arterial wall stiffness in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensuke Toyama

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Statin- and exercise-therapy are both clinically beneficial by preventing cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD. However, there is no information on the vascular effects of the combination of statins and exercise on arterial wall stiffness in CAD patients. METHODS: The present study is a sub-analysis of PRESET study that determined the effects of 20-week treatment with statins (rosuvastatin, n=14, atorvastatin, n=14 combined with regular exercise on arterial wall stiffness assessed by measurement of brachial and ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV in CAD patients. RESULTS: The combination of statins and regular exercise significantly improved exercise capacity, lipid profile, including low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, baPWV (baseline: 1747 ± 355, at 20 weeks of treatment: 1627 ± 271 cm/s, p=0.008, and basophil count (baseline: 42 ± 32, 20 weeks: 26 ± 15 cells/µL, p=0.007, but had no effect on blood pressure (baseline: 125 ± 22, 20 weeks: 121 ± 16 mmHg. Changes in baPWV correlated significantly with changes in basophil count (r=0.488, p=0.008, but not with age, lipids profile, exercise capacity, or hs-CRP. CONCLUSION: In CAD patients, the combination treatment with statins and exercise resulted in significant amelioration of arterial wall stiffness, at least in part, through reduction of circulating basophils.

  12. Basic fibroblast growth factor gene transfection in repair of internal carotid artery aneurysm wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Jiao; Ming Jiang; Jinghai Fang; Yinsheng Deng; Zejun Chen; Min Wu

    2012-01-01

    Surgery or interventional therapy has some risks in the treatment of cerebral aneurysm. We established an internal carotid artery aneurysm model by dripping elastase in the crotch of the right internal and external carotid arteries of New Zealand rabbits. Following model induction, lentivirus carrying basic fibroblast growth factor was injected through the ear vein. We found that the longer the action time of the lentivirus, the smaller the aneurysm volume. Moreover, platelet-derived growth factor expression in the aneurysm increased, but smooth muscle 22 alpha and hypertension-related gene 1 mRNA expression decreased. At 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks following model establishment, following 1 week of injection of lentivirus carrying basic fibroblast growth factor, the later the intervention time, the more severe the blood vessel damage, and the bigger the aneurysm volume, the lower the smooth muscle 22 alpha and hypertension-related gene 1 mRNA expression. Simultaneously, platelet-derived growth factor expression decreased. These data suggest that recombinant lentivirus carrying basic fibroblast growth factor can repair damaged cells in the aneurysmal wall and inhibit aneurysm dynamic growth, and that the effect is dependent on therapeutic duration.

  13. Artery buckling analysis using a two-layered wall model with collagen dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottahedi, Mohammad; Han, Hai-Chao

    2016-07-01

    Artery buckling has been proposed as a possible cause for artery tortuosity associated with various vascular diseases. Since microstructure of arterial wall changes with aging and diseases, it is essential to establish the relationship between microscopic wall structure and artery buckling behavior. The objective of this study was to developed arterial buckling equations to incorporate the two-layered wall structure with dispersed collagen fiber distribution. Seven porcine carotid arteries were tested for buckling to determine their critical buckling pressures at different axial stretch ratios. The mechanical properties of these intact arteries and their intima-media layer were determined via pressurized inflation test. Collagen alignment was measured from histological sections and modeled by a modified von-Mises distribution. Buckling equations were developed accordingly using microstructure-motivated strain energy function. Our results demonstrated that collagen fibers disperse around two mean orientations symmetrically to the circumferential direction (39.02°±3.04°) in the adventitia layer; while aligning closely in the circumferential direction (2.06°±3.88°) in the media layer. The microstructure based two-layered model with collagen fiber dispersion described the buckling behavior of arteries well with the model predicted critical pressures match well with the experimental measurement. Parametric studies showed that with increasing fiber dispersion parameter, the predicted critical buckling pressure increases. These results validate the microstructure-based model equations for artery buckling and set a base for further studies to predict the stability of arteries due to microstructural changes associated with vascular diseases and aging.

  14. Determination of wall tension in cerebral artery aneurysms by numerical simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksen, J.G.; Bazilevs, Y.; Kvamsdal, T.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cerebral artery aneurysms rupture when wall tension exceeds the strength of the wall tissue. At present, risk-assessment of unruptured aneurysms does not include evaluation of the lesions shape, yet clinical experience suggests that this is of importance. We aimed to develop...... a computational model for simulation of fluid-structure interaction in cerebral aneurysms based on patient specific lesion geometry, with special emphasis on wall tension. METHODS: An advanced isogeometric fluid-structure analysis model incorporating flexible aneurysm wall based on patient specific computed...... tomography angiogram images was developed. Variables used in the simulation model were retrieved from a literature review. RESULTS: The simulation results exposed areas of high wall tension and wall displacement located where aneurysms usually rupture. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that analyzing wall tension...

  15. Fibrillar, fibril-associated and basement membrane collagens of the arterial wall: architecture, elasticity and remodeling under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osidak, M S; Osidak, E O; Akhmanova, M A; Domogatsky, S P; Domogatskaya, A S

    2015-01-01

    The ability of a human artery to pass through 150 million liters of blood sustaining 2 billion pulsations of blood pressure with minor deterioration depends on unique construction of the arterial wall. Viscoelastic properties of this construction enable to re-seal the occuring damages apparently without direct immediate participance of the constituent cells. Collagen structures are considered to be the elements that determine the mechanoelastic properties of the wall in parallel with elastin responsible for elasticity and resilience. Collagen scaffold architecture is the function-dependent dynamic arrangement of a dozen different collagen types composing three distinct interacting forms inside the extracellular matrix of the wall. Tightly packed molecules of collagen types I, III, V provide high tensile strength along collagen fibrils but toughness of the collagen scaffold as a whole depends on molecular bonds between distinct fibrils. Apart of other macromolecules in the extracellular matrix (ECM), collagen-specific interlinks involve microfilaments of collagen type VI, meshwork-organized collagen type VIII, and FACIT collagen type XIV. Basement membrane collagen types IV, XV, XVIII and cell-associated collagen XIII enable transmission of mechanical signals between cells and whole artery matrix. Collagen scaffold undergoes continuous remodeling by decomposition promoted with MMPs and reconstitution from newly produced collagen molecules. Pulsatile stress-strain load modulates both collagen synthesis and MMP-dependent collagen degradation. In this way the ECM structure becomes adoptive to mechanical challenges. The mechanoelastic properties of the arterial wall are changed in atherosclerosis concomitantly with collagen turnover both type-specific and dependent on the structure. Improving the feedback could be another approach to restore sufficient blood circulation.

  16. Residual stress distribution in a lamellar model of the arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighipour, Nooshin; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Avolio, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Excessive wall circumferential stress in arteries caused by luminal pressure leads to endothelial damage and clinical consequences. In addition to circumferential stress, arterial wall contains residual stress with compressive and tensile components on intima and adventitia sides. The intimal compressive component compensates part of tensile stress induced by blood pressure, hence reduces severity of endothelial tension. The opening angle caused by radial cut of arterial ring defines residual stress. In this study, finite element modelling is used to evaluate residual stress in a lamellar model of human aorta with differing opening angle and elastic modulus. Results show non-linear residual stress profiles across wall thickness, influenced by structural and mechanical parameters. Elevation of opening angle from 50° to 90° leads to increase of intimal compressive component compensating up to 32.6% of the pressure-induced tensile stress. Results may be applied in study of endothelial injury caused by excessive stress in situations such as aging, hypertension and atherosclerosis.

  17. N-3 vs. saturated fatty acids: effects on the arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheendran, S; Chang, C C; Deckelbaum, R J

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. Atherosclerosis and unstable plaques are underlying causes for cardiovascular diseases. Cardiovascular disease is associated with consumption of diets high in saturated fats. In contrast there is increasing evidence that higher intakes of dietary n-3 fatty acids decrease risk for cardiovascular disease. Recent studies are beginning to clarify how n-3 compared with saturated fatty acids influence cardiovascular disease risk via pathways in the arterial wall. In this paper we will review studies that report on mechanisms whereby dietary fatty acids affect atherosclerosis through modulation of arterial wall lipid deposition, inflammation, cell proliferation, and plaque vulnerability.

  18. Structural-and-functional alterations in the arterial wall and clinical manifestations of nonspecific aortoarteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovskiĭ, A V; Kuntsevich, G I; Zotikov, E A; Burtseva, E A; Kulbak, V A

    2009-01-01

    The authors studied structural-and-functional properties of the arterial wall, also assessing elastic properties of the common femoral artery and the brachial artery flow-dependent dilatation (FDD) index in a total of thirty-six patients presenting with nonspecific aortoarteritis (NAA). The overwhelming majority of the patients, i. e., twenty-four (89%), showed a statistically significant decrease in the FDD as compared with the control-group patients (P<0.05). We revealed a statistically reliable (P=0.0005) inverse correlation between the level of systolic arterial pressure and an increase in the rigidity index of the common femoral artery wall. Also determined was a correlation of the femoral artery wall rigidity (systolic AP equalling 140 mm Hg and higher) and the brachial artery flow-dependent dilatation index (r=-0.61). All the patients suffering from non-specific aortoarteritis were diagnosed as having a decrease in the elasticity values, accompanied by an increase in systolic arterial pressure (r=0.36; P=0.07). Comparing the level of systolic arterial pressure with the values of the distensibility coefficient and compliance coefficient revealed a weak inverse correlation (r=-0.28 and 0.21, respectively). Evaluating the impact of duration of the disease on the distensibility coefficient, compliance coefficient and the rigidity index made it possible to detect a statistically significant (P=0.0039) direct correlation between the rigidity index and the duration of non-specific aortoarteritis. To a leaser degree, the duration of the inflammatory process influenced the distensibility coefficient and compliance coefficient (r=-0.28; r=-0.30, respectively; P=0.06).

  19. PREFACE: Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrows, C. H.; Meier, G.

    2012-01-01

    Domain structures in magnetic materials are ubiquitous and have been studied for decades. The walls that separate them are topological defects in the magnetic order parameter and have a wide variety of complex forms. In general, their investigation is difficult in bulk materials since only the domain structure on the surface of a specimen is visible. Cutting the sample to reveal the interior causes a rearrangement of the domains into a new form. As with many other areas of magnetism, the study of domain wall physics has been revitalised by the advent of nanotechnology. The ability to fabricate nanoscale structures has permitted the formation of simplified and controlled domain patterns; the development of advanced microscopy methods has permitted them to be imaged and then modelled; subjecting them to ultrashort field and current pulses has permitted their dynamics to be explored. The latest results from all of these advances are described in this special issue. Not only has this led to results of great scientific beauty, but also to concepts of great applicability to future information technologies. In this issue the reader will find the latest results for these domain wall dynamics and the high-speed processes of topological structures such as domain walls and magnetic vortices. These dynamics can be driven by the application of magnetic fields, or by flowing currents through spintronic devices using the novel physics of spin-transfer torque. This complexity has been studied using a wide variety of experimental techniques at the edge of the spatial and temporal resolution currently available, and can be described using sophisticated analytical theory and computational modelling. As a result, the dynamics can be engineered to give rise to finely controlled memory and logic devices with new functionality. Moreover, the field is moving to study not only the conventional transition metal ferromagnets, but also complex heterostructures, novel magnets and even other

  20. Combined aerobic and resistance exercise training decreases peripheral but not central artery wall thickness in subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, T.H.A.; Munckhof, I.C.L. van den; Poelkens, F.; Hopman, M.T.; Thijssen, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the impact of exercise training on conduit artery wall thickness in type 2 diabetes. We examined the local and systemic impact of exercise training on superficial femoral (SFA), brachial (BA), and carotid artery (CA) wall thickness in type 2 diabetes patients and con

  1. Characterization of the vessel geometry, flow mechanics and wall shear stress in the great arteries of wildtype prenatal mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon Hwai Yap

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Abnormal fluid mechanical environment in the pre-natal cardiovascular system is hypothesized to play a significant role in causing structural heart malformations. It is thus important to improve our understanding of the prenatal cardiovascular fluid mechanical environment at multiple developmental time-points and vascular morphologies. We present such a study on fetal great arteries on the wildtype mouse from embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5 to near-term (E18.5. METHODS: Ultrasound bio-microscopy (UBM was used to measure blood velocity of the great arteries. Subsequently, specimens were cryo-embedded and sectioned using episcopic fluorescent image capture (EFIC to obtain high-resolution 2D serial image stacks, which were used for 3D reconstructions and quantitative measurement of great artery and aortic arch dimensions. EFIC and UBM data were input into subject-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD for modeling hemodynamics. RESULTS: In normal mouse fetuses between E14.5-18.5, ultrasound imaging showed gradual but statistically significant increase in blood velocity in the aorta, pulmonary trunk (with the ductus arteriosus, and descending aorta. Measurement by EFIC imaging displayed a similar increase in cross sectional area of these vessels. However, CFD modeling showed great artery average wall shear stress and wall shear rate remain relatively constant with age and with vessel size, indicating that hemodynamic shear had a relative constancy over gestational period considered here. CONCLUSION: Our EFIC-UBM-CFD method allowed reasonably detailed characterization of fetal mouse vascular geometry and fluid mechanics. Our results suggest that a homeostatic mechanism for restoring vascular wall shear magnitudes may exist during normal embryonic development. We speculate that this mechanism regulates the growth of the great vessels.

  2. A NEW UNSTEADY THREE DIMENSIONAL MODEL FOR MACROMOLECULAR TRANSPORT AND WATER FILTRATION ACROSS THE ARTERIAL WALL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄浩; 温功碧

    2001-01-01

    A new unsteady three-dimensional convective-diffusive mathematical model for the transportation of macromolecules and water across the arterial wall was proposed . After the formation of leaky junctions due to the mitosis of endothelial cell of the arterial wall, the macromolecular transport happens surrounding the leaky cells. The arterial wall was divided into four layers: the endothelial layer, the subendothelial intima, the internal elastic lamina and the media for the convenience of research. The time-dependent concentration growth,the effect of the shape of endothelial cell and the effect of physiological parameters were analyzed. The analytical solution of velocity field and pressure field of water flow across the arterial wall were obtained; and concentration distribution of three macromolecules ; LDL,HRP and Albumin, were calculated with numerical simulation method. The new theory predicts, the maximum and distribution areas of time dependent concentration with round shape endothelial cell are both larger than that with ellipse-shape endothelial cell. The model also predicts the concentration growth is much alike that of a two-dimensional model and it shows that the concentration reaches its peak at the leaky junction where atherosclerotic formation frequently occurs and falls down rapidly in a limited area beginning from its earlier time growth to the state when macromolecular transfer approaches steadily. These predictions of the new model are in agreement with the experimental observation for the growth and concentration distribution of LDL and Albumin.

  3. Altered Metabolism of LDL in the Arterial Wall Precedes Atherosclerosis Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D.; Christoffersen, Christina; Lindholm, Marie W.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Plasma cholesterol lowering is beneficial in patients with atherosclerosis. However, it is unknown how it affects entry and degradation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles in the lesioned arterial wall. Objective: We studied the effect of lipid-lowering therapy on LDL permeability...

  4. Regional calcium distribution and ultrasound images of the vessel wall in human carotid arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szikszai, Z.; Kertész, Zs.; Uzonyi, I.; Szíki, G. Á.; Magyar, M. T.; Molnár, S.; Ida, Y.; Csiba, L.

    2005-04-01

    Arterial calcification can take place at two sites in the vessel wall: the intima and the media. Intimal calcification occurs exclusively within atherosclerotic plaques, while medial calcification may develop independently. Extensive calcified plaques in the carotid arteries can be easily detected by B-mode ultrasonic imaging. The calcium content might correlate with the ultrasound reflectance of the vessel wall, and could be a surrogate marker for arteriosclerosis. In this study, segments of human carotid arteries collected at autopsy were examined by ultrasonography in vitro and calcium distributional maps of sections from the same segments were determined by particle induced X-ray emission. Our aim was to make a first step towards investigating the relationship between the calcium distributional maps and the respective ultrasound images.

  5. Automatic airway-artery analysis on lung CT to quantify airway wall thickening and bronchiectasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez-Rovira, Adria; Kuo, Wieying; Petersen, Jens;

    2016-01-01

    area percentage (WAP), wall thickness ratio (WTR), and airway diameters. Results: The method was thoroughly evaluated using 8000 manual annotations of airway-artery pairs from 24 full-inspiration pediatric CT scans (12 diseased and 12 controls). Limits of agreement between the automatically...... and manually measured diameters were comparable to interobserver limits of agreement. Differences in automatically obtained WAR, AAR, WAP, and WTR between bronchiectatic subjects and controls were similar as when manual annotations were used: WAR and outer AAR were significantly higher in the bronchiectatic......Purpose: Bronchiectasis and airway wall thickening are commonly assessed in computed tomography (CT) by comparing the airway size with the size of the accompanying artery. Thus, in order to automate the quantification of bronchiectasis and wall thickening following a similar principle...

  6. Quantifying [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the arterial wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Björn Alexander; Bashyam, A.; Ramachandran, A.;

    2015-01-01

    -18-FDG was determined in the aortic wall by calculating the blood pool-corrected maximum standardized uptake value (cSUV(MAX)) and cSUV(MEAN). The PVE-corrected SUVMEAN (pvcSUV(MEAN)) was also calculated using F-18-FDG PET/CT and CECT images. Finally, corresponding target-to-background ratios (TBR......) were calculated. Results At 60 min, pvcSUV(MEAN) was on average 3.1 times greater than cSUV(MAX) (P SUV(MEAN) (P SUV(MEAN) was on average 2.6 times greater than cSUV(MAX) (P SUV(MEAN) (P

  7. Fast domain wall dynamics in amorphous and nanocrystalline magnetic microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, R., E-mail: rvarga@upjs.sk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54, Kosice (Slovakia); Klein, P.; Richter, K. [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, UPJS, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54, Kosice (Slovakia); Zhukov, A. [Dept. Fisica de Materiales, Fac. Quimica, UPV/EHU, San Sebastian (Spain); Vazquez, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    We have studied the effect of thermal treatment on the domain wall dynamics of FeSiB and FeCoMoB microwires. It was shown that annealing in transversal magnetic field increases the domain wall mobility as well as the domain wall velocity. Annealing under the tensile stress hinders the appearance of the monodomain structure but application of tensile stress leads to the magnetic bistability having the domain wall mobility twice higher that in as-cast state. Further increase of the tensile stress reduces the domain wall mobility but the domain wall velocity increases as a result of the decrease of critical propagation field. Annealing of the FeCoMoB microwire by Joule heating leads to introduction of the circular anisotropy that favors the vortex domain wall. Such treatment increases the domain wall mobility as well as the maximum domain wall velocity.

  8. Plaque components affect wall stress in stented human carotid artery:A numerical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Min Fan; Xiao Liu; Cheng-Fei Du; An-Qiang Sun; Nan Zhang; Zhan-Ming Fan; Yu-Bo Fan; Xiao-Yan Deng

    2016-01-01

    Carotid artery stenting presents challenges of in-stent restenosis and late thrombosis, which are caused primarily by alterations in the mechanical environment of the artery after stent implantation. The present study con-structed patient-specific carotid arterial bifurcation models with lipid pools and calcified components based on magnetic resonance imaging. We numerically analyzed the effects of multicomponent plaques on the distributions of von Mises stresses (VMSs) in the patient-specific models after stenting. The results showed that when a stent was deployed, the large soft lipid pool in atherosclerotic plaques cushioned the host artery and reduced the stress within the arterial wall;how-ever, this resulted in a sharp increase of VMS in the fibrous cap. When compared with the lipid pool, the presence of the calcified components led to slightly increased stresses on the luminal surface. However, when a calcification was located close to the luminal surface of the host artery and the stenosis, the local VMS was elevated. Overall, compared with calcified components, large lipid pools severely dam-aged the host artery after stenting. Furthermore, damage due to the calcified component may depend on location.

  9. Plaque components affect wall stress in stented human carotid artery: A numerical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zhen-Min; Liu, Xiao; Du, Cheng-Fei; Sun, An-Qiang; Zhang, Nan; Fan, Zhan-Ming; Fan, Yu-Bo; Deng, Xiao-Yan

    2016-09-01

    Carotid artery stenting presents challenges of in-stent restenosis and late thrombosis, which are caused primarily by alterations in the mechanical environment of the artery after stent implantation. The present study constructed patient-specific carotid arterial bifurcation models with lipid pools and calcified components based on magnetic resonance imaging. We numerically analyzed the effects of multicomponent plaques on the distributions of von Mises stresses (VMSs) in the patient-specific models after stenting. The results showed that when a stent was deployed, the large soft lipid pool in atherosclerotic plaques cushioned the host artery and reduced the stress within the arterial wall; however, this resulted in a sharp increase of VMS in the fibrous cap. When compared with the lipid pool, the presence of the calcified components led to slightly increased stresses on the luminal surface. However, when a calcification was located close to the luminal surface of the host artery and the stenosis, the local VMS was elevated. Overall, compared with calcified components, large lipid pools severely damaged the host artery after stenting. Furthermore, damage due to the calcified component may depend on location.

  10. Computerized flow and vessel wall analyses of coronary arteries for detection of non-calcified plaques in coronary CT angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jun; Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Chughtai, Aamer; Agarwal, Prachi; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Kazerooni, Ella

    2016-03-01

    The buildup of non-calcified plaques (NCP) that are vulnerable to rupture in coronary arteries is a risk for myocardial infarction. We are developing a computer-aided detection (CADe) system to assist radiologists in detecting NCPs in cCTA. A major challenge of NCP detection is the large number of false positives (FPs) caused by the small sized coronary arteries, image noise and artifacts. In this study, our purpose is to design new image features to reduce FPs. A data set of 98 cCTA scans was retrospectively collected from patient files. We first used vessel wall analysis, in which topological features were extracted from vessel wall and fused with a support-vector machine, to identify the NCP candidates from the segmented coronary tree. Computerized flow dynamic (CFD) features that characterize the change in blood flow due to the presence of plaques and a vascular cross-sectional (VCS) feature that quantifies the presence of low attenuation region at the vessel wall were designed for FP reduction. Using a leave-one-out resampling method, a support vector machine classifier was trained to merge the features into a NCP likelihood score using the vessel wall features alone or in combination with the new CDF and VCS features. The performance of the new features in classification of true NCPs and FPs was evaluated by the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Without the new CFD and VCS features, the test AUC was 0.84+/-0.01. The AUC was improved to 0.88+/-0.01 with the addition of the new features. The improvement was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The study indicated that the new flow dynamic and vascular cross-sectional features were useful for differentiation of NCPs from FPs in cCTA.

  11. Serum carotenoids reduce progression of early atherosclerosis in the carotid artery wall among Eastern Finnish men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouni Karppi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several previous epidemiologic studies have shown that high blood levels of carotenoids may be protective against early atherosclerosis, but results have been inconsistent. We assessed the association between atherosclerotic progression, measured by intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery wall, and serum levels of carotenoids. METHODS: We studied the effect of carotenoids on progression of early atherosclerosis in a population-based study. The association between concentrations of serum carotenoids, and intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery wall was explored in 840 middle-aged men (aged 46-65 years from Eastern Finland. Ultrasonography of the common carotid arteries were performed at baseline and 7-year follow-up. Serum levels of carotenoids were analyzed at baseline. Changes in mean and maximum intima media thickness of carotid artery wall were related to baseline serum carotenoid levels in covariance analyses adjusted for covariates. RESULTS: In a covariance analysis with adjustment for age, ultrasound sonographer, maximum intima media thickness, examination year, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, smoking, physical activity, serum LDL cholesterol, family history of coronary heart disease, antihypertensive medication and serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein, 7-year change in maximum intima media thickness was inversely associated with lycopene (p = 0.005, α-carotene (p = 0.002 and β-carotene (p = 0.019, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows that high serum concentrations of carotenoids may be protective against early atherosclerosis.

  12. Artery wall layer dimensions during normal pregnancy: a longitudinal study using noninvasive high-frequency ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Tansim; Larsson, Anders; Larsson, Marita; Wikström, Anna-Karin; Naessen, Tord

    2013-01-15

    The vascular effects of normal pregnancy were investigated by estimating the intima and media thicknesses of the common carotid artery separately using 22-MHz ultrasound (Collagenoson, Meudt, Germany) in 57 healthy women with normal pregnancies and pregnancy outcomes, in all three trimesters and at 1 yr postpartum. A thick intima, thin media, and high intima-to-media (I/M) ratio are signs of a less healthy artery wall. Mean artery wall layer dimensions remained fairly constant during pregnancy, but the intima thickness and I/M thickness ratio appeared to improve (decrease) postpartum (P blood pressure in the first trimester were associated with higher I/M ratios, especially in the second trimester, whereas higher serum estradiol levels were significantly associated with a lower I/M ratio. Changes from the first to second trimesters in I/M ratio, taking into account differential changes in intima and media thickness, were significantly (P pregnancy appeared to improve postpartum. However, higher age, body mass index, or blood pressure and lower serum estradiol levels in the first trimester appeared to negatively affect the artery wall, strongly suggesting that pregnancy has negative vascular effects in some women. A less likely explanation involves possible adaptation to physiological changes during and after pregnancy.

  13. Targeting novel antigens in the arterial wall in thromboangiitis obliterans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Akkus

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Thromboangiitis obliterans is an inflammatory disease possibly resulting from cigarette smoking as a primary etiologic factor, perhaps as a delayed type of hypersensitivity or toxic angiitis. As little is known about the pathogenesis of the disease, we aimed to determine novel antigens that might be responsible from the local inflammatory reactions and structural changes observed in this disease. An indirect immunoperoxidase technique is used to examine the tissue samples obtained from the dorsalis pedis artery of affected individuals with twenty monoclonal antibodies. Among these several antigens which are not previously reported in TAO like CD34, CD44 and CD90 were determined in the tissue samples examined. On the other hand, many other antigens like cytokine/chemokine receptors, several enzymes and leukocyte/lymphocyte antigens were lacking giving some clues about the local pathological reactions. We briefly discussed our findings for several critical antigens those first described in the present work, possibly having roles in the development of the disease. Expression of the CD90/CD11c receptor/ligand pair seems to play an important role in mononuclear cell recruitment to the damage site. Vascular invasion of not only tunica intima but also the tunica media in affected vessels is clearly demonstrated using endothelial cell specific antigens.

  14. Modelling non-symmetric collagen fibre dispersion in arterial walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzapfel, Gerhard A; Niestrawska, Justyna A; Ogden, Ray W; Reinisch, Andreas J; Schriefl, Andreas J

    2015-05-06

    New experimental results on collagen fibre dispersion in human arterial layers have shown that the dispersion in the tangential plane is more significant than that out of plane. A rotationally symmetric dispersion model is not able to capture this distinction. For this reason, we introduce a new non-symmetric dispersion model, based on the bivariate von Mises distribution, which is used to construct a new structure tensor. The latter is incorporated in a strain-energy function that accommodates both the mechanical and structural features of the material, extending our rotationally symmetric dispersion model (Gasser et al. 2006 J. R. Soc. Interface 3, 15-35. (doi:10.1098/rsif.2005.0073)). We provide specific ranges for the dispersion parameters and show how previous models can be deduced as special cases. We also provide explicit expressions for the stress and elasticity tensors in the Lagrangian description that are needed for a finite-element implementation. Material and structural parameters were obtained by fitting predictions of the model to experimental data obtained from human abdominal aortic adventitia. In a finite-element example, we analyse the influence of the fibre dispersion on the homogeneous biaxial mechanical response of aortic strips, and in a final example the non-homogeneous stress distribution is obtained for circumferential and axial strips under fixed extension. It has recently become apparent that this more general model is needed for describing the mechanical behaviour of a variety of fibrous tissues.

  15. Wall-to-lumen ratio of intracranial arteries measured by indocyanine green angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Daichi; Shojima, Masaaki; Yoshino, Masanori; Kin, Taichi; Imai, Hideaki; Nomura, Seiji; Saito, Toki; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Oyama, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2016-01-01

    Background: The wall-to-lumen ratio (WLR) is an important parameter in vascular medicine because it indicates the character of vascular wall as well as the degree of stenosis. Despite the advances in medical imaging technologies, it is still difficult to measure the thin-walled normal intracranial arteries, and the reports on the WLR of normal intracranial artery are limited. It might be possible to calculate the WLR using the indocyanine green (ICG) angiography, which is used to observe intracranial vessels during microsurgery. Purpose: To evaluate the WLR of normal intracranial arteries using ICG angiography. Materials and Methods: From the three cases in which ICG angiography was recorded with a ruler during microsurgery, 20 measurement points were chosen for the analysis. The ICG was injected intravenously with a dose of 0.2 mg/kg, and the vessels were inspected at high magnification using an operating microscope equipped with near-infrared illumination system. The vessel outer diameter and the luminal diameter were measured using the images before and after the ICG arrival based on the pixel ratio method using a ruler as reference, respectively. The WLR was calculated as 0.5 × (vessel outer diameter − vessel luminal diameter). Results: The WLR (mean ± standard deviation) of normal intracranial arteries was 0.086 ± 0.022. The WLR tended to be high in small arteries. Conclusion: The WLR of normal intracranial arteries calculated using ICG angiography was consistent with the WLR reported in the previous reports based on human autopsy.

  16. High-resolution Magnetic Resonance Vessel Wall Imaging for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-Jin Zhu; Wu Wang; Zun-Jing Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To discuss the feasibility and clinical value of high-resolution magnetic resonance vessel wall imaging (HRMR VWI) for intracranial arterial stenosis.Date Sources:We retrieved information from PubMed database up to December 2015,using various search terms including vessel wall imaging (VWI),high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging,intracranial arterial stenosis,black blood,and intracranial atherosclerosis.Study Selection:We reviewed peer-reviewed articles printed in English on imaging technique of VWI and characteristic findings of various intracranial vasculopathies on VWI.We organized this data to explain the value of VWI in clinical application.Results:VWI with black blood technique could provide high-quality images with submillimeter voxel size,and display both the vessel wall and lumen of intracranial artery simultaneously.Various intracranial vasculopathies (atherosclerotic or nonatherosclerotic) had differentiating features including pattern of wall thickening,enhancement,and vessel remodeling on VWI.This technique could be used for determining causes of stenosis,identification of stroke mechanism,risk-stratifying patients,and directing therapeutic management in clinical practice.In addition,a new morphological classification based on VWI could be established for predicting the efficacy of endovascular therapy.Conclusions:This review highlights the value of HRMR VWI for discrimination of different intracranial vasculopathies and directing therapeutic management.

  17. The dynamics of pulsatile flow in distensible model arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepsch, D W; Zimmer, R

    1995-12-01

    Deposits and blockages are often found in the carotid, coronary, renal and femoral arteries. This paper deals with laser-Doppler velocity measurements in models of bifurcations of the human femoral arteries. Several models were prepared for the studies: a simplified 35 degrees glass model, two elastic-silicone-rubber models with a wall thickness of 1 mm and 2 mm, and true-to-scale rigid and elastic models. These measurements give a clearer picture of how hemodynamics influences the formation of atherosclerotic plaques where there is a hardening of the arterial walls and a loss of elasticity. In addition to the effects of elasticity, the influence of the flow's pulsatility were studied. The measurements were done in steady and pulsatile flow. From the velocity measurements the shear stresses were calculated.

  18. [Large artery wall properties in dialyse and renal transplant patients with normal blood pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadzy-Małaczyńska, Anna; Kosch, Marcus; Hausberg, Martin; Rahn, Karl H; Małaczyński, Paweł; Głuszek, Jerzy; Tykarski, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    Structural and mechanical properties of the arterial wall are altered in patients with renal failure. Age and hypertension are known to affect the vessel wall structure. Aging process of arterial wall appears to be accelerated in patients with end-stage renal failure. The mechanisms responsible for reduced arterial compliance and distensibility in dialyse patients and renal transplant recipients without hypertension remain to be evaluated. 20 normotensive dialyse patients (D), 20 normotensive renal transplant recipients (T) and 20 healthy volunteers (N) matched for age, sex and blood pressure as controls were enrolled in to the study. Patients with cardiovascular risk factors and diabetes were excluded. The arterial blood pressure of all patients placed below 140/90 mmHg. The dialyse patients and renal transplant recipients were eligible for the study if the serum creatinine level was below 2 mg/dl. In all subjects, fasting concentrations of serum creatinine, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, hemoglobin and glucose were determined at enrollment to the study. Long-term immunosuppression consisted of cyclosporine and prednisolone. Blood pressure was measured using an automatic sphygmomanometer (Criticon Dinamap model 1846 SX). Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was evaluated using non-invasive automatic Complior device. The vessel wall properties of the left common carotid artery were studied using multigate pulsed Doppler's system (Pie Medical Equipment BV Maastricht, The Netherlands). The frequency of transducer used was 7.5 MHz. With this non-invasive method, the end-diastolic diameter (d) and the systolic increase of vessel diameter (distension delta d) were measured using ECG trigger. From these data relative systolic increase of vessel diameter (delta d/d) and arterial wall distensibility coefficient (DC) were calculated. Simultaneously with the ultrasound measurements at the left common carotid artery carotid pulse waveforms are recorded using

  19. Virtual-Wall Model for Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Qian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A large number of molecules are usually required to model atomic walls in molecular dynamics simulations. A virtual-wall model is proposed in this study to describe fluid-wall molecular interactions, for reducing the computational time. The infinite repetition of unit cell structures within the atomic wall causes the periodicity of the force acting on a fluid molecule from the wall molecules. This force is first calculated and then stored in the memory. A fluid molecule appearing in the wall force field is subjected to the force from the wall molecules. The force can then be determined by the position of the molecule relative to the wall. This model avoids excessive calculations of fluid-wall interactions and reduces the computational time drastically. The time reduction is significant for small fluid density and channel height. The virtual-wall model is applied to Poiseuille and Couette flows, and to a flow in a channel with a rough surface. Results of the virtual and atomic wall simulations agree well with each other, thereby indicating the usefulness of the virtual-wall model. The appropriate bin size and cut-off radius in the virtual-wall model are also discussed.

  20. A comparison of estimation methods for computational fluid dynamics outflow boundary conditions using patient-specific carotid artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Joon; Uemiya, Nahoko; Ishihara, Shoichiro; Zhang, Yu; Qian, Yi

    2013-06-01

    Computational fluid dynamics simulations can provide important hemodynamic insights for investigating the effectiveness of carotid artery stenting, but its accuracy is dependent on the boundary conditions such as the outflow pressure, which is difficult to obtain by measurements. Many computational fluid dynamics simulations assume that the outflow pressure is constant (P = 0), but this method is likely to produce different results compared to clinical measurements. We have developed an alternative estimation method called the minimum energy loss method based on the concept of energy loss minimization at flow bifurcation. This new method has been tested on computational fluid dynamics simulation of two patients treated with carotid artery stenting, and its flow ratio at internal carotid artery and wall shear stress distribution was compared with the constant zero outlet pressure method. Three different procedure stages (prestent, poststent, and follow-up) were analyzed. The internal carotid artery flow ratio using the minimum energy loss method generally matched well with ultrasound measurements, but the internal carotid artery flow ratio based on zero outlet pressure method showed a large difference. Wall shear stress distributions varied between methods in response to the change in internal carotid artery flow rate. This study demonstrates the importance of accurate outlet boundary condition for assessing the long-term efficacy of carotid artery stenting and the risk of restenosis in treated patients.

  1. Bestrophin-3 associated Ca2+-activated Cl- conductance is important for synchronization in the arterial wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøgger, Torbjørn; Aalkjær, Christian; Matchkov, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    of bestrophin proteins family - Best-3. We have aimed here to explore the importance of Best-3 for vascular wall function.   Segments of the mesenteric small arteries were transfected in vivo in anaesthetized rats with siRNA against Best-3 and siRNA with mismatching nucleotides (mutated siRNA) as a control....... The efficiency of transfection at molecular level was evaluated 3 days after transfection. Contractility, vasomotion and [Ca2+]i dynamic were tested in isometric myograph and using confocal microscope.   The specific Best-3 siRNA significantly reduced Best-3 expression in comparison to the control. Arteries from......-cGMP to the endothelium-denuded vessels restored vasomotion but did not change the difference between groups. SMCs in control endothelium-intact arteries were completely synchronized whereas in the siRNA-transfected arteries only partial synchronization was observed.   Our data suggest that the Best-3-associated Ic...

  2. Dual stack black blood carotid artery CMR at 3T: Application to wall thickness visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Nikolaus

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing understanding of atherosclerosis as an important risk factor for the development of acute ischemic events like ischemic stroke has stimulated increasing interest in non-invasive assessment of the structure, composition and burden of plaque depositions in the carotid artery wall. Vessel wall imaging by means of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR is conventionally done by 2D dual inversion recovery (DIR techniques, which often fail in covering large volumes of interest as required in plaque burden assessment. Although the technique has been extended to 2D multislice imaging, its straight extension to 3D protocols is still limited by the prolonged acquisition times and incomplete blood suppression. A novel approach for rapid overview imaging of large sections of the carotid artery wall at isotropic spatial resolutions is presented, which omits excitation of the epiglottis. By the interleaved acquisition of two 3D stacks with the proposed motion sensitized segmented steady-state black-blood gradient echo technique (MSDS the coverage of the carotid artery trees on both sides in reasonable scan times is enabled. Results 10 patients were investigated with the proposed technique and compared to conventional transversal DIR turbo spin and gradient echo approaches centered at the height of the carotid bifurcation. In all MSDS experiments sufficient black-blood contrast could be obtained over the entire covered volumes. The contrast to noise ratio between vessel and suppressed blood was improved by 73% applying the motion sensitizing technique. In all patients the suspicious areas of vessel wall thickening could be clearly identified and validated by the conventional local imaging approach. The average assessable vessel wall segment length was evaluated to be 18 cm. While in 50% of the cases motion artifacts could be appreciated in the conventional images, none were detected for the MSDS technique. Conclusion The

  3. Dynamic stiffness for thin-walled structures by power series

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Bin; LEUNG A.Y.T.

    2006-01-01

    The dynamic stiffness method is introduced to analyze thin-walled structures including thin-walled straight beams and spatial twisted helix beam. A dynamic stiffness matrix is formed by using frequency dependent shape functions which are exact solutions of the governing differential equations. With the obtained thin-walled beam dynamic stiffness matrices, the thin-walled frame dynamic stiffness matrix can also be formulated by satisfying the required displacements compatibility and forces equilibrium, a method which is similar to the finite element method (FEM). Then the thin-walled structure natural frequencies can be found by equating the determinant of the system dynamic stiffness matrix to zero. By this way, just one element and several elements can exactly predict many modes of a thin-walled beam and a spatial thin-walled frame, respectively. Several cases are studied and the results are compared with the existing solutions of other methods. The natural frequencies and buckling loads of these thin-walled structures are computed.

  4. Arterial wall stiffness in patients with essential hypertension at young age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolesnik E.L.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Research objective was investigating arterial wall stiffness in patients with hypertension at young age and assessing the relationship between subclinical target organs damage and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM parameters. 30 male patients aged 18-35 years with essential hypertension stage I and II, hypertension 1 and 2nd grade were surveyed. The examination included general clinical methods, echocardiography, ABPM and suprasystolic sfigmography. It was found that the pulse wave velocity (PWVao (r = 0,557 p <0,01, central aortic blood pressure (SBPao (r = 0,492 p <0,01 and augmentation index (AIxao (r = 0,489 p <0.01 significantly increased with the pa¬tients’ age. Abdominal obesity (r = 0,566 p <0,01 and BMI (r = 0,599 p <0,01 impacted on the PWVao acceleration. Increasing of the left ventricular mass index (LVMI is highly associated with SBPao (r = 0,506 p <0,05 and PWVao (r = 0,434 p <0,05. According to ABPM the most significant correlation with arterial wall stiffness parameters demon¬strated diastolic blood pressure (DBP daytime level (AIxao (r = 0,418 p <0,01, with PWVao (r = 0,699 p <0.01 and SBPao (r = 0,695 p <0,01. Thus, age, excessive body weight and obesity should be considered as unfavorable factors that worsen arterial wall stiffness in patients with hypertension at the age before 35 years. Increase of DBP levels especially during the day causes maximum negative impact on the arterial wall stiffness parameters according to ABPM. Increased SBPao and PWVao in patients with hypertension at a young age are associated with increased left ventricular mass index.

  5. Injection-moulded models of major and minor arteries: the variability of model wall thickness owing to casting technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, T; Morris, L; O'Donnell, M; Walsh, M; McGloughlin, T

    2005-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease of major and minor arteries is a common cause of death in Western society. The wall mechanics and haemodynamics within the arteries are considered to be important factors in the disease formation process. This paper is concerned with the development of an efficient computer-integrated technique to manufacture idealized and realistic models of diseased major and minor arteries from radiological images and to address the issue of model wall thickness variability. Variations in wall thickness from the original computer models to the final castings are quantified using a CCD camera. The results found that wall thickness variation from the major and minor idealized artery models to design specification were insignificant, up to a maximum of 16 per cent. In realistic models, however, differences were up to 23 per cent in the major arterial models and 58 per cent in the minor arterial models, but the wall thickness variability remained within the limits of previously reported wall thickness results. It is concluded that the described injection moulding procedure yields idealized and realistic castings suitable for use in experimental investigations, with idealized models giving better agreement with design. Wall thickness is variable and should be assessed after the models are manufactured.

  6. Finite element formulation and analysis for an arterial wall with residual and active stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Naoki; Adachi, Taiji

    2015-08-01

    In this study, for predicting arterial function and pathogenesis from a mechanical viewpoint, we develop a continuum mechanical model of an arterial wall that embodies residual and active stresses following a traditional anisotropic passive constitutive law. The residual and active stresses are incorporated into finite element methods based on a two-field variational principle described in the Lagrangian form. The linearisation of nonlinear weak-form equations derived from this variational principle is then described for developing an original finite element algorithm. Numerical simulations reveal the following: (i) residual stresses lead to a reduction in stress gradient regardless of the magnitude of external load; (ii) active stresses help homogenise stress distribution under physiological external load, but this homogeneity collapses under pathological external load; (iii) when residual and active stresses act together, the effect of the residual stresses is relatively obscured by that of the active stresses. We conclude that residual stresses have minor but persistent mechanical effects on the arterial wall under both physiological and pathological external loads; active stresses play an important role in the physiological functions and pathogenesis of arteries, and the mechanical effect of residual stresses is dependent on the presence/absence of active stresses.

  7. [Hematoma of the abdominal wall. A case report: pitfall of Seldinger method via femoral artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Hisaya; Sugiura, Yasushi; Takeda, Ririko; Nanba, Hiroki

    2009-02-01

    We reported a case of an abdominal wall hematoma which caused by Seldinger method via the femoral artery. A 48-year-old female, suffered from direct carotid cavernous fistula, was treated by transfemoral transvenous embolization (TVE). The whole procedure was completed without difficulty except minor resistance of guide wire manipulation during left femoral artery catheterization. Four hours later, the patient became hypotensive and showed the sign of impending shock without definitive causes. Nine hours after the embolization a huge hematoma of the abdominal wall was found. It required the total 1200 m/ of blood transfusion before her blood pressure returned to normal. She recovered fully from this event and discharged uneventfully. There is a speculation that a deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) was injured with an angle-shaped guide wire and bled into the abdominal wall. And subsequent systemic heparinization prevented the coagulation process, resulting a large hematoma. Anatomically, an angle-shaped guide wire is easily able to migrate into DCIA. To prevent a vascular injury, it is very important to manipulate a guide wire under fluoroscopic control and to select a J-shaped guide wire instead of an angle-shaped one.

  8. Arterial wall mechanics as a function of heart rate: role of vascular smooth muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvucci, Fernando Pablo; Schiavone, Jonathan; Craiem, Damian; Barra, Juan Gabriel [Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Favaloro Av. Belgrano 1723 - Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Vascular wall viscoelasticity can be evaluated using a first-order lumped model. This model consists of a spring with elastic constant E and a dashpot with viscous constant {eta}. More importantly, this viscoelastic model can be fitted in-vivo measuring arterial pressure and diameter. The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of heart rate over E and {eta}. In two anesthetized sheep, diameter in thoracic aorta and intravascular pressure has been registered. The right atrium was connected to a programmable stimulator through a pair of pace-maker wires to produce changes in stimulation heart rate (HR) from 80 to 160 bpm. Additionally, local activation of vascular smooth muscle was induced with phenylephrine. After converting pressure and diameter signals into stress and strain respectively, E y {eta} were calculated in control state and during muscle activation. The elastic modulus E did not present significant changes with heart rate. The viscous modulus {eta} decreased 49% with a two-fold acceleration in heart rate from 80 to 160 bpm. However, the product {eta} HR remained stable. The viscous modulus {eta} increased 39% with smooth muscle activation. No significant pressure changes were registered during the experiment. The contractile action of vascular smooth muscle could contribute to increasing arterial wall viscosity. The decrease of {eta} when HR increased might be related to smooth muscle relaxation mediated by endothelium activity, which was stimulated by flow increase. We conclude that HR can modulate arterial wall viscoelasticity through endothelium-dependent mechanisms.

  9. Relaxed incremental variational approach for the modeling of damage-induced stress hysteresis in arterial walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Balzani, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional relaxed incremental variational damage model is proposed, which enables the description of complex softening hysteresis as observed in supra-physiologically loaded arterial tissues, and which thereby avoids a loss of convexity of the underlying formulation. The proposed model extends the relaxed formulation of Balzani and Ortiz [2012. Relaxed incremental variational formulation for damage at large strains with application to fiber-reinforced materials and materials with truss-like microstructures. Int. J. Numer. Methods Eng. 92, 551-570], such that the typical stress-hysteresis observed in arterial tissues under cyclic loading can be described. This is mainly achieved by constructing a modified one-dimensional model accounting for cyclic loading in the individual fiber direction and numerically homogenizing the response taking into account a fiber orientation distribution function. A new solution strategy for the identification of the convexified stress potential is proposed based on an evolutionary algorithm which leads to an improved robustness compared to solely Newton-based optimization schemes. In order to enable an efficient adjustment of the new model to experimentally observed softening hysteresis, an adjustment scheme using a surrogate model is proposed. Therewith, the relaxed formulation is adjusted to experimental data in the supra-physiological domain of the media and adventitia of a human carotid artery. The performance of the model is then demonstrated in a finite element example of an overstretched artery. Although here three-dimensional thick-walled atherosclerotic arteries are considered, it is emphasized that the formulation can also directly be applied to thin-walled simulations of arteries using shell elements or other fiber-reinforced biomembranes.

  10. Dynamic load test of Arquin-designed CMU wall.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Richard Pearson

    2010-02-01

    The Arquin Corporation has developed a new method of constructing CMU (concrete masonry unit) walls. This new method uses polymer spacers connected to steel wires that serve as reinforcing as well as a means of accurately placing the spacers so that the concrete block can be dry stacked. The hollows of the concrete block are then filled with grout. As part of a New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA), Sandia National Laboratories conducted a series of tests that dynamically loaded wall segments to compare the performance of walls constructed using the Arquin method to a more traditional method of constructing CMU walls. A total of four walls were built, two with traditional methods and two with the Arquin method. Two of the walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every third cell filled with grout. The remaining two walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every cell filled with grout. The walls were dynamically loaded with explosive forces. No significant difference was noted between the performance of the walls constructed by the Arquin method when compared to the walls constructed by the traditional method.

  11. Pulmonary arterial wall distensibility assessed by intravascular ultrasound in children with congenital heart disease : an indicator for pulmonary vascular disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, Rolf M F; Cromme-Dijkhuis, Adri H; Hop, Wim C J; Kruit, Marco N; Hess, John; Berger, Rudolphus

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary overflow are associated with functional and structural changes of the pulmonary arterial wall. Current techniques to evaluate the pulmonary vasculature neglect the pulsatile nature of pulmonary flow. STUDY OBJECTIVES: To determine whether the dyn

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of domain walls with cross-ties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovik, M. N.; Zverev, V. V.; Filippov, B. N.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamic behavior of a domain wall with cross-ties is analyzed on the basis of micromagnetic simulation with exact allowance for all main (exchange, magnetoanisotropic, and magnetostatic) interactions in thin magnetically uniaxial ferromagnetic films with planar anisotropy. It is found that the peculiarities of motion of such domain walls are closely related to the behavior of topological defects in the magnetization distribution (generation, motion, and annihilation of vortex-antivortex pairs on the film surface and Bloch points). We observe three different regimes of motion (stationary, periodic, and turbulent regimes), each of which is realized in a certain range of fields oriented along the easy magnetization axis. It is shown that the experimentally observed dynamic bends of the walls with cross-ties are determined by the type of motion of vortices and antivortices. The velocities of domain walls in different regimes are calculated, and the dynamic configurations of the magnetization and existing dynamic transitions between them are investigated.

  13. Non-Newtonian effects of blood on LDL transport inside the arterial lumen and across multi-layered arterial wall with and without stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyranlou, Amin; Niazmand, Hamid; Sadeghi, Mahmood-Reza; Mesri, Yaser

    2016-06-01

    Blood non-Newtonian behavior on low-density lipoproteins (LDL) accumulation is analyzed numerically, while fluid-multilayered arteries are adopted for nonstenotic and 30%-60% symmetrical stenosed models. Present model considers non-Newtonian effects inside the lumen and within arterial layers simultaneously, which has not been examined in previous studies. Navier-Stokes equations are solved along with the mass transport convection-diffusion equations and Darcy’s model for species transport inside the luminal flow and across wall layers, respectively. Carreau model for the luminal flow and the modified Darcy equation for the power-law fluid within arterial layers are employed to model blood rheological characteristics, appropriately. Results indicate that in large arteries with relatively high Reynolds number Newtonian model estimates LDL concentration patterns well enough, however, this model seriously incompetent for regions with low WSS. Moreover, Newtonian model for plasma underestimates LDL concentration especially on luminal surface and across arterial wall. Therefore, applying non-Newtonian model seems essential for reaching to a more accurate estimation of LDL distribution in the artery. Finally, blood flow inside constricted arteries demonstrates that LDL concentration patterns along the stenoses inside the luminal flow and across arterial layers are strongly influenced as compared to the nonstenotic arteries. Additionally, among four stenosis severity grades, 40% stenosis is prone to more LDL accumulation along the post-stenotic regions.

  14. Posterior Wall Capture and Femoral Artery Stenosis Following Use of StarClose Closing Device: Diagnosis and Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanczyk, Ludomir [Medical University of Lodz, First Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Elgalal, Marcin T., E-mail: telgalal@yahoo.co.uk [Medical University of Lodz, Second Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Szubert, Wojciech; Grzelak, Piotr [Medical University of Lodz, First Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland); Szopinski, Piotr [Institute of Haematology and Transfusion Medicine, Department of Vascular Surgery (Poland); Majos, Agata [Medical University of Lodz, Second Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging (Poland)

    2013-10-15

    A case of femoral artery obstruction following application of a StarClose type arterial puncture closing device (APCD) is presented. Ultrasonographic and angiographic imaging of this complication was obtained. The posterior wall of the vessel was accidentally caught in the anchoring element of the nitinol clip. This complication was successfully resolved by endovascular treatment and the implantation of a stent.

  15. Plasma levels of the arterial wall protein fibulin-1 are associated with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Esben; Høyem, Pernille; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl;

    2013-01-01

    -associated extracellular matrix protein, fibulin-1, was recently found in higher concentrations in the arterial wall and in plasma in patients with long duration type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, plasma fibulin-1 independently predicted total mortality and was associated with pulse pressure, an indirect measure of arterial...

  16. SYNERGY OF WALL SHEAR STRESS AND CIRCUMFERENTIAL STRESS IN STRAIGHT ARTERIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Kai-rong; XU Zhe; WU Hao; JIANG Zong-lai; LIU Zhao-rong

    2005-01-01

    The Wall Shear Stress (WSS) generated by blood flow and Circumferential Stress (CS) driven by blood pressure have been thought to play an important role in blood flow-dependent phenomena such as angiogenesis, vascular remodeling, and atherosgenesis.The WSS and CS in straight arteries were calculated by measuring the blood pressure, center-line velocity, wall thickness, and radius of vessels.The WSS and CS in the time domain were then decomposed into the amplitude and phase in the frequency domain.The CS amplitude to the WSS amplitude ratio (referred as stress amplitude ratio, Zs) and the phase difference between the CS and the WSS (referred as stress phase difference, SPA) in the frequency domain were calculated to characterize the synergy of the CS and WSS.Numerical results demonstrated that the CS is not in phase with the WSS, a time delay in the time domain or a stress phase difference in the frequency domain between the WSS and the CS exists.Theoretical analysis demonstrated that the Zs and SPA are primarily determined by the local factors (blood viscosity, local inertial effects, local geometry, local elasticity) and the input impedance of whole downstream arterial beds.Because the arterial input impedance has been shown to reflect the physiological and pathological states of whole downstream arterial beds, the stress amplitude ratio Zs and stress phase difference SPA would be thought to be the appropriate indices to reflect the effects of states of whole downstream arterial beds on the local blood flow-dependent phenomena such as angiogenesis, vascular remodeling, and atherosgenesis.

  17. Vortex dynamics of particle-wall collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leweke, Thomas; Thompson, Mark C.; Hourigan, Kerry

    2003-11-01

    We present results from an experimental and numerical study of the flow generated by a particle impacting onto a solid wall at low Reynolds numbers. Experimentally, a 3/4" bronze sphere attached to an inelastic string was lowered onto a Plexiglas plate inside a glass tank, using a stepper motor. Direct Numerical Simulations were carried out using either an axisymmetric or a fully 3D spectral-element code. The parameters varied were the running distance before impact, the sphere Reynolds number during motion, and the stopping distance away from the wall. For running lengths less than 7.5 diameters, the sphere wake remains axisymmetric in the form of an attached vortex ring. At impact, this ring overtakes the sphere and spreads out along the wall. When the sphere stops more than 0.3 diameters away from the wall, the secondary vorticity generated at the sphere surface rolls up into a second vortex ring persisting over a long time. At Reynolds number above 1000, the flow after impact exhibits a 3D instability with azimuthal wave numbers of around 20. Flow visualizations, vorticity fields, and quantitative information on the flow topology will be shown to illustrate the different regimes. The effect of a rebound of the sphere is also discussed.

  18. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound and transient arterial occlusion for quantification of arterial perfusion reserve in peripheral arterial disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amarteifio, E., E-mail: erick.amarteifio@med.uni-heidelberg.de [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wormsbecher, S. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Krix, M. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Bracco Imaging Germany, Konstanz (Germany); Demirel, S. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Braun, S. [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Delorme, S. [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Boeckler, D. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Vascular Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, H.-U. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Weber, M.-A. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    Objective: To quantify muscular micro-perfusion and arterial perfusion reserve in peripheral arterial disease (PAD) with dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and transient arterial occlusion. Materials and methods: This study had local institutional review board approval and written informed consent was obtained from all subjects. We examined the dominant lower leg of 40 PAD Fontaine stage IIb patients (mean age, 65 years) and 40 healthy volunteers (mean age, 54 years) with CEUS (7 MHz; MI, 0.28) during continuous intravenous infusion of 4.8 mL microbubbles. Transient arterial occlusion at mid-thigh level simulated physical exercise. With time-CEUS-intensity curves obtained from regions of interest within calf muscles, we derived the maximum CEUS signal after occlusion (max) and its time (t{sub max}), slope to maximum (m), vascular response after occlusion (AUC{sub post}), and analysed accuracy, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, and correlations with ankle-brachial index (ABI) and walking distance. Results: All parameters differed in PAD and volunteers (p < 0.014). In PAD, t{sub max} was delayed (31.2 {+-} 13.6 vs. 16.7 {+-} 8.5 s, p < 0.0001) and negatively correlated with ankle-brachial-index (r = -0.65). m was decreased in PAD (4.3 {+-} 4.6 mL/s vs. 13.1 {+-} 8.4 mL/s, p < 0.0001) and had highest diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity/specificity, 75%/93%) for detection of diminished muscular micro-perfusion in PAD (cut-off value, m < 5{approx}mL/s). Discriminant analysis and ROC curves revealed m, and AUC{sub post} as optimal parameter combination for diagnosing PAD and therefore impaired arterial perfusion reserve. Conclusions: Dynamic CEUS with transient arterial occlusion quantifies muscular micro-perfusion and arterial perfusion reserve. The technique is accurate to diagnose PAD.

  19. Static and dynamic buckling of thin-walled plate structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kubiak, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    This monograph deals with buckling and postbuckling behavior of thin plates and thin-walled structures with flat wall subjected to static and dynamic load. The investigations are carried out in elastic range. The basic assumption here is the  thin plate theory. This method is used to determination the buckling load and postbuckling analysis of thin-walled structures subjected to static and dynamic load. The book introduces two methods for static and dynamic buckling investigation which allow for a wider understanding of the phenomenon. Two different methods also can allow uncoupling of the phenomena occurring at the same time and attempt to estimate their impact on the final result. A general mathematical model, adopted in proposed analytical-numerical method, enables the consideration of all types of stability loss i.e.local, global and interactive forms of buckling. The applied numerical-numerical method includes adjacent of walls, shear-lag phenomenon and a deplanation of cross-sections.

  20. Computational fluid dynamics evaluation of incomplete stent apposition in a tapered artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Eric; Thondapu, Vikas; Ooi, Andrew; Hayat, Umair; Barlis, Peter; Moore, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    Coronary stents are deployed to prop open blocked arteries and restore normal blood flow, however in-stent restenosis (ISR) and stent thrombosis (ST) remain possibly catastrophic complications. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses can elucidate the pathological impact of alterations in coronary hemodynamics and correlate wall shear stress (WSS) with atherosclerotic processes. The natural tapering of a coronary artery often leads to proximal incomplete stent apposition (ISA) where stent struts are not in contact with the vessel wall. By employing state-of-the-art computer-aided design (CAD) software, generic open-cell and closed-cell coronary stent designs were virtually deployed in an idealised tapered coronary artery. Pulsatile blood flow (80 mL/min at 75 beats/min) was carried out numerically on these CAD models using a finite volume solver. CFD results reveal significant fluctuations in proximal WSS and large recirculation regions in the setting of proximal ISA, resulting in regions of high wall shear stress gradient (WSSG) that have been previously linked to poor endothelial cell coverage and vascular injury. The clinical significance of these proximal high WSSG regions will be correlated with findings from high-resolution in-vivo imaging. Supported by the Australian Research Council (LP120100233) and Victorian Life Sciences Computation Initiative (VR0210).

  1. Ultrafast domain wall dynamics in magnetic nanotubes and nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertel, R.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamic properties of magnetic domain walls in nanotubes and in cylindrical nanowires can be significantly different from the well known domain wall dynamics in thin films and in flat thin strips. The main differences are the occurrence of chiral symmetry breaking and, perhaps more importantly, the possibility to obtain magnetic domain walls that are stable against the usual Walker breakdown. This stability enables the magnetic field-driven propagation of the domain walls in nanotubes and nanocylinders at constant velocities which are significantly higher than the usual propagation speeds of the domain walls. Simulations predict that the ultrafast motion of magnetic domain walls at velocities in a range above 1000 m s-1 can lead to the spontaneous excitation of spin waves in a process that is the magnetic analog of the Cherenkov effect. In the case of solid cylindrical wires, the domain wall can contain a micromagnetic point singularity. We discuss the current knowledge on the ultrafast dynamics of such Bloch points, which remains still largely unexplored.

  2. "Sausage-string" appearance of arteries and arterioles can be caused by an instability of the blood vessel wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; Beierholm, Ulrik; Mikkelsen, Rene

    2002-01-01

    in vascular wall tension. Despite much research, the mechanisms underlying the sausage pattern have remained unknown. Here we present an anisotropic model of the vessel wall and show that the sausage pattern can arise because of an instability of the vessel wall. The model reproduces many of the key features...... phenomenon. Experimental data suggest that the structural changes induced by the instability may cause secondary damage to the wall of small arteries and arterioles in the form of endothelial hyperpermeability followed by local fibrinoid necrosis of the vascular wall....

  3. Original Research: Sickle cell anemia and pediatric strokes: Computational fluid dynamics analysis in the middle cerebral artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Christian P; Veneziani, Alessandro; Ware, Russell E; Platt, Manu O

    2016-04-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) have a high incidence of strokes, and transcranial Doppler (TCD) identifies at-risk patients by measuring blood velocities in large intracerebral arteries; time-averaged mean velocities greater than 200 cm/s confer high stroke risk and warrant therapeutic intervention with blood transfusions. Our objective was to use computational fluid dynamics to alter fluid and artery wall properties, to simulate scenarios causative of significantly elevated arterial blood velocities. Two-dimensional simulations were created and increasing percent stenoses were created in silico, with their locations varied among middle cerebral artery (MCA), internal carotid artery (ICA), and anterior cerebral artery (ACA). Stenoses placed in the MCA, ICA, or ACA generated local increases in velocity, but not sufficient to reach magnitudes > 200 cm/s, even up to 75% stenosis. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the MCA, ICA, and ACA from children with SCA were generated from magnetic resonance angiograms. Using finite element method, blood flow was simulated with realistic velocity waveforms to the ICA inlet. Three-dimensional reconstructions revealed an uneven, internal arterial wall surface in children with SCA and higher mean velocities in the MCA up to 145 cm/s compared to non-SCA reconstructions. There were also greater areas of flow recirculation and larger regions of low wall shear stress. Taken together, these bumps on the internal wall of the cerebral arteries could create local flow disturbances that, in aggregate, could elevate blood velocities in SCA. Identifying cellular causes of these microstructures as adhered blood cells or luminal narrowing due to endothelial hyperplasia induced by disturbed flow would provide new targets to treat children with SCA. The preliminary qualitative results provided here point out the critical role of 3D reconstruction of patient-specific vascular geometries and provide qualitative insight to complex

  4. Effect of hypertension on low-density lipoprotein transport within a multi-layered arterial wall: modelling consistent with experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Jesionek, Katarzyna; Kostur, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The influence of hypertension on low-density lipoproteins intake into the arterial wall is an important factor for understanding mechanisms of atherosclerosis. It has been experimentally observed that the increased pressure leads to the higher level of the LDL inside the wall. In this paper we attempt to construct a model of the LDL transport which reproduces quantitatively experimental outcomes. We supplement the well known four-layer arterial wall model to include two pressure induced effects: the compression of the intima tissue and the increase of the fraction of leaky junctions. We demonstrate that such model can reach the very good agreement with experimental data.

  5. Increased wall tension in response to vasoconstrictors in isolated mesenteric arterial rings from patients with high blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahvanainen, Anna; Taurio, Jyrki; Mäki-Jouppi, Jenni; Kööbi, Peeter; Mustonen, Jukka; Kähönen, Mika; Sand, Juhani; Nordback, Isto; Pörsti, Ilkka

    2006-12-01

    Essential hypertension is associated with several alterations in arterial function. A wealth of information from animal models is available concerning hypertensive changes in the mesenteric circulation, while only few studies have examined human mesenteric arterial function. The tone of isolated mesenteric arterial segments (outer diameter 0.7-0.9 mm) was examined from individuals with high (n=17) or normal (n=22) blood pressure, grouped using the current definition of elevated blood pressure (140/90 mmHg). Since the majority of them were operated because of malignancies, we evaluated whether functional vascular properties provided information about patient prognosis. Wall tension development (mN/mm) in response to vasoconstrictors (noradrenaline, 5-hydroxy tryptamine, potassium chloride) was higher in mesenteric arterial rings from patients with high than normal blood pressure. There was no difference in vasoconstrictor sensitivity, or endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent vasorelaxation. Arterial segment weight was higher in hypertensive subjects, suggesting vascular wall hypertrophy. The 10-year follow-up showed no differences in the control of arterial tone between the surviving (n=14) or deceased (n=25) patients. In conclusion, isolated mesenteric arterial segments from hypertensive patients showed increased wall tension in response to vasoconstrictors. Since the mesenteric circulation is an important regulator of peripheral arterial resistance, possible functional alterations in this vascular bed should be further investigated in hypertensive patients.

  6. Wall Imaging for Unilateral Intracranial Vertebral Artery Hypoplasia with Three-dimensional High-isotropic Resolution Magnetic Resonance Images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-Jin Zhu; Wu Wang; Bin Du; Lei Liu; Xin-Xin He; Li-Bin Hu; Xue-Bin Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background:There are few studies for evaluating wall characteristics of intracranial vertebral artery hypoplasia (VAH).The aim of this study was to determine wall characteristics of VAH with three-dimensional volumetric isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (3D VISTA) images and differentiate between acquired atherosclerotic stenosis and VAH.Methods:Thirty patients with suspicious VAH by luminograms were retrospectively enrolled between January 2014 and February 2015.The patients were classified as "acquired atherosclerotic stenosis" or "VAH" based on 3D VISTA images.The wall characteristics of VAH were assessed to determine the presence of atherosclerotic lesions,and the patients were classified into two subgroups (VAH with atherosclerosis and VAH with normal wall).Wall characteristics of basilar arteries and vertebral arteries were also assessed.The clinical and wall characteristics were compared between the two groups.Results:Five of 30 patients with suspicious VAH were finally diagnosed as acquired atherosclerotic stenosis by 3D VISTA images.25 patients were finally diagnosed as VAH including 16 (64.00%) patients with atherosclerosis and 9 (36.00%) patients with normal wall.In the 16 patients with atherosclerosis,plaque was found in 9 patients,slight wall thickening in 6 patients,and thrombus and wall thickening in 1 patient.Compared with VAH patients with normal wall,VAH patients with atherosclerosis showed atherosclerotic basilar arteries and dominant vertebral arteries more frequently (P =0.000).Conclusions:Three-dimensional VISTA images enable differentiation between the acquired atherosclerotic stenosis and VAH.VAH was also prone to atherosclerotic processes.

  7. Characterization of Hemodynamics in Great Arteries of Wild-Type Mouse Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Based on Ultrasound Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Zhou, Yue; Ma, Youcai; Wang, Jingying; He, Yihua; Li, Zhian

    2016-03-01

    Hemodynamic factors in cardiovascular system are hypothesized to play a significant role in causing structural heart development. It is thus important to improve our understanding of velocity characteristics and parameters. We present such a study on wild-type mouse to characterize the vessel geometry, flow pattern, and wall shear stress in great arteries. Microultrasound imaging for small animals was used to measure blood boundary and velocity of the great arteries. Subsequently, specimens' flow boundary conditions were used for 3-dimensional reconstructions of the great artery and aortic arch dimensions, and blood flow velocity data were input into subject-specific computational fluid dynamics for modeling hemodynamics. Measurement by microultrasound imaging showed that blood velocities in the great artery and aortic arch had strong correlations with vascular sizes, whereas blood pressure had a weak trend in relation to vascular size. Wall shear stress magnitude increased when closer to arterial branches and reduced proximally in the aortic root and distally in the descending aorta, and the parameters were related to the fluid mechanics in branches in some degree. We developed a method to investigate fluid mechanics in mouse arteries, using a combination of microultrasound and computational fluid dynamics, and demonstrated its ability to reveal detailed geometric, kinematic, and fluid mechanics parameters.

  8. CARDIAC TRANSPLANT REJECTION AND NON-INVASIVE COMON CAROTID ARTERY WALL FUNCTIONAL INDICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Shevchenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Allograft rejection would entail an increase in certain blood biomarkers and active substances derived from activated inflammatory cells which could influence entire vascular endothelial function and deteriorate arterial wall stiffness. We propose that carotid wall functional indices measured with non-invasive ultrasound could we valuable markers of the subclinical cardiac allograft rejection. Aim. Our goal was to analyze the clinical utility of functional common carotid wall (CCW variables measured with high-resolution Doppler ultrasound as a non-invasive screening tool for allograft rejection in cardiac transplant patients (pts. Methods. One hundred and seventy one pts included 93 cardiac recipients, 30 dilated cardiomyopathy waiting list pts, and 48 stable coronary artery disease (SCAD pts without decompensated heart failure were included. Along with resistive index (Ri, pulsative index (Pi, and CCW intima-media thickness (IMT, CCW rigidity index (iRIG was estimated using empirical equation. Non-invasive evaluation was performed in cardiac transplant recipients prior the endomyo- cardial biopsy. Results. Neither of Ri, Pi, or CCW IMT were different in studied subgroups. iRIG was signifi- cantly lower in SCAD pts when compared to the dilated cardiomyopathy subgroup. The later had similar values with cardiac transplant recipients without rejection. Antibody-mediated and cellular rejection were found in 22 (23.7% and 17 (18.3% cardiac recipients, respectively. Mean iRIG in pts without rejection was significantly lower in comparison to antibody-mediated rejection and cell-mediated (5514.7 ± 2404.0 vs 11856.1 ± 6643.5 and 16071.9 ± 10029.1 cm/sec2, respectively, p = 0.001. Area under ROC for iRIG was 0.90 ± 0.03 units2. Analysis showed that iRIG values above estimated treshold 7172 cm/sec2 suggested relative risk of any type of rejection 17.7 (95%CI = 6.3–49.9 sensitivity 80.5%, specificity – 81.1%, negative predictive value – 84

  9. Coronary artery wall imaging in mice using osmium tetroxide and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pai, Vinay M.; Kozlowski, Megan; Donahue, Danielle; Miller, Elishiah; Xiao, Xianghui; Chen, Marcus Y.; Yu, Zu-Xi; Connelly, Patricia; Jeffries, Kenneth; Wen, Han (NIH)

    2012-05-10

    The high spatial resolution of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is ideal for 3D imaging of coronary arteries in intact mouse heart specimens. Previously, micro-CT of mouse heart specimens utilized intravascular contrast agents that hardened within the vessel lumen and allowed a vascular cast to be made. However, for mouse coronary artery disease models, it is highly desirable to image coronary artery walls and highlight plaques. For this purpose, we describe an ex vivo contrast-enhanced micro-CT imaging technique based on tissue staining with osmium tetroxide (OsO{sub 4}) solution. As a tissue-staining contrast agent, OsO{sub 4} is retained in the vessel wall and surrounding tissue during the fixation process and cleared from the vessel lumens. Its high X-ray attenuation makes the artery wall visible in CT. Additionally, since OsO{sub 4} preferentially binds to lipids, it highlights lipid deposition in the artery wall. We performed micro-CT of heart specimens of 5- to 25-week-old C57BL/6 wild-type mice and 5- to 13-week-old apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE{sup -/-}) mice at 10 {mu}m resolution. The results show that walls of coronary arteries as small as 45 {mu}m in diameter are visible using a table-top micro-CT scanner. Similar image clarity was achieved with 1/2000th the scan time using a synchrotron CT scanner. In 13-week-old apoE mice, lipid-rich plaques are visible in the aorta. Our study shows that the combination of OsO{sub 4} and micro-CT permits the visualization of the coronary artery wall in intact mouse hearts.

  10. Modeling the transport of drugs eluted from stents: physical phenomena driving drug distribution in the arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozsak, Franz; Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Barakat, Abdul I

    2014-04-01

    Despite recent data that suggest that the overall performance of drug-eluting stents (DES) is superior to that of bare-metal stents, the long-term safety and efficacy of DES remain controversial. The risk of late stent thrombosis associated with the use of DES has also motivated the development of a new and promising treatment option in recent years, namely drug-coated balloons (DCB). Contrary to DES where the drug of choice is typically sirolimus and its derivatives, DCB use paclitaxel since the use of sirolimus does not appear to lead to satisfactory results. Since both sirolimus and paclitaxel are highly lipophilic drugs with similar transport properties, the reason for the success of paclitaxel but not sirolimus in DCB remains unclear. Computational models of the transport of drugs eluted from DES or DCB within the arterial wall promise to enhance our understanding of the performance of these devices. The present study develops a computational model of the transport of the two drugs paclitaxel and sirolimus eluted from DES in the arterial wall. The model takes into account the multilayered structure of the arterial wall and incorporates a reversible binding model to describe drug interactions with the constituents of the arterial wall. The present results demonstrate that the transport of paclitaxel in the arterial wall is dominated by convection while the transport of sirolimus is dominated by the binding process. These marked differences suggest that drug release kinetics of DES should be tailored to the type of drug used.

  11. New phenotypic aspects of the decidual spiral artery wall during early post-implantation mouse pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elia, Artemis; Charalambous, Fotini [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Cyprus, University Campus, P.O. Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Georgiades, Pantelis, E-mail: pgeor@ucy.ac.cy [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Cyprus, University Campus, P.O. Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spiral artery (SA) wall remodeling (SAR) is ill-defined and clinically important. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SA muscular phenotype prior to and during SAR in mice is underexplored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SA muscular wall consists of contractile and non-contractile components. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SA wall non-contractile component may be synthetic smooth muscle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Timing and extent of SA wall contractile component loss is revealed. -- Abstract: During pregnancy the walls of decidual spiral arteries (SAs) undergo clinically important structural modifications crucial for embryo survival/growth and maternal health. However, the mechanisms of SA remodeling (SAR) are poorly understood. Although an important prerequisite to this understanding is knowledge about the phenotype of SA muscular wall prior to and during the beginning of mouse SAR, this remains largely unexplored and was the main aim of this work. Using histological and immunohistochemical techniques, this study shows for the first time that during early mouse gestation, from embryonic day 7.5 (E7.5) to E10.5, the decidual SA muscular coat is not a homogeneous structure, but consists of two concentric layers. The first is a largely one cell-thick sub-endothelial layer of contractile mural cells (positive for {alpha}-smooth muscle actin, calponin and SM22{alpha}) with pericyte characteristics (NG2 positive). The second layer is thicker, and evidence is presented that it may be of the synthetic/proliferative smooth muscle phenotype, based on absence ({alpha}-smooth muscle actin and calponin) or weak (SM22{alpha}) expression of contractile mural cell markers, and presence of synthetic smooth muscle characteristics (expression of non-muscle Myosin heavy chain-IIA and of the cell proliferation marker PCNA). Importantly, immunohistochemistry and morphometrics showed that the contractile mural cell layer although prominent at E7.5-E8

  12. Positive association between increased popliteal artery vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis: is OA also part of the metabolic syndrome?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornaat, Peter R.; Sharma, Ruby; Geest, Rob J. van der; Lamb, Hildo J.; Bloem, Johan L.; Watt, Iain [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Kloppenburg, Margreet [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology, Leiden (Netherlands); Hellio le Graverand, Marie-Pierre [Pfizer Global Research and Development, New London, CT (United States)

    2009-12-15

    The purpose of the study was to determine if a positive association exists between arterial vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis (OA). Our hypothesis is that generalized OA is another facet of the metabolic syndrome. The medical ethical review board of our institution approved the study. Written informed consent was obtained from each patient prior to the study. Magnetic resonance (MR) images of the knee were obtained in 42 patients who had been diagnosed with generalized OA at multiple joint sites. Another 27 MR images of the knee were obtained from a matched normal (non-OA) reference population. Vessel wall thickness of the popliteal artery was quantitatively measured by dedicated software. Linear regression models were used to investigate the association between vessel wall thickness and generalized OA. Adjustments were made for age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Confidence intervals (CI) were computed at the 95% level and a significance level of {alpha} = 0.05 was used. Patients in the generalized OA population had a significant higher average vessel wall thickness than persons from the normal reference population (p {<=} {alpha}), even when correction was made for sex, age, and BMI. The average vessel wall thickness of the popliteal artery was 1.09 mm in patients with generalized OA, and 0.96 mm in the matched normal reference population. The association found between increased popliteal artery vessel wall thickness and generalized osteoarthritis suggests that generalized OA might be another facet of the metabolic syndrome. (orig.)

  13. In vitro model of atherosclerosis using coculture of arterial wall cells and macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Y; Sugiyama, A; Kohro, T; Kobayashi, M; Takeya, M; Naito, M; Kodama, T

    2000-12-01

    In order to determine the precise mechanism of the interactions between different types of cells, which are common phenomena in tissues and organs, the importance of coculture techniques are becoming increasingly important. In the area of cardiology, artificial arteries have been developed, based on the understanding of physiological communication of the arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC), endothelial cells (EC), and the extracellular matrix (ECM). In the study of atherosclerosis, the modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), which result in the recruitment and accumulation of white blood cells, especially, monocytes/macrophages, and foam cell formation, are hypothesized. Although there are well known animal models, an in vitro model of atherogenesis with a precisely known atherogenesis mechanism has not yet been developed. In this paper, an arterial wall reconstruction model using rabbit primary cultivated aortic SMCs and ECs, was shown. In addition, human peripheral monocytes were used and the transmigration of monocytes was observed by scanning electron and laser confocal microscopy. Monocyte differentiation into macrophages was shown by immunohistochemistry and comprehensive gene expression analysis. With the modified form of LDL, the macrophages were observed to accumulate lipids with a foamy appearance and differentiate into the foam cells in the ECM between the ECs and SMCs in the area of our coculture model.

  14. Wall stress of the cervical carotid artery in patients with carotid dissection: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, Fraser M; Luechinger, Roger; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan; Sarikaya, Hakan; Poulikakos, Dimos; Baumgartner, Ralf W

    2011-04-01

    Spontaneous internal carotid artery (ICA) dissection (sICAD) results from an intimal tear located around the distal carotid sinus. The mechanisms causing the tear are unknown. This case-control study tested the hypotheses that head movements increase the wall stress in the cervical ICA and that the stress increase is greater in patients with sICAD than in controls. Five patients with unilateral, recanalized, left sICAD and five matched controls were investigated before and after maximal head rotation to the left and neck hyperextension after 45° head rotation to the left. The anatomy of the extracranial carotid arteries was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and used to create finite element models of the right ICA. Wall stress increased after head movements. Increases above the 80th and 90th percentile were located at the intimal side of the artery wall from 7.4 mm below to 10 mm above the cranial edge of the carotid sinus, i.e., at the same location as histologically confirmed tears in patients with sICAD. Wall stress increase did not differ between patients and controls. The present findings suggest that wall stress increases at the intimal side of the artery wall surrounding the distal edge of the carotid bulb after head movements may be important for the development of carotid dissection. The lack of wall stress difference between the two groups indicates that the carotid arteries of patients with carotid dissection have either distinct functional or anatomical properties or endured unusually heavy wall stresses to initiate dissection.

  15. Quantitative Evaluation of Left Ventricular Wall Motion in Patient with Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Using Magnetic Resonance Tagging Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Tadashi; Nakano, Takahiro; Tsutsumi, Masakazu; Kawasaki, Shingo; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Tokuda, Masataka

    Left ventricular wall motions during systole were investigated from a mechanical perspective by using a magnetic resonance tagging technique. Subjects were 7 patients with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). First, by analyzing strain in the left ventricular wall, cardiac contractility was evaluated in the patients with CABG. Next, by calculating displacement in the myocardial wall, paradoxical movements following CABG were quantitatively evaluated. Strain analysis showed local decreases in circumferential strain in 4 of 7 subjects. The results of displacement analysis clarified that following CABG, the degree of radial displacement was small in the septal wall and large in the lateral wall, and circumferential displacement towards the septal wall occurred in the anterior and posterior walls. Since this behavior was seen in both reduced and normal cardiac contractility groups, paradoxical movements in the present patients were not caused by reduced cardiac contractility, but rather by rigid-body motion of the entire heart.

  16. Dynamic metabolic flux analysis of plant cell wall synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuewen; Alonso, Ana P; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2013-07-01

    The regulation of plant cell wall synthesis pathways remains poorly understood. This has become a bottleneck in designing bioenergy crops. The goal of this study was to analyze the regulation of plant cell wall precursor metabolism using metabolic flux analysis based on dynamic labeling experiments. Arabidopsis T87 cells were cultured heterotrophically with (13)C labeled sucrose. The time course of ¹³C labeling patterns in cell wall precursors and related sugar phosphates was monitored using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry until steady state labeling was reached. A kinetic model based on mass action reaction mechanisms was developed to simulate the carbon flow in the cell wall synthesis network. The kinetic parameters of the model were determined by fitting the model to the labeling time course data, cell wall composition, and synthesis rates. A metabolic control analysis was performed to predict metabolic regulations that may improve plant biomass composition for biofuel production. Our results describe the routes and rates of carbon flow from sucrose to cell wall precursors. We found that sucrose invertase is responsible for the entry of sucrose into metabolism and UDP-glucose-4-epimerase plays a dominant role in UDP-Gal synthesis in heterotrophic Aradidopsis cells under aerobic conditions. We also predicted reactions that exert strong regulatory influence over carbon flow to cell wall synthesis and its composition.

  17. Reconstruction after Anterior Chest Wall Keloid Resection Using Internal Mammary Artery Perforator Propeller Flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Rei; Ono, Shimpei; Akaishi, Satoshi; Dohi, Teruyuki; Iimura, Takeshi; Nakao, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is difficult to completely resect huge anterior chest wall keloids and then close the wound directly. We report here our retrospective analysis of our case series of patients with such keloids who underwent reconstruction with internal mammary artery perforator (IMAP) pedicled propeller flaps and then received postoperative high-dose-rate superficial brachytherapy. Methods: All consecutive patients with large/severe keloids on the anterior chest wall who underwent keloid resection followed by reconstruction with IMAP-pedicled propeller flaps and then high-dose-rate superficial brachytherapy in our academic hospital were identified. All cases were followed for >18 months. Donor site position, perforator pedicle, flap size, angle of flap rotation, complications, and recurrence were documented. Results: There were nine men and one woman. The average age was 37.9 years. The average follow-up duration was 28.7 months. The largest flap was 16 × 4 cm. The dominant perforators of the internal mammary artery were located in the sixth (n = 2), seventh (n = 5), eighth (n = 1), and ninth (n = 2) intercostal spaces. Twelve months after surgery, patients reported marked relief from keloid-associated pain and itching, except in two patients who underwent partial keloid resection; their remaining keloids were still troublesome but after conservative therapies, including steroid ointments/plasters, the keloids gradually ameliorated. Eighteen months after surgery, there was no keloid recurrence or new development of keloids on the donor site. Conclusions: IMAP-pedicled propeller flaps transfer skin tension from the anterior chest wall to the abdomen. Our series suggests that this approach combined with radiation therapy can control keloid recurrence.

  18. Portal venous arterialization resulting in increased portal inflow and portal vein wall thickness in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Gang Li; Yong-Liang Chen; Jing-Xi Chen; Lei Qu; Bin-Dang Xue; Zhi-Hai Peng; Zhi-Qiang Huang

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To explore the influence of portal vein hemodynamic changes after portal venous arterialization(PVA) on peribiliary vascular plexus (PVP)morphological structure and hepatic pathology,and to establish a theoretical basis for the clinical application of PVA.METHODS:Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control and PVA groups.After PVA,hemodynamic changes of the portal vein and morphological structure of hepatohilar PVP were observed using Doppler ultrasound,liver function tests,ink perfusion transparency management and three-dimensional reconstruction of computer microvisualization,and pathological examination was performed on tissue from the bile duct wall and the liver.RESULTS:After PVA,the cross-sectional area and blood flow of the portal vein were increased,and the increase became more significant over time,in a certain range.If the measure to limit the flow in PVA was not adopted,the high blood flow would lead to dilatation of intrahepatic portal vein and its branches,increase in collagen and fiber degeneration in tunica intima.Except glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT),other liver function tests were normal.CONCLUSION:Blood with a certain flow and oxygen content is important for filling the PVP and meeting the oxygen requirement of the bile duct wall.After PVA,It is the anatomic basis to maintain normal morphology of hepatohilar bile duct wall that the blood with high oxygen content and high flow in arterialized portal vein may fill PVP by collateral vessel reflux.A adequate measure to limit blood flow is necessary in PVA.

  19. Critical domain-wall dynamics of model B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, R H; Zheng, B; Zhou, N J

    2009-05-01

    With Monte Carlo methods, we simulate the critical domain-wall dynamics of model B, taking the two-dimensional Ising model as an example. In the macroscopic short-time regime, a dynamic scaling form is revealed. Due to the existence of the quasirandom walkers, the magnetization shows intrinsic dependence on the lattice size L . An exponent which governs the L dependence of the magnetization is measured to be sigma=0.243(8) .

  20. Influence of constriction, wall tension, smooth muscle activation and cellular deformation on rat resistance artery vasodilator reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, Ilsley; Mandalà, Maurizio; Morton, Jude; Davidge, Sandra T; Osol, George

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how vasoconstriction (tone), wall tension, smooth muscle activation, and vascular wall deformation influence resistance artery vasodilator reactivity. Resistance arteries, from two different regional circulations (splanchnic, uterine) and from pregnant and non-pregnant rats, were cannulated and pressurized, or mounted on a wire myograph under isometric conditions prior to being exposed to both endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) vasodilator agonists. A consistent pattern of reduced vasodilator sensitivity was noted as a function of extent of preconstriction for both agonists noted in pressurized arteries. A similar pattern regarding activation was noted in wire-mounted arteries in response to SNP but not ACh. Wall tension proved to be a major determinant of vascular smooth muscle vasodilator reactivity and its normalization reversed this pattern, as more constricted vessels were more sensitive to ACh relaxation without any change in SNP sensitivity, suggesting that endothelial deformation secondary to vasoconstriction augments its vasodilator output. To our knowledge, this is the first study to dissect out the complex interplay between biophysical forces impinging on VSM (pressure, wall tension), the ambient level of tone (vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell activation), and consequences of cellular (particularly endothelial) deformation secondary to constriction in determining resistance artery vasodilatory reactivity.

  1. Assessment of Carotid Arterial Wall Elasticity in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients with Microalbuminuria by Real-Time Ultrasound Elastography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hong Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate carotid arterial wall elasticity in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM with microalbuminuria by real-time ultrasound elastography. Two hundred and ten T2DM patients were divided into two groups according to levels of urinary albumin excretion (UAE: T2DM without microalbuminuria (T2DM1 group, 120 and T2DM with microalbuminuria (T2DM2 group, 90. The right common carotid arteries were examined by real-time ultrasound elastography. The strain ratio (SR, blood to arterial wall strain ratio was calculated by dividing the strain value of the blood by that of the carotid arterial wall. The correlation between SR and general data was analyzed. The mean SR value ± SD of T2DM2 group was significantly higher than that of T2DM1 group (P<0.05. SR was positively and significantly correlated with UAE, HbA1c, and systolic blood pressure (r=0.456,0.435,0.235, P<0.05 for all. The mean value ± SD of UAE, HbA1c, 2hPG, BMI, and TC of T2DM2 group was significantly higher than that of T2DM1 group (P<0.05 for all. In conclusion, there is an association between microalbuminuria and carotid arterial wall elasticity in T2DM patients.

  2. Domain wall dynamics in expanding spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Francisco J; Zamora-Sillero, Elías; Quintero, Niurka R

    2006-05-01

    We study the effects on the dynamics of kinks due to expansions and contractions of the space. We show that the propagation velocity of the kink can be adiabatically tuned through slow expansions and/or contractions, while its width is given as a function of the velocity. We also analyze the case of fast expansions and/or contractions, where we are no longer on the adiabatic regime. In this case the kink moves more slowly after an expansion-contraction cycle as a consequence of the loss of energy through radiation. All these effects are numerically studied in the nonlinear Klein-Gordon equations (both for the sine-Gordon and for the potential), and they are also studied within the framework of the collective coordinate evolution equations for the width and the center of mass of the kink. These collective coordinate evolution equations are obtained with a procedure that allows us to consider even the case of large expansions and/or contractions.

  3. Bioresorbable microporous stents deliver recombinant adenovirus gene transfer vectors to the arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Y W; Landau, C; Willard, J E; Rajasubramanian, G; Moskowitz, A; Aziz, S; Meidell, R S; Eberhart, R C

    1998-01-01

    The use of intravascular stents as an adjunct for percutaneous transluminal revascularization is limited by two principal factors, acute thrombosis and neointimal proliferation, resulting in restenosis. To overcome these limitations, we have investigated the potential of microporous bioresorbable polymer stents formed from poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA)/poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) blends to function both to provide mechanical support and as reservoirs for local delivery of therapeutic molecules and particles to the vessel wall. Tubular PLLA/PCL stents were fabricated by the flotation-precipitation method, and helical stents were produced by a casting/winding technique. Hybrid structures in which a tubular sheath is deposited on a helical skeleton were also generated. Using a two-stage solvent swelling technique, polyethylene oxide has been incorporated into these stents to improve hydrophilicity and water uptake, and to facilitate the ability of these devices to function as drug carriers. Stents modified in this manner retain axial and radial mechanical strength sufficient to stabilize the vessel wall against elastic recoil caused by vasoconstrictive and mechanical forces. Because of the potential of direct gene transfer into the vessel wall to ameliorate thrombosis and neointimal proliferation, we have investigated the capacity of these polymer stents to function in the delivery of recombinant adenovirus vectors to the vessel wall. In vitro, virus stock was observed to readily absorb into, and elute from these devices in an infectious form, with suitable kinetics. Successful gene transfer and expression has been demonstrated following implantation of polymer stents impregnated with a recombinant adenovirus carrying a nuclear-localizing betaGal reporter gene into rabbit carotid arteries. These studies suggest that surface-modified polymer stents may ultimately be useful adjunctive devices for both mechanical support and gene transfer during percutaneous

  4. Ultrasonic Measurement of Transient Change in Stress-Strain Property of Radial Arterial Wall Caused by Endothelium-Dependent Vasodilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeshita, Kazuki; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2008-05-01

    The endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step of atherosclerosis. Additionally, it was reported that the smooth muscle, which constructs the media of the artery, changes its characteristics owing to atherosclerosis. Therefore, it is essential to develop a method for assessing the regional endothelial function and mechanical property of the arterial wall. There is a conventional technique of measuring the transient change in the diameter of the brachial artery caused by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) after the release of avascularization. For more sensitive and regional evaluation, we developed a method of measuring the change in the elasticity of the radial artery due to FMD. In this study, the transient change in the mechanical property of the arterial wall was further revealed by measuring the stress-strain relationship during each heartbeat. The minute change in the thickness (strain) of the radial arterial wall during a cardiac cycle was measured by the phased tracking method, together with the waveform of blood pressure which was continuously measured with a sphygmometer at the radial artery. The transient change in stress-strain relationship during a cardiac cycle was obtained from the measured changes in wall thickness and blood pressure to show the transient change in instantaneous viscoelasticity. From the in vivo experimental results, the stress-strain relationship shows the hysteresis loop. The slope of the loop decreased owing to FMD, which shows that the elastic modulus decreased, and the increasing area of the loop depends on the ratio of the loss modulus (depends on viscosity) to the elastic modulus when the Voigt model is assumed. These results show a potential of the proposed method for the thorough analysis of the transient change in viscoelasticity due to FMD.

  5. A possible formation mechanism of double-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotube: a molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dianrong; Luo, Chenglin; Dai, Yafei; Zhu, Xingfeng

    2016-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations based on an empirical potential were performed to study the interaction of graphene nanoribbons and the single-walled carbon nanotubes. The results indicated that a piece of graphene nanoribbon can form a tube structure inside or outside single-walled carbon nanotubes spontaneously under certain condition. Based on this kind of spontaneous phenomenon, we proposed a new possible formation mechanism of double walled carbon nanotube and multi-walled carbon nanotube, and suggested the possibility of controlling the structure of double-walled carbon nanotube and/or multi-walled carbon nanotube.

  6. Data density curves of B-mode ultrasound arterial wall thickness measurements in unaffected control and at-risk populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, E; Hovingh, GK; Zwinderman, AH; Wiegman, A; Smit, AJ; Kastelein, JJP

    2005-01-01

    Aim. Atherosclerosis is a slow disease process of arterial walls with onset decades prior to its clinical manifestations. Lifelong follow-up data may help to identify and understand the pathophysiology of this process. These longitudinal data are scarce. Using a standardized imaging and image analys

  7. A Computational Model to Assess Poststenting Wall Stresses Dependence on Plaque Structure and Stenosis Severity in Coronary Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuned Hajiali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study presents computational models to investigate the poststenting hemodynamic stresses and internal stresses over/within the diseased walls of coronary arteries which are in different states of atherosclerotic plaque. The finite element method is applied to build the axisymmetric models which include the plaque, arterial wall, and stent struts. The study takes into account the mechanical effects of the opening pressure and its association with the plaque severity and the morphology. The wall shear stresses and the von Mises stresses within the stented coronary arteries show their strong dependence on the plaque structure, particularly the fibrous cap thickness. Higher stresses occur in severely stenosed coronaries with a thinner fibrous cap. Large stress concentrations around the stent struts cause injury or damage to the vessel wall which is linked to the mechanism of restenosis. The in-stent restenosis rate is also highly dependent on the opening pressure, to the extent that stenosed artery is expanded, and geometry of the stent struts. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, that the restenosis is to be viewed as a consequence of biomechanical design of a stent repeating unit, the opening pressure, and the severity and morphology of the plaque.

  8. A statistical state dynamics approach to wall-turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Farrell, Brian F; Ioannou, Petros J

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews results demonstrating the benefits of studying wall-bounded shear flows using dynamics for the evolution of the statistical state of the turbulent system. The statistical state dynamics (SSD) approach used in this work employs a second order closure which isolates the interaction between the streamwise mean and the equivalent of the perturbation covariance. This closure restricts nonlinearity in the SSD to that explicitly retained in the streamwise constant mean together with nonlinear interactions between the mean and the perturbation covariance. This dynamical restriction, in which explicit perturbation-perturbation nonlinearity is removed from the perturbation equation, results in a simplified dynamics referred to as the restricted nonlinear (RNL) dynamics. RNL systems in which an ensemble of a finite number of realizations of the perturbation equation share the same mean flow provide tractable approximations to the equivalently infinite ensemble RNL system. The infinite ensemble system,...

  9. Children and Adolescent Obesity Associates with Pressure-Dependent and Age-Related Increase in Carotid and Femoral Arteries' Stiffness and Not in Brachial Artery, Indicative of Nonintrinsic Arterial Wall Alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Castro, Juan Manuel; Arana, Maite; Giachetto, Gustavo; Chiesa, Pedro; Zócalo, Yanina

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze if childhood obesity associates with changes in elastic, transitional, and/or muscular arteries' stiffness. Methods. 221 subjects (4–15 years, 92 females) were assigned to normal weight (NW, n = 137) or obesity (OB, n = 84) groups, considering their body mass index z-score. Age groups were defined: 4–8; 8–12; 12–15 years old. Carotid, femoral, and brachial artery local stiffness was determined through systodiastolic pressure-diameter and stress-strain relationships. To this end, arterial diameter and peripheral and aortic blood pressure (BP) levels and waveforms were recorded. Carotid-femoral, femoropedal, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities were determined to evaluate aortic, lower-limb, and upper-limb regional arterial stiffness, respectively. Correlation analysis between stiffness parameters and BP was done. Results. Compared to NW, OB subjects showed higher peripheral and central BP and carotid and femoral stiffness, reaching statistical significance in subjects aged 12 and older. Arterial stiffness differences disappeared when levels were normalized for BP. There were no differences in intrinsic arterial wall stiffness (elastic modulus), BP stiffness relationships, and regional stiffness parameters. Conclusion. OB associates with BP-dependent and age-related increase in carotid and femoral (but not brachial) stiffness. Stiffness changes would not be explained by intrinsic arterial wall alterations but could be associated with the higher BP levels observed in obese children. PMID:27066273

  10. Mathematical modeling of coupled drug and drug-encapsulated nanoparticle transport in patient-specific coronary artery walls

    KAUST Repository

    Hossain, Shaolie S.

    2011-08-20

    The majority of heart attacks occur when there is a sudden rupture of atherosclerotic plaque, exposing prothrombotic emboli to coronary blood flow, forming clots that can cause blockages of the arterial lumen. Diseased arteries can be treated with drugs delivered locally to vulnerable plaques. The objective of this work was to develop a computational tool-set to support the design and analysis of a catheter-based nanoparticulate drug delivery system to treat vulnerable plaques and diffuse atherosclerosis. A threedimensional mathematical model of coupled mass transport of drug and drug-encapsulated nanoparticles was developed and solved numerically utilizing isogeometric finite element analysis. Simulations were run on a patient-specific multilayered coronary artery wall segment with a vulnerable plaque and the effect of artery and plaque inhomogeneity was analyzed. The method captured trends observed in local drug delivery and demonstrated potential for optimizing drug design parameters, including delivery location, nanoparticle surface properties, and drug release rate. © Springer-Verlag 2011.

  11. Mathematical modeling of coupled drug and drug-encapsulated nanoparticle transport in patient-specific coronary artery walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Shaolie S.; Hossainy, Syed F. A.; Bazilevs, Yuri; Calo, Victor M.; Hughes, Thomas J. R.

    2012-02-01

    The majority of heart attacks occur when there is a sudden rupture of atherosclerotic plaque, exposing prothrombotic emboli to coronary blood flow, forming clots that can cause blockages of the arterial lumen. Diseased arteries can be treated with drugs delivered locally to vulnerable plaques. The objective of this work was to develop a computational tool-set to support the design and analysis of a catheter-based nanoparticulate drug delivery system to treat vulnerable plaques and diffuse atherosclerosis. A three-dimensional mathematical model of coupled mass transport of drug and drug-encapsulated nanoparticles was developed and solved numerically utilizing isogeometric finite element analysis. Simulations were run on a patient-specific multilayered coronary artery wall segment with a vulnerable plaque and the effect of artery and plaque inhomogeneity was analyzed. The method captured trends observed in local drug delivery and demonstrated potential for optimizing drug design parameters, including delivery location, nanoparticle surface properties, and drug release rate.

  12. Effects of arterial blood flow on walls of the abdominal aorta: distributions of wall shear stress and oscillatory shear index determined by phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sughimoto, Koichi; Shimamura, Yoshiaki; Tezuka, Chie; Tsubota, Ken'ichi; Liu, Hao; Okumura, Kenichiro; Masuda, Yoshitada; Haneishi, Hideaki

    2016-07-01

    Although abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) occur mostly inferior to the renal artery, the mechanism of the development of AAA in relation to its specific location is not yet clearly understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that even healthy volunteers may manifest specific flow characteristics of blood flow and alter wall shear or oscillatory shear stress in the areas where AAAs commonly develop. Eight healthy male volunteers were enrolled in this prospective study, aged from 24 to 27. Phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed with electrocardiographic triggering. Flow-sensitive four-dimensional MR imaging of the abdominal aorta, with three-directional velocity encoding, including simple morphological image acquisition, was performed. Information on specific locations on the aortic wall was applied to the flow encodes to calculate wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI). While time-framed WSS showed the highest peak of 1.14 ± 0.25 Pa in the juxtaposition of the renal artery, the WSS plateaued to 0.61 Pa at the anterior wall of the abdominal aorta. The OSI peaked distal to the renal arteries at the posterior wall of the abdominal aorta of 0.249 ± 0.148, and was constantly elevated in the whole abdominal aorta at more than 0.14. All subjects were found to have elevated OSI in regions where AAAs commonly occur. These findings indicate that areas of constant peaked oscillatory shear stress in the infra-renal aorta may be one of the factors that lead to morphological changes over time, even in healthy individuals.

  13. A statistical state dynamics approach to wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, B F; Gayme, D F; Ioannou, P J

    2017-03-13

    This paper reviews results obtained using statistical state dynamics (SSD) that demonstrate the benefits of adopting this perspective for understanding turbulence in wall-bounded shear flows. The SSD approach used in this work employs a second-order closure that retains only the interaction between the streamwise mean flow and the streamwise mean perturbation covariance. This closure restricts nonlinearity in the SSD to that explicitly retained in the streamwise constant mean flow together with nonlinear interactions between the mean flow and the perturbation covariance. This dynamical restriction, in which explicit perturbation-perturbation nonlinearity is removed from the perturbation equation, results in a simplified dynamics referred to as the restricted nonlinear (RNL) dynamics. RNL systems, in which a finite ensemble of realizations of the perturbation equation share the same mean flow, provide tractable approximations to the SSD, which is equivalent to an infinite ensemble RNL system. This infinite ensemble system, referred to as the stochastic structural stability theory system, introduces new analysis tools for studying turbulence. RNL systems provide computationally efficient means to approximate the SSD and produce self-sustaining turbulence exhibiting qualitative features similar to those observed in direct numerical simulations despite greatly simplified dynamics. The results presented show that RNL turbulence can be supported by as few as a single streamwise varying component interacting with the streamwise constant mean flow and that judicious selection of this truncated support or 'band-limiting' can be used to improve quantitative accuracy of RNL turbulence. These results suggest that the SSD approach provides new analytical and computational tools that allow new insights into wall turbulence.This article is part of the themed issue 'Toward the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number'.

  14. Automated registration of multispectral MR vessel wall images of the carotid artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klooster, R. van ' t; Staring, M.; Reiber, J. H. C.; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Geest, R. J. van der, E-mail: rvdgeest@lumc.nl [Department of Radiology, Division of Image Processing, Leiden University Medical Center, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Klein, S. [Department of Radiology and Department of Medical Informatics, Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam 3015 GE (Netherlands); Kwee, R. M.; Kooi, M. E. [Department of Radiology, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6202 AZ (Netherlands)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Atherosclerosis is the primary cause of heart disease and stroke. The detailed assessment of atherosclerosis of the carotid artery requires high resolution imaging of the vessel wall using multiple MR sequences with different contrast weightings. These images allow manual or automated classification of plaque components inside the vessel wall. Automated classification requires all sequences to be in alignment, which is hampered by patient motion. In clinical practice, correction of this motion is performed manually. Previous studies applied automated image registration to correct for motion using only nondeformable transformation models and did not perform a detailed quantitative validation. The purpose of this study is to develop an automated accurate 3D registration method, and to extensively validate this method on a large set of patient data. In addition, the authors quantified patient motion during scanning to investigate the need for correction. Methods: MR imaging studies (1.5T, dedicated carotid surface coil, Philips) from 55 TIA/stroke patients with ipsilateral <70% carotid artery stenosis were randomly selected from a larger cohort. Five MR pulse sequences were acquired around the carotid bifurcation, each containing nine transverse slices: T1-weighted turbo field echo, time of flight, T2-weighted turbo spin-echo, and pre- and postcontrast T1-weighted turbo spin-echo images (T1W TSE). The images were manually segmented by delineating the lumen contour in each vessel wall sequence and were manually aligned by applying throughplane and inplane translations to the images. To find the optimal automatic image registration method, different masks, choice of the fixed image, different types of the mutual information image similarity metric, and transformation models including 3D deformable transformation models, were evaluated. Evaluation of the automatic registration results was performed by comparing the lumen segmentations of the fixed image and

  15. Dynamics of Biased Domain Walls and the Devaluation Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Pina-Avelino, P; Sousa, L

    2008-01-01

    We study the evolution of biased domain walls in the early universe. We explicitly discuss the roles played by the surface tension and volume pressure in the evolution of the walls, and quantify their effects by looking at the collapse of spherical wall solutions. We then apply our results to a particular mechanism, known as the devaluation scenario, in which the dynamics of biased domain walls was suggested as a possible solution to the cosmological constant problem. Our results indicate that devaluation will in general lead to values of the cosmological constant that differ by several orders of magnitude from the observationally inferred value, $\\rho^{1/4}_{vac}\\sim10^{-3} \\rm eV$. We also argue that the reasons behind this are not specific to a particular realization, and are expected to persist in any scenario of this kind, except if a low energy cut-off on the spectra of vacuum energy densities, of the order of the critical density at the present time, is postulated. This implies that any such scenario w...

  16. Dynamics of biased domain walls and the devaluation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelino, P. P.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Sousa, L.

    2008-08-01

    We study the evolution of biased domain walls in the early universe. We explicitly discuss the roles played by the surface tension and volume pressure in the evolution of the walls, and quantify their effects by looking at the collapse of spherical wall solutions. We then apply our results to a particular mechanism, known as the devaluation scenario, in which the dynamics of biased domain walls was suggested as a possible solution to the cosmological constant problem. Our results indicate that devaluation will, in general, lead to values of the cosmological constant that differ by several orders of magnitude from the observationally inferred value, ρvac1/4˜10-3eV. We also argue that the reasons behind this are not specific to a particular realization, and are expected to persist in any scenario of this kind, except if a low-energy cutoff on the spectra of vacuum energy densities, of the order of the critical density at the present time, is postulated. This implies that any such scenario will require a fine-tuning similar to the usual one.

  17. Localization of Vector Field on Dynamical Domain Wall

    CERN Document Server

    Higuchi, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    In the previous works (arXiv:1202.5375 and 1402.1346), the dynamical domain wall, where the four dimensional FRW universe is embedded in the five imensional space-time, has been realized by using two scalar fields. In this paper, we consider the localization of vector field in three formulations. The first formulation was investigated in the previous paper (arXiv:1510.01099) for the $U(1)$ gauge field. In the second formulation, we investigate the Dvali-Shifman mechanism (hep-th/9612128), where the non-abelian gauge field is confined in the bulk but the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken on the domain wall. In the third formulation, we investigate the Kaluza-Klein modes coming from the five dimensional graviton. In the Randall-Sundrum model, the graviton was localized on the brane. We show that the $(5,\\mu)$ components $\\left(\\mu=0,1,2,3\\right)$ of the graviton are also localized on the domain wall and can be regarded as the vector field on the domain wall. There are, however, some corrections coming from...

  18. Structural alterations of the coronary arterial wall are associated with myocardial flow heterogeneity in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, Thomas H. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Moelecular and Medical Pharmacology, Radiological Science]|[University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiovascular Center, Nuclear Cardiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Facta, Alvaro D.; Prior, John O.; Cadenas, Jerson; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Sayre, James; Goldin, Jonathan; Schelbert, Heinrich R. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Moelecular and Medical Pharmacology, Radiological Science; Li, Yanjie [University of Southern California, Atherosclerosis Research Unit, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2009-02-15

    To determine the relationship between carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), coronary artery calcification (CAC), and myocardial blood flow (MBF) at rest and during vasomotor stress in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). In 68 individuals, carotid IMT was measured using high-resolution vascular ultrasound, while the presence of CAC was determined with electron beam tomography (EBT). Global and regional MBF was determined in milliliters per gram per minute with {sup 13}N-ammonia and positron emission tomography (PET) at rest, during cold pressor testing (CPT), and during adenosine (ADO) stimulation. There was neither a relationship between carotid IMT and CAC (r = 0.10, p = 0.32) nor between carotid IMT and coronary circulatory function in response to CPT and during ADO (r = -0.18, p = 0.25 and r = 0.10, p = 0.54, respectively). In 33 individuals, EBT detected CAC with a mean Agatston-derived calcium score of 44 {+-} 18. There was a significant difference in regional MBFs between territories with and without CAC at rest and during ADO-stimulated hyperemia (0.69 {+-} 0.24 vs. 0.74 {+-} 0.23 and 1.82 {+-} 0.50 vs. 1.95 {+-} 0.51 ml/g/min; p {<=} 0.05, respectively) and also during CPT in DM but less pronounced (0.81 {+-} 0.24 vs. 0.83 {+-} 0.23 ml/g/min; p = ns). The increase in CAC was paralleled with a progressive regional decrease in resting as well as in CPT- and ADO-related MBFs (r = -0.36, p {<=} 0.014; r = -0.46, p {<=} 0.007; and r = -0.33, p {<=} 0.041, respectively). The absence of any correlation between carotid IMT and coronary circulatory function in type 2 DM suggests different features and stages of early atherosclerosis in the peripheral and coronary circulation. PET-measured MBF heterogeneity at rest and during vasomotor stress may reflect downstream fluid dynamic effects of coronary artery disease (CAD)-related early structural alterations of the arterial wall. (orig.)

  19. Low-density lipoprotein accumulation within a carotid artery with multilayer elastic porous wall: fluid-structure interaction and non-Newtonian considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyranlou, Amin; Niazmand, Hamid; Sadeghi, Mahmood-Reza

    2015-09-18

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), which is recognized as bad cholesterol, typically has been regarded as a main cause of atherosclerosis. LDL infiltration across arterial wall and subsequent formation of Ox-LDL could lead to atherogenesis. In the present study, combined effects of non-Newtonian fluid behavior and fluid-structure interaction (FSI) on LDL mass transfer inside an artery and through its multilayer arterial wall are examined numerically. Navier-Stokes equations for the blood flow inside the lumen and modified Darcy's model for the power-law fluid through the porous arterial wall are coupled with the equations of mass transfer to describe LDL distributions in various segments of the artery. In addition, the arterial wall is considered as a heterogeneous permeable elastic medium. Thus, elastodynamics equation is invoked to examine effects of different wall elasticity on LDL distribution in the artery. Findings suggest that non-Newtonian behavior of filtrated plasma within the wall enhances LDL accumulation meaningfully. Moreover, results demonstrate that at high blood pressure and due to the wall elasticity, endothelium pores expand, which cause significant variations on endothelium physiological properties in a way that lead to higher LDL accumulation. Additionally, results describe that under hypertension, by increasing angular strain, endothelial junctions especially at leaky sites expand more dramatic for the high elastic model, which in turn causes higher LDL accumulation across the intima layer and elevates atherogenesis risk.

  20. Mechanical Interaction of an Expanding Coiled Stent with a Plaque-Containing Arterial Wall: A Finite Element Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Tré R; Eberhart, Robert C; Banerjee, Subhash; Chuong, Cheng-Jen

    2016-03-01

    Wall injury is observed during stent expansion within atherosclerotic arteries, related in part to stimulation of the inflammatory process. Wall stress and strain induced by stent expansion can be closely examined by finite element analysis (FEA), thus shedding light on procedure-induced sources of inflammation. The purpose of this work was to use FEA to examine the interaction of a coiled polymer stent with a plaque-containing arterial wall during stent expansion. An asymmetric fibrotic plaque-containing arterial wall model was created from intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images of a diseased artery. A 3D model for a coil stent at unexpanded state was generated in SolidWorks. They were imported into ANSYS for FEA of combined stent expansion and fibrotic plaque-distortion. We simulated the stent expansion in the plaqued lumen by increasing balloon pressure from 0 to 12 atm in 1 atm step. At increasing pressure, we examined how the expanding stent exerts forces on the fibrotic plaque and vascular wall components, and how the latter collectively resist and balance the expansive forces from the stent. Results show the expanding coiled stent creates high stresses within the plaque and the surrounding fibrotic capsule. Lower stresses were observed in adjacent medial and adventitial layers. High principal strains were observed in plaque and fibrotic capsule. The results suggest fibrotic capsule rupture might occur at localized regions. The FEA/IVUS method can be adapted for routine examination of the effects of the expansion of selected furled stents against IVUS-reconstructed diseased vessels, to improve stent deployment practices.

  1. Contractility studies on isolated bovine choroidal small arteries: determination of the active and passive wall tension-internal circumference relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaey, C; Boussery, K; Van de Voorde, J

    2002-09-01

    Studies on isolated choroidal arteries could help to understand the regulatory mechanisms in the choroidal circulation. The aim of the present study was therefore to assess whether contractility studies on isolated choroidal arteries were feasible and to determine the active and passive wall tension-internal circumference relation of these arteries. This relation is essential for reliable further pharmacodynamic studies on these vessels. Isolated choroidal arteries were mounted on a wire myograph for isometric tension recording. After the vessel was mounted, the L(100) (the circumference of the vessel at a transmural pressure of 100 mmHg) was determined. Then the passive and active wall tension-internal circumference relation of the choroidal vessels was obtained by stepwise increasing the internal circumference. The changes in the internal circumference were expressed as a percentage of L(100). After each increase in circumference, the passive tone (in a calcium free medium), the spontaneous tone (in a Krebs--Ringer bicarbonate solution) and the active tone (in a solution containing K(+) 120 mM and prostaglandin F(2 alpha) 30 microM) was measured. The passive tone of the vessel increased exponentially with the circumference of the vessel. Both the spontaneous tone and the active tone also increased when the vessel was stretched. They peaked when the internal circumference approached 90% of the L(100) and diminished again when the circumference was further increased. The peak value of the active tension curve averaged 2.24+/-0.47 Nm(-1) (n=10). The passive tension was 0.57+/-0.08 Nm(-1) (n=10) at this circumference. The peak value of the spontaneous tension curve averaged 0.37+/-0.08 Nm(-1) (n=10). It can be concluded that in vitro contractility studies on isolated choroidal arteries are feasible. The optimal length or preload of the choroidal arteries is attained when the internal circumference of the artery is set to 90% of the L(100).

  2. Domain-wall spin dynamics in kagome antiferromagnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhotel, E; Simonet, V; Ortloff, J; Canals, B; Paulsen, C; Suard, E; Hansen, T; Price, D J; Wood, P T; Powell, A K; Ballou, R

    2011-12-16

    We report magnetization and neutron scattering measurements down to 60 mK on a new family of Fe based kagome antiferromagnets, in which a strong local spin anisotropy combined with a low exchange path network connectivity lead to domain walls intersecting the kagome planes through strings of free spins. These produce unfamiliar slow spin dynamics in the ordered phase, evolving from exchange-released spin flips towards a cooperative behavior on decreasing the temperature, probably due to the onset of long-range dipolar interaction. A domain structure of independent magnetic grains is obtained that could be generic to other frustrated magnets.

  3. A statistical state dynamics approach to wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, B. F.; Gayme, D. F.; Ioannou, P. J.

    2017-03-01

    This paper reviews results obtained using statistical state dynamics (SSD) that demonstrate the benefits of adopting this perspective for understanding turbulence in wall-bounded shear flows. The SSD approach used in this work employs a second-order closure that retains only the interaction between the streamwise mean flow and the streamwise mean perturbation covariance. This closure restricts nonlinearity in the SSD to that explicitly retained in the streamwise constant mean flow together with nonlinear interactions between the mean flow and the perturbation covariance. This dynamical restriction, in which explicit perturbation-perturbation nonlinearity is removed from the perturbation equation, results in a simplified dynamics referred to as the restricted nonlinear (RNL) dynamics. RNL systems, in which a finite ensemble of realizations of the perturbation equation share the same mean flow, provide tractable approximations to the SSD, which is equivalent to an infinite ensemble RNL system. This infinite ensemble system, referred to as the stochastic structural stability theory system, introduces new analysis tools for studying turbulence. RNL systems provide computationally efficient means to approximate the SSD and produce self-sustaining turbulence exhibiting qualitative features similar to those observed in direct numerical simulations despite greatly simplified dynamics. The results presented show that RNL turbulence can be supported by as few as a single streamwise varying component interacting with the streamwise constant mean flow and that judicious selection of this truncated support or `band-limiting' can be used to improve quantitative accuracy of RNL turbulence. These results suggest that the SSD approach provides new analytical and computational tools that allow new insights into wall turbulence.

  4. Characterizaton of the Vessel Geometry, Flow Mechanics and Wall Shear Stress in the Great Arteries of Wildtype Prenatal Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Choon Hwai Yap; Xiaoqin Liu; Kerem Pekkan

    2014-01-01

    Characterizaton of the Vessel Geometry, Flow Mechanics and Wall Shear Stress in the Great Arteries of Wildtype Prenatal Mouse Choon Hwai Yap1, Xiaoqin Liu2, Kerem Pekkan3* 1 Department of Biomedical Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore, 2 Department of Developmental Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America, 3 Department of Biomedical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh...

  5. Composition of connective tissues and morphometry of vascular smooth muscle in arterial wall of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats - In relation with arterial remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kozaburo; Shimizu, Emiko

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension (HT) was induced in Wistar rats aged 16 and 48 weeks by a deoxycortico-sterone acetate (DOCA)-salt procedure. Common carotid arteries were resected 16 weeks after, and their histological specimens were selectively stained for observations of collagen, elastin, and vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells. Then, the fractions of collagen and elastin and their radial distributions, and the size and number of VSM cells were determined with an image analyzer. These results were compared with the results from age-matched, non-treated, normotensive (NT) animals and also with those from our previous biomechanical studies. In both age groups, there were no significant differences in the fractions of collagen and elastin, and the ratio of collagen to elastin content between HT and NT arteries. These results correspond well with our previous biomechanical results, which showed no significant difference in wall elasticity between HT and NT vessels. Moreover, in the innermost layer out of 4 layers bordered with thick elastic lamellae, the fraction of collagen was significantly greater in HT arteries than in NT ones, which is attributable to HT-related stress concentration in the layer. VSM cells were significantly hypertrophied and their content was increased by HT, although their total number in the media remained unchanged. The increased size and content of cells correspond to the enhancement of vascular tone and contractility in HT arteries.

  6. Carotid artery longitudinal wall motion is associated with local blood velocity and left ventricular rotational, but not longitudinal, mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Jason S; Ditor, David S; MacDonald, Maureen J; Stöhr, Eric J

    2016-07-01

    Recent studies have identified a predictable movement pattern of the common carotid artery wall in the longitudinal direction. While there is evidence that the magnitude of this carotid artery longitudinal wall motion (CALM) is sensitive to cardiovascular health status, little is known about the determinants of CALM The purpose of this integrative study was to evaluate the contribution of left ventricular (LV) cardiac motion and local blood velocity to CALM Simultaneous ultrasound measurements of CALM, common carotid artery mean blood velocity (MBV), and left ventricular motion were performed in ten young, healthy individuals (6 males; 22 ± 1 years). Peak anterograde CALM occurred at a similar time as peak MBV (18.57 ± 3.98% vs. 18.53 ± 2.81% cardiac cycle; t-test: P = 0.94; ICC: 0.79, P longitudinal displacement was not associated with peak CALM (r = 0.11, P = 0.77). These results suggest that the rotational mechanical movement of the LV base may be closely associated with longitudinal mechanics in the carotid artery. This finding may have important implications for interpreting the complex relationship between ventricular and vascular function.

  7. The Dynamic Similitude Design Method of Thin Walled Structures and Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the applicability of dynamic similitude models of thin walled structures, such as engine blades, turbine discs, and cylindrical shells, the dynamic similitude design of typical thin walled structures is investigated. The governing equation of typical thin walled structures is firstly unified, which guides to establishing dynamic scaling laws of typical thin walled structures. Based on the governing equation, geometrically complete scaling law of the typical thin walled structure is derived. In order to determine accurate distorted scaling laws of typical thin walled structures, three principles are proposed and theoretically proved by combining the sensitivity analysis and governing equation. Taking the thin walled annular plate as an example, geometrically complete and distorted scaling laws can be obtained based on the principles of determining dynamic scaling laws. Furthermore, the previous five orders’ accurate distorted scaling laws of thin walled annular plates are presented and numerically validated. Finally, the effectiveness of the similitude design method is validated by experimental annular plates.

  8. Genetic susceptibility of the arterial wall is an important determinant of atherosclerosis in C57BL/6 and FVB/N mouse strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Jeong; Handberg, Aase; Östergren, Eva-Britt Caroline

    2011-01-01

    How genetic variations among inbred mouse strains translate into differences in atherosclerosis susceptibility is of significant interest for the development of new therapeutic strategies. The objective of the present study was to examine whether genetically controlled arterial wall properties...

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of the Effect of Plaques in the Left Coronary Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanapong Chaichana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was to investigate the hemodynamic effect of simulated plaques in left coronary artery models, which were generated from a sample patient’s data. Plaques were simulated and placed at the left main stem and the left anterior descending (LAD to produce at least 60% coronary stenosis. Computational fluid dynamics analysis was performed to simulate realistic physiological conditions that reflect the in vivo cardiac hemodynamics, and comparison of wall shear stress (WSS between Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid models was performed. The pressure gradient (PSG and flow velocities in the left coronary artery were measured and compared in the left coronary models with and without presence of plaques during cardiac cycle. Our results showed that the highest PSG was observed in stenotic regions caused by the plaques. Low flow velocity areas were found at postplaque locations in the left circumflex, LAD, and bifurcation. WSS at the stenotic locations was similar between the non-Newtonian and Newtonian models although some more details were observed with non-Newtonian model. There is a direct correlation between coronary plaques and subsequent hemodynamic changes, based on the simulation of plaques in the realistic coronary models.

  10. Hemodynamic analysis in an idealized artery tree: differences in wall shear stress between Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared C Weddell

    Full Text Available Development of many conditions and disorders, such as atherosclerosis and stroke, are dependent upon hemodynamic forces. To accurately predict and prevent these conditions and disorders hemodynamic forces must be properly mapped. Here we compare a shear-rate dependent fluid (SDF constitutive model, based on the works by Yasuda et al in 1981, against a Newtonian model of blood. We verify our stabilized finite element numerical method with the benchmark lid-driven cavity flow problem. Numerical simulations show that the Newtonian model gives similar velocity profiles in the 2-dimensional cavity given different height and width dimensions, given the same Reynolds number. Conversely, the SDF model gave dissimilar velocity profiles, differing from the Newtonian velocity profiles by up to 25% in velocity magnitudes. This difference can affect estimation in platelet distribution within blood vessels or magnetic nanoparticle delivery. Wall shear stress (WSS is an important quantity involved in vascular remodeling through integrin and adhesion molecule mechanotransduction. The SDF model gave a 7.3-fold greater WSS than the Newtonian model at the top of the 3-dimensional cavity. The SDF model gave a 37.7-fold greater WSS than the Newtonian model at artery walls located immediately after bifurcations in the idealized femoral artery tree. The pressure drop across arteries reveals arterial sections highly resistive to flow which correlates with stenosis formation. Numerical simulations give the pressure drop across the idealized femoral artery tree with the SDF model which is approximately 2.3-fold higher than with the Newtonian model. In atherosclerotic lesion models, the SDF model gives over 1 Pa higher WSS than the Newtonian model, a difference correlated with over twice as many adherent monocytes to endothelial cells from the Newtonian model compared to the SDF model.

  11. Hemodynamic analysis in an idealized artery tree: differences in wall shear stress between Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weddell, Jared C; Kwack, JaeHyuk; Imoukhuede, P I; Masud, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Development of many conditions and disorders, such as atherosclerosis and stroke, are dependent upon hemodynamic forces. To accurately predict and prevent these conditions and disorders hemodynamic forces must be properly mapped. Here we compare a shear-rate dependent fluid (SDF) constitutive model, based on the works by Yasuda et al in 1981, against a Newtonian model of blood. We verify our stabilized finite element numerical method with the benchmark lid-driven cavity flow problem. Numerical simulations show that the Newtonian model gives similar velocity profiles in the 2-dimensional cavity given different height and width dimensions, given the same Reynolds number. Conversely, the SDF model gave dissimilar velocity profiles, differing from the Newtonian velocity profiles by up to 25% in velocity magnitudes. This difference can affect estimation in platelet distribution within blood vessels or magnetic nanoparticle delivery. Wall shear stress (WSS) is an important quantity involved in vascular remodeling through integrin and adhesion molecule mechanotransduction. The SDF model gave a 7.3-fold greater WSS than the Newtonian model at the top of the 3-dimensional cavity. The SDF model gave a 37.7-fold greater WSS than the Newtonian model at artery walls located immediately after bifurcations in the idealized femoral artery tree. The pressure drop across arteries reveals arterial sections highly resistive to flow which correlates with stenosis formation. Numerical simulations give the pressure drop across the idealized femoral artery tree with the SDF model which is approximately 2.3-fold higher than with the Newtonian model. In atherosclerotic lesion models, the SDF model gives over 1 Pa higher WSS than the Newtonian model, a difference correlated with over twice as many adherent monocytes to endothelial cells from the Newtonian model compared to the SDF model.

  12. Impaired Arterial Elasticity Identified by Pulse Waveform Analysis as a Marker for Vascular Wall Damage in Humans With Aging and Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yan; Tao Jun; Tu Chang; Yang Zhen; Xu Mingguo; Wang Jiemei; Jin Yafei; Ma Hong

    2005-01-01

    Objectives Cardiovascular risk factors lead to pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and its clinical events by impairing vascular wall. Endothelial dysfunction is the earliest marker for vascular wall injuries. Development of new method to detect early vascular wall damage has an important clinical implication for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, the present study was performed to evaluate effect of aging and hypertension, two independent risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, on arterial elasticity by using pulse waveform analysis and investigate whether the changes in arterial elasticity can be used as a risk marker for vascular structural and functional abnormalities. Methods Using modified Windkessel model of the circulation and pulse waveform analysis,C 1 large artery and C2 small artery elasticity indices of 204 Chinese normal healthy subjects ( age 15-80years) and 46 Chinese essential hypertensive patients (age 35-70 years) were measured. Age- and hypertension-related arterial elasticity changes were examined. Results C1 large artery and C2 small artery elasticity indices were reduced with advancing age in healthy subjects. C1 large artery and C2 small artery elasticity indices were negatively correlated with age (r=-0.628, P<0.001; r=-0.595, P<0.001). C1 large artery and C2 small artery elasticity indices in patients with essential hypertension compared with the agematched healthy subjects were (9.31±3.85 ml/mm Hg x 10 versus 15.13±4.14 ml/mmHg x 10, P<0.001) and (3.57± 1.62 ml/mm Hg x 100 versus 7.89±2.91 ml/mmHg ×100 P <0.001), respectively, and were significantly lower than the corresponding healthy subjects. There were negative association between C1large artery and C2 small artery elasticity indices and systolic blood pressure (r=-0.37, P<0.05; r=-0.39,P<0.05) and pulse pressure (r=-0.39, P<0.05; r=0.43,P<0.05) in patients with essential hypertension.Conclusions Advancing age and essential

  13. Effect of atherosclerosis on thermo-mechanical properties of arterial wall and its repercussion on plaque instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinea, G V; Atienza, J M; Fantidis, P; Rojo, F J; Ortega, A; Torres, M; Gonzalez, P; Elices, M L; Hayashi, K; Elices, M

    2009-03-06

    Data from the literature report febrile reactions prior to myocardial infarction in patients with normal coronary arteries and that coronary syndromes seem to be triggered by bacterial and viral infections, being fever the common symptom. The thermo-mechanical behavior of thoracic aortas of New Zealand White rabbits with different degrees of atherosclerosis was measured by means of pressure-diameter tests at different temperatures. Specific measurements of the thermal dilatation coefficient of atheroma plaques were performed by means of tensile tests. Results show a different thermo-mechanical behavior, the dilatation coefficient of atheroma plaque being at least twice that of the arterial wall. Temperature-induced mechanical stress at the plaque-vessel interface could be enough to promote plaque rupture. Therefore, increases of corporal temperature, either local or systemic, can play a role in increasing the risk of acute coronary syndromes and deserve a more comprehensive study.

  14. Arterial bending angle and wall morphology correlate with slow coronary flow: Determination with multidetector CT coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantarci, Mecit, E-mail: akkanrad@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Medical Faculty, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Guendogdu, Fuat [Department of Cardiology, Medical Faculty, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Doganay, Selim [Department of Radiology, Medical Faculty, Erciyes University, Kayseri (Turkey); Duran, Cihan [Department of Radiology, Bilim University, Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Kalkan, M. Emin [Department of Cardiology, Medical Faculty, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Sagsoz, M. Erdem [Department of Radiology, Medical Faculty, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Kucuk, Osman [Department of Electronic Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Karakaya, Afak [Department of Radiology, Medical Faculty, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Kucuk, Ahmet [Department of Mathematics, Science Faculty, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Akguen, Metin [Department of Chest, Medical Faculty, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2011-01-15

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess angulations and vessel wall morphology that could lead to bending head loss in the RCA and LMCA arteries of patients with slow coronary flow (SCF) evaluated by MDCT coronary angiography. Methods: The study involved 51 patients (45 males, mean age: 59.6 years) who were diagnosed with SCF by coronary angiography. Diagnosis of SCF was based on thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) frame count. Fifty-one patients with absence of slow flow were selected as the control group. The angulations of the main coronary arteries with the aorta were measured from the axial images obtained through MDCT coronary angiography, and the findings were recorded. In addition, the coronary artery walls of these patients were evaluated. For statistical analysis, SPSS for Windows 10.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) was used. For comparisons of the angles, either independent samples t test or the Mann-Whitney U test was used where appropriate. Results: The results of the study indicated that 38 patients had SCF in the LAD. Comparisons of patients with SCF with the controls revealed that in the patients with SCF, the mean angle of the LMCA with the aorta (40.9 {+-} 20.5{sup o}) was statistically significantly smaller than the mean angle of the LMCA with the aorta in the control cases (71.8 {+-} 11{sup o}). In 12 patients, slow flow was detected in the RCA. Those with slow flow in the RCA had significantly smaller angles (mean: 33.2 {+-} 20.4{sup o}) than the other cases (mean: 78.9 {+-} 10.7{sup o}). Conclusion: A small angle of origin of the main coronary arteries from the aorta, measured on MDCT examinations is correlated with slow blood flow in those vessels, as calculated by the TIMI frame count in catheter coronary angiography.

  15. Examination of nanoparticles as a drug carrier on blood flow through catheterized composite stenosed artery with permeable walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijaz, S; Nadeem, S

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we have discussed the influence of copper nanoparticles on a blood flow through composite stenosed artery with permeable walls. The nature of blood is discussed mathematically by considering it as viscous nanofluid. The study is carried out for a blood vessel under mild stenosis approximations and expressions of the temperature, velocity, resistance impedance to flow, wall shear stress and the pressure gradient is obtained by using corresponding boundary conditions. Results for the effects of permeability on blood flow through composite stenosis have been discussed graphically. The considered analysis also summarizes that the drug copper nanoparticles are efficient to reduce hemodynamics of stenosis and could be helpful to predict important uses for biomedical applications. Results indicate that nanoparticles are helpful as drug carriers to minimize the effects of resistance impedance to blood flow or coagulation factors due to stenosis.

  16. Dynamic respiratory mechanics and exertional dyspnoea in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laveneziana, Pierantonio; Garcia, Gilles; Joureau, Barbara; Nicolas-Jilwan, Fadia; Brahimi, Toufik; Laviolette, Louis; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Humbert, Marc; Similowski, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may exhibit reduced expiratory flows at low lung volumes, which could promote exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation (DH). This study aimed to examine the impact of a potential exercise-related DH on the intensity of dyspnoea in patients with PAH undergoing symptom-limited incremental cardiopulmonary cycle exercise testing (CPET). 25 young (aged mean±sd 38±12 yrs) nonsmoking PAH patients with no evidence of spirometric obstruction and 10 age-matched nonsmoking healthy subjects performed CPET to the limit of tolerance. Ventilatory pattern, operating lung volumes (derived from inspiratory capacity (IC) measurements) and dyspnoea intensity (Borg scale) were assessed throughout CPET. IC decreased (i.e. DH) progressively throughout CPET in PAH patients (average 0.15 L), whereas it increased in all the healthy subjects (0.45 L). Among PAH patients, 15 (60%) exhibited a decrease in IC throughout exercise (average 0.50 L), whereas in the remaining 10 (40%) patients IC increased (average 0.36 L). Dyspnoea intensity and ventilation were greater in PAH patients than in controls at any stage of CPET, whereas inspiratory reserve volume was lower. We conclude that DH-induced mechanical constraints and excessive ventilatory demand occurred in these young nonsmoking PAH patients with no spirometric obstruction and was associated with exertional dyspnoea.

  17. Extremal states of energy of a double-layered thick-walled tube - application to residually stressed arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waffenschmidt, Tobias; Menzel, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Various biological tissues are designed to optimally support external loads for complex geometries and mechanobiological structures. This results in complex microstructures of such materials. The design of, for instance, (healthy) arteries, which are in the focus of this work, is characterised by a residually stressed fibre-reinforced multi-layered composite with highly non-linear elastic response. The complex interaction of material properties with the geometry and residual stress effects enables the optimal support under different blood pressures, respectively blood flow, within the vessel. The fibres reinforcing the arterial wall, as well as residual stresses present in the vessel, strongly influence its overall behaviour and performance. Turn-over and remodelling processes of the collagenous fibres occurring in the respective layers - either resulting from natural growth phenomena or from artificially induced changes in loading condition such as stent deployment - support the optimisation of the multi-layered composite structure of arteries for the particular loading conditions present in the artery. Within this contribution, the overall energetic properties of an artery are discussed by means of the inflation, bending and extension of a double-layered cylindrical tube. Different states of residual stresses and different fibre orientations are considered so that, for instance, representative fibre angles that result in extremal states of the total potential energy can be identified. In view of turn-over and remodelling processes, these orientations are considered to constitute preferred directions of fibre alignment. In summary, the main goal of this work is to calculate optimal material, structural and loading parameters by concepts of energy-minimisation. Several numerical studies show that the obtained values - such as the fibre orientations, the residual axial stretch and the opening angle - are in good agreement with respective physiological parameters

  18. Shaking table tests and dynamic analyses of masonry wall buildings with flame-shear walls at lower stories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Lihong; David Xiong; Wu Ruifeng; Xia Jingqian

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes shaking table tests of three eight-story building models: all are masonry structures in the upper stories, with or without frame-shear walls of one- or two- stories at the bottom. The test results of damage characteristics and seismic responses are provided and compared. Then, nonlinear response analyses are conducted to examine the reliability of the dynamic analysis. Finally, many nonlinear response analyses are performed and it is concluded that for relatively hard sites under a certain lateral stiffness ratio (I.e., the ratio of the stiffness of the lowest upper masonry story to that of the frame-shear wall story), the masonry structure with one-story frame-shear wall at the bottom performs better than a structure built entirely of masonry, and a masonry structure with frame-shear wall of two stories performs better than with one-story frame-shear wall. In relatively soft soil conditions, all three structures have similar performane. In addition, some suggestions that could be helpful for design ofmasomy structures with ground story of frame-shear wall structure in seismic intensity region VII, such as the appropriate lateral stiffness ratio, shear force increase factor of the frame-shear wall story, and permissible maximum height of the building, are proposed.

  19. Current-driven dynamics of chiral ferromagnetic domain walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emori, Satoru; Bauer, Uwe; Ahn, Sung-Min; Martinez, Eduardo; Beach, Geoffrey S D

    2013-07-01

    In most ferromagnets the magnetization rotates from one domain to the next with no preferred handedness. However, broken inversion symmetry can lift the chiral degeneracy, leading to topologically rich spin textures such as spin spirals and skyrmions through the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI). Here we show that in ultrathin metallic ferromagnets sandwiched between a heavy metal and an oxide, the DMI stabilizes chiral domain walls (DWs) whose spin texture enables extremely efficient current-driven motion. We show that spin torque from the spin Hall effect drives DWs in opposite directions in Pt/CoFe/MgO and Ta/CoFe/MgO, which can be explained only if the DWs assume a Néel configuration with left-handed chirality. We directly confirm the DW chirality and rigidity by examining current-driven DW dynamics with magnetic fields applied perpendicular and parallel to the spin spiral. This work resolves the origin of controversial experimental results and highlights a new path towards interfacial design of spintronic devices.

  20. Pseudoaneurysm of profunda femoris artery following dynamic hip screw fixation for intertrochanteric femoral fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shailendra Singh; Sumit Arora; Ankit Thora; Ram Mohan; Sumit Sural; Anil Dhal

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic hip screw fixation is a commonly performed procedure for internal fixation of intertrochanteric femoral fractures.Arterial injury following the operative fixation is a rare but serious event.We present a patient who developed pseudoaneurysm of profunda femoris artery after internal fixation of intertrochanteric fracture with a dynamic hip screw.The diagnosis was confirmed by angiographic study and it was successfully treated by coil embolization.

  1. Modeling thermally activated domain wall dynamics in thin magnetic strips with disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurson, L; Mughal, A; Serpico, C; Durin, G; Zapperi, S, E-mail: lasse.laurson@gmail.com [ISI Foundation, Torino (Italy)

    2011-04-01

    We study the effect of disorder and temperature on the field-driven dynamics of a transverse domain wall occurring in thin and narrow magnetic strips made of a soft magnetic material such as permalloy. Motivated by a micromagnetic description of such a domain wall, we construct a model based on two coupled flexible lines enclosing the domain wall transition region, capturing both the finite width and the characteristic V-shape of the wall. Disorder is included via randomly distributed pinning centers interacting with the two lines. We study the field-driven dynamics of the domain wall in disordered strips in a finite temperature, and compare our findings to experimental observations of stochastic domain wall dynamics.

  2. Poisson׳s ratio of arterial wall - Inconsistency of constitutive models with experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skacel, Pavel; Bursa, Jiri

    2016-02-01

    Poisson׳s ratio of fibrous soft tissues is analyzed in this paper on the basis of constitutive models and experimental data. Three different up-to-date constitutive models accounting for the dispersion of fibre orientations are analyzed. Their predictions of the anisotropic Poisson׳s ratios are investigated under finite strain conditions together with the effects of specific orientation distribution functions and of other parameters. The applied constitutive models predict the tendency to lower (or even negative) out-of-plane Poisson׳s ratio. New experimental data of porcine arterial layer under uniaxial tension in orthogonal directions are also presented and compared with the theoretical predictions and other literature data. The results point out the typical features of recent constitutive models with fibres concentrated in circumferential-axial plane of arterial layers and their potential inconsistence with some experimental data. The volumetric (in)compressibility of arterial tissues is also discussed as an eventual and significant factor influencing this inconsistency.

  3. Flow and wall shear stress in end-to-side and side-to-side anastomosis of venous coronary artery bypass grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulikakos Dimos

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery represents the standard treatment of advanced coronary artery disease. Two major types of anastomosis exist to connect the graft to the coronary artery, i.e., by using an end-to-side or a side-to-side anastomosis. There is still controversy because of the differences in the patency rates of the two types of anastomosis. The purpose of this paper is to non-invasively quantify hemodynamic parameters, such as mass flow and wall shear stress (WSS, in end-to-side and side-to-side anastomoses of patients with CABG using computational fluid dynamics (CFD. Methods One patient with saphenous CABG and end-to-side anastomosis and one patient with saphenous CABG and side-to-side anastomosis underwent 16-detector row computed tomography (CT. Geometric models of coronary arteries and bypasses were reconstructed for CFD analysis. Blood flow was considered pulsatile, laminar, incompressible and Newtonian. Peri-anastomotic mass flow and WSS were quantified and flow patterns visualized. Results CFD analysis based on in-vivo CT coronary angiography data was feasible in both patients. For both types of CABG, flow patterns were characterized by a retrograde flow into the native coronary artery. WSS variations were found in both anastomoses types, with highest WSS values at the heel and lowest WSS values at the floor of the end-to-side anastomosis. In contrast, the highest WSS values of the side-to-side anastomosis configuration were found in stenotic vessel segments and not in the close vicinity of the anastomosis. Flow stagnation zones were found in end-to-side but not in side-to-side anastomosis, the latter also demonstrating a smoother stream division throughout the cardiac cycle. Conclusion CFD analysis of venous CABG based on in-vivo CT datasets in patients was feasible producing qualitative and quantitative information on mass flow and WSS. Differences were found between the two types of anastomosis

  4. Dynamic analysis of a small artery of a human finger by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Mitsuo; Takahashi, Natsuki; Takada, Daisuke; Ohmi, Masato; Haruna, Masamitsu

    2011-03-01

    OCT is highly potential for development of a new field of dynamic skin physiology, as recently reported by the authors. In this paper, we demonstrate dynamic analysis of a small artery of a human finger by the SS-OCT. Among the vascular system, only the small artery has two physiological functions both for the elastic artery (like main and middle arteries) and for muscle-controlled one (like arterioles). It, therefore, is important for dynamic analysis of blood flow and circulation. In the time-sequential OCT images obtained with 25 frames/s, it is found that the small artery makes a sharp response to sound stress for contraction and expansion while it continues pulsation in synchronization with the heartbeats. This result indicates that the small artery exhibits clearly the two physiological functions for blood flow and circulation. In response to sound stress, blood flow is controlled effectively by thickness change of the tunica media which consists of five to six layers of smooth muscles. It is thus found that the thickness of the tunica media changes remarkably in response to external stress, reflecting activity of the sympathetic nerve. The dynamic OCT of the small artery presented here will allow us not only to understand the mechanism of blood flow control and also to detect abnormal physiological functions in the whole vascular system.

  5. Automatic detection of the carotid artery boundary on cross-sectional MR image sequences using a circle model guided dynamic programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brambs Hans

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systematic aerobe training has positive effects on the compliance of dedicated arterial walls. The adaptations of the arterial structure and function are associated with the blood flow-induced changes of the wall shear stress which induced vascular remodelling via nitric oxide delivered from the endothelial cell. In order to assess functional changes of the common carotid artery over time in these processes, a precise measurement technique is necessary. Before this study, a reliable, precise, and quick method to perform this work is not present. Methods We propose a fully automated algorithm to analyze the cross-sectional area of the carotid artery in MR image sequences. It contains two phases: (1 position detection of the carotid artery, (2 accurate boundary identification of the carotid artery. In the first phase, we use intensity, area size and shape as features to discriminate the carotid artery from other tissues and vessels. In the second phase, the directional gradient, Hough transform, and circle model guided dynamic programming are used to identify the boundary accurately. Results We test the system stability using contrast degraded images (contrast resolutions range from 50% to 90%. The unsigned error ranges from 2.86% ± 2.24% to 3.03% ± 2.40%. The test of noise degraded images (SNRs range from 16 to 20 dB shows the unsigned error ranging from 2.63% ± 2.06% to 3.12% ± 2.11%. The test of raw images has an unsigned error 2.56% ± 2.10% compared to the manual tracings. Conclusions We have proposed an automated system which is able to detect carotid artery cross sectional boundary in MRI sequences during heart cycles. The accuracy reaches 2.56% ± 2.10% compared to the manual tracings. The system is stable, reliable and results are reproducible.

  6. Breast arterial calcification and risk of carotid atherosclerosis: Focusing on the preferentially affected layer of the vessel wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedighi, Nahid, E-mail: nsedighi@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radmard, Amir Reza, E-mail: radmard@ams.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radmehr, Ali, E-mail: radmehr@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Pari, E-mail: phtums@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hajizadeh, Abdolmahmoud, E-mail: mroomezi@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taheri, Amir Pejman Hashemi, E-mail: hashemip@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Radiology, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. North Kargar Ave., Tehran 14114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Objective: To assess the relationship between breast arterial calcification (BAC) detected on screening mammography and atherosclerosis of carotid arteries considering the most likely involved layer of the arterial wall. Materials and methods: A total of 537 consecutive women who underwent screening mammography were enrolled in this study. Seventy-nine subjects having BAC, aged 46-75 years, and 125 age-matched controls from those without BAC were selected for ultrasound examination of carotid arteries assessing intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaque presence. Participants were divided into three groups of risk including, low-risk: IMT < 0.6 mm without plaque, medium-risk: 0.6 mm {<=} IMT {<=} 0.8 mm without plaque and high-risk: IMT > 0.8 mm and/or plaque. Risk factors for atherosclerosis were obtained from medical records for independent effects. Results: BAC was present in 14.7% of mammograms. According to multivariable logistic regression analyses, significant association was identified between the carotid atherosclerosis risk and presence of BAC. Compared to women with IMT < 0.6 mm, those with 0.6 mm {<=} IMT{<=} 0.8 mm and IMT > 0.8 mm had OR (95% CI) of 4.88 (1.47-16.16) and 23.36 (4.54-120.14), respectively. The OR (95% CI) for carotid plaque was 3.13 (1.3-7.57). There was no interaction between IMT category and plaque. Significant associations were also detected with postmenopausal duration (P = 0.02) and hypertension (P = 0.004). Conclusion: The risk of carotid atherosclerosis increases with the presence of BAC. Women with BAC are more likely to have thicker IMT than plaque, which could be attributed to the preferentially similar affected layer of media causing thick IMT rather than plaque.

  7. Measurement of arterial wall thickness as a surrogate marker for atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, E; Hovingh, GK; Wiegman, A; Duriez, P; Smit, AJ; Fruchart, JC; Kastelein, JJP

    2004-01-01

    Large observational studies and atherosclerosis regression trials of lipid-modifying pharmacotherapy have established that intima-media thickness of the carotid and femoral arteries, as measured noninvasively by B-mode ultrasound, is a valid surrogate marker for the progression of atherosclerotic di

  8. Ultrasound characterization of arterial wall structures based on integrated backscatter profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Peder C.; Chakareski, Jacob; Lara-Montalvo, Ruben

    2003-05-01

    Studies suggest that the composition of atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid arteries is predictive of stroke risk. The goal of this investigation has been to explore how well the true integrated backscatter (IBS) from plaque regions can be measured non-invasively using ultrasound, based on which plaque composition may be inferred. To obtain the true arterial IBS non-invasively, the scattering and aberrating effect of the intervening tissue layers must be overcome. This is achieved by using the IBS from arterial blood as a reference backscatter, specifically the backscatter from a blood volume along the same scan line as and adjacent to the region of interest. The arterial blood IBS is obtained as an estimated mean of a stochastic process, after clutter removal. We have shown that the variance of the IBS estimate of the blood backscatter signal can be quantified and reduced to a tolerable level. The results are in the form of IBS profiles along the vessel. IBS profiles not normalized with the IBS of the blood-mimicking fluid have been measured for vessels phantom, with and without an intervening inhomogeneous medium; these results are contrasted with the corresponding normalized IBS profiles.

  9. Endotoxemia reduces cerebral perfusion but enhances dynamic cerebrovascular autoregulation at reduced arterial carbon dioxide tension*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, Patrice; Kim, Yu-Sok; van Lieshout, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: The administration of endotoxin to healthy humans reduces cerebral blood flow but its influence on dynamic cerebral autoregulation remains unknown. We considered that a reduction in arterial carbon dioxide tension would attenuate cerebral perfusion and improve dynamic cerebral......-104] mm Hg; p = .75), but increased cardiac output (8.3 [6.1-9.5] L·min vs. 6.0 [4.5-8.2] L·min; p = .02) through an elevation in heart rate (82 ± 9 beats·min vs. 63 ± 10 beats·min; p arterial carbon dioxide tension (37 ± 5 mm Hg vs. 41 ± 2 mm Hg; p artery mean...... in arterial carbon dioxide tension explains the improved dynamic cerebral autoregulation and the reduced cerebral perfusion encountered in healthy subjects during endotoxemia....

  10. Particulate suspension Jeffrey fluid flow in a stenosed artery with a particle-free plasma layer near the wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponalagusamy, R.

    2016-08-01

    The present article concerns the problem of blood flow through an artery with an axially asymmetric stenosis (constriction). The two-layered macroscopic model consisting of a cell-rich core of suspension of all the erythrocytes described as a particle-fluid suspension (Jeffrey fluid) and a peripheral zone of cell-free plasma (Newtonian fluid). The analytical expressions for flow characteristics such as fluid phase and particle phase velocities, flow rate, wall shear stress, and resistive force are obtained. It is of interest to mention that the magnitudes of wall shear stress and flow resistance increase with red cell concentration but the flow resistance decreases with increasing shape parameter. One of the important observations is that when blood behaves like a Jeffrey fluid, the flowing blood experiences lesser wall shear stress and flow resistance than in the case of blood being characterized as a Newtonian fluid in both the particle-fluid suspension and particle- free flow studies. The rheology of blood as Jeffrey fluid and the introduction of plasma layer thickness cause significant reduction in the magnitudes of the flow characteristics.

  11. CORRELATIONS OF DIFFERENT STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ARTERIAL WALL WITH TRADITIONAL CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN HEALTHY PEOPLE OF DIFFERENT AGE. PART 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Strazhesko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Arterial wall status is determined by several characteristics, the main of them are as follows: pulse wave velocity (PWV, carotid arteries intima-media thickness (IMT, the presence of atherosclerotic plaques, endothelium-dependent vasodilation (EDVD. When these parameters change, the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD grows. The nature of relationship between these indices in people without CVD clinical signs is understudied, especially in those of older age.Aim. To estimate correlations between different parameters of arterial wall in patients of different age without CVD.Material and methods. A total of 303 people aged 25-91 years without any manifestations of CVD or other chronic diseases and without regular medical treatment were examined. PWV estimation, carotid ultrasound with IMT measurement and atherosclerotic plaques amount calculation and EDVD estimation using reactive hyperemia test were performed. Results. Patients without CVD clinical signs rather often reveal arterial wall lesions already in the younger age group (mean age 40.9±8.7: reduced EDVD – in 26% of the cases, the presence of atherosclerotic plaques – in 22%, increased PWV – in 15%, increased IMT – in 8%. The prevalence of arterial wall alterations in the older age group (mean age 61.19±8.5 increase many-fold. All arterial wall parameters correlate with age. The stronger correlation was revealed between IMT and the amount of atherosclerotic plaques: r=0.46 (р<0.001 in the younger group and r=0.47 (р<0.001 in the older one. We didn’t find any relationship between PWV and EDVD in the younger group and between PWV and the amount of atherosclerotic plaques in the older one. Thickened carotid intima-media increases the risk of arterial stiffness by 2.3 times.Conclusion. Estimation of the state of arterial wall in people of young age without CVD allows detecting individuals who require active CVD prevention. Increased stiffness of arterial wall and the development

  12. Comparison of arterial pressure and plethysmographic waveform-based dynamic preload variables in assessing fluid responsiveness and dynamic arterial tone in patients undergoing major hepatic resection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J. J.; Kalmar, A. F.; Struys, M. M. R. F.; Wietasch, J. K. G.; Hendriks, H. G. D.; Scheeren, T. W. L.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic preload variables to predict fluid responsiveness are based either on the arterial pressure waveform (APW) or on the plethysmographic waveform (PW). We compared the ability of APW-based variations in stroke volume (SVV) and pulse pressure (PPV) and of PW-based plethysmographic variability in

  13. Electric field induced domain-wall dynamics: Depinning and chirality switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyaya, Pramey; Dusad, Ritika; Hoffman, Silas; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Alzate, Juan G.; Amiri, Pedram Khalili; Wang, Kang L.

    2013-12-01

    We theoretically study the equilibrium and dynamic properties of nanoscale magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) and magnetic wires, in which an electric field controls the magnetic anisotropy through spin-orbit coupling. By performing micromagnetic simulations, we construct a rich phase diagram and find that, in particular, the equilibrium magnetic textures can be tuned between Néel and Bloch domain walls in an elliptical MTJ. Furthermore, we develop a phenomenological model of a quasi-one-dimensional domain wall confined by a parabolic potential and show that, near the Néel-to-Bloch-wall transition, a pulsed electric field induces precessional domain-wall motion which can be used to reverse the chirality of a Néel wall and even depin it. This domain-wall motion controlled by electric fields, in lieu of applied current, may provide a model for ultralow-power domain-wall memory and logic devices.

  14. Quantifying [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the arterial wall: the effects of dual time-point imaging and partial volume effect correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, Bjoern A. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark); Bashyam, Arjun; Ramachandran, Abhinay; Gholami, Saeid; Houshmand, Sina; Salavati, Ali; Werner, Tom; Alavi, Abass [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    The human arterial wall is smaller than the spatial resolution of current positron emission tomographs. Therefore, partial volume effects should be considered when quantifying arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. We evaluated the impact of a novel method for partial volume effect (PVE) correction with contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) assistance on quantification of arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake at different imaging time-points. Ten subjects were assessed by CECT imaging and dual time-point PET/CT imaging at approximately 60 and 180 min after {sup 18}F-FDG administration. For both time-points, uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG was determined in the aortic wall by calculating the blood pool-corrected maximum standardized uptake value (cSUV{sub MAX}) and cSUV{sub MEAN}. The PVE-corrected SUV{sub MEAN} (pvcSUV{sub MEAN}) was also calculated using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CECT images. Finally, corresponding target-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated. At 60 min, pvcSUV{sub MEAN} was on average 3.1 times greater than cSUV{sub MAX} (P <.0001) and 8.5 times greater than cSUV{sub MEAN} (P <.0001). At 180 min, pvcSUV{sub MEAN} was on average 2.6 times greater than cSUV{sub MAX} (P <.0001) and 6.6 times greater than cSUV{sub MEAN} (P <.0001). This study demonstrated that CECT-assisted PVE correction significantly influences quantification of arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. Therefore, partial volume effects should be considered when quantifying arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake with PET. (orig.)

  15. Arterialization and anomalous vein wall remodeling in varicose veins is associated with upregulated FoxC2-Dll4 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendran, Sumi; S Ramegowda, Kalpana; Suresh, Aarcha; Binil Raj, S S; Lakkappa, Ravi Kumar B; Kamalapurkar, Giridhar; Radhakrishnan, N; C Kartha, Chandrasekharan

    2016-04-01

    Varicose veins of lower extremities are a heritable common disorder. Mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis are still vague. Structural failures such as valve weakness and wall dilatation in saphenous vein result in venous retrograde flow in lower extremities of body. Reflux of blood leads to distal high venous pressure resulting in distended veins. In an earlier study, we observed a positive association between c.-512C>T FoxC2 gene polymorphism and upregulated FoxC2 expression in varicose vein specimens. FoxC2 overexpression in vitro in venous endothelial cells resulted in the elevated mRNA expression of arterial endothelial markers such as Delta-like ligand 4 (Dll4) and Hairy/enhancer-of-split related with YRPW motif protein 2 (Hey2). We hypothesized that an altered FoxC2-Dll4 signaling underlies saphenous vein wall remodeling in patients with varicose veins. Saphenous veins specimens were collected from 22 patients with varicose veins and 20 control subjects who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. Tissues were processed for paraffin embedding and sections were immunostained for Dll4, Hey2, EphrinB2, α-SMA, Vimentin, and CD31 antigens and examined under microscope. These observations were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis. An examination of varicose vein tissue specimens by immunohistochemistry indicated an elevated expression of Notch pathway components, such as Dll4, Hey2, and EphrinB2, and smooth muscle markers, which was further confirmed by gene and protein expression analyses. We conclude that the molecular alterations in Dll4-Hey2 signaling are associated with smooth muscle cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia in varicose veins. Our observations substantiate a significant role for altered FoxC2-Dll4 signaling in structural alterations of saphenous veins in patients with varicose veins.

  16. Children and Adolescent Obesity Associates with Pressure-Dependent and Age-Related Increase in Carotid and Femoral Arteries’ Stiffness and Not in Brachial Artery, Indicative of Nonintrinsic Arterial Wall Alteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria García-Espinosa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To analyze if childhood obesity associates with changes in elastic, transitional, and/or muscular arteries’ stiffness. Methods. 221 subjects (4–15 years, 92 females were assigned to normal weight (NW, n=137 or obesity (OB, n=84 groups, considering their body mass index z-score. Age groups were defined: 4–8; 8–12; 12–15 years old. Carotid, femoral, and brachial artery local stiffness was determined through systodiastolic pressure-diameter and stress-strain relationships. To this end, arterial diameter and peripheral and aortic blood pressure (BP levels and waveforms were recorded. Carotid-femoral, femoropedal, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities were determined to evaluate aortic, lower-limb, and upper-limb regional arterial stiffness, respectively. Correlation analysis between stiffness parameters and BP was done. Results. Compared to NW, OB subjects showed higher peripheral and central BP and carotid and femoral stiffness, reaching statistical significance in subjects aged 12 and older. Arterial stiffness differences disappeared when levels were normalized for BP. There were no differences in intrinsic arterial wall stiffness (elastic modulus, BP stiffness relationships, and regional stiffness parameters. Conclusion. OB associates with BP-dependent and age-related increase in carotid and femoral (but not brachial stiffness. Stiffness changes would not be explained by intrinsic arterial wall alterations but could be associated with the higher BP levels observed in obese children.

  17. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Carotid Vessel Wall Inflammation in Coronary Artery Disease Patients FDG-PET and CT Imaging Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Bucerius; R. Duivenvoorden; V. Mani; C. Moncrieff; J.H.F. Rudd; C. Calcagno; J. Machac; V. Fuster; M.E. Farkouh; Z.A. Fayad

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We investigated the prevalence and clinical risk factors of carotid vessel wall inflammation by means of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in a population consisting of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. BACKGROUND The atherosclerotic disease process is

  18. Highly sensitive monitoring of chest wall dynamics and acoustics provides diverse valuable information for evaluating ventilation and diagnosing pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesin, Jimy; Faingersh, Anna; Waisman, Dan; Landesberg, Amir

    2014-06-15

    Current practice of monitoring lung ventilation in neonatal intensive care units, utilizing endotracheal tube pressure and flow, end-tidal CO2, arterial O2 saturation from pulse oximetry, and hemodynamic indexes, fails to account for asymmetric pathologies and to allow for early detection of deteriorating ventilation. This study investigated the utility of bilateral measurements of chest wall dynamics and sounds, in providing early detection of changes in the mechanics and distribution of lung ventilation. Nine healthy New Zealand rabbits were ventilated at a constant pressure, while miniature accelerometers were attached to each side of the chest. Slowly progressing pneumothorax was induced by injecting 1 ml/min air into the pleural space on either side of the chest. The end of the experiment (tPTX) was defined when arterial O2 saturation from pulse oximetry dropped ventilation was attained for all animals. Side identification of the pneumothorax was achieved at 50% tPTX, within a 95% confidence interval. Diagnosis was, on average, 34.1 ± 18.8 min before tPTX. In conclusion, bilateral monitoring of the chest dynamics and acoustics provide novel information that is sensitive to asymmetric changes in ventilation, enabling early detection and localization of pneumothorax.

  19. Changes in the structural and biochemical composition of the arterial wall in type 2 diabetes patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørdam Preil, Simone

    nedbrydningen. Flere studier har vist, at rygning påvirker den arterielle stivhed, mens andre studier peger mod, at cystein proteasen calpian-1 øger mængden af matrix metalloproteinasen 2 (MMP-2), som nedbryder bl.a. elastin. Vores hypotese i studie III gik både ud på, at calpain-1 kunne være forøget hos...... patienter med type 2 diabetes, hvorved den vil føre til forøget kollagen indhold, forøget MMP-2 og reduceret elastin i arterierne, og at rygning kunne have en indvirkning på mængden af disse molekyler. Niveauet af MMP-2, calpain-1 og actin α smooth muscle blev målt ved hjælp af western blotting i mammaria...... ikke påvirkede mængden af calpain-1, MMP-2, desmosine og hydroxyproline i den human arterie væg, mens mængden af desmosine var nedsat i arterier fra ryger og tidligere rygere sammenlignet med ikke rygere. Et andet protein der ligeledes er involveret i den strukturelle sammensætning af arterievæggen er...

  20. Assessment of influence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and inflammation on arterial wall structural characteristics in psoriatic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T V Korotaeva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of influence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and inflammation on arterial wall structural characteristics in psoriatic arthritis. Objective. To assess possibility of traditional cardiovascular risk (CVR factors application as markers of subclinical atherosclerosis in pts with psoriatic arthritis (PA. Material and methods. 130 pts with PA (51 male and 79 female without clinical signs of coronary heart disease (CHD and stroke. were included. Mean age was 43 years (39-48 years, mean PA duration – 7 years (2 months-42 years, mean psoriasis duration – 15 years (5,5 – 26 years. PA activity was assessed with DAS4. Age, total cholesterol (TC, high density lipoprotein (HDLP, low density lipoprotein (LDLP, C-reactive protein (CRP, fibrinogen, systolic blood pressure, body mass index (BMI, atherogenity coefficient (AC, relative risk of CHD development, presence of diabetes and smoking were evaluated. Mean and maximal intima-media complex thickness (IMCT of common carotid arteries was examined with duplex scanning. Results. TC, LDLP and AC elevation was revealed in all and BMI elevation – in one third of pts. In 55% of pts CVR was mean and higher, in 23,5% CVR was absent and in 21,5% CVR was below mean. CVR significantly correlated with mean and maximal carotid arteries IMCT (R=0,48, p<0,00001 and R=0,41, p<0,00001 and fibrinogen (R=0,22, p<0,011. In women CVR correlated with fibrinogen (R=0,27, p<0,16, BMI (R=0,35, p<0,16, mean and maximal carotid arteries IMCT (R=0,50, p<0,00001 and R=0,38, p<0,0005 respectively and psoriasis duration (R=0,30, p<0,006. In men CVR did not correlated with fibrinogen. CVR did not correlated with DAS4 and CRP. Conclusion. CVR in PA is not connected with traditional markers of inflammation andindex of clinical disease activity.

  1. Quantum Dynamics of Spin Wave Propagation through Domain Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, S.; Raedt, H. De; Miyashita, S.

    2006-01-01

    Through numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we demonstrate that magnetic chains with uniaxial anisotropy support stable structures, separating ferromagnetic domains of opposite magnetization. These structures, domain walls in a quantum system, are shown to remain stable if

  2. Beyond the quasi-particle: stochastic domain wall dynamics in soft ferromagnetic nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, T. J.; Omari, K. A.

    2017-03-01

    We study the physical origins of stochastic domain wall pinning in soft ferromagnetic nanowires using focused magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements and dynamic micromagnetic simulations. Our results illustrate the ubiquitous nature of these effects in Ni80Fe20 nanowires, and show that they are not only a result of the magnetisation history of the system (i.e. the magnetisation structure of the injected domain walls), and the onset of non-linear propagation dynamics above the Walker breakdown field, but also a complex interplay between the two. We show that this means that, while micromagnetics can be used to make qualitative predictions of the behaviour of domain walls at defect sites, making quantitative predictions is much more challenging. Together, our results reinforce the view that even in these simple pseudo-one dimensional nanomagnets, domain walls must be considered as complex, dynamically evolving objects rather than simple quasi-particles.

  3. Potential for tissue characterization of plaque and arterial wall using intravascular ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Krishnakutty; Fitzgerald, Peter J.; Yock, Paul G.

    1993-09-01

    Current intravascular ultrasound imaging technology is able to determine the extent and distribution of pathologic processes within the vessel wall, but is not highly sensitive in discriminating between different types of pathologic tissue. `Tissue characterization' refers to a set of computer-based techniques that utilize features of the ultrasound signal beyond basic amplitude to help define the structure of the tissue of interest. Although preliminary results with this approach are encouraging, additional work is needed to define its clinical application in vascular disease.

  4. Flow induced by ependymal cilia dominates near-wall cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the lateral ventricles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siyahhan, Bercan; Knobloch, Verena; de Zélicourt, Diane; Asgari, Mahdi; Schmid Daners, Marianne; Poulikakos, Dimos; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2014-05-06

    While there is growing experimental evidence that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow induced by the beating of ependymal cilia is an important factor for neuronal guidance, the respective contribution of vascular pulsation-driven macroscale oscillatory CSF flow remains unclear. This work uses computational fluid dynamics to elucidate the interplay between macroscale and cilia-induced CSF flows and their relative impact on near-wall dynamics. Physiological macroscale CSF dynamics are simulated in the ventricular space using subject-specific anatomy, wall motion and choroid plexus pulsations derived from magnetic resonance imaging. Near-wall flow is quantified in two subdomains selected from the right lateral ventricle, for which dynamic boundary conditions are extracted from the macroscale simulations. When cilia are neglected, CSF pulsation leads to periodic flow reversals along the ventricular surface, resulting in close to zero time-averaged force on the ventricle wall. The cilia promote more aligned wall shear stresses that are on average two orders of magnitude larger compared with those produced by macroscopic pulsatile flow. These findings indicate that CSF flow-mediated neuronal guidance is likely to be dominated by the action of the ependymal cilia in the lateral ventricles, whereas CSF dynamics in the centre regions of the ventricles is driven predominantly by wall motion and choroid plexus pulsation.

  5. The Fatty Acid Composition of Blood Plasma and Arterial Wall in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Osipenko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the fatty acid balance in the blood plasma, in the fragments of the intact vessels and the vessels showing signs of atherosclerosis.Material and Methods: The article presents the results of the examination of the blood plasma samples of patients with coronary heart disease and coronary atherosclerosis. The control group consisted of 16 healthy individuals. Also, the fragments of the abdominal aorta and the common carotid artery with varying degrees of atherosclerotic lesions were studied. Fatty acid analysis was conducted using capillary gas-liquid chromatography. Results: A reduction in the relative linoleic acid level with an increase in almost all the saturated fatty acids and polyunsaturated dihomo-γ-linolenic acid in the plasma was noted in patients with coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis. The relationships between certain fatty acids in patients with atherosclerosis and myocardial ischemia showed changes. In patients with atherosclerosis, a marked imbalance was observed between the monounsaturated and correspondingly the saturated fatty acids (with the same number of carbon atoms in the abdominal aorta with significant atherosclerotic lesions, as well as in the intact common carotid arteries. These disorders are probably related to the relatively low content of the linoleic acid in the blood plasma. The reasons for the increased activity of the fatty acid synthase in vessels with significant atherosclerotic lesions are described. It is concluded that most of the fatty acids of the plaque were formed due to the synthetic processes in the smooth muscle cells, and not as a result of their intake from the blood plasma.

  6. Low-dimensional representation of near-wall dynamics in shear flows, with implications to wall-models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, P. J.; Sayadi, T.

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of coherent structures near the wall of a turbulent boundary layer is investigated with the aim of a low-dimensional representation of its essential features. Based on a triple decomposition into mean, coherent and incoherent motion and a dynamic mode decomposition to recover statistical information about the incoherent part of the flow field, a driven linear system coupling first- and second-order moments of the coherent structures is derived and analysed. The transfer function for this system, evaluated for a wall-parallel plane, confirms a strong bias towards streamwise elongated structures, and is proposed as an `impedance' boundary condition which replaces the bulk of the transport between the coherent velocity field and the coherent Reynolds stresses, thus acting as a wall model for large-eddy simulations (LES). It is interesting to note that the boundary condition is non-local in space and time. The extracted model is capable of reproducing the principal Reynolds stress components for the pretransitional, transitional and fully turbulent boundary layer.

  7. Velocity profile and wall shear stress of saccular aneurysms at the anterior communicating artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Ryuhei; Ujiie, Hiroshi; Haida, Sayaka; Nakazawa, Nobuhiko; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2008-01-01

    It has recently been shown that the aspect ratio (dome/neck) of an aneurysm correlates well with intraaneurysmal blood flow. Aneurysms with an aspect ratio larger than 1.6 carry a higher risk of rupture. We examined the effect of aspect ratio (AR) on intra-aneurysmal flow using experimental models. Flow visualization with particle imaging velocimetry and measurement of wall shear stress using laser Doppler anemometry were performed on three different aneurysm models: AR 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0. Intraaneurysmal flow consists of inflow, circulation, and outflow. Rapid inflow impinged on the distal neck creating a stagnant point. Rapid flow and maximum wall shear stress were observed in the vicinity of the stagnant point. By changing the Reynold's number, the stagnant point moved. By increasing the AR of the aneurysm, vortices inside the aneurysm sac closed and very slow flow was observed, resulting in very low shear stress markedly at a Reynold's number of 250, compatible with the diastolic phase. In the aneurysm model AR 2.0, both rapid flow at the neck and vortices inside the aneurysm are sufficient to activate platelets, making a thrombus that may anchor on the dome where very slow flow takes place. Hemodynamics in aneurysms larger than AR 2.0 definitely contribute to thrombus formation.

  8. Assessment of pulsatile wall shear stress in compliant arteries: numerical model, validation and experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvucci, Fernando P; Perazzo, Carlos A; Barra, Juan G; Armentano, Ricardo L

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that wall shear stress (WSS) is associated with vascular disease. In particular, it is widely accepted that vascular segments with low or oscillatory values of WSS are more probable to develop vascular disease. It is then necessary to establish a realistic model of the blood flow in blood vessels in order to determine precisely WSS. We proposed a numerical 1D model which takes into account the pulsatile nature of blood flow, the elasticity of the vessel, and its geometry. The model allows the calculation of shear stress. It was validated for stationary situations. Then, we computed the time-dependent WSS distribution from experimental data in the sheep thoracic aorta. Results showed that mean WSS calculated through steady flow and rigid walls models is overestimated. Peak WSS values for pulsatile flow must be considered since they resulted to be at least one order higher than mean values. Oscillations in shear stress in a period showed to be approximately of 40%. These findings show that the proposed model is suitable for estimating time-dependent WSS distributions, and confirm the need of using this kind of model when trying to evaluate realistic WSS in blood vessels.

  9. A multiscale SPH particle model of the near-wall dynamics of leukocytes in flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Babak; Comerford, Andrew; Ellero, Marco

    2014-01-01

    A novel multiscale Lagrangian particle solver based on SPH is developed with the intended application of leukocyte transport in large arteries. In such arteries, the transport of leukocytes and red blood cells can be divided into two distinct regions: the bulk flow and the near-wall region. In the bulk flow, the transport can be modeled on a continuum basis as the transport of passive scalar concentrations. Whereas in the near-wall region, specific particle tracking of the leukocytes is required and lubrication forces need to be separately taken into account. Because of large separation of spatio-temporal scales involved in the problem, simulations of red blood cells and leukocytes are handled separately. In order to take the exchange of leukocytes between the bulk fluid and the near-wall region into account, solutions are communicated through coupling of conserved quantities at the interface between these regions. Because the particle tracking is limited to those leukocytes lying in the near-wall region only, our approach brings considerable speedup to the simulation of leukocyte circulation in a test geometry of a backward-facing step, which encompasses many flow features observed in vivo.

  10. Compliant model of a coupled sequential coronary arterial bypass graft: effects of vessel wall elasticity and non-Newtonian rheology on blood flow regime and hemodynamic parameters distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabinejadian, Foad; Ghista, Dhanjoo N

    2012-09-01

    We have recently developed a novel design for coronary arterial bypass surgical grafting, consisting of coupled sequential side-to-side and end-to-side anastomoses. This design has been shown to have beneficial blood flow patterns and wall shear stress distributions which may improve the patency of the CABG, as compared to the conventional end-to-side anastomosis. In our preliminary computational simulation of blood flow of this coupled sequential anastomoses design, the graft and the artery were adopted to be rigid vessels and the blood was assumed to be a Newtonian fluid. Therefore, the present study has been carried out in order to (i) investigate the effects of wall compliance and non-Newtonian rheology on the local flow field and hemodynamic parameters distribution, and (ii) verify the advantages of the CABG coupled sequential anastomoses design over the conventional end-to-side configuration in a more realistic bio-mechanical condition. For this purpose, a two-way fluid-structure interaction analysis has been carried out. A finite volume method is applied to solve the three-dimensional, time-dependent, laminar flow of the incompressible, non-Newtonian fluid; the vessel wall is modeled as a linearly elastic, geometrically non-linear shell structure. In an iteratively coupled approach the transient shell equations and the governing fluid equations are solved numerically. The simulation results indicate a diameter variation ratio of up to 4% and 5% in the graft and the coronary artery, respectively. The velocity patterns and qualitative distribution of wall shear stress parameters in the distensible model do not change significantly compared to the rigid-wall model, despite quite large side-wall deformations in the anastomotic regions. However, less flow separation and reversed flow is observed in the distensible models. The wall compliance reduces the time-averaged wall shear stress up to 32% (on the heel of the conventional end-to-side model) and somewhat

  11. Comparison of cardiovascular magnetic resonance of late gadolinium enhancement and diastolic wall thickness to predict recovery of left ventricular function after coronary artery bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udompunturak Suthipol

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective was to compare the value of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE and end-diastolic wall thickness (EDWT assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR in predicting recovery of left ventricular function after coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG. Methods We enrolled patients with coronary artery disease and left ventricular ejection fraction Results We studied 46 men and 4 women with an average age of 61 years. Baseline left ventricular ejection fraction was 37 ± 13%. A total of 2,020 myocardial segments were analyzed. Abnormal wall motion and the LGE area were detected in 1,446 segments (71.6% and 1,196 segments (59.2% respectively. Wall motion improvement was demonstrated in 481 of 1,227 segments (39.2% that initially had wall motion abnormalities at baseline. Logistic regression analysis showed that the LGE area, EDWT and resting wall motion grade predicted wall motion improvement. Comparison of Receiver-Operator-Characteristic (ROC curves demonstrated that the LGE area was the most important predictor (p Conclusion LGE and EDWT are independent predictors for functional recovery after revascularization. However, LGE appears to be a more important factor and independent of EDWT.

  12. A model of smooth muscle cell synchronization in the arterial wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; Aalkjær, Christian; Nilsson, Holger

    2007-01-01

    in membrane potential and flow of current through gap junctions. The amplitude of these oscillations in potential grows with increasing [cGMP], and, past a certain threshold, they become strong enough to entrain all cells in the vascular wall, thereby initiating sustained vasomotion. In this state...... number of cells. Gap-junctional current between cells is due to the appearance of oscillations in the membrane potential that again depends on the entrainment of sarcoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane within the individual cell....... there is a rhythmic flow of calcium through voltage-sensitive calcium channels into the cytoplasm, making the frequency of established vasomotion sensitive to membrane potential. It is concluded that electrical coupling through gap junctions is likely to be responsible for the rapid synchronization across a large...

  13. Numerical analysis of contact line dynamics passing over a single wettable defect on a wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yasufumi; Higashida, Shohei; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Wakimoto, Tatsuro; Ito, Takahiro; Katoh, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the dynamics of a contact line passing a single defect, which was represented by a locally wettable part (whose static contact angle is less than the other part, namely, chemically heterogeneous and physically flat part), was analyzed using numerical simulations employing the front-tracking method and the generalized Navier boundary condition. We observed that the contact line was distorted with a logarithmic shape far from the defect; however, the distortion was dependent on the wall velocity. The apparent (averaged) dynamic contact angle of the wall with a defect was evaluated using a macroscopic energy balance. The apparent dynamic contact angles estimated from the energy balance agree well with the arithmetic averaged angles obtained from the present simulations. The macroscopic energy balance is useful to consider the effect of heterogeneity or roughness of the wall on the relation between the dynamic contact angle and contact line speed.

  14. Electric-field-driven dynamics of magnetic domain walls in magnetic nanowires patterned on ferroelectric domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Wiele, Ben; Leliaert, Jonathan; Franke, Kévin J. A.; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2016-03-01

    Strong coupling of magnetic domain walls onto straight ferroelastic boundaries of a ferroelectric layer enables full and reversible electric-field control of magnetic domain wall motion. In this paper, the dynamics of this new driving mechanism is analyzed using micromagnetic simulations. We show that transverse domain walls with a near-180° spin structure are stabilized in magnetic nanowires and that electric fields can move these walls with high velocities. Above a critical velocity, which depends on material parameters, nanowire geometry and the direction of domain wall motion, the magnetic domain walls depin abruptly from the ferroelastic boundaries. Depinning evolves either smoothly or via the emission and annihilation of a vortex or antivortex core (Walker breakdown). In both cases, the magnetic domain wall slows down after depinning in an oscillatory fashion and eventually comes to a halt. The simulations provide design rules for hybrid ferromagnetic-ferroelectric domain-wall-based devices and indicate that material disorder and structural imperfections only influence Walker-breakdown-like depinning at high domain wall velocities.

  15. Construction and histological analysis of a 3D human arterial wall model containing vasa vasorum using a layer-by-layer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Fumiaki; Narita, Hirokazu; Hiura, Ayami; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Akashi, Mitsuru

    2017-03-01

    There is considerable global demand for three-dimensional (3D) functional tissues which mimic our native organs and tissues for use as in vitro drug screening systems and in regenerative medicine. In particular, there has been an increasing number of patients who suffer from arterial diseases such as arteriosclerosis. As such, in vitro 3D arterial wall models that can evaluate the effects of novel medicines and a novel artificial graft for the treatment are required. In our previous study, we reported the rapid construction of 3D tissues by employing a layer-by-layer (LbL) technique and revealed their potential applications in the pharmaceutical fields and tissue engineering. In this study, we successfully constructed a 3D arterial wall model containing vasa vasorum by employing a LbL technique for the first time. The cells were coated with extracellular matrix nanofilms and seeded into a culture insert using a cell accumulation method. This model had a three-layered hierarchical structure: a fibroblast layer, a smooth muscle layer, and an endothelial layer, which resembled the native arterial wall. Our method could introduce vasa vasorum into a fibroblast layer in vitro and the 3D arterial wall model showed barrier function which was evaluated by immunostaining and transendothelial electrical resistance measurement. Furthermore, electron microscopy observations revealed that the vasa vasorum was composed of single-layered endothelial cells, and the endothelial tubes were surrounded by the basal lamina, which are known to promote maturation and stabilization in native blood capillaries. These models should be useful for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and pharmaceutical applications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 814-823, 2017.

  16. Coupled Dzyaloshinskii walls and their current-induced dynamics by the spin Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, Eduardo, E-mail: edumartinez@usal.es [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de los Caídos s/n, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Alejos, Óscar [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electrónica, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo de Belén, 7, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2014-07-14

    The nucleation of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic/heavy-metal bilayers is studied by means of micromagnetic simulations. In the presence of interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, the nucleated walls naturally adopt a homochiral configuration with internal magnetization pointing antiparallely. The interaction between these walls was analyzed and described in terms of a classical dipolar force between the magnetic moments of the walls, which couples their dynamics. Additionally, the current-induced motion of two homochiral walls in the presence of longitudinal fields was also studied by means of a simple one-dimensional model and micromagnetic modeling, considering both one free-defect strip and another one with random edge roughness. It is evidenced that in the presence of pinning due to edge roughness, the in-plane longitudinal field introduces an asymmetry in the current-induced depinning, in agreement with recent experimental results.

  17. Influence of Dzialoshinskii–Moriya interaction on static and dynamic properties of a transverse domain wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravchuk, Volodymyr P., E-mail: vkravchuk@bitp.kiev.ua

    2014-10-01

    It is shown that the Dzialoshinskii–Moriya interaction leads to asymmetrical deformation of the transverse domain wall profile in one-dimensional biaxial magnet. Amplitude of the deformation is linear with respect to the Dzialoshinskii constant D. Corrections caused by the Dzialoshinskii–Moriya interaction are obtained for the number of the domain wall parameters: energy density, Döring mass, and Walker field. The modified q–Φ model with an additional pair of conjugated collective variables is proposed for studying the dynamical properties of the wall with taking into account the internal degrees of freedom. - Highlights: • Dzialoshinskii–Moriya interaction deforms the domain wall profile asymmetrically. • Extended model with 2 pairs of collective variables is proposed for a domain wall. • The Walker field is slightly changed due to the Dzialoshinskii–Moriya interaction.

  18. The Effect of Hypertension on the Transport of LDL Across the Deformable Arterial Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabagh, Mahsa; Jalali, Payman

    2010-05-01

    The influences of increased endothelial cell turnover and deformation of the intima on the transport of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) under hypertension are investigated by applying a multilayered model of aortic wall. The thickness and properties of the endothelium, intima, internal elastic lamina (IEL), and media are affected by the transmural pressure. Navier-Stokes and Brinkman equations are applied for the transport of the transmural flow and the convective-diffusion equation is solved for LDL transport. LDL macromolecules enter the intima through leaky junctions, and then pass through the media layer where they permeate over the surface of smooth muscle cells (SMC). Uptake of LDL by cells is modeled through a uniform reaction evenly distributed in the macroscopically homogeneous media layer. The results show that transmural pressure significantly affects the LDL fluxes across the leaky junction, the intima, fenestral pores in the IEL, and the media layer. Many realistic predictions including the proper magnitudes for the permeability of endothelium and intimal layers, and the hydraulic conductivity of all layers as well as their trends with pressure are predicted by the present model.

  19. Intermittent foot claudication caused by a dynamic compression of the posterior tibial artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczynski, Jakub; Topliss, Claire; Fligelstone, Louis

    2016-07-14

    A young adult presented with an atypical intermittent foot claudication caused by a dynamic compression of the posterior tibial artery by a ganglion. This case highlights the diagnostic challenges when dealing with an entrapment syndrome. Subsequent open surgical treatment was successful, and the patient has made a good recovery.

  20. EFFECTS OF PARENT ARTERY SEGMENTATION AND ANEURISMALWALL ELASTICITY ON PATIENT-SPECIFIC HEMODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jia-liang; DING Guang-hong; YANG Xin-jian; LI Hai-yun

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that hemodynamics and wall tension play an important role in the formation,growth and rupture of aneurysms.In the present study,the authors investigated the influence of parent artery segmentation and aneurismal-wall elasticity on patient-specific hemodynamic simulations with two patient-specific eases of cerebral aneurysms.Realistic models of the aneurysms were constructed from 3-D angiography images and blood flow dynamics was studied under physiologically representative waveform of inflow.For each aneurysm three computational models were constructed:Model 1 with more extensive upstream parent artery with the rigid arterial and aneurismal wall,Model 2 with the partial upstream parent artery with the elastic arterial and aneurismal wall,Model 3 with more extensive upstream parent artery with the rigid wall for arterial wall far from the aneurysm and the elastic wall for arterial wall near the aneurysm.The results show that Model 1 could predict complex intra-aneurismal flow patterns and wall shear stress distribution in the aneurysm,but is unable to give aneurismal wall deformation and tension,Model 2 demonstrates aneurismal wall deformation and tension,but fails to properly model inflow pattern contributed by the upstream parent artery,resulting in local misunderstanding Wall Shear Stress (WSS) distribution,Model 3 can overcome limitations of the former two models,and give an overall and accurate analysis on intra-aneurismal flow patterns,wall shear stress distribution,aneurismal-wall deformation and tension.Therefore we suggest that the proper length of extensive upstream parent artery and aneuri-smal-wall elasticity should be considered carefully in establishing computational model to predict the intra-aneurismal hemodynamic and wall tension.

  1. Computational study of the effect of dynamic wall confinement on ventricular filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xudong; Xue, Qian

    2013-11-01

    Ventricular filling is a major cardiac phase in which the freshly oxygenated blood in the left atrium (LA) enters the left ventricle (LV). There is an increasing consensus that dynamics of transmitral blood flow during filling plays a critical role in dictating overall cardiac health and predicting early changes in cardiac function. The ventricular flow during filling is determined by the interplay of incoming mitral jet and myocardial wall confinement and manifested by a complex morphing pattern of an asymmetric vortex ring. In the current study, we employ computational simulations to explore the effects of dynamic wall confinement on ventricular flow in an idealized left ventricle model. The effects of radial and longitudinal confinement as well as wall motion will be investigated, with special interests on vortex dynamics, such as vortex ring tilting, pinch off and breakdown, intraventricular pressure drop, filling velocity, energy dissipation and blood mixing.

  2. DBIO Best Thesis Award: Mechanics, Dynamics, and Organization of the Bacterial Cytoskeleton and Cell Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Siyuan

    2012-02-01

    Bacteria come in a variety of shapes. While the peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall serves as an exoskeleton that defines the static cell shape, the internal bacterial cytoskeleton mediates cell shape by recruiting PG synthesis machinery and thus defining the pattern of cell-wall synthesis. While much is known about the chemistry and biology of the cytoskeleton and cell wall, much of their biophysics, including essential aspects of the functionality, dynamics, and organization, remain unknown. This dissertation aims to elucidate the detailed biophysical mechanisms of cytoskeleton guided wall synthesis. First, I find that the bacterial cytoskeleton MreB contributes nearly as much to the rigidity of an Escherichia coli cell as the cell wall. This conclusion implies that the cytoskeletal polymer MreB applies meaningful force to the cell wall, an idea favored by theoretical modeling of wall growth, and suggests an evolutionary origin of cytoskeleton-governed cell rigidity. Second, I observe that MreB rotates around the long axis of E. coli, and the motion depends on wall synthesis. This is the first discovery of a cell-wall assembly driven molecular motor in bacteria. Third, I prove that both cell-wall synthesis and the PG network have chiral ordering, which is established by the spatial pattern of MreB. This work links the molecular structure of the cytoskeleton and of the cell wall with organismal-scale behavior. Finally, I develop a mathematical model of cytoskeleton-cell membrane interactions, which explains the preferential orientation of different cytoskeleton components in bacteria.

  3. Spin distributions and dynamics in domain walls guided by soft magnetic nanowire structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jusang; Erskine, James L.

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulations are used to investigate static and dynamic properties of spin distributions within domain walls confined by rectangular cross section Permalloy nanowire conduits having widths up to 1000 nm and thickness up to 50 nm. Phase boundaries and critical regions associated with domain-wall spin distributions of various topologies [transverse (or asymmetric transverse), vortex, double-vortex, triple-vortex and cross-tie] are accurately determined using high-performance computing resources. Mobility curves are calculated that characterize domain-wall propagation for an interesting region of the spin texture phase diagram: 20 nm thick nanowires with widths of 60-700 nm at axial drive fields extending to 150 Oe. The simulations (and corresponding experiments, which are discussed), reveal new propagating fixed configuration domain-wall topologies with enhanced velocity. Effects of temperature on the spin distributions and dynamics are explored, by conducting simulations that include separately varying temperature-dependent parameters (saturation magnetization and exchange constant) and simulating effects of temperature-dependent fluctuations using the Langevin dynamics feature of the simulation code. Related temperature-dependent experiments are discussed. The simulation studies demonstrate a close connection between static and (field-driven) dynamic spin configurations in nanowire-confined domain walls and demonstrate the importance of exploring model-system parameter space at high numerical precision.

  4. Asymmetric driven dynamics of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Tejerina, L.; Alejos, Ó.; Martínez, E.; Muñoz, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is studied from both numerical and analytical micromagnetics. The influence of a moderate interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction associated to a bi-layer strip arrangement has been considered, giving rise to the formation of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls. Such walls possess under equilibrium conditions an inner magnetization structure defined by a certain orientation angle that make them to be considered as intermediate configurations between Bloch and Néel walls. Two different dynamics are considered, a field-driven and a current-driven dynamics, in particular, the one promoted by the spin torque due to the spin-Hall effect. Results show an inherent asymmetry associated with the rotation of the domain wall magnetization orientation before reaching the stationary regime, characterized by a constant terminal speed. For a certain initial DW magnetization orientation at rest, the rotation determines whether the reorientation of the DW magnetization prior to reach stationary motion is smooth or abrupt. This asymmetry affects the DW motion, which can even reverse for a short period of time. Additionally, it is found that the terminal speed in the case of the current-driven dynamics may depend on either the initial DW magnetization orientation at rest or the sign of the longitudinally injected current.

  5. Dynamic characteristics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under a transverse magnetic field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Li; H J Xie; X Wang

    2011-02-01

    This paper reports the results of an investigation into the effect of transverse magnetic fields on dynamic characteristics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Couple dynamic equations of MWNTs subjected to a transverse magnetic field are derived and solved by considering the Lorentz magnetic forces induced by a transverse magnetic field exerted on MWCNTs. Results show that the transverse magnetic field exerted on MWNTs makes the lowest frequency of the MWNTs nonlinearly decrease and the highest frequency, changeless. When the strength of applied transverse magnetic fields is larger than a given value the two walls of MWNTs appear in the radial and axial coaxial vibration phenomena.

  6. Hydrodynamic Interaction Between a Platelet and an Erythrocyte: Effect of Erythrocyte Deformability, Dynamics, and Wall Proximity

    OpenAIRE

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Diamond, Scott L.; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2013-01-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical simulations of hydrodynamic interaction between a red blood cell (RBC) and a platelet in a wall-bounded shear flow. The dynamics and large deformation of the RBC are fully resolved in the simulations using a front-tracking method. The objective is to quantify the influence of tank treading and tumbling dynamics of the RBC, and the presence of a bounding wall on the deflection of platelet trajectories. We observe two types of interaction: A crossing event...

  7. Dynamical corrections to the anomalous holographic soft-wall model: the pomeron and the odderon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capossoli, Eduardo Folco [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Colegio Pedro II, Departamento de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Li, Danning [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science (ITP, CAS), Beijing (China); Boschi-Filho, Henrique [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-06-15

    In this work we use the holographic soft-wall AdS/QCD model with anomalous dimension contributions coming from two different QCD beta functions to calculate the masses of higher spin glueball states for both even and odd spins and their Regge trajectories, related to the pomeron and the odderon, respectively. We further investigate this model taking into account dynamical corrections due to a dilaton potential consistent with the Einstein equations in five dimensions. The results found in this work for the Regge trajectories within the anomalous soft-wall model with dynamical corrections are consistent with those present in the literature. (orig.)

  8. Asymmetric driven dynamics of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Tejerina, L. [Dpto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Alejos, Ó., E-mail: oscaral@ee.uva.es [Dpto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Martínez, E. [Dpto. Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca, 37011 Salamanca (Spain); Muñoz, J.M. [Dpto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is studied from both numerical and analytical micromagnetics. The influence of a moderate interfacial Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction associated to a bi-layer strip arrangement has been considered, giving rise to the formation of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls. Such walls possess under equilibrium conditions an inner magnetization structure defined by a certain orientation angle that make them to be considered as intermediate configurations between Bloch and Néel walls. Two different dynamics are considered, a field-driven and a current-driven dynamics, in particular, the one promoted by the spin torque due to the spin-Hall effect. Results show an inherent asymmetry associated with the rotation of the domain wall magnetization orientation before reaching the stationary regime, characterized by a constant terminal speed. For a certain initial DW magnetization orientation at rest, the rotation determines whether the reorientation of the DW magnetization prior to reach stationary motion is smooth or abrupt. This asymmetry affects the DW motion, which can even reverse for a short period of time. Additionally, it is found that the terminal speed in the case of the current-driven dynamics may depend on either the initial DW magnetization orientation at rest or the sign of the longitudinally injected current. - Highlights: • The asymmetric response of domain walls in bilayer strips with PMA is studied. • Out-of-plane fields and SHE longitudinal currents are applied. • The response is associated to the rotation of the domain wall inner magnetization. • Clockwise and counter-clockwise magnetization rotations are not equivalent. • The asymmetry results in different travelled distances and/or terminal speeds.

  9. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity and cerebral blood flow and O2 uptake during dynamic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, P L; Sperling, B K; Warming, T

    1993-01-01

    Results obtained by the 133Xe clearance method with external detectors and by transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) suggest that dynamic exercise causes an increase of global average cerebral blood flow (CBF). These data are contradicted by earlier data obtained during less-well-defined conditions....... To investigate this controversy, we applied the Kety-Schmidt technique to measure the global average levels of CBF and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during rest and dynamic exercise. Simultaneously with the determination of CBF and CMRO2, we used TCD to determine mean maximal flow velocity...... in the middle cerebral artery (MCA Vmean). For values of CBF and MCA Vmean a correction for an observed small drop in arterial PCO2 was carried out. Baseline values for global CBF and CMRO2 were 50.7 and 3.63 ml.100 g-1.min-1, respectively. The same values were found during dynamic exercise, whereas a 22% (P

  10. Threshold Setting for Likelihood Function for Elasticity-Based Tissue Classification of Arterial Walls by Evaluating Variance in Measurement of Radial Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Kentaro; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi; Ichiki, Masataka; Tezuka, Fumiaki

    2008-05-01

    Pathologic changes in arterial walls significantly influence their mechanical properties. We have developed a correlation-based method, the phased tracking method [H. Kanai et al.: IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 43 (1996) 791], for measurement of the regional elasticity of the arterial wall. Using this method, elasticity distributions of lipids, blood clots, fibrous tissue, and calcified tissue were measured in vitro by experiments on excised arteries (mean±SD: lipids 89±47 kPa, blood clots 131 ±56 kPa, fibrous tissue 1022±1040 kPa, calcified tissue 2267 ±1228 kPa) [H. Kanai et al.: Circulation 107 (2003) 3018; J. Inagaki et al.: Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 44 (2005) 4593]. It was found that arterial tissues can be classified into soft tissues (lipids and blood clots) and hard tissues (fibrous tissue and calcified tissue) on the basis of their elasticity. However, there are large overlaps between elasticity distributions of lipids and blood clots and those of fibrous tissue and calcified tissue. Thus, it was difficult to differentiate lipids from blood clots and fibrous tissue from calcified tissue by simply thresholding elasticity value. Therefore, we previously proposed a method by classifying the elasticity distribution in each region of interest (ROI) (not a single pixel) in an elasticity image into lipids, blood clots, fibrous tissue, or calcified tissue based on a likelihood function for each tissue [J. Inagaki et al.: Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 44 (2006) 4732]. In our previous study, the optimum size of an ROI was determined to be 1,500 µm in the arterial radial direction and 1,500 µm in the arterial longitudinal direction [K. Tsuzuki et al.: Ultrasound Med. Biol. 34 (2008) 573]. In this study, the threshold for the likelihood function used in the tissue classification was set by evaluating the variance in the ultrasonic measurement of radial strain. The recognition rate was improved from 50 to 54% by the proposed thresholding.

  11. Relation of aortic calcification, wall thickness, and distensibility with severity of coronary artery disease: evaluation with coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seonah; Yong, Hwan Seok; Doo, Kyung Won; Kang, Eun-Young; Woo, Ok Hee; Choi, Eun Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Korea Univ. Guro Hospital, Korea Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: yhwanseok@naver.com

    2012-10-15

    Background Three known risk factors for aortic atherosclerosis predict the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD): aortic calcification (AC), aortic wall thickness (AWT), and aortic distensibility (AD). Purpose To determine the relationship of AC, AWT, and AD with the severity of CAD. Material and Methods A total of 104 patients who underwent both coronary CT angiography (CCTA) and invasive coronary angiography were enrolled. The severity of CAD was assessed by three methods: the segment involvement score (SIS), the segment stenosis score (SSS), and the modified Gensini score (mG). We quantified AC using the Agatston method on low-dose ungated chest CT (LDCT). We measured AWT at the thickest portion of the descending thoracic aorta on CCTA. AD was calculated as the difference between the maximum and minimum areas of the ascending aorta and the pulse pressure. The relationships between the severity of CAD and the three aortic factors were assessed. Results The AC and AWT of the thoracic aorta were significantly higher in the occlusive CAD (OCAD) group (1984.21 {+-} 2986.10 vs. 733.00 {+-} 1648.71, P = 0.01; 4.13 {+-} 1.48 vs. 3.40 {+-} 1.01, P = 0.22). Patients with OCAD had more than one epicardial coronary artery with >50% luminal stenosis. The AC (r = 0.453 with SIS; r = 0.454 with SSS; r = 0.427 with mG) and the AWT (r = 0.279 with SIS; r = 0.324 with SSS; r = 0.304 with mG) were significantly correlated with all three methods, and the AD was negatively correlated with the SIS (r = - 0.221, P < 0.05, respectively) in the unadjusted model. After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors, only the correlations between AC and all three methods assessing CAD remained significant. Conclusion There are significant relationships between AC, AWT and AD and severity of CAD. In particular, AC measured on LDCT is the most consistent predictor of severity of CAD.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanochannel flows with effects of wall lattice-fluid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, C Y; Yen, T H; Tzeng, P Y

    2007-09-01

    In the present paper, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to explore the effects of wall lattice-fluid interactions on the hydrodynamic characteristics in nanochannels. Couette and Poiseuille flows of liquid argon with channel walls of face-centered cubic (fcc) lattice structure are employed as the model configurations. Truncated and shifted Lennard-Jones (LJ) 12-6 potentials for evaluations of fluid-fluid and wall-fluid interactions, and a nonlinear spring potential for wall-wall interaction, are used as interatomistic or molecular models. The hydrodynamics at various flow orientation angles with respect to channel walls of lattice planes (111), (100), and (110) are explored. The present work discloses that the effects of key parameters, such as wall density, lattice plane, flow orientation, and LJ interaction energy, have a very significant impact on the nanochannel flow characteristics. The related interfacial phenomena and the underlying physical mechanisms are explored and interpreted. These results are significant in the understanding of nanoscale hydrodynamics, as well as in various applications where an accurate nanoscale flow rate control is necessary.

  13. Moisture dynamics in wall paintings monitored by single-sided NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oligschläger, D; Waldow, S; Haber, A; Zia, W; Blümich, B

    2015-01-01

    The durability of historic wall paintings is highly dependent on environmental influences such as moisture ingress, salt crystallization and temperature changes. A fundamental understanding of dynamic transport processes in wall paintings is necessary to apply suitable conservation and restoration methods to preserve such objects with high cultural value. Non-invasive, mobile-NMR techniques with single-sided sensors, such as the NMR-MOUSE(®), enable to monitor the moisture content, transport and apparent diffusion constants in wall paintings. We investigated this technique by experiment and modeling to correlate salt crystallization, moisture transport and local diffusion in wall-painting samples. Moreover, the influence of different painting techniques (fresco and secco) and conservation/consolidation methods on moisture transport and diffusion is discussed. The results are compared with results from field measurements on real fresco paintings in Casa del Salone Nero and the Villa of the Papyri, Herculaneum, Italy.

  14. Investigation of wall-bounded turbulent flow using Dynamic mode decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, Yoshinori; Duke, Daniel; Atkinson, Callum; Soria, Julio, E-mail: yoshinori.mizuno@monash.edu [Laboratory for Turbulence Research in Aerospace and Combustion, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Monash University (Australia)

    2011-12-22

    Dynamics mode decomposition (DMD) which is a method to construct a linear mapping describing the dynamics of a given time-series of any quantities is applied to the analysis of a turbulent channel flow. The flow fields are generated by direct numerical simulations for the friction Reynolds number Re{sub {tau}} = 190. The time-series of the flow fields in a short time-interval in the order of the wall-unit time-scale and in a small spatial domain that encloses a single near-wall structure are used as the inputs to DMD. In some datasets, linearly growing modes that seem to contribute to the well-known self-sustained cycle of the flow structures near the wall are detected.

  15. Dynamics of premixed flames in a narrow channel with a step-wise wall temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurdyumov, Vadim N. [Department of Energy, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pizza, Gianmarco [Aerothermochemistry and Combustion Systems Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich CH-8092 (Switzerland); Combustion Research, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen CH-5232 (Switzerland); Frouzakis, Christos E. [Aerothermochemistry and Combustion Systems Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich CH-8092 (Switzerland); Mantzaras, John [Combustion Research, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen CH-5232 (Switzerland)

    2009-11-15

    The effect of channel height, inflow velocity and wall temperature on the dynamics and stability of unity Lewis number premixed flames in channels with specified wall temperature is investigated with steady and transient numerical simulations using a two-dimensional thermo-diffusive model. The simplified model is capable of capturing many of the transitions and the combustion modes observed experimentally and in direct numerical simulations in micro- and meso-scale channels, and indicates that the thermal flame/wall interaction is the mechanism leading to the observed flame instabilities. Finally, an ad-hoc one-dimensional model based on the flame-sheet approximation is tested in its capacity to reproduce some of the flame dynamics of the two-dimensional thermo-diffusive model. (author)

  16. Dynamics of molecules adsorbed on a die wall during polymer melt extrusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tchesnokov, M.A.; Molenaar, J.; Slot, J.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    A new, quantitative model to describe the dynamics of polymer molecules grafted on a solid wall is presented. This model is based on the bond vector probability distribution function (BVPDF) which contains the necessary information about the spatial conformations of the grafted chains. All macroscop

  17. Management of a subclavian artery thrombosis causing acute anterior wall infarction and concurrent left arm ischemia in a patient with prior coronary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgüllü, Çağdaş; Eryılmaz, Ufuk; Zencir, Cemil; Güngör, Hasan

    2014-12-01

    We report a 57-year-old patient with acute anterior wall infarction with a history of a coronary baypass graft operation in 2007. He also had concurrent left arm cyanosis and severe pain. He had received diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma one month previously and had had his first chemotherapy in the previous week with gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. After the angiography, a giant thrombus was detected in the proximal left subclavian artery, deteriorating the flows of both left internal mammarian artery (LIMA) to left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery graft, as well as the left brachial artery. The proximal subclavian artery was stented and good flow was achieved. Through the LIMA, the distal part of LAD, which was totally obstructed with probable distal thrombus embolization, was reached and a percutaneous balloon angioplasty performed. However, the no-reflow phenomenon was observed in distal LAD. A Fogarty traction of thrombus was performed successfully for the revascularization of the left arm. Approximately 30 minutes after the procedure, both angina and ST segment elevation in ECG were resolved under unfractioned heparin and nitroglycerin infusion. However, the patient died due to sepsis seven days after admission to hospital. In the literature, there are only a few previous reports on this rare clinical entity. The eitology, presentation, and the possible management strategies of this clinical entity is presented in this report.

  18. PUVB-mediated prevention of luminal narrowing after arterial wall injury: modulation of mechanical arterial properties as a putative mechanism of action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perree, Jop; Kerindongo, Raphaela P.; van Leeuwen, Ton G. J. M.

    2001-10-01

    In a previous study we have found that the photodynamic modality PUVB (8-methoxy-Psoralen + UVB) reduces luminal narrowing after arterial endovascular injury. We hypothesized that PUVB may modulate the arterial mechanical properties and tested this hypothesis by measuring the stress as a function of the strain in segments of carotid artery. Furthermore, we have investigated the potential for PUVB-induced cross-linking of extracellular matrix proteins by gel electrophoresis. It was found that both techniques were suitable for testing our hypotheses as evidenced by a statistically significant difference for the positive control. However, no differences between A) control, B) sensitizer only, C) light only and D) PUVB-treated samples could be found with respect to macro- and micro-mechanical properties. Therefore, the hypothesis that PUVB mediates its luminal narrowing reduction effect by directly changing the arterial mechanical properties should be rejected.

  19. Rapid 3D dynamic arterial spin labeling with a sparse model-based image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Fielden, Samuel W; Feng, Xue; Wintermark, Max; Mugler, John P; Meyer, Craig H

    2015-11-01

    Dynamic arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI measures the perfusion bolus at multiple observation times and yields accurate estimates of cerebral blood flow in the presence of variations in arterial transit time. ASL has intrinsically low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and is sensitive to motion, so that extensive signal averaging is typically required, leading to long scan times for dynamic ASL. The goal of this study was to develop an accelerated dynamic ASL method with improved SNR and robustness to motion using a model-based image reconstruction that exploits the inherent sparsity of dynamic ASL data. The first component of this method is a single-shot 3D turbo spin echo spiral pulse sequence accelerated using a combination of parallel imaging and compressed sensing. This pulse sequence was then incorporated into a dynamic pseudo continuous ASL acquisition acquired at multiple observation times, and the resulting images were jointly reconstructed enforcing a model of potential perfusion time courses. Performance of the technique was verified using a numerical phantom and it was validated on normal volunteers on a 3-Tesla scanner. In simulation, a spatial sparsity constraint improved SNR and reduced estimation errors. Combined with a model-based sparsity constraint, the proposed method further improved SNR, reduced estimation error and suppressed motion artifacts. Experimentally, the proposed method resulted in significant improvements, with scan times as short as 20s per time point. These results suggest that the model-based image reconstruction enables rapid dynamic ASL with improved accuracy and robustness.

  20. Dynamic non-equilibrium wall-modeling for large eddy simulation at high Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Soshi; Larsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    A dynamic non-equilibrium wall-model for large-eddy simulation at arbitrarily high Reynolds numbers is proposed and validated on equilibrium boundary layers and a non-equilibrium shock/boundary-layer interaction problem. The proposed method builds on the prior non-equilibrium wall-models of Balaras et al. [AIAA J. 34, 1111-1119 (1996)], 10.2514/3.13200 and Wang and Moin [Phys. Fluids 14, 2043-2051 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1476668: the failure of these wall-models to accurately predict the skin friction in equilibrium boundary layers is shown and analyzed, and an improved wall-model that solves this issue is proposed. The improvement stems directly from reasoning about how the turbulence length scale changes with wall distance in the inertial sublayer, the grid resolution, and the resolution-characteristics of numerical methods. The proposed model yields accurate resolved turbulence, both in terms of structure and statistics for both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium flows without the use of ad hoc corrections. Crucially, the model accurately predicts the skin friction, something that existing non-equilibrium wall-models fail to do robustly.

  1. A HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DYNAMIC ANALYSIS AND DESIGN OF COUPLED SHEAR WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A BERRAIS

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-linear dynamic analysis techniques are rapidly being developed and have been recognized as indispensable tools. However, their use in the design office requires special experience. Consequently they are not generally accepted as analysis/design tools. Additionally, uncertainties are associated with the determination of the earthquake forces, the stiffness and strength of the structure; the selection of the mathematical models; and the form of the earthquake. In this paper a hybrid system for the non-linear dynamic analysis/design of coupled shear walls is briefly described. The system combines expert system technology with finite element method to carry out the dynamic analysis of coupled walls under earthquake forces. The system has been implemented using Quintec-Prolog, Quintec-Flex and FORTRAN 77, and runs on a SUN SPARC station under Unix system.

  2. Curvature Perturbation and Domain Wall Formation with Pseudo Scaling Scalar Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ema, Yohei; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological dynamics of scalar field with a monomial potential $\\phi^{n}$ with a general background equation of state is revisited. It is known that if $n$ is smaller than a critical value, the scalar field exhibits a coherent oscillation and if $n$ is larger it obeys a scaling solution without oscillation. We study in detail the case where $n$ is equal to the critical value, and find a peculiar scalar dynamics which is neither oscillating nor scaling solution, and we call it a pseudo scaling solution. We also discuss cosmological implications of a pseudo scaling scalar dynamics, such as the curvature perturbation and the domain wall problem.

  3. Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube Growth from Graphite Layers-a Tight Binding Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuntuan FANG; Min ZHU; Yongshun WANG

    2003-01-01

    The growth of single-wall carbon nanotube from graphite layers is studied by tight binding molecular dynamics simulation. Given temperature of 2500 K or 3500 K and an interval of 0.25 nm for the two layers of graphite, a single-wall carbon nanotube with a zigzag shell will be produced. On the other conditions the carbon nanotube cannot grow or grows with too many defects. All carbon nanotube ends have pentagons which play an important role during the tube ends closing.

  4. Total Bolus Extraction Method Improves Arterial Image Quality in Dynamic CTAs Derived from Whole-Brain CTP Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elyas Ghariq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purposes. The 320-detector row CT scanner enables visualization of whole-brain hemodynamic information (dynamic CT angiography (CTA derived from CT perfusion scans. However, arterial image quality in dynamic CTA (dCTA is inferior to arterial image quality in standard CTA. This study evaluates whether the arterial image quality can be improved by using a total bolus extraction (ToBE method. Materials and Methods. DCTAs of 15 patients, who presented with signs of acute cerebral ischemia, were derived from 320-slice CT perfusion scans using both the standard subtraction method and the proposed ToBE method. Two neurointerventionalists blinded to the scan type scored the arterial image quality on a 5-point scale in the 4D dCTAs in consensus. Arteries were divided into four categories: (I large extradural, (II intradural (large, medium, and small, (III communicating arteries, and (IV cerebellar and ophthalmic arteries. Results. Quality of extradural and intradural arteries was significantly higher in the ToBE dCTAs than in the standard dCTAs (extradural P=0.001, large intradural P<0.001, medium intradural P<0.001, and small intradural P<0.001. Conclusion. The 4D dCTAs derived with the total bolus extraction (ToBE method provide hemodynamic information combined with improved arterial image quality as compared to standard 4D dCTAs.

  5. Age-specific characteristics and coupling of cerebral arterial inflow and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Schmid Daners

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to quantify age-related differences in the characteristics and coupling of cerebral arterial inflow and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF dynamics. To this end, 3T phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging blood and CSF flow data of eleven young (24 ± 3 years and eleven elderly subjects (70 ± 5 years with a comparable sex-ratio were acquired. Flow waveforms and their frequency composition, transfer functions from blood to CSF flows and cross-correlations were analyzed. The magnitudes of the frequency components of CSF flow in the aqueduct differ significantly between the two age groups, as do the frequency components of the cervical spinal CSF and the arterial flows. The males' aqueductal CSF stroke volumes and average flow rates are significantly higher than those of the females. Transfer functions and cross-correlations between arterial blood and CSF flow reveal significant age-dependence of phase-shift between these, as do the waveforms of arterial blood, as well as cervical-spinal and aqueductal CSF flows. These findings accentuate the need for age- and sex-matched control groups for the evaluation of cerebral pathologies such as hydrocephalus.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Formaldehyde Adsorption and Diffusion in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pin Lv; Zhenan Tang; Jun Yu; Yanbing Xue

    2006-01-01

    For gas sensor application, adsorption and diffusion of formaldehyde gas in single-wall carbon nanotube were investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation. The conformations of formaldehyde molecule adsorbed in carbon nanotube were optimized according to principle of minimum energy. The axis of conformatiot is parallel to the axis of carbon nanotube and about 0.3 nm~0.4 nm away from carbon nanotube wall. The conformation, which is different from that of the formaldehyde molecule in the gas-phase, rotates around carbon nanotube axis. The adsorption energy and diffusivity of formaldehyde molecule in single-wall carbon nanotube is of-56.2 kJ/mol and of 0.2× 10-4 cm2/s, respectively.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Thermal Conductivity of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, M.; Srivastava, Deepak; Govindan,T. R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have very attractive electronic, mechanical. and thermal properties. Recently, measurements of thermal conductivity in single wall CNT mats showed estimated thermal conductivity magnitudes ranging from 17.5 to 58 W/cm-K at room temperature. which are better than bulk graphite. The cylinderical symmetry of CNT leads to large thermal conductivity along the tube axis, additionally, unlike graphite. CNTs can be made into ropes that can be used as heat conducting pipes for nanoscale applications. The thermal conductivity of several single wall carbon nanotubes has been calculated over temperature range from l00 K to 600 K using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics using Tersoff-Brenner potential for C-C interactions. Thermal conductivity of single wall CNTs shows a peaking behavior as a function of temperature. Dependence of the peak position on the chirality and radius of the tube will be discussed and explained in this presentation.

  8. [Ruptured aneurysm at the anterior wall of the internal carotid artery in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus and secondary antiphospholipid syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonan, Masashi; Fujimura, Miki; Inoue, Takashi; Tominaga, Teiji

    2011-07-01

    A 60 year-old woman, who had a 45-year history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and secondary antiphospholipid syndrome, presented with subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured aneurysm at the anterior wall of the non-branching site of the right internal carotid artery. She underwent radical surgery on the day of onset. In light of the possibility of arterial dissection, we performed extracranial-intracranial bypass prior to careful exploration of the aneurysm. Based on the finding of saccular aneurysm, she ultimately underwent neck clipping of the aneurysm without complication. Postoperative course was uneventful, and she did not suffer from cerebral vasospasm. We recommend early surgical intervention in patients with aneurysmal SAH associated with SLE, while intrinsic pathologies of SLE such as fragile vascular structure and the risk for ischemic complication should be considered.

  9. Corrections of arterial input function for dynamic H215O PET to assess perfusion of pelvic tumours: arterial blood sampling versus image extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüdemann, L.; Sreenivasa, G.; Michel, R.; Rosner, C.; Plotkin, M.; Felix, R.; Wust, P.; Amthauer, H.

    2006-06-01

    Assessment of perfusion with 15O-labelled water (H215O) requires measurement of the arterial input function (AIF). The arterial time activity curve (TAC) measured using the peripheral sampling scheme requires corrections for delay and dispersion. In this study, parametrizations with and without arterial spillover correction for fitting of the tissue curve are evaluated. Additionally, a completely noninvasive method for generation of the AIF from a dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) acquisition is applied to assess perfusion of pelvic tumours. This method uses a volume of interest (VOI) to extract the TAC from the femoral artery. The VOI TAC is corrected for spillover using a separate tissue TAC and for recovery by determining the recovery coefficient on a coregistered CT data set. The techniques were applied in five patients with pelvic tumours who underwent a total of 11 examinations. Delay and dispersion correction of the blood TAC without arterial spillover correction yielded in seven examinations solutions inconsistent with physiology. Correction of arterial spillover increased the fitting accuracy and yielded consistent results in all patients. Generation of an AIF from PET image data was investigated as an alternative to arterial blood sampling and was shown to have an intrinsic potential to determine the AIF noninvasively and reproducibly. The AIF extracted from a VOI in a dynamic PET scan was similar in shape to the blood AIF but yielded significantly higher tissue perfusion values (mean of 104.0 ± 52.0%) and lower partition coefficients (-31.6 ± 24.2%). The perfusion values and partition coefficients determined with the VOI technique have to be corrected in order to compare the results with those of studies using a blood AIF.

  10. Imaging of Blood Flow in Cerebral Arteries with Dynamic Helical Computed Tomography Angiography (DHCTA) Using a 64-Row CT Scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pekkola, J.; Kangasniemi, M. (Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland))

    2009-08-15

    Background: Cerebral computed tomography angiography (CTA) depicts a structural image of intracranial arteries without providing much time-resolved information on blood flow dynamics. Current CT technology allows obtaining of rapidly repeated helical scans during the arterial contrast filling phase after an intravenous contrast injection. Purpose: To report our experience on dynamic CT imaging in determining the direction of contrast filling within proximal intracranial arteries of operated cerebral artery aneurysm patients. Such dynamic information can help detect vascular occlusion or severe spasm. The method is here referred to as dynamic helical CT angiography (DHCTA). Material and Methods: We retrospectively collected image and related technical data for 23 patients who underwent DHCTA and CTA during their first postoperative day after cerebral artery aneurysm surgery. For DHCTA, we had helically scanned a 4-cm tissue volume three times in succession with a 64-row CT scanner at intervals of 2.6 s during arterial contrast filling after an intravenous contrast injection. We assessed how well DHCTA succeeded in demonstrating the direction of contrast filling in the proximal intracranial arteries, evaluated clinically relevant structural information provided by DHCTA and CTA, and compared radiation doses for the two methods. Results: For 21 patients, DHCTA outlined the direction of contrast filling in proximal intracranial arteries. As to arterial spasm and residual filling of the operated aneurysm, CTA and DHCTA gave similar information. Radiation doses were higher (P<0.000001) for DHCTA than for CTA at 120 kV tube voltage. At 100 kV, the difference was smaller, but doses for DHCTA still exceeded (P<0.05) those for CTA. Conclusion: DHCTA gave dynamic information unobtainable with CTA and could prove useful in selected clinical settings

  11. A computational fluid dynamics modeling study of guide walls for downstream fish passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Kevin; Towler, Brett; Haro, Alexander J.; Ahlfeld, David P.

    2017-01-01

    A partial-depth, impermeable guidance structure (or guide wall) for downstream fish passage is typically constructed as a series of panels attached to a floating boom and anchored across a water body (e.g. river channel, reservoir, or power canal). The downstream terminus of the wall is generally located nearby to a fish bypass structure. If guidance is successful, the fish will avoid entrainment in a dangerous intake structure (i.e. turbine intakes) while passing from the headpond to the tailwater of a hydroelectric facility through a safer passage route (i.e. the bypass). The goal of this study is to determine the combination of guide wall design parameters that will most likely increase the chance of surface-oriented fish being successfully guided to the bypass. To evaluate the flow field immediately upstream of a guide wall, a parameterized computational fluid dynamics model of an idealized power canal was constructed in © ANSYS Fluent v 14.5 (ANSYS Inc., 2012). The design parameters investigated were the angle and depth of the guide wall and the average approach velocity in the power canal. Results call attention to the importance of the downward to sweeping flow ratio and demonstrate how a change in guide wall depth and angle can affect this important hydraulic cue to out-migrating fish. The key findings indicate that a guide wall set at a small angle (15° is the minimum in this study) and deep enough such that sweeping flow dominant conditions prevail within the expected vertical distribution of fish approaching the structure will produce hydraulic conditions that are more likely to result in effective passage.

  12. Evolución de los modelos constitutivos de respuesta pasiva para paredes arteriales//Evolution of constitutive models for passive response of the arterial walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Fernández‐Collazo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available La respuesta mecánica de las paredes arteriales se modifica como consecuencia del envejecimiento y el desarrollo de enfermedades. Estos cambios se ven reflejados en modificaciones en su estructura, composición, resistencia y forma. La predicción de su comportamiento en dependencia de su estado fisiológico usando modelos biomecánicos se muestra como una potente herramienta en el tratamiento y diagnóstico de aneurismas, ateroesclerosis, hipertensión arterial entre otras. Realizando un profundo análisis de la literatura consultada se presenta un estudio bibliográfico de los modelos constitutivos de paredes arteriales en su respuesta pasiva, clasificándolos y destacando sus principales ventajas, desventajas y la evolución de estos desde los puramente fenomenológicos hasta los más complejos.Palabras claves: modelos, arterias, respuesta pasiva, biomecánica._______________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe mechanical response of arterial walls is modified as a result of aging and disease development. These changes are reflected in changes in its composition, strength, shape and structure. The prediction of their behavior, depending on their physiological state used biomechanical models is shown as a powerful tool in the treatment and diagnosis of aneurysms, atherosclerosis, hypertensionand others. It´s presented in its passive response, a profound analysis of the literature and the bibliographic review of the constitutive models of arterial walls, classifying and highlighting their main advantages, disadvantages and the  volution from purely phenomenological to the most complex response.Key words: models, artery, passive response, biomechanics.

  13. NONLINEAR DYNAMIC INSTABILITY OF DOUBLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES UNDER PERIODIC EXCITATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yiming Fu; Rengui Bi; Pu Zhang

    2009-01-01

    A multiple-elastic beam model based on Euler-Bernoulli-beam theory is presented to investigate the nonlinear dynamic instability of double-walled nanotubes. Taking the geometric nonlinearity of structure deformation, the effects of van der Waais forces as well as the non-coaxial curvature of each nested tube into account, the nonlinear parametric vibration governing equations are derived. Numerical results indicate that the double-walled nanotube (DWNT) can be considered as a single column when the van der Waals forces are sufficiently strong. The stiffness of medium could substantially reduce the area of the nonlinear dynamic instability region, in particular, the geometric nonlinearity can be out of account when the stiffness is large enough. The area of the principal nonlinear instability region and its shifting distance aroused by the nonlinearity both decrease with the increment of the aspect ratio of the nanotubes.

  14. DYNAMIC BUCKLING OF DOUBLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES UNDER STEP AXIAL LOAD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengqi Sun; Kaixln Liu

    2009-01-01

    An approximate method is presented in this paper for studying the dynamic buckling of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) under step axial load. The analysis is based on the continuum mechanics model, which takes into account the van der Waals interaction between the outer and inner nanotubes. A buckling condition is derived, from which the critical buckling load and associated buckling mode can be determined. As examples, numerical results are worked out for DWNTs under fixed boundary conditions. It is shown that, due to the effect of van der Waals forces, the critical buckling load of a DWNT is enhanced when inserting an inner tube into a single-walled one. The paper indicates that the critical buckling load of DWNTs for dynamic buckling is higher than that for static buckling. The effect of the radii is also examined. In addition, some of the results are compared with the previous ones.

  15. Functional assessment of cerebral artery stenosis: A pilot study based on computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Yan, Zhengzheng; Pu, Yuehua; Shiu, Wen-Shin; Wu, Jianhuang; Chen, Rongliang; Leng, Xinyi; Qin, Haiqiang; Liu, Xin; Jia, Baixue; Song, Ligang; Wang, Yilong; Miao, Zhongrong; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Liping; Cai, Xiao-Chuan

    2016-10-04

    The fractional pressure ratio is introduced to quantitatively assess the hemodynamic significance of severe intracranial stenosis. A computational fluid dynamics-based method is proposed to non-invasively compute the FPRCFD and compared against fractional pressure ratio measured by an invasive technique. Eleven patients with severe intracranial stenosis considered for endovascular intervention were recruited and an invasive procedure was performed to measure the distal and the aortic pressure (Pd and Pa). The fractional pressure ratio was calculated as [Formula: see text] The computed tomography angiography was used to reconstruct three-dimensional (3D) arteries for each patient. Cerebral hemodynamics was then computed for the arteries using a mathematical model governed by Navier-Stokes equations and with the outflow conditions imposed by a model of distal resistance and compliance. The non-invasive [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and FPRCFD were then obtained from the computational fluid dynamics calculation using a 16-core parallel computer. The invasive and non-invasive parameters were tested by statistical analysis. For this group of patients, the computational fluid dynamics method achieved comparable results with the invasive measurements. The fractional pressure ratio and FPRCFD are very close and highly correlated, but not linearly proportional, with the percentage of stenosis. The proposed computational fluid dynamics method can potentially be useful in assessing the functional alteration of cerebral stenosis.

  16. Control of Dynamic Response of Thin-Walled Composite Beams using Structural Tailoring and Piezoelectric Actuation

    OpenAIRE

    Na, Sungsoo

    1997-01-01

    A dual approach integrating structural tailoring and adaptive materials technology and designed to control the dynamic response of cantilever beams subjected to external excitations is addressed. The cantilevered structure is modeled as a thin-walled beam of arbitrary cross-section and incorporates a number of non-classical effects such as transverse shear, warping restraint, anisotropy of constituent materials and heterogeneity of the construction. Whereas structura...

  17. Lattice Dynamics of Potassium-Doped Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yang; YAN Xiao-Hong; CAO Jue-Xian; MAO Yu-Liang; DENG Yu-Xiang; DING Jian-Wen

    2004-01-01

    @@ We calculate the vibrational properties of potassium-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes within lattice dynamical theory. The results show that the frequency of high-frequency Raman mode E2g for K5C40 downshifts to 1553cm-1, which is in agreement with the value for highly doped samples with effective composition KCs.Moreover, the specific heat curves have a turnover at 22 K, originating from the saturation of K atoms vibrational modes at low energy.

  18. Axial stent strut angle influences wall shear stress after stent implantation: analysis using 3D computational fluid dynamics models of stent foreshortening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warltier David C

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The success of vascular stents in the restoration of blood flow is limited by restenosis. Recent data generated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD models suggest that the vascular geometry created by an implanted stent causes local alterations in wall shear stress (WSS that are associated with neointimal hyperplasia (NH. Foreshortening is a potential limitation of stent design that may affect stent performance and the rate of restenosis. The angle created between axially aligned stent struts and the principal direction of blood flow varies with the degree to which the stent foreshortens after implantation. Methods In the current investigation, we tested the hypothesis that stent foreshortening adversely influences the distribution of WSS and WSS gradients using time-dependent 3D CFD simulations of normal arteries based on canine coronary artery measurements of diameter and blood flow. WSS and WSS gradients were calculated using conventional techniques in ideal (16 mm and progressively foreshortened (14 and 12 mm stented computational vessels. Results Stent foreshortening increased the intrastrut area of the luminal surface exposed to low WSS and elevated spatial WSS gradients. Progressive degrees of stent foreshortening were also associated with strut misalignment relative to the direction of blood flow as indicated by analysis of near-wall velocity vectors. Conclusion The current results suggest that foreshortening may predispose the stented vessel to a higher risk of neointimal hyperplasia.

  19. [Morphological signs of mitochondrial cytopathy in skeletal muscles and micro-vessel walls in a patient with cerebral artery dissection associated with MELAS syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharova, A V; Kalashnikova, L A; Chaĭkovskaia, R P; Mir-Kasimov, M F; Nazarova, M A; Pykhtina, T N; Dobrynina, L A; Patrusheva, N L; Patrushev, L I; Protskiĭ, S V

    2012-01-01

    Skin and muscles biopsy specimens of a patient harboring A3243G mutation in mitochondrial DNA, with dissection of internal carotid and vertebral arteries, associated with MELAS were studied using histochemical and electron-microscopy techniques. Ragged red fibers, regional variability of SDH histochemical reaction, two types of morphologically atypical mitochondria and their aggregation were found in muscle. There was correlation between SDH histochemical staining and number of mitochondria revealed by electron microscopy in muscle tissue. Similar mitochondrial abnormality, their distribution and cell lesions followed by extra-cellular matrix mineralization were found in the blood vessel walls. In line with generalization of cytopathy process caused by gene mutation it can be supposed that changes found in skin and muscle microvessels also exist in large cerebral vessels causing the vessel wall "weakness", predisposing them to dissection.

  20. Numerical Investigation on Dynamic Crushing Behavior of Auxetic Honeycombs with Various Cell-Wall Angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-chun Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Auxetic honeycombs have proven to be an attractive advantage in actual engineering applications owing to their unique mechanical characteristic and better energy absorption ability. The in-plane dynamic crushing behaviors of the honeycombs with various cell-wall angles are studied by means of explicit dynamic finite element simulation. The influences of the cell-wall angle, the impact velocity, and the edge thickness on the macro/microdeformation behaviors, the plateau stresses, and the specific energy absorption of auxetic honeycombs are discussed in detail. Numerical results show, that except for the impact velocity and the edge thickness, the in-plane dynamic performances of auxetic honeycombs also rely on the cell-wall angle. The “> <”-mode local deformation bands form under low- or moderate-velocity impacting, which results in lateral compression shrinkage and shows negative Poisson's ratio during the crushing. For the given impact velocity, the plateau stress at the proximal end and the energy-absorbed ability can be improved by increasing the negative cell angle, the relative density, the impact velocity, and the matrix material strength. When the microcell parameters are the constant, the plateau stresses are proportional to the square of impact velocity.

  1. Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Weixing; Zhao Binghui; Conover, David; Liu Jiangkun; Ning Ruola [Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Radiology, Shanghai 6th People' s Hospital, 600 Yishan Road, Xuhui, Shanghai (China); Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States); Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14642 (United States) and Koning Corporation, Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive Suite 112, West Henrietta, New York 14586 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan. Methods: A dynamic cone beam CT scan acquired projections over four revolutions within a time window of 40 s after contrast agent injection through a femoral vein to cover the entire wash-in and wash-out phases. A dynamic cone beam CT reconstruction algorithm was utilized and a novel recovery method was developed to correct the time-enhancement curve of contrast flow. From the same data set, both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction approaches were utilized and compared to remove the background tissues and visualize the 3D vascular structure to provide the dynamic anatomic information. Results: Through computer simulations, the new recovery algorithm for dynamic time-enhancement curves was optimized and showed excellent accuracy to recover the actual contrast flow. Canine model experiments also indicated that the recovered time-enhancement curves from dynamic cone beam CT imaging agreed well with that of an IV-digital subtraction angiography (DSA) study. The dynamic vascular structures reconstructed using both projection-based subtraction and reconstruction-based subtraction were almost identical as the differences between them were comparable to the background noise level. At the enhancement peak, all the major carotid and cerebral arteries and the Circle of Willis could be clearly observed. Conclusions: The proposed dynamic cone beam CT approach can accurately recover the actual contrast flow, and dynamic anatomic imaging can be obtained with high isotropic 3D resolution. This approach is promising for diagnosis and treatment planning of vascular diseases and strokes.

  2. Lateral static and dynamic characteristics of thin-walled box girder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAN Yan-an; ZHOU Guang-chun

    2009-01-01

    To analyze the static and dynamic behaviors of the thin-walled box girder in its lateral webs in consideration of shear lag effect and shear deformation, an approach based on the minimum potential principle is introduced in this paper. Both static and dynamic response equations as well as the corresponding natural boundary conditions of the box girder are deduced. Meanwhile, three generalized displacement functions:w(x), U(x) and 0(x) are employed and their differences in the calculus of variation are quantitatively investigated. The comparison of finite shell element results with analytical results of calculation examples validates the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  3. Nitric oxide inhibits neointimal hyperplasia following vascular injury via differential, cell-specific modulation of SOD-1 in the arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahnson, Edward S M; Koo, Nathaniel; Cantu-Medellin, Nadiezhda; Tsui, Aaron Y; Havelka, George E; Vercammen, Janet M; Jiang, Qun; Kelley, Eric E; Kibbe, Melina R

    2015-01-30

    Superoxide (O2(•-)) promotes neointimal hyperplasia following arterial injury. Conversely, nitric oxide ((•)NO) inhibits neointimal hyperplasia through various cell-specific mechanisms, including redox regulation. What remains unclear is whether (•)NO exerts cell-specific regulation of the vascular redox environment following arterial injury to inhibit neointimal hyperplasia. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess whether (•)NO exerts cell-specific, differential modulation of O2(•-) levels throughout the arterial wall, establish the mechanism of such modulation, and determine if it regulates (•)NO-dependent inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia. In vivo, (•)NO increased superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) levels following carotid artery balloon injury in a rat model. In vitro, (•)NO increased SOD-1 levels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), but had no effect on SOD-1 in endothelial cells or adventitial fibroblasts. This SOD-1 increase was associated with an increase in sod1 gene expression, increase in SOD-1 activity, and decrease in O2(•-) levels. Lastly, to determine the role of SOD-1 in (•)NO-mediated inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia, we performed the femoral artery wire injury model in wild type and SOD-1 knockout (KO) mice, with and without (•)NO. Interestingly, (•)NO inhibited neointimal hyperplasia only in wild type mice, with no effect in SOD-1 KO mice. In conclusion, these data show the cell-specific modulation of O2(•-) by (•)NO through regulation of SOD-1 in the vasculature, highlighting its importance on the inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia. These results also shed light into the mechanism of (•)NO-dependent redox balance, and suggest a novel VSMC redox target to prevent neointimal hyperplasia.

  4. Numerical Analysis of Dynamic Force Acting Perpendicularly on a Wall Made of Concrete Blocks with Rubber Inserts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major Maciej

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper numerical analysis considering the influence of dynamical force acting on wall made of concrete blocks with rubber inserts is presented. By examining the stress values on front and back surface of the analysed wall structure model, the effectiveness of proposed solution can be measured comparing to the wall made of concrete blocks without rubber inserts. Complete numerical analysis was performed in ADINA program.

  5. Dynamic Viscoelasticity and Surface Properties of Porcine Left Anterior Descending Coronary Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Hanna E; Freij, Jenny M; Espino, Daniel M

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was, for the first time, to measure and compare quantitatively the viscoelastic properties and surface roughness of coronary arteries. Porcine left anterior descending coronary arteries were dissected ex vivo. Viscoelastic properties were measured longitudinally using dynamic mechanical analysis, for a range of frequencies from 0.5 to 10 Hz. Surface roughness was calculated following three-dimensional reconstructed of surface images obtained using an optical microscope. Storage modulus ranged from 14.47 to 25.82 MPa, and was found to be frequency-dependent, decreasing as the frequency increased. Storage was greater than the loss modulus, with the latter found to be frequency-independent with a mean value of 2.10 ± 0.33 MPa. The circumferential surface roughness was significantly greater (p surface roughness, ranging from 0.73 to 2.83 and 0.35 to 0.92 µm, respectively. However, if surface roughness values were corrected for shrinkage during processing, circumferential and longitudinal surface roughness were not significantly different (1.04 ± 0.47, 0.89 ± 0.27 µm, respectively; p > 0.05). No correlation was found between the viscoelastic properties and surface roughness. It is feasible to quantitatively measure the viscoelastic properties of coronary arteries and the roughness of their endothelial surface.

  6. Use potential of large arteries age elasticity changes for forensic medical determination of body parts of corpse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Efimov

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of study of elasticity age changes of walls of right and left carotid, brachial and femoral arteries based on the autopsy material have been presented. Mathematical analysis has shown the unidirectional dynamics and absence of essential differences of indices of arterial walls elasticity between right and left equally topographically placed arteries (carotid, brachial and femoral in various age groups. The conclusion about use perspective of age changes of arterial walls elasticity during the forensic medical expertise of fragmented bodies has been made

  7. Effect of cholesterol lowering on stiffness of aortic and femoral arterial walls in rabbits on a high fat diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Li; XU Wan-hai; XU Jin-zhi; ZHANG Tong; BI Hong-yuan; SHEN Bao-zhong

    2009-01-01

    Background Researches in arterial elasticity have increased over the past few years. We investigated the effects of simvastatin on vascular stiffness in fat fed rabbits by ultrasonography.Methods Thirty rabbits were assigned randomly to 3 groups: normal control group (A), the cholesterol group (B), simvastatin group (C: high fat diet for 4 weeks and high fat diet + simvastatin for further 4 weeks). Stiffness coefficient, pressure strain elastic modulus and velocity of pulse waves in abdominal aorta and femoral artery were measured by ultrasonographic echo tracking at the end of the 4th and the 8th weeks.Results At the end of the 4th week, stiffness coefficient, pressure strain elastic modulus and pulse wave velocity of femoral artery were significantly increased in group B compared with those in group A. Similarly, at the end of the 8th week, the same parameters of abdominal aorta were significantly increased in group B compared with those in group A. In contrast, stiffness coefficient, pressure strain elastic modulus and pulse wave velocity of femoral artery were significantly decreased in group C compared with those in group B, however, there was no significant difference in parameters of abdominal aorta between groups B and C.Conclusion Short term administration of simvastatin can improve the elasticity of femoral artery but not abdominal aorta.

  8. Experimental study of the pathogenesis of moyamoya disease: histological changes in the arterial wall caused by immunological reactions in monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terai Y

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease is a progressive vascular disorder of unknown etiology. Theories of inflammatory and immunologic mechanisms have been proposed as the pathogeneses. We have designed a new method of administering N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP for experimental induction of moyamoya disease using an intravascular interventional technique combined with rod-shaped embolic materials made from lactic acid-glycolic acid copolymer. The embolic materials containing MDP were repeatedly injected into the right internal carotid artery of monkeys in the embolic group. Intravenous injections of MDP solution alone were performed in the intravenous group. Histological examination of the arteries demonstrated reduplication and lamination of the internal elastic laminae, which corresponded with findings of moyamoya disease in both groups. These histological changes occurred not only in the intracranial arteries on the embolization side, but also in the contralateral intracranial and even extracranial arteries. The changes were more prominent in the intravenous group than in the embolic group. We conclude that the systemic humoral factors induced by MDP in this study may be important in the pathogeneses of moyamoya disease. Our observations suggest that moyamoya disease is a systemic vascular disease and has an etiologic factor affecting both intracranial and extracranial arteries

  9. Effect of the hydroaffinity and topology of pore walls on the structure and dynamics of confined water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrach, Michael F., E-mail: harrach@fkp.tu-darmstadt.de; Klameth, Felix; Drossel, Barbara; Vogel, Michael, E-mail: michael.vogel@physik.tu-darmstadt.de [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, Hochschulstr. 6, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-01-21

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to observe the structure and dynamics of SPC/E water in amorphous silica pores and amorphous ice pores with radii slightly larger than 10 Å. In addition to atomically rough pores, we construct completely smooth pores such that the potential felt at a given distance from the pore wall is an averaged atomic potential. As compared to rough walls, smooth walls induce stronger distortions of water structure for both silica and ice confinements. On the other hand, unlike the smooth pores, the rough pores strongly slow down water dynamics at the pore wall. The slowdown vanishes when reducing the atomic charges in the wall, i.e., when varying the hydroaffinity, while keeping the surface topology, indicating that it is not a geometric effect. Rather, it is due to the fact that the wall atoms provide a static energy landscape along the surface, e.g., fixed anchor-points for hydrogen bonds, to which the water molecules need to adapt, blocking channels for structural rearrangement. In the smooth pores, water dynamics can be faster than in the bulk liquid not only at the pore wall but also in the pore center. Changes in the tetrahedral order rather than in the local density are identified as the main cause for this change of the dynamical behavior in the center of smooth pores.

  10. Soft Walls in Dynamic AdS/QCD and the Techni-dilaton

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Nick; Scott, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic AdS/QCD is a modification of AdS/QCD that includes the running of the anomalous dimension of the q-bar q quark bilinear and in which the generation of the constituent quark mass plays the role of an IR wall. The model allows one to move away smoothly from the controlled spectrum of the N=2 super Yang-Mills theory of the D3/probe-D7 system to more QCD-like theories with chiral symmetry breaking. We investigate soft wall behaviour in the model that gives Regge trajectories with M_{n,s}^2 ~ n,s. To achieve these behaviours requires the quark's constituent mass to fall peculiarly sharply in the IR so that meson physics is sensitive to RG scales well below the quark's on-shell mass. Including soft wall behaviour in models of walking gauge dynamics breaks the near conformal symmetry which is present above the quark on-shell mass which can generate a large mass for the techni-dilaton like state. We conclude that the meson spectrum is rather sensitive to the IR decoupling.

  11. On the Dynamic Behavior of a Liquid Droplet Impacting upon a Wall Having Obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boseon Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effects of a step edge and a stationary droplet on the dynamic behavior of a droplet impacting upon a wall are experimentally studied. The main parameters were the distance from the step edge to the center of the impacting droplet and the center-to-center distance between the stationary and impacting droplets. Photographic images showed the coalescence dynamics, shape evolution and contact line movement of the impacting droplet. The spread length is presented for the step edge and two coalescing droplets. The droplets exhibited much different dynamic behavior depending on the location of the step edge. The momentum of the impacting droplet was better transferred to the stationary droplet as the center-to-center distance between the two droplets was reduced, resulting in more spreading of the coalescing droplet.

  12. Dynamic torsional buckling of multi-walled carbon nanotubes embedded in an elastic medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengqi Sun; Kaixin Liu; Guoxing Lu

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the dynamic torsional buckling of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) embedded in an elastic medium is studied by using a continuum mechan-ics model. By introducing initial imperfections for MWNTs and applying the preferred mode analytical method, a buck-ling condition is derived for the buckling load and associ-ated buckling mode. In particular, explicit expressions are obtained for embedded double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs). Numerical results show that, for both the DWNTs and embedded DWNTs, the buckling form shifts from the lower buckling mode to the higher buckling mode with increasing the buckling load, but the buckling mode is invari-able for a certain domain of the buckling load. It is also indicated that, the surrounding elastic medium generally has effect on the lower buckling mode of DWNTs only when compared with the corresponding one for individual DWNTs.

  13. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS (CFD) SIMULATIONS OF DRAG REDUCTION WITH PERIODIC MICRO-STRUCTURED WALL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; ZHOU Ming; WU Bo; YE Xia; CAI Lan

    2008-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics(CFD) simulations are adopted to investigate rectangular microchannel flows with various periodic micro-structured wall by introducing velocity slip boundary condition at low Reynolds number. The purpose of the current study is to numerically find out the effects of periodic micro-structured wall on the flow resistance in rectangular microchannel with the different spacings between microridges ranging from 15 to 60 μm. The simulative results indicate that pressure drop with different spacing between microridges increases linearly with flow velocity and decreases monotonically with slip velocity; Pressure drop reduction also increases with the spacing between microridges at the same condition of slip velocity and flow velocity. The results of numerical simulation are compared with theoretical predictions and experimental results in the literatures. It is found that there is qualitative agreement between them.

  14. Spatio-temporal patterns in ultra-slow domain wall creep dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrero, Ezequiel E; Giamarchi, Thierry; Kolton, Alejandro B; Rosso, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    In presence of impurities, ferromagnetic and ferroelectric domain walls slide only above a finite external field. Close to this depinning threshold, the wall proceeds by large and abrupt jumps, called avalanches, while, at much smaller field, it creeps by thermal activation. In this work we develop a novel numerical technique that captures the ultra-slow creep regime over huge time scales. We point out the existence of activated events that involve collective reorganizations similar to avalanches, but, at variance with them, display correlated spatio-temporal patterns that resemble the complex sequence of aftershocks observed after a large earthquake. Remarkably, we show that events assembly in independent clusters owning the same scale-free statistics as critical depinning avalanches. This correlated dynamics should be experimentally accessible by magneto-optical imaging of ferro- magnetic films.

  15. Cell wall dynamics modulate acetic acid-induced apoptotic cell death of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Rego

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid triggers apoptotic cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, similar to mammalian apoptosis. To uncover novel regulators of this process, we analyzed whether impairing MAPK signaling affected acetic acid-induced apoptosis and found the mating-pheromone response and, especially, the cell wall integrity pathways were the major mediators, especially the latter, which we characterized further. Screening downstream effectors of this pathway, namely targets of the transcription factor Rlm1p, highlighted decreased cell wall remodeling as particularly important for acetic acid resistance. Modulation of cell surface dynamics therefore emerges as a powerful strategy to increase acetic acid resistance, with potential application in industrial fermentations using yeast, and in biomedicine to exploit the higher sensitivity of colorectal carcinoma cells to apoptosis induced by acetate produced by intestinal propionibacteria.

  16. Is prophylactic embolization of the hepatic falciform artery needed before radioembolization in patients with {sup 99m}Tc-MAA accumulation in the anterior abdominal wall?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Sabet, Amir; Muckle, Marianne; Haslerud, Torjan; Biersack, Hans Juergen; Ezziddin, Samer [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Moehlenbruch, Markus; Meyer, Carsten; Wilhelm, Kai; Schild, Hans Heinz [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    While influx of chemoembolic agents into the hepatic falciform artery (HFA) from the hepatic artery can cause supraumbilical skin rash, epigastric pain and even skin necrosis, the significance of a patent HFA in patients undergoing radioembolization is not completely clear. Furthermore, the presence of tracer in the anterior abdominal wall seen in {sup 99m}Tc-macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) images, which is generally performed prior to radioembolization, has been described as a sign of a patent HFA. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the incidence and consequences of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA accumulation in the anterior abdominal wall, indicating a patent HFA, in patients undergoing radioembolization of liver tumours. A total of 224 diagnostic hepatic angiograms combined with {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT were acquired in 192 patients with different types of cancer, of whom 142 were treated with a total of 214 radioembolization procedures. All patients received a whole-body scan, and planar and SPECT/CT scans of the abdomen. Only patients with extrahepatic {sup 99m}Tc-MAA accumulation in the anterior abdominal wall were included in this study. Posttreatment bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT and follow-up results for at least 3 months served as reference standards. Tracer accumulation in the anterior abdominal wall was present in pretreatment {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT images of 18 patients (9.3%). The HFA was found and embolized by radiologists before treatment in one patient. In the remaining patients radioembolization was performed without any modification in the treatment plan despite the previously mentioned extrahepatic accumulation. Only one patient experienced abdominal muscle pain above the navel, which started 24 h after treatment and lasted for 48 h without any skin changes. The remaining patients did not experience any relevant side effects during the follow-up period. Side effects after radioembolization in patients with tracer accumulation in the

  17. Intimal and medial contributions to the hydraulic resistance of the arterial wall at different pressures: a combined computational and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chooi, K Y; Comerford, A; Sherwin, S J; Weinberg, P D

    2016-06-01

    The hydraulic resistances of the intima and media determine water flux and the advection of macromolecules into and across the arterial wall. Despite several experimental and computational studies, these transport processes and their dependence on transmural pressure remain incompletely understood. Here, we use a combination of experimental and computational methods to ascertain how the hydraulic permeability of the rat abdominal aorta depends on these two layers and how it is affected by structural rearrangement of the media under pressure. Ex vivo experiments determined the conductance of the whole wall, the thickness of the media and the geometry of medial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and extracellular matrix (ECM). Numerical methods were used to compute water flux through the media. Intimal values were obtained by subtraction. A mechanism was identified that modulates pressure-induced changes in medial transport properties: compaction of the ECM leading to spatial reorganization of SMCs. This is summarized in an empirical constitutive law for permeability and volumetric strain. It led to the physiologically interesting observation that, as a consequence of the changes in medial microstructure, the relative contributions of the intima and media to the hydraulic resistance of the wall depend on the applied pressure; medial resistance dominated at pressures above approximately 93 mmHg in this vessel.

  18. Thermal vibration of a single-walled carbon nanotube predicted by semiquantum molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rumeng; Wang, Lifeng

    2015-02-21

    Quantum effects should be considered in the thermal vibrations of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). To this end, molecular dynamics based on modified Langevin dynamics, which accounts for quantum statistics by introducing a quantum heat bath, is used to simulate the thermal vibration of a cantilevered single-walled CNT (SWCNT). A nonlocal elastic Timoshenko beam model with quantum effects (TBQN), which can take the effect of microstructure into consideration, has been established to explain the resulting power spectral density of the SWCNT. The root of mean squared (RMS) amplitude of the thermal vibration of the SWCNT obtained from semiquantum molecular dynamics (SQMD) is lower than that obtained from classical molecular dynamics, especially at very low temperature and high-order modes. The natural frequencies of the SWCNT obtained from the Timoshenko beam model are closer to those obtained from molecular dynamics if the nonlocal effect is taken into consideration. However, the nonlocal Timoshenko beam model with the law of energy equipartition (TBCN) can only predict the RMS amplitude of the SWCNT obtained from classical molecular dynamics without considering quantum effects. The RMS amplitude of the SWCNT obtained from SQMD and that obtained from TBQN coincide very well. These results indicate that quantum effects are important for the thermal vibration of the SWCNT in the case of high-order modes, short length and low temperature.

  19. Simultaneous acquisition of dynamic PET-MRI: arterial input function using DSC-MRI and [18F]-FET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldeira, Liliana; Yun, Seong Dae; Silva, Nuno da; Filss, Christian; Scheins, Juergen; Telmann, Lutz; Herzog, Hans; Shah, Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine - 4, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2015-05-18

    This work focuses on the study of simultaneous dynamic MR-PET acquisition in brain tumour patients. MR-based perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI) and PET [18F]-FET are dynamic methods, which allow to evaluate tumour metabolism in a quantitative way. In both methods, arterial input function (AIF) is necessary for quantification. However, the AIF estimation is a challenging task. In this work, we explore the possibilities to combine dynamic MR and PET AIF.

  20. Analysis of C60 insertion into single wall carbon nanotube by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takafumi; Esfarjani, Keivan; Hashi, Yuichi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Iijima, Sumio

    2001-10-01

    Classical molecular dynamics is used to simulate the insertion of C60 into a (10, 10) single wall nano tube (SWNT). We propose that the insertion process occurs through the open end of the tube. After insertion, the energy exchange between the C60 and the nanotube causes the kinetic energy of the former to decrease as it moves inside the tube. This kinetic energy loss is due to a "friction force" which we calculated for several insertion conditions. The binding energy of the C60 with the SWNT is due to Van der Waals interaction, and is found to be about 3.5 eV.

  1. Visualizing the growth dynamics of individual single-wall carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Zhang, Lili; He, Maoshuai;

    In order to meet the increasing demand of faster and more flexible electronics and optical devices and at the same time decrease the use of the critical metals, carbon based devices are in fast development. Single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based electronics is a way of addressing...... around the studied sample at elevated temperature gives a unique way of monitoring gas-solid interactions such as CNT growth. Here we show the direct experimental evidence on the growth dynamics of SW-CNTs from Co/MgO catalysts using CO as carbon source inside the environmental TEM. The evolution...

  2. Spatial Finite Element Analysis for Dynamic Response of Curved Thin-Walled Box Girder Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinhui Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the flexural and torsional characteristics of curved thin-walled box girder with the effect of initial curvature, 7 basic displacements of curved box girder are determined. And then the strain-displacement calculation correlations were established. Under the curvilinear coordinate system, a three-noded curved girder finite element which has 7 degrees of freedom per node for the vibration characteristic and dynamic response analysis of curved box girder is constructed. The shape functions are used as the interpolation functions of variable curvature and variable height to accommodate to the variation of curvature and section height. A MATLAB numerical analysis program has been implemented.

  3. A New Boundary Model for Simulating Complex and Flexible Wall Bounded Domain in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Mokhtarian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive area of applications, simulation of complex wall bounded problems or any deformable boundary is still a challenge in a Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation. This limitation is rooted in the soft force nature of DPD and the fact that we need to use an antipenetration model for escaped particles. In the present paper, we propose a new model of antipenetration which preserves the conservation of linear momentum on the boundaries and enables us to simulate complex and flexible boundaries. Finally by performing numerical simulations, we demonstrate the validity of our new model.

  4. IFE thick liquid wall chamber dynamics: Governing mechanisms andmodeling and experimental capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffray, A.R.; Meier, W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.; Bonazza, R.; Calderoni, P.; Debonnel, C.S.; Dragojlovic, Z.; El-Guebaly, L.; Haynes,D.; Latkowski, J.; Olson, C.; Peterson, P.F.; Reyes, S.; Sharpe, P.; Tillack, M.S.; Zaghloul, M.

    2005-01-24

    For thick liquid wall concepts, it is important to understand the different mechanisms affecting the chamber dynamics and the state of the chamber prior to each shot a compared with requirements from the driver and target. These include ablation mechanisms, vapor transport and control, possible aerosol formation, as well as protective jet behavior. This paper was motivated by a town meeting on this subject which helped identify the major issues, assess the latest results, review the capabilities of existing modeling and experimental facilities with respect to addressing remaining issues, and helping guide future analysis and R&D efforts; the paper covers these exact points.

  5. Dynamic Mechanism of Single-Stranded DNA Encapsulated into Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yan-Fei; Yang, Chuan-Lu; Mo, Yong-Fang; Wang, Mei-Shan; Ma, Xiao-Guang

    2014-02-01

    Hybrids of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and biological molecules have been utilized for numerous applications in sensing, imaging, and drug delivery. By molecular dynamics simulation, we investigate the encapsulation of single-strand DNA (ssDNA) containing eight adenine bases with (17,17)-(12,12) SWCNTs. The effects of the diameter and length of SWCNTs on the encapsulation process are explored with the calculated curves of the center-of-mass distance, the van der Waals interaction between the ssDNA and SWCNT, the root-mean-square deviation of the ssDNA, and the radius of gyration of the ssDNA. The free energy of the encapsulated ssDNA for each SWCNT is also obtained via steered molecular dynamics simulation. The most suitable SWCNT for encapsulating the ssDNA is also suggested.

  6. Study of the role and distribution of wall shear stress in rabbit atherosclerotic carotid artery%家兔颈动脉粥样硬化壁面剪应力分布及作用的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄志芳; 陈明; 张宇辉; 夏良华; 曲俊朴; 王超; 涂志兰; 黄东雅

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨家兔颈总动脉粥样硬化(AS)发病过程中动脉血管壁上壁面剪应力(WSS)的分布及其对AS进程的影响.方法 24只新西兰大白兔随机分为对照组(正常饲料喂养,12只)和实验组(采用空气干燥加高脂饮食制造AS模型,12只).空气干燥术后2、4、8、12周采用彩色多普勒超声及血流剪应力定量分析软件测定血流动力学参数,分别于术后第4、8、12周处死实验组兔4只,处死前检测血脂,并做病理切片观察颈动脉病变的形态特征,对照组兔在第4周全部处死,获得相应的数据,进行对照分析.结果 实验组的各项血脂指标呈不同程度的升高,与对照组比较差异具有统计学意义(P<0.01).实验组从实施手术开始至术后4周,颈总动脉低WSS数目的分布增加,实验组左侧颈总动脉内约45%的WSS集中在0.2~0.4 N/m2,右侧约36%,左侧颈总动脉WSS降低的速度比右侧进展快.至术后8~12周,实验组颈总动脉低WSS分布反而减少,而高WSS血流点数目增加,实施干燥术后12周,实验组颈总动脉管壁逐渐僵硬、增厚,脂质沉积增加,平滑肌移行增殖,胶原增生,弹性降低,实验组左侧颈总动脉AS程度重于右侧.各项实验结果均证实实验组出现较典型的AS改变.结论 随着AS进程的延长,实验兔颈总动脉局部WSS逐步降低,低WSS进一步刺激血管内皮细胞增生,出现颈总动脉内中膜增厚及血管重构,提示颈总动脉WSS减低与动脉AS的形成有关.%Objective To dynamically observe the distribution of wall shear stress (WSS) in the carotid artery of rabbit and its impact on atherosclerosis(AS) by using AS model.Methods Twenty-four New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into control group (normal diet,n =12) and experimental group (air-drying plus high fat diet,n =12).In the 2nd,4th,8th,12th week after operation,hemodynamic parameters were measured by using color Doppler flow imaging and shear stress

  7. A dynamic wall model for Large-Eddy simulations of wind turbine dedicated airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    J, Calafell; O, Lehmkuhl; A, Carmona; D, Pérez-Segarra C.; A, Oliva

    2014-06-01

    This work aims at modelling the flow behavior past a wind turbine dedicated airfoil at high Reynolds number and large angle of attack (AoA). The DU-93-W-210 airfoil has been selected. To do this, Large Eddy Simulations (LES) have been performed. Momentum equations have been solved with a parallel unstructured symmetry preserving formulation while the wall-adapting local-eddy viscosity model within a variational multi-scale framework (VMS- WALE) is used as the subgrid-scales model. Since LES calculations are still very expensive at high Reynolds Number, specially at the near-wall region, a dynamic wall model has been implemented in order to overcome this limitation. The model has been validated with a very unresolved Channel Flow case at Reτ = 2000. Afterwards, the model is also tested with the Ahmed Car case, that from the flow physics point of view is more similar to an stalled airfoil than the Channel Flow is, including flow features as boundary layer detachment and recirculations. This case has been selected because experimental results of mean velocity profiles are available. Finally, a flow around a DU-93-W-210 airfoil is computed at Re = 3 x 106 and with an AoA of 15°. Numerical results are presented in comparison with Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) or experimental data for all cases.

  8. Hydrodynamic interaction between a platelet and an erythrocyte: effect of erythrocyte deformability, dynamics, and wall proximity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Diamond, Scott L; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2013-05-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical simulations of hydrodynamic interaction between a red blood cell (RBC) and a platelet in a wall-bounded shear flow. The dynamics and large deformation of the RBC are fully resolved in the simulations using a front-tracking method. The objective is to quantify the influence of tank treading and tumbling dynamics of the RBC, and the presence of a bounding wall on the deflection of platelet trajectories. We observe two types of interaction: A crossing event in which the platelet comes in close proximity to the RBC, rolls over it, and continues to move in the same direction; and a turning event in which the platelet turns away before coming close to the RBC. The crossing events occur when the initial lateral separation between the cells is above a critical separation, and the turning events occur when it is below the critical separation. The critical lateral separation is found to be higher during the tumbling motion than that during the tank treading. When the RBC is flowing closer to the wall than the platelet, the critical separation increases by several fold, implying the turning events have higher probability to occur than the crossing events. On the contrary, if the platelet is flowing closer to the wall than the RBC, the critical separation decreases by several folds, implying the crossing events are likely to occur. Based on the numerical results, we propose a mechanism of continual platelet drift from the RBC-rich region of the vessel towards the wall by a succession of turning and crossing events. The trajectory deflection in the crossing events is found to depend nonmonotonically on the initial lateral separation, unlike the monotonic trend observed in tracer particle deflection and in deformable sphere-sphere collision. This nonmonotonic trend is shown to be a consequence of the deformation of the RBC caused by the platelet upon collision. An estimation of the platelet diffusion coefficient yields values that are

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF CALCULATING MODEL APPLICABLE FOR CYLINDER WALL DYNAMIC HEAT TRANSFER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Minjun; SHI Tielin

    2007-01-01

    In the calculation of submarine air conditioning load of the early stage, the obtained heat is regarded as cooling load. The confusion of the two words causing the cooling load figured out is abnormally high, and the change of air conditioning cooling load can not be indicated. In accordance with submarine structure and heat transfer characteristics of its inner components, Laplace transformation to heat conduction differential equation of cylinder wall is carried out. The dynamic calculation of submarine conditioning load based on this model is also conducted, and the results of calculation are compared with those of static cooling load calculation. It is concluded that the dynamic cooling load calculation methods can illustrate the change of submarine air conditioning cooling load more accurate than the static one.

  10. Temperature-dependent Neel wall dynamics in GaMnAs/GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honolka, J; Herrera Diez, L; Kremer, R K; Kern, K [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Placidi, E; Arciprete, F, E-mail: j.honolka@fkf.mpg.d [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' and CNR-INFM, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    Extensive Kerr microscopy studies reveal strongly temperature-dependent domain wall (DW) dynamics in Hall bars made from compressively strained GaMnAs. Depending on the temperature, magnetic charging of the DWs is observed, and the nucleation rates depend on the Hall geometry with respect to the crystal axes. Above a critical temperature where a biaxial-to-uniaxial anisotropy transition occurs, a drastic increase in nucleation events is observed. Below this temperature, the nucleation of domains tends to be rather insensitive to temperature. This spatially resolved study of the DW dynamics in patterned GaMnAs at variable temperature has important implications for potential applications in single DW magneto-logic devices made from ferromagnetic semiconductors.

  11. Dynamic stiffness matrix of thin-walled composite I-beam with symmetric and arbitrary laminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam-Il; Shin, Dong Ku; Park, Young-Suk

    2008-11-01

    For the spatially coupled free vibration analysis of thin-walled composite I-beam with symmetric and arbitrary laminations, the exact dynamic stiffness matrix based on the solution of the simultaneous ordinary differential equations is presented. For this, a general theory for the vibration analysis of composite beam with arbitrary lamination including the restrained warping torsion is developed by introducing Vlasov's assumption. Next, the equations of motion and force-displacement relationships are derived from the energy principle and the first order of transformed simultaneous differential equations are constructed by using the displacement state vector consisting of 14 displacement parameters. Then explicit expressions for displacement parameters are derived and the exact dynamic stiffness matrix is determined using force-displacement relationships. In addition, the finite-element (FE) procedure based on Hermitian interpolation polynomials is developed. To verify the validity and the accuracy of this study, the numerical solutions are presented and compared with analytical solutions, the results from available references and the FE analysis using the thin-walled Hermitian beam elements. Particular emphasis is given in showing the phenomenon of vibrational mode change, the effects of increase of the modulus and the bending-twisting coupling stiffness for beams with various boundary conditions.

  12. Dynamic Response of High Rise Structures Under The Influence of Shear Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Khasim Mutwalli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the procedure for seismic performance estimation of high-rise buildings based on a concept of the capacity spectrum method. In 3D analytical model of thirty storied buildings have been generated for symmetric buildings Models and analyzed using structural analysis tool ETABS. The analytical model of the building includes all important components that influence the mass, strength, stiffness and deformability of the structure. To study the effect of concrete core wall & shear wall at different positions during earthquake, seismic analysis using both linear static, linear dynamic and non-linear static procedure has been performed. The deflections at each storey level has been compared by performing Equivalent static, response spectrum method as well as pushover method has also been performed to determine capacity, demand and performance level of the considered building models. From the below studies it has been observed that non-linear pushover analysis provide good estimate of global as well as local inelastic deformation demands and also reveals design weakness that may remain hidden in an elastic analysis and also the performance level of the structure. Storey drifts are found within the limit as specified by code (IS: 1893-2002 in Equivalent static, linear dynamic & non-linear static analysis.

  13. Dynamics of Ca2+-dependent Cl- channel modulation by niflumic acid in rabbit coronary arterial myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledoux, Jonathan; Greenwood, Iain A; Leblanc, Normand

    2005-01-01

    Calcium-activated chloride channels (Cl(Ca)) are crucial regulators of vascular tone by promoting a depolarizing influence on the resting membrane potential of vascular smooth muscle cells. Niflumic acid (NFA), a potent blocker of Cl(Ca) in vascular myocytes, was shown recently to cause inhibition and paradoxical stimulation of sustained calcium-activated chloride currents [I(Cl(Ca))] in rabbit pulmonary artery myocytes. The aims of the present study were to investigate whether NFA produced a similar dual effect in coronary artery smooth muscle cells and to determine the concentration-dependence and dynamics of such a phenomenon. Sustained I(Cl(Ca)) evoked by intracellular Ca(2+) clamped at 500 nM were dose-dependently inhibited by NFA (IC(50) = 159 microM) and transiently augmented in a concentration-independent manner (10 microM to 1 mM) approximately 2-fold after NFA removal. However, the time to peak and duration of NFA-enhanced I(Cl(Ca)) increased in a concentration-dependent fashion. Moreover, the rate of recovery was reduced by membrane depolarization, suggesting the involvement of a voltage-dependent step in the interaction of NFA, leading to stimulation of I(Cl(Ca)). Computer simulations derived from a kinetic model involving low (K(i) = 1.25 mM) and high (K(i) < 30 microM) affinity sites could reproduce the properties of the NFA-modulated I(Cl(Ca)) fairly well.

  14. A dynamic signal coordination control method for urban arterial roads and its application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-jiang SHEN; Yong-yao YANG

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel dynamic traffic signal coordination method that takes account of the special traffic flow char-acteristics of urban arterial roads. The core of this method includes a control area division module and a signal coordination control module. Firstly, we analyze and model the influences of segment distance, traffic flow density, and signal cycle time on the cor-relation degree between two neighboring intersections. Then, we propose a fuzzy computing method to estimate the correlation degree based on a hierarchical structure and a method to divide the control area of urban arterial roads into subareas based on correlation degrees. Subarea coordination control arithmetic is used to calculate the public cycle time of the control subarea, up-run offset and down-run offset of the section, and the split of each intersection. An application of the method in Shaoxing City, Zhejiang Province, China shows that the method can reduce the average travel time and the average stop rate effectively.

  15. The low-dose atorvastatin and valsartan combination effectively protects the arterial wall from atherogenic diet-induced impairment in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janić, Miodrag; Lunder, Mojca; Zupan, Janja; Černe, Darko; Marc, Janja; Drevenšek, Gorazd; Šabovič, Mišo

    2014-11-15

    New preventive strategies for atherosclerosis are needed. In this study, we tested whether a new therapeutic approach consisting of low-dose treatment with a statin and sartan combination could prevent atherogenic diet-induced impairment of the arterial wall in guinea pigs. Twenty-five Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs were randomly assigned to five experimental groups: 1) normal diet; 2) atherogenic diet (AD); 3) AD + a low-dose atorvastatin and valsartan combination (5mg/kg/day and 2.4mg/kg/day, respectively); 4) AD + low-dose atorvastatin (5mg/kg/day); 5) AD + low-dose valsartan (2.4mg/kg/day). After 8 weeks of treatment, the animals were killed, blood samples collected and thoracic and abdominal aortas isolated. The atherogenic diet significantly impaired maximal thoracic aorta endothelium-dependent relaxation by 40.1% relative to the normal diet. The low-dose combination, compared to the separate drugs, completely preserved thoracic aorta endothelium-dependent relaxation at the level of the group receiving normal diet. This substantial effect was associated with a significant change in the expression of NOS3 (R=0.93; P=0.0002) and IL1b (R=-0.79; P=0.003) genes. In addition, treatment with the low-dose combination or the separate drugs also prevented atherosclerotic plaque formation. We found that treatment with the low-dose atorvastatin and valsartan combination has the capability to completely protect the arterial wall from atherogenic diet-induced damage in the guinea pig model. Further studies evaluating this new therapeutic approach are desirable.

  16. An impedance matching of femoral-popliteal arterial grafts: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, H; Nishimura, T; Fukuyama, Y

    1997-05-01

    We have proposed a mathematical method to investigate the matching conditions for an arterial graft in the femoral-popliteal region from a mechanical stand-point. Pulsatory blood flow, arterial wall motions, and conservation law are expressed by linear dynamical equations based on strict mechanical and constitutional considerations. To express the physiological blood flow in an actual arterial system, the tethering effects from the surrounding tissue and wall tensions were incorporated. The physiological parameters of arterial wall and tethering were utilized from reported experimental data. By complex analysis, mathematical expressions for the local impedance and reflection coefficient were obtained. They include not only blood properties such as viscosity and density, but also arterial properties including elastic modulus, radius, Poisson ratio, wall thickness, wall tension, frequency, and tethering effects from surrounding tissue. A matching condition was defined for minimizing the local impedance and reflection coefficient. The biophysical background was to reduce any mechanical mismatches, thus minimizing the disturbance of the flow velocity profile and shear stress distribution within the artery. Impedance matching in turn diminishes the negative factors for graft substitution represented by intimal hyperplasia and thrombosis. The calculated impedance and reflection coefficient inversed parabolically to functions of the resistance of the host artery, and there was one host arterial resistance that minimized the impedance and reflection coefficient. The present analysis revealed that for matching host artery with an elevated resistance, the dynamic elastic modulus of the wall of the graft that minimizes the impedance and reflection coefficient was increased. This indicates that for a host artery with a high resistance, an impedance matched stiff wall graft is preferable. For a large radius and a compliant host artery on the other hand, a large compliant graft

  17. Age determination of vessel wall hematoma in spontaneous cervical artery dissection: A multi-sequence 3T Cardiovascular Magnetic resonance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habs Maximilian

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously proposed classifications for carotid plaque and cerebral parenchymal hemorrhages are used to estimate the age of hematoma according to its signal intensities on T1w and T2w MR images. Using these classifications, we systematically investigated the value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR in determining the age of vessel wall hematoma (VWH in patients with spontaneous cervical artery dissection (sCAD. Methods 35 consecutive patients (mean age 43.6 ± 9.8 years with sCAD received a cervical multi-sequence 3T CMR with fat-saturated black-blood T1w-, T2w- and TOF images. Age of sCAD was defined as time between onset of symptoms (stroke, TIA or Horner's syndrome and the CMR scan. VWH were categorized into hyperacute, acute, early subacute, late subacute and chronic based on their signal intensities on T1w- and T2w images. Results The mean age of sCAD was 2.0, 5.8, 15.7 and 58.7 days in patients with acute, early subacute, late subacute and chronic VWH as classified by CMR (p Conclusions Signal intensities of VWH in sCAD vary over time and multi-sequence CMR can help to determine the age of an arterial dissection. Furthermore, findings of this study suggest that the time course of carotid hematomas differs from that of cerebral hematomas.

  18. System identification of dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance by arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljuri, A. N.; Bursac, N.; Marini, R.; Cohen, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to microgravity in space flight missions (days) impairs the mechanisms responsible for defense of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cardiac output (CO) against orthostatic stress in the post-flight period. The mechanisms responsible for the observed orthostatic intolerance are not yet completely understood. Additionally, effective counter measures to attenuate this pathophysiological response are not available. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of our proposed system identification method to predict closed-loop dynamic changes in TPR induced by changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and right atrial pressure (RAP). For this purpose we designed and employed a novel experimental animal model for the examination of arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors in the dynamic closed-loop control of total peripheral resistance (TPR), and applied system identification to the analysis of beat-to-beat fluctuations in the measured signals. Grant numbers: NAG5-4989. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Computational Analysis on Stent Geometries in Carotid Artery: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisal, Muhammad Sufyan Amir; Taib, Ishkrizat; Ismail, Al Emran

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the work done by previous researchers in order to gather the information for the current study which about the computational analysis on stent geometry in carotid artery. The implantation of stent in carotid artery has become popular treatment for arterial diseases of hypertension such as stenosis, thrombosis, atherosclerosis and embolization, in reducing the rate of mortality and morbidity. For the stenting of an artery, the previous researchers did many type of mathematical models in which, the physiological variables of artery is analogized to electrical variables. Thus, the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) of artery could be done, which this method is also did by previous researchers. It lead to the current study in finding the hemodynamic characteristics due to artery stenting such as wall shear stress (WSS) and wall shear stress gradient (WSSG). Another objective of this study is to evaluate the nowadays stent configuration for full optimization in reducing the arterial side effect such as restenosis rate after a few weeks of stenting. The evaluation of stent is based on the decrease of strut-strut intersection, decrease of strut width and increase of the strut-strut spacing. The existing configuration of stents are actually good enough in widening the narrowed arterial wall but the disease such as thrombosis still occurs in early and late stage after the stent implantation. Thus, the outcome of this study is the prediction for the reduction of restenosis rate and the WSS distribution is predicted to be able in classifying which stent configuration is the best.

  20. Renal blood flow regulation and arterial pressure fluctuations: a case study in nonlinear dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Marsh, D J

    1994-01-01

    The arterial blood pressure, a physiological variable on which all renal excretory processes depend, fluctuates over a wide range of amplitudes and frequencies. Much of this variation originates in nonrenal vascular beds to support nonrenal tasks, and the fluctuations provide a noisy environment...... a relatively noise-free environment in which to work. Because of the time-varying nature of the blood pressure, we have concentrated in this review on the now substantial body of work on the dynamics of renal blood flow regulation and the underlying mechanisms. Renal vascular control mechanisms are not simply...... of experimental hypertension provide tubular pressure records that pass statistical tests for ordered structure and sensitive dependence on initial conditions in the reconstructed state space, two of the hallmarks of deterministic chaos. These records also pass recent more stringent tests for chaos...

  1. Probing nuclear dynamics and architecture using single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon; Li, Junang; Fakhri, Nikta

    Chromatin is a multiscale dynamic architecture that acts as a template for many biochemical processes such as transcription and DNA replication. Recent developments such as Hi-C technology enable an identification of chromatin interactions across an entire genome. However, a single cell dynamic view of chromatin organization is far from understood. We discuss a new live cell imaging technique to probe the dynamics of the nucleus at a single cell level using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNTs are non-perturbing rigid rods (diameter of 1 nm and length of roughly 100 nm) that fluoresce in the near infrared region. Due to their high aspect ratio, they can diffuse in tight spaces and report on the architecture and dynamics of the nucleoplasm. We develop 3D imaging and tracking of SWNTs in the volume of the nucleus using double helix point spread function microscopy (DH-PSF) and discuss the capabilities of the DH-PSF for inferring the 3D orientation of nanotubes based on vectorial diffraction theory.

  2. Development of EEM based silicon-water and silica-water wall potentials for non-reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junghan; Iype, Eldhose; Frijns, Arjan J. H.; Nedea, Silvia V.; van Steenhoven, Anton A.

    2014-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of heat transfer in gases are computationally expensive when the wall molecules are explicitly modeled. To save computational time, an implicit boundary function is often used. Steele's potential has been used in studies of fluid-solid interface for a long time. In this work, the conceptual idea of Steele's potential was extended in order to simulate water-silicon and water-silica interfaces. A new wall potential model is developed by using the electronegativity-equalization method (EEM), a ReaxFF empirical force field and a non-reactive molecular dynamics package PumMa. Contact angle simulations were performed in order to validate the wall potential model. Contact angle simulations with the resulting tabulated wall potentials gave a silicon-water contact angle of 129°, a quartz-water contact angle of 0°, and a cristobalite-water contact angle of 40°, which are in reasonable agreement with experimental values.

  3. Specific features of low-frequency vibrational dynamics and low-temperature heat capacity of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramenko, M. V.; Roshal, S. B.

    2016-05-01

    A continuous model has been constructed for low-frequency dynamics of a double-walled carbon nanotube. The formation of the low-frequency part of the phonon spectrum of a double-walled nanotube from phonon spectra of its constituent single-walled nanotubes has been considered in the framework of the proposed approach. The influence of the environment on the phonon spectrum of a single double-walled carbon nanotube has been analyzed. A combined method has been proposed for estimating the coefficients of the van der Waals interaction between the walls of the nanotube from the spectroscopic data and the known values of the elastic moduli of graphite. The low-temperature specific heat has been calculated for doublewalled carbon nanotubes, which in the field of applicability of the model ( T nanotubes forming it.

  4. Monitoring of gadolinium-BOPTA uptake into the vessel wall during magnetic resonance (MR)-guided angioplasty of the peripheral arteries with a paclitaxel/gadolinium-BOPTA-coated balloon. An experimental study at 3 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neizel, M.; Kelm, M. [University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology, Pneumology and Angiology; Ruebben, A.; Weiss, N. [Aachen Resonance, Aachen (Germany); Guenther, R.W. [University Hospital Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Krombach, G.A. [University Hospital Giessen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: The success of paclitaxel distribution within the vessel wall during paclitaxel-coated balloon angioplasty to prevent restenosis cannot be monitored under X-ray guidance. The aim of this pilot study was to demonstrate the feasibility of monitoring Gadolinium-BOPTA delivery within the vessel wall during magnetic resonance (MR)-guided paclitaxel/Gadolinium-BOPTA-coated balloon angioplasty of the peripheral arteries. Materials and methods: 6 pigs (47 ± 2 kg) were investigated. All experiments were performed using a 3 Tesla MR scanner. MR-guided bilaterial angioplasty of the iliac arteries was performed using a paclitaxel/MR contrast agent-coated balloon catheter. The feasibility of monitoring the delivery of Gadolinium-BOPTA to the vessel was assessed in 4 animals. In two additional animals, bilateral stenosis was surgically induced in the iliac arteries. Delivery of paclitaxel to the vessel wall was monitored using a 3 D T1-weighted gradient echo (GE) sequence for delineation of the vessel wall. Normalized signal intensity (SI) of the vessel wall was measured before and repeatedly after the intervention for 45 min. in all animals. Results: Paclitaxel/gadolinium-BOPTA-coated balloon angioplasty was successfully accomplished in all iliac arteries (n = 12). In animals with stenosis MR-angiography demonstrated successful dilatation (n = 4). The normalized SI of the vessel wall on T1-weighted GE images significantly increased after the intervention in all animals with and without stenosis for more than 45 min. (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Monitoring of Gadolinium-BOPTA into the vessel wall during MR-guided coated balloon angioplasty is feasible. This is a first step towards providing a tool for the online control of homogenous drug delivery after paclitaxel-coated balloon angioplasty. (orig.)

  5. Influence of atomic vacancies on the dynamic characteristics of nanoresonators based on double walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ajay M.; Joshi, Anand Y.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic analysis of double walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with different boundary conditions has been performed using atomistic finite element method. The double walled carbon nanotube is modeled considering it as a space frame structure similar to a three dimensional beam. The elastic properties of beam element are calculated by considering mechanical characteristics of covalent bonds between the carbon atoms in the hexagonal lattice. Spring elements are used to describe the interlayer interactions between the inner and outer tubes caused due to the van der Waals forces. The mass of each beam element is assumed as point mass at nodes coinciding with carbon atoms at inner and outer wall of DWCNT. It has been reported that atomic vacancies are formed during the manufacturing process in DWCNT which tend to migrate leading to a change in the mechanical characteristics of the same. Simulations have been carried out to visualize the behavior of such defective DWCNTs subjected to different boundary conditions and when used as mass sensing devices. The variation of such atomic vacancies in outer wall of Zigzag and Armchair DWCNT is performed along the length and the change in response is noted. Moreover, as CNTs have been used as mass sensors extensively, the present approach is focused to explore the use of zigzag and armchair DWCNT as sensing device with a mono-atomic vacancy in it. The results clearly state that the dynamic characteristics are greatly influenced by defects like vacancies in it. A higher frequency shift is observed when the vacancy is located away from the fixed end for both Armchair as well as zigzag type of CNTs. A higher frequency shift is reported for armchair CNT for a mass of 10-22 g which remains constant for 10-21 g and then decreases gradually. Comparison with the other experimental and theoretical studies exhibits good association which suggests that defective DWCNTs can further be explored for mass sensing. This investigation is helpful

  6. Absolute Versus Relative Myocardial Blood Flow by Dynamic CT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Patients With Anatomic Coronary Artery Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wichmann, Julian L.; Meinel, Felix G.; Schoepf, U. Joseph; Lo, Gladys G.; Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Wang, Yining; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Varga-Szemes, Akos; Muscogiuri, Giuseppe; Cannao, Paola M.; De Cecco, Carlo N.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in the diagnostic accuracy of absolute and relative territorial myocardial blood flow (MBF) derived from stress dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) for the detection of significant coronary artery stenosis. MATERIALS AND METH

  7. Study of fluid flow behavior in smooth and rough nanochannels through oscillatory wall by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatipour, Hamed; Azimian, Ahmad-Reza; Atlaschian, Omid

    2017-01-01

    The method of molecular dynamics simulation is applied in order to study the behavior of liquid Argon flow within oscillatory Couette flows, in both smooth and rough nanochannels. To accomplish this study, the fluid velocity and the fluid slip in oscillatory Couette flows were used to assess the effects of: oscillatory velocity amplitude, speed frequency rate, channel height, wall density, and the amount of interaction between fluid and wall particles. Both smooth and rough walls were modelled in order to investigate the effect on the fluid patterns as well. Rectangular and triangular wall roughnesses in different dimensions were used to study this effect. The results indicate that an increase in the velocity amplitude increases the fluid slip, and decreases the fluid velocity fluctuations near the walls. Similar to the steady-state Couette flow, in oscillatory flow we observe a decrease in fluid slip by reducing the wall density. Moreover, by reducing the energy parameter between the fluid and wall, the fluid slip increases, and by reducing the length parameter the fluid slip decreases. Implementing the rectangular and triangular roughness to the bottom wall in the oscillatory flow results in a decrease in fluid slip, which is also similar to the usual non-oscillating flows.

  8. Modelos constitutivos para paredes arteriales, descripción del movimiento y estado de deformación//Constitutive models for arterial walls, description of movement and state of deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Otero‐Martínez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Las paredes arteriales son uno de los tejidos blandos encontrados en los seres vivos. Tienen como características ser no lineales, incompresibles y anisotrópicos. En los últimos años se han desarrollado un conjunto de modelos constitutivos que consideran un material hiperelástico. Algunos de estos modelos consideran isotropía del material pero han demostrado no ser adecuados paramodelar el comportamiento de arterias sanas. Los modelos más difundidos en este sentido consideran el material anisotrópico debido a la organización de las fibras de colágeno y a pesar de haber sido formulados para describir la conducta arterial pueden ser utilizados para representar el comportamiento de otros tejidos blandos como la vena cava infra-renal, la pared intestinal, las propiedades mecánicas del esófago, entre otros. Algunos autores incluso los han utilizado para modelar también el daño en las arterias.Palabras claves: modelo constitutivo, tejido arterial, elasticidad, pared aortica, análisis de tensiones, respuesta pasiva._________________________________________________________________________________AbstractArterial walls are one of the soft tissues found in living organism. They are non lineal, incompressible and anisotropic. A set of constitutive models have been developed considering a hyperelastic material. Some of these models consider material isotropy but they have proved to be inadequate for modeling healthy arterial behavior. Mostly used models consider the anisotropic material due to the collagens fibers and nevertheless they have been created to describe arterial behavior can be also used for modeling different soft tissue behavior as infrarenal vena cava, intestine wall, mechanical properties of the esophagus, among others. General author have used them for modeling arterial damage.Key words: constitutive modelling, arterial tissue, elasticity, aortic wall, stress análisis, passive response.

  9. Fast and Accurate Pressure-Drop Prediction in Straightened Atherosclerotic Coronary Arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T.C. Schrauwen (Jelle); D. Koeze (Dion); J.J. Wentzel (Jolanda); F.N. van de Vosse (Frans); A.F.W. van der Steen (Ton); F.J.H. Gijsen (Frank)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractAtherosclerotic disease progression in coronary arteries is influenced by wall shear stress. To compute patient-specific wall shear stress, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is required. In this study we propose a method for computing the pressure-drop in regions proximal and distal to

  10. Films, layers, and droplets: The effect of near-wall fluid structure on spreading dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hanyu; Sibley, David N.; Thiele, Uwe; Archer, Andrew J.

    2017-02-01

    We present a study of the spreading of liquid droplets on a solid substrate at very small scales. We focus on the regime where effective wetting energy (binding potential) and surface tension effects significantly influence steady and spreading droplets. In particular, we focus on strong packing and layering effects in the liquid near the substrate due to underlying density oscillations in the fluid caused by attractive substrate-liquid interactions. We show that such phenomena can be described by a thin-film (or long-wave or lubrication) model including an oscillatory Derjaguin (or disjoining or conjoining) pressure and explore the effects it has on steady droplet shapes and the spreading dynamics of droplets on both an adsorption (or precursor) layer and completely dry substrates. At the molecular scale, commonly used two-term binding potentials with a single preferred minimum controlling the adsorption layer height are inadequate to capture the rich behavior caused by the near-wall layered molecular packing. The adsorption layer is often submonolayer in thickness, i.e., the dynamics along the layer consists of single-particle hopping, leading to a diffusive dynamics, rather than the collective hydrodynamic motion implicit in standard thin-film models. We therefore modify the model in such a way that for thicker films the standard hydrodynamic theory is realized, but for very thin layers a diffusion equation is recovered.

  11. Dynamic Analysis of Horizontally Curved Thin-Walled Box-Girder Bridge due to Moving Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nallasivam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact on curved box-girder bridges due to vehicle moving across rough bridge deck have been analyzed using bridge-vehicle coupled dynamics. The bridge deck unevenness has been assumed to be a homogeneous random process in space specified by a PSD function. The analysis incorporates the effect of centrifugal forces due to vehicle moving on curved bridge. The curved box-girder bridge has been numerically modeled using computationally efficient thin-walled box-beam finite elements which take into account the torsional warping, distortion and distortional warping, that are important features of thin-walled box girders. Rigid vehicle with longitudinal and transverse input to the wheels giving rise to heave-pitch-roll degrees of freedom has been considered. The theoretical bridge model used in simulation study has been validated by a free vibration experiment using impact excitation. The impact factors for several response parameters such as bending moment, shear force, torsional moment, torsional bi-moment, distortional moment, distortional bi-moment and vertical deflections have been obtained for various bridge-vehicle parameters. Both constant velocity and forward acceleration of the vehicle have been considered to examine impact factor. The results highlighted that the impact factors of a curved box girder bridge corresponding to torsion, distortion and their corresponding bimoments have been observed to be generally very high, while those of the other responses are also relatively higher than that of corresponding straight box girder bridge.

  12. Impact of flame-wall interaction on premixed flame dynamics and transfer function characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Kedia, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we numerically investigate the response of a perforated-plate stabilized laminar methane-air premixed flame to imposed inlet velocity perturbations. A flame model using detailed chemical kinetics mechanism is applied and heat exchange between the burner plate and the gas mixture is incorporated. Linear transfer functions, for low mean inlet velocity oscillations, are analyzed for different equivalence ratio, mean inlet velocity, plate thermal conductivity and distance between adjacent holes. The oscillations of the heat exchange rate at the top of the burner surface plays a critical role in driving the growth of the perturbations over a wide range of conditions, including resonance. The flame response to the perturbations at its base takes the form of consumption speed oscillations in this region. Flame stand-off distance increases/decreases when the flame-wall interaction strengthens/weakens, impacting the overall dynamics of the heat release. The convective lag between the perturbations and the flame base response govern the phase of heat release rate oscillations. There is an additional convective lag between the perturbations at the flame base and the flame tip which has a weaker impact on the heat release rate oscillations. At higher frequencies, the flame-wall interaction is weaker and the heat release oscillations are driven by the flame area oscillations. The response of the flame to higher amplitude oscillations are used to gain further insight into the mechanisms. © 2010 Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of The Combustion Institute. All rights reserved.

  13. Growth of single-walled gold nanotubes confined in carbon nanotubes, studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yang; Hu, Ting; Dong, Jinming

    2013-01-01

    Growth of the single-walled gold nanotube (SWGNT), confined in the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) has been studied by using the classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, in which two different empirical potentials (the glue and EAM potentials) are used for the interaction between gold atoms. It is found that under the glue potential, three new SWGNTs, (3, 2), (4, 2) and (6, 3) gold tubes can be formed, in addition to the previously found (3, 3), (4, 3) and (5, 3) ones, among which two achiral ones, (4, 2) and (6, 3) gold tubes are particularly interesting because they were thought to be not the tube-like structures, or to have large enough diameter, permitting an extra gold atom chain in it. However, when the EAM potential is used, only four SWGNTs, i.e., (3, 2), (4, 2), (4, 3) and (5, 3) gold tubes could be formed in our MD simulations. After comparing all the MD simulation results with those of the first principles calculations, it is found that the EAM potential is better to describe the interaction between gold atoms than the glue potential for the MD simulation on the growth of gold tubular structure in confined CNT.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of non-covalent single-walled carbon nanotube functionalization with surfactant peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzegar, Abolfazl; Mansouri, Alireza; Azamat, Jafar

    2016-03-01

    Non-covalent functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with improved solubility and biocompatibility can successfully transfer drugs, DNA, RNA, and proteins into the target cells. Theoretical studies such as molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations in fully atomistic scale were used to investigate the hydrophobic and aromatic π-π-stacking interaction of designing four novel surfactant peptides for non-covalent functionalization of SWCNTs. The results indicated that the designed peptides have binding affinity towards SWCNT with constant interactions during MD simulation times, and it can even be improved by increasing the number of tryptophan residues. The aromatic content of the peptides plays a significant role in their adsorption in SWCNT wall. The data suggest that π-π stacking interaction between the aromatic rings of tryptophan and π electrons of SWCNTs is more important than hydrophobic effects for dispersing carbon nanotubes; nevertheless SWCNTs are strongly hydrophobic in front of smooth surfaces. The usage of aromatic content of peptides for forming SWCNT/peptide complex was proved successfully, providing new insight into peptide design strategies for future nano-biomedical applications.

  15. Films, layers and droplets: The effect of near-wall fluid structure on spreading dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Yin, Hanyu; Thiele, Uwe; Archer, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    We present a study of the spreading of liquid droplets on a solid substrate at very small scales. We focus on the regime where effective wetting energy (binding potential) and surface tension effects significantly influence steady and spreading droplets. In particular, we focus on strong packing and layering effects in the liquid near the substrate due to underlying density oscillations in the fluid caused by attractive substrate-liquid interactions. We show that such phenomena can be described by a thin-film (or long-wave or lubrication) model including an oscillatory Derjaguin (or disjoining/conjoining) pressure, and explore the effects it has on steady droplet shapes and the spreading dynamics of droplets on both, an adsorption (or precursor) layer and completely dry substrates. At the molecular scale, commonly used two-term binding potentials with a single preferred minimum controlling the adsorption layer height are inadequate to capture the rich behaviour caused by the near-wall layered molecular packin...

  16. Dynamics of capillary infiltration of liquids into a highly aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncel, Sławomir; Walczak, Krzysztof Z; Koziol, Krzysztof K K

    2011-01-01

    The physical compatibility of a highly aligned carbon nanotube (HACNT) film with liquids was established using a fast and convenient experimental protocol. Two parameters were found to be decisive for the infiltration process. For a given density of nanotube packing, the thermodynamics of the infiltration process (wettability) were described by the contact angle between the nanotube wall and a liquid meniscus (θ). Once the wettability criterion (θ capillarity for a steady process (Lucas-Washburn law), where the nanoscale capillary force, here supported by gravity, is compensated by viscous drag. This most general theory of capillarity can be applied in a prediction of both wettability of HACNT films and the dynamics of capillary rise in the intertube space in various technological applications.

  17. Compressive characteristics of single walled carbon nanotube with water interactions investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C. H.; Vijayaraghavan, V.

    2014-01-01

    The elastic properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with surrounding water interactions are studied using molecular dynamics simulation technique. The compressive loading characteristic of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a fluidic medium such as water is critical for its role in determining the lifetime and stability of CNT based nano-fluidic devices. In this paper, we conducted a comprehensive analysis on the effect of geometry, chirality and density of encapsulated water on the elastic properties of SWCNT. Our studies show that defect density and distribution can strongly impact the compressive resistance of SWCNTs in water. Further studies were conducted on capped SWCNTs with varying densities of encapsulated water, which is necessary to understand the strength of CNT as a potential drug carrier. The results obtained from this paper will help determining the potential applications of CNTs in the field of nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) such as nano-biological and nano-fluidic devices.

  18. Nonlocal continuum model and molecular dynamics for free vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yan-Gao; Liew, K M; Wang, Q

    2011-12-01

    Free transverse, longitudinal and torsional vibrations of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are investigated through nonlocal beam model, nonlocal rod model and verified by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The nonlocal Timoshenko beam model offers a better prediction of the fundamental frequencies of shorter SWCNTs, such as a (5, 5) SWCNT shorter than 3.5 nm, than local beam models. The nonlocal rod model is employed to study the longitudinal and torsional vibrations of SWCNT and found to enable a good prediction of the MD results for shorter SWCNTs. Nonlocal and local continuum models provide a good agreement with MD results for relatively longer SWCNTs, such as (5, 5) SWCNTs longer than 3.5 nm. The scale parameter in nonlocal beam and rod models is estimated by calibrations from MD results.

  19. Bifurcation of resistive wall mode dynamics predicted by magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S. X.; Wang, Z. X., E-mail: zxwang@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Beams of the Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, S.; Hao, G. Z., E-mail: haogz@swip.ac.cn; Song, X. M.; Wang, A. K. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O.Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O.Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2015-09-15

    The magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid theory has been extensively and successfully applied for interpreting experimental observations of macroscopic, low frequency instabilities, such as the resistive wall mode, in fusion plasmas. In this work, it is discovered that an analytic version of the hybrid formulation predicts a bifurcation of the mode dynamics while varying certain physical parameters of the plasma, such as the thermal particle collisionality or the ratio of the thermal ion to electron temperatures. This bifurcation can robustly occur under reasonably large parameter spaces as well as with different assumptions, for instance, on the particle collision model. Qualitatively similar bifurcation features are also observed in full toroidal computations presented in this work, based on a non-perturbative hybrid formulation.

  20. Compressive characteristics of single walled carbon nanotube with water interactions investigated by using molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.H., E-mail: chwong@ntu.edu.sg; Vijayaraghavan, V.

    2014-01-24

    The elastic properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with surrounding water interactions are studied using molecular dynamics simulation technique. The compressive loading characteristic of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a fluidic medium such as water is critical for its role in determining the lifetime and stability of CNT based nano-fluidic devices. In this paper, we conducted a comprehensive analysis on the effect of geometry, chirality and density of encapsulated water on the elastic properties of SWCNT. Our studies show that defect density and distribution can strongly impact the compressive resistance of SWCNTs in water. Further studies were conducted on capped SWCNTs with varying densities of encapsulated water, which is necessary to understand the strength of CNT as a potential drug carrier. The results obtained from this paper will help determining the potential applications of CNTs in the field of nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) such as nano-biological and nano-fluidic devices.

  1. Molecular Dynamics for Elastic and Plastic Deformation of a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Under Nanoindentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Te-Hua; JIAN Sheng-Rui; CHUU Der-San

    2004-01-01

    @@ Mechanical characteristics of a suspended (10, 10) single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) during atomic force microscopy (AFM) nanoindentation are investigated at different temperatures by molecular dynamics simulations.The results indicate that the Young modulus of the (10, 10) SWCNT under temperatures of 300-600K is 1.2-1.3 TPa. As the temperature increases, the Young modulus of the SWCNT increases, but the axial strain of the SWCNT decreases. The strain-induced spontaneous formation of the Stone-Wales defects and the rippled behaviour under inhomogeneous stress are studied. The rippled behaviour of the SWCNT is enhanced with the increasing axial strain. The adhesive phenomenon between the probe and the nanotube and the elastic recovery of the nanotube during the retraction are also investigated.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of the test of single-walled carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU ChenXin; CHEN YunFei; JIAO JiWei

    2007-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to do the test of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) under tensile loading with the use of Brenner potential to describe the interactions of atoms in SWCNTs. The Young's modulus and tensile strength for SWCNTs were calculated and the values found are 4.2 TPa and 1.40―1.77 TPa, respectively. During the simulation, it was found that if the SWCNTs are unloaded prior to the maximum stress, the stress-strain curve for unloading process overlaps with the loading one, showing that the SWCNT's deformation up to its fracture point is completely elastic. The MD simulation also demonstrates the fracture process for several types of SWCNT and the breaking mechanisms for SWCNTs were analyzed based on the energy and structure behavior.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of the test of single-walled carbon nanotubes under tensile loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to do the test of sin-gle-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) under tensile loading with the use of Bren-ner potential to describe the interactions of atoms in SWCNTs. The Young’s modulus and tensile strength for SWCNTs were calculated and the values found are 4.2 TPa and 1.40―1.77 TPa, respectively. During the simulation, it was found that if the SWCNTs are unloaded prior to the maximum stress, the stress-strain curve for unloading process overlaps with the loading one, showing that the SWCNT’s de-formation up to its fracture point is completely elastic. The MD simulation also demonstrates the fracture process for several types of SWCNT and the breaking mechanisms for SWCNTs were analyzed based on the energy and structure be-havior.

  4. Dynamic Changes of Pulmonary Arterial Pressure and Ductus Arteriosus in Human Newborns From Birth to 72 Hours of Age

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Normal pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary hypertension assessment of newborns is rarely reported. The aim of the study is to explore dynamic changes of pulmonary arterial pressure and ductus arteriosus in human newborns from birth to 72 h of age with echocardiography. A total of 76 cases of normal newborns were prospectively detected by echocardiography after birth of 2 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h, respectively. Ductus arteriosus diameter, blood shunt direction, blood flo...

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of single-walled silicon carbide nanotubes immersed in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, Fariba; Javadian, Soheila; Hashemianzadeh, Seyed Majid

    2013-07-01

    The structure and dynamics of water confined in single-walled silicon carbon nanotubes (SWSiCNTs) are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The density of water inside SWSiCNTs is reported, and an equation is suggested to predict the density of water inside SWSiCNTs. Interestingly, the water diffusion coefficients (D) here are larger compared with those in SWCNTs and single-walled boron-nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs). Furthermore, water inside zigzag SWCNTs has a lower diffusion coefficient than water inside armchair SWCNTs. A thorough analysis of the density profiles, hydrogen bonding, and water molecule orientation inside SWSiCNTs is presented to explore the mechanism behind the diffusive behavior of water observed here. It is shown here, by mean square displacement (MSD) analysis, that water molecules inside SWSiCNTs diffuse with a ballistic motion mechanism for up to 500ps. Additionally it is confirmed here for the first time that water molecules confined in the SWSiCNTs with diameters of less than 10Å obey the single-file diffusion mechanism at time scales in excess of 500ps. The orientation of water molecules inside SWSiCNTs could be a good explanation for the difference between the diffusion coefficient in (6,6) and (10,0) SWSiCNTs. Finally, a PMF analysis explains the difficulty of water entrance into SWSiCNTs and also the different water self-diffusion inside armchair and zigzag SWSiCNTs. These results are motivating reasons to use SWSiCNTs in nanoscale biochannels, for instance, in drug-delivery applications.

  6. Domain wall motion and precursor dynamics in PbZrO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchberger, S.; Soprunyuk, V.; Majchrowski, A.; Roleder, K.; Schranz, W.

    2016-12-01

    Single crystals of PbZrO3 have been studied by dynamic mechanical analysis measurements in the low-frequency range f =0.02 -50 Hz. The complex Young's modulus exhibits a quite rich behavior and depends strongly on the direction of the applied dynamic force. In pseudocubic [100] c direction, we found intrinsic elastic behavior as expected from the Landau theory; at the antiferroelectric transition Tc≈510 K, a downwards cusp anomaly in Y' accompanied by a peak in Y'' points to a quadratic/linear order parameter/strain coupling in the Landau free energy. Both anomalies are increasing with decreasing frequency showing that the measurements are performed in the limit ω τth>1 . Frequency scans around Tc show energy dissipation, which could result from interphase boundary motion and/or heat diffusion. Above Tc, we observe a pronounced precursor softening, quite similar as it was found in other perovskites, which can be perfectly fitted including isotropic order parameter fluctuations. The low-frequency elastic response in [110] c direction is different. Below Tc, we find in addition to the intrinsic anomaly a strong contribution from ferroelastic domains, which leads to an additional softening in Y'. With decreasing temperatures this superelastic softening gradually disappears, due to an increasing relaxation time τDW for domain wall motion, indicating glassy behavior of domain freezing in PbZrO3. In contrast to the [100] c direction, for forces along [110] c, we found a pronounced precursor hardening, starting at about 60 K above Tc. Since this anomaly is of dynamic nature, starting at the same temperature as the observed birefringence and piezoelectric anomalies [Ko et al. Phys. Rev. B 87, 184110 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.184110], we conclude that it originates from slow dynamic polar clusters, which freeze at T*≈550 K>Tc .

  7. A new picture of cell wall protein dynamics in elongating cells of Arabidopsis thaliana: Confirmed actors and newcomers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamet Elisabeth

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell elongation in plants requires addition and re-arrangements of cell wall components. Even if some protein families have been shown to play roles in these events, a global picture of proteins present in cell walls of elongating cells is still missing. A proteomic study was performed on etiolated hypocotyls of Arabidopsis used as model of cells undergoing elongation followed by growth arrest within a short time. Results Two developmental stages (active growth and after growth arrest were compared. A new strategy consisting of high performance cation exchange chromatography and mono-dimensional electrophoresis was established for separation of cell wall proteins. This work allowed identification of 137 predicted secreted proteins, among which 51 had not been identified previously. Apart from expected proteins known to be involved in cell wall extension such as xyloglucan endotransglucosylase-hydrolases, expansins, polygalacturonases, pectin methylesterases and peroxidases, new proteins were identified such as proteases, proteins related to lipid metabolism and proteins of unknown function. Conclusion This work highlights the CWP dynamics that takes place between the two developmental stages. The presence of proteins known to be related to cell wall extension after growth arrest showed that these proteins may play other roles in cell walls. Finally, putative regulatory mechanisms of protein biological activity are discussed from this global view of cell wall proteins.

  8. Dynamic mechanical analysis of single walled carbon nanotubes/polymethyl methacrylate nanocomposite films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Badawi; N. Al-Hosiny

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical properties of nanocomposite films with different ratios of single walled carbon nan-otubes/polymethyl methacrylate (SWCNTs/PMMA) are studied. Nanocomposite films of different ratios (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 weight percent (wt%)) of SWCNTs/PMMA are fabricated by using a casting technique. The morphological and struc-tural properties of both SWCNT powder and SWCNTs/PMMA nanocomposite films are investigated by using a high resolution transmission electron microscope and x-ray diffractometer respectively. The mechanical properties including the storage modulus, loss modulus, loss factor (tanδ) and stiffness of the nanocomposite film as a function of tempera-ture are recorded by using a dynamic mechanical analyzer at a frequency of 1 Hz. Compared with pure PMMA film, the nanocomposite films with different ratios of SWCNTs/PMMA are observed to have enhanced storage moduli, loss moduli and high stiffness, each of which is a function of temperature. The intensity of the tanδ peak for pure PMMA film is larger than those of the nanocomposite films. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of SWCNTs/PMMA nanocomposite film shifts towards the higher temperature side with respect to pure PMMA film from 91.2 ◦C to 99.5 ◦C as the ratio of SWCNTs/PMMA increases from 0 to 2.0 wt%.

  9. Dynamics of capillary infiltration of liquids into a highly aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Boncel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The physical compatibility of a highly aligned carbon nanotube (HACNT film with liquids was established using a fast and convenient experimental protocol. Two parameters were found to be decisive for the infiltration process. For a given density of nanotube packing, the thermodynamics of the infiltration process (wettability were described by the contact angle between the nanotube wall and a liquid meniscus (θ. Once the wettability criterion (θ < 90° was met, the HACNT film (of free volume equal to 91% was penetrated gradually by the liquid in a rate that can be linearly correlated to dynamic viscosity of the liquid (η. The experimental results follow the classical theory of capillarity for a steady process (Lucas–Washburn law, where the nanoscale capillary force, here supported by gravity, is compensated by viscous drag. This most general theory of capillarity can be applied in a prediction of both wettability of HACNT films and the dynamics of capillary rise in the intertube space in various technological applications.

  10. Calculation of the neutron electric dipole moment with two dynamical flavors of domain wall fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Berruto, F; Orginos, K; Soni, A

    2005-01-01

    We present a study of the neutron electric dipole moment ($\\vec d_N$) within the framework of lattice QCD with two flavors of dynamical lig ht quarks. The dipole moment is sensitive to the topological structure of the gaug e fields, and accuracy can only be achieved by using dynamical, or sea quark, calc ulations. However, the topological charge evolves slowly in these calculations, le ading to a relatively large uncertainty in $\\vec d_N$. It is shown, using quenched configurations, that a better sampling of the charge d istribution reduces this problem, but because the CP even part of the fermion determinant is absent, both the topological charge dis tribution and $\\vec d_N$ are pathological in the chiral limit. We discuss the statistical and systematic uncertainties arising from the topological charge distr ibution and unphysical size of the quark mass in our calculations and prospects fo r eliminating them. Our calculations employ the RBC collaboration two flavor domain wall fermion and DBW2 gauge action l...

  11. Long-term effects of biodegradable versus durable polymer-coated sirolimus-eluting stents on coronary arterial wall morphology assessed by virtual histology intravascular ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hui-liang; ZHANG Jiao; JIN Zhi-geng; LUO Jian-ping; MA Dong-xing; YANG Sheng-li; LIU Ying; HAN Wei; JING Li-min; MENG Rong-ying

    2011-01-01

    Background The durable presence of polymer coating on drug-eluting stent (DES) surface may be one of the principal reasons for stent thrombosis. The long-term coronary arterial response to biodegradable polymer-coated sirolimus-eluting stent (BSES) in vivo remained unclear.Methods Forty-one patients were enrolled in this study and virtual histology intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS) was performed to assess the native artery vascular responses to BSES compared with durable polymer-coated SES (DSES) during long-term follow-up (median: 8 months). The incidence of necrotic core abutting to the lumen was evaluated at follow-up.Results With similar in-stent late luminal loss (0.15 mm (0.06-0.30 mm) vs. 0.19 mm (0.03-0.30 mm), P=0.772), the overall incidence of necrotic core abutting to the lumen was significantly less in BSES group than in DSES group (44% vs.63%, P <0.05) (proximal 18%, stented site 14% and distal 12% in BSES group, proximal 19%, stented site 28% and distal 16% in DSES group). The DSES-treated segments had a significant higher incidence of necrotic core abutting to the lumen through the stent struts (73% vs. 36%, P <0.01). In addition, more multiple necrotic core abutting to the lumen was observed in DSES group (overall: 63% vs. 36%, P <0.05). Furthermore, when the stented segments with necrotic core abutting to the lumen had been taken into account only, DSES-treated lesions tended to contain more multiple necrotic core abutting to the lumen through the stent struts than BSES-treated lesions (74% vs. 33%), although there was no statistically significant difference between them (P=0.06).Conclusions By VH-IVUS analysis at follow-up, a greater frequency of stable lesion morphometry was shown in lesions treated with BSESs compared with lesions treated with DSESs. The major reason was BSES produced less toxicity to the arterial wall and facilitated neointimal healing as a result of polymer coating on DES surface biodegraded as time went by.

  12. Coupled Static and Dynamic Buckling Modelling of Thin-Walled Structures in Elastic Range Review of Selected Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kołakowski Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A review of papers that investigate the static and dynamic coupled buckling and post-buckling behaviour of thin-walled structures is carried out. The problem of static coupled buckling is sufficiently well-recognized. The analysis of dynamic interactive buckling is limited in practice to columns, single plates and shells. The applications of finite element method (FEM or/and analytical-numerical method (ANM to solve interaction buckling problems are on-going. In Poland, the team of scientists from the Department of Strength of Materials, Lodz University of Technology and co-workers developed the analytical-numerical method. This method allows to determine static buckling stresses, natural frequencies, coefficients of the equation describing the post-buckling equilibrium path and dynamic response of the plate structure subjected to compression load and/or bending moment. Using the dynamic buckling criteria, it is possible to determine the dynamic critical load. They presented a lot of interesting results for problems of the static and dynamic coupled buckling of thin-walled plate structures with complex shapes of cross-sections, including an interaction of component plates. The most important advantage of presented analytical-numerical method is that it enables to describe all buckling modes and the post-buckling behaviours of thin-walled columns made of different materials. Thin isotropic, orthotropic or laminate structures were considered.

  13. Endovascular repair of arterial iliac vessel wall lesions with a self-expandable nitinol stent graft system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birger Mensel

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the therapeutic outcome after endovascular repair of iliac arterial lesions (IALs using a self-expandable Nitinol stent graft system. METHODS: Between July 2006 and March 2013, 16 patients (13 males, mean age: 68 years with a self-expandable Nitinol stent graft. A total of 19 lesions were treated: nine true aneurysms, two anastomotic aneurysms, two dissections, one arteriovenous fistula, two type 1B endoleaks after endovascular aneurysm repair, one pseudoaneurysm, and two perforations after angioplasty. Pre-, intra-, and postinterventional imaging studies and the medical records were analyzed for technical and clinical success and postinterventional complications. RESULTS: The primary technical and clinical success rate was 81.3% (13/16 patients and 75.0% (12/16, respectively. Two patients had technical failure due to persistent type 1A endoleak and another patient due to acute stent graft thrombosis. One patient showed severe stent graft kinking on the first postinterventional day. In two patients, a second intervention was performed. The secondary technical and clinical success rate was 87.5% (14/16 and 93.8% (15/16. The minor complication rate was 6.3% (patient with painful hematoma at the access site. The major complication rate was 6.3% (patient with ipsilateral deep vein thrombosis. During median follow-up of 22.4 months, an infection of the aneurysm sac in one patient and a stent graft thrombosis in another patient were observed. CONCLUSION: Endovascular repair of various IALs with a self-expandable Nitinol stent graft is safe and effective.

  14. Real-time ultrasound-tagging to track the 2D motion of the common carotid artery wall in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahnd, Guillaume, E-mail: g.zahnd@erasmusmc.nl [Biomedical Imaging Group Rotterdam, Departments of Radiology and Medical Informatics, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam 3000 CA (Netherlands); Salles, Sébastien; Liebgott, Hervé; Vray, Didier [Université de Lyon, CREATIS, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U1044, INSA-Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Lyon 69100 (France); Sérusclat, André [Department of Radiology, Louis Pradel Hospital, Lyon 69500 (France); Moulin, Philippe [Department of Endocrinology, Louis Pradel Hospital, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, Lyon 69100, France and INSERM UMR 1060, Lyon 69500 (France)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Tracking the motion of biological tissues represents an important issue in the field of medical ultrasound imaging. However, the longitudinal component of the motion (i.e., perpendicular to the beam axis) remains more challenging to extract due to the rather coarse resolution cell of ultrasound scanners along this direction. The aim of this study is to introduce a real-time beamforming strategy dedicated to acquire tagged images featuring a distinct pattern in the objective to ease the tracking. Methods: Under the conditions of the Fraunhofer approximation, a specific apodization function was applied to the received raw channel data, in real-time during image acquisition, in order to introduce a periodic oscillations pattern along the longitudinal direction of the radio frequency signal. Analytic signals were then extracted from the tagged images, and subpixel motion tracking of the intima–media complex was subsequently performed offline, by means of a previously introduced bidimensional analytic phase-based estimator. Results: The authors’ framework was applied in vivo on the common carotid artery from 20 young healthy volunteers and 6 elderly patients with high atherosclerosis risk. Cine-loops of tagged images were acquired during three cardiac cycles. Evaluated against reference trajectories manually generated by three experienced analysts, the mean absolute tracking error was 98 ± 84 μm and 55 ± 44 μm in the longitudinal and axial directions, respectively. These errors corresponded to 28% ± 23% and 13% ± 9% of the longitudinal and axial amplitude of the assessed motion, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed framework enables tagged ultrasound images of in vivo tissues to be acquired in real-time. Such unconventional beamforming strategy contributes to improve tracking accuracy and could potentially benefit to the interpretation and diagnosis of biomedical images.

  15. NUCLEON STRUCTURE IN LATTICE QCD WITH DYNAMICAL DOMAIN--WALL FERMIONS QUARKS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIN H.-W.; OHTA, S.

    2006-10-02

    We report RBC and RBC/UKQCD lattice QCD numerical calculations of nucleon electroweak matrix elements with dynamical domain-wall fermions (DWF) quarks. The first, RBC, set of dynamical DWF ensembles employs two degenerate flavors of DWF quarks and the DBW2 gauge action. Three sea quark mass values of 0.04, 0.03 and 0.02 in lattice units are used with 220 gauge configurations each. The lattice cutoff is a{sup -1} {approx} 1.7GeV and the spatial volume is about (1.9fm){sup 3}. Despite the small volume, the ratio of the isovector vector and axial charges g{sub A}/g{sub V} and that of structure function moments {sub u-d}/{sub {Delta}u-{Delta}d} are in agreement with experiment, and show only very mild quark mass dependence. The second, RBC/UK, set of ensembles employs one strange and two degenerate (up and down) dynamical DWF quarks and Iwasaki gauge action. The strange quark mass is set at 0.04, and three up/down mass values of 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 in lattice units are used. The lattice cutoff is a{sup -1} {approx} 1.6GeV and the spatial volume is about (3.0fm){sup 3}. Even with preliminary statistics of 25-30 gauge configurations, the ratios g{sub A}/g{sub V} and {sub u-d}/{sub {Delta}u-{Delta}d} are consistent with experiment and show only very mild quark mass dependence. Another structure function moment, d{sub 1}, though yet to be renormalized, appears small in both sets.

  16. DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF HIGH RISE STRUCTURES UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DISCRETE STAGGERED SHEAR WALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. B. KAMESHWARI

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well-established fact that shear walls are quite effective in lateral load resistance of low-rise to medium-rise reinforced concrete buildings. Restriction in the architectural design by the presence of the shear walls may contribute to discourage the engineers from adopting the shear walls. Due to this a new concept ofproviding storey deep and bay wide discrete staggered shear wall panels have been introduced. In this study, the effect of various configurations of shear walls on high-rise structure is analysed. The drift and inter-storey drift of the structure in the following configurations of shear wall panels is studied and is compared with that of bare frame: (1 Conventional shear walls. (2 Alternate arrangement of shear walls. (3 Diagonal arrangement of shear walls. (4 Zigzag arrangement of shear walls. (5 Influence of lift core walls. Of the configurations studied, the zigzag shear wall configuration is found to be better than the other systems studied in controlling the response to earthquake loading. The diagonal configuration is found to be having significant role in controlling the response of structures to earthquake.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Based Gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Srivastava, Deepak; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties of a multi-walled carbon nanotube based gear. Previous work computationally suggested that molecular gears fashioned from (14,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes operate well at 50-100 gigahertz. The gears were formed from nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. The gear in this study was based on the smallest multi-walled nanotube supported by some experimental evidence. Each gear was a (52,0) nanotube surrounding a (37,10) nanotube with approximate 20.4 and 16,8 A radii respectively. These sizes were chosen to be consistent with inter-tube spacing observed by and were slightly larger than graphite inter-layer spacings. The benzyne teeth were attached via 2+4 cycloaddition to exterior of the (52,0) tube. 2+4 bonds were used rather than the 2+2 bonds observed by Hoke since 2+4 bonds are preferred by naphthalene and quantum calculations by Jaffe suggest that 2+4 bonds are preferred on carbon nanotubes of sufficient diameter. One gear was 'powered' by forcing the atoms near the end of the outside buckytube to rotate to simulate a motor. A second gear was allowed to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its outside buckytube on a cylinder. The ends of both gears were constrained to stay in an approximately constant position relative to each other, simulating a casing, to insure that the gear teeth meshed. The stiff meshing aromatic gear teeth transferred angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. The simulation was performed in a vacuum and with a software thermostat. Preliminary results suggest that the powered gear had trouble turning the driven gear without slip. The larger radius and greater mass of these gears relative to the (14,0) gears previously studied requires a

  18. Static Properties and Current-Driven Dynamics of Domain Walls in Perpendicular Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy Nanostrips with Rectangular Cross-Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Martinez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current-induced domain wall motion along thin ferromagnetic strips with high perpendicular magnetocrystalline anisotropy is studied by means of full micromagnetic simulations and the extended one-dimensional model, taking into account thermal effects and edge roughness. A slow creep regime, where the motion is controlled by wall pinning and thermal activation, and a flow regime with linear variation of the DW velocity, are observed. In asymmetric stacks, where the Rashba spin-orbit field stabilizes the domain wall against turbulent transformations, the steady linear regime is extended to higher currents, leading to higher velocities than in single-layer or symmetric stacks. The pinning and depinning at and from a local constriction were also studied. The results indicate that engineering pinning sites in these strips provide an efficient pathway to achieve both high stability against thermal fluctuations and low-current depinning avoiding Joule heating. Finally, the current-driven dynamics of a pinned domain wall is examined, and both the direct and the alternating contributions to the induced voltage signal induced are characterized. It was confirmed that the direct contribution to the voltage signal can be linearly enhanced with the number of pinned walls, an observation which could be useful to develop domain-wall-based nano-oscillators.

  19. Endovascular aneurysm repair alters renal artery movement : A preliminary evaluation using dynamic CTA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muhs, Bart E.; Teutelink, Arno; Prokop, Matthias; Vincken, Koen L.; Moll, Frans L.; Verhagen, Hence J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To observe the natural renal artery motion during cardiac cycles in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and how the implantation of stent-grafts may distort this movement. Methods: Data on 29 renal arteries from 15 male patients (mean age 72.6 years, range 66-83) treated with Tale

  20. Diagnostic value of transmural perfusion ratio derived from dynamic CT-based myocardial perfusion imaging for the detection of haemodynamically relevant coronary artery stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Coenen (Adriaan); M. Lubbers (Marisa); A. Kurata (Akira); A.K. Kono (Atsushi K.); A. Dedic (Admir); R.G. Chelu (Raluca Gabriela); M.L. Dijkshoorn (Marcel); Rossi, A. (Alexia); R.J.M. van Geuns (Robert Jan); K. Nieman (Koen)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To investigate the additional value of transmural perfusion ratio (TPR) in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging for detection of haemodynamically significant coronary artery disease compared with fractional flow reserve (FFR). Methods: Subjects with suspected or known coro

  1. Dynamic behavior of radiant cooling system based on capillary tubes in walls made of high performance concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikeska, Tomás; Svendsen, Svend

    2015-01-01

    using cooling water for the radiant cooling system with a temperature only about 4K lower than the temperature of the room air. The relatively high speed reaction of the designed system is a result of the slim construction of the sandwich wall elements made of high performance concrete. (C) 2015...... the small amount of fresh air required by standards to provide a healthy indoor environment.This paper reports on experimental analyses evaluating the dynamic behavior of a test room equipped with a radiant cooling system composed of plastic capillary tubes integrated into the inner layer of sandwich wall...

  2. Self-assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes into multiwalled carbon nanotubes in water: molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jian; Ji, Baohua; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2006-03-01

    We report discoveries from a series of molecular dynamics simulations that single-walled carbon nanotubes, with different diameters, lengths, and chiralities, can coaxially self-assemble into multiwalled carbon nanotubes in water via spontaneous insertion of smaller tubes into larger ones. The assembly process is tube-size-dependent, and the driving force is primarily the intertube van der Waals interactions. The simulations also suggest that a multiwalled carbon nanotube may be separated into single-walled carbon nanotubes under appropriate solvent conditions. This study suggests possible bottom-up self-assembly routes for the fabrication of novel nanodevices and systems.

  3. NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR DYNAMIC INITIAL SHOCK PARAMETERS OF COUPLING CHARGE ON BOREHOLE WALL UNDER THE ACTION OF HIGH EXPLOSIVES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪芝芳; 李玉民

    1996-01-01

    According to detonation theory and hydrodynamic principle, a physical model has been set up in this paper. Based on the model a methodology for calculating dynamic initial shock parameters such as shock pressure p,,, shock wave velosity Dm etc. of coupling charge on borehole wall has ben developed. The shock parameters have been calculated when high explosives works on granite, limestone and marble respectively. The magnitude of every parameter on borehole wall has been obtained from ignited dot to the end of borehole along axial direction. Some important conclusions are also gained.

  4. Interplay of domain walls and magnetization rotation on dynamic magnetization process in iron/polymer-matrix soft magnetic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobák, Samuel; Füzer, Ján; Kollár, Peter; Fáberová, Mária; Bureš, Radovan

    2017-03-01

    This study sheds light on the dynamic magnetization process in iron/resin soft magnetic composites from the viewpoint of quantitative decomposition of their complex permeability spectra into the viscous domain wall motion and magnetization rotation. We present a comprehensive view on this phenomenon over the broad family of samples with different average particles dimension and dielectric matrix content. The results reveal the pure relaxation nature of magnetization processes without observation of spin resonance. The smaller particles and higher amount of insulating resin result in the prevalence of rotations over domain wall movement. The findings are elucidated in terms of demagnetizing effects rising from the heterogeneity of composite materials.

  5. Correlated Switching Dynamics in the Nanoscale Proximity of 90∘ Ferroelectric Domain Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Shiming; Wang, Xueyun; Cheong, S. W.; Chen, L. Q.; Kalinin, Sergei; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2015-03-01

    Ferroelectrics are materials which have a built in polarization in their crystal structure even in the absence of an electric field. Domain walls themselves can possess dramatically different properties than the bulk ferroelectrics themselves. Previously we discovered that the universally present 180° walls have an order of magnitude lower domain switching threshold field than the bulk. This effect extends up to many microns around a wall, though the wall itself is unit cell thick. Here we present new results on 90° walls in PbTiO3 single crystals that show similar proximity effect and correlated switching. Our SSPFM imaging across the a / c / a domain walls suggests a strong correlated switching behavior in the proximity of the inclined 90° domain walls, even at a small AC driving voltage of 1V without DC bias on the tip. Consistent with phase-field modeling results, the inclined extended domain walls is found to act as nucleation sites in ferroelectric materials, and give rise to the domain wall asymmetrical broadening across the domain wall.

  6. Nonlinear dynamics of bi-layered graphene sheet, double-walled carbon nanotube and nanotube bundle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajbhiye, Sachin O.; Singh, S. P.

    2016-05-01

    Due to strong van der Waals (vdW) interactions, the graphene sheets and nanotubes stick to each other and form clusters of these corresponding nanostructures, viz. bi-layered graphene sheet (BLGS), double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) and nanotube bundle (NB) or ropes. This research work is concerned with the study of nonlinear dynamics of BLGS, DWCNT and NB due to nonlinear interlayer vdW forces using multiscale atomistic finite element method. The energy between two adjacent carbon atoms is represented by the multibody interatomic Tersoff-Brenner potential, whereas the nonlinear interlayer vdW forces are represented by Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential function. The equivalent nonlinear material model of carbon-carbon bond is used to model it based on its force-deflection relation. Newmark's algorithm is used to solve the nonlinear matrix equation governing the motion of the BLGS, DWCNT and NB. An impulse and harmonic excitations are used to excite these nanostructures under cantilevered, bridged and clamped boundary conditions. The frequency responses of these nanostructures are computed, and the dominant resonant frequencies are identified. Along with the forced vibration of these structures, the eigenvalue extraction problem of armchair and zigzag NB is also considered. The natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes are extracted for the different length and boundary conditions of the nanotube bundle.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation on adsorption of pyrene-polyethylene onto ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lu; Lv, Wenzhen; Zhu, Hong; Xu, Qun

    2016-07-01

    The mechanism of the adsorption of pyrene-polyethylene (Py-PE) onto ultrathin single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) was studied by using all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We found that solvent polarity and pyrene group are two critical factors in the Py-PE decoration on ultrathin SWNT. Combined MD simulations with free energy calculations, our results indicate that larger solvent polarity can decrease the contribution of conformation entropy, but contributes little to the interaction energy, moreover, larger SWNT diameter can decrease the contribution of conformation entropy but lead to the increasing of the interaction energy. In polar organic solvent (N, N-Dimethylacetamide), the pyrene group plays a key role in the adsorption of Py-PE onto ultrathin SWNT, not only facilitates the spontaneous adsorption of Py-PE onto ultrathin SWNT, but also helps to form compact structure between themselves in the final adsorption states. While in aqueous solution, pyrene group no longer works as an anchor, but still affects a lot to the final adsorption conformation. Our present work provides detailed theoretical clue to understand the noncovalent interaction between aromatic segment appended polymer and ultrathin SWNT, and helps to explore the potential application of ultrathin SWNT in the fields of hybrid material, biomedical and electronic materials.

  8. Spin wave dynamics in Heisenberg ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Bin-Zhou

    2016-09-01

    The spin wave dynamics, including the magnetization, spin wave dispersion relation, and energy level splitting, of Heisenberg ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes are systematically calculated by use of the double-time Green's function method within the random phase approximation. The role of temperature, diameter of the tube, and wave vector on spin wave energy spectrum and energy level splitting are carefully analyzed. There are two categories of spin wave modes, which are quantized and degenerate, and the total number of independent magnon branches is dependent on diameter of the tube, caused by the physical symmetry of nanotubes. Moreover, the number of flat spin wave modes increases with diameter of the tube rising. The spin wave energy and the energy level splitting decrease with temperature rising, and become zero as temperature reaches the critical point. At any temperature, the energy level splitting varies with wave vector, and for a larger wave vector it is smaller. When pb=π, the boundary of first Brillouin zone, spin wave energies are degenerate, and the energy level splittings are zero.

  9. Structural ensemble dynamics based closure model for wall-bounded turbulent flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Su She; Ning Hu; You Wu

    2009-01-01

    Wall-bounded turbulent flow involves the development of multi-scale turbulent eddies, as well as a sharply varying boundary layer. Its theoretical descriptions are yet phenomenological. We present here a new framework called structural ensemble dynamics (SED), which aims at using systematically all relevant statistical properties of turbulent structures for a quantitative description of ensemble means. A new set of closure equations based on the SED approach for a turbulent channel flow is presented. SED order functions are defined, and numerically determined from data of direct numerical simulations (DNS). Computational results show that the new closure model reproduces accurately the solution of the original Navier-Stokes simulation, including the mean velocity profile, the kinetic energy of the stream-wise velocity component, and every term in the energy budget equation. It is suggested that the SED-based studies of turbulent structure builds a bridge between the studies of physical mechanisms of turbulence and the development of accurate model equations for engineering predictions.

  10. Spin wave dynamics in Heisenberg ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Bin-Zhou, E-mail: mbzfjerry2008@126.com [Department of Basic Curriculum, North China Institute of Science and Technology, Beijing 101601 (China); Department of Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-09-15

    The spin wave dynamics, including the magnetization, spin wave dispersion relation, and energy level splitting, of Heisenberg ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes are systematically calculated by use of the double-time Green’s function method within the random phase approximation. The role of temperature, diameter of the tube, and wave vector on spin wave energy spectrum and energy level splitting are carefully analyzed. There are two categories of spin wave modes, which are quantized and degenerate, and the total number of independent magnon branches is dependent on diameter of the tube, caused by the physical symmetry of nanotubes. Moreover, the number of flat spin wave modes increases with diameter of the tube rising. The spin wave energy and the energy level splitting decrease with temperature rising, and become zero as temperature reaches the critical point. At any temperature, the energy level splitting varies with wave vector, and for a larger wave vector it is smaller. When pb=π, the boundary of first Brillouin zone, spin wave energies are degenerate, and the energy level splittings are zero.

  11. Wide dynamic range enrichment method of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes with weak field centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Wieland G; Tomović, Željko; Weitz, R Thomas; Krupke, Ralph; Mikhael, Jules

    2017-03-20

    The potential of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to outperform silicon in electronic application was finally enabled through selective separation of semiconducting nanotubes from the as-synthesized statistical mix with polymeric dispersants. Such separation methods provide typically high semiconducting purity samples with narrow diameter distribution, i.e. almost single chiralities. But for a wide range of applications high purity mixtures of small and large diameters are sufficient or even required. Here we proof that weak field centrifugation is a diameter independent method for enrichment of semiconducting nanotubes. We show that the non-selective and strong adsorption of polyarylether dispersants on nanostructured carbon surfaces enables simple separation of diverse raw materials with different SWCNT diameter. In addition and for the first time, we demonstrate that increased temperature enables higher purity separation. Furthermore we show that the mode of action behind this electronic enrichment is strongly connected to both colloidal stability and protonation. By giving simple access to electronically sorted SWCNTs of any diameter, the wide dynamic range of weak field centrifugation can provide economical relevance to SWCNTs.

  12. Dynamic synergy of graphitic nanoplatelets and multi-walled carbon nanotubes in polyetherimide nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Sun, L. L.; Caceres, S.; Li, B.; Wood, W.; Perugini, A.; Maguire, R. G.; Zhong, W. H.

    2010-03-01

    Hybridizing graphitic nanoplatelets (GNP) with commercially functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in a polyetherimide (PEI) composite at a total loading of 0.5 wt% resulted in considerable improvements in electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and dynamic mechanical properties, compared to solely GNP or solely MWCNT composites at the same total loading. The results reveal a synergistic interaction between the GNPs and MWCNTs based on GNP protection against fragmentation of the MWCNTs during high power sonication, while still allowing full dispersion of both fillers, by providing a shielding mechanism against MWCNT damage during dispersion processing. A new process for molecular level dispersion of exfoliated GNPs in PEI is also reported. Field emission scanning electron microscopy revealed strong interactions between PEI and the flat surfaces of GNPs and effectively intercalated GNP morphology within the matrix. GNPs alone can also produce excellent electrical conductivity improvements: at 1.0 wt% of GNP, electrical conductivity of the composite increased by 11 orders of magnitude and the percolation threshold was determined to be between 0.5 and 1.0 wt% of GNP.

  13. Adsorption of collagen onto single walled carbon nanotubes: a molecular dynamics investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Ravimohan; Balamurugan, Kanagasabai; Singam, Ettayapuram Ramaprasad Azhagiya; Sundaraman, Subramanian; Subramanian, Venkatesan

    2011-07-28

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been carried out to understand the adsorption of collagen like peptides onto single walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) in an aqueous environment. It is observed that the triple helical structure of all the model collagen like peptides (CPs) has been unaltered upon adsorption onto CNT. The model CPs do not wrap around the CNT, however, the axis of the triple helix subtends a cross angle with respect to the axis of the CNT. The interaction between the CPs and CNT as well as that between the CPs and water molecules was observed by MD simulation snapshots. The inherent nature of the interaction of CPs with CNT facilitates the penetration of CPs into the water/CNT interface. During this process, water molecules trapped between the CPs and CNT are appreciably displaced. Although, hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction is crucial for the interaction, the role of πR (R = OH and NH(2)) interactions are also observed from the geometrical parameters. The sequence specific interaction of CPs with CNT is evident from the results. It is found that the length of the CNT, curvature of the CNT and length of the CPs do not significantly influence interaction between the two systems. Overall the findings provide important information for the development of nanocomposite materials from collagen and CNT.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Study for Channel Size Dependence of Shear Stress Between Droplet and Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Akinori; Mima, Toshiki; Kinefuchi, Ikuya; Tokumasu, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the channel size dependence of the shear stress between water droplets and solid walls in nm-order channel was analyzed. We considered a several different-sized and highly hydrophobic channel whose macroscopic contact angle was about 150 degrees. We have evaluated the shear stress and the normal pressure by molecular dynamics simulation. Analyzing shear stress and normal pressure based on the macroscopic model, we have discussed the difference between the macroscopic model based on hydrodynamics and the microscopic model. As a result, in the high hydrophobic case, it became clear that the shear stress depends on the channel size due to the large Laplace pressure. Furthermore, in the case that the channel size was less than 50 A, the normal pressure by the molecular simulation didn't agree with the expected value from the Young-Laplace equation. From this study it was clear that molecular simulation is needed when the channel size is less than 40 A.

  15. Nanoscale soldering of axially positioned single-walled carbon nanotubes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jianlei; Yang, Lijun; Zhou, Liang; Wang, Yang

    2014-02-12

    The miniaturization of electronics devices into the nanometer scale is indispensable for next-generation semi-conductor technology. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered to be the promising candidates for future interconnection wires. To study the carbon nanotubes interconnection during nanosoldering, the melting process of nanosolder and nanosoldering process between single-walled carbon nanotubes are simulated with molecular dynamics method. As the simulation results, the melting point of 2 nm silver solder is about 605 K because of high surface energy, which is below the melting temperature of Ag bulk material. In the nanosoldering process simulations, Ag atoms may be dragged into the nanotubes to form different connection configuration, which has no apparent relationship with chirality of SWNTs. The length of core filling nanowires structure has the relationship with the diameter, and it does not become longer with the increasing diameter of SWNT. Subsequently, the dominant mechanism of was analyzed. In addition, as the heating temperature and time, respectively, increases, more Ag atoms can enter the SWNTs with longer length of Ag nanowires. And because of the strong metal bonds, less Ag atoms can remain with the tight atomic structures in the gap between SWNT and SWNT. The preferred interconnection configurations can be achieved between SWNT and SWNT in this paper.

  16. On the elastic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes/poly(ethylene oxide) nanocomposites using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhi, S; Alizadeh, Y; Ansari, R

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the physical and mechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes/poly(ethylene oxide) nanocomposites. The effects of nanotube atomic structure, diameter, and volume fraction on the polymer density distribution, polymer atom distribution, stress-strain curves of nanocomposites and Young's, and shear moduli of single-walled carbon nanotubes/poly(ethylene oxide) nanocomposites are explored. It is shown that the density of polymer, surrounding the nanotube surface, has a peak near the nanotube surface. However, increasing distance leads to dropping it to the value near the density of pure polymer. It is seen that for armchair nanotubes, the average polymer atoms distances from the single-walled carbon nanotubes are larger than the polymer atom distance from zigzag nanotubes. It further is shown that zigzag nanotubes are better candidates to reinforce poly (ethylene oxide) than their armchair counterparts.

  17. Experimental study of lattice dynamics in individual semiconducting double-walled carbon nanotubes: Tangential G modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levshov, D. I.; Tran, H. N.; Slabodyan, Yu. S.; Osadchii, A. V.; Roshal', S. B.; Yuzyuk, Yu. I.

    2017-02-01

    The tangential G modes in individual semiconducting double-walled nanotubes have been examined via Raman spectroscopy over a wide laser excitation wavelength range. Individual suspended nanotubes have been synthesized via chemical vapor deposition. The ( n, m) chirality indices are determined via electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The pronounced shift in the tangential modes compared to the analogous modes of single-walled nanotubes has been observed in Raman spectra of double-walled nanotubes. The shift value is shown to depend on the interlayer distance and on the van der Waals interaction between the layers in a double-walled tube.

  18. Direct observation of massless domain wall dynamics in nanostripes with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, J; Bonfim, M; Rougemaille, N; Boulle, O; Miron, I M; Auffret, S; Rodmacq, B; Gaudin, G; Cezar, J C; Sirotti, F; Pizzini, S

    2012-06-15

    Domain wall motion induced by nanosecond current pulses in nanostripes with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (Pt/Co/AlO(x)) is shown to exhibit negligible inertia. Time-resolved magnetic microscopy during current pulses reveals that the domain walls start moving, with a constant speed, as soon as the current reaches a constant amplitude, and no or little motion takes place after the end of the pulse. The very low "mass" of these domain walls is attributed to the combination of their narrow width and high damping parameter α. Such a small inertia should allow accurate control of domain wall motion by tuning the duration and amplitude of the current pulses.

  19. Assessment of vessel permeability by combining dynamic contrast-enhanced and arterial spin labeling MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ho-Ling; Chang, Ting-Ting; Yan, Feng-Xian; Li, Cheng-He; Lin, Yu-Shi; Wong, Alex M

    2015-06-01

    The forward volumetric transfer constant (K(trans)), a physiological parameter extracted from dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI, is weighted by vessel permeability and tissue blood flow. The permeability × surface area product per unit mass of tissue (PS) in brain tumors was estimated in this study by combining the blood flow obtained through pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (PCASL) and K(trans) obtained through DCE MRI. An analytical analysis and a numerical simulation were conducted to understand how errors in the flow and K(trans) estimates would propagate to the resulting PS. Fourteen pediatric patients with brain tumors were scanned on a clinical 3-T MRI scanner. PCASL perfusion imaging was performed using a three-dimensional (3D) fast-spin-echo readout module to determine blood flow. DCE imaging was performed using a 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence, and the K(trans) map was obtained with the extended Tofts model. The numerical analysis demonstrated that the uncertainty of PS was predominantly dependent on that of K(trans) and was relatively insensitive to the flow. The average PS values of the whole tumors ranged from 0.006 to 0.217 min(-1), with a mean of 0.050 min(-1) among the patients. The mean K(trans) value was 18% lower than the PS value, with a maximum discrepancy of 25%. When the parametric maps were compared on a voxel-by-voxel basis, the discrepancies between PS and K(trans) appeared to be heterogeneous within the tumors. The PS values could be more than two-fold higher than the K(trans) values for voxels with high K(trans) levels. This study proposes a method that is easy to implement in clinical practice and has the potential to improve the quantification of the microvascular properties of brain tumors.

  20. Comparison of arterial spin labeling and dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion MRI in patients with acute stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chu Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether arterial spin labeling (ASL perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can reliably quantify perfusion deficit as compared to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC perfusion MRI. METHODS: Thirty-nine patients with acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation territory were recruited. All underwent ASL and DSC MRI perfusion scans within 30 hours after stroke onset and 31 patients underwent follow-up MRI scans. ASL cerebral blood flow (CBF and DSC time to maximum (T(max maps were used to calculate the perfusion defects. The ASL CBF lesion volume was compared to the DSC Tmax lesion volume by Pearson's correlation coefficient and likewise the ASL CBF and DSC T(max lesion volumes were compared to the final infarct sizes respectively. A repeated measures analysis of variance and least significant difference post hoc test was used to compare the mean lesion volumes among ASL CBF, DSC T(max >4-6 s and final infarct. RESULTS: Mean patient age was 72.6 years. The average time from stroke onset to MRI was 13.9 hours. The ASL lesion volume showed significant correlation with the DSC lesion volume for T(max >4, 5 and 6 s (r = 0.81, 0.82 and 0.80; p5 s (29.2 ml, p6 s (21.8 ml, p5 or 6 s were close to mean final infarct size. CONCLUSION: Quantitative measurement of ASL perfusion is well correlated with DSC perfusion. However, ASL perfusion may overestimate the perfusion defects and therefore further refinement of the true penumbra threshold and improved ASL technique are necessary before applying ASL in therapeutic trials.

  1. Anatomical vertebral artery hypoplasia and insufficiency impairs dynamic blood flow regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kohei; Yoneya, Marina; Otsuki, Aki; Sadamoto, Tomoko; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested that vertebral artery (VA) hypoplasia is a predisposing factor for posterior cerebral stroke. We examined whether anatomical vertebrobasilar ischemia, i.e., unilateral VA hypoplasia and insufficiency, impairs dynamic blood flow regulation. Twenty-eight female subjects were divided into three groups by defined criteria: (i) unilateral VA hypoplasia (n = 8), (ii) VA insufficiency (n = 6), and (iii) control (n = 14). Hypoplastic VA criterion was VA blood flow of 40 ml min(-1) , whereas VA insufficiency criterion was net (left + right) VA blood flow of 100 ml min(-1) or less. We evaluated left, right, and net VA blood flows by ultrasonography during hypercapnia, normocapnia, and hypocapnia to evaluate VA CO2 reactivity. The unilateral VA hypoplasia group showed lower CO2 reactivity at hypoplastic VA than at non-hypoplastic VA (2.65 ± 0.58 versus 3.00 ± 0.48% per mmHg, P = 0.027) and net VA CO2 reactivity was preserved (Unilateral VA hypoplasia, 2.95 ± 0.48 versus Control, 2.93 ± 0.42% per mmHg, P = 0.992). However, the VA insufficiency group showed a lower net VA CO2 reactivity compared to the control (2.29 ± 0.55 versus 2.93 ± 0.42% per mmHg, P = 0.032) and the unilateral VA hypoplasia (P = 0.046). VA hypoplasia reduced CO2 reactivity, although non-hypoplastic VA may compensate this regulatory limitation. In subjects with VA insufficiency, lowered CO2 reactivity at the both VA could not preserve normal net VA CO2 reactivity. These findings provide a possible physiological mechanism for the increased risk of posterior cerebral stroke in subjects with VA hypoplasia and insufficiency.

  2. Heat stress redistributes blood flow in arteries of the brain during dynamic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kohei; Oue, Anna; Yoneya, Marina; Sadamoto, Tomoko; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesized that heat stress would decrease anterior and posterior cerebral blood flow (CBF) during exercise, and the reduction in anterior CBF would be partly associated with large increase in extracranial blood flow (BF). Nine subjects performed 40 min of semirecumbent cycling at 60% of the peak oxygen uptake in hot (35°C; Heat) and thermoneutral environments (25°C; Control). We evaluated BF and conductance (COND) in the external carotid artery (ECA), internal carotid artery (ICA), and vertebral artery (VA) using ultrasonography. During the Heat condition, ICA and VA BF were significantly increased 10 min after the start of exercise (P brain arteries to exercise, which resulted in an alteration in the distribution of cardiac output. Moreover, a hyperthermia-induced increase in extracranial BF might compromise anterior CBF during exercise with heat stress.

  3. Development of EEM based silicon–water and silica–water wall potentials for non-reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Junghan; Iype, Eldhose; Frijns, Arjan J.H.; Nedea, Silvia V.; Steenhoven, Anton A. van

    2014-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of heat transfer in gases are computationally expensive when the wall molecules are explicitly modeled. To save computational time, an implicit boundary function is often used. Steele's potential has been used in studies of fluid–solid interface for a long time. In this work, the conceptual idea of Steele's potential was extended in order to simulate water–silicon and water–silica interfaces. A new wall potential model is developed by using the electronegativity-equalization method (EEM), a ReaxFF empirical force field and a non-reactive molecular dynamics package PumMa. Contact angle simulations were performed in order to validate the wall potential model. Contact angle simulations with the resulting tabulated wall potentials gave a silicon–water contact angle of 129°, a quartz–water contact angle of 0°, and a cristobalite–water contact angle of 40°, which are in reasonable agreement with experimental values.

  4. Modeling of the blood flow in the lower extremities for dynamic diffuse optical tomography of peripheral artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marone, A.; Hoi, J. W.; Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Shrikhande, G.; Dayal, R.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2015-07-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is caused by a reduction of the internal diameters of the arteries in the upper or lower extremities mainly due to atherosclerosis. If not treated, its worsening may led to a complete occlusion, causing the death of the cells lacking proper blood supply, followed by gangrene that may require chirurgical amputation. We have recently performed a clinical study in which good sensitivities and specificities were achieved with dynamic diffuse optical tomography. To gain a better understanding of the physiological foundations of many of the observed effects, we started to develop a mathematical model for PAD. The model presented in this work is based on a multi-compartment Windkessel model, where the vasculature in the leg and foot is represented by resistors and capacitors, the blood pressure with a voltage drop, and the blood flow with a current. Unlike existing models, the dynamics induced by a thigh-pressure-cuff inflation and deflation during the measurements are taken into consideration. This is achieved by dynamically varying the resistances of the large veins and arteries. By including the effects of the thigh-pressure cuff, we were able to explain many of the effects observed during our dynamic DOT measurements, including the hemodynamics of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration changes. The model was implemented in MATLAB and the simulations were normalized and compared with the blood perfusion obtained from healthy, PAD and diabetic patients. Our preliminary results show that in unhealthy patients the total system resistance is sensibly higher than in healthy patients.

  5. Numerical distortion and effects of thermostat in molecular dynamics simulations of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Rui; Hu Yuan-Zhong; Wang Hui; Zhang Yu-Jun

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are studied through molecular dynamics (MD) simulation.The simulations are performed at temperatures of 1 and 300 K separately,with atomic interactions characterized by the second Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) potential,and temperature controlled by a certain thermostat,i.e.by separately using the velocity scaling,the Berendsen scheme,the Nose-Hoover scheme,and the generalized Langevin scheme.Results for a (5,5) SWCNT with a length of 24.5 nm show apparent distortions in nanotube configuration,which can further enter into periodic vibrations,except in simulations using the generalized Langevin thermostat,which is ascribed to periodic boundary conditions used in simulation.The periodic boundary conditions may implicitly be applied in the form of an inconsistent constraint along the axis of the nanotube.The combination of the inconsistent constraint with the cumulative errors in calculation causes the distortions of nanotubes.When the generalized Langevin thermostat is applied,inconsistently distributed errors are dispersed by the random forces,and so the distortions and vibrations disappear.This speculation is confirmed by simulation in the case without periodic boundary conditions,where no apparent distortion and vibration occur.It is also revealed that numerically induced distortions and vibrations occur only in simulation of nanotubes with a small diameter and a large length-to-diameter ratio.When MD simulation is applied to a system with a particular geometry,attention should be paid to avoiding the numerical distortion and the result infidelity.

  6. Pure Optical Dephasing Dynamics in Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Matt [University of California, Berkeley; Fleming, Graham [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Yingzhong [ORNL; Green, Alexander A. [Northwestern University, Evanston; Hersam, Mark C. [Northwestern University, Evanston

    2011-01-01

    We report a detailed study of ultrafast exciton dephasing processes in semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) employing a sample highly enriched in a single tube species, the (6,5) tube. Systematic measurements of femtosecond pump-probe, two-pulse photon echo and three-pulse photon echo peak shift over a broad range of excitation intensities and lattice temperature (from 4.4 to 292 K) enable us to quantify the timescales of pure optical dephasing (T 2 ), along with exciton-exciton and exciton-phonon scattering, environmental effects as well as spectral diffusion. While the exciton dephasing time (T2 ) increases from 205 fs at room temperature to 320 fs at 70 K, we found that further decrease of the lattice temperature leads to a shortening of the T2 times. This complex temperature dependence was found to arise from an enhanced relaxation of exciton population at lattice temperatures below 80 K. By quantitatively accounting the contribution from the population relaxation, the corresponding pure optical dephasing times increase monotonically from 225 fs at room temperature to 508 fs at 4.4 K. We further found that below 180 K, the inverse of the pure dephasing time (1/T 2 ) scales linearly with temperature with a slope of 6.7 0.6 eV/K, which suggests dephasing arising from one-phonon scattering (i.e. acoustic phonons). In view ofthe large dynamic disorder of the surrounding environment, the origin of the long room temperature pure dephasing time is proposed to result from reduced strength of exciton-phonon coupling by motional narrowing over nuclear fluctuations. This consideration further suggests the occurrence of remarkable initial exciton delocalization, and makes nanotubes ideal to study many-body effects in spatially confined systems.

  7. Powell dynamic identification of displacement parameters of indeterminate thin-walled curve box based on FCSE theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zhang; Chu-Wei Zhou; Jia-Shou Zhuo

    2011-01-01

    The FCSE controlling equation of pinned thinwalled curve box was derived and the indeterminate problem of continuous thin-walled curve box with diaphragm was solved based on flexibility theory. With Bayesian statistical theory, dynamic Bayesian error function of displacement parameters of indeterminate curve box was founded. The corresponding formulas of dynamic Bayesian expectation and variance were deduced. Combined with one-dimensional Fibonacci automatic search scheme of optimal step size,the Powell optimization theory was utilized to research the stochastic identification of displacement parameters of indeterminate thin-walled curve box. Then the identification steps were presented in detail and the corresponding calculation procedure was compiled. Through some classic examples, it is obtained that stochastic performances of systematic parameters and systematic responses are simultaneously deliberated in dynamic Bayesian error function. The one-dimensional optimization problem of the optimal step size is solved by adopting Fibonacci search method. And the Powell identification of displacement parameters of indeterminate thin-walled curve box has satisfied numerical stability and convergence, which demonstrates that the presented method and the compiled procedure are correct and reliable.The project was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China ( 10472045.10772078 and 11072108 and the Science Foundation of NUAA(S0851-013).During parameters' iterative processes, the Powell theory is irrelevant with the calculation of finite curve strip element (FCSE) partial differentiation, which proves high computation efficiency of the studied method.

  8. Combined Visualization of Wall Thickness and Wall Shear Stress for the Evaluation of Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaßer, Sylvia; Lawonn, Kai; Hoffmann, Thomas; Skalej, Martin; Preim, Bernhard

    2014-12-01

    For an individual rupture risk assessment of aneurysms, the aneurysm's wall morphology and hemodynamics provide valuable information. Hemodynamic information is usually extracted via computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation on a previously extracted 3D aneurysm surface mesh or directly measured with 4D phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. In contrast, a noninvasive imaging technique that depicts the aneurysm wall in vivo is still not available. Our approach comprises an experiment, where intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is employed to probe a dissected saccular aneurysm phantom, which we modeled from a porcine kidney artery. Then, we extracted a 3D surface mesh to gain the vessel wall thickness and hemodynamic information from a CFD simulation. Building on this, we developed a framework that depicts the inner and outer aneurysm wall with dedicated information about local thickness via distance ribbons. For both walls, a shading is adapted such that the inner wall as well as its distance to the outer wall is always perceivable. The exploration of the wall is further improved by combining it with hemodynamic information from the CFD simulation. Hence, the visual analysis comprises a brushing and linking concept for individual highlighting of pathologic areas. Also, a surface clustering is integrated to provide an automatic division of different aneurysm parts combined with a risk score depending on wall thickness and hemodynamic information. In general, our approach can be employed for vessel visualization purposes where an inner and outer wall has to be adequately represented.

  9. Detailed Dynamic Heat Transfer in Thick Brick Walls Typical of Lille Metropolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antczak E.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of thermal transfer in old houses massive walls offers a big interest permitting the understanding of their specificities and the choice of a suitable material for their eventual insulation. We propose to study the thermal transfer in massive brick walls that characterize the Northern Europe old houses. To do so, we will begin by defining the thermal transfer mode: we proved that the transfer mode can be reduced to a unidirectional transfer. Then, an experimental wall is built and submitted to two different solicitation types (constant temperature in steady state mode and sinusoidal temperature through a wooden insulated box containing a radiator. The interest of these solicitations is to determine the thermal properties of the wall: the steady-state regime permits to determine the thermal resistances of the system when the harmonic regime permits to determine the thermal capacities of the system.

  10. Large eddy simulation of a stenosed artery using a femoral artery pulsatile flow profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Tracie J; Simmons, Anne

    2011-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics simulation of stenosed arteries allows the analysis of quantities including wall shear stress, velocity, and pressure; detailed in vivo measurement is difficult yet the analysis of the fluid dynamics related to stenosis is important in understanding the likely causes and ongoing effects on the integrity of the vessel. In this study, a three-dimensional Large Eddy Simulation is conducted of a 50% occluded vessel, with a typical femoral artery profile used as the transient inlet conditions. The fluid is assumed to be homogenous, Newtonian and incompressible and the walls are assumed rigid. The stenosis is axisymmetric, however the three-dimensional study allows for a flow field that is not axisymmetric and results show significant three-dimensionality. High values of wall shear stress and oscillatory values of wall shear stress (varying in both space time) are observed. The results of the study give insight into the time-varying flow structures for a mildly stenosed artery and indicate that three-dimensional simulations may be important to gain a complete understanding of the flow field.

  11. Numerical simulaion of dynamics of a gas bubble in liquid near a rigid wall during its growth and collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgamov, M. A.; Kosolapova, L. A.; Malakhov, V. G.

    2016-11-01

    A numerical technique of calculating the dynamics of a cavitation bubble near a plane rigid wall is presented. The bubble at its collapse can become toroidal. The liquid is assumed inviscid and incompressible, its flow being potential. The bubble surface movement is determined by the Euler method, the normal component of the liquid velocity on the bubble surface is found by the boundary element method. The technique also includes an algorithm for calculating the velocity and pressure fields in the liquid. The convergence of the numerical solution with refining the temporal and spatial steps is demonstrated. The results of the present technique are compared with some known numerical and experimental data by other authors, their satisfactory agreement is found. To illustrate the capabilities of the present technique the process of growth and collapse of a bubble in water near a wall is considered. The liquid pressure contours in the stage of the bubble collapse are given and the radial liquid pressure profiles on the wall and at a small distance from the wall where the liquid pressure is maximum are shown.

  12. Universal domain wall dynamics under electric field in Ta/CoFeB/MgO devices with perpendicular anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Weiwei; Vernier, Nicolas; Agnus, Guillaume; Garcia, Karin; Ocker, Berthold; Zhao, Weisheng; Fullerton, Eric E.; Ravelosona, Dafiné

    2016-11-01

    Electric field effects in ferromagnetic metal/dielectric structures provide a new route to control domain wall dynamics with low-power dissipation. However, electric field effects on domain wall velocities have only been observed so far in the creep regime where domain wall velocities are low due to strong interactions with pinning sites. Here we show gate voltage modulation of domain wall velocities ranging from the creep to the flow regime in Ta/Co40Fe40B20/MgO/TiO2 structures with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. We demonstrate a universal description of the role of applied electric fields in the various pinning-dependent regimes by taking into account an effective magnetic field being linear with the electric field. In addition, the electric field effect is found to change sign in the Walker regime. Our results are consistent with voltage-induced modification of magnetic anisotropy. Our work opens new opportunities for the study and optimization of electric field effect at ferromagnetic metal/insulator interfaces.

  13. [A dynamic study of blood flow in patients with unilateral obstruction of the iliac artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Padilla, F; Díez Herranz, M; Peñafiel Marfil, R; García Rospide, V; González Ríos, L; Ramosa Bruno, J; Ros Die, E

    1991-01-01

    Sanguineous flow is studied in a group of patients with unilateral obliteration of iliac artery. This flow was particularly studied during exercise with the purpose of determinate the modifications on the flow produced by exercise. For this purpose, 11 patients with no associated pathologies were studied during more than a year follow-up.

  14. Dynamic cone beam CT angiography of carotid and cerebral arteries using canine model

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Weixing; zhao,binghui; Conover, David; Liu, Jiangkun; Ning, Ruola

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This research is designed to develop and evaluate a flat-panel detector-based dynamic cone beam CT system for dynamic angiography imaging, which is able to provide both dynamic functional information and dynamic anatomic information from one multirevolution cone beam CT scan.

  15. Modelling of the dynamic relationship between arterial pressure, renal sympathetic nerve activity and renal blood flow in conscious rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, C S; Malpas, S C

    1998-12-01

    A linear autoregressive/moving-average model was developed to describe the dynamic relationship between mean arterial pressure (MAP), renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and renal blood flow (RBF) in conscious rabbits. The RBF and SNA to the same kidney were measured under resting conditions in a group of eight rabbits. Spectral analysis of the data sampled at 0.4 Hz showed that the low-pass bandwidth of the signal power for RBF was approximately 0. 05 Hz. An autoregressive/moving-average model with an exogenous input (ARMAX) was then derived (using the iterative Gauss-Newton algorithm provided by the MATLAB identification Toolbox), with MAP and SNA as inputs and RBF as output, to model the low-frequency fluctuations. The model step responses of RBF to changes in SNA and arterial pressure indicated an overdamped response with a settling time that was usually less than 2 s. Calculated residuals from the model indicated that 79 5 % (mean s.d., averaged over eight independent experiments) of the variation in RBF could be accounted for by the variations in arterial pressure and SNA. Two additional single-input models for each of the inputs were similarly obtained and showed conclusively that changes in RBF, in the conscious resting rabbit, are a function of both SNA and MAP and that the SNA signal has the predominant effect. These results indicate a strong reliance on SNA for the dynamic regulation of RBF. Such information is likely to be important in understanding the diminished renal function that occurs in a variety of disease conditions in which overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system occurs.

  16. Shape effects on dynamics of inertia-free spheroids in wall turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challabotla, Niranjan Reddy; Zhao, Lihao; Andersson, Helge I. [Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-06-15

    The rotational motion of inertia-free spheroids has been studied in a numerically simulated turbulent channel flow. Although inertia-free spheroids were translated as tracers with the flow, neither the disk-like nor the rod-like particles adapted to the fluid rotation. The flattest disks preferentially aligned their symmetry axes normal to the wall, whereas the longest rods were parallel with the wall. The shape-dependence of the particle orientations carried over to the particle rotation such that the mean spin was reduced with increasing departure from sphericity. The streamwise spin fluctuations were enhanced due to asphericity, but substantially more for prolate than for oblate spheroids.

  17. Analysis of domain wall dynamics based on skewness of magnetic Barkhausen noise for applied stress determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Song; Tian, GuiYun; Dobmann, Gerd; Wang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Skewness of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) signal is used as a new feature for applied stress determination. After experimental studies, skewness presents its ability for measuring applied tensile stress compared with conventional feature, meanwhile, a non-linear behavior of this new feature and an independence of the excitation conditions under compressive stress are found and discussed. Effective damping during domain wall motion influencing the asymmetric shape of the MBN statistical distribution function is discussed under compressive and tensile stress variation. Domain wall (DW) energy and distance between pinning edges of the DW are considered altering the characteristic relaxation time, which is the reason for the non-linear phenomenon of skewness.

  18. Dynamics of domain walls with lines in rare-earth orthoferrites in magnetic and electric fields with exchange relaxation processes taken into account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekomasov, E. G.

    2003-08-01

    The influence of exchange relaxation on the dynamics of domain walls with a "fine structure" in rare-earth orthoferrites in the presence of external magnetic and electric fields is investigated. A system of differential equations is obtained which describe the dynamics of a domain wall with a solitary line. The dependence of the steady-state velocity of the domain wall and line on the values of the relaxation parameters and on the components of the magnetic and electric fields is found. The results are compared with the known experimental results.

  19. Correlation between arterial wall stiffness, N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide, functional and structural myocardial abnormalities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiac autonomic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriya Aleksandrovna Serhiyenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess arterial wall stiffness, plasma levels of of N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, as well as functional state and structure of the myocardium in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM and cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN.Materials and Methods. The study involved a total of 65 patients with T2DM. 12 had no evidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD or CAN, 14 were diagnosed with subclinical stage of CAN, 18 – with functional stage, and 21 – with organic stage. We measured aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV, aortic augmentation index (AIx, brachial artery AIx, ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI and plasma levels of NT-proBNP. Clinical examination included ECG, Holter monitoring, ambulatory BP measurement and echocardiography.Results. Patients with isolated T2DM showed a trend for increased vascular wall stiffness. PWV was increased in patients with subclinical stage of CAN. Aortic and brachial AIx, PWV and AASI were elevated in patients with functional stage of CAN, PWV being significantly higher vs. subclinical CAN subgroup. Organic stage was characterized by pathologically increased values of all primary parameters; PWV and AASI were significantly higher compared with other groups. Development and progression of CAN was accompanied by an increase in NT-proBNP plasma levels. Concentration of NT-proBNP was in direct correlation with left ventricular mass (LVM and PWV. PWV and LVM values also directly correlated between themselves.Conclusion. Development and progression of CAN in patients with T2DM is accompanied by an increase in vascular wall stiffness. The elevation of plasma NT-proBNP in patients with T2DM correlates with the development of CAN and is significantly and independently associated with an increase in LVM and PWV. Our data suggests the pathophysiological interconnection between metabolic, functional and structural myocardial abnormalities in patients with T2DM and CAN.

  20. Coupling between Current and Dynamic Magnetization : from Domain Walls to Spin Waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    So far, we have derived some general expressions for domain-wall motion and the spin motive force. We have seen that the β parameter plays a large role in both subjects. In all chapters of this thesis, there is an emphasis on the determination of this parameter. We also know how to incorporate therm

  1. Nonadiabatic Spin Torque Investigated Using Thermally Activated Magnetic Domain Wall Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eltschka, M.; Woetzel, Mathias; Rhensius, J.

    2010-01-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy, we investigate the thermally activated motion of domain walls (DWs) between two positions in Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) nanowires at room temperature. We show that this purely thermal motion is well described by an Arrhenius law, allowing for a description...

  2. Nonadiabatic spin torque investigated using thermally activated magnetic domain wall dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eltschka, M.; Wötzel, M.; Rhensius, J.; Krzyk, S.; Nowak, U.; Kläui, M.; Kasama, T.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Heyderman, L. J.; van Driel, H.J.; Duine, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy, we investigate the thermally activated motion of domain walls (DWs) between two positions in Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) nanowires at room temperature. We show that this purely thermal motion is well described by an Arrhenius law, allowing for a description of the DW

  3. Evolution and dynamics of shear-layer structures in near-wall turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Arne V.; Alfredsson, P. H.; Kim, John

    1991-01-01

    Near-wall flow structures in turbulent shear flows are analyzed, with particular emphasis on the study of their space-time evolution and connection to turbulence production. The results are obtained from investigation of a database generated from direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow at a Reynolds number of 180 based on half-channel width and friction velocity. New light is shed on problems associated with conditional sampling techniques, together with methods to improve these techniques, for use both in physical and numerical experiments. The results clearly indicate that earlier conceptual models of the processes associated with near-wall turbulence production, based on flow visualization and probe measurements need to be modified. For instance, the development of asymmetry in the spanwise direction seems to be an important element in the evolution of near-wall structures in general, and for shear layers in particular. The inhibition of spanwise motion of the near-wall streaky pattern may be the primary reason for the ability of small longitudinal riblets to reduce turbulent skin friction below the value for a flat surface.

  4. Could Peripheral Arterial Disease Be Your Problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercise and yoga classes and has returned to teaching. Fast Facts Peripheral arterial disease (P.A.D.) occurs when a fatty material called plaque (pronounced plak) builds up on the inside walls of the arteries that carry blood from ...

  5. Numerical simulation of ultrasound-induced dynamics of a gas bubble neighboring a rigid wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Ando, Keita

    2016-11-01

    Cavitation erosion has been a technical issue in ultrasonic cleaning under which cavitation bubbles appear near target surfaces to be cleaned. In the present study, we numerically study the interaction of ultrasonic standing waves with a gas bubble in the neighborhood of a rigid wall. We solve multicomponent Euler equations that ignore surface tension and phase change at interfaces, by the finite-volume WENO scheme with interface capturing. The pressure amplitude of the ultrasound is set at several atmospheres and the ultrasound wavelength is tuned to obtain the situation near resonance. In the simulation, we observe jetting flow toward the rigid wall at violent bubble collapse that may explain cavitation erosion in ultrasonic cleaning.

  6. Towards a model of large scale dynamics in transitional wall-bounded flows

    CERN Document Server

    Manneville, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A system of simplified equations is proposed to govern the feedback interactions of large-scale flows present in laminar-turbulent patterns of transitional wall-bounded flows, with small-scale Reynolds stresses generated by the self-sustainment process of turbulence itself modeled using an extension of Waleffe's approach (Phys. Fluids 9 (1997) 883-900), the detailed expression of which is displayed as an annex to the main text.

  7. Detection of biological objects using dynamic characteristics of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ajay M.; Joshi, Anand Y.

    2015-08-01

    This study explores double-walled carbon nanotubes as the sensing devices for biological objects including viruses and bacteria. The biological objects studied include alanine with amino terminal residue, deoxyadenosine with free residue, Coronaviridae and Bartonella bacilliformis. An expression has been articulated to identify the mass of biological objects from the shift of frequency. Sensitivity of the sensor has been calculated when subjected to such biological objects. Molecular structural mechanics approach has been used for investigating the vibrational responses of zigzag and armchair double-walled carbon nanotube-based nano biosensors. The elastic properties of beam element are calculated by considering mechanical characteristics of covalent bonds between the carbon atoms in the hexagonal lattice. Spring elements are used to describe the interlayer interactions between the inner and outer tubes caused due to the van der Waals forces. The mass of each beam element is assumed as point mass at nodes coinciding with carbon atoms at inner and outer wall of DWCNT. Based on the sensitivity and the frequency shift it can be concluded that cantilever zigzag DWCNTs are better candidates for detecting the biological objects.

  8. The dynamics of field and current-driven magnetic domain wall depinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Geoffrey; Knutson, Carl; Tsoi, Maxim; Erskine, James

    2008-03-01

    The depinning of a magnetic domain wall from a well-defined potential well was studied experimentally on timescales ranging from minutes down to tens of nanoseconds. At longer timescales, the behavior follows the classical Neel-Brown model of thermal activation, one of the few observations of this process for the ideal case of a single energy barrier. Below one microsecond, however, the depinning rate becomes independent of the activation volume and assumes a more universal behavior. This transition is due to a vanishing of the energy barrier at a critical field, beyond which the rate of depinning depends primarily on the torque supplied by the field and spin current. A dc spin-polarized current flowing across the domain wall has the effect of lowering the energy barrier by an amount that is predominantly quadratic in current, independent of its direction. This is seen to arise from a shift of the wall in the energy potential due to the adiabatic component of spin-transfer torque.

  9. The dynamics of a capsule in a wall-bounded oscillating shear flow

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, LaiLai; Brandt, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The motion of an initially spherical capsule in a wall-bounded oscillating shear flow is investigated via an accelerated boundary integral implementation. The neo-Hookean model is used as the constitutive law of the capsule membrane. The maximum wall-normal migration is observed when the oscillation period of the imposed shear is of the order of the relaxation time of the elastic membrane; hence, the optimal capillary number scales with the inverse of the oscillation frequency and the ratio agrees well with the theoretical prediction in the limit of high-frequency oscillation. The migration velocity decreases monotonically with the frequency of the applied shear and the capsule-wall distance. We report a significant correlation between the capsule lateral migration and the normal stress difference induced in the flow. The periodic variation of the capsule deformation is roughly in phase with that of the migration velocity and normal stress difference, with twice the frequency of the imposed shear. The maximum...

  10. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Takara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V CW = rib cage (V RC + abdomen (V AB] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE V CW increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V CW regulation as EEV CW increased non-linearly in 17/30 "hyperinflators" and decreased in 13/30 "non-hyperinflators" (P < 0.05. EEV AB decreased slightly in 8 of the "hyperinflators", thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI V CW (P < 0.05. In contrast, decreases in EEV CW in the "non-hyperinflators" were due to the combination of stable EEV RC with marked reductions in EEV AB. These patients showed lower EIV CW and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05. Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV CW regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001. However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  11. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T.M.; Barbosa, P.; Rodrigues, M.K.; Oliveira, M.F.; Nery, L.E. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neder, J.A. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V{sub CW}) = rib cage (V{sub RC}) + abdomen (V{sub AB})] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) V{sub CW} increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V{sub CW} regulation as EEV{sub CW} increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEV{sub AB} decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) V{sub CW} (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEV{sub CW} in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEV{sub RC} with marked reductions in EEV{sub AB}. These patients showed lower EIV{sub CW} and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV{sub CW} regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  12. Vortex dynamics and wall shear stress behaviour associated with an elliptic jet impinging upon a flat plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J.; New, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    Vortical structures and dynamics of a Re h = 2100 elliptic jet impinging upon a flat plate were studied at H/ d h = 1, 2 and 4 jet-to-plate separation distances. Flow investigations were conducted along both its major and minor planes using laser-induced fluorescence and digital particle image velocimetry techniques. Results show that the impingement process along the major plane largely consists of primary jet ring-vortex and wall-separated secondary vortex formations, where they subsequently separate from the flat plate at smaller H/ d h = 1 and 2 separation distances. Key vortex formation locations occur closer to the impingement point as the separation distance increases. Interestingly, braid vortices and rib structures begin to take part in the impingement process at H/ d h = 4 and wave instabilities dominate the flow field. In contrast, significantly more coherent primary and secondary vortices with physically larger vortex core sizes and higher vortex strengths are observed along the minor plane, with no signs of braid vortices and rib structures. Lastly, influences of these different flow dynamics on the major and minor plane instantaneous and mean skin friction coefficient levels are investigated to shed light on the effects of separation distance on the wall shear stress distributions.

  13. Dynamic Runner Forces and Pressure Fluctuations on the Draft Tube Wall of a Model Pump-Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, O.; Ruprecht, A.; Göde, E.; Riedelbauch, S.

    2016-11-01

    When Francis-turbines and pump-turbines operate at off-design conditions, typically a vortex rope develops. The vortex rope causes pressure oscillations leading to fluctuations of the forces affecting the runner. The presence of dynamic runner forces over a long period of time might damage the bearings and possibly the runner. In this experimental investigation, the fluctuating part of the runner forces and the pressure oscillations on the draft tube wall were measured on a model pump-turbine with a simplified straight cone draft tube in different operating conditions. The investigation focuses on the correlation of the pressure fluctuations frequency measured at the draft tube wall with the frequency of the fluctuating forces on the runner. The comparison between pressure fluctuations and dynamic forces shows a significant correlation in all operating points. For the comparison of different components in the spatial directions of the forces, the pressure fluctuations were separated in a synchronous part and a rotating part for operating points with higher amplitudes. The rotating pressure fluctuations correlate with the radial forces especially in the operating points with a rotating vortex rope. At frequencies with higher amplitudes in the pressure fluctuations caused by the vortex rope movement, there are also higher amplitudes in the radial forces at the same frequencies.

  14. Domain wall dynamics under electric field in CoFeB-MgO structures with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelosona, Dafine

    2016-10-01

    One crucial breakthrough in spin electronics has recently been achieved regarding the possibility to move magnetic domain walls (DWs) in magnetic tracks using the sole action of an electrical current instead of a conventional magnetic field. Here, we will present our recent results of DW dynamics obtained in Ta-CoFeB-MgO nanodevices with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), which are widely used in STT-RAM applications, and discuss the critical problems to be addressed for implementation into a memory device. Using NV center microscopy to map DW pinning along a magnetic wire, we will first show1 that Ta/CoFeB(1nm)/MgO structures exhibit a very low density of pinning defects with respect to others materials with PMA. Then, we will focus on the possibility to use Electric Field Effect to control domain wall motion with low power dissipation. We will demonstrate gate voltage modulation of DW dynamics using different approaches based on dielectrics, piezoelectrics and ionic liquid layers.

  15. Mapping the dynamics of brain perfusion using functional ultrasound in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Clément; Isabel, Clothilde; Martin, Abraham; Dussaux, Clara; Savoye, Anne; Emmrich, Julius; Montaldo, Gabriel; Mas, Jean-Louis; Baron, Jean-Claude; Urban, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Following middle cerebral artery occlusion, tissue outcome ranges from normal to infarcted depending on depth and duration of hypoperfusion as well as occurrence and efficiency of reperfusion. However, the precise time course of these changes in relation to tissue and behavioral outcome remains unsettled. To address these issues, a three-dimensional wide field-of-view and real-time quantitative functional imaging technique able to map perfusion in the rodent brain would be desirable. Here, we applied functional ultrasound imaging, a novel approach to map relative cerebral blood volume without contrast agent, in a rat model of brief proximal transient middle cerebral artery occlusion to assess perfusion in penetrating arterioles and venules acutely and over six days thanks to a thinned-skull preparation. Functional ultrasound imaging efficiently mapped the acute changes in relative cerebral blood volume during occlusion and following reperfusion with high spatial resolution (100 µm), notably documenting marked focal decreases during occlusion, and was able to chart the fine dynamics of tissue reperfusion (rate: one frame/5 s) in the individual rat. No behavioral and only mild post-mortem immunofluorescence changes were observed. Our study suggests functional ultrasound is a particularly well-adapted imaging technique to study cerebral perfusion in acute experimental stroke longitudinally from the hyper-acute up to the chronic stage in the same subject.

  16. Discrepant imaging findings of portal vein thrombosis with dynamic computed tomography and computed tomography during arterial portography in hepatocellular carcinoma: possible cause leading to inappropriate treatment selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Hidenori; Kumada, Takashi; Tada, Toshifumi; Mizuno, Kazuyuki; Kobayashi, Natsuko; Inukai, Yosuke; Takeda, Akira; Sone, Yasuhiro

    2017-04-01

    We encountered a patient with hepatocellular carcinoma who had discrepant imaging findings on portal vein thrombosis with portal phase dynamic computed tomography (CT) and CT during arterial portography (CTAP). CTAP, via the superior mesenteric artery and via the splenic artery, both showed a portal perfusion defect in the right hepatic lobe, indicating portal vein thrombosis in the main trunk of the right portal vein. Portal phase dynamic CT clearly depicted portal perfusion of the same hepatic area. Transarterial chemoembolization was successfully performed, but it was associated with severe liver injury. Clinicians should be cautious about this possible discrepancy based on imaging technique. The inaccurate evaluation of portal vein thrombosis may result in inappropriate treatment selection, which can worsen patient prognosis.

  17. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in purified and as-grown single-walled carbon nanotube films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Yong-Bing; Song Li; Zhang Chun-Yu; Wang Li; Fu Pan-Ming; Zhang Zhi-Guo; Xie Si-Shen; Wang Guo-Ping

    2005-01-01

    Ultrafast time-resolved optical transmissions in purified and as-grown single-walled carbon nanotube films are measured at a temperature of 200K. The signal of the purified sample shows a crossover from photobleaching to photoabsorption. The former and the latter are interpreted as the state filling and the red shift of the π-plasmon,respectively. The signal of the as-grown sample can be perfectly fitted by a single-exponential with a time constant of 232fs. The disappearance of the negative component in the as-grown sample is attributed to the charge transfer between the semiconducting nanotubes and the impurities.

  18. Test of the diffusing-diffusivity mechanism using near-wall colloidal dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Matse, Mpumelelo

    2016-01-01

    The diffusing-diffusivity mechanism proposed by Chubynsky and Slater [PRL 113, 098302, 2014] predicts that, in environments where the diffusivity changes gradually, the displacement distribution becomes non-Gaussian, even though the mean-squared displacement (MSD) grows linearly with time. Here, we report single-particle tracking measurements of the diffusion of colloidal spheres near a planar wall. Because the local effective diffusivity is known, we have been able to carry out the first direct test of this mechanism for diffusion in inhomogeneous media.

  19. Heart wall motion analysis by dynamic 3D strain rate imaging from tissue Doppler echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastenteufel, Mark; Wolf, Ivo; de Simone, Raffaele; Mottl-Link, Sibylle; Meinzer, Hans-Peter

    2002-04-01

    The knowledge about the complex three-dimensional (3D) heart wall motion pattern, particular in the left ventricle, provides valuable information about potential malfunctions, e.g., myocardial ischemia. Nowadays, echocardiography (cardiac ultrasound) is the predominant technique for evaluation of cardiac function. Beside morphology, tissue velocities can be obtained by Doppler techniques (tissue Doppler imaging, TDI). Strain rate imaging (SRI) is a new technique to diagnose heart vitality. It provides information about the contraction ability of the myocardium. Two-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography is still the most important clinical method for estimation of morphology and function. Two-dimensional methods leads to a lack of information due to the three-dimensional overall nature of the heart movement. Due to this complex three-dimensional motion pattern of the heart, the knowledge about velocity and strain rate distribution over the whole ventricle can provide more valuable diagnostic information about motion disorders. For the assessment of intracardiac blood flow three-dimensional color Doppler has already shown its clinical utility. We have developed methods to produce strain rate images by means of 3D tissue Doppler echocardiography. The tissue Doppler and strain rate images can be visualized and quantified by different methods. The methods are integrated into an interactively usable software environment, making them available in clinical everyday life. Our software provides the physician with a valuable tool for diagnosis of heart wall motion.

  20. Interstitial and arterial-venous [K+] in human calf muscle during dynamic exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, S; Langberg, Henning; Skovgaard, D

    2000-01-01

    little information on the response of [K+]I to exercise in human skeletal muscle. Five young healthy subjects performed plantar flexion exercise for four 5 min periods at increasing power outputs ( approximately 1-6 W) with 10 min intervening recovery periods, as well as for two 5 min periods......Changes in the concentration of interstitial K+ surrounding skeletal muscle fibres ([K+]I) probably play some role in the regulation of cardiovascular adjustments to muscular activity, as well as in the aetiology of muscle pain and fatigue during high-intensity exercise. However, there is very...... with ischaemia at approximately 1 and approximately 3 W. Microdialysis probes were inserted into the gastrocnemius medialis muscle of the right leg to measure [K+]I, and K+ release from the plantar flexors during and after incremental exercise was calculated from plasma flow and arterial-venous differences for K...

  1. The dynamic study of the pulmonary artery obstruction degree and the right ventricular function in massive pulmonary embolism on CT pulmonary angiography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianguo Wang; Yulin Guo; Xiaojuan Guo; Min Liu; Youmin Guo; Chen Wang; Yuanhua Yang; Zhenguo Zhai; Li Zhu; Hongxia Ma

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the value of CTPA in assessing the dissolve of embolus and the function of the fight ventricle dynamically.Methods:Twenty-three cases of massive pulmonary embolism were analyzed retrospectively. The pulmonary artery obstruction index and the fight ventricular function parameters were collected and analyzed on CTPA before thrombolytic therapy, 24 hours and 14 days after therapy, respectively. Results:The pulmonary artery obstruction index decreased gradually, and there was significant difference before therapy, 24 hours and 2 weeks after therapy. Twenty-four hours after therapy, the maximal short axes diameter and the maximal transverse area of fight ventricle(RVd, RVs) decreased significantly, the maximal short axes diameter and the maximal transverse area of left ventricle(LVd, LVs) increased significantly, and the RVd/LVd, RVs/LVs decreased apparently. The pulmonary artery symbolic pressure before and 24 hours after therapy were apparently different. There was no significant difference between azygos vein, the super vena cava, the main pulmonary artery and vein reflux before and after therapy. Conclusion:CTPA can evaluate the pulmonary artery obstruction degree and right ventricular function dynamically.

  2. Effects of Pulsatile Pressure on Stress Distributionin Artery Wall at in Vivo Longitudinal Limit Constraint%脉动血压对在体轴向极限强约束血管壁应力分布的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈泳; 覃开蓉; 滕忠照; 柳兆荣

    2000-01-01

    本文详细分析正弦脉动压力载荷对动脉管壁应力分布的影响。结果表明,对某确定时刻,包含在运动方程中的惯性项对血管壁应力的影响很小,可忽略不计;在体轴向极限强约束下,血管壁周向应力随时间的变化曲线与压力曲线同相位和同周期,而且振幅不随频率的快慢而改变。一个心动周期内,血管内、外壁处周向应力随时间变化的平均值只与脉动压力载荷的平均值有关,而振幅主要与脉压有关,在内壁处随平均压的改变有一定变化,但在外壁处受平均压的影响很小。%In this paper, the effects of the sinusoidal pulsatile pressure on the stress distribution in the artery wall will be studied. Results show that the acceleration term in the equation of motion has little influence on the stress in the artery wall, and can be ignored. At in vivo longitudinal limit constraint, the variation of the circumferential stress with time have the same phase and period with the curves of the pulsatile pressure, and the amplitudes have no change with the frequency. During a cardiac cycle, the mean circumferential stress in the inner and outer wall only relates to the mean pressure, and the pulsatile stress value is mainly connected with the pulsatile pressure. The change of mean pressure has some influence to the pulsatile value in the inner wall, and little influence in the outer wall.

  3. The dynamics of plant cell-wall polysaccharide decomposition in leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Isabel Eva; de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Harholt, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    The degradation of live plant biomass in fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants is poorly characterised but fundamental for understanding the mutual advantages and efficiency of this obligate nutritional symbiosis. Controversies about the extent to which the garden-symbiont Leucocoprinus gongylophorus......, to map the occurrence of cell wall polymers in consecutive sections of the fungus garden of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior. We show that pectin, xyloglucan and some xylan epitopes are degraded, whereas more highly substituted xylan and cellulose epitopes remain as residuals in the waste...... material that the ants remove from their fungus garden. These results demonstrate that biomass entering leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens is only partially utilized and explain why disproportionally large amounts of plant material are needed to sustain colony growth. They also explain why substantial...

  4. The dynamics of plant cell-wall polysaccharide decomposition in leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Isabel Eva; de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard; Harholt, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    communities of microbial and invertebrate symbionts have evolved associations with the dump material from leaf-cutting ant nests, to exploit decomposition niches that the ant garden-fungus does not utilize. Our approach thus provides detailed insight into the nutritional benefits and shortcomings associated......The degradation of live plant biomass in fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants is poorly characterised but fundamental for understanding the mutual advantages and efficiency of this obligate nutritional symbiosis. Controversies about the extent to which the garden-symbiont Leucocoprinus gongylophorus......, to map the occurrence of cell wall polymers in consecutive sections of the fungus garden of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior. We show that pectin, xyloglucan and some xylan epitopes are degraded, whereas more highly substituted xylan and cellulose epitopes remain as residuals in the waste...

  5. Time-domain solution for transient dynamic response of a large-diameter thin-walled pipe pile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xuanming; Liu, Hanlong; Chu, Jian; Cheng, Ke

    2015-06-01

    The propagation of stress waves in a large-diameter pipe pile for low strain dynamic testing cannot be explained properly by traditional 1D wave theories. A new computational model is established to obtain a wave equation that can describe the dynamic response of a large-diameter thin-walled pipe pile to a transient point load during a low strain integrity test. An analytical solution in the time domain is deduced using the separation of variables and variation of constant methods. The validity of this new solution is verified by an existing analytical solution under free boundary conditions. The results of this time domain solution are also compared with the results of a frequency domain solution and field test data. The comparisons indicate that the new solution agrees well with the results of previous solutions. Parametric studies using the new solution with reference to a case study are also carried out. The results show that the mode number affects the accuracy of the dynamic response. A mode number greater than 10 is required to enable the calculated dynamic responses to be independent of the mode number. The dynamic response is also greatly affected by soil properties. The larger the side resistance, the smaller the displacement response and the smaller the reflected velocity wave crest. The displacement increases as the stress waves propagate along the pile when the pile shaft is free. The incident waves of displacement and velocity responses of the pile are not the same among different points in the circumferential direction on the pile top. However, the arrival time and peak value of the pile tip reflected waves are almost the same among different points on the pile top.

  6. Clocking the anisotropic lattice dynamics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by four-dimensional ultrafast transmission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Gaolong; Sun, Shuaishuai; Li, Zhongwen; Tian, Huanfang; Yang, Huaixin; Li, Jianqi

    2015-02-01

    Recent advances in the four-dimensional ultrafast transmission electron microscope (4D-UTEM) with combined spatial and temporal resolutions have made it possible to directly visualize structural dynamics of materials at the atomic level. Herein, we report on our development on a 4D-UTEM which can be operated properly on either the photo-emission or the thermionic mode. We demonstrate its ability to obtain sequences of snapshots with high spatial and temporal resolutions in the study of lattice dynamics of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). This investigation provides an atomic level description of remarkable anisotropic lattice dynamics at the picosecond timescales. Moreover, our UTEM measurements clearly reveal that distinguishable lattice relaxations appear in intra-tubular sheets on an ultrafast timescale of a few picoseconds and after then an evident lattice expansion along the radial direction. These anisotropic behaviors in the MWCNTs are considered arising from the variety of chemical bonding, i.e. the weak van der Waals bonding between the tubular planes and the strong covalent sp2-hybridized bonds in the tubular sheets.

  7. Dynamics of 2+1 dimensional SOS surfaces above a wall: slow mixing induced by entropic repulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Caputo, Pietro; Martinelli, Fabio; Sly, Allan; Toninelli, Fabio Lucio

    2012-01-01

    We study the Glauber dynamics for the (2+1)D Solid-On-Solid model above a hard wall and below a far away ceiling, on an $L \\times L$ box of $Z^2$ with zero boundary conditions, at large inverse-temperature $\\beta$. It was shown by Bricmont, El-Mellouki and Fr\\"ohlich (1986) that the floor constraint induces an entropic repulsion effect which lifts the surface to an average height $H \\asymp (1/\\beta)\\log L$. As an essential step in understanding the effect of entropic repulsion on the Glauber dynamics we determine the equilibrium height $H$ to within an additive constant: $H=(1/4\\beta)\\log L+O(1)$. We then show that starting from zero initial conditions the surface rises to its final height $H$ through a sequence of metastable transitions between consecutive levels. The time for a transition from height $h=aH $, $a\\in (0,1)$, to height $h+1$ is roughly $\\exp(c L^a)$ for some constant $c>0$. In particular, the mixing time of the dynamics is exponentially large in $L$, i.e., $T_{mix} \\geq e^{c L}$. We also provi...

  8. Resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brunsell, P. R.

    2002-01-01

    Observations of resistive wall instabilities and tearing mode dynamics in the EXTRAP T2R thin shell (τw=6 ms) reversed field pinch are described. A nonresonant mode (m=1,n=-10) with the same handedness as the internal field grows nearly exponentially with an average growth time of about 2.6 ms (less than 1/2 of the shell time) consistent with linear stability theory. The externally nonresonant unstable modes (m=1,n>0), predicted by linear stability theory, are observed to have only low amplitudes (in the normal low-Θ operation mode of the device). The radial field of the dominant internally resonant tearing modes (m=1,n=-15 to n=-12) remain low due to spontaneous fast mode rotation, corresponding to angular phase velocities up to 280 krad/s. Phase aligned mode structures are observed to rotate toroidally with an average angular velocity of 40 krad/s, in the opposite direction of the plasma current. Toward the end of the discharge, the radial field of the internally resonant modes grows as the modes slow down and become wall-locked, in agreement with nonlinear computations. Fast rotation of the internally resonant modes has been observed only recently and is attributed to a change of the front-end system (vacuum vessel, shell, and TF coil) of the device.

  9. Exact dynamic stiffness matrix of non-symmetric thin-walled curved beams subjected to initial axial force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam-Il, Kim; Moon-Young, Kim

    2005-06-01

    An improved numerical method to exactly evaluate the dynamic element stiffness matrix is proposed for the spatially coupled free vibration analysis of non-symmetric thin-walled curved beams subjected to uniform axial force. For this purpose, firstly equations of motion, boundary conditions and force-deformation relations are rigorously derived from the total potential energy for a curved beam element. Next systems of linear algebraic equations with non-symmetric matrices are constructed by introducing 14 displacement parameters and transforming the fourth-order simultaneous differential equations into the first-order simultaneous equations. And then explicit expressions for displacement parameters are numerically evaluated via eigensolutions and the exact 14×14 element stiffness matrix is determined using force-deformation relations. In order to demonstrate the validity and the accuracy of this study, the spatially coupled natural frequencies of non-symmetric thin-walled curved beams subjected to uniform compressive and tensile forces are evaluated and compared with analytical and finite element solutions using Hermitian curved beam elements or ABAQUS's shell element. In addition, some results by the parametric study are reported.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulation of melting and crystallization processes of polyethylene clusters confined in armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhou; Wang, Jinjian; Zhu, Xiaolei; Lu, Xiaohua; Guan, Wenwen; Yang, Yuchen

    2015-01-01

    The confined interaction is important to understand the melting and crystallization of polymers within single-wall carbon tube (SWNT). However, it is difficult for us to observe this interaction. In the current work, the structures and behaviors of melting and crystallization for polyethylene (PE) clusters confined in armchair single-walled carbon nanotubes ((n,n)-SWNTs) are investigated and examined based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The nonbonded energies, structures, Lindemman indices, radial density distributions, and diffusion coefficients are used to demonstrate the features of melting phase transition for PE clusters confined in (n,n)-SWNTs. The chain end-to-end distance (R(n)) and chain end-to-end distribution are used to examine the flexibility of the PE chain confined in SWNT. The global orientational order parameter (P2) is employed to reveal the order degree of whole PE polymer. The effect of polymerization degree on melting temperature and the influence of SWNT chirality on structure of PE cluster are examined and discussed. Results demonstrate that within the confined environment of SWNT, PE clusters adopt novel co-axial crystalline layer structure, in which parallel chains of each layer are approximately vertical to tube axis. The disordered-ordered transformation of PE chains in each layer is an important structural feature for crystallization of confined PE clusters. SWNTs have a considerable effect on the structures and stabilities of the confined PE clusters.

  11. STUDY OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC STABILITY OF THIN-WALLED BARS EXCITED BY PERIODICAL AXIAL EXTERNAL FORCES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minodora Maria PASĂRE

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In these paper, starting from the relations for the displacements and spinning the transversal section of a bar with thin walls of sections opened expressed by the corresponding influence functions and introducing the components of the exterior forces distributed and the moments of the exterior forces distributed due to the inertia forces, the exciting axial forces together with the following effect of these and of the reaction forces of the elastic environment for leaning it may reach to the system of the equations of parametric vibrations under the form of three integral equation These equations may serve for the study of vibrations of the bars, to study the static stability and to study the dynamic stability

  12. Measurement of particle trajectories, dynamics, surface adhesion and detachment in near-wall shear flows using 3D velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Schmidt, Brian; Lawrence, Michael; Breuer, Kenneth

    2007-11-01

    Three-dimensional total internal reflection velocimetry (3D-TIRV) is used to measure the trajectories of fluorescent tracer particles within 200 nm of a wall. Diffusion and shear-induced motion can result in mean velocity measurement errors, and by taking measurements using different particle sizes and sampling times, we quantify these effects and compare with theory. We also use 3D-TIRV to observe and characterize the adhesion, surface rolling and release dynamics of particles that can adhere to the surface through the action of biological binding proteins. Particles coated with P-Selectin are allowed to adhere to and detach from a PSGL-1-coated microchannel surface, modeling the interaction between leukocytes (white blood cells) and blood vessels, respectively. Binding affinities, bond strengths and hydrodynamic interactions are inferred from the trajectory data.

  13. Systematics analyses on nucleon isovector observables in 2+1-flavor dynamical domain-wall lattice QCD near physical mass

    CERN Document Server

    Ohta, Shigemi

    2014-01-01

    Analyses on possible systematics in some isovector nucleon observables in the RBC+UKQCD 2+1-flavor dynamical domain-wall fermion (DWF) lattice-QCD are presented. The vector charge, axial charge, quark momentum and helicity fractions, and transversity are discussed using mainly the Iwasaki\\(\\times\\)DSDR ensemble at pion mass of 170 MeV. No autocorrelation issue is observed in the vector charge and quark momentum and helicity fractions. Blocked Jack-knife analyses expose significant growth of estimated error for the axial charge with increasing block sizes that are similar to or larger than the known autocorrelation time of the gauge-field topological charge. Similar growth is seen in the transversity. These two observables, however, do not seem correlated with the topological charge.

  14. Pharmacological modulation of arterial stiffness.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boutouyrie, Pierre

    2011-09-10

    Arterial stiffness has emerged as an important marker of cardiovascular risk in various populations and reflects the cumulative effect of cardiovascular risk factors on large arteries, which in turn is modulated by genetic background. Arterial stiffness is determined by the composition of the arterial wall and the arrangement of these components, and can be studied in humans non-invasively. Age and distending pressure are two major factors influencing large artery stiffness. Change in arterial stiffness with drugs is an important endpoint in clinical trials, although evidence for arterial stiffness as a therapeutic target still needs to be confirmed. Drugs that independently affect arterial stiffness include antihypertensive drugs, mostly blockers of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, hormone replacement therapy and some antidiabetic drugs such as glitazones. While the quest continues for \\'de-stiffening drugs\\

  15. The Non-Invasive Functional Tissue Characterization for Arteriosclerosis by Artery Wall Motion Analysis with Time Series High-Speed Echo Images and Continuous Spygmo-Manometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Abstract- The evaluation method of arteriosclerosis has been established, but most of them are invasive way. In late years, non-invasive diagnostic...method for arteriosclerosis can be done by the diagnosis with high resolution echography. However, even this new diagnostic method can not diagnose...until beginning the morphologic changes of the arteries by stenosis. There is little value even if it could be detected the arteriosclerosis after the

  16. Dual anterior descending coronary artery associated with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siqueira Luciane da L. V.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The patient is a male with risk factors for coronary artery disease, who was referred for cardiac catheterization after acute myocardial infarction in the inferior wall. The patient underwent transluminal coronary angioplasty in the right coronary artery with successful stent implantation.

  17. Effects of an impermeable wall in dissipative dynamics of saturated porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Pietro Artale

    2016-01-01

    A phase transition model for porous media in consolidation is studied. The model is able to describe the phenomenon of fluid-segregation during the consolidation process, i.e., the coexistence of two phases di?ering from fluid content inside the porous medium under static load. Considering pure Darcy dissipation, the dynamics is described by a Cahn-Hilliard-like system of partial differential equations (PDE). The goal, here, is to study the dynamics of the formation of stationary fluid-rich bubbles. The evolution of the strain and fluid density pro?files of the porous medium is analyzed in two physical situation: fluid free to flow through the boundaries of the medium and fluid flow prevented at one of the two boundaries. Morover, an analytic result on the position of the interface between the two phases is provided.

  18. Dynamics of fragmentation and multiple vacancy generation in irradiated single-walled carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Javeed, Sumera; Ahmad, Shoaib

    2016-01-01

    The results from mass spectrometry of clusters sputtered from Cs+ irradiated single-walled carbon nano-tubes (SWCNTs) as a function of energy and dose identify the nature of the resulting damage in the form of multiple vacancy generation. For pristine SWCNTs at all Cs+ energies, C2 is the most dominant species, followed by C3, C4 and C1. The experiments were performed in three stages: in the first stage, Cs+ energy E(Cs+) was varied. During the second stage, the nanotubes were irradiated continuously at E(Cs+) = 5 keV for 1,800 s. Afterwards, the entire sequence of irradiation energies was repeated to differentiate between the fragmentation patterns of the pristine and of heavily irradiated SWCNTs. The sputtering and normalized yields identify the quantitative and relative extent of the ion-induced damage by creating double, triple and quadruple vacancies; the single vacancies are least favored. Sputtering from the heavily irradiated SWCNTs occurs not only from the damaged and fragmented nanotubes, but also f...

  19. Excitonic effects on coherent phonon dynamics in single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, A. R. T.; Rosenthal, E. I.; Hasdeo, E. H.; Sanders, G. D.; Stanton, C. J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Saito, R.

    2013-08-01

    We discuss how excitons can affect the generation of coherent radial breathing modes in the ultrafast spectroscopy of single-wall carbon nanotubes. Photoexcited excitons can be localized spatially and give rise to a spatially distributed driving force in real space which involves many phonon wave vectors of the exciton-phonon interaction. The equation of motion for the coherent phonons is modeled phenomenologically by the Klein-Gordon equation, which we solve for the oscillation amplitudes as a function of space and time. By averaging the calculated amplitudes per nanotube length, we obtain time-dependent coherent phonon amplitudes that resemble the homogeneous oscillations that are observed in some pump-probe experiments. We interpret this result to mean that the experiments are only able to see a spatial average of coherent phonon oscillations over the wavelength of light in carbon nanotubes and the microscopic details are averaged out. Our interpretation is justified by calculating the time-dependent absorption spectra resulting from the macroscopic atomic displacements induced by the coherent phonon oscillations. The calculated coherent phonon spectra including excitonic effects show the experimentally observed symmetric peaks at the nanotube transition energies, in contrast to the asymmetric peaks that would be obtained if excitonic effects were not included.

  20. The dynamics of plant cell-wall polysaccharide decomposition in leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel E Moller

    Full Text Available The degradation of live plant biomass in fungus gardens of leaf-cutting ants is poorly characterised but fundamental for understanding the mutual advantages and efficiency of this obligate nutritional symbiosis. Controversies about the extent to which the garden-symbiont Leucocoprinus gongylophorus degrades cellulose have hampered our understanding of the selection forces that induced large scale herbivory and of the ensuing ecological footprint of these ants. Here we use a recently established technique, based on polysaccharide microarrays probed with antibodies and carbohydrate binding modules, to map the occurrence of cell wall polymers in consecutive sections of the fungus garden of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex echinatior. We show that pectin, xyloglucan and some xylan epitopes are degraded, whereas more highly substituted xylan and cellulose epitopes remain as residuals in the waste material that the ants remove from their fungus garden. These results demonstrate that biomass entering leaf-cutting ant fungus gardens is only partially utilized and explain why disproportionally large amounts of plant material are needed to sustain colony growth. They also explain why substantial communities of microbial and invertebrate symbionts have evolved associations with the dump material from leaf-cutting ant nests, to exploit decomposition niches that the ant garden-fungus does not utilize. Our approach thus provides detailed insight into the nutritional benefits and shortcomings associated with fungus-farming in ants.

  1. Impact of inner-wall reflection on UV reactor performance as evaluated by using computational fluid dynamics: The role of diffuse reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wentao; Li, Mengkai; Bolton, James R; Qu, Jiuhui; Qiang, Zhimin

    2017-02-01

    Making use of the reflected ultraviolet (UV) radiation with a reflective inner wall is a promising way to improve UV reactor performance. In this study, the impact of inner-wall reflection on UV reactor performance was evaluated in annular single-lamp UV reactors by using computational fluid dynamics, with an emphasis on the role of diffuse reflection. The UV radiation inside the reactor chamber was simulated using a calibrated discrete ordinates radiation model, which has been proven to be a reliable tool for modeling fluence rate (FR) distributions in UV reactors with a reflective inner wall. The results show that UV reactors with a highly reflective inner wall (Reflectivity = 0.80) had obviously higher FRs and reduction equivalent fluences (REFs) than those with an ordinary inner wall (Reflectivity = 0.26). The inner-wall diffuse reflection further increased the reactor REF, as a result of the elevated volume-averaged FR. The FR distribution uniformity had conditioned contributions to UV reactor performance. Specifically, in UV reactors with a plug-like flow the FR distribution uniformity contributed to the REF to some extent, while in UV reactors with a mixed flow it had little influence on the REF. This study has evaluated, for the first time, the impact of inner-wall diffuse reflection on UV reactor performance and has renewed the understanding about the contribution of FR distribution uniformity to UV reactor performance.

  2. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI assessment of hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume in peripheral arterial disease: initial findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas Versluis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of the current study was to describe a method that assesses the hyperemic microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. The reversibly albumin binding contrast agent gadofosveset was used in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE MRI to assess the microvascular status in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD and healthy controls. In addition, the reproducibility of this method in healthy controls was determined. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten PAD patients with intermittent claudication and 10 healthy control subjects were included. Patients underwent contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the peripheral arteries, followed by one DCE MRI examination of the musculature of the calf. Healthy control subjects were examined twice on different days to determine normative values and the interreader and interscan reproducibility of the technique. The MRI protocol comprised dynamic imaging of contrast agent wash-in under reactive hyperemia conditions of the calf musculature. Using pharmacokinetic modeling the hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume (V(p, unit: % of the anterior tibial, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles was calculated. RESULTS: V(p was significantly lower for all muscle groups in PAD patients (4.3±1.6%, 5.0±3.3% and 6.1±3.6% for anterior tibial, gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, respectively compared to healthy control subjects (9.1±2.0%, 8.9±1.9% and 9.3±2.1%. Differences in V(p between muscle groups were not significant. The coefficient of variation of V(p varied from 10-14% and 11-16% at interscan and interreader level, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Using DCE MRI after contrast-enhanced MR angiography with gadofosveset enables reproducible assessment of hyperemic fractional microvascular blood plasma volume of the calf musculature. V(p was lower in PAD patients than in healthy controls, which reflects a promising functional (hemodynamic biomarker for the

  3. Characteristic dynamic modes and domain-wall motion in magnetic nanotubes excited by resonant rotating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jaehak; Kim, Junhoe; Kim, Bosung; Cho, Young-Jun; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2016-07-01

    We performed micromagnetic numerical calculations to explore a cylindrical nanotube's magnetization dynamics and domain-wall (DW) motions driven by eigen-circular-rotating magnetic fields of different frequencies. We discovered the presence of two different localized DW oscillations as well as asymmetric ferromagnetic resonance precession and azimuthal spin-wave modes at the corresponding resonant frequencies of the circular-rotating fields. Associated with these intrinsic modes, there exist very contrasting DW motions of different speed and propagation direction for a given DW chirality. The direction and speed of the DW propagation were found to be controllable according to the rotation sense and frequency of noncontact circular-rotating fields. Furthermore, spin-wave emissions from the moving DW were observed at a specific field frequency along with their Doppler effect. This work furthers the fundamental understanding of soft magnetic nanotubes' intrinsic dynamic modes and spin-wave emissions and offers an efficient means of manipulating the speed and direction of their DW propagations.

  4. Multicomponent ballistic transport in narrow single wall carbon nanotubes: Analytic model and molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutat, T.; Adler, J.; Sheintuch, M.

    2011-01-01

    The transport of gas mixtures through molecular-sieve membranes such as narrow nanotubes has many potential applications, but there remain open questions and a paucity of quantitative predictions. Our model, based on extensive molecular dynamics simulations, proposes that ballistic motion, hindered by counter diffusion, is the dominant mechanism. Our simulations of transport of mixtures of molecules between control volumes at both ends of nanotubes give quantitative support to the model's predictions. The combination of simulation and model enable extrapolation to longer tubes and pore networks.

  5. A Novel Model of Atherosclerosis in Rabbits Using Injury to Arterial Walls Induced by Ferric Chloride as Evaluated by Optical Coherence Tomography as well as Intravascular Ultrasound and Histology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwei Tian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aim was to develop a new model of atherosclerosis by FeCl3-induced injury to right common carotid arteries (CCAs of rabbits. Right CCAs were induced in male New Zealand White rabbits (=15 by combination of a cholesterol-rich diet and FeCl3-induced injury to arterial walls. The right and left CCAs were evaluated by histology and in vivo intravascular ultrasound (IVUS and optical coherence tomography (OCT examinations of 24 hours (=3, 8 weeks (=6, and 12 weeks (=6 after injury. Each right CCA of the rabbits showed extensive white-yellow plaques. At eight and 12 weeks after injury, IVUS, OCT, and histological findings demonstrated that the right CCAs had evident eccentric plaques. Six plaques (50% with evident positive remodeling were observed. Marked progression was clearly observed in the same plaque at 12 weeks after injury when it underwent repeat OCT and IVUS. We demonstrated, for the first time, a novel model of atherosclerosis induced by FeCl3. The model is simple, fast, inexpensive, and reproducible and has a high success rate. The eccentric plaques and remodeling of plaques were common in this model. We successfully carried out IVUS and OCT examinations twice in the same lesion within a relatively long period of time.

  6. Dynamics of a thin film flowing down a heated wall with finite thermal diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallaston, Michael C.; Tseluiko, Dmitri; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    Consider the dynamics of a thin film flowing down a heated substrate. The substrate heating generates a temperature distribution on the free surface, which in turn induces surface-tension gradients and corresponding thermocapillary stresses that affect the free surface and therefore the fluid flow. We study here the effect of finite substrate thermal diffusivity on the film dynamics. Linear stability analysis of the full Navier-Stokes and heat transport equations indicates if the substrate diffusivity is sufficiently small, the film becomes unstable at a finite wavelength and at a Reynolds number smaller than that predicted in the long-wavelength limit. This property is captured in a reduced-order system of equations derived using a weighted-residual integral-boundary-layer method. This reduced-order model is also used to compute the bifurcation diagrams of solution branches connecting the trivial flat film to traveling waves including solitary pulses. The effect of finite diffusivity is to separate a simultaneous Hopf-transcritical bifurcation into its individual component bifurcations. The appropriate Hopf bifurcation then connects only to the solution branch of negative-hump pulses, with wave speed less than the linear wave speed, while the branch of positive-single-hump pulses merges with the branch of positive-two-hump pulses at a supercritical Reynolds number. In the regime where finite-wavelength instability occurs, there exists a Hopf-bifurcation pair connected by a branch of periodic solutions, whose period cannot be increased indefinitely. Numerical simulation of the reduced-order system shows the development of a train of coherent structures, each of which resembles a stationary positive-hump pulse, and, in the regime of finite-wavelength instability, wavelength selection and saturation to periodic traveling waves.

  7. Evaluation of flow velocities after carotid artery stenting through split spectrum Doppler optical coherence tomography and computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Barry; Genis, Helen; Wong, Ronnie; Ramjist, Joel; Jivraj, Jamil; Farooq, Hamza; Sun, Cuiru; Yang, Victor X D

    2014-12-01

    Hemodynamics plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis, specifically in regions of curved vasculature such as bifurcations exhibiting irregular blood flow profiles. Carotid atherosclerotic disease can be intervened by stent implantation, but this may result in greater alterations to local blood flow and consequently further complications. This study demonstrates the use of a variant of Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) known as split spectrum DOCT (ssDOCT) to evaluate hemodynamic patterns both before and after stent implantation in the bifurcation junction in the internal carotid artery (ICA). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were constructed to simulate blood velocity profiles and compared to the findings achieved through ssDOCT images. Both methods demonstrated noticeable alterations in hemodynamic patterns following stent implantation, with features such as slow velocity regions at the neck of the bifurcation and recirculation zones at the stent struts. Strong correlation between CFD models and ssDOCT images demonstrate the potential of ssDOCT imaging in the optimization of stent implantation in the clinical setting.

  8. Dynamic analysis with a fractional-order chaotic system for estimation of peripheral arterial disease in diabetic foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chien-Ming; Du, Yi-Chun; Wu, Jian-Xing; Lin, Chia-Hung; Ho, Yueh-Ren; Chen, Tainsong

    2013-08-01

    Lower-extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is caused by narrowing or occlusion of vessels in patients like type 2 diabetes mellitus, the elderly and smokers. Patients with PAD are mostly asymptomatic; typical early symptoms of this limb-threatening disorder are intermittent claudication and leg pain, suggesting the necessity for accurate diagnosis by invasive angiography and ankle-brachial pressure index. This index acts as a gold standard reference for PAD diagnosis and categorizes its severity into normal, low-grade and high-grade, with respective cut-off points of ≥0.9, 0.9-0.5 and diabetics and 11 healthy adults, with analysis of dynamic errors based on various butterfly motion patterns, and color relational analysis as classifier for pattern recognition. The results show that the classification of PAD severity among these testees was achieved with high accuracy and efficiency. This noninvasive methodology potentially provides timing and accessible feedback to patients with asymptomatic PAD and their physicians for further invasive diagnosis or strict management of risk factors to intervene in the disease progression.

  9. Automatic determination of the arterial input function in dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI: comparison of different reproducible clustering algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Jiandong; Yang, Jiawen; Guo, Qiyong [Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Department of Radiology, Shenyang (China)

    2015-05-01

    Arterial input function (AIF) plays an important role in the quantification of cerebral hemodynamics. The purpose of this study was to select the best reproducible clustering method for AIF detection by comparing three algorithms reported previously in terms of detection accuracy and computational complexity. First, three reproducible clustering methods, normalized cut (Ncut), hierarchy (HIER), and fast affine propagation (FastAP), were applied independently to simulated data which contained the true AIF. Next, a clinical verification was performed where 42 subjects participated in dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) scanning. The manual AIF and AIFs based on the different algorithms were obtained. The performance of each algorithm was evaluated based on shape parameters of the estimated AIFs and the true or manual AIF. Moreover, the execution time of each algorithm was recorded to determine the algorithm that operated more rapidly in clinical practice. In terms of the detection accuracy, Ncut and HIER method produced similar AIF detection results, which were closer to the expected AIF and more accurate than those obtained using FastAP method; in terms of the computational efficiency, the Ncut method required the shortest execution time. Ncut clustering appears promising because it facilitates the automatic and robust determination of AIF with high accuracy and efficiency. (orig.)

  10. ANALYSIS OF PULSATILE BLOOD FLOW IN AXIALLY MOVING ARTERIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to study motional properties of pulsatile blood flow in axially moving arteries, the authors derived some expressions of the pulsatile blood flow from the basic equations of motion for blood and vascular walls, including an axial blood velocity equation, a flow rate equation and a wall shear stress equation, which described not only the overall axial movement of the arteries but also the elastic properties of the vascular walls, discussed the effects of the arterial wall elasticity on the wall shear stress in coronary arteries in terms of these expressions, and analyzed changes of motional properties of pulsatile blood flow between an elastic arterial tube model and a rigid tube model. The results proved the inference by J.E. Moore Jr. et al. (1994) that the axial movement of arteries be as important in determining coronary artery hemodynamics as the elastic property of the vascular wall.

  11. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winant, Celeste D.; Aparici, Carina Mari; Zelnik, Yuval R.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bacharach, Stephen L.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2012-01-01

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomography (PET)) and SPECT/D (dynamic SPECT from database of SPECT phantom projections). SPECT/P simulated SPECT-like dynamic projections using reprojections of reconstructed dynamic 94Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (94Tc-MIBI) PET images acquired in three human subjects (1 min infusion). This approach was used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in rate parameters K1 for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 or 54 s. Blood input and myocardium tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K1. For the second method (SPECT/D), an anthropomorphic cardiac torso phantom was used to create real SPECT dynamic projection data of a tracer distribution derived from 94Tc-MIBI PET scans in the blood pool, myocardium, liver and background. This method introduced attenuation, collimation and scatter into the modeling of dynamic SPECT projections. Both approaches were used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in parameters for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 and 54 s. Dynamic cardiac SPECT was also performed in a human subject at rest using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of 99mTc-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 min. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using the same spatiotemporal splines. The spatiotemporal maximum

  12. Investigation of dynamic SPECT measurements of the arterial input function in human subjects using simulation, phantom and human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winant, Celeste D; Aparici, Carina Mari; Zelnik, Yuval R; Reutter, Bryan W; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Bacharach, Stephen L; Gullberg, Grant T

    2012-01-21

    Computer simulations, a phantom study and a human study were performed to determine whether a slowly rotating single-photon computed emission tomography (SPECT) system could provide accurate arterial input functions for quantification of myocardial perfusion imaging using kinetic models. The errors induced by data inconsistency associated with imaging with slow camera rotation during tracer injection were evaluated with an approach called SPECT/P (dynamic SPECT from positron emission tomography (PET)) and SPECT/D (dynamic SPECT from database of SPECT phantom projections). SPECT/P simulated SPECT-like dynamic projections using reprojections of reconstructed dynamic (94)Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile ((94)Tc-MIBI) PET images acquired in three human subjects (1 min infusion). This approach was used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in rate parameters K(1) for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 or 54 s. Blood input and myocardium tissue time-activity curves (TACs) were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K(1). For the second method (SPECT/D), an anthropomorphic cardiac torso phantom was used to create real SPECT dynamic projection data of a tracer distribution derived from (94)Tc-MIBI PET scans in the blood pool, myocardium, liver and background. This method introduced attenuation, collimation and scatter into the modeling of dynamic SPECT projections. Both approaches were used to evaluate the accuracy of estimating myocardial wash-in parameters for rotation speeds providing 180° of projection data every 27 and 54 s. Dynamic cardiac SPECT was also performed in a human subject at rest using a hybrid SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 min. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using the same spatiotemporal splines. The

  13. Resetting of the carotid arterial baroreflex during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norton, K H; Boushel, Robert Christopher; Andersen, Line Strange

    1999-01-01

    at the onset of moderate- to maximal-intensity L exercise. Therefore, CBR stimulus-response relationships were compared in seven male volunteers by using the neck pressure-neck suction technique during dynamic exercise that ranged in intensity from 50 to 100% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2 max)). L exercise...... alone was performed at 50 and 75% VO(2 max), and L exercise combined with arm (A) exercise (L + A) was performed at 75 and 100% VO(2 max). O(2) consumption and heart rate (HR) increased in direct relation with the increases in exercise intensity. The threshold and saturation pressures of the carotid......-cardiac reflex at 100% VO(2 max) were >75% VO(2 max), which were in turn >50% VO(2 max) (P max)). In addition, the HR response value at threshold and saturation at 75% VO(2 max) was >50% VO(2 max) (P VO(2 max) was >75% VO(2 max) (P

  14. Nitinol Stent Oversizing in Patients Undergoing Popliteal Artery Revascularization: A Finite Element Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökgöl, Can; Diehm, Nicolas; Nezami, Farhad Rikhtegar; Büchler, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Nitinol stent oversizing is frequently performed in peripheral arteries to ensure a desirable lumen gain. However, the clinical effect of mis-sizing remains controversial. The goal of this study was to provide a better understanding of the structural and hemodynamic effects of Nitinol stent oversizing. Five patient-specific numerical models of non-calcified popliteal arteries were developed to simulate the deployment of Nitinol stents with oversizing ratios ranging from 1.1 to 1.8. In addition to arterial biomechanics, computational fluid dynamics methods were adopted to simulate the physiological blood flow inside the stented arteries. Results showed that stent oversizing led to a limited increase in the acute lumen gain, albeit at the cost of a significant increase in arterial wall stresses. Furthermore, localized areas affected by low Wall Shear Stress increased with higher oversizing ratios. Stents were also negatively impacted by the procedure as their fatigue safety factors gradually decreased with oversizing. These adverse effects to both the artery walls and stents may create circumstances for restenosis. Although the ideal oversizing ratio is stent-specific, this study showed that Nitinol stent oversizing has a very small impact on the immediate lumen gain, which contradicts the clinical motivations of the procedure.

  15. Sex differences in intracranial arterial bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon M; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Morgan, Michael K

    2010-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious condition, occurring more frequently in females than in males. SAH is mainly caused by rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which is formed by localized dilation of the intracranial arterial vessel wall, usually at the apex of the arterial bifurcation....... The female preponderance is usually explained by systemic factors (hormonal influences and intrinsic wall weakness); however, the uneven sex distribution of intracranial aneurysms suggests a possible physiologic factor-a local sex difference in the intracranial arteries....

  16. Sex differences in intracranial arterial bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekleiv, Haakon M; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian; Morgan, Michael K;

    2010-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious condition, occurring more frequently in females than in males. SAH is mainly caused by rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, which is formed by localized dilation of the intracranial arterial vessel wall, usually at the apex of the arterial bifurcation. T....... The female preponderance is usually explained by systemic factors (hormonal influences and intrinsic wall weakness); however, the uneven sex distribution of intracranial aneurysms suggests a possible physiologic factor-a local sex difference in the intracranial arteries....

  17. Bilateral accessory thoracodorsal artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsis, Konstantinos; Totlis, Trifon; Tsikaras, Prokopios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2006-09-01

    The subscapular artery arises from the third part of the axillary artery and gives off the circumflex scapular and the thoracodorsal arteries. Although anatomical variations of the axillary artery are very common, the existence of a unilateral accessory thoracodorsal artery has been described in the literature only once. There are no reports of bilateral accessory thoracodorsal artery, in the literature. In the present study, a bilateral accessory thoracodorsal artery, originating on either side of the third part of the axillary artery, is described in a 68-year-old female cadaver. All the other branches of the axillary artery had a typical origin, course, distribution and termination. This extremely rare anatomical variation apart from the anatomical importance also has clinical significance for surgeons in this area. Especially, during the dissection or mobilization of the latissimus dorsi that is partly used for coverage problems in many regions of the body and also in dynamic cardiomyoplasty, any iatrogenic injury of this accessory artery may result in ischemia and functional loss of the graft.

  18. Modelling the performance of the tapered artery heat pipe design for use in the radiator of the solar dynamic power system of the NASA Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Austin Lewis

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents a computer program developed to model the steady-state performance of the tapered artery heat pipe for use in the radiator of the solar dynamic power system of the NASA Space Station. The program solves six governing equations to ascertain which one is limiting the maximum heat transfer rate of the heat pipe. The present model appeared to be slightly better than the LTV model in matching the 1-g data for the standard 15-ft test heat pipe.

  19. Analysis of carotid artery plaque and wall boundaries on CT images by using a semi-automatic method based on level set model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saba, Luca; Sannia, Stefano; Ledda, Giuseppe [University of Cagliari - Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria di Cagliari, Department of Radiology, Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Gao, Hao [University of Strathclyde, Signal Processing Centre for Excellence in Signal and Image Processing, Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Acharya, U.R. [Ngee Ann Polytechnic University, Department of Electronics and Computer Engineering, Clementi (Singapore); Suri, Jasjit S. [Biomedical Technologies Inc., Denver, CO (United States); Idaho State University (Aff.), Pocatello, ID (United States)

    2012-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potentialities of a semi-automated technique in the detection and measurement of the carotid artery plaque. Twenty-two consecutive patients (18 males, 4 females; mean age 62 years) examined with MDCTA from January 2011 to March 2011 were included in this retrospective study. Carotid arteries are examined with a 16-multi-detector-row CT system, and for each patient, the most diseased carotid was selected. In the first phase, the carotid plaque was identified and one experienced radiologist manually traced the inner and outer boundaries by using polyline and radial distance method (PDM and RDM, respectively). In the second phase, the carotid inner and outer boundaries were traced with an automated algorithm: level-set-method (LSM). Data were compared by using Pearson rho correlation, Bland-Altman, and regression. A total of 715 slices were analyzed. The mean thickness of the plaque using the reference PDM was 1.86 mm whereas using the LSM-PDM was 1.96 mm; using the reference RDM was 2.06 mm whereas using the LSM-RDM was 2.03 mm. The correlation values between the references, the LSM, the PDM and the RDM were 0.8428, 0.9921, 0.745 and 0.6425. Bland-Altman demonstrated a very good agreement in particular with the RDM method. Results of our study indicate that LSM method can automatically measure the thickness of the plaque and that the best results are obtained with the RDM. Our results suggest that advanced computer-based algorithms can identify and trace the plaque boundaries like an experienced human reader. (orig.)

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of flame propagation along a monopropellant PETN coupled with multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S.; Mo, G.; Qiao, L.

    2017-02-01

    Reactive molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to study the flame speed enhancement phenomenon of a solid mono-propellant, Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN), when coupled to highly conductive multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The simulations were based on the first-principles derived reactive force field, ReaxFF, which includes both the physical changes such as thermal transport and the chemical changes such as bond breaking and forming. An annular deposition of a PETN layer around the MWCNTs was considered. The thickness of the PETN layer and the diameter of the MWCNT were varied to understand the effect of the MWCNT loading ratio on the flame propagation. Flame speed enhancements up to 3 times the bulk value were observed. An optimal MWCNT loading ratio was determined. The enhancement was attributed to the layering of the PETN molecules around the MWCNT, which increased the heat transport among the PETN molecules near the MWCNT surface, thus causing the flame to travel faster. Furthermore, a stronger ignition source was required for the MWCNT-PETN complex because of the higher thermal transport among the PETN molecules along the MWCNT, which makes the ignition energy dissipate more quickly. Lastly, the MWCNT remained unburned during the PETN combustion process.

  1. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian; Chen, Da

    2016-07-01

    The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  2. The fluid dynamic and shear environment in the NASA/JSC rotating-wall perfused-vessel bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, C. M.; Kleis, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    The rotating-wall perfused-vessel (RWPV) bioreactor, used for both microgravity and Earth-based cell science experiments, is characterized in terms of the fluid dynamic and fluid shear stress environment. A numerical model of the flow field is developed and verified with laser Doppler velocimeter measurements. The effects of changes in operating conditions, including rotation rates and fluid perfusion rates, are investigated with the numerical model. The operating conditions typically used for ground-based experiments (equal rotation of the inner and outer cylinders) leads to flow patterns with relatively poor mass distribution characteristics. Approximately 50% of the inlet-perfused fluid bypasses the bulk of the fluid volume and flows to the perfusion exit. For operating conditions typical in microgravity, small differential rotation rates between the inner and outer cylinders lead to greatly improved flow distribution patterns and very low fluid shear stress levels over a large percentage of the fluid volume. Differences in flow patterns for the different operating conditions are explored. Large differences in the hydrodynamic environments for operating conditions typical of true microgravity and ground-based "microgravity simulations" are demonstrated.

  3. Tailoring Pull-out Properties of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles by Varying Binding Structures through Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2014-08-12

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have demonstrated a remarkable capacity for self-assembly into nanobundles through intermolecular van der Waals interactions, bestowing these agglomerates extraordinary mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties. However, how to improve the binding ability of SWCNT bundles to mitigate the delamination and sliding effects between individual nanotubes remains to be further investigated. By utilizing molecular dynamics simulation, here we present the construction of SWCNT bundles with discrete cylindrical and continuous helical binders by noncovalent coating of the bundle surface with sp(2)-hybridized carbon networks. Meanwhile, by modifying the binding potentials between the binder and SWCNT bundles to mimic the different binding types actually used, the bound SWCNT bundle presents a variety of distinct mechanical properties unmatched by unbound bundles. The pull-out tests with discrete binders portray an intriguing force-displacement curve which can help determine the number of discrete binders used in the system. SWCNT bundles with binders depict unique mechanical properties which can differentiate them from unbound SWCNT bundles. These findings provide compelling evidence that bound SWCNT bundles will open up novel avenues for a variety of applications, especially in nanocomposites.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of SnF2 nanostructures in the internal channels of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotlib, I. Yu.; Ivanov-Schitz, A. K.; Murin, I. V.; Petrov, A. V.; Romantsov, G. A.; Zakalyukin, R. M.

    2014-07-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation of solid tin(II) fluoride nanostructures formed in internal channels of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been performed using two types of model potentials—without and with inclusion of the polarization of ions. For the potential taking into account the polarization of ions, an ordered SnF2@SWCNT structure is reproduced: in SWCNT(10, 10), it has the form of the SnF2 internal nanotube. At the same time, the SnF2@SWCNT(11,11) structure is substantially disordered (glass-like). It has been found that heating of the SnF2@SWCNT model system produces a superionic state characterized by a high mobility of fluorine ions without migration of tin ions. The model potentials disregard the covalent character of Sn-F bonds and the specific interactions of a lone electron pair of the Sn2+ ion. This makes it impossible to completely reproduce the properties of SnF2 at normal pressures. However, some characteristics of the SnF2 high-pressure modification can be reproduced if the polarization of ions is taken into account.

  5. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huan [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Tang, Xiaobin, E-mail: tangxiaobin@nuaa.edu.cn [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing (China); Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Chen, Da [Department of Nuclear Science & Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing (China)

    2016-07-01

    Highlights: • Various incident sites of CNTs are classified into three types for the first time. • Different ion energies and fluences are considered to study the radiation damage. • CNTs have ability to heal the radiation-induced damage at higher temperature. • Stability of a large-diameter tube excels in a slim one under the same conditions. - Abstract: The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  6. Dynamic study of lower limb arteries using the ECTRICKS MRI technique; La perspective d'une etude dynamique des arteres des membres inferieures en IRM grace a la sequence ECTRICKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolas, M.; Laurent, V.; Tissier, S.; Cannard, L.; Leclerc, J.C.; Beot, S.; Regent, D. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Nancy-Brabois, Service de Radiologie Adultes, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2005-01-15

    Purpose. This article presents a new MR angiography technique, Elliptic Centric Time Resolved Imaging on Contrast KineticS (ECTRICKS), which allows dynamic evaluation of the lower limb arteries opacification when venous return prevents adequate diagnostic evaluation of calf arteries. Patient and methods. Comparative examination of the calf arteries in 59 patients using a standard MRA technique and the ECTRICKS technique. Results. A total of 33 examinations could be compared. Additional arteries could be evaluated in 10% of our patient population using the ECTRICKS technique, and in 20% for our diabetic population. Arterial evaluation was better with the ECTRICKS technique in patients with diabetes and venous insufficiency. Conclusion. ECTRICKS is a good complementary sequence for evaluating the calf arteries in patients with diabetes or early venous return. (author)

  7. Dynamics of propagating turbulent pipe flow structures. Part I: Effect of drag reduction by spanwise wall oscillation

    CERN Document Server

    Duggleby, A; Paul, M R

    2006-01-01

    The results of a comparative analysis between turbulent pipe flow and drag reduced turbulent pipe flow by spanwise wall oscillation based upon a Karhunen-Loeve expansion are presented. The turbulent flow is generated by a direct numerical simulation at a Reynolds number Re_\\tau = 150. The spanwise wall oscillation is imposed as a velocity boundary condition with an amplitude of A^+ = 20 and a period of T^+ = 50. The flow is driven by a constant pressure gradient, resulting in a 27% mean velocity increase with wall oscillation. The peaks of the Reynolds stress and root-mean-squared velocities shift away from the wall and the Karhunen-Loeve dimension of the turbulent attractor is reduced from 2453 to 102. The coherent vorticity structures are pushed away from the wall into higher speed flow, causing an increase of their advection speed of 34% as determined by a normal speed locus. The mechanism of drag reduction by spanwise wall oscillation is discussed.

  8. Localized domain wall nucleation dynamics in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings revealed by direct time-resolved magnetic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Kornel; Krone, Andrea; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Krüger, Benjamin; Weigand, Markus; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-07-01

    We report time-resolved observations of field-induced domain wall nucleation in asymmetric ferromagnetic rings using single direction field pulses and rotating fields. We show that the asymmetric geometry of a ring allows for controlling the position of nucleation events, when a domain wall is nucleated by a rotating magnetic field. Direct observation by scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) reveals that the nucleation of domain walls occurs through the creation of transient ripplelike structures. This magnetization state is found to exhibit a surprisingly high reproducibility even at room temperature and we determine the combinations of field strengths and field directions that allow for reliable nucleation of domain walls and directly quantify the stability of the magnetic states. Our analysis of the processes occurring during field induced domain wall nucleation shows how the effective fields determine the nucleation location reproducibly, which is a key prerequisite toward using domain walls for spintronic devices.

  9. On the vibrational behavior of single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes under the physical adsorption of biomolecules in the aqueous environment: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajori, S; Ansari, R; Darvizeh, M

    2016-03-01

    The adsorption of biomolecules on the walls of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an aqueous environment is of great importance in the field of nanobiotechnology. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to understand the mechanical vibrational behavior of single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and DWCNTs) under the physical adsorption of four important biomolecules (L-alanine, guanine, thymine, and uracil) in vacuum and an aqueous environment. It was observed that the natural frequencies of these CNTs in vacuum reduce under the physical adsorption of biomolecules. In the aqueous environment, the natural frequency of each pure CNT decreased as compared to its natural frequency in vacuum. It was also found that the frequency shift for functionalized CNTs as compared to pure CNTs in the aqueous environment was dependent on the radius and the number of walls of the CNT, and could be positive or negative.

  10. Arterial spin labelling MRI for assessment of cerebral perfusion in children with moyamoya disease: comparison with dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetti, Robert [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); O' Gorman, Ruth [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Center for MR Research, Zurich (Switzerland); Khan, Nadia [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Moyamoya Center, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Kellenberger, Christian J.; Scheer, Ianina [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-05-15

    This study seeks to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of cerebral perfusion imaging with arterial spin labelling (ASL) MR imaging in children with moyamoya disease compared to dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) imaging. Ten children (7 females; age, 9.2 {+-} 5.4 years) with moyamoya disease underwent cerebral perfusion imaging with ASL and DSC on a 3-T MRI scanner in the same session. Cerebral perfusion images were acquired with ASL (pulsed continuous 3D ASL sequence, 32 axial slices, TR = 5.5 s, TE = 25 ms, FOV = 24 cm, matrix = 128 x 128) and DSC (gradient echo EPI sequence, 35 volumes of 28 axial slices, TR = 2,000 ms, TE = 36 ms, FOV = 24 cm, matrix = 96 x 96, 0.2 ml/kg Gd-DOTA). Cerebral blood flow maps were generated. ASL and DSC images were qualitatively assessed regarding perfusion of left and right ACA, MCA, and PCA territories by two independent readers using a 3-point-Likert scale and quantitative relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was calculated. Correlation between ASL and DSC for qualitative and quantitative assessment and the accuracy of ASL for the detection of reduced perfusion per territory with DSC serving as the standard of reference were calculated. With a good interreader agreement ({kappa} = 0.62) qualitative perfusion assessment with ASL and DSC showed a strong and significant correlation ({rho} = 0.77; p < 0.001), as did quantitative rCBF (r = 0.79; p < 0.001). ASL showed a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 94 %, 93 %, and 93 % for the detection of reduced perfusion per territory. In children with moyamoya disease, unenhanced ASL enables the detection of reduced perfusion per vascular territory with a good accuracy compared to contrast-enhanced DSC. (orig.)

  11. Pulsatile flow characterization in a vessel phantom with elastic wall using ultrasonic particle image velocimetry technique: the impact of vessel stiffness on flow dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ming; Niu, Lili; Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong; Abbott, Derek; Zhou, Qifa; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to experimentally investigate the impact of vessel stiffness on the flow dynamics of pulsatile vascular flow. Vessel phantoms with elastic walls were fabricated using polyvinyl alcohol cryogel to result in stiffness ranging from 60.9 to 310.3 kPa and tested with pulsatile flows using a flow circulation set-up. Two-dimensional instantaneous and time-dependent flow velocity and shear rate vector fields were measured using ultrasonic particle image velocimetry (EchoPIV). The waveforms of peak velocities measured by EchoPIV were compared with the ultrasonic pulse Doppler spectrum, and the measuring accuracy was validated. The cyclic vessel wall motion and flow pressure were obtained as well. The results showed that vessel stiffening influenced the waveforms resulting from vessel wall distension and flow pressure, and the fields of flow velocity and shear rate. The stiffer vessel had smaller inner diameter variation, larger pulse pressure and median pressure. The velocity and shear rate maximized at peak systole for all vessels. The results showed a decrease in wall shear stress for a stiffer vessel, which can initiate the atherosclerotic process. Our study elucidates the impact of vessel stiffness on several flow dynamic parameters, and also demonstrates the EchoPIV technique to be a useful and powerful tool in cardiovascular research.

  12. Quantum chemical molecular dynamics simulation of single-walled carbon nanotube cap nucleation on an iron particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Yasuhito; Okamoto, Yoshiko; Page, Alister J; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2009-11-24

    The atomic scale details of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) nucleation on metal catalyst particles are elusive to experimental observations. Computer simulation of metal-catalyzed SWNT nucleation is a challenging topic but potentially of great importance to understand the factors affecting SWNT diameters, chirality, and growth efficiency. In this work, we use nonequilibrium density functional tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations and report nucleation of sp(2)-carbon cap structures on an iron particle consisting of 38 atoms. One C(2) molecule was placed every 1.0 ps around an Fe(38) cluster for 30 ps, after which a further 410 ps of annealing simulation without carbon supply was performed. We find that sp(2)-carbon network nucleation and annealing processes occur in three sequential and repetitive stages: (A) polyyne chains on the metal surface react with each other to evolve into a Y-shaped polyyne junction, which preferentially form a five-membered ring as a nucleus; (B) polyyne chains on the first five-membered ring form an additional fused five- or six-membered ring; and (C) pentagon-to-hexagon self-healing rearrangement takes place with the help of short-lived polyyne chains, stabilized by the mobile metal atoms. The observed nucleation process resembles the formation of a fullerene cage. However, the metal particle plays a key role in differentiating the nucleation process from fullerene cage formation, most importantly by keeping the growing cap structure from closing into a fullerene cage and by keeping the carbon edge "alive" for the addition of new carbon material.

  13. Renal dynamic scintigraphy with captropil in systemic arterial hypertension diagnosis; Cintilografia renal dinamica com captopril no diagnostico da hipertensao arterial renovascular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervo, Marco Antonio Cadorna; Amarante Junior, Jose Luiz de Medeiros; Souza, Ricardo Alberto Manhaes; Evangelista, Maria Gardenia [Hospital Naval Marcilio Dias, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    1995-12-31

    Forty one patients, 15 male and 16 female presenting systemic arterial hypertension were submitted to Basal RDC and after being simulated by Captopril; the radiotracer used was 99 mTc-DTPA (dietileno triamino pentacetic acid-99 Tc-technetium). From the 41 patients studied, 13 had the GFR (Glomerular filtration rate) Captopril when compared to Basal RDC radioactive, 11 of them were confirmed as having vascular renal disease by Renal Artiography and two of them were false (one case renal litiase and the other chronic pyelonephritis). Two more false negative cases have occurred in the RDC and three patients refused to be submitted to a Renal Arteriography. In the cases which the Total Glomerular Filtration Rate was reduced, there was an agreement of 89,5% between the RDC and the Renal Arteriography. No alterations have been observed in the Renal Arteriography on the remaining 23 patients and in the RDC after Captopril there was normal increase in the Glomerular Filtration Rate when compared to the Basal RDC. The method has showed sensitivity of 84% and specificity of 92%. We can conclude that the RDC with Captopril test is not an invasive method, it has good sensitivity and specificity and it can be indicated as a beginning test to select patients when you intend to detect vascular renal disease; nevertheless the RDC will never be used as a final test of vascular lesion. (author) 22 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. On the necessity of modelling fluid-structure interaction for stented coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiastra, Claudio; Migliavacca, Francesco; Martínez, Miguel Ángel; Malvè, Mauro

    2014-06-01

    Although stenting is the most commonly performed procedure for the treatment of coronary atherosclerotic lesions, in-stent restenosis (ISR) remains one of the most serious clinical complications. An important stimulus to ISR is the altered hemodynamics with abnormal shear stresses on endothelial cells generated by the stent presence. Computational fluid dynamics is a valid tool for studying the local hemodynamics of stented vessels, allowing the calculation of the wall shear stress (WSS), which is otherwise not directly possible to be measured in vivo. However, in these numerical simulations the arterial wall and the stent are considered rigid and fixed, an assumption that may influence the WSS and flow patterns. Therefore, the aim of this work is to perform fluid-structure interaction (FSI) analyses of a stented coronary artery in order to understand the effects of the wall compliance on the hemodynamic quantities. Two different materials are considered for the stent: cobalt-chromium (CoCr) and poly-l-lactide (PLLA). The results of the FSI and the corresponding rigid-wall models are compared, focusing in particular on the analysis of the WSS distribution. Results showed similar trends in terms of instantaneous and time-averaged WSS between compliant and rigid-wall cases. In particular, the difference of percentage area exposed to TAWSS lower than 0.4Pa between the CoCr FSI and the rigid-wall cases was about 1.5% while between the PLLA cases 1.0%. The results indicate that, for idealized models of a stented coronary artery, the rigid-wall assumption for fluid dynamic simulations appears adequate when the aim of the study is the analysis of near-wall quantities like WSS.

  15. The dynamic of aterosclerosis affection on brachio-cefalic arterys of the high risk patients under the hypolipidemic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Simerzin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To study the statin influence on lipid exchange and the degree of the brachiocefalic arterys alteration. Methods. The research included 33 high risk patients. The patients inverstigation included lipid spectrum, blood coagulation indexes, by the means of triplex scanning of the brachiochefalic arterys the thickness of the intima - media complex and the expression of stenosis of carotid, vertebral and subclavian arterys were measured. Results. All the patients were divided into the groups according to the total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Patients were divided into subgroups according to the expression of stenosis. The 1 group of patients received rosuvastating 10 mg, the 2 group - atorvastain 20 mg, 3the 3 group - simvastatin 40 mg. This inverstigation shows that the high risk patients with high levels of total cholesterol and low density lipoproteins have the highest expressiveness of brachiocefalic arterys atherosclerosis affection. Conclusion. The assignment of the statins to these patients is accompanied by the lowering of the levels of total cholesterol and low density lipoproteins and the quantity of arteries affected by the atherosclerosis and also by decreasing of the stenosis expression

  16. 320-Multidetector row whole-head dynamic subtracted CT angiography and whole-brain CT perfusion before and after carotid artery stenting: Technical note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Millan Ruiz, Diego, E-mail: dsanmil1@jhmi.ed [Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 600 North Wolfe Street, B-100, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Murphy, Kieran, E-mail: KMURPHY@jhmi.ed [Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, 600 North Wolfe Street, B-100, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Gailloud, Philippe, E-mail: pgailloud@cerebrovascular.ne [Division of Interventional Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 600 North Wolfe Street, B-100, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Introduction: Multidetector CT (MDCT) is increasingly used for the investigation of neurovascular disorders, but restricted z-axis coverage (3.2 cm for 64-MDCT) currently limits perfusion to a small portion of the brain close to the circle of Willis, and precludes dynamic angiographic appreciation of the entire brain circulation. We illustrate the clinical potential of recently developed 320-MDCT extending the z-axis coverage to 16 cm in a patient with symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. Methods: In a 74-year-old patient presenting with critical symptomatic stenosis of the left CCA, pre- and post-carotid artery stenting whole-head subtracted dynamic MDCT angiography and perfusion were obtained in addition to CT angiography of the supra-aortic trunks. Both whole-head subtracted MDCT angiography and perfusion demonstrated delayed left ICA circulation, which normalized after carotid stenting. Discussion: 320-MDCT offers unprecedented z-axis coverage allowing for whole-brain perfusion and subtracted dynamic angiography of the entire intracranial circulation. These innovations can consolidate the role of MDCT as a first intention imaging technique for cerebrovascular disorders, in particular for the acute management of stroke.

  17. Temperature gradient-induced fluid pumping inside a single-wall carbon nanotube: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Fahim; Rajabpour, Ali

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we investigate the fluid transport inside a single-wall carbon nanotube induced by a temperature gradient along the tube length, focusing on the effect of fluid-wall interaction strength. It is found that the fluid moves from the hot side of the nanotube towards the cold side. By increasing the fluid-wall interaction strength, the fluid volumetric flux assumes a maximum, increases, and then decreases. Fluid transport is pressure-driven in weak interactions; in contrast, in strong interactions, the fluid is broken into two parts in the radial direction. Fluid transport in the central regions of the tube is pressure-driven, while it is surface-driven in the areas close to the wall.

  18. A novel framework for fluid/structure interaction in rapid subject specific simulations of blood flow in coronary artery bifurcations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blagojević Milan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Practical difficulties, particularly long model development time, have limited the types and applicability of computational fluid dynamics simulations in numerical modeling of blood flow in serial manner. In these simulations, the most revealing flow parameters are the endothelial shear stress distribution and oscillatory shear index. The aim of this study was analyze their role in the diagnosis of the occurrence and prognosis of plaque development in coronary artery bifurcations. Methods. We developed a novel modeling technique for rapid cardiovascular hemodynamic simulations taking into account interactions between fluid domain (blood and solid domain (artery wall. Two numerical models that represent the observed subdomains of an arbitrary patient-specific coronary artery bifurcation were created using multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT coronagraphy and ultrasound measurements of blood velocity. Coronary flow using an in-house finite element solver PAK-FS was solved. Results. Overall behavior of coronary artery bifurcation during one cardiac cycle is described by: velocity, pressure, endothelial shear stress, oscillatory shear index, stress in arterial wall and nodal displacements. The places where (a endothelial shear stress is less than 1.5, and (b oscillatory shear index is very small (close or equal to 0 are prone to plaque genesis. Conclusion. Finite element simulation of fluid-structure interaction was used to investigate patient-specific flow dynamics and wall mechanics at coronary artery bifurcations. Simulation model revealed that lateral walls of the main branch and lateral walls distal to the carina are exposed to low endothelial shear stress which is a predilection site for development of atherosclerosis. This conclusion is confirmed by the low values of oscillatory shear index in those places.

  19. Molecular dynamics study of the interfacial thermal conductance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and van der Waals force induced deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Qingyuan; Shao, Cheng; Bao, Hua

    2017-02-01

    Thermal boundary resistance (TBR) plays an important role in the thermal conduction of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based materials and CNT networks (e.g., thin films, arrays, and aerogels). Although individual CNTs have extremely high thermal conductivity, interfacial resistances can dominate the overall resistance and largely influence their thermal performance. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we systematically study the interfacial thermal conductance (ITC, the inverse of TBR) of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT)-substrate interfaces and MWNT-MWNT junctions, and compare the CNT-CNT junctions with graphene-graphene junctions. The results show that for CNTs with the diameter of a few nanometers, the total ITCs first decrease and then stabilize with the increase of the number of walls, mainly due to the changes of mechanical strength and adhesive energy. Increasing the CNT diameter leads to a larger total ITC and it is mainly due to a larger contact area. The area normalized ITC of CNT-CNT junctions increases and then saturates with the number of walls, and it behaves non-monotonically with the diameter. Furthermore, a trapezoidal model of multi-layer graphene-graphene junctions is used to explain the number of wall dependence of ITC. We also find that with the same adhesive energy, total ITCs of CNT-CNT junctions and graphene-graphene junctions are similar, which allows us to roughly estimate ITCs of CNT-CNT junctions without performing numerical simulations.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulations of Maternal Circulation: Wall Shear Stress in the Human Placenta and Its Biological Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecarpentier, E.; Bhatt, M.; Bertin, G. I.; Deloison, B.; Salomon, L. J.; Deloron, P.; Fournier, T.; Barakat, A. I.; Tsatsaris, V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the human placenta the maternal blood circulates in the intervillous space (IVS). The syncytiotrophoblast (STB) is in direct contact with maternal blood. The wall shear stress (WSS) exerted by the maternal blood flow on the STB has not been evaluated. Our objective was to determine the physiological WSS exerted on the surface of the STB during the third trimester of pregnancy. Material and Methods To gain insight into the shear stress levels that the STB is expected to experience in vivo, we have formulated three different computational models of varying levels of complexity that reflect different physical representations of the IVS. Computations of the flow fields in all models were performed using the CFD module of the finite element code COMSOL Multiphysics 4.4. The mean velocity of maternal blood in the IVS during the third trimester was measured in vivo with dynamic MRI (0.94±0.14 mm.s-1). To investigate if the in silico results are consistent with physiological observations, we studied the cytoadhesion of human parasitized (Plasmodium falciparum) erythrocytes to primary human STB cultures, in flow conditions with different WSS values. Results The WSS applied to the STB is highly heterogeneous in the IVS. The estimated average values are relatively low (0.5±0.2 to 2.3±1.1 dyn.cm-2). The increase of WSS from 0.15 to 5 dyn.cm-2 was associated with a significant decrease of infected erythrocyte cytoadhesion. No cytoadhesion of infected erythrocytes was observed above 5 dyn.cm-2 applied for one hour. Conclusion Our study provides for the first time a WSS estimation in the maternal placental circulation. In spite of high maternal blood flow rates, the average WSS applied at the surface of the chorionic villi is low (<5 dyn.cm-2). These results provide the basis for future physiologically-relevant in vitro studies of the biological effects of WSS on the STB. PMID:26815115

  1. [Dynamics of changes in the thickness of the choroid in patients with stenosis of the internal carotid artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashina, A I; Ioffe, D I; Zolotarevskiĭ, A V; Mikhaĭlova, G D; Kuntsevich, G I

    1989-01-01

    Thirty-five patients suffering from atherosclerosis with carotid artery stenosis of varying severity have been examined. The thickness of the choroid has been paramacularly measured by the ultrasonic methods. The studies have revealed a significant decrease of the choroid thickness in both eyes of patients with bilateral hemodynamically significant stenoses of the carotid arteries and with bilateral stenoses on the point of occlusion. Of the 12 patients with hemodynamically insignificant stenoses, the choroid thickness has reduced only in 3. Surgical treatment (vascular restoration operations on the carotid arteries) has resulted in recovery of the choroid thickness in all the patients. This has lead the authors to a conclusion that isolated measurements of the choroid thickness in patients with impaired arterial extracranial blood stream cannot serve the diagnostic ophthalmologic test for the detection of patients with carotid insufficiency, but such measurements carried out by ultrasonic techniques, combined with other functional ophthalmologic methods, give valuable information on the time course of changes in the eyeball blood content.

  2. Multidimensional solid-state NMR studies of the structure and dynamics of pectic polysaccharides in uniformly 13C-labeled Arabidopsis primary cell walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick-Perez, Marilu; Wang, Tuo; Salazar, Andre; Zabotina, Olga A.; Hong, Mei

    2012-07-08

    Plant cell wall (CW) polysaccharides are responsible for the mechanical strength and growth of plant cells; however, the high-resolution structure and dynamics of the CW polysaccharides are still poorly understood because of the insoluble nature of these molecules. Here, we use 2D and 3D magic-angle-spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) to investigate the structural role of pectins in the plant CW. Intact and partially depectinated primary CWs of Arabidopsis thaliana were uniformly labeled with 13C and their NMR spectra were compared. Recent 13C resonance assignment of the major polysaccharides in Arabidopsis thaliana CWs allowed us to determine the effects of depectination on the intermolecular packing and dynamics of the remaining wall polysaccharides. 2D and 3D correlation spectra show the suppression of pectin signals, confirming partial pectin removal by chelating agents and sodium carbonate. Importantly, higher cross peaks are observed in 2D and 3D 13C spectra of the depectinated CW, suggesting higher rigidity and denser packing of the remaining wall polysaccharides compared with the intact CW. 13C spin–lattice relaxation times and 1H rotating-frame spin–lattice relaxation times indicate that the polysaccharides are more rigid on both the nanosecond and microsecond timescales in the depectinated CW. Taken together, these results indicate that pectic polysaccharides are highly dynamic and endow the polysaccharide network of the primary CW with mobility and flexibility, which may be important for pectin functions. This study demonstrates the capability of multidimensional SSNMR to determine the intermolecular interactions and dynamic structures of complex plant materials under near-native conditions. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Steam Condensation on Nuclear Containment Wall Surfaces Based on Semiempirical Generalized Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan K. Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In water-cooled nuclear power reactors, significant quantities of steam and hydrogen could be produced within the primary containment following the postulated design basis accidents (DBA or beyond design basis accidents (BDBA. For accurate calculation of the temperature/pressure rise and hydrogen transport calculation in nuclear reactor containment due to such scenarios, wall condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC is used. In the present work, the adaptation of a commercial CFD code with the implementation of models for steam condensation on wall surfaces in presence of noncondensable gases is explained. Steam condensation has been modeled using the empirical average HTC, which was originally developed to be used for “lumped-parameter” (volume-averaged modeling of steam condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases. The present paper suggests a generalized HTC based on curve fitting of most of the reported semiempirical condensation models, which are valid for specific wall conditions. The present methodology has been validated against limited reported experimental data from the COPAIN experimental facility. This is the first step towards the CFD-based generalized analysis procedure for condensation modeling applicable for containment wall surfaces that is being evolved further for specific wall surfaces within the multicompartment containment atmosphere.

  4. Dynamics of clinical semiotics in children with pathological tortuosity of internal carotid arteries in remote period after surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoĭkhet, Ya N; Khorev, N G; Kulikova, N I; Beller, A V; Kulikov, V P; Miller, V E

    2010-01-01

    The present study enrolling a total of eighty-eight 4-to-16-year-old children and adolescents was aimed at detailed elaboration and formalization of clinical signs of the internal carotid artery pathological kinking syndrome. To achieve these objectives, the authors carried out a comparative analysis of clinical manifestations of the disease in the surgically treated subjects (constituting the Surgery Group comprising 43 children and adolescents) and non-operated patients (making up the Comparison Group consisting of 45 age- and gender-matched subjects). There were no baseline differences in the incidence rate of clinical syndromes and symptoms between the groups of the would-be operated and conservatively treated patients. Also studied were the remote outcomes (1-to-12-year follow up) of surgical correction for pathological tortuosity of the internal carotid artery. The incidence rate of regression of neurological symptomatology along different clinical signs after surgery was shown to vary within a wide range from 11.6% to 96.3%. Resection of the proximal portion of the internal carotid artery with re-implantation into the old ostium turned out to be clinically effective in 90.0% of cases, with the haemodynamic efficacy amounting to 83.3%. Arteriolysis of the internal carotid artery rendered a clinical effect in 75% of cases, with a haemodynamical effect thereof equalling 25.0%. The decision as to the type of a surgical intervention to perform was primarily made based on the findings of angiography of the internal carotid artery. The operation of arteriolysis did not lead to deterioration of the child's condition.

  5. Dynamical scaling, domain-growth kinetics, and domain-wall shapes of quenched two-dimensional anisotropic XY models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Praestgaard, Eigil

    1988-01-01

    temperature, the domain-growth kinetics is found to be independent of the value of this parameter over several decades of its range. This suggests that a universal principle is operative. The domain-wall shape is analyzed and shown to be well represented by a hyperbolic tangent function. The growth process......The domain-growth kinetics in two different anisotropic two-dimensional XY-spin models is studied by computer simulation. The models have uniaxial and cubic anisotropy which leads to ground-state orderings which are twofold and fourfold degenerate, respectively. The models are quenched from...... infinite to zero temperature as well as to nonzero temperatures below the ordering transition. The continuous nature of the spin variables causes the domain walls to be ‘‘soft’’ and characterized by a finite thickness. The steady-state thickness of the walls can be varied by a model parameter, P. At zero...

  6. [Multicenter trial for optimization of bolus tracking settings and contrast material injection protocol in arterial dominant phase of dynamic computed tomography for diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Shushi; Okada, Masahiro; Kondo, Hiroshi; Sou, Hironobu; Murakami, Takamichi; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Ichikawa, Tomoaki; Hayakawa, Akiko; Shiosakai, Kazuhito; Awai, Kazuo; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2014-08-01

    Alongside current improvements in the performance of computer tomography (CT) systems, there has been an increase in the use of bolus tracking (BT) to acquire arterial dominant phase images for dynamic CT at optimal timing for characterization of liver focal lesions. However, optimal BT settings have not been established. In the present study, methods of contrast enhancement and BT setting values were evaluated using a multicenter post-marketing surveillance study on contrast media used in patients with chronic hepatitis and/or cirrhosis who had undergone liver dynamic CT for diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma, conducted by Daiichi Sankyo Co., Ltd. The results suggested the contrast injection method to be clinically useful if the amount of iodine per kilogram of body weight is set at 600 mg/kg and the injection duration at 30 s. To achieve a good arterial dominant scan under conditions where the injection duration is fixed at 30 s or the average injection duration is 34 s using the fixed injection rate method, the scan delay time should ideally to be set to longer than 13 s. If using the BT method, we recommend that the BT settings should be revalidated in reference to our results.

  7. A histopathologic study of retinal arterial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichte, C; Streeten, B W; Friedman, A H

    1978-04-01

    An isolated retinal arterial aneurysm was found postmortem in the eye of a 75-year-old hypertensive woman, and multiple aneurysms were in the enucleated eye of a 68-year-old hypertensive man with neovascular glaucoma. The aneurysmal sites showed thickening of the vessel walls with hyaline, fibrin, and foamy macrophages. Fresh or organized thrombus partially filled the aneurysmal lumina. Trypsin digestion preparations in Case 2 showed a progressive severity of aneurysmal changes from the simplest "cuff" type to the hemorrhagic "b;pwout" aneurysms with a linear split in the vessel wall. Atheroma was present in the larger arterial branches and fat was in most of the aneurysmal walls. These findings suggested that damage to the arterial wall by cholesterol or other emboli, or by occlusive disease, may predispose especially hypertensive patients to arterial aneurysm formation.

  8. Dynamic response analysis model for an ecological compound wall structure%生态复合墙结构动力反应分析模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄炜; 王斌; 张程华; 张荫; 赵冬; 侯莉娜

    2012-01-01

    An ecological compound wall structure is a unique structure composed of many kinds of materials. It is complicated to calculate the dynamic performance of the structure so a simplified dynamic calculation model is required. Based on the previous study and the relevant theories,a simplified model for dynamic response analysis of an ecological composite wall structure in elastic stage. The partial differential equations for the distributed parameter systems of each floor of the wall were derived to calculate their modes and frequencies. In addition,the displacements of the top of each ' floor were taken as the support excitation of the above floor,and the vibration shape superposition method was adopted to analyze the damping dynamic response of each floor of the wall. The dynamic response analysis of the whole wall was conducted and the results were compared with the preliminary shake table test ones. Theoretic and experimental results showed that the frequency of the 1 st mode and the acceleration response curves of each floor agrees well with the experimental data,so the model has certain calculation precision and practicability,it provides a better simplified and practical calculation method for dynamic response of an ecological compound wall structure in elastic stage.%独特构造及多种材料的使用与嵌套,使生态复合墙结构的动力特性计算异常复杂,故需提出其简化动力计算模型.结合课题组前期研究成果及相关理论,提出生态复合墙结构在弹性阶段简化的动力反应分析模型;建立每层复合墙体分布参数体系的运动偏微分方程,计算其振型和频率;把每层顶点位移作为上一层支座激励,利用振型叠加法对每层复合墙体进行有阻尼动力反应分析;对整体复合墙体进行动力反应分析,并与前期振动台试验结果进行对比分析.理论与试验结果表明:该简化模型计算求得的各层加速度时程反应值与试验值吻合较好,

  9. Anomalous Origin of the Left Coronary Artery From the Pulmonary Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkat Gangadharan MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36-year-old woman was seen with complaints of exertional chest pain and shortness of breath. Her medical history included atrial fibrillation and diabetes. Physical examination was unremarkable except for an irregular cardiac rhythm. Myocardial perfusion imaging revealed the presence of a large area of infarction involving the entire anterior and apical walls and part of the anteroseptal wall with minimal periinfarct ischemia. Computed tomography coronary angiogram revealed an anomalous left main coronary artery arising from the main pulmonary artery. Right and left heart catheterizations demonstrated moderate pulmonary hypertension with a slight step-up in oxygen saturation between the right ventricle and main pulmonary artery. Coronary angiography showed a large tortuous right coronary artery with collaterals to the left anterior descending artery that drained into the main pulmonary artery. She was referred for surgery. This case demonstrates a rare coronary artery anomaly in an adult where survival is dependent on collateral circulation.

  10. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... kidney can often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury or trauma to ...

  11. Numerical Simulation of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft with an Assistant Graft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; WANG Feng

    2014-01-01

    The conventional bypass design is to implant a graft on the stenosed host artery allowing blood to flow bypass the stenotic artery. However, restenosis is a challenging problem which finally results in reoperation. The purpose of this paper is to propose a new bypass graft design of coronary artery with an assistant graft for the treatment of coronary artery stenosis. An additional assistant graft was employed in the new design compared with the conventional ETS anastomosis. Numerical simulations were performed by means of finite volume method using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver. Results demonstrated that the new anastomoses model provided a more smooth flow at the distal ETS anastomosis without any stagnation point on anastomotic bed and vortex formation in the heel region. Oscillatory shear index (OSI) and time-averaged wall shear stress gradient (TAWSSG) at the artery bed of the distal ETS anastomosis were reduced. The coronary artery bypass graft with an assistant graft is feasible to improve the local hemodynamics and diminish the probability of restenosis in the treatment of coronary artery stenosis.

  12. Influence of tissue preservation methods on arterial geometry and echogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, H.; Wilhjelm, J; Vogt, Katja;

    1997-01-01

    original, ultrasound, ultrasonic measurement, vessel diameter, wall thickness, measurement of echogenicity, freezing of specimen, formalin fixation, pressurized formalin fixation, porcine artery......original, ultrasound, ultrasonic measurement, vessel diameter, wall thickness, measurement of echogenicity, freezing of specimen, formalin fixation, pressurized formalin fixation, porcine artery...

  13. Mathematical model of carotid artery for stent placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Tengku Husna Tengku Abdul; Din, Ummul Khair Salma; Ahmad, Rokiah @ Rozita

    2016-11-01

    The carotid artery stenting is one of the methods used to reduce the effect of artherosclerosis which caused by the thickening of the artery wall. In most of the studies, the measure of wall elasticity, shear stress and the blood pressure through the blood flow were considered. The aim of this study is to determine the position to place the stent inside the carotid artery. A mathematical model is reconstructed to determine the suitable location of the stent in the carotid artery. Throughout the study, differences in fluid flow between a normal carotid artery wall and stenosed carotid artery wall are investigated. Since the existence of the stenosis provides a resistance in the flow, it is important to identify the right position to place the stent. The stent will be placed in the position where stenosis exists to ease the blood to flow normally. Later after the stent placement, the blood flow normally through the blood vessel.

  14. Local effects of atherosclerotic plaque on arterial distensibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannattasio, C; Failla, M; Emanuelli, G; Grappiolo, A; Boffi, L; Corsi, D; Mancia, G

    2001-11-01

    Hypertension, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia are characterized by a reduction in arterial distensibility and by accelerated atherosclerosis. Whether arterial stiffening is an inherent feature of these conditions or just the consequence of the atherosclerotic clinical or subclinical lesions is not known, however. Our aim was to obtain information on this issue by directly measuring, in humans, arterial distensibility both at the site of an atherosclerotic lesion and at the proximal normal site. In 10 patients (8 men; mean+/-SEM age, 65.2+/-3.4 years) affected by monolateral hemodynamic significant internal carotid artery stenosis, we measured arterial distensibility (Wall Track System; PIE Medical) bilaterally, both at the internal carotid artery and at the common carotid artery level. In the common carotid artery, measurements were made 3 cm below the bifurcation. In the affected internal carotid artery, measurements were made at the plaque shoulder (wall thickness of 2 mm). Measurements were made in the contralateral internal carotid artery at a symmetrical level. Arterial wall thickness was measured in the same site of arterial distensibility. Arterial distensibility was less in the internal than in the common carotid artery, with a marked reduction at the plaque internal carotid artery level compared with the corresponding contralateral site (-45%, P<0.01). It was also less, however, in the common carotid artery branching into the atherosclerotic internal carotid artery than in the contralateral common carotid artery (-25%, P<0.05). Wall thickness was similar in the 2 common carotid arteries and obviously greater in the affected internal carotid artery than in the contralateral artery. Arterial distensibility was markedly less in the internal carotid artery where there was a plaque compared with the intact contralateral internal carotid artery; it was also less, however, in the common carotid artery of the affected side in comparison with the contralateral

  15. Consistence study of carotid artery wall thickness by MDCTA and high-frequency ultrasound%MDCTA与高频超声检测颈动脉壁厚度的一致性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪玮; 赵刚; 王弘; 邱晓明; 王珍

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the relevance and consistence between multi-detector row computed tomography angi-ography (MDCTA) and high-frequency ultrasound in measuring carotid artery wall thickness (CAWT) and the intima-media thickness (IMT). Methods Altogether, 64 subjects were prospectively analysed using a 64-detector row CT and high-frequency ultrasound. And they were classified as non-plaque group and plaque group. CAWT and IMT were measured in each patient using MDCTA and ultrasound, respectively. CAWT and IMT were compared and dependency analysed. Bland-Altman statistics was employed to measure the consistency between MDCTA and ultrasound. Results There was not significant difference between CAWT and IMT in the same group ( P > 0. 05). There was a high degree of correlation between all the common carotid artery CAWT and IMT, correlation coefficient was 0. 912 ( P <0. 01). By analysing the Bland-Altman plot, we observed a good consistence between CAWT and IMT with a bias between methods of 0. 029 mm and limit of consistence from 0. 187 mm to 0. 244 mm. Conclusion There was a good consistency between MDCTA and high-frequency ultrasound in the measurement of CAWT and IMT. CAWT can be used as an evaluating indicator of carotid atherosclerosis by MDCTA.%目的 探讨多层螺旋CT血管造影(MDCTA)检测颈总动脉壁厚度(CAWT)与高频超声检测颈总动脉内-中膜层厚度(IMT)的相关性和一致性.方法 应用MDCTA和高频超声对64例患者颈总动脉CAWT和IMT分别进行扫描,分为无斑块组和有斑块组,统计学比较CAWT与IMT的差异性和相关性,用Bland-Altman分析比较两者的一致性.结果 两组患者颈总动脉CAWT与IMT比较无统计学差异(P>0.05),相关性分析呈高度正相关,相关系数为0.912(P<0.O1),Bland-Altman分析存在较好一致性,偏倚为0.029mm,一致性界限为0.187~0.244mm.结论 MDCTA测量颈总动脉CAWT与高频超声测量颈总动脉IMT之间存在高度相关性和较好一致

  16. Arterial endothelial function measurement method and apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F

    2014-03-04

    A "relaxoscope" (100) detects the degree of arterial endothelial function. Impairment of arterial endothelial function is an early event in atherosclerosis and correlates with the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. An artery (115), such as the brachial artery (BA) is measured for diameter before and after several minutes of either vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. The change in arterial diameter is a measure of flow-mediated vasomodification (FMVM). The relaxoscope induces an artificial pulse (128) at a superficial radial artery (115) via a linear actuator (120). An ultrasonic Doppler stethoscope (130) detects this pulse 10-20 cm proximal to the point of pulse induction (125). The delay between pulse application and detection provides the pulse transit time (PTT). By measuring PTT before (160) and after arterial diameter change (170), FMVM may be measured based on the changes in PTT caused by changes in vessel caliber, smooth muscle tone and wall thickness.

  17. Assessment of conduit artery vasomotion using photoplethysmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanders, Karlis; Grabovskis, Andris; Marcinkevics, Zbignevs; Aivars, Juris Imants

    2013-11-01

    Vasomotion is a spontaneous oscillation of vascular tone. The phenomenon has been observed in small arterioles and capillaries as well as in the large conduit arteries. The layer of smooth muscle cells that surrounds a blood vessel can spontaneously and periodically change its tension and thereby the arterial wall stiffness also changes. As the understanding of the phenomenon is still rather obscure, researchers would benefit from a low-cost and reliable investigation technique such as photoplethysmography (PPG). PPG is an optical blood pulsation measurement technique that can offer substantial information about the arterial stiffness. The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the usefulness of the PPG technique in the research of vasomotion and to investigate vasomotion in the relatively large conduit arteries. Continuous 15 minute long measurements of posterior tibial artery wall stiffness were taken. Artery diameter, electrocardiogram, blood pressure and respiration were also simultaneously registered. Fast Fourier Transform power spectra were calculated to identify unique stiffness oscillations that did not correspond to fluctuations in the systemic parameters and thus would indicate vasomotion. We concluded that photoplethysmography is a convenient method for the research of the vasomotion in large arteries. Local stiffness parameter b/a is more accurate to use and easier to measure than the pulse wave velocity which describes stiffness of a segment of an artery. Conduit arteries might exhibit a low amplitude high frequency vasomotion ( 9 to 27 cycles per minute). Low frequency vasomotion is problematic to distinguish from the passive oscillations imposed by the arterial pressure.

  18. Low prevalence of significant carotid artery disease in Iranian patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimi Fatemeh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary artery bypass grafting ranks as one of the most frequent operations worldwide. The presence of carotid artery stenosis may increase the stroke rate in the perioperative period. Routine preoperative noninvasive assessment of the carotid arteries are recommended in many institutions to reduce the stroke rate. Methods 271 consecutive patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting at Shaheed Madani hospital of Tabriz, Iran (age, 58.5 Y; 73.1% male underwent preoperative ultrasonography for assessment of carotid artery wall thickness. Results Plaque in right common, left common, right internal and left internal carotid arteries was detected in 4.8%, 7.4%, 43.2% and 42.1% of patients respectively. 5 patients (1.8% had significant ( Conclusion Consecutive Iranian patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass surgery show a very low prevalence of significant carotid artery disease.

  19. Oxygen transfer in human carotid artery bifurcation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.G.Zhang; Y.B.Fan; X.Y.Deng

    2007-01-01

    Arterial bifurcations are places where blood flow may be disturbed and slow recirculation flow may occur.To reveal the correlation between local oxygen transfer and atherogenesis, a finite element method was employed to simulate the blood flow and the oxygen transfer in the human carotid artery bifurcation. Under steady-state flow conditions, the numerical simulation demonstrated a variation in local oxygen transfer at the bifurcation, showing that the convective condition in the disturbed flow region may produce uneven local oxygen transfer at the blood/wall interface.The disturbed blood flow with formation of slow eddies in the carotid sinus resulted in a depression in oxygen supply to the arterial wall at the entry of the sinus, which in turn may lead to an atherogenic response of the arterial wall, and contribute to the development of atherosclerotic stenosis there.

  20. Numerical simulation of pulsatile flow with newtonian and non-newtonian behavior in arterial stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Movahedi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is considerable evidence that vascular fluid dynamics plays an important role in the developmentand prevalence of atherosclerosis which is one of the most widespread disease in humans .The onset and prevalence of atherosclerosis hemodynamic parameter are largely affected by geometric parameters. If any obstacle interferes with the blood flow, the above parameters change dramatically. Most of the arterial diseases, such as atherosclerosis, occur in the arteries with complex patterns of fluid flow where the blood dynamics plays an important role. Arterial stenosis mostly occurs in an area with a complex pattern of fluid flow, such as coronary artery, aorta bifurcation, carotid and vessels of lower limbs. During the past three decades, many experimental studies have been performed on the hemodynamic role of the blood in forming sediment in the inner wall of the vessels. It has been shown that forming sediment in the inner wall of vessels depends on the velocity of fluid and also on the amount of wall shear stress.Methods: We have examined the effect on the blood flow of local stenosis in carotid artery in numerical form using the incompressible Navier-Stockes equations. The profile of the velocity in different parts and times in the pulsatile cycle, separation and reattachment points on the wall, the distance stability of flow and also alteration caused by the wall shear stress in entire vessel were shown and compared with two behaviors flow (Newtonian and Non-Newtonian.Finally we describe the influence of the severity of the stenosis on the separation and reattachmentpoints for a Non-Newtonian fuid. Results: In the present study, we have pointed very low and high oscillating WSS (Wall Shear Stress values play a significant role in the development of forming sediment in the inner wall of vessels. Also, we obtain this probability is higher for Newtonian than Non-Newtonian fluid behavior.Conclusion: Based on our results, the

  1. Microfluidic strategy to investigate dynamics of small blood vessel function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasotharan, Sanjesh; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian; Guenther, Axel

    2010-11-01

    Resistance arteries (RAs, 30-300 microns in diameter) that are located within the terminal part of the vascular tree regulate the laminar perfusion of tissue with blood, via the peripheral vascular resistance, and hence controls the systemic blood pressure. The structure of RAs is adapted to actively controlling flow resistance by dynamically changing their diameter, which is non-linearly dependent on the temporal variation of the transmural pressure, perfusion flow rate and spatiotemporal changes in the chemical environment. Increases in systemic blood pressure (hypertension) resulting from pathologic changes in the RA response represent the primary risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We use a microfluidic strategy to investigate small blood vessels by quantifying structural variations within the arterial wall, RA outer contour and diameter over time. First, we document the artery response to vasomotor drugs that were homogeneously applied at step-wise increasing concentration. Second, we investigate the response in the presence of well-defined axial and circumferential heterogeneities. Artery per- and superfusion is discussed based on microscale PIV measurements of the fluid velocity on both sides of the arterial wall. Structural changes in the arterial wall are quantified using cross-correlation and proper orthogonal decomposition analyses of bright-field micrographs.

  2. Effect of Vaginal or Systemic Estrogen on Dynamics of Collagen Assembly in the Rat Vaginal Wall1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, T. Ignacio; Maldonado, P. Antonio; Acevedo, Jesus F.; Word, R. Ann

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to compare the effects of systemic and local estrogen treatment on collagen assembly and biomechanical properties of the vaginal wall. Ovariectomized nulliparous rats were treated with estradiol or conjugated equine estrogens (CEEs) either systemically, vaginal CEE, or vaginal placebo cream for 4 wk. Low-dose local CEE treatment resulted in increased vaginal epithelial thickness and significant vaginal growth without uterine hyperplasia. Furthermore, vaginal wall distensibility increased without compromise of maximal force at failure. Systemic estradiol resulted in modest increases in collagen type I with no change in collagen type III mRNA. Low-dose vaginal treatment, however, resulted in dramatic increases in both collagen subtypes whereas moderate and high dose local therapies were less effective. Consistent with the mRNA results, low-dose vaginal estrogen resulted in increased total and cross-linked collagen content. The inverse relationship between vaginal dose and collagen expression may be explained in part by progressive downregulation of estrogen receptor-alpha mRNA with increasing estrogen dose. We conclude that, in this menopausal rat model, local estrogen treatment increased total and cross-linked collagen content and markedly stimulated collagen mRNA expression in an inverse dose-effect relationship. High-dose vaginal estrogen resulted in downregulation of estrogen receptor-alpha and loss of estrogen-induced increases in vaginal collagen. These results may have important clinical implications regarding the use of local vaginal estrogen therapy and its role as an adjunctive treatment in women with loss of vaginal support. PMID:25537371

  3. Heterogeneous mechanics of the mouse pulmonary arterial network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pilhwa; Carlson, Brian E; Chesler, Naomi; Olufsen, Mette S; Qureshi, M Umar; Smith, Nicolas P; Sochi, Taha; Beard, Daniel A

    2016-10-01

    Individualized modeling and simulation of blood flow mechanics find applications in both animal research and patient care. Individual animal or patient models for blood vessel mechanics are based on combining measured vascular geometry with a fluid structure model coupling formulations describing dynamics of the fluid and mechanics of the wall. For example, one-dimensional fluid flow modeling requires a constitutive law relating vessel cross-sectional deformation to pressure in the lumen. To investigate means of identifying appropriate constitutive relationships, an automated segmentation algorithm was applied to micro-computerized tomography images from a mouse lung obtained at four different static pressures to identify the static pressure-radius relationship for four generations of vessels in the pulmonary arterial network. A shape-fitting function was parameterized for each vessel in the network to characterize the nonlinear and heterogeneous nature of vessel distensibility in the pulmonary arteries. These data on morphometric and mechanical properties were used to simulate pressure and flow velocity propagation in the network using one-dimensional representations of fluid and vessel wall mechanics. Moreover, wave intensity analysis was used to study effects of wall mechanics on generation and propagation of pressure wave reflections. Simulations were conducted to investigate the role of linear versus nonlinear formulations of wall elasticity and homogeneous versus heterogeneous treatments of vessel wall properties. Accounting for heterogeneity, by parameterizing the pressure/distention equation of state individually for each vessel segment, was found to have little effect on the predicted pressure profiles and wave propagation compared to a homogeneous parameterization based on average behavior. However, substantially different results were obtained using a linear elastic thin-shell model than were obtained using a nonlinear model that has a more

  4. Probing the Salt Concentration Dependent Nucelobase Distribution in a Single-Stranded DNA-Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Hybrid with Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumadwip; Patel, Nisheet; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi

    2016-01-28

    The hybrids of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and single stranded DNA (ssDNA) are novel nanoscale materials having remarkable applications in nanotechnology. The absorption of nucleobases on the surface of a SWCNT depends strongly on the ionic strength of the medium. In this paper, using atomistic molecular dynamics we have shown that at low salt concentration ssDNA wraps on the surface of SWCNT through hydrophobic π-π stacking between the DNA bases and the sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms of the carbon nanotube. At high salt concentration, however, the DNA molecule adopts a partially folded structure and the ssDNA-SWCNT wrapping gets weakened significantly due to the self-stacking of the DNA bases. Our study can find relevance in CNT mediated gene delivery processes where subsequent unwrapping of the gene from its carrier is anticipated across the cell membrane regulated by an existing salt concentration gradient.

  5. Regional and voxel-wise comparisons of blood flow measurements between dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Carissa M; Pope, Whitney B; Zaw, Taryar; Qiao, Joe; Naeini, Kourosh M; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Wang, J J; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Ellingson, Benjamin M

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the regional and voxel-wise correlation between dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) and arterial spin labeling (ASL) perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in patients with brain tumors. Thirty patients with histologically verified brain tumors were evaluated in the current study. DSC-MRI was performed by first using a preload dose of gadolinium contrast, then collecting a dynamic image acquisition during a bolus of contrast, followed by posthoc contrast agent leakage correction. Pseudocontinuous ASL was collected using 30 pairs of tag and control acquisition using a 3-dimensional gradient-echo spin-echo (GRASE) acquisition. All images were registered to a high-resolution anatomical atlas. Average CBF measurements within regions of contrast-enhancement and T2 hyperintensity were evaluated between the two modalities. Additionally, voxel-wise correlation between CBF measurements obtained with DSC and ASL were assessed. Results demonstrated a positive linear correlation between DSC and ASL measurements of CBF when regional average values were compared; however, a statistically significant voxel-wise correlation was only observed in around 30-40% of patients. These results suggest DSC and ASL may provide regionally similar, but spatially different measurements of CBF.

  6. Bending and twisting of an in vivo coronary artery at a bifurcation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, Y C; Lu, J T; Ritman, E L

    1992-03-01

    Dynamic changes in the geometric shape and dimensions of a left coronary artery tree were extracted from the computer-tomographically reconstructed three-dimensional images of an in situ beating heart of an anesthetized dog. Wireframe models of the left coronary artery tree at 16 different instants of a cardiac cycle were constructed for the study of its flexing motion. For quantifying the local bending and twisting of the left coronary artery tree, the anatomic landmarks of the bifurcation points are selected as focussed locations. At these points, the space curves of the tree at different cardiac instants were first derived in parametric forms. Curvature and torsion expressions are next obtained in terms of the derivatives with respect to the parameter. This analysis revealed that during the initial contraction of the heart wall, a 2% reduction per millisecond in the radius of curvature occurred near the bifurcation point where the left circumflex coronary artery descends toward the apex of the heart. When the left ventricular chamber reached a maximum value, the radius of curvature was found to decrease at a rate of 2.3% ms-1. At the end of diastole, an increase in the radius of curvature at a rate of 5.7% ms-1 was observed. The twisting rates per unit length of artery near the bifurcation point of the selected artery were found to range from -0.62 to 0.63 degrees ms-1.

  7. Minimizing the blood velocity differences between phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics simulation in cerebral arteries and aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Adib, Mohd Azrul Hisham; Ii, Satoshi; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Wada, Shigeo

    2017-02-04

    The integration of phase-contrast magnetic resonance images (PC-MRI) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a way to obtain detailed information of patient-specific hemodynamics. This study proposes a novel strategy for imposing a pressure condition on the outlet boundary (called the outlet pressure) in CFD to minimize velocity differences between the PC-MRI measurement and the CFD simulation, and to investigate the effects of outlet pressure on the numerical solution. The investigation involved ten patient-specific aneurysms reconstructed from a digital subtraction angiography image, specifically on aneurysms located at the bifurcation region. To evaluate the effects of imposing the outlet pressure, three different approaches were used, namely: a pressure-fixed (P-fixed) approach; a flow rate control (Q-control) approach; and a velocity-field-optimized (V-optimized) approach. Numerical investigations show that the highest reduction in velocity difference always occurs in the V-optimized approach, where the mean of velocity difference (normalized by inlet velocity) is 19.3%. Additionally, the highest velocity differences appear near to the wall and vessel bifurcation for 60% of the patients, resulting in differences in wall shear stress. These findings provide a new methodology for PC-MRI integrated CFD simulation and are useful for understanding the evaluation of velocity difference between the PC-MRI and CFD.

  8. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how wall...

  9. Wonderful Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author emphasizes the importance of "working" walls in children's programs. Children's programs need "working" walls (and ceilings and floors) which can be put to use for communication, display, storage, and activity space. The furnishings also work, or don't work, for the program in another sense: in aggregate, they serve as…

  10. Intravenous injection of nicardipine changed the distribution of coronary artery endothelial shear stress and fluid dynamics in patients with unstable angina

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Shao-liang; HU Zuo-ying; ZHANG Jun-jie; KAN Jing; XU Tian; LIU Zhi-zhong; XU Hai-mei

    2012-01-01

    Background Coronary endothelial shear stress (ESS) triggered the development of atherosclerosis.However,the effect of calcium channel antagonist on the distribution of ESS remained unclear.Methods Twenty consecutive patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) 48 hours after maximal medication with single left anterior descending artery stenosis <50% were studied.Nicardipine was intravenously injected at 1 μg/kg after a bolus of 10 mg in order to achieve mean blood pressure (MBP) reduced by 10% or more,or the heart rate increased by 10- 15 beats/min.Hemodynamic variables and angiogram at baseline and during injection of nicardipine were recorded,respectively.Coronary artery 3-D reconstruction was used for the analysis of ESS.Results Distal reference-vessel-diameter and minimal lumen diameter decreased significantly from (2.42±0.41) mm and (1.47±0.49) mm at baseline to (2.22±0.35) mm and (1.35±0.49) mm at maximal drug-dosage (P=0.018 and 0.020,respectively).Nicardipine did not change blood velocity.Lowest mean shear stress at segments 2-mm distal to plaque increased significantly from (0.034±0.519) Pa at baseline to (0.603±0.728) Pa (P=0.013) at peak effect of drug.Conclusions Nicardipine was associated with the constriction of diseased vessel segment that adapted to the reduction of blood pressure,without dynamic change of blood velocity at each stage of whole cardiac cycle.Increased ESS value at segments distal to plaque reflected the cardioprotection by nicardipine (ChiCTR-TRC-10000964).

  11. Parametric response mapping of dynamic CT for predicting intrahepatic recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after conventional transcatheter arterial chemoembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Seung Joon; Kim, Hyung Sik [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Department of Radiology, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jonghoon [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Electronic Electrical and Computer Engineering, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jongbum [Yonsei University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-min [Hanyang University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hyunjin [Sungkyunwkan University, School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The aim of our study was to determine the diagnostic value of a novel image analysis method called parametric response mapping (PRM) for prediction of intrahepatic recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with conventional transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). This retrospective study was approved by the IRB. We recruited 55 HCC patients who achieved complete remission (CR) after TACE and received longitudinal multiphasic liver computed tomography (CT). The patients fell into two groups: the recurrent tumour group (n = 29) and the non-recurrent tumour group (n = 26). We applied the PRM analysis to see if this technique could distinguish between the two groups. The results of the PRM analysis were incorporated into a prediction algorithm. We retrospectively removed data from the last time point and attempted to predict the response to therapy of the removed data. The PRM analysis was able to distinguish between the non-recurrent and recurrent groups successfully. The prediction algorithm detected response to therapy with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.76, while the manual approach had AUC 0.64. Adopting PRM analysis can potentially distinguish between recurrent and non-recurrent HCCs and allow for prediction of response to therapy after TACE. (orig.)

  12. Effect of Coronary Artery Stenosis on the Transmural Extent of the Rest Myocardial Perfusion of Different Segments of Left Ventricular Wall Using 640 Slices CT%静息态下冠状动脉狭窄对左室壁透壁心肌灌注影响的640层CT研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈为军; 李丹; 孙永青; 卢明明; 全冠民; 车东东; 袁涛; 刘亚飞; 门肾力; 杨卓

    2012-01-01

    目的 确定静息态下透壁心肌灌注指数(TPR)的正常值,并探讨静息态下不同分支的冠状动脉狭窄与各冠状动脉分支的不同狭窄程度对左室壁不同节段TPR的影响.方法 274例患者行Toshiba 640层CT检查,包括冠状动脉CTA及左心室室壁CT灌注(CTP)检查.根据冠状动脉狭窄程度及17节段进行分组.计算正常组及不同冠状动脉狭窄程度组之间相应节段内TPR是否存在差异,以及冠状动脉狭窄程度与相应节段TPR的相关性.结果 前降支及左旋支病变对于左室壁心肌灌注影响较为明显,前降支狭窄主要影响中间段前壁(r=-0.288)、心尖段前壁(r=-0.263)及中间段间隔壁(r=-0.196),左旋支主要影响基底部前侧壁(r=-0.241)、基底部后侧壁(r=-0.279)及心尖段侧壁(r=-0.201),而右冠状动脉病变影响较小,主要影响中间段后壁(r=-0.195);冠状动脉中、重度狭窄组对于左室壁心肌灌注影响程度较大(P<0.05),轻度狭窄影响较小;左室前壁心肌灌注最易受到冠状动脉狭窄影响;在静息状态下前降支供血区域组、左旋支供血区域组及右冠状动脉供血区域组正常心肌和重度狭窄心肌平均TPR值分别为1.14±0.09和1.07±0.13、1.13±0.11和1.06±0.14、1.15±0.14和1.10±0.12.结论 不同冠状动脉分支狭窄分别可以影响不同节段的心肌透壁灌注;不同冠状动脉狭窄程度可以不同程度地影响心肌的TPR,二者具有相关性;静息状态下TPR正常值大于负荷状态下TPR.本研究提供了TPR静息态下的正常值.%Objective To evaluate the influence of different branches and degree of the coronary artery stenosis on the myocardial transmural perfusion ratio of different segments of left ventricular wall, and to discuss the normal myocardial transmural perfusion ratio(TPR) of each territory of left ventricular wall in the rest state. Methods CT images of 274 patients who received Toshiba 640 slices CT for CTA and CTP

  13. Simulation of stent deployment in a realistic human coronary artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Steen Anton FW

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of restenosis after a stenting procedure is related to local biomechanical environment. Arterial wall stresses caused by the interaction of the stent with the vascular wall and possibly stress induced stent strut fracture are two important parameters. The knowledge of these parameters after stent deployment in a patient derived 3D reconstruction of a diseased coronary artery might give insights in the understanding of the process of restenosis. Methods 3D reconstruction of a mildly stenosed coronary artery was carried out based on a combination of biplane angiography and intravascular ultrasound. Finite element method computations were performed to simulate the deployment of a stent inside the reconstructed coronary artery model at inflation pressure of 1.0 MPa. Strut thickness of the stent was varied to investigate stresses in the stent and the vessel wall. Results Deformed configurations, pressure-lumen area relationship and stress distribution in the arterial wall and stent struts were studied. The simulations show how the stent pushes the arterial wall towards the outside allowing the expansion of the occluded artery. Higher stresses in the arterial wall are present behind the stent struts and in regions where the arterial wall was thin. Values of 200 MPa for the peak stresses in the stent strut were detected near the connecting parts between the stent struts, and they were only just below the fatigue stress. Decreasing strut thickness might reduce arterial damage without increasin