WorldWideScience

Sample records for arsenic metabolism neurological

  1. Arsenic exposure at low-to-moderate levels and skin lesions, arsenic metabolism, neurological functions, and biomarkers for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases: Review of recent findings from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contamination of groundwater by arsenic in Bangladesh is a major public health concern affecting 35-75 million people. Although it is evident that high levels (> 300 μg/L) of arsenic exposure from drinking water are related to adverse health outcomes, health effects of arsenic exposure at low-to-moderate levels (10-300 μg/L) are not well understood. We established the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study (HEALS) with more than 20,000 men and women in Araihazar, Bangladesh, to prospectively investigate the health effects of arsenic predominately at low-to-moderate levels (0.1 to 864 μg/L, mean 99 μg/L) of arsenic exposure. Findings to date suggest adverse effects of low-to-moderate levels of arsenic exposure on the risk of pre-malignant skin lesions, high blood pressure, neurological dysfunctions, and all-cause and chronic disease mortality. In addition, the data also indicate that the risk of skin lesion due to arsenic exposure is modifiable by nutritional factors, such as folate and selenium status, lifestyle factors, including cigarette smoking and body mass index, and genetic polymorphisms in genes related to arsenic metabolism. The analyses of biomarkers for respiratory and cardiovascular functions support that there may be adverse effects of arsenic on these outcomes and call for confirmation in large studies. A unique strength of the HEALS is the availability of outcome data collected prospectively and data on detailed individual-level arsenic exposure estimated using water, blood and repeated urine samples. Future prospective analyses of clinical endpoints and related host susceptibility will enhance our knowledge on the health effects of low-to-moderate levels of arsenic exposure, elucidate disease mechanisms, and give directions for prevention.

  2. [Inborn errors of metabolism in adult neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedel, F

    2013-02-01

    Inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) are caused by mutations in genes coding for enzymes and other proteins involved in cell metabolism. Many IEM can be treated effectively. Although IEM have usually been considered pediatric diseases, they can present at any age, mostly with neurological and psychiatric symptoms, and therefore constitute an integral subspeciality of neurology. However, although they are increasingly being recognized, IEM remain rare, and the care for patients should be optimized in specialized reference centers. Since the number of different diseases is very large, the diagnostic approach needs to be rigorous, starting at the clinics and calling upon the additional help of neuroradiology, biochemistry and molecular biology. In practice, it is important for the neurologist to recognize: (1) when to start suspecting an IEM; and (2) how to correlate a given clinical presentation with one of the five major groups of diseases affecting the nervous system. These five groups may be classified as: (a) energy metabolism disorders such as respiratory chain disorders, pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency, GLUT1 deficiency, fatty-acid β-oxidation defects, and disorders involving key cofactors such as electron transfer flavoprotein, thiamine, biotin, riboflavin, vitamin E and coenzyme Q10; (b) intoxication syndromes such as porphyrias, urea-cycle defects, homocystinurias, organic acidurias and amino acidopathies; (c) lipid-storage disorders such as lysosomal storage disorders (Krabbe disease, metachromatic leukodystrophy, Niemann - Pick disease type C, Fabry disease and Gaucher's disease), peroxisomal disorders (adrenomyeloneuropathy, Refsum disease, disorders of pristanic acid metabolism, peroxisome biogenesis disorders), Tangier disease and cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis; (d) metal-storage diseases such as iron, copper and manganese metabolic disorders; and (e) neurotransmitter metabolism defects, including defects of serotonin, dopamine and glycine metabolism

  3. [Nutritional and metabolic aspects of neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas Vilà, Mercè

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system regulates food intake, homoeostasis of glucose and electrolytes, and starts the sensations of hunger and satiety. Different nutritional factors are involved in the pathogenesis of several neurological diseases. Patients with acute neurological diseases (traumatic brain injury, cerebral vascular accident hemorrhagic or ischemic, spinal cord injuries, and cancer) and chronic neurological diseases (Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease) increase the risk of malnutrition by multiple factors related to nutrient ingestion, abnormalities in the energy expenditure, changes in eating behavior, gastrointestinal changes, and by side effects of drugs administered. Patients with acute neurological diseases have in common the presence of hyper metabolism and hyper catabolism both associated to a period of prolonged fasting mainly for the frequent gastrointestinal complications, many times as a side effect of drugs administered. During the acute phase, spinal cord injuries presented a reduction in the energy expenditure but an increase in the nitrogen elimination. In order to correct the negative nitrogen balance increase intakes is performed with the result of a hyper alimentation that should be avoided due to the complications resulting. In patients with chronic neurological diseases and in the acute phase of cerebrovascular accident, dysphagia could be present which also affects intakes. Several chronic neurological diseases have also dementia, which lead to alterations in the eating behavior. The presence of malnutrition complicates the clinical evolution, increases muscular atrophy with higher incidence of respiratory failure and less capacity to disphagia recuperation, alters the immune response with higher rate of infections, increases the likelihood of fractures and of pressure ulcers, increases the incapacity degree and is an independent factor to increase mortality. The periodic nutritional

  4. Arsenic toxicity: the effects on plant metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eFinnegan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The two forms inorganic arsenic, arsenate (AsV and arsenite (AsIII, are easily taken up by the cells of the plant root. Once in the cell, AsV can be readily converted to AsIII, the more toxic of the two forms. AsV and AsIII both disrupt plant metabolism, but through distinct mechanisms. AsV is a chemical analogue of phosphate that can disrupt at least some phosphate-dependent aspects of metabolism. AsV can be translocated across cellular membranes by phosphate transport proteins, leading to imbalances in phosphate supply. It can compete with phosphate during phosphorylation reactions, leading to the formation of AsV adducts that are often unstable and short-lived. As an example, the formation and rapid autohydrolysis of AsV-ADP sets in place a futile cycle that uncouples photophosphorylation and oxidative phosphorylation, decreasing the ability of cells to produce ATP and carry out normal metabolism. AsIII is a dithiol reactive compound that binds to and potentially inactivates enzymes containing closely spaced cysteine residues or other sulfhydryl-containing groups. Arsenic exposure generally induces the production of reactive oxygen species that can lead to the production of antioxidant metabolites and numerous enzymes involved in antioxidant defense. Oxidative carbon metabolism, amino acid and protein relationships, and nitrogen and sulfur assimilation pathways are also impacted by As exposure. These effects are reflected in a dramatic restructuring of amino acid pools in Arabidopsis thaliana upon AsV exposure. Readjustment of several metabolic pathways, such as glutathione production, has been shown to lead to increased arsenic tolerance in plants. Species- and cultivar-dependent variation in arsenic sensitivity and the remodeling of metabolite pools that occurs in response to As exposure gives hope that additional metabolic pathways associated with As tolerance will be identified.

  5. DIVERSITY OF ARSENIC METABOLISM IN CULTURED HUMAN CANCER CELL LINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diversity of arsenic metabolism in cultured human cancer cell lines. Arsenic has been known to cause a variety of malignancies in human. Pentavalent As (As 5+) is reduced to trivalent As (As3+) which is further methylated by arsenic methyltransferase(s) to monomethylarson...

  6. Arsenic uptake and metabolism in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, F J; Ma, J F; Meharg, A A; McGrath, S P

    2009-03-01

    Arsenic (As) is an element that is nonessential for and toxic to plants. Arsenic contamination in the environment occurs in many regions, and, depending on environmental factors, its accumulation in food crops may pose a health risk to humans.Recent progress in understanding the mechanisms of As uptake and metabolism in plants is reviewed here. Arsenate is taken up by phosphate transporters. A number of the aquaporin nodulin26-like intrinsic proteins (NIPs) are able to transport arsenite,the predominant form of As in reducing environments. In rice (Oryza sativa), arsenite uptake shares the highly efficient silicon (Si) pathway of entry to root cells and efflux towards the xylem. In root cells arsenate is rapidly reduced to arsenite, which is effluxed to the external medium, complexed by thiol peptides or translocated to shoots. One type of arsenate reductase has been identified, but its in planta functions remain to be investigated. Some fern species in the Pteridaceae family are able to hyperaccumulate As in above-ground tissues. Hyperaccumulation appears to involve enhanced arsenate uptake, decreased arsenite-thiol complexation and arsenite efflux to the external medium, greatly enhanced xylem translocation of arsenite, and vacuolar sequestration of arsenite in fronds. Current knowledge gaps and future research directions are also identified.

  7. Association of Genetic Variation in Cystathionine-β-Synthase and Arsenic Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, Kristin E.; Basu, Anamika; Alan E Hubbard; Bates, Michael N.; Kalman, David; Rey, Omar; Smith, Allan; Smith, Martyn T.; Steinmaus, Craig; Skibola, Christine F.

    2010-01-01

    Variation in individual susceptibility to arsenic-induced disease may be partially explained by genetic differences in arsenic metabolism. Mounting epidemiological evidence and in vitro studies suggest that methylated arsenic metabolites, particularly monomethylarsonic (MMA3), are more acutely toxic than inorganic arsenic; thus, MMA3 may be the primary toxic arsenic species. To test the role of genetic variation in arsenic metabolism, polymorphisms in genes involved in one-carbon metabolism [...

  8. Effects of arsenic on nitrogen metabolism in arsenic hyperaccumulator and non-hyperaccumulator ferns

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the effects of arsenic on the in vitro activities of the enzymes (nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase) involved in nitrate metabolism in the roots, rhizomes, and fronds of two four-month old fern plants, Pteris vittata, an arsenic-hyperaccumulator, and Pteris ensiformis, ...

  9. Significantly increased risk of carotid atherosclerosis with arsenic exposure and polymorphisms in arsenic metabolism genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Yi-Chen [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wusing St., Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Lien, Li-Ming [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Neurology, Shin Kong WHS Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chung, Wen-Ting [Department of Neurology, Wanfang Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Fang-I; Hsieh, Pei-Fan [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wusing St., Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Wu, Meei-Maan [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wusing St., Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medicine, College of Medicine, Fu-Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Hung-Pin [Department of Neurology, Lotung Poh-Ai Hospital, I-Lan, Taiwan (China); Chiou, Hung-Yi, E-mail: hychiou@tmu.edu.tw [School of Public Health, College of Public Health and Nutrition, Taipei Medical University, 250 Wusing St., Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chien-Jen [Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-15

    Individual susceptibility to arsenic-induced carotid atherosclerosis might be associated with genetic variations in arsenic metabolism. The purpose of this study is to explore the interaction effect on risk of carotid atherosclerosis between arsenic exposure and risk genotypes of purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP), arsenic (+3) methyltransferase (As3MT), and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) and omega 2 (GSTO2). A community-based case-control study was conducted in northeastern Taiwan to investigate the arsenic metabolic-related genetic susceptibility to carotid atherosclerosis. In total, 863 subjects, who had been genotyped and for whom the severity of carotid atherosclerosis had been determined, were included in the present study. Individual well water was collected and arsenic concentration determined using hydride generation combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The result showed that a significant dose-response trend (P=0.04) of carotid atherosclerosis risk associated with increasing arsenic concentration. Non-significant association between genetic polymorphisms of PNP Gly51Ser, Pro57Pro, As3MT Met287Thr, GSTO1 Ala140Asp, and GSTO2 A-183G and the risk for development of carotid atherosclerosis were observed. However, the significant interaction effect on carotid atherosclerosis risk was found for arsenic exposure (>50 {mu}g/l) and the haplotypes of PNP (p=0.0115). A marked elevated risk of carotid atherosclerosis was observed in subjects with arsenic exposure of >50 {mu}g/l in drinking water and those who carried the PNP A-T haplotype and at least either of the As3MT risk polymorphism or GSTO risk haplotypes (OR, 6.43; 95% CI, 1.79-23.19). In conclusion, arsenic metabolic genes, PNP, As3MT, and GSTO, may exacerbate the formation of atherosclerosis in individuals with high levels of arsenic concentration in well water (>50 {mu}g/l). - Highlights: {yields}Arsenic metabolic genes might be associated with carotid atherosclerosis. {yields

  10. Microbial arsenic metabolism: New twists on an old poison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J.F.; Basu, P.; Oremland, R.S.

    2010-01-01

    Phylogenetically diverse microorganisms metabolize arsenic despite its toxicity and are part of its robust iogeochemical cycle. Respiratory arsenate reductase is a reversible enzyme, functioning in some microbes as an arsenate reductase but in others as an arsenite oxidase. As(III) can serve as an electron donor for anoxygenic photolithoautotrophy and chemolithoautotrophy. Organoarsenicals, such as the feed additive roxarsone, can be used as a source of energy, releasing inorganic arsenic.

  11. Association between occupational exposure to arsenic and neurological, respiratory and renal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halatek, Tadeusz; Sinczuk-Walczak, Halina; Rabieh, Sasan; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2009-09-01

    Occupational exposure by inhalation in copper smelter is associated with several subclinical health phenomena. The respiratory tract is usually involved in the process of detoxication of inhaled noxious agents which, as arsenic, can act as inductors of oxidative stress (Lantz, R.C., Hays, A.M., 2006. Role of oxidative stress in arsenic-induced toxicity. Drug Metab. Rev. 38, 791-804). It is also known that irritating fumes affect distal bronchioles of non-ciliated, epithelial Clara cells, which secrete anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive Clara cell protein (CC16) into the respiratory tract. The study group comprised 39 smelters employed at different workplaces in a copper foundry, matched for age and smoking habits with the control group (n=16). Subjective neurological symptoms (SNS), visual evoked potentials (VEP), electroneurographic (EneG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) results were examined in the workers and the relationships between As concentration in the air (As-Air) and urine (As-U) were assessed. Effects of exposure were expressed in terms of biomarkers: CC16 as early pulmonary biomarker and beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)M) in urine and serum and retinol binding protein (RBP) as renal markers, measured by sensitive latex immunoassay. The concentrations of arsenic exceeded about two times the Threshold Limit Values (TLV) (0.01 mg/m(3)). The contents of lead did not exceed the TLV (0.05 mg/m(3)). Low CC16 levels in serum (12.1 microg/l) of workers with SNS and VEP symptoms and highest level As-U (x(a) 39.0 microg/l) were noted earliest in relation to occupational time. Moreover, those effects were associated with increased levels of urinary and serum beta(2)M and urinary RBP. Results of our study suggested the initiative key role of oxidative stress in triggering the processes that eventually lead to the subclinical effects of arsenic on the nervous system. PMID:19410594

  12. Association between occupational exposure to arsenic and neurological, respiratory and renal effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational exposure by inhalation in copper smelter is associated with several subclinical health phenomena. The respiratory tract is usually involved in the process of detoxication of inhaled noxious agents which, as arsenic, can act as inductors of oxidative stress (Lantz, R.C., Hays, A.M., 2006. Role of oxidative stress in arsenic-induced toxicity. Drug Metab. Rev. 38, 791-804). It is also known that irritating fumes affect distal bronchioles of non-ciliated, epithelial Clara cells, which secrete anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive Clara cell protein (CC16) into the respiratory tract. The study group comprised 39 smelters employed at different workplaces in a copper foundry, matched for age and smoking habits with the control group (n = 16). Subjective neurological symptoms (SNS), visual evoked potentials (VEP), electroneurographic (EneG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) results were examined in the workers and the relationships between As concentration in the air (As-Air) and urine (As-U) were assessed. Effects of exposure were expressed in terms of biomarkers: CC16 as early pulmonary biomarker and β2-microglobulin (β2M) in urine and serum and retinol binding protein (RBP) as renal markers, measured by sensitive latex immunoassay. The concentrations of arsenic exceeded about two times the Threshold Limit Values (TLV) (0.01 mg/m3). The contents of lead did not exceed the TLV (0.05 mg/m3). Low CC16 levels in serum (12.1 μg/l) of workers with SNS and VEP symptoms and highest level As-U (xa 39.0 μg/l) were noted earliest in relation to occupational time. Moreover, those effects were associated with increased levels of urinary and serum β2M and urinary RBP. Results of our study suggested the initiative key role of oxidative stress in triggering the processes that eventually lead to the subclinical effects of arsenic on the nervous system.

  13. Effects of arsenic on nitrate metabolism in arsenic hyperaccumulating and non-hyperaccumulating ferns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Nandita [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fl 32611-0290 (United States); Eco-Auditing group, National Botanical Research Institute, Rana Pratap Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India); Ma, Lena Q., E-mail: lqma@ufl.ed [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fl 32611-0290 (United States); Vu, Joseph C. [Chemistry Research Unit, CMAVE, USDA-ARS, Gainesville, FL 32608-1069 and Agronomy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0500 (United States); Raj, Anshita [Eco-Auditing group, National Botanical Research Institute, Rana Pratap Marg, Lucknow 226 001 (India)

    2009-08-15

    This study investigated the effects of arsenic on the in vitro activities of the enzymes (nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase) involved in nitrate metabolism in the roots, rhizomes, and fronds of four-month old Pteris vittata (arsenic - hyperaccumulator) and Pteris ensiformis (non-arsenic--hyperaccumulator) plants. The arsenic treatments (0, 150, and 300 muM as sodium arsenate) in hydroponics had adverse effects on the root and frond dry weights, and this effect was more evident in P. ensiformis than in P. vittata. Nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase activities of arsenate-treated plants were reduced more in P. ensiformis than in P. vittata. This effect was accompanied by similar decreases in tissue NO{sub 3}{sup -} concentrations. Therefore, this decrease is interpreted as being indirect, i.e., the consequence of the reduced NO{sub 3}{sup -} uptake and translocation in the plants. The study shows the difference in the tolerance level of the two Pteris species with varying sensitivity to arsenic. - Arsenic reduced the activity of nitrate and nitrite reductase more in Pteris ensiformis than Pteris vittata.

  14. Neurological and neuropsychological functions in adults with a history of developmental arsenic poisoning from contaminated milk powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Kato, Tsuguhiko; Ohta, Hitoshi;

    2016-01-01

    During the summer of 1955, mass arsenic poisoning of bottle-fed infants occurred in the western part of Japan due to contaminated milk powder, and more than 100 died; some childhood victims were later found to suffer from neurological sequelae in adolescence. This unique incident enabled us to ex...

  15. Neurological and neuropsychological functions in adults with a history of developmental arsenic poisoning from contaminated milk powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Kato, Tsuguhiko; Ohta, Hitoshi; Bellinger, David C; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Grandjean, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    During the summer of 1955, mass arsenic poisoning of bottle-fed infants occurred in the western part of Japan due to contaminated milk powder, and more than 100 died; some childhood victims were later found to suffer from neurological sequelae in adolescence. This unique incident enabled us to explore infancy as a critical period of arsenic exposure in regard to developmental neurotoxicity and its possible persistence through adulthood. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the association between developmental arsenic exposure and the neurological outcomes more than 50 years later. We conducted a retrospective cohort study during the period from April 2012 to February 2013 in two hospitals in Okayama Prefecture, Japan. The study sample consisted of 50 individuals: 27 known poisoning victims from Okayama Prefecture, and 23 non-exposed local controls of similar age. In addition to neurological examination, we adapted a battery of neurophysiological and neuropsychological tests to identify the types of brain functions affected by early-life arsenic exposure. While limited abnormalities were found in the neurophysiological tests, neuropsychological deficits were observed. Except for Finger tapping, all test scores in the exposed group--Vocabulary and Block Design from Wechsler Adults Intelligent Scale III, Design memory subtest from Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning 2, and Grooved pegboard test--were substantially below those obtained by the unexposed. The exposed group showed average performance at least 1.2 standard deviations below the average for the controls. Exposed participants performed less well than controls, even after exclusion of subjects with recognized disabilities or those with a high level of education. Adults who had suffered arsenic poisoning during infancy revealed neuropsychological dysfunctions, even among those subjects not recognized as having disabilities. Developmental neurotoxicity due to arsenic likely results in permanent

  16. Neurological and neuropsychological functions in adults with a history of developmental arsenic poisoning from contaminated milk powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorifuji, Takashi; Kato, Tsuguhiko; Ohta, Hitoshi; Bellinger, David C; Matsuoka, Kenichi; Grandjean, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    During the summer of 1955, mass arsenic poisoning of bottle-fed infants occurred in the western part of Japan due to contaminated milk powder, and more than 100 died; some childhood victims were later found to suffer from neurological sequelae in adolescence. This unique incident enabled us to explore infancy as a critical period of arsenic exposure in regard to developmental neurotoxicity and its possible persistence through adulthood. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the association between developmental arsenic exposure and the neurological outcomes more than 50 years later. We conducted a retrospective cohort study during the period from April 2012 to February 2013 in two hospitals in Okayama Prefecture, Japan. The study sample consisted of 50 individuals: 27 known poisoning victims from Okayama Prefecture, and 23 non-exposed local controls of similar age. In addition to neurological examination, we adapted a battery of neurophysiological and neuropsychological tests to identify the types of brain functions affected by early-life arsenic exposure. While limited abnormalities were found in the neurophysiological tests, neuropsychological deficits were observed. Except for Finger tapping, all test scores in the exposed group--Vocabulary and Block Design from Wechsler Adults Intelligent Scale III, Design memory subtest from Wide Range Assessment of Memory and Learning 2, and Grooved pegboard test--were substantially below those obtained by the unexposed. The exposed group showed average performance at least 1.2 standard deviations below the average for the controls. Exposed participants performed less well than controls, even after exclusion of subjects with recognized disabilities or those with a high level of education. Adults who had suffered arsenic poisoning during infancy revealed neuropsychological dysfunctions, even among those subjects not recognized as having disabilities. Developmental neurotoxicity due to arsenic likely results in permanent

  17. Update on 3-iodothyronamine and its neurological and metabolic actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo eZucchi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available 3-iodothyronamine (T1AM is an endogenous amine, that has been detected many rodent tissues, and in human blood. It has been hypothesized to derive from thyroid hormone metabolism, but this hypothesis still requires validation. T1AM is not a ligand for nuclear thyroid hormone receptors, but stimulates with nanomolar affinity trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1, a G protein-coupled membrane receptor. With a lower affinity it interacts with alpha2A adrenergic receptors. Additional targets are represented by apolipoprotein B100, mitochondrial ATP synthase, and membrane monoamine transporters, but the functional relevance of these interactions is still uncertain. Among the effects reported after administration of exogenous T1AM to experimental animals, metabolic and neurological responses deserve special attention, because they were obtained at low dosages, which increased endogenous tissue concentration by about one order of magnitude. Systemic T1AM administration favored fatty acid over glucose catabolism, increased ketogenesis and increased blood glucose. Similar responses were elicited by intracerebral infusion, which inhibited insulin secretion and stimulated glucagon secretion. However, T1AM administration increased ketogenesis and gluconeogenesis also in hepatic cell lines and in perfused liver preparations, providing evidence for a peripheral action, as well. In the central nervous system, T1AM behaved as a neuromodulator, affecting adrenergic and/or histaminergic neurons. Intracerebral T1AM administration favoured learning and memory, modulated sleep and feeding, and decreased the pain threshold. In conclusion T1AM should be considered as a component of thyroid hormone signalling and might play a significant physiological and/or pathophysiological role. T1AM analogues have already been synthetized and their therapeutical potential is currently under investigation.

  18. Arsenomics: Omics of Arsenic Metabolism in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudra Deo eTripathi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractArsenic (As contamination of drinking water and groundwater used for irrigation can lead to contamination of the food chain and poses serious health risk to people worldwide. To reduce As intake through the consumption of contaminated food, identification of the mechanisms for As accumulation and detoxification in plant is a prerequisite to develop efficient phytoremediation methods and safer crops with reduced As levels. Transcriptome, proteome and metabolome analysis of any organism reflects the total biological activities at any given time which are responsible for the adaptation of the organism to the surrounding environmental conditions. As these approaches are very important in analyzing plant As transport and accumulation, we termed Arsenomics as approach which deals transcriptome, proteome and metabolome alterations during As exposure. Although, various studies have been performed to understand modulation in transcriptome in response to As, many important questions need to be addressed regarding the translated proteins of plants at proteomic and metabolomic level, resulting in various ecophysiological responses. In this review, the comprehensive knowledge generated in this area has been compiled and analyzed. There is a need to strengthen Arsenomics which will lead to develop of tools to develop As-free plants for safe consumption.

  19. Individual Variations in Inorganic Arsenic Metabolism Associated with AS3MT Genetic Polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruo Takeshita

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Individual variations in inorganic arsenic metabolism may influence the toxic effects. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state methyltransferase (AS3MT that can catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet to trivalent arsenical, may play a role in arsenic metabolism in humans. Since the genetic polymorphisms of AS3MT gene may be associated with the susceptibility to inorganic arsenic toxicity, relationships of several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in AS3MT with inorganic arsenic metabolism have been investigated. Here, we summarize our recent findings and other previous studies on the inorganic arsenic metabolism and AS3MT genetic polymorphisms in humans. Results of genotype dependent differences in arsenic metabolism for most of SNPs in AS3MT were Inconsistent throughout the studies. Nevertheless, two SNPs, AS3MT 12390 (rs3740393 and 14458 (rs11191439 were consistently related to arsenic methylation regardless of the populations examined for the analysis. Thus, these SNPs may be useful indicators to predict the arsenic metabolism via methylation pathways.

  20. Biochemical and Metabolic Changes in Arsenic Contaminated Boehmeria nivea L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, Hussani; Mirza, Nosheen; Chai, Li-Yuan; Yang, Zhi-Hui; Yong, Wang; Tang, Chong-Jian; Mahmood, Qaisar; Pervez, Arshid; Farooq, Umar; Fahad, Shah; Nasim, Wajid; Siddique, Kadambot H M

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is identified by the EPA as the third highest toxic inorganic contaminant. Almost every 9th or 10th human in more than 70 countries including mainland China is affected by As. Arsenic along with other toxins not only affects human life but also creates alarming situations such as the deterioration of farm lands and desertion of industrial/mining lands. Researchers and administrators have agreed to opt for phytoremediation of As over costly cleanups. Boehmeria nivea L. can soak up various heavy metals, such as Sb, Cd, Pb, and Zn. But the effect of As pollution on the biology and metabolism of B. nivea has been somewhat overlooked. This study attempts to evaluate the extent of As resistance, chlorophyll content, and metabolic changes in As-polluted (5, 10, 15, and 20 mg L(-1) As) B. nivea in hydroponics. Toxic effects of As in the form of inhibited growth were apparent at the highest level of added As. The significant changes in the chlorophyll, electrolyte leakage, and H2O2, significant increases in As in plant parts, catalase (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA), with applied As revealed the potential of B. nivea for As decontamination. By employing the metabolic machinery of B. nivea, As was sustainably removed from the contaminated areas. PMID:27022603

  1. Biochemical and Metabolic Changes in Arsenic Contaminated Boehmeria nivea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussani Mubarak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic (As is identified by the EPA as the third highest toxic inorganic contaminant. Almost every 9th or 10th human in more than 70 countries including mainland China is affected by As. Arsenic along with other toxins not only affects human life but also creates alarming situations such as the deterioration of farm lands and desertion of industrial/mining lands. Researchers and administrators have agreed to opt for phytoremediation of As over costly cleanups. Boehmeria nivea L. can soak up various heavy metals, such as Sb, Cd, Pb, and Zn. But the effect of As pollution on the biology and metabolism of B. nivea has been somewhat overlooked. This study attempts to evaluate the extent of As resistance, chlorophyll content, and metabolic changes in As-polluted (5, 10, 15, and 20 mg L−1 As B. nivea in hydroponics. Toxic effects of As in the form of inhibited growth were apparent at the highest level of added As. The significant changes in the chlorophyll, electrolyte leakage, and H2O2, significant increases in As in plant parts, catalase (CAT, and malondialdehyde (MDA, with applied As revealed the potential of B. nivea for As decontamination. By employing the metabolic machinery of B. nivea, As was sustainably removed from the contaminated areas.

  2. Exposure to inorganic arsenic in pregnancy and metabolism-nutrition interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Li

    2006-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is metabolized by most mammals, including humans, via alternating reduction and oxidative methylation with S-adenosylmethionine as main methyl donor. Thus, it seems likely that it is influenced by the availability of methyl groups. The main arsenic metabolites excreted in human urine are monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), besides un-methylated inorganic arsenic (arsenate [As(V)] and arsenite [As(III)]). The aim of the present study wa...

  3. Determination of Arsenic Poisoning and Metabolism in Hair by Synchrotron Radiation: The Case of Phar Lap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempson, Ivan M.; Henry, Dermot A. (Museum Vic.); (U. South Australia)

    2010-08-26

    Fresh physical evidence about the demise of the racehorse Phar Lap (see photograph) has been gathered from the study of mane hair samples by synchrotron radiation analysis with high resolution X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analyses. The results are indicative of arsenic ingestion and metabolism, and show that the racing champion died from arsenic poisoning.

  4. Gene Therapy for the Treatment of Neurological Disorders: Metabolic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, Dominic J.; Gao, Guangping

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic disorders comprise a large group of heterogeneous diseases ranging from very prevalent diseases such as diabetes mellitus to rare genetic disorders like Canavan Disease. Whether either of these diseases is amendable by gene therapy depends to a large degree on the knowledge of their pathomechanism, availability of the therapeutic gene, vector selection, and availability of suitable animal models. In this book chapter, we review three metabolic disorders of the central nervous system (CNS; Canavan Disease, Niemann–Pick disease and Phenylketonuria) to give examples for primary and secondary metabolic disorders of the brain and the attempts that have been made to use adeno-associated virus (AAV) based gene therapy for treatment. Finally, we highlight commonalities and obstacles in the development of gene therapy for metabolic disorders of the CNS exemplified by those three diseases. PMID:26611604

  5. Arsenic Metabolism by Human Gut Microbiota upon In Vitro Digestion of Contaminated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Speciation analysis is essential when evaluating risks from arsenic (As) exposure. In an oral exposure scenario, the importance of presystemic metabolism by gut microorganisms has been evidenced with in vivo animal models and in vitro experiments with ...

  6. Association between polymorphisms in arsenic metabolism genes and urinary arsenic methylation profiles in girls and boys chronically exposed to arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio-Vega, Rogelio; González-Cortes, Tania; Olivas-Calderón, Edgar; Clark Lantz, R; Jay Gandolfi, A; Michel-Ramirez, Gladis

    2016-08-01

    Disease manifestations or susceptibilities often differ among individuals exposed to the same concentrations of arsenic (As). These differences have been associated with several factors including As metabolism, sex, age, genetic variants, nutritional status, smoking, and others. This study evaluated the associations between four As metabolism-related gene polymorphisms/null genotypes with urinary As methylation profiles in girls and boys chronically exposed to As. In a total of 332 children aged 6-12 years, the frequency of AS3MT, GSTO1, GSTT1, and GSTM1 polymorphisms/null genotypes and As urinary metabolites were measured. The results revealed that total As and monomethyl metabolites of As (MMA) levels were higher in boys than in girls. No differences in the frequency of the evaluated polymorphisms were found between girls and boys. In AS3MT-Met287Thr carriers, %MMA levels were higher and second methylation levels (defined as dimethylarsinic acid divided by MMA) were lower. In children with the GSTM1 null genotype, second methylation levels were higher. In boys, a positive association between the AS3MT-Met287Thr polymorphism with %MMA and between the GSTO1-Glu155del and As(v) was found; whereas, a negative relationship was identified between AS3MT-Met287Thr and second methylation profiles. In girls, a positive association was found between the GSTO1-Ala140Asp polymorphism with second methylation levels. In conclusion, our data indicate that gender, high As exposure levels, and polymorphisms in the evaluated genes negatively influenced As metabolism. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:516-525, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Lipid imbalance in the progressive neurological metabolic disorder, Farber disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Maria Gil Roseira; Ferreira, Natália; Alves, Mariana; Ribeiro, Isaura

    2010-01-01

    Farber disease is a neurodegenerative metabolic inherited disease caused by the deficient activity of acid ceramidase which leads to ceramide accumulation within lysosomes. Besides the structural role in biomembranes ceramide also acts as signalling molecule. The present study investigated whether intracellular trafficking of lipid molecules is blocked in diseased fibroblasts. The observation of secondary lysosomal glycosphingolipids and cholesterol storage in Farber cells rein...

  8. Atherosclerosis induced by arsenic in drinking water in rats through altering lipid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic in drinking water is a global environmental health problem, and the exposure may increase cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases mortalities, most likely through causing atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism of atherosclerosis formation after arsenic exposure is still unclear. To study the mechanism of atherosclerosis formation after arsenic exposure and explore the role of high cholesterol diet (HCD) in this process, we fed spontaneous hypertensive rats and Wistar Kyoto rats with basal diet or HCD and provided with them drinking water containing arsenic at different ages and orders for 20 consecutive weeks. We measured high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol, triglycerides, heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70), and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) at predetermined intervals and determined expressions of cholesteryl ester transfer protein-1 (CETP-1) and liver X receptor β (LXRβ) in the liver. Atherosclerosis was determined by examining the aorta with hematoxylin and eosin stain. After 20 weeks, we found arsenic, alone or combined with HCD, may promote atherosclerosis formation with transient increases in HSP 70 and hs-CRP. Early combination exposure decreased the HDL-C/LDL-C ratio without changing the levels of total cholesterol and triglyceride until 30 weeks old. Both CETP-1 and LXRβ activities were suppressed, most significantly in early combination exposure. In conclusion, arsenic exposure may induce atherosclerosis through modifying reverse cholesterol transport in cholesterol metabolism and suppressing LXRβ and CEPT-1 expressions. For decreasing atherosclerosis related mortality associated with arsenic, preventing exposure from environmental sources in early life is an important element. - Highlights: → Arsenic causes cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases through atherosclerosis. → Arsenic may promote atherosclerosis with transient increase in HSP 70 and hs

  9. Metagenomic analysis revealed highly diverse microbial arsenic metabolism genes in paddy soils with low-arsenic contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ke-Qing; Li, Li-Guan; Ma, Li-Ping; Zhang, Si-Yu; Bao, Peng; Zhang, Tong; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2016-04-01

    Microbe-mediated arsenic (As) metabolism plays a critical role in global As cycle, and As metabolism involves different types of genes encoding proteins facilitating its biotransformation and transportation processes. Here, we used metagenomic analysis based on high-throughput sequencing and constructed As metabolism protein databases to analyze As metabolism genes in five paddy soils with low-As contents. The results showed that highly diverse As metabolism genes were present in these paddy soils, with varied abundances and distribution for different types and subtypes of these genes. Arsenate reduction genes (ars) dominated in all soil samples, and significant correlation existed between the abundance of arr (arsenate respiration), aio (arsenite oxidation), and arsM (arsenite methylation) genes, indicating the co-existence and close-relation of different As resistance systems of microbes in wetland environments similar to these paddy soils after long-term evolution. Among all soil parameters, pH was an important factor controlling the distribution of As metabolism gene in five paddy soils (p = 0.018). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study using high-throughput sequencing and metagenomics approach in characterizing As metabolism genes in the five paddy soil, showing their great potential in As biotransformation, and therefore in mitigating arsenic risk to humans.

  10. Individual Differences in Arsenic Metabolism and Lung Cancer in a Case-Control Study in Cordoba, Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    Steinmaus, Craig; Yuan, Yan; Kalman, Dave; Rey, Omar A.; Skibola, Christine F.; Dauphine, Dave; Basu, Anamika; Porter, Kristin E.; Hubbard, Alan; Bates, Michael N.; Smith, Martyn T.; Smith, Allan H.

    2010-01-01

    In humans, ingested inorganic arsenic is metabolized to monomethylarsenic (MMA) then to dimethylarsenic (DMA), although in most people this process is not complete. Previous studies have identified associations between the proportion of urinary MMA (%MMA) and increased risks of several arsenic-related diseases, although none of these reported on lung cancer. In this study, urinary arsenic metabolites were assessed in 45 lung cancer cases and 75 controls from arsenic-exposed areas in Cordoba, ...

  11. Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of countries, including Argentina, Bangladesh, Chile, China, India, Mexico, and the United States of America. Drinking-water, ... ingestion of inorganic arsenic include developmental effects, neurotoxicity, diabetes, pulmonary disease and cardiovascular disease. Arsenic-induced myocardial ...

  12. Evidence for arsenic metabolism and cycling by microorganisms 2.7 billion years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforna, Marie Catherine; Philippot, Pascal; Somogyi, Andrea; van Zuilen, Mark A.; Medjoubi, Kadda; Schoepp-Cothenet, Barbara; Nitschke, Wolfgang; Visscher, Pieter T.

    2014-11-01

    The ability of microbes to metabolize arsenic may have emerged more than 3.4 billion years ago. Some of the modern environments in which prominent arsenic metabolism occurs are anoxic, as were the Precambrian oceans. Early oceans may also have had a relatively high abundance of arsenic. However, it is unclear whether arsenic cycling occurred in ancient environments. Here we assess the chemistry and nature of cell-like globules identified in salt-encrusted portions of 2.72-billion-year-old fossil stromatolites from Western Australia. We use Raman spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence to show that the globules are composed of organic carbon and arsenic (As). We argue that our data are best explained by the occurrence of a complete arsenic cycle at this site, with As(III) oxidation and As(V) reduction by microbes living in permanently anoxic conditions. We therefore suggest that arsenic cycling could have occurred more widely in marine environments in the several hundred million years before the Earth’s atmosphere and shallow oceans were oxygenated.

  13. Arsenic induces structural and compositional colonic microbiome change and promotes host nitrogen and amino acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheer, Rishu; Patterson, Jena; Dudash, Mark; Stachler, Elyse N; Bibby, Kyle J; Stolz, Donna B; Shiva, Sruti; Wang, Zeneng; Hazen, Stanley L; Barchowsky, Aaron; Stolz, John F

    2015-12-15

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water causes cancer and non-cancer diseases. However, mechanisms for chronic arsenic-induced pathogenesis, especially in response to lower exposure levels, are unclear. In addition, the importance of health impacts from xeniobiotic-promoted microbiome changes is just being realized and effects of arsenic on the microbiome with relation to disease promotion are unknown. To investigate impact of arsenic exposure on both microbiome and host metabolism, the stucture and composition of colonic microbiota, their metabolic phenotype, and host tissue and plasma metabolite levels were compared in mice exposed for 2, 5, or 10weeks to 0, 10 (low) or 250 (high) ppb arsenite (As(III)). Genotyping of colonic bacteria revealed time and arsenic concentration dependent shifts in community composition, particularly the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, relative to those seen in the time-matched controls. Arsenic-induced erosion of bacterial biofilms adjacent to the mucosal lining and changes in the diversity and abundance of morphologically distinct species indicated changes in microbial community structure. Bacterical spores increased in abundance and intracellular inclusions decreased with high dose arsenic. Interestingly, expression of arsenate reductase (arsA) and the As(III) exporter arsB, remained unchanged, while the dissimilatory nitrite reductase (nrfA) gene expression increased. In keeping with the change in nitrogen metabolism, colonic and liver nitrite and nitrate levels and ratios changed with time. In addition, there was a concomitant increase in pathogenic arginine metabolites in the mouse circulation. These data suggest that arsenic exposure impacts the microbiome and microbiome/host nitrogen metabolism to support disease enhancing pathogenic phenotypes.

  14. Ground water pollution by arsenic and its effects on health. Involvement of metabolic methylation in arsenic-induced genetic damage and tumorigenesis; Muki hiso no mechiru ka taisha to idenshi shogaisei narabini shuyo yuhatsusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamanaka, K. [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan)] Okada, S. [Shizuoka Prefecture (Japan)

    1997-07-10

    Drinking water contamination has become a worldwide problem. It is pointed out that re-evaluation of genetic damage with carcinogen is considered as an important problem particularly arsenic`s effects on health. To explain the genetic damage development mechanism of arsenic compound, results of the research conducted on the action of arsenic compound which develops during metabolic methylation process and inorganic arsenic are explained in this paper. The results of the study are summarized as follows. Arsenic genetic damage mutation is caused by dimethyl arsenic in main metabolism than inorganic arsenic. Lung DNA damage is induced by the interaction of O2 and arsenic peroxide radical. Dimethyl arsenic shows very important effect on lung cancer formation process which is induced based on 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO). It not only promotes lung cancer but it also plays an important role in malignant tumor`s mutation. 25 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Nutritional Manipulation of One-Carbon Metabolism: Effects on Arsenic Methylation and Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan N. Hall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to arsenic (As through drinking water is a substantial problem worldwide. The methylation of As, a reactive metalloid, generates monomethyl- (MMA and dimethyl-arsenical (DMA species. The biochemical pathway that catalyzes these reactions, one-carbon metabolism, is regulated by folate and other micronutrients. Arsenic methylation exerts a critical influence on both its urinary elimination and chemical reactivity. Mice having the As methyltransferase null genotype show reduced urinary As excretion, increased As retention, and severe systemic toxicity. The most toxic As metabolite in vitro is MMAIII, an intermediate in the generation of DMAV, a much less toxic metabolite. These findings have raised the question of whether As methylation is a detoxification or bioactivation pathway. Results of population-based studies suggest that complete methylation of inorganic As to DMA is associated with reduced risk for As-induced health outcomes, and that nutrients involved in one-carbon metabolism, such as folate, can facilitate As methylation and elimination.

  16. Nutritional Status Has Marginal Influence on the Metabolism of Inorganic Arsenic in Pregnant Bangladeshi Women

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Li; Ekström, Eva-Charlotte; Goessler, Walter; Lönnerdal, Bo; Nermell, Barbro; Yunus, Mohammad; Rahman, Anisur; Arifeen, Shams El; Persson, Lars Åke; Vahter, Marie

    2007-01-01

    Background The interindividual variation in metabolism of inorganic arsenic (iAs), involving methylation via one-carbon metabolism, has been well documented, but the reasons remain unclear. Objectives In this population-based study we aimed to elucidate the effect of nutrition on As methylation among women in Matlab, Bangladesh, where people are chronically exposed to iAs via drinking water. Methods We studied effects of macronutrient status using body mass index (BMI) among 442 women in earl...

  17. Individual differences in arsenic metabolism and lung cancer in a case-control study in Cordoba, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In humans, ingested inorganic arsenic is metabolized to monomethylarsenic (MMA) then to dimethylarsenic (DMA), although in most people this process is not complete. Previous studies have identified associations between the proportion of urinary MMA (%MMA) and increased risks of several arsenic-related diseases, although none of these reported on lung cancer. In this study, urinary arsenic metabolites were assessed in 45 lung cancer cases and 75 controls from arsenic-exposed areas in Cordoba, Argentina. Folate has also been linked to arsenic-disease susceptibility, thus an exploratory assessment of associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms in folate metabolizing genes, arsenic methylation, and lung cancer was also conducted. In analyses limited to subjects with metabolite concentrations above detection limits, the mean %MMA was higher in cases than in controls (17.5% versus 14.3%, p = 0.01). The lung cancer odds ratio for subjects with %MMA in the upper tertile compared to those in the lowest tertile was 3.09 (95% CI, 1.08-8.81). Although the study size was too small for a definitive conclusion, there was an indication that lung cancer risks might be highest in those with a high %MMA who also carried cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) rs234709 and rs4920037 variant alleles. This study is the first to report an association between individual differences in arsenic metabolism and lung cancer, a leading cause of arsenic-related mortality. These results add to the increasing body of evidence that variation in arsenic metabolism plays an important role in arsenic-disease susceptibility.

  18. MiADMSA reverses impaired mitochondrial energy metabolism and neuronal apoptotic cell death after arsenic exposure in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwivedi, Nidhi; Mehta, Ashish; Yadav, Abhishek [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Defence Research and Development Establishment, Gwalior-474 002 (India); Binukumar, B.K.; Gill, Kiran Dip [Department of Biochemistry, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh-160 012 (India); Flora, Swaran J.S., E-mail: sjsflora@hotmail.com [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Defence Research and Development Establishment, Gwalior-474 002 (India)

    2011-11-15

    Arsenicosis, due to contaminated drinking water, is a serious health hazard in terms of morbidity and mortality. Arsenic induced free radicals generated are known to cause cellular apoptosis through mitochondrial driven pathway. In the present study, we investigated the effect of arsenic interactions with various complexes of the electron transport chain and attempted to evaluate if there was any complex preference of arsenic that could trigger apoptosis. We also evaluated if chelation with monoisoamyl dimercaptosuccinic acid (MiADMSA) could reverse these detrimental effects. Our results indicate that arsenic exposure induced free radical generation in rat neuronal cells, which diminished mitochondrial potential and enzyme activities of all the complexes of the electron transport chain. Moreover, these complexes showed differential responses towards arsenic. These early events along with diminished ATP levels could be co-related with the later events of cytosolic migration of cytochrome c, altered bax/bcl{sub 2} ratio, and increased caspase 3 activity. Although MiADMSA could reverse most of these arsenic-induced altered variables to various extents, DNA damage remained unaffected. Our study for the first time demonstrates the differential effect of arsenic on the complexes leading to deficits in bioenergetics leading to apoptosis in rat brain. However, more in depth studies are warranted for better understanding of arsenic interactions with the mitochondria. -- Research highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arsenic impairs mitochondrial energy metabolism leading to neuronal apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arsenic differentially affects mitochondrial complexes, I - III and IV being more sensitive than complex II. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arsenic-induced apoptosis initiates through ROS generation or impaired [Ca{sup 2+}]i homeostasis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiADMSA reverses arsenic toxicity via intracellular arsenic- chelation, antioxidant

  19. Cerebral metabolic changes in neurologically presymptomatic patients undergoing haemodialysis: in vivo proton MR spectroscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Ming-Lun; Chiang, I. Chan [Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging (China); Li, Chun-Wei [Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Health Science (China); Chang, Jer-Ming [Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Internal Medicine, Kaohsiung Hsiao-Kang Municipal Hospital (China); Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Nephrology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine (China); Ko, Chih-Hung [Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, College of Medicine (China); Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry (China); Chuang, Hung-Yi [Kaohsiung Medical University, Faculty of Public Health, College of Health Science (China); Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine (China); Sheu, Reu-Sheng [Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Municipal Hsiao-Kang Hospital (China); Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine (China); Lee, Chen-Chang [Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, College of Health Science (China); Kaohsiung Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (China); Hsieh, Tsyh-Jyi [Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging (China); Kaohsiung Medical University, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine (China); Kaohsiung Municipal Ta-Tung Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging (China)

    2010-06-15

    To prospectively investigate and detect early cerebral metabolic changes in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by using in vivo proton MR spectroscopy (MRS). We enrolled 32 patients with ESRD and 32 healthy controls between the ages of 26 and 50 years. Short echo time single-voxel proton MRS was acquired from volumes of interest (VOIs) located in the frontal grey and white matter, temporal white matter and basal ganglia. The choline/phospatidylcholine (Cho), myo-inositol (mI), N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and total creatine (tCr) peaks were measured and the metabolic ratios with respect to tCr were calculated. In the ESRD group, significant elevations of the Cho/tCr and mI/tCr ratios were observed for the frontal grey matter, frontal white matter, temporal white matter and basal ganglia as compared with controls. There was no significant difference in the NAA/tCr ratios at all VOIs between the ESRD patients and the healthy controls. Proton MRS is a useful and non-invasive imaging tool for the detection of early cerebral metabolic changes in neurologically presymptomatic ESRD patients. (orig.)

  20. The role of active arsenic species produced by metabolic reduction of dimethylarsinic acid in genotoxicity and tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent research of arsenic carcinogenesis, many researchers have directed their attention to methylated metabolites of inorganic arsenics. Because of its high cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, trivalent dimethylated arsenic, which can be produced by the metabolic reduction of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), has attracted considerable attention from the standpoint of arsenic carcinogenesis. In the present paper, we examined trivalent dimethylated arsenic and its further metabolites for their chemical properties and biological behavior such as genotoxicity and tumorigenicity. Our in vitro and in vivo experiments suggested that the formation of cis-thymine glycol in DNA was induced via the production of dimethylated arsenic peroxide by the reaction of trivalent dimethylated arsenic with molecular oxygen, but not via the production of common reactive oxygen species (ROS; superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, etc.). Thus, dimethylated arsenic peroxide may be the main species responsible for the tumor promotion in skin tumorigenesis induced by exposure to DMA. Free radical species, such as dimethylarsenic radical [(CH3)2As·] and dimethylarsenic peroxy radical [(CH3)2AsOO·], that are produced by the reaction of molecular oxygen and dimethylarsine [(CH3)2AsH], which is probably a further reductive metabolite of trivalent dimethylated arsenic, may be main agents for initiation in mouse lung tumorigenesis

  1. Arsenic metabolism by microbial communities from an arsenic-rich shallow-water hydrothermal system in Ambitle Island, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Chancho, M.; Pichler, T.; Amend, J. P.; Akerman, N. H.

    2011-12-01

    Arsenic, although toxic, is used as an energy source by certain microbes, some of which can catalyse the reduction of arsenate by using different electron donors, while others oxidize arsenite with oxygen or nitrate as electron acceptors. The marine shallow-water hydrothermal system in Tutum Bay, Ambitle Island, Papua New Guinea is ideal for investigating the metabolism of microbes involved in arsenic cycling, because there hydrothermal vents discharge fluids with arsenite concentrations as high as 950 μg/L. Vent fluids are hot (˜100°C), slightly acidic (pH˜6) and reducing. Upon mixing with colder and oxygen-rich seawater the fluid chemistry changes rapidly within a few meters from the hydrothermal source. The objective of this work was to study arsenic metabolism due to microbial activity in Tutum Bay. Sediments collected at 7.5 and 30 m along a transect beginning at a hydrothermal vent were used as inocula in the microbial culturing experiments. Media were designed using chemical analyses of the hydrothermal fluids. Following culture experiments, arsenic species identification and quantification were performed for the growth media with HPLC-ICP(HR)MS, using anion exchange and reversed phase chromatography. Quality control included mass balance calculations and spiking experiments. A fast reduction of arsenate to arsenite was observed in the first 24 hours leading to the conclusion that the microbial communities were capable of reducing arsenic. However, mass balance calculations revealed that more than 30% of the arsenic had been transformed to one or more unknown species, which could not be detected by ion exchange chromatography. The addition of peroxide combined with reversed phase chromatography revealed the presence of several unknown species. Following the addition of peroxide some of the unknown species were identified to be thio-arsenic compounds, because they were oxidized to their oxo-analogues. Nevertheless, a significant fraction of unknown

  2. Association of neurological diseases with metabolic syndrome among out-patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is highly prevalent in Japan; however, most previous surveys have studied only adults able to engage fully in normal daily activities, after excluding persons with diseases or disabilities. Recently, lifestyle-related risk factors have been strongly linked to a number of major diseases. In particular, the incidence of atherosclerotic vascular diseases associated with MetS has increased markedly, and this trend is projected to continue. We focused on the prevalence of MetS among out-patients with neurological diseases. The subjects for this hospital-based study were 713 out-patients with various neurological diseases (329 men, mean age 65.2±14.5 yr, age range 40-78 yr, and 384 women, mean age 64.6±15.3 yr, age range 40-88 yr) who presented at the Department of Neurology, Nara Medical University Hospital. A total of 120 patients had cerebral infarction, 102 Parkinson's disease, 32 spinal spondylosis, 30 headache, 32 myositis, and the rest various other neurological diseases. MetS was diagnosed according to the criteria proposed by The Japanese Society of Internal Medicine in 2005. The cutoff values for waist circumference (WC) were greater than 85 cm in men and 90 cm in women. A diagnosis of MetS additionally required two or more of the following: a serum triglyceride level (TG) of at least 150 mg/dl and/or a high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level (HDL-C) of less than 40 mg/dl; a blood pressure (BP) of greater than 130/85; or a fasting plasma glucose level (FPG) of greater than 110 mg/dl. Visceral fat accumulation was measured by abdominal CT scanning (N2system, K.K., Japan). WC positively correlated with visceral fat area as determined by CT scanning. WC also positively correlated with TG in both sexes and fasting blood sugar (FBS) in women, but negatively correlated with HDL-C in both sexes. The mean prevalence of MetS among subjects 40 to 70 years of age was 25.1% in men and 12.6% in women. To assess the incidence of MetS in the

  3. Urinary arsenic metabolism in a Western Chinese population exposed to high-dose inorganic arsenic in drinking water: Influence of ethnicity and genetic polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Songbo [Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, Key Lab of Etiology and Epidemiology, Education Bureau of Hei Long Jiang Province and Ministry of Health (23618104), Harbin 150081 (China); Wu, Jie [Laboratory of Medical Genetics, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China); Li, Yuanyuan [Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, Key Lab of Etiology and Epidemiology, Education Bureau of Hei Long Jiang Province and Ministry of Health (23618104), Harbin 150081 (China); Liu, Yan [Department of Health Statistics, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150081 (China); Gao, Yanhui; Yao, Feifei [Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, Key Lab of Etiology and Epidemiology, Education Bureau of Hei Long Jiang Province and Ministry of Health (23618104), Harbin 150081 (China); Qiu, Chuanying [Dongcheng District Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100009 (China); Song, Li; Wu, Yu [Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, Key Lab of Etiology and Epidemiology, Education Bureau of Hei Long Jiang Province and Ministry of Health (23618104), Harbin 150081 (China); Liao, Yongjian [Gansu Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 730020 (China); Sun, Dianjun, E-mail: hrbmusdj@163.com [Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Harbin Medical University, Key Lab of Etiology and Epidemiology, Education Bureau of Hei Long Jiang Province and Ministry of Health (23618104), Harbin 150081 (China)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the differences in urinary arsenic metabolism patterns of individuals exposed to a high concentration of inorganic arsenic (iAs) in drinking water, an epidemiological investigation was conducted with 155 individuals living in a village where the arsenic concentration in the drinking water was 969 μg/L. Blood and urine samples were collected from 66 individuals including 51 cases with skin lesions and 15 controls without skin lesions. The results showed that monomethylated arsenic (MMA), the percentage of MMA (%MMA) and the ratio of MMA to iAs (MMA/iAs) were significantly increased in patients with skin lesions as compared to controls, while dimethylated arsenic (DMA), the percentage of DMA (%DMA) and the ratio of DMA to MMA (DMA/MMA) were significantly reduced. The percent DMA of individuals with the Ala/Asp genotype of glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) was significantly lower than those with Ala/Ala. The percent MMA of individuals with the A2B/A2B genotype of arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) was significantly lower than those with AB/A2B. The iAs and total arsenic (tAs) content in the urine of a Tibetan population were significantly higher than that of Han and Hui ethnicities, whereas MMA/iAs was significantly lower than that of Han and Hui ethnicities. Our results showed that when exposed to the same arsenic environment, different individuals exhibited different urinary arsenic metabolism patterns. Gender and ethnicity affect these differences and above polymorphisms may be effectors too. - Highlights: • We first survey a village with high iAs content in the drinking water (969 μg/L). • 90 villagers suffered typical skin lesions with a morbidity rate of 58%. • Cases exhibited higher %MMA and MMA/iAs, and lower %DMA and DMA/MMA than controls. • Gender and ethnicity affect the differences of iAs methylation metabolism levels. • GSTO1 and AS3MT gene polymorphisms may be factors too.

  4. Diversity, metabolic properties and arsenic mobilization potential of indigenous bacteria in arsenic contaminated groundwater of West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kazy, Sufia K; Gupta, Ashok K; Pal, Taraknath; Sar, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) mobilization in alluvial aquifers is caused by a complex interplay of hydro-geo-microbiological activities. Nevertheless, diversity and biogeochemical significance of indigenous bacteria in Bengal Delta Plain are not well documented. We have deciphered bacterial community compositions and metabolic properties in As contaminated groundwater of West Bengal to define their role in As mobilization. Groundwater samples showed characteristic high As, low organic carbon and reducing property. Culture-independent and -dependent analyses revealed presence of diverse, yet near consistent community composition mostly represented by genera Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Brevundimonas, Polaromonas, Rhodococcus, Methyloversatilis and Methylotenera. Along with As-resistance and -reductase activities, abilities to metabolize a wide range carbon substrates including long chain and polyaromatic hydrocarbons and HCO3, As3+ as electron donor and As5+/Fe3+ as terminal electron acceptor during anaerobic growth were frequently observed within the cultivable bacteria. Genes encoding cytosolic As5+ reductase (arsC) and As3+ efflux/transporter [arsB and acr3(2)] were found to be more abundant than the dissimilatory As5+ reductase gene arrA. The observed metabolic characteristics showed a good agreement with the same derived from phylogenetic lineages of constituent populations. Selected bacterial strains incubated anaerobically over 300 days using natural orange sand of Pleistocene aquifer showed release of soluble As mostly as As3+ along with several other elements (Al, Fe, Mn, K, etc.). Together with the production of oxalic acid within the biotic microcosms, change in sediment composition and mineralogy indicated dissolution of orange sand coupled with As/Fe reduction. Presence of arsC gene, As5+ reductase activity and oxalic acid production by the bacteria were found to be closely related to their ability to mobilize sediment bound As. Overall observations suggest that

  5. Diversity, metabolic properties and arsenic mobilization potential of indigenous bacteria in arsenic contaminated groundwater of West Bengal, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Paul

    Full Text Available Arsenic (As mobilization in alluvial aquifers is caused by a complex interplay of hydro-geo-microbiological activities. Nevertheless, diversity and biogeochemical significance of indigenous bacteria in Bengal Delta Plain are not well documented. We have deciphered bacterial community compositions and metabolic properties in As contaminated groundwater of West Bengal to define their role in As mobilization. Groundwater samples showed characteristic high As, low organic carbon and reducing property. Culture-independent and -dependent analyses revealed presence of diverse, yet near consistent community composition mostly represented by genera Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Brevundimonas, Polaromonas, Rhodococcus, Methyloversatilis and Methylotenera. Along with As-resistance and -reductase activities, abilities to metabolize a wide range carbon substrates including long chain and polyaromatic hydrocarbons and HCO3, As3+ as electron donor and As5+/Fe3+ as terminal electron acceptor during anaerobic growth were frequently observed within the cultivable bacteria. Genes encoding cytosolic As5+ reductase (arsC and As3+ efflux/transporter [arsB and acr3(2] were found to be more abundant than the dissimilatory As5+ reductase gene arrA. The observed metabolic characteristics showed a good agreement with the same derived from phylogenetic lineages of constituent populations. Selected bacterial strains incubated anaerobically over 300 days using natural orange sand of Pleistocene aquifer showed release of soluble As mostly as As3+ along with several other elements (Al, Fe, Mn, K, etc.. Together with the production of oxalic acid within the biotic microcosms, change in sediment composition and mineralogy indicated dissolution of orange sand coupled with As/Fe reduction. Presence of arsC gene, As5+ reductase activity and oxalic acid production by the bacteria were found to be closely related to their ability to mobilize sediment bound As. Overall observations

  6. Creatinine, arsenic metabolism, and renal function in an arsenic-exposed population in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandilyn A Peters

    Full Text Available Kidney disease is emerging as an arsenic (As-linked disease outcome, however further evidence of this association is warranted. Our first objective for this paper was to examine the potential renal toxicity of As exposure in Bangladesh. Our second objective relates to examining whether the previously reported positive association between urinary creatinine (uCrn and As methylation may be explained by renal function. We had hypothesized that these associations relate to supply and demand for s-adenosylmethionine, the methyl donor for both creatine synthesis and As methylation. Alternatively, renal function could influence both As and creatinine excretion, or the As metabolites may influence renal function, which in turn influences uCrn. We conducted a cross-sectional study (N = 478 of adults, composed of a sample recruited in 2001 and a sample recruited in 2003. We assessed renal function using plasma cystatin C, and calculated the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. Consistent with renal toxicity of As, log-uAs had a marginal inverse association with eGFR in the 2003 sample (b = -5.6, p = 0.07, however this association was not significant in the 2001 sample (b = -1.9, p = 0.24. Adjustment for eGFR did not alter the associations between uCrn and the %uAs metabolites, indicating that GFR does not explain these associations. Increased eGFR was associated with increased odds of having %uInAs >12.2% (2001: OR = 1.01, 95%CI (1.00,1.03; 2003: OR = 1.04, 95%CI (1.01,1.07. In the 2003 sample only, there was a negative association between eGFR and %uDMA (b = -0.08, p = 0.02. These results may indicate differential effects of renal function on excretion of InAs and DMA. Alternatively, a certain methylation pattern, involving decreased %InAs and increased %DMA, may reduce renal function. Given that these studies were cross-sectional, we cannot distinguish between these two possibilities. Discrepancies between the

  7. Effects of exogenous glutathione on arsenic burden and NO metabolism in brain of mice exposed to arsenite through drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan [China Medical University, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Heping District, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Liaoning University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Department of Public Health Management, School of Professional Technology, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Zhao, Fenghong; Jin, Yaping; Zhong, Yuan; Yu, Xiaoyun; Li, Gexin; Lv, Xiuqiang; Sun, Guifan [China Medical University, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Heping District, Shenyang, Liaoning (China)

    2011-03-15

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) is associated with neurotoxicity. Studies to date have disclosed that methylation of ingested iAs is the main metabolic pathway, and it is a process relying on reduced glutathione (GSH). The aim of this study was to explore the effects of exogenous GSH on arsenic burden and metabolism of nitric oxide (NO) in the brain of mice exposed to arsenite via drinking water. Mice were exposed to sodium arsenite through drinking water contaminated with 50 mg/L arsenic for 4 weeks and treated intraperitoneally with saline solution, 200 mg/kg body weight (b.w), 400 mg/kg b.w, or 800 mg/kg b.w GSH, respectively, at the 4th week. Levels of iAs, monomethylarsenic acid, and dimethylarsenic acid (DMAs) in the liver, blood, and brain were determined by method of hydride generation coupled with atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Activities of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and contents of NO in the brain were determined by colorimetric method. Compared with mice exposed to arsenite alone, administration of GSH increased dose-dependently the primary and secondary methylation ratio in the liver, which caused the decrease in percent iAs and increase in percent DMAs in the liver, as a consequence, resulted in significant decrease in iAs levels in the blood and total arsenic levels in both blood and brain. NOS activities and NO levels in the brain of mice in iAs group were significantly lower than those in control; however, administration of GSH could increase significantly activities of NOS and contents of NO. Findings from this study suggested that exogenous GSH could promote both primary and secondary arsenic methylation capacity in the liver, which might facilitate excretion of arsenicals, and consequently reduce arsenic burden in both blood and brain and furthermore ameliorate the effects of arsenicals on NO metabolism in the brain. (orig.)

  8. Simultaneous occurrence of metabolic, hematologic, neurologic and cardiac complications after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Merve; Gundogdu, Yasemin; Karsli, Merve; Ozben, Volkan; Onder, Fatih Oguz; Baca, Bilgi

    2016-10-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is a commonly performed procedure in the surgical treatment of morbid obesity. Since a major anatomical alteration is made, this procedure may lead to significant postoperative complications, including nutritional deficiencies related to malabsorption. As a consequence of micronutrient deficiencies, secondary metabolic, hematologic and neurologic complications might also develop. Each of these complications is well reported in the literature; however, there are limited data on the simultaneous occurrence of these complications in a single patient. In this report, we aimed to present the diagnosis and management of metabolic, hematologic, neurologic and cardiac complications, which occurred simultaneously in a 57-year-old female patient after undergoing laparoscopic RYGB procedure.

  9. Differential response of oxidative stress and thiol metabolism in contrasting rice genotypes for arsenic tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Preeti; Mishra, Aradhana; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Trivedi, Prabodh K; Singh, Rana Pratap; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2012-05-01

    The mechanism of arsenic (As) tolerance was investigated on two contrasting rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes, selected for As tolerance and accumulation. One tolerant (Triguna) and one sensitive (IET-4786) variety were exposed to various arsenate (0-50 μM) levels for 7 d for biochemical analyses. Arsenic induced oxidative stress was more pronounced in IET-4786 than Triguna especially in terms of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, EC and pro-oxidant enzymes (NADPH oxidase and ascorbate oxidase). However, Triguna tolerated As stress through the enhanced enzymes activities particularly pertaining to thiol metabolism such as serine acetyl transferase (SAT), cysteine synthase (CS), γ-glutamyl cysteine synthase (γ-ECS), γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (γ-GT), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) as well as arsenate reductase (AR). Besides maintaining the ratio of redox couples GSH/GSSG and ASC/DHA, the level of phytochelatins (PCs) and phytochelatin synthase (PCS) activity were more pronounced in Triguna, in which harmonized responses of thiol metabolism was responsible for As tolerance in contrast to IET-4786 showing its susceptible nature towards As exposure.

  10. Urine arsenic methylated metabolism in mice exposed to acute arsenic%急性砷暴露小鼠尿砷甲基化代谢的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董丹丹; 王欣; 赵朔; 段晓旭; 李炜; 李冰

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the level of urine arsenic excretion and methylated metabolism pattern in mice exposed to acute arsenic. Methods Healthy female Kunming mice were exposed to sodium arsenite ( NaAsO2) by intragastric infusion at doses of 2.5 mg/kg, 5.0 mg/kg, 10.0 mg/kg and 20.0 mg/kg, the exposure time for each group were 12 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours. The mice were placed in metabolic cages and urine samples of 24 - hour group were collected (urine samples of 12 hours were collect from 12 - hour group) before the end of exposure day. The level of inorganic arsenic (iAs) , monomethy-lated arsenic [ MMA) and dimethylated arsenic ( DMA) in urine were determined by cold trap hydride generation atomic absorption spectrophotometer respectively, the level of T-As, iAs% , MMA% , DMA% , primary methylation index (PMI) and secondary methylation index ( SMI) were calculated. Results Urine T - As level, iAs% and MMA in the mice exposed to acute arsenic increased significantly with the increase of arsenic concentration, but DMA% and SMI decreased with stable PMI. With the increase of time after exposure, urine T - As level, iAs% and MMA% gradually decreased, while DMA% , PMI and SMI increased significantly. The most urine arsenic were excreted within 24 hours, and its percentage content and methylation index were at same level, the level of urine arsenic excretion was very low in 48 - hour and 72 hour groups and their percentage content and methylation index were at same level. Conclusion Urine arsenic excretion in mice exposed to acute arsenic has obvious dose deffect relation and time - effect relation; High concentration of arsenic exposure may effectively inhibit methylated metabolism , and urine arsenic content within 24 hours could be used as an indicator to determine the arsenic burden of an acute arsenic poisoned body.%目的 探讨急性砷暴露小鼠尿砷排泄及其甲基化代谢模式.方法 健康雌性昆明种小鼠一次性灌

  11. Influence of diet, vitamin, tea, trace elements and exogenous antioxidants on arsenic metabolism and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiyan; Liu, Su; Li, Mei; Wu, Bing

    2016-04-01

    Health risk of arsenic (As) has received increasing attention. Acute and chronic exposure to As could cause several detrimental effects on human health. As toxicity is closely related to its bioaccessibility and metabolism. In real environment, many factors, such as diet and nutrition, can influence As bioaccessibility, metabolism and toxicity. This paper mainly reviews the influences of diets and elements on As bioaccessibility, metabolism and toxicity and their underlying mechanisms to provide suggestions for future investigations. Vitamins, jaggery, fruit, tea, glutathione, N-acetylcysteine and zinc could reduce the As-induced toxicity by increasing antioxidative enzymes to antagonize oxidative stress caused by As and/or increasing As methylation. However, bean and betel nut could increase risk of skin lesions caused by As. Interestingly, high-fat diet, selenium and iron have incompatible effects on As bioaccessibility, metabolism and toxicity in different experimental conditions. Based on current literatures, the As methylation and As-induced oxidative damage might be two main ways that the diets and elements influence As toxicity. Combined application of in vitro human cell lines and gastrointestinal models might be useful tools to simultaneously characterize the changes in As bioaccessibility and toxicity in the future research. PMID:26169729

  12. Genome-wide association study identifies chromosome 10q24.32 variants associated with arsenic metabolism and toxicity phenotypes in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Pierce

    Full Text Available Arsenic contamination of drinking water is a major public health issue in many countries, increasing risk for a wide array of diseases, including cancer. There is inter-individual variation in arsenic metabolism efficiency and susceptibility to arsenic toxicity; however, the basis of this variation is not well understood. Here, we have performed the first genome-wide association study (GWAS of arsenic-related metabolism and toxicity phenotypes to improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which arsenic affects health. Using data on urinary arsenic metabolite concentrations and approximately 300,000 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for 1,313 arsenic-exposed Bangladeshi individuals, we identified genome-wide significant association signals (P<5×10(-8 for percentages of both monomethylarsonic acid (MMA and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA near the AS3MT gene (arsenite methyltransferase; 10q24.32, with five genetic variants showing independent associations. In a follow-up analysis of 1,085 individuals with arsenic-induced premalignant skin lesions (the classical sign of arsenic toxicity and 1,794 controls, we show that one of these five variants (rs9527 is also associated with skin lesion risk (P = 0.0005. Using a subset of individuals with prospectively measured arsenic (n = 769, we show that rs9527 interacts with arsenic to influence incident skin lesion risk (P = 0.01. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL analyses of genome-wide expression data from 950 individual's lymphocyte RNA suggest that several of our lead SNPs represent cis-eQTLs for AS3MT (P = 10(-12 and neighboring gene C10orf32 (P = 10(-44, which are involved in C10orf32-AS3MT read-through transcription. This is the largest and most comprehensive genomic investigation of arsenic metabolism and toxicity to date, the only GWAS of any arsenic-related trait, and the first study to implicate 10q24.32 variants in both arsenic metabolism and arsenical

  13. The Arsenic Cycle in Searles Lake, California: An Arsenic-Rich, Salt-Saturated Soda Lake. II. Isolation of Arsenic-Metabolizing Microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Stolz, J. F.; Langley, S.; Beveridge, T. J.; Kulp, T. R.; Oremland, R. S.

    2004-12-01

    The motivation for isolating arsenic-metabolizing prokaryotes from Searles Lake was to characterize the physiology of microbes that can cope simultaneously with at least 3 environmental extremes: saturating salt concentration, high pH, and high dissolved inorganic arsenic. A secondary motivation was to find extremely halophilc Archaea that could respire As(V), as this has only been reported for the Crenarchaea. Enrichment cultures of arsenate [As(V)]-respirers were established by inoculating Searles Lake mud into an anaerobic, alkaline (pH = 9.8) artificial medium containing 346 g/L dissolved salts, with lactate as the electron donor and As(V) as the electron acceptor. After about 6 months of bi-weekly transfers, the enrichment was purified by serial dilution, with the highest growth-positive dilution tube exhibiting motile cells having uniform morphology (curved rods). This culture, strain SLAS-1, grew by oxidizing lactate to acetate plus carbon dioxide while reducing As(V) to arsenite [As(III)]. The doubling time was 48 hours at 346 g/L salinity, and nearly equivalent growth rates were observed over a salinity range of 200 to 346 g/l, with no growth evident below 200 g/L. The pH range was 8.5 to 10, with an optimum at 9.5. Strain SLAS-1 has an unusual motility that can be characterized as a "fish-like" swimming motion. Thin section electron micrographs revealed the presence of an internal cytoplasmic filament that runs the full length of the microorganism. We suggest that this filament may be involved in cellular motility. However, taxonomic classification of SLAS-1 made by 16S rRNA gene sequences aligned it in the order Haloanaerobacteriales of the Domain Bacteria. In a further effort to isolate haloalkaliphilic Archaea, a similar enrichment strategy was employed as above, but cell-wall antibiotics were added to the medium to discourage the growth of Bacteria. An enrichment culture, designated Serl-Ab, was established that oxidized lactate to acetate plus carbon

  14. Expression profiling of Crambe abyssinica under arsenate stress identifies genes and gene networks involved in arsenic metabolism and detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandasamy Suganthi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic contamination is widespread throughout the world and this toxic metalloid is known to cause cancers of organs such as liver, kidney, skin, and lung in human. In spite of a recent surge in arsenic related studies, we are still far from a comprehensive understanding of arsenic uptake, detoxification, and sequestration in plants. Crambe abyssinica, commonly known as 'abyssinian mustard', is a non-food, high biomass oil seed crop that is naturally tolerant to heavy metals. Moreover, it accumulates significantly higher levels of arsenic as compared to other species of the Brassicaceae family. Thus, C. abyssinica has great potential to be utilized as an ideal inedible crop for phytoremediation of heavy metals and metalloids. However, the mechanism of arsenic metabolism in higher plants, including C. abyssinica, remains elusive. Results To identify the differentially expressed transcripts and the pathways involved in arsenic metabolism and detoxification, C. abyssinica plants were subjected to arsenate stress and a PCR-Select Suppression Subtraction Hybridization (SSH approach was employed. A total of 105 differentially expressed subtracted cDNAs were sequenced which were found to represent 38 genes. Those genes encode proteins functioning as antioxidants, metal transporters, reductases, enzymes involved in the protein degradation pathway, and several novel uncharacterized proteins. The transcripts corresponding to the subtracted cDNAs showed strong upregulation by arsenate stress as confirmed by the semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusions Our study revealed novel insights into the plant defense mechanisms and the regulation of genes and gene networks in response to arsenate toxicity. The differential expression of transcripts encoding glutathione-S-transferases, antioxidants, sulfur metabolism, heat-shock proteins, metal transporters, and enzymes in the ubiquitination pathway of protein degradation as well as several unknown

  15. Renal and Neurologic Effects of Cadmium, Lead, Mercury, and Arsenic in Children: Evidence of Early Effects and Multiple Interactions at Environmental Exposure Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Burbure, Claire; Buchet, Jean-Pierre; Leroyer, Ariane; Nisse, Catherine; Haguenoer, Jean-Marie; Mutti, Antonio; Smerhovský, Zdenek; Cikrt, Miroslav; Trzcinka-Ochocka, Malgorzata; Razniewska, Grazyna; Jakubowski, Marek; Bernard, Alfred

    2006-01-01

    Lead, cadmium, mercury, and arsenic are common environmental pollutants in industrialized countries, but their combined impact on children’s health is little known. We studied their effects on two main targets, the renal and dopaminergic systems, in > 800 children during a cross-sectional European survey. Control and exposed children were recruited from those living around historical nonferrous smelters in France, the Czech Republic, and Poland. Children provided blood and urine samples for the determination of the metals and sensitive renal or neurologic biomarkers. Serum concentrations of creatinine, cystatin C, and β2-microglobulin were negatively correlated with blood lead levels (PbB), suggesting an early renal hyperfiltration that averaged 7% in the upper quartile of PbB levels (> 55 μg/L; mean, 78.4 μg/L). The urinary excretion of retinol-binding protein, Clara cell protein, and N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase was associated mainly with cadmium levels in blood or urine and with urinary mercury. All four metals influenced the dopaminergic markers serum prolactin and urinary homovanillic acid, with complex interactions brought to light. Heavy metals polluting the environment can cause subtle effects on children’s renal and dopaminergic systems without clear evidence of a threshold, which reinforces the need to control and regulate potential sources of contamination by heavy metals. PMID:16581550

  16. Neurological effects of inorganic arsenic exposure: altered cysteine/glutamate transport, NMDA expression and spatial memory impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio A Ramos-Chávez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic arsenic (iAs is an important natural pollutant. Millions of individuals worldwide drink water with high levels of iAs. Chronic exposure to iAs has been associated with lower IQ and learning disabilities as well as memory impairment. iAs is methylated in tissues such as the brain generating mono and dimethylated species. iAs methylation requires cellular glutathione (GSH, which is the main antioxidant in the central nervous system. In humans, As species cross the placenta and are found in cord blood. A CD1 mouse model was used to investigate effects of gestational iAs exposure which can lead to oxidative damage, disrupted cysteine/glutamate transport and its putative impact in learning and memory. On postnatal days (PNDs 1, 15 and 90, the expression of membrane transporters related to GSH synthesis and glutamate transport and toxicity, such as xCT, EAAC1, GLAST and GLT1, as well as LAT1, were analyzed. Also, the expression of the glutamate receptor N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDAR subunits NR2A and B as well as the presence of As species in cortex and hippocampus were investigated. On PND 90, an object location task was performed to associate exposure with memory impairment. Gestational exposure to iAs affected the expression of cysteine/glutamate transporters in cortex and hippocampus and induced a negative modulation of NMDAR NR2B subunit in the hippocampus. Behavioral tasks showed significant spatial memory impairment in males while the effect was marginal in females.

  17. Mutations in mitochondrial enzyme GPT2 cause metabolic dysfunction and neurological disease with developmental and progressive features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Qing; Nakayama, Tojo; Baytas, Ozan; Davidson, Shawn M; Yang, Chendong; Schmidt, Michael; Lizarraga, Sofia B; Mishra, Sasmita; Ei-Quessny, Malak; Niaz, Saima; Gul Butt, Mirrat; Imran Murtaza, Syed; Javed, Afzal; Chaudhry, Haroon Rashid; Vaughan, Dylan J; Hill, R Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N; Yoo, Seung-Yun; Lam, Anh-Thu N; Nasir, Ramzi; Al-Saffar, Muna; Barkovich, A James; Schwede, Matthew; Nagpal, Shailender; Rajab, Anna; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Housman, David E; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H; Morrow, Eric M

    2016-09-20

    Mutations that cause neurological phenotypes are highly informative with regard to mechanisms governing human brain function and disease. We report autosomal recessive mutations in the enzyme glutamate pyruvate transaminase 2 (GPT2) in large kindreds initially ascertained for intellectual and developmental disability (IDD). GPT2 [also known as alanine transaminase 2 (ALT2)] is one of two related transaminases that catalyze the reversible addition of an amino group from glutamate to pyruvate, yielding alanine and α-ketoglutarate. In addition to IDD, all affected individuals show postnatal microcephaly and ∼80% of those followed over time show progressive motor symptoms, a spastic paraplegia. Homozygous nonsense p.Arg404* and missense p.Pro272Leu mutations are shown biochemically to be loss of function. The GPT2 gene demonstrates increasing expression in brain in the early postnatal period, and GPT2 protein localizes to mitochondria. Akin to the human phenotype, Gpt2-null mice exhibit reduced brain growth. Through metabolomics and direct isotope tracing experiments, we find a number of metabolic abnormalities associated with loss of Gpt2. These include defects in amino acid metabolism such as low alanine levels and elevated essential amino acids. Also, we find defects in anaplerosis, the metabolic process involved in replenishing TCA cycle intermediates. Finally, mutant brains demonstrate misregulated metabolites in pathways implicated in neuroprotective mechanisms previously associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Overall, our data reveal an important role for the GPT2 enzyme in mitochondrial metabolism with relevance to developmental as well as potentially to neurodegenerative mechanisms. PMID:27601654

  18. Neurological, Metabolic, and Psychiatric Adverse Events in Children and Adolescents Treated With Aripiprazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Klaus Damgaard; Bruhn, Christina Hedegaard; Pagsberg, Anne-Katrine; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Nielsen, Jimmi

    2016-10-01

    Aripiprazole is a partial dopamine agonist with only minor neurological and psychiatric adverse effects, making it a potential first-line drug for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. However, the evidence of its use in children and adolescents is rather sparse. The aim of this case study is to discuss adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports concerning aripiprazole-associated neurological and psychiatric events in children and adolescents. The ADR report database at Danish Medicines Agency was searched for all ADRs involving children and adolescents (disorders (PS group) and nonpsychotic disorders (non-PS group). The PS group consisted of 5 patients with schizophrenia and psychoses, not otherwise specified; and the non-PS group consisted of fourteen cases including autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and Tourette syndrome. The main reported adverse effects in the non-PS group were chronic insomnia, Parkinsonism, behavioral changes psychoses, and weight gain, whereas the adverse effects in the PS group was predominantly anxiety, convulsions, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Although aripiprazole is considered safe and well tolerated in children and adolescents, severe adverse events as neuroleptic malignant syndrome, extreme insomnia, and suicidal behavior has been reported to health authorities. Clinicians should pay attention to these possible hazards when prescribing aripiprazole to this vulnerable group of patients. PMID:27504593

  19. Sulfur metabolism: different tolerances of two aquatic macrophytes exposed to arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leão, G A; Oliveira, J A; Farnese, F S; Gusman, G S; Felipe, R T A

    2014-07-01

    The toxicity of arsenic (As) and the mechanisms of response to this pollutant were analyzed in two aquatic plant species, one sensitive and one tolerant to the pollutant, Salvinia minima and Lemna gibba, respectively. The plants, grown in nutrient solution at pH 6.5, were exposed to As concentrations of 0.0 and 1.0mgL(-1) for 3 days. Both species accumulated As in their tissues, which resulted in increases in H2O2 production. L. gibba accumulated eleven times more As than S. minima. However, L. gibba was more tolerant, as shown by the absence of cell membrane damage and, despite greater accumulation, smaller growth reduction than S. minima. Indeed, the index of tolerance to As was twenty percent higher in L. gibba than in S. minima, which most likely results from the presence of a more efficient defense system. This defense system in L. gibba is most likely based on sulfate absorption, assimilation and metabolism. L. gibba showed an increase in sulfate absorption and adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) sulfurylase activity (the first enzyme of the inorganic sulfate assimilation pathway) following exposure to As. Consequently, the plant produced greater concentrations of sulfur-containing compounds that are involved in cellular detoxification, such as glutathione and non-protein thiols, and demonstrated greater enzymatic activity of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, glutathione S-transferase and glutathione reductase. Therefore, the plant׳s ability to increase absorption, assimilation and metabolism of sulfur are key steps for tolerance to oxidative stress triggered by metals. PMID:24780231

  20. Ethnic characterization of a population of children exposed to high doses of arsenic via drinking water and a possible correlation with metabolic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobillo, Cecilia; Navoni, Julio A; Olmos, Valentina; Merini, Luciano J; Villaamil Lepori, Edda; Corach, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Because the ratio between the two major arsenic metabolites is related to the adverse health effects of arsenic, numerous studies have been performed to establish a relationship between the ability to metabolically detoxify arsenic and other variables, including exposure level, gender, age and ethnicity. Because ethnicity may play a key role and provide relevant information for heterogeneous populations, we characterized a group of 70 children from rural schools in the Argentinean provinces of Chaco and Santiago del Estero who were exposed to high levels of arsenic. We used genetic markers for maternal, paternal and bi-parental ancestry to achieve this goal. Our results demonstrate that the Amerindian maternal linages are present in 100% of the samples, whereas the Amerindian component transmitted through the paternal line is less than 10%. Informative markers for autosomal ancestry show a predominantly European ancestry, in which 37% of the samples contained between 90 and 99% European ancestry. The native American component ranged from 50 to 80% in 15.7% of the samples, and in all but four samples, the African component was less than 10%. Correlation analysis demonstrated that the ethnicity and the ratio of the excreted arsenic metabolites monomethyl arsenic and dimethyl arsenic are not associated, dismissing a relationship between ethnic origin and differential metabolism. PMID:24596592

  1. Metabolic and neurological patterns in chronic cerebral infarction: a single-voxel {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, K. [Department of Neurosurgery, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, North-15, West-7, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060 (Japan); Houkin, K. [Department of Neurosurgery, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, North-15, West-7, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060 (Japan); Iwasaki, Y. [Department of Neurosurgery, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, North-15, West-7, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060 (Japan); Abe, H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, North-15, West-7, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060 (Japan); Kashiwaba, T. [Kashiwaba Neurosurgical Hospital, Hokkaido (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    The details of brain metabolism in chronic cerebral infarcts have not been clarified. Using proton MR spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS) at 1.5 T, we measured biochemical changes in 16 patients with large infarcts involving the motor cortex in the chronic phase (median 293.9 days) and related the findings to clinical data. Localised spectra were obtained using point-resolved spectroscopy, with an echo time of 270 ms. Regions of interest were placed on the frontal lobe, including the precentral gyrus and central sulcus. Motor function was assessed by the manual muscle power test at the time of the {sup 1}H-MRS study. Only three patients with severe paresis had no signal in the lesions and a lactate signal was obtained in 13 cases. N -acetyl aspartate (NAA) was observed in 4 cases with recanalisation of an occluded vessel. Motor function correlated strongly with the NAA/choline-containing compounds (Cho) ratio (P < 0.01) and lactate/Cho ratio (P < 0.01). We found various metabolic patterns, reflecting residual neurological function. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Altered white matter metabolism in delayed neurologic sequelae after carbon monoxide poisoning: A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Hiroshi; Fujihara, Kazuo; Mugikura, Shunji; Takahashi, Shoki; Kushimoto, Shigeki; Aoki, Masashi

    2016-01-15

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was recently used to examine altered metabolism in the white matter (WM) of patients experiencing carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning; however, only a small number of patients with delayed neurologic sequelae (DNS) were analyzed. We aimed to detect altered metabolism in the WM of patients with DNS using (1)H-MRS; to explore its clinical relevance in the management of patients experiencing CO poisoning. Patients experiencing acute CO poisoning underwent (1)H-MRS and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination within 1week and at 1month after acute poisoning. Metabolites including choline-containing compounds (Cho), creatine (Cr), N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and lactate were measured from the periventricular WM. Myelin basic protein (MBP) concentrations were measured in CSF. Fifty-two patients experiencing acute CO poisoning (15 with DNS, 37 without DNS; median age, 49years; 65% males) underwent (1)H-MRS. Within 1week, NAA/Cr ratios, reflecting neuroaxonal viability, were lower in patients with DNS than in those without DNS (PDNS, Cho/Cr ratios were higher, and NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios lower in patients with DNS (P=0.0001, DNS development; (1)H-MRS at 1month may be useful for discriminating patients with DNS and predicting long-term outcomes. PMID:26723994

  3. Microprobe XRF mapping and XAS investigations of the intracellular metabolism of arsenic for understanding arsenic-induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Kristie L; Mariana, Anna; Klavins, Andrejs I; Foster, Amalanie J; Lai, Barry; Vogt, Stefan; Cai, ZhongHou; Harris, Hugh H; Dillon, Carolyn T

    2008-09-01

    Arsenic (As) is responsible for mass-poisonings worldwide following the ingestion of As-contaminated drinking water. Importantly, however, As toxicity is exploited in the antileukemia drug, Trisenox (As2O3), which successfully cures 65-80% of patients suffering relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia. In an effort to determine the intracellular organelle and biomolecular targets of As, microprobe X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) analyses were performed on HepG2 cells following their exposure to high doses of arsenite (1 mM) or arsenate (20 mM). Microprobe XRF elemental mapping of thin-sectioned cells showed As accumulation in the euchromatin region of the cell nucleus (following arsenite exposure) synonymous with As targeting of DNA or proteins involved in DNA transcription. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of arsenite-treated cells, however, showed the predominance of an As tris-sulfur species, providing increased credence to As interactions with nuclear proteins as a key factor in As-induced toxicity. PMID:18597498

  4. Designing and implementing a longitudinal study of children with neurological, genetic or metabolic conditions: charting the territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Betty

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with progressive metabolic, neurological, or chromosomal conditions and their families anticipate an unknown lifespan, endure unstable and often painful symptoms, and cope with erratic emotional and spiritual crises as the condition progresses along an uncertain trajectory towards death. Much is known about the genetics and pathophysiology of these diseases, but very little has been documented about the trajectory of symptoms for children with these conditions or the associated experience of their families. A longitudinal study design will help to close this gap in knowledge. Methods/Design Charting the Territory is a longitudinal descriptive, correlational study currently underway with children 0-19 years who are diagnosed with progressive neurological, metabolic, or chromosomal conditions and their families. The purpose of the study is to determine and document the clinical progression of the condition and the associated bio-psychosocial-spiritual experiences of the parents and siblings age 7-18 years. Approximately 300 families, both newly diagnosed children and those with established conditions, are being recruited in six Canadian cities. Children and their families are being followed for a minimum of 18 months, depending on when they enroll in the study. Family data collection will continue after the child's death if the child dies during the study period. Data collection includes monthly parental assessment of the child's symptoms; an annual functional assessment of the child; and completion of established instruments every 6 months by parents to assess family functioning, marital satisfaction, health status, anxiety, depression, stress, burden, grief, spirituality, and growth, and by siblings to assess coping and health. Impact of participation on parents is assessed after 1 year and at the end of the study. Chart reviews are conducted at enrollment and at the conclusion of the study or at the time of the

  5. ARSENIC SPECIATION ANALYSIS IN HUMAN SALIVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Determination of arsenic species in human saliva is potentially useful for biomonitoring of human exposure to arsenic and for studying arsenic metabolism. However, there is no report on the speciation analysis of arsenic in saliva. Methods: Arsenic species in saliva ...

  6. Ethnic differences in five intronic polymorphisms associated with arsenic metabolism within human arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human arsenic (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) is known to catalyze the methylation of arsenite, and intronic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs: G7395A, G12390C, T14215C, T35587C, and G35991A) in the AS3MT gene were shown to be related to inter-individual variation in the arsenic metabolism. In the present study, the genotyping for these SNPs was developed using the polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism technique. Applying this method, the genotype distribution among the Ovambo, Turkish, Mongolian, Korean, and Japanese populations was investigated, and our results were compared with those from other studies. G7395, G12390, T35587, and A35991 were predominant among the five populations in our study. However, a previous study in Argentina, C12390 and G35991 showed the highest allele frequency among the eight populations studied in other studies. The dominant allele of T14215C differed among populations: the T14215 allele was predominant in Argentina, the allele frequency of C14215 was higher than that of T14215 among Turks, Mongolians, Europeans, and American ancestry. In Korea and Japan, similar allele frequencies were observed in T14215 and C14215. Higher allele frequencies were observed in haplotype G7395/G12390/C14215/T35587 with frequencies of 0.40 (Turks), 0.28 (Mongolians), and 0.23 (Koreans). On the other hand, the allele frequency for G7395/G14215/T35587/A35991 was the highest among the Ovambos (0.32), and the frequency for G7395/G12390/C35587/G35991 was the highest among the Japanese (0.27). It is noteworthy that the Japanese haplotype differs from that of the Koreans and Mongolians, which indicates the importance of investigating other intronic polymorphisms in AS3MT, especially in Asians

  7. The effect of arsenic contamination on amino acids metabolism in Spinacia oleracea L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlík, Milan; Pavlíková, Daniela; Staszková, Ludmila; Neuberg, Marek; Kaliszová, Regina; Száková, Jirina; Tlustos, Pavel

    2010-09-01

    Changes of amino acid concentrations (proline, glutamate, asparagine, aspartate, alanine) and glutamate kinase activity (GKA) in plants under arsenic chronic stress reported here reveal their role in plant arsenic stress adaptation. Results of the pot experiment confirmed the toxic effect of arsenic at tested levels (As1=25 mg As kg(-1) soil, As2=50 mg As kg(-1) soil, As3=75 mg As kg(-1) soil) for spinach. Growing available arsenic contents in soil were associated with the strong inhibition of above-ground biomass and with the enhancement of As plant content. The changes of glutamate, asparagine, aspartate and proline levels in the plants showed strong linear dependences on arsenic concentration in plants (R2=0.60-0.90). Compared to the untreated control, concentrations of free proline and aspartate of As3 treatment were enhanced up to 381% and 162%, respectively. The significant changes of glutamate were observed on As2 and As3 treatments (increased level up to 188, i.e. 617%). Arsenic in plants was shown to be an inhibitor of glutamase kinase activity (R2=0.91). Inhibition of GKA resulted in an increase in the content of glutamate that is used in synthesis of phytochelatins in plant cells. Concentration of alanine did not have a confirmed linear dependence on arsenic concentration in plant (R2=0.05). The changes of its concentrations could be affected by changes of pH in plant cell or induction of alanine aminotransferase by hypoxia.

  8. Mathematical model of uptake and metabolism of arsenic(III in human hepatocytes - Incorporation of cellular antioxidant response and threshold-dependent behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isukapalli Sastry S

    2011-01-01

    processes that influence arsenic metabolism by explicitly modelling the metabolic network of GSH-adducts formation. The parametric comparison with the TK model developed for rats suggests that the variability in GSH conjugation could have an important role in inter-species variability of arsenical methylation. The TK model can be incorporated into larger-scale physiologically based toxicokinetic (PBTK models of arsenic for improving the estimates of PBTK model parameters.

  9. Reduced arsenic accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) shoot involves sulfur mediated improved thiol metabolism, antioxidant system and altered arsenic transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Garima; Singh, Amit Pal; Kumar, Amit; Mishra, Seema; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Kumar, Smita; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Pandey, Vivek; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2016-02-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination in rice is at alarming level as majority of rice growing regions are As contaminated such as South East Asia. Restricting the As in aerial parts of rice plant may be an effective strategy to reduce As contamination in food chain. Sulfur (S), an essential element for plant growth and development, plays a crucial role in diminishing heavy metal toxicity. Current study is designed to investigate the role of S to mitigate As toxicity in rice under different S regimes. High S (5 mM) treatment resulted in enhanced root As accumulation as well as prevented its entry in to shoot. Results of thiol metabolism indicate that As was complexed in plant roots through enhanced synthesis of phytochelatins. High S treatment also reduced the expression of OsLsi1 and OsLsi2, the potent transporters of As in rice. High S treatment enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes and mitigated the As induced oxidative stress. Thus from present study it is evident that proper supply of S nutrition may be helpful in prevention of As accumulation in aerial parts of plant as well as As induced toxicity.

  10. Reduced arsenic accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) shoot involves sulfur mediated improved thiol metabolism, antioxidant system and altered arsenic transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Garima; Singh, Amit Pal; Kumar, Amit; Mishra, Seema; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Kumar, Smita; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Pandey, Vivek; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2016-02-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination in rice is at alarming level as majority of rice growing regions are As contaminated such as South East Asia. Restricting the As in aerial parts of rice plant may be an effective strategy to reduce As contamination in food chain. Sulfur (S), an essential element for plant growth and development, plays a crucial role in diminishing heavy metal toxicity. Current study is designed to investigate the role of S to mitigate As toxicity in rice under different S regimes. High S (5 mM) treatment resulted in enhanced root As accumulation as well as prevented its entry in to shoot. Results of thiol metabolism indicate that As was complexed in plant roots through enhanced synthesis of phytochelatins. High S treatment also reduced the expression of OsLsi1 and OsLsi2, the potent transporters of As in rice. High S treatment enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes and mitigated the As induced oxidative stress. Thus from present study it is evident that proper supply of S nutrition may be helpful in prevention of As accumulation in aerial parts of plant as well as As induced toxicity. PMID:26741538

  11. Sulfur alleviates arsenic toxicity by reducing its accumulation and modulating proteome, amino acids and thiol metabolism in rice leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Garima; Singh, Amit Pal; Kumar, Amit; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Deeba, Farah; Kumar, Smita; Suman, Shankar; Adhikari, Bijan; Shukla, Yogeshwar; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Pandey, Vivek; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of water is a global concern and rice consumption is the biggest dietary exposure to human posing carcinogenic risks, predominantly in Asia. Sulfur (S) is involved in di-sulfide linkage in many proteins and plays crucial role in As detoxification. Present study explores role of variable S supply on rice leaf proteome, its inclination towards amino acids (AA) profile and non protein thiols under arsenite exposure. Analysis of 282 detected proteins on 2-DE gel revealed 113 differentially expressed proteins, out of which 80 were identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF. The identified proteins were mostly involved in glycolysis, TCA cycle, AA biosynthesis, photosynthesis, protein metabolism, stress and energy metabolism. Among these, glycolytic enzymes play a major role in AA biosynthesis that leads to change in AAs profiling. Proteins of glycolytic pathway, photosynthesis and energy metabolism were also validated by western blot analysis. Conclusively S supplementation reduced the As accumulation in shoot positively skewed thiol metabolism and glycolysis towards AA accumulation under AsIII stress.

  12. [Metabolic therapy in neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhivolupov, S A; Samartsev, I N; Rashidov, N A; Bodrova, T V; Vorob'eva, M N

    2013-01-01

    We studied the efficacy of rheosorbilact, an original infusion drug based on polyalcohols, in the complex therapy of patients with brain ischemia and diabetic neuropathy. Reosorbilact was used intravenously indrops 200-400 ml in day - 20 days. The primary endpoint of the study was the improvement of quality of life assessed with the SF-36 scale after 1 month of treatment. Patients with brain ischemia underwent neuropsychological tests and ultrasound duplex scanning of the carotid and vertebral arteries. In the group of patients with diabetic neuropathy, we evaluated the intensity of pain syndrome with the NRS, blood glucose level and electroneuromyography parameters of low extremities nerves. Some characteristics of acid-base balance were studied in patients of both groups. The results obtained in the study indicate the significant clinical effect of reosorbilact in patients with brain ischemia and diabetic neuropathy. PMID:23994919

  13. Concurrent subacute exposure to arsenic through drinking water and malathion via diet in male rats: effects on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naraharisetti, Suresh Babu [Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh (India); University of Washington, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Seattle, WA (United States); Aggarwal, Manoj [Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh (India); Institut fuer Arbeitsphysiologie an der Universitaet Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany); Sarkar, S.N.; Malik, J.K. [Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Izatnagar, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2008-08-15

    Arsenic is a known global groundwater contaminant, while malathion is one of the most widely used pesticides in agriculture and public health practices in the world. Here, we investigated whether repeated exposure to arsenic at the groundwater contamination levels and to malathion at sublethal levels exerts adverse effects on the hepatic drug-metabolizing system in rats, and whether concurrent exposure is more hazardous than the single agent. Male Wistar rats were exposed daily to 4 or 40 ppm of arsenic via drinking water, 50 or 500 ppm of malathion-mixed feed and in a similar fashion co-exposed to 4 ppm of arsenic and 50 ppm of malathion or 40 ppm of arsenic and 500 ppm of malathion for 28 days. At term, toxicity was assessed by evaluating changes in body weight, liver weight, levels of cytochrome P{sub 450} (CYP), cytochrome b{sub 5} and microsomal and cytosolic proteins, and activities of aminopyrine-N-demethylase (ANDM), aniline-P-hydroxylase (APH), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) in liver. Arsenic and malathion alone did not alter body weight and liver weight, but these were significantly decreased in both the co-exposed groups. These treatments decreased the activities of ANDM and APH and the levels of liver microsomal and cytosolic proteins, increased GST activity and had no effect on UGT activity. The effects of exposure to low-dose and high-dose combinations on the activities of either phase I or phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes and protein content were mostly similar to that produced by the respective low and high dose of either arsenic or malathion, except APH activity. The effect of arsenic (40 ppm) on APH activity was partially, but significantly, inhibited by malathion (500 ppm). Results indicate that the body or liver weights and the biochemical parameters were differentially affected in male rats following concurrent subacute exposure to arsenic and malathion, with the co-exposure appearing

  14. Arsenic as a food chain contaminant: mechanisms of plant uptake and metabolism and mitigation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang-Jie; McGrath, Steve P; Meharg, Andrew A

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is an environmental and food chain contaminant. Excessive accumulation of As, particularly inorganic arsenic (As(i)), in rice (Oryza sativa) poses a potential health risk to populations with high rice consumption. Rice is efficient at As accumulation owing to flooded paddy cultivation that leads to arsenite mobilization, and the inadvertent yet efficient uptake of arsenite through the silicon transport pathway. Iron, phosphorus, sulfur, and silicon interact strongly with As during its route from soil to plants. Plants take up arsenate through the phosphate transporters, and arsenite and undissociated methylated As species through the nodulin 26-like intrinsic (NIP) aquaporin channels. Arsenate is readily reduced to arsenite in planta, which is detoxified by complexation with thiol-rich peptides such as phytochelatins and/or vacuolar sequestration. A range of mitigation methods, from agronomic measures and plant breeding to genetic modification, may be employed to reduce As uptake by food crops.

  15. Arsenic Metabolism and Toxicity Influenced by Ferric Iron in Simulated Gastrointestinal Tract and the Roles of Gut Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiyan; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Liu, Su; Yu, Jing; Cheng, Shupei; Ren, Hong-Qiang; Ye, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Iron (Fe) is a common trace element in drinking water. However, little is known about how environmental concentrations of Fe affect the metabolism and toxicity of arsenic (As) in drinking water. In this study, influence of Fe at drinking water-related concentrations (0.1, 0.3, and 3 mg Fe (total)/L) on As metabolism and toxicity, and the roles of gut microbiota during this process were investigated by using in vitro Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem (SHIME). Results showed that Fe had ability to decrease bioaccessible As by coflocculation in small intestine. 0.1 and 0.3 mg/L Fe significantly increased As methylation in simulated transverse and descending colon. Gut microbiota played an important role in alteration of As species, and Fe could affect As metabolism by changing the gut microbiota. Bacteroides, Clostridium, Alistipes, and Bilophila had As resistance and potential ability to methylate As. Cytotoxicity assays of effluents from simulated colons showed that the low levels of Fe decreased As toxicity on human hepatoma cell line HepG2, which might be due to the increase of methylated As. When assessing the health risk of As in drinking water, the residual Fe should be considered. PMID:27280682

  16. Arsenic poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furr, A.

    1977-01-01

    The route of arsenic exposure is usually by ingestion, thus the veterinarian is concerned with treating either an acute or a peracute condition. The arsenic compounds are considered to be highly toxic with a rapid onset of clinical signs. The toxicity and rapidity of onset are variable, depending upon the age and the species of animal. The chemical form and solubility of the toxicant also play a role in the course of the clinical syndrome. Inorganic arsenicals inhibit the sulfhydryl enzyme systems which are essential for normal cellular respiration and for metabolism of fats and carbohydrates. Therapeutic measures are intended to either remove or inactivate the unabsorbed material in the intestine, protect the alimentary tract, reverse the toxic syndrome and restore the homeostatic equilibrium of the animal. 5 references.

  17. Study on cerebral metabolism in rats with arsenic%染砷大鼠脑砷代谢研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛龙; 刘嘉鸣; 夏荣香; 魏洁群; 吴军; 郑玉建

    2015-01-01

    目的:研究染砷大鼠脑中砷形态代谢产物、代谢酶含量水平及其相关性,初步探讨砷代谢与砷毒性机制关联性。方法雄性清洁级 Wistar 大鼠20只,分成对照组及砷酸钠低、中、高剂量组4组。各组大鼠砷酸钠经口染毒3个月后处死并摘取脑组织。采用高效液相色谱-氢化物发生原子荧光光谱法(HPLC-HGAFS)测定并比较砷酸钠各剂量染毒组大鼠脑组织中砷形态代谢产物[iAs(Ⅲ)、iAs(Ⅴ)、总砷(Total As)含量以及一甲基化率(PMI)、二甲基化率(SMI)]及代谢酶 GSSG 含量、甲基转移酶活力、GST 活力、GSH 含量;通过试剂盒法分析各组大鼠脑中甲基转移酶的活力,并探讨大鼠脑中砷形态代谢产物与代谢酶的相关性。结果染毒组大鼠随染毒剂量和时间的增加,出现生长发育迟缓及狂躁、相互撕咬等现象;砷染毒剂量升高会促进脑中 iAs(Ⅲ)和总砷含量增加;同时砷染毒组脑组织中 GSSG 含量有所升高而 GSH 含量有所下降;随染毒剂量升高,GST 活力也随之呈现升高趋势;与对照组比较,砷酸钠染毒各剂量组大鼠脑中 PMI 值均较低,SMI 值有所升高(P <0.05)。砷酸钠染毒组甲基转移酶活力与iAs(Ⅲ)%含量呈负相关(r =-0.714,P <0.05),与 PMI 和 SMI 均呈正相关(r PMI =0.714,r SMI =0.805,P <0.05);砷酸钠染毒组 GSH 含量与 iAs(Ⅲ)% 含 量 呈 正 相 关(r =0.855,P <0.05),与 PMI 和 SMI 均呈负相关(r PMI =-0.855,r SMI =-0.858,P <0.05)。结论低剂量砷酸钠染毒会打破脑组织中 GSSG 与 GSH 的动态平衡,造成脑组织的氧化损伤,砷酸钠染毒后其代谢产物在脑组织中可能具有一定的蓄积能力。%Objective To observe the arsenic metabolites,metabolic enzyme levels in arsenic-poisoned rat brain for a preliminary study on the

  18. Genetic polymorphisms in AS3MT and arsenic metabolism in residents of the Red River Delta, Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To elucidate the role of genetic factors in arsenic (As) metabolism, we studied associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in As (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) with the As concentrations in hair and urine, and urinary As profile in residents in the Red River Delta, Vietnam. Concentrations of total As in groundwater were 0.7-502 μg/l. Total As levels in groundwater drastically decreased by using sand filter, indicating that the filter could be effective to remove As from raw groundwater. Concentrations of inorganic As (IAs) in urine and total As in hair of males were higher than those of females. A significant positive correlation between monomethylarsonic acid (MMA)/IAs and age in females indicates that older females have higher methylation capacity from IAs to MMA. Body mass index negatively correlated with urinary As concentrations in males. Homozygote for SNPs 4602AA, 35991GG, and 37853GG, which showed strong linkage disequilibrium (LD), had higher percentage (%) of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in urine. SNPs 4740 and 12590 had strong LD and associated with urinary %DMA. Although SNPs 6144, 12390, 14215, and 35587 comprised LD cluster, homozygotes in SNPs 12390GG and 35587CC had lower DMA/MMA in urine, suggesting low methylation capacity from MMA to DMA in homo types for these SNPs. SNPs 5913 and 8973 correlated with %MMA and %DMA, respectively. Heterozygote for SNP 14458TC had higher MMA/IAs in urine than TT homozygote, indicating that the heterozygote may have stronger methylation ability of IAs. To our knowledge, this is the first study on the association of genetic factors with As metabolism in Vietnamese.

  19. Current neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topics covered in this book include: Duchenne muscular dystrophy: DNA diagnosis in practice; Central nervous system magnetic resonance imaging; and Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neurologic diseases

  20. Metagenomic approach reveals variation of microbes with arsenic and antimony metabolism genes from highly contaminated soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinming Luo

    Full Text Available Microbes have great potential for arsenic (As and antimony (Sb bioremediation in heavily contaminated soil because they have the ability to biotransform As and Sb to species that have less toxicity or are more easily removed. In this study, we integrated a metagenomic method with physicochemical characterization to elucidate the composition of microbial community and functional genes (related to As and Sb in a high As (range from 34.11 to 821.23 mg kg-1 and Sb (range from 226.67 to 3923.07 mg kg-1 contaminated mine field. Metagenomic analysis revealed that microbes from 18 phyla were present in the 5 samples of soil contaminated with high As and Sb. Moreover, redundancy analysis (RDA of the relationship between the 18 phyla and the concentration of As and Sb demonstrated that 5 phyla of microbes, i.e. Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, Tenericutes and Gemmatimonadetes were positively correlated with As and Sb concentration. The distribution, diversity and abundance of functional genes (including arsC, arrA, aioA, arsB and ACR3 were much higher for the samples containing higher As and Sb concentrations. Based on correlation analysis, the results showed a positive relationship between arsC-like (R2 = 0.871 and aioA-like (R2 = 0.675 gene abundance and As concentration, and indicated that intracellular As(V reduction and As(III oxidation could be the dominant As detoxification mechanism enabling the microbes to survive in the environment. This study provides a direct and reliable reference on the diversity of microbial community and functional genes in an extremely high concentration As- and Sb-contaminated environment.

  1. The effect of fluoride and arsenic pollution on bone metabolism in exposed population%氟砷污染对暴露人群骨代谢的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾奇兵; 刘云; 张爱华; 洪峰; 杨鋆; 喻仙

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨氟和砷对暴露人群骨代谢的影响.方法 2006年选择贵州省兴仁县雨樟镇交乐村152例氟砷联合暴露者以及位于交乐村约13 km无高氟高砷暴露史59例对照作为研究对象.分别检测尿氟、尿砷及骨代谢效应指标尿羟脯氨酸(UHYP)和尿Ⅰ型胶原交联氨基末端肽(UNTX)、骨强度指数(STI).结果 氟对UHYP、UNTX的主效应均有统计学意义(F=9.785、4.225,P均0.05).砷对UNTX的主效应有统计学意义(F=2.660,P0.05).氟、砷的交互作用对UNTX有统计学意义(F=2.429,P0.05).结论 氟可影响胶原代谢及骨吸收,砷主要影响骨吸收.氟砷混合暴露时对骨吸收影响较显著.对氟、砷暴露人群进行健康监测时,UNTX可作为评价氟砷污染致暴露人群骨代谢交互作用的生物学标志.%Objective To explore the effect of fluoride and arsenic pollution on bone metabolism in exposed population. Methods One hundred and fifty-two fluoride and arsenic exposed people were selected from Jiaole village, Yuzhang town, Xingron county, Guizhou province in 2006, and 59 not exposed people from Daguoduo village 13 km away from Jiaole village were selected as control. Urinary fluorine(UF), urinary arsenic (UAs), urinary hydroxyproline (UHYP), cross-linked N-telopeptides of type I collagen (UNTX) and bone strength index(STI) were detected. Results The main effect of fluoride on UHYP and UNTX were statistically significant (F = 9.785, 4.225, P 0.05). The main effect of arsenic on UNTX was statistically significant (F = 2.660, P 0.05). The interaction between fluoride and arsenic on UNTX was statistically significant (F= 2.429, P 0.05). Conclusions Fluoride exposure can affect the metabolism of collagen and bone resorption, and Arsenic exposure main affect bone resorption, fluoride and arsenic co-exposure have more significant effect on bone resorption. UNTX may be used as biological biomarker of bone metabolism for population co-exposed to fluoride and arsenic

  2. [Ten-years records of organic arsenic (diphenylarsinic acid) poisoning: epidemiology, clinical feature, metabolism, and toxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishi, Kazuhiro; Tamaoka, Akira

    2015-01-01

    We report here the symptoms of diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) poisoning recorded over 10 years since the DPAA contamination of the potable well water was first detected in the Kamisu City, Ibaraki Prefecture, in 2003. The poisoning symptoms associated with the cerebellum and brainstem included nystagmus, tremors, myoclonus, and cerebellar ataxia as well as the symptoms associated with the temporal and occipital lobes such as memory impairment, sleep disorder, and visual disturbance. Some of the affected children exhibited mental retardation. Moreover, reduced blood flow and reduced glucose metabolism in the cerebella, brainstem, and temporal and occipital lobes persisted for several years among the DPAA-exposed persons. Based on the animal studies for DPAA intoxication, the target organs for the DPAA toxicity were determined to be the central nervous system (CNS), liver, and biliary system. In particular, DPAA tends to persist in the brain for a long time, resulting in long-term impacts on the brain. The cerebral blood flow and brain glucose metabolism, which can be measured by positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), respectively, are useful objective clinical markers to determine the effect of DPAA on CNS. We believe that continuous monitoring of the DPAA-exposed people may promote the effect of carcinogen and accelerate brain aging.

  3. Identification and characterization of metabolic properties of bacterial populations recovered from arsenic contaminated ground water of North East India (Assam).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soma; Sar, Pinaki

    2013-12-01

    Diversity of culturable bacterial populations within the Arsenic (As) contaminated groundwater of North Eastern state (Assam) of India is studied. From nine As contaminated samples 89 bacterial strains are isolated. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis reveals predominance of Brevundimonas (35%) and Acidovorax (23%) along with Acinetobacter (10%), Pseudomonas (9%) and relatively less abundant (<5%) Undibacterium, Herbaspirillum, Rhodococcus, Staphylococcus, Bosea, Bacillus, Ralstonia, Caulobacter and Rhizobiales members. High As(III) resistance (MTC 10-50 mM) is observed for the isolates obtained from As(III) enrichment, particularly for 3 isolates of genus Brevundimonas (MTC 50 mM). In contrast, high resistance to As(V) (MTC as high as 550 mM) is present as a ubiquitous property, irrespective of isolates' enrichment condition. Bacterial genera affiliated to other groups showed relatively lower degree of As resistance [MTCs of 15-20 mM As(III) and 250-350 mM As(V)]. As(V) reductase activity is detected in strains with high As(V) as well as As(III) resistance. A strong correlation could be established among isolates capable of reductase activity and siderophore production as well as As(III) tolerance. A large number of isolates (nearly 50%) is capable of anaerobic respiration using alternate inorganic electron acceptors [As(V), Se(VI), Fe(III), [NO(3)(2), SO(4)(2), S(2)O(3)(2). Ability to utilize different carbon sources ranging from C2-C6 compounds along with some complex sugars is also observed. Particularly, a number of strains is found to possess ability to grow chemolithotrophically using As(III) as the electron donor. The study reports for the first time the identity and metabolic abilities of bacteria in As contaminated ground water of North East India, useful to elucidate the microbial role in influencing mobilization of As in the region. PMID:24210546

  4. Variability of arsenic bioaccessibility and metabolism in soils by human gut microbiota using different in vitro methods combined with SHIME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Naiyi; Du, Huili; Zhang, Zhennan; Cai, Xiaolin; Li, Zejiao; Sun, Guoxin; Cui, Yanshan

    2016-10-01

    Arsenic (As) speciation analysis is essential when evaluating the risks upon oral exposure to As-contaminated soils. In this study, we first investigated the variability in the As bioaccessibility and speciation using a combination of five common in vitro methods (SBRC, PBET, DIN, UBM and IVG) (gastric and small intestinal phases) and the SHIME model (colon phase). Our results indicate that the As bioaccessibility varies in the colon phase. An increase in the As bioaccessibility for SBRC and PBET, and a decrease for UBM and IVG were observed in the colon phase. In addition, we found different extents of methylation and large amounts of arsenite [As(III)] due to microbial reduction in the colon digests. The UBM-SHIME method displayed a higher methylation percentage of 13.5-82.1%, but a lower methylation percentage of 0.2-21.8% was observed in the SBRC-SHIME method. Besides, The MMA(V) levels in the colon digests were positively correlated with those of As(III) and DMA(V), so DMA(V) can be considered an indicator to evaluate the As metabolic speed of in vitro cultured human gut microbiota. Based on the standard reference soil of NIST 2710a, the As bioaccessibility in the colon phase of PBET-SHIME and SBRC-SHIME were the closest to the in vivo results. Combining in vitro methods and SHIME will remarkably affect the accurate assessment of potential risks to human health associated with oral exposure to soil As. PMID:27320743

  5. Factors Affecting Arsenic Methylation in Arsenic-Exposed Humans: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui; Niu, Qiang; Xu, Mengchuan; Rui, Dongsheng; Xu, Shangzhi; Feng, Gangling; Ding, Yusong; Li, Shugang; Jing, Mingxia

    2016-02-06

    Chronic arsenic exposure is a critical public health issue in many countries. The metabolism of arsenic in vivo is complicated because it can be influenced by many factors. In the present meta-analysis, two researchers independently searched electronic databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Springer, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, to analyze factors influencing arsenic methylation. The concentrations of the following arsenic metabolites increase (parsenic exposure: inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethyl arsenic (MMA), dimethyl arsenic (DMA), and total arsenic. Additionally, the percentages of iAs (standard mean difference (SMD): 1.00; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60-1.40; parsenic methylation, and arsenic methylation is more efficient in women than in men. The results of this analysis may provide information regarding the role of arsenic oxidative methylation in the arsenic poisoning process.

  6. Factors Affecting Arsenic Methylation in Arsenic-Exposed Humans: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui; Niu, Qiang; Xu, Mengchuan; Rui, Dongsheng; Xu, Shangzhi; Feng, Gangling; Ding, Yusong; Li, Shugang; Jing, Mingxia

    2016-02-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is a critical public health issue in many countries. The metabolism of arsenic in vivo is complicated because it can be influenced by many factors. In the present meta-analysis, two researchers independently searched electronic databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Springer, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, to analyze factors influencing arsenic methylation. The concentrations of the following arsenic metabolites increase (parsenic exposure: inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethyl arsenic (MMA), dimethyl arsenic (DMA), and total arsenic. Additionally, the percentages of iAs (standard mean difference (SMD): 1.00; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.60-1.40; parsenic methylation, and arsenic methylation is more efficient in women than in men. The results of this analysis may provide information regarding the role of arsenic oxidative methylation in the arsenic poisoning process.

  7. 三氧化二砷的代谢途径及毒理机制综述%Toxicity Mechanisms and Metabolic Pathways of Arsenic Trioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛一民; 樱井徹郎; 孙晖; 王喜军

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide is well known as a deadly poison. However, arsenous acid injection, which is originated from white arsenic in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), has great efficacy in the treatment of acute promyeloeytic leukemia (APL). This medication is still accompanied with some severe adverse drug reactions (ADR). This paper tried to discuss metabolic pathways, as well as acute and chronic mechanisms of arsenic trioxide. The hypothetic ADB mechanism of arsenous acid injection was proposed to provide basis for new drug discovery in order to eliminate ADR.%三氧化二砷作为剧毒药广为人知,传统中药称其为"砒霜",而从中药砒霜中诞生的亚砷酸注射液其治疗急性早幼粒细胞白血病的疗效又为世人所瞩目,但仍伴随不同程度的不良反应.本文主要介绍了三氧化二砷的代谢途径及急慢性毒性机制,提出亚砷酸注射液不良反应的机制假设,为研究开发消除不良反应的药物提供依据.

  8. Determination of arsenic metabolic complex excreted in human urine after administration of sodium 2,3-dimercapto-1-propane sulfonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhilong; Jiang, Guifeng; Cullen, William R; Aposhian, H Vasken; Le, X Chris

    2002-10-01

    Sodium 2,3-dimercapto-1-propane sulfonate (DMPS) has been used to treat acute arsenic poisoning. Presumably DMPS functions by chelating some arsenic species to increase the excretion of arsenic from the body. However, the excreted complex of DMPS with arsenic has not been detected. Here we describe a DMPS complex with monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)), a key trivalent arsenic in the arsenic methylation process, and show the presence of the DMPS-MMA(III) complex in human urine after the administration of DMPS. The DMPS-MMA(III) complex was characterized using electrospray tandem mass spectrometry and determined by using HPLC separation with hydride generation atomic fluorescence detection (HGAFD). The DMPS-MMA(III) complex did not form a volatile hydride with borohydride treatment. On-line digestion with 0.1 M sodium hydroxide following HPLC separation decomposed the DMPS-MMA(III) complex and allowed for the subsequent quantification by hydride generation atomic fluorescence. Arsenite (As(III)), arsenate (As(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), MMA(III), and DMPS-MMA(III) complex were analyzed in urine samples from human subjects collected after the ingestion of 300 mg of DMPS. The administration of DMPS resulted in a decrease of the DMA(V) concentration and an increase of the MMA(V) concentration excreted in the urine, confirming the previous results. The finding of the DMPS-MMA(III) complex in human urine after DMPS treatment provides an explanation for the inhibition of arsenic methylation by DMPS. Because MMA(III) is the substrate for the biomethylation of arsenic from MMA(V) to DMA(V), the formation of DMPS-MMA(III) complex would reduce the availability of MMA(III) for the subsequent biomethylation. PMID:12387631

  9. Neurological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Ann Butler

    2016-08-01

    Neurological system assessment is an important skill for the orthopaedic nurse because the nervous system has such an overlap with the musculoskeletal system. Nurses whose scope of practice includes such advanced evaluation, e.g. nurse practitioners, may conduct the examination described here but the information will also be useful for nurses caring for patients who have abnormal neurological assessment findings. Within the context of orthopaedic physical assessment, possible neurological findings are evaluated as they complement the patient's history and the examiner's findings. Specific neurological assessment is integral to diagnosis of some orthopaedic conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome. In other situations such as crushing injury to the extremities, there is high risk of associated neurological or neurovascular injury. These patients need anticipatory examination and monitoring to prevent complications. This article describes a basic neurological assessment; emphasis is on sensory and motor findings that may overlap with an orthopaedic presentation. The orthopaedic nurse may incorporate all the testing covered here or choose those parts that further elucidate specific diagnostic questions suggested by the patient's history, general evaluation and focused musculoskeletal examination. Abnormal findings help to suggest further testing, consultation with colleagues or referral to a specialist. PMID:27118633

  10. Arsenic Toxicity in Male Reproduction and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yoon-Jae; Kim, Jong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic is a toxic metalloid that exists ubiquitously in the environment, and affects global health problems due to its carcinogenicity. In most populations, the main source of arsenic exposure is the drinking water. In drinking water, chronic exposure to arsenic is associated with increased risks of various cancers including those of skin, lung, bladder, and liver, as well as numerous other non-cancer diseases including gastrointestinal and cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and neurologic a...

  11. Environmental Source of Arsenic Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jin-Yong; Yu, Seung-Do; Hong, Young-Seoub

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring metalloid that may be a significant risk factor for cancer after exposure to contaminated drinking water, cigarettes, foods, industry, occupational environment, and air. Among the various routes of arsenic exposure, drinking water is the largest source of arsenic poisoning worldwide. Arsenic exposure from ingested foods usually comes from food crops grown in arsenic-contaminated soil and/or irrigated with arsenic-contaminated water. According to a recent World Health Organization report, arsenic from contaminated water can be quickly and easily absorbed and depending on its metabolic form, may adversely affect human health. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration regulations for metals found in cosmetics to protect consumers against contaminations deemed deleterious to health; some cosmetics were found to contain a variety of chemicals including heavy metals, which are sometimes used as preservatives. Moreover, developing countries tend to have a growing number of industrial factories that unfortunately, harm the environment, especially in cities where industrial and vehicle emissions, as well as household activities, cause serious air pollution. Air is also an important source of arsenic exposure in areas with industrial activity. The presence of arsenic in airborne particulate matter is considered a risk for certain diseases. Taken together, various potential pathways of arsenic exposure seem to affect humans adversely, and future efforts to reduce arsenic exposure caused by environmental factors should be made. PMID:25284196

  12. Environmental source of arsenic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jin-Yong; Yu, Seung-Do; Hong, Young-Seoub

    2014-09-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring metalloid that may be a significant risk factor for cancer after exposure to contaminated drinking water, cigarettes, foods, industry, occupational environment, and air. Among the various routes of arsenic exposure, drinking water is the largest source of arsenic poisoning worldwide. Arsenic exposure from ingested foods usually comes from food crops grown in arsenic-contaminated soil and/or irrigated with arsenic-contaminated water. According to a recent World Health Organization report, arsenic from contaminated water can be quickly and easily absorbed and depending on its metabolic form, may adversely affect human health. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration regulations for metals found in cosmetics to protect consumers against contaminations deemed deleterious to health; some cosmetics were found to contain a variety of chemicals including heavy metals, which are sometimes used as preservatives. Moreover, developing countries tend to have a growing number of industrial factories that unfortunately, harm the environment, especially in cities where industrial and vehicle emissions, as well as household activities, cause serious air pollution. Air is also an important source of arsenic exposure in areas with industrial activity. The presence of arsenic in airborne particulate matter is considered a risk for certain diseases. Taken together, various potential pathways of arsenic exposure seem to affect humans adversely, and future efforts to reduce arsenic exposure caused by environmental factors should be made.

  13. Adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schor, Nina F

    2012-08-21

    As it is currently configured, completion of child neurology residency requires performance of 12 months of training in adult neurology. Exploration of whether or not this duration of training in adult neurology is appropriate for what child neurology is today must take into account the initial reasons for this requirement and the goals of adult neurology training during child neurology residency.

  14. 植物砷吸收与代谢的研究进展%A BRIEF REVIEW OF ARSENIC UPTAKE AND METABOLISM IN PLANTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文菊; 赵方杰

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is widely distributed in the environment; it is a nonessential element to plants. Excessive accumulation of arsenic can cause phytotoxieity and pose a potential health risk to humans through consumption of high-As food crops. Arsenate is taken up by plant roots via phosphate transporters, and arsenite and undissociated methylated As species (MMA and DMA) through the nodulin 26-like intrinsic protein (NIP) aquaporin channels and by a silicon efflux carrier. Arsenate is readily reduced to arsenite in planta, which is complexed with thiol-rich peptides such as phytochelatins (PCs) or effluxed to the external medium as arsenite. Arsenic is detoxified by complexation of araenite with PCs and subsequent storage in the vacuoles.Whether plants can methylate inorganic arsenic remains to be confirmed. Recent progress in the understanding of the mechanisms of arsenic uptake and metabolism in plants is reviewed in this article.%砷(As)作为一种植物非必需的类金属元素广泛存在于自然界中,砷过量摄人不仅会对植物生长产生毒害作用,而且在植物的可食部位累积并通过食物链对人体健康构成威胁.生长介质中的砷酸盐(五价砷)一般是通过磷酸盐转运蛋白被植物吸收的,而亚砷酸(三价砷)和没有解离的甲基化砷则主要是通过质膜上的水通道蛋白被植物吸收的.在植物体内五价砷很容易被还原为三价砷,三价砷和带巯基的植物络合素(PCs)结合形成络合物储存在液泡中,从而使植物达到解毒的目的.植物能否将无机砷甲基化仍待证实.本文综述了近年来植物对砷的吸收及其在植物体内存在行为的相关研究.

  15. Biomarkers for assessing potential carcinogenic effects of chronic arsenic exposure in Inner Mongolia, CHINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic is ubiquitous in the environment. Chronic arsenic exposure via drinking water has been associated. with carcinogenic, cardiovascular, neurological and diabetic effects in humans and has been of great public health concern worldwide. In 2001, U.S. Environmental Protection ...

  16. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease: an X-linked neurologic disorder of myelin metabolism with a novel mutation in the gene encoding proteolipid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencic, S; Abuelo, D; Ambler, M; Hudson, L D

    1989-01-01

    The nosology of the inborn errors of myelin metabolism has been stymied by the lack of molecular genetic analysis. Historically, Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease has encompassed a host of neurologic disorders that present with a deficit of myelin, the membrane elaborated by glial cells that encircles and successively enwraps axons. We describe here a Pelizaeus-Merzbacher pedigree of the classical type, with X-linked inheritance, a typical clinical progression, and a pathologic loss of myelinating cells and myelin in the central nervous system. To discriminate variants of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease, a set of oligonucleotide primers was constructed to polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) amplify and sequence the gene encoding proteolipid protein (PLP), a structural protein that comprises half of the protein of the myelin sheath. The PLP gene in one of two affected males and the carrier mother of this family exhibited a single base difference in the more than 2 kb of the PLP gene sequenced, a C----T transition that would create a serine substitution for proline at the carboxy end of the protein. Our results delineate the clinical features of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease, define the possible molecular pathology of this dysmyelinating disorder, and address the molecular classification of inborn errors of myelin metabolism. Patients with the classical form (type I) and the more severely affected, connatal variant of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (type II) would be predicted to display mutation at the PLP locus. The other variants (types III-VI), which have sometimes been categorized as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease, may represent mutations in genes encoding other structural myelin proteins or proteins critical to myelination. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:2773936

  17. Occupational neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, R G

    1987-01-01

    The nervous system is vulnerable to the effects of certain chemicals and physical conditions found in the work environment. The activities of an occupational neurologist focus on the evaluation of patients with neurological disorders caused by occupational or environmental conditions. When one is making a differential diagnosis in patients with neurological disorders, the possibility of toxic exposure or encounters with physical factors in the workplace must not be overlooked. Central to an accurate clinical diagnosis is the patient's history. A diagnosis of an occupational or environmental neurological problem requires a careful assessment of the clinical abnormalities and confirmation of these disabilities by objective tests such as nerve conduction velocity, evoked potentials, electroencephalogram, neuropsychological batteries, or nerve biopsy. On the basis of information about hazards in the workplace, safety standards and environmental and biological monitoring can be implemented in the workplace to reduce the risks of undue injury. Clinical manifestations of headache, memory disturbance, and peripheral neuropathy are commonly encountered presentations of the effects of occupational hazards. Physicians in everyday clinical practice must be aware of the signs and symptoms associated with exposure to possible neurotoxins and work methods. Occupational and environmental circumstances must be explored when evaluating patients with neurologic disorders.

  18. SPECIES SPECIFIC DIETARY ARSENIC EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT: THE NEED TO ESTIMATE BIOACCESSIBILITY AND ASSESSING THE IMPLIED PRESYSTEMIC METABOLISM IMPLICATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical form specific toxicity of arsenic dictates the need for species specific quantification in order to accurately assess the risk from an exposure. The literature has begun to produce preliminary species specific databases for certain dietary sources, but a quantitativ...

  19. Research Progress in the Mutual Transformation of Different Arsenic Speciation in Metabolic Pathways%不同形态的As在代谢途径中相互转化的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱美霖; 姜阳; 曹红斌

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination occurs in many regions. It produces toxic effects to humans mainly through groundwater and food chain. Due to the different toxicity of different arsenic speciation, the toxic harms of arsenic can be reduced through transforming its speciation. Based on the understanding about the mechanism and influencing factors of mutual transformation of arsenic speciation, the arsenic speciation can be transformed through a certain method. In this paper, the transformation of arsenic speciation in metabolic pathways was introduced.%环境中的As污染问题在很多国家和地区都存在,As通过地下水和食物链进入人体造成毒害作用.由于不同形态的As毒性差别很大,因此可以通过调控其存在形态减少其对人或其他生物造成的毒害;了解不同形态的As在生物体中的转化机理和影响因素,就可以采取一定的方法促使其形态发生转化.在此对生物体代谢途径中不同形态As的转化进行了综述.

  20. Algae metabolism and organic carbon in sediments determining arsenic mobilisation in ground- and surface water. A field study in Doñana National Park, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohfahl, Claus; Navarro, Daniel Sánchez-Rodas; Mendoza, Jorge Armando; Vadillo, Iñaki; Giménez-Forcada, Elena

    2016-02-15

    A study has been performed to explore the origin, spatiotemporal behaviour and mobilisation mechanism of the elevated arsenic (As) concentrations found in ground water and drinking ponds of the Doñana National Park, Southern Spain. At a larger scale, 13 piezometers and surface water samples of about 50 artificial drinking ponds and freshwater lagoons throughout the National Park were collected and analysed for major ions, metals and trace elements. At a smaller scale, 5 locations were equipped with piezometers and groundwater was sampled up to 4 times for ambient parameters, major ions, metals, trace elements and iron (Fe) speciation. As was analysed for inorganic and organic speciation. Undisturbed sediment samples were analysed for physical parameters, mineralogy, geochemistry as well as As species. Sediment analyses yielded total As between 0.1 and 18 mg/kg and are not correlated with As concentration in water. Results of the surface- and groundwater sampling revealed elevated concentration of As up to 302 μg/L within a restricted area of the National Park. Results of groundwater sampling reveals strong correlation of As with Fe(2+) pointing to As mobilisation due to reductive dissolution of hydroferric oxides (HFO) in areas of locally elevated amounts of organic matter within the sediments. High As concentrations in surface water ponds are correlated with elevated alkalinity and pH attributed to algae metabolism, leading to As desorption from HFO. The algae metabolism is responsible for the presence of methylated arsenic species in surface water, in contrast to ground water in which only inorganic As species was found. Temporal variations in surface water and groundwater are also related to changes in pH and alkalinity as a result of enhanced algae metabolism in surface water or related to changes in the redox level in the case of groundwater.

  1. Arsenic response of AtPCS1- and CePCS-expressing plants - effects of external As(V) concentration on As-accumulation pattern and NPT metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojas, Sylwia; Clemens, Stephan; Skłodowska, Aleksandra; Maria Antosiewicz, Danuta

    2010-02-15

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are small, cysteine-rich peptides, known to play a major role in detoxification of both cadmium and arsenic. The aim of this study was to determine whether overexpression of either of two PC synthase (PCS) genes, AtPCS1 and CePCS in Nicotiana tabacum (previously shown to cause decrease and increase, respectively, of cadmium tolerance of tobacco - Wojas et al., 2008) also contributes to such contrasting phenotypes with respect to arsenic (As) tolerance and accumulation, and how observed responses relate to non-protein thiol (NPT) metabolism. The expression of both genes resulted in an increase of As-tolerance, with CePCS plants most tolerant. We showed for the first time that the response of PCS overexpressing plants to As qualitatively depends on the external As(V) concentration. At the less toxic 50muM As(V), AtPCS1 and CePCS transformants accumulated more As in roots and leaves than WT. An increase in PC production and the level of PC2 species was detected in leaves of AtPCS1 and CePCS plants, which might explain their enhanced As-accumulation and tolerance. In contrast, at the highly toxic 200muM As(V), several disturbances in thiol metabolism of PCS overexpressing plants were found, surprisingly, including decrease of PC levels both in roots and leaves of transgenic plants relative to WT. The increase in As-tolerance and accumulation due to AtPCS1 and CePCS overexpression, observed at the As(V) concentrations similar to those found in As-contaminated soils, makes these genes promising candidates for plant engineering for phytoremediation.

  2. Arsenic in the aetiology of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapio, Soile; Grosche, Bernd

    2006-06-01

    Arsenic, one of the most significant hazards in the environment affecting millions of people around the world, is associated with several diseases including cancers of skin, lung, urinary bladder, kidney and liver. Groundwater contamination by arsenic is the main route of exposure. Inhalation of airborne arsenic or arsenic-contaminated dust is a common health problem in many ore mines. This review deals with the questions raised in the epidemiological studies such as the dose-response relationship, putative confounders and synergistic effects, and methods evaluating arsenic exposure. Furthermore, it describes the metabolic pathways of arsenic, and its biological modes of action. The role of arsenic in the development of cancer is elucidated in the context of combined epidemiological and biological studies. However, further analyses by means of molecular epidemiology are needed to improve the understanding of cancer aetiology induced by arsenic.

  3. Toxicity of arsenic in humans. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning arsenic toxicity to humans. Citations examine arsenic assays, neurological effects, epidemiological studies, arsenic levels in drinking water, carcinogenesis, excretion studies, and industrial sources of arsenic poisoning. The interaction of arsenic with other heavy metals such as cadmium and lead is also discussed. In vivo and in vitro studies are described. (Contains a minimum of 123 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. 饮水砷暴露对子代大鼠体内砷代谢的影响%Metabolism and distribution of arsenic in offspring rats after exposure to arsenic via drinking water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    席淑华; 孙贵范; 金亚平; 孙文娟

    2010-01-01

    Objective To observe the metabolism and distribution of arsenic in liver and brain of offspring rata by exposure to arsenic of pregnant rats or lactation dams and weaned pups,and explore if arsenic could penetrate the placental barrier,lactation barrier and blood brain barrier. Methods The Wistar female rots were randomly divided into four groups according to body weights,12 in each group,and were fed with drinking water that contained arsenic(NaAsO_2) 0,10,50,100 mg/L beginning from the gestafional day 6 until pups 42 days old. Pups were separately sacrificed on postnatal day(PND) 0,15,28,42. Arsenic in liver and brain of offspring rots and in breast milk was examined by atomic absorption speetrophotometer with an arsenic speeiation pretreatment system. Results Concentration of iAs,MMA,DMA of brain in 50,100 mg/L groups were higher than that of 0 mg/L group[0,0,0,(7.3±6.6),0,(44.2±27.4)ng/g]on PND 0,42[iAs: (120.0±46.0),(195.5±125.3),(216.5±278.4),(176.6±151.8) ng/g; M MA: (47.2±18.1),(199.6±389.1),(47.4±55.2),(82.7±79.2) ng/g; DMA: (984.3±377.4),(2222.1±1433.2),(998.1±368.3),(1781.3±715.7)ng/g,all P < 0.05]. Concentration of DMA of brain in 50,100 mg/L groups were higher than that of 0 mg/L group[(13.9±18.1),(50.6±98.3)ng/g]on PND 15,28 [(270.3±73.1),(323.9±72.7),(758.7±245.9),(1020.6±383.6) ng/g,all P < 0.05]. Concentration of iAs,DMA of liver in 10,50,100 mg/L groups were higher than that of 0 mg/L group [(1.4±3.5),(49.7± 47.1),0,(100.4±30.2)ng/g]on PND 28,42 [iAs: (37.5±28.1),(268.8±246.4),(307.2±339.9),(15.4±9.4),(479.1±161.1),(408.4±51.9)ng/g;DMA: (594.5±148.8),(3181.9±519.0),(4834.2±2568.4),(1061.8± 85.2),(3697.1±553.7),(4120.0±732.8) ng/g,all P < 0.05]. Concentration of DMA of liver in 10,50,100 mg/L groups were higher than that of 0 mg/L group[(13.2±20.5)ng/g]on PND 15[(182.0±60,2),(637.6±90.0),(1458.7±196.3)ng/g,all P < 0.05]. Concentration of arsenicals of liver and brain showed a dose-dependent increase. The

  5. Arsenic ototoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gulin Gokçen Kesici

    2016-01-01

    High levels of arsenic are found in many parts of the world and more than 100 million people may have been exposed to it. There is growing evidence to indicate that arsenic has a deleterious effect on the auditory system. This paper provides the general information of arsenic and its ototoxic effects.

  6. Arsenic, Anaerobes, and Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J. F.; Oremland, R. S.; Switzer Blum, J.; Hoeft, S. E.; Baesman, S. M.; Bennett, S.; Miller, L. G.; Kulp, T. R.; Saltikov, C.

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic is an element best known for its highly poisonous nature, so it is not something one would associate with being a well-spring for life. Yet discoveries made over the past two decades have delineated that not only are some microbes resistant to arsenic, but that this element's primary redox states can be exploited to conserve energy and support prokaryotic growth ('arsenotrophy') in the absence of oxygen. Hence, arsenite [As(III)] can serve as an electron donor for chemo- or photo-autotrophy while arsenate [As(V)] will serve as an electron acceptor for chemo-heterotrophs and chemo-autotrophs. The phylogenetic diversity of these microbes is broad, encompassing many individual species from diverse taxonomic groups in the Domain Bacteria, with fewer representatives in the Domain Archaea. Speculation with regard to the evolutionary origins of the key functional genes in anaerobic arsenic transformations (arrA and arxA) and aerobic oxidation (aioB) has led to a disputation as to which gene and function is the most ancient and whether arsenic metabolism extended back into the Archaean. Regardless of its origin, robust arsenic metabolism has been documented in extreme environments that are rich in their arsenic content, such as hot springs and especially hypersaline soda lakes associated with volcanic regions. Searles Lake, CA is an extreme, salt-saturated end member where vigorous arsenic metabolism occurs, but there is no detectable sulfate-reduction or methanogenesis. The latter processes are too weak bio-energetically to survive as compared with arsenotrophy, and are also highly sensitive to the abundance of borate ions present in these locales. These observations have implications with respect to the search for microbial life elsewhere in the Solar System where volcanic-like processes have been operative. Hence, because of the likelihood of encountering dense brines in the regolith of Mars (formed by evapo-concentration) or beneath the ice layers of Europa

  7. N-6-Adenine-Specific DNA Methyltransferase 1 (N6AMT1) Polymorphisms and Arsenic Methylation in Andean Women

    OpenAIRE

    Harari, Florencia; Engström, Karin; Concha, Gabriela; Colque, Graciela; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In humans, inorganic arsenic is metabolized to methylated metabolites mainly by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT). AS3MT polymorphisms are associated with arsenic metabolism efficiency. Recently, a putative N-6-adenine-specific DNA methyltransferase 1 (N6AMT1) was found to methylate arsenic in vitro. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the role of N6AMT1 polymorphisms in arsenic methylation efficiency in humans. METHODS: We assessed arsenic methylation efficiency in 188 w...

  8. Study of relationship between antioxidant levels and arsenic metabolism by arsenic intervention of rabbit skin%染砷家兔皮肤抗氧化水平与砷代谢关联研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘媛; 吴军; 葛龙; 郎曼; 马艳; 郑玉建

    2015-01-01

    between the impacts and the urine arsenic metabolism level.Methods A total of 30 male healthy rabbits were divided into 5 groups:the control group (deionized water),sodium arsenite low dose group (0.075 mg/kg),secondary low dose group (0.15 mg/kg),second-ary high dose group (0.375 mg/kg),high dose group (0.75 mg/kg)respectively,with 6 rabbits in each group.Prepare the prion aqueous solution according to the rabbits′daily water intake and free drinking was exposed to 12 weeks with continuous sodium arsenite exposure.Skin tissue samples were collected in 12 weeks,and the samples were fixed with 2.5% glutaraldehyde and observed the ultrastructure by scanning electron microscope.Collect the skin tissue samples of backside and homogenate the samples.Test the ac-tivity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px),glutathione transferase (GST),superoxide dismutase (SOD). High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HPLC-HGAFS)was adopted to test the content of arsenic metabolites in urine collected from rabbits′bladder.Results Compared with the control group,the weight of exposure groups showed an increasing tendency,but with no statistical significance (P >0.05).The results by scanning microscope showed dif-ferent changes in skin stratum corneum.The activity of GSH-Px reduced and the GST activity increased, with a statistical significance (P 0.05).The content of dimethyl arsenic acid (DMA)was higher than that of methyl arsenic acid (MMA)in urine with the sodium arsenite exposure doses increasing;the content of DMA and MMA increased first and then de-creased,with a statistical significance (P <0.05).There was no correlation between the content of inor-ganic arsenic(iAs3+ 、iAs5+ )and GSH-Px,GST respectively.There was negative correlation between the activity of GSH-Px and the content of DMA (r =-0.562,P <0.05),MMA (r =-0.507,P <0.05)re-spectively.There was positive correlation between the activity of GST and the content of DMA (r

  9. Interactive effect of fluoride and arsenic pollution on bone metabolism in exposed population%氟砷污染对暴露人群骨代谢交互作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾奇兵; 喻仙; 杨鋆; 洪峰

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the interacive effect of fluoride and arsenic pollution on bone metabolism in exposed population. Methods Totally 198 people with both fluoride and arsenic exposure were selected from Liuchang town of Qinzhen city, Guizhou province. Urinary fluorine ( UF), urinary arsenic ( UAs), urinary hydroxyproline ( UHYP) ,urinary cross-linked N-telopeptides of type I collagen( UNTX) , and bone strength index(STI) of the people were detected. The people were divided into groups according the contents of UF and UAs. Results The content of UNTX in low fluoride and arsenic combined exposure group (26. 82 nmol/mmol Cr) was lower than those of low fluoride exposure group and low arsenic exposure group(8. 97 and 20. 91 nmol/mmol Cr). The content of UNTX for low fluoride concentration and high arsenic concentration,high fluoride concentration and low arsenic concentration exposure groups(45.19 nmol/mmol Cr and 54.79 nmol/mmol Cr) was higher than those of the low fluoride exposure group and low arsenic exposure group(20. 51 and 20. 91 nmol/mmol Cr,8. 97 and 33. 68 nmol/mmol Cr). The interactive effect of fluoride and arsenic on UNTX was significant (P 0. 05). Conclusion Under the specific exposure level, the interaction of low fluoride concentration and low arsenic concentration on UNTX was antagonistic, with synergistic under low fluoride concentration and high arsenic concentration,high fluoride concentration and high arsenic concentration. No interactive effect of fluoride and arsenic on HYP was observed.%目的 探讨氟砷对暴露人群骨代谢的交互作用.方法 2009年选择贵州省清镇市流长乡198例氟砷联合暴露者作为研究对象,分别检测尿氟、尿砷及骨代谢效应标志尿羟脯氨酸(UHYP)和尿I型胶原交联氨基末端肽(UNTX)、骨强度指数(STI),以尿氟(UF)、尿砷(UAs)分组.结果 UNTX含量(26.82 nmol/mmol Cr)在低氟低砷水平低于氟、砷单独作用水平之和[(8.97 +20.91) nmol/mmol Cr],UNTX含量(45

  10. Urinary Arsenic Metabolites of Subjects Exposed to Elevated Arsenic Present in Coal in Shaanxi Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsheng Yang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to arsenic (As poisoning caused by naturally occurring inorganic arsenic-contaminated water consumption, coal arsenic poisoning (CAP induced by elevated arsenic exposure from coal combustion has rarely been reported. In this study, the concentrations and distributions of urinary arsenic metabolites in 57 volunteers (36 subjects with skin lesions and 21 subjects without skin lesions, who had been exposed to elevated levels of arsenic present in coal in Changshapu village in the south of Shaanxi Province (China, were reported. The urinary arsenic species, including inorganic arsenic (iAs [arsenite (iAsIII and arsenate (iAsV], monomethylarsonic acid (MMAV and dimethylarsinic acid (DMAV, were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS. The relative distributions of arsenic species, the primary methylation index (PMI = MMAV/iAs and the secondary methylation index (SMI = DMAV/MMAV were calculated to assess the metabolism of arsenic. Subjects with skin lesions had a higher concentration of urinary arsenic and a lower arsenic methylation capability than subjects without skin lesions. Women had a significantly higher methylation capability of arsenic than men, as defined by a higher percent DMAV and SMI in urine among women, which was the one possible interpretation of women with a higher concentration of urinary arsenic but lower susceptibility to skin lesions. The findings suggested that not only the dose of arsenic exposure but also the arsenic methylation capability have an impact on the individual susceptibility to skin lesions induced by coal arsenic exposure.

  11. Arsenic poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoolmeester, W.L.; White, D.R.

    1980-02-01

    Arsenic poisoning continues to require awareness of its diverse clinical manifestations. Industry is the major source of arsenic exposure. Although epidemiologic studies strongly contend that arsenic is carcinogenic, there are little supportive research data. Arsenic poisoning, both acute and chronic, is often overlooked initially in the evaluation of the patient with multisystem disease, but once it is suspected, many accurate methods are available to quantitate the amount and duration of exposure. Treatment with dimercaprol remains the mainstay of therapy, and early treatment is necessary to prevent irreversible complications.

  12. Neurological Sequelae of Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurological Sequelae Of Lupus Information Page Synonym(s): Lupus - Neurological Sequelae, Systemic Lupus ... resources from MedlinePlus What are Neurological Sequelae Of Lupus? Lupus (also called systemic lupus erythematosus ) is a ...

  13. Arsenic poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, D.G.

    1971-01-01

    The use of arsenic in ant poisons, herbicides, and insecticides affords the necessary contact with the poison by pets. Treatment was discussed in relation to two circumstances: very early poisoning in which the owner has observed ingestion of the arsenic, and when the signs of the poisoning are evident. Treatment for early ingestion involves emptying the stomach before the arsenic can pass in quantity into the intestine. This is followed with a 1% solution of sodium bicarbonate, with the administering of 3 to 6 mg of apomorphine. When signs of arsenic toxicity are already advanced, there is little advantage to be gained by either gastric lavage or administration of an emetic. The treatment then consists of the intramuscular administration of dimercaprol (BAL) at a dosage of 3 mg/lb of body weight three times a day until recovery. This is the specific antidote for arsenic. 1 reference.

  14. Sulfur mediated reduction of arsenic toxicity involves efficient thiol metabolism and the antioxidant defense system in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Garima; Singh, Amit Pal; Kumar, Amit; Singh, Pradyumna Kumar; Kumar, Smita; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Pandey, Vivek; Norton, Gareth John; Dhankher, Om Parkash; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2015-11-15

    Arsenic (As) contamination is a global issue, with South Asia and South East Asia being worst affected. Rice is major crop in these regions and can potentially pose serious health risks due to its known As accumulation potential. Sulfur (S) is an essential macronutrient and a vital element to combat As toxicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of S with regards to As toxicity in rice under different S regimes. To achieve this aim, plants were stressed with AsIII and AsV under three different S conditions (low sulfur (0.5mM), normal sulfur (3.5mM) and high sulfur (5.0mM)). High S treatment resulted in increased root As accumulation, likely due to As complexation through enhanced synthesis of thiolic ligands, such as non-protein thiols and phytochelatins, which restricted As translocation to the shoots. Enzymes of S assimilatory pathways and downstream thiolic metabolites were up-regulated with increased S supplementation; however, to maintain optimum concentrations of S, transcript levels of sulfate transporters were down-regulated at high S concentration. Oxidative stress generated due to As was counterbalanced in the high S treatment by reducing hydrogen peroxide concentration and enhancing antioxidant enzyme activities. The high S concentration resulted in reduced transcript levels of Lsi2 (a known transporter of As). This reduction in Lsi2 expression level is a probable reason for low shoot As accumulation, which has potential implications in reducing the risk of As in the food chain.

  15. Microbial responses to environmental arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez-Espino, David; Tamames, Javier; de Lorenzo, Víctor; Cánovas, David

    2009-02-01

    Microorganisms have evolved dynamic mechanisms for facing the toxicity of arsenic in the environment. In this sense, arsenic speciation and mobility is also affected by the microbial metabolism that participates in the biogeochemical cycle of the element. The ars operon constitutes the most ubiquitous and important scheme of arsenic tolerance in bacteria. This system mediates the extrusion of arsenite out of the cells. There are also other microbial activities that alter the chemical characteristics of arsenic: some strains are able to oxidize arsenite or reduce arsenate as part of their respiratory processes. These type of microorganisms require membrane associated proteins that transfer electrons from or to arsenic (AoxAB and ArrAB, respectively). Other enzymatic transformations, such as methylation-demethylation reactions, exchange inorganic arsenic into organic forms contributing to its complex environmental turnover. This short review highlights recent studies in ecology, biochemistry and molecular biology of these processes in bacteria, and also provides some examples of genetic engineering for enhanced arsenic accumulation based on phytochelatins or metallothionein-like proteins.

  16. Health effects of arsenic in drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowle, J.R.; Abernathy, C.O.; Mass, M.J.; McKinney, J.D.; North, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Current knowledge about metabolism, essentiality, and toxicity is summarized in the document. These are placed in a risk assessment context. Research needs are identified with their implications for improving the ability to assess risk from exposure to arsenic.

  17. The microbial genomics of arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Jérémy; Bertin, Philippe N

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic, which is a major contaminant of many aquatic ecosystems worldwide, is responsible for serious public health issues. However, life has evolved various strategies for coping with this toxic element. In particular, prokaryotic organisms have developed processes enabling them to resist and metabolize this chemical. Studies based on genome sequencing and transcriptome, proteome and metabolome profiling have greatly improved our knowledge of prokaryotes' metabolic potential and functioning in contaminated environments. The increasing number of genomes available and the development of descriptive and comparative approaches have made it possible not only to identify several genetic determinants of the arsenic metabolism, but also to elucidate their phylogenetic distribution and their modes of regulation. In addition, studies using functional genomic tools have established the pleiotropic character of prokaryotes' responses to arsenic, which can be either common to several species or species-specific. These approaches also provide promising means of deciphering the functioning of microbial communities including uncultured organisms, the genetic transfers involved and the possible occurrence of metabolic interactions as well as the evolution of arsenic resistance and metabolism.

  18. Nutrition in neurologically impaired children

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Malnutrition, either under- or overnutrition, is a common condition among neurologically impaired children. Energy needs are difficult to define in this heterogeneous population, and there is a lack of information on what normal growth should be in these children. Non-nutritional factors may influence growth, but nutritional factors such as insufficient caloric intake, excessive nutrient losses and abnormal energy metabolism also contribute to growth failure. Malnutrition is associated with s...

  19. Selenate mitigates arsenite toxicity in rice (Oryza sativa L.) by reducing arsenic uptake and ameliorates amino acid content and thiol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Dixit, Garima; Singh, Amit Pal; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Srivastava, Sudhakar; Mishra, Kumkum; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2016-11-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic element with the potential to cause health effects in humans. Besides rice is a source of both amino acids (AAs) and mineral nutrients, it is undesired source of As for billions of people consuming rice as the staple food. Selenium (Se) is an essential metalloid, which can regulate As toxicity by strengthening antioxidant potential. The present study was designed to investigate As(III) stress mitigating effect of Se(VI) in rice. The level of As, thiolic ligands and AAs was analyzed in rice seedlings after exposure to As(III)/Se(VI) alone and As(III)+Se(VI) treatments. Selenate supplementation (As(III) 25μM+Se(VI) 25μM) decreased total As accumulation in both root and shoot (179 & 144%) as compared to As(III) alone treatment. The As(III)+Se(VI) treatment also induced the levels of non-protein thiols (NPTs), glutathione (GSH) and phytochelatins (PCs) as compared to As(III) alone treatment and also modulated the activity of enzymes of thiol metabolism. The content of amino acids (AAs) was significantly altered with Se(VI) supplementation. Importantly, essential amino acids (EAAs) were enhanced in As(III)+Se(VI) treatment as compared to As(III) alone treatment. In contrast, stress related non-essential amino acids (NEAAs) like GABA, Glu, Gly, Pro and Cys showed enhanced levels in As(III) alone treatment. In conclusion, rice supplemented with Se(VI) tolerated As toxicity with reduced As accumulation and increased the nutrition quality by increasing EAAs.

  20. Arsenic species excretion after dimercaptopropanesulfonic acid (DMPS) treatment of an acute arsenic trioxide poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinrich-Ramm, R. [Ordinariat fuer Arbeitsmedizin der Universitaet Hamburg und Zentralinstitut fuer Arbeitsmedizin, Hamburg (Germany); Schaller, K.H.; Angerer, J. [Institut und Poliklinik fuer Arbeits-, Sozial- und Umweltmedizin der Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Schillerstr. 25, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Horn, J. [Medizinische Klinik II, Toxikologische-internistische Intensivstation, Klinikum Nuernberg, Nuernberg (Germany)

    2003-02-01

    We studied the urinary excretion of the different arsenic species in urine samples from a young man who tried to commit suicide by ingesting about 0.6 g arsenic trioxide. He received immediate therapy with dimercaptopropanesulfonic acid (DMPS) after his delivery into the hospital. We assessed urinary arsenite (inorganic trivalent arsenic), arsenate (inorganic pentavalent arsenic), pentavalent dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) and pentavalent monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine with ion-exchange chromatography and on-line hydride-technique atomic absorption spectrometry. The predominant amount of the excreted arsenic was unchanged trivalent inorganic arsenic (37.4%), followed by pentavalent inorganic arsenic (2.6%), MMA (2.1%), DMA (0.2%) and one unidentified arsenic species (0.7%, if calculated as DMA). In the first urine voiding in the clinic, the total arsenic concentration was 215 mg/l, which fell 1000-fold after 8 days of DMPS therapy. A most striking finding was the almost complete inhibition of the second methylation step in arsenic metabolism. As mechanisms for the reduced methylation efficiency, the saturation of the enzymatic process of arsenic methylation, the high dosage of antidote DMPS, which might inhibit the activity of the methyl transferases, and analytical reasons are discussed. The high dosage of DMPS is the most likely explanation. The patient left the hospital after a 12-day treatment with antidote. (orig.)

  1. Microbial transformations of arsenic: perspectives for biological removal of arsenic from water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Cavalca; A. Corsini; P. Zaccheo; V. Andreoni; G. Muyzer

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is present in many environments and is released by various natural processes and anthropogenic actions. Although arsenic is recognized to cause a wide range of adverse health effects in humans, diverse bacteria can metabolize it by detoxification and energy conservation reactions. This revie

  2. Arsenic-Induced Genotoxicity and Genetic Susceptibility to Arsenic-Related Pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Bianchi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The arsenic (As exposure represents an important problem in many parts of the World. Indeed, it is estimated that over 100 million individuals are exposed to arsenic, mainly through a contamination of groundwaters. Chronic exposure to As is associated with adverse effects on human health such as cancers, cardiovascular diseases, neurological diseases and the rate of morbidity and mortality in populations exposed is alarming. The purpose of this review is to summarize the genotoxic effects of As in the cells as well as to discuss the importance of signaling and repair of arsenic-induced DNA damage. The current knowledge of specific polymorphisms in candidate genes that confer susceptibility to arsenic exposure is also reviewed. We also discuss the perspectives offered by the determination of biological markers of early effect on health, incorporating genetic polymorphisms, with biomarkers for exposure to better evaluate exposure-response clinical relationships as well as to develop novel preventative strategies for arsenic- health effects.

  3. Neurology and neurologic practice in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Jia, Jian-Ping

    2011-11-29

    In the wake of dramatic economic success during the past 2 decades, the specialized field of neurology has undergone a significant transformation in China. With an increase in life expectancy, the problems of aging and cognition have grown. Lifestyle alterations have been associated with an epidemiologic transition both in the incidence and etiology of stroke. These changes, together with an array of social issues and institution of health care reform, are creating challenges for practicing neurologists throughout China. Notable problems include overcrowded, decrepit facilities, overloaded physician schedules, deteriorating physician-patient relationships, and an insufficient infrastructure to accommodate patients who need specialized neurologic care. Conversely, with the creation of large and sophisticated neurology centers in many cities across the country, tremendous opportunities exist. Developments in neurologic subspecialties enable delivery of high-quality care. Clinical and translational research based on large patient populations as well as highly sophisticated technologies are emerging in many neurologic centers and pharmaceutical companies. Child neurology and neurorehabilitation will be fast-developing subdisciplines. Given China's extensive population, the growth and progress of its neurology complex, and its ever-improving quality control, it is reasonable to anticipate that Chinese neurologists will contribute notably to unraveling the pathogenic factors causing neurologic diseases and to providing new therapeutic solutions.

  4. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also influenced by body composition — people with more muscle and less fat generally have higher BMRs. previous continue Things That Can Go Wrong With Metabolism Most of the time your metabolism works effectively ...

  5. Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008255 Serum adiponectin level declines in the elderly with metabolic syndrome.WU Xiaoyan(吴晓琰),et al.Dept Geriatr,Huashan Hosp,Fudan UnivShanghai200040.Chin J Geriatr2008;27(3):164-167.Objective To investigate the correlation between ser-um adiponectin level and metabolic syndrome in the elderly·Methods Sixty-one subjects with metabolic syndrome and140age matched subjects without metabolic

  6. Biological exposure limit in bone metabolism damage induced by co-exposure to fluorine and arsenic from coal burning%燃煤氟砷致骨代谢损伤的生物暴露限值初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾奇兵; 喻仙; 杨鋆; 洪峰

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the biological exposure limit in bone metabolism damage caused by coexposure to fluorine and arsenic from coal burning in exposed population.Methods One hundred and ninety-eight cases of fluoride and arsenic co-exposed people from Liuchang village,Qinzhen city,Guizhou province were enrolled in the study.Urinary fluorine (UF),urinary arsenic (UAs),urinary hydroxyproline (UHYP),ross-linked Ntelopeptides of type Ⅰ collagen(UNTX) and bone strength index(STI) were detected.BMDS Version 2.1 software was used to calculate UF,UAs benchmark dose (BMD) and its lower confidence limit (BMDL) on the damage of bone metabolism caused by co-exposure to fluorine and arsenic from coal burning.Results The BMD and BMDL range of UF caused by co-exposure to fluorine and arsenic from coal burning were 0.68-1.35 mg/g Cr,0.57-1.11 mg/g Cr.The BMD and BMDL range of UAs caused by co-exposure to fluorine and arsenic from coal burning were 8.36-18.77 μg/g Cr,7.12-15.40 μg/g Cr.Conclusion The biological exposure limits of UF and UAs for bone metabolism toxicity are proposed as 0.57 mg/g Cr and 7.12 μg/g Cr in co-exposure to fluoride and arsenic from coal burning,respectively.%目的 探讨燃煤氟砷致暴露人群骨代谢损伤的生物暴露限值(BEL).方法 2009年选择贵州省清镇市流长乡198例氟砷联合暴露者作为调查对象,分别检测尿氟、尿砷及骨代谢效应标志尿羟脯氨酸(UHYP)和尿Ⅰ型胶原交联氨基末端肽(UNTX)、骨强度指数(STI).应用BMDS Version 2.1软件计算燃煤氟砷致骨代谢损伤的尿氟、尿砷基准剂量(BMD)及其可信限下限(BMDL).结果 氟、砷混合暴露引起骨代谢损伤的尿氟BMD及BMDL范围分别为0.68 ~ 1.35 mg/g Cr和0.57 ~ 1.11 mg/g Cr;尿砷BMD及BMDL范围分别为8.36 ~ 18.77 μg/g Cr和7.12 ~ 15.40 μg/g Cr.结论 建议燃煤氟砷混合暴露引起骨代谢损伤的生物暴露限值,尿氟为0.57 mg/g Cr,尿砷为7.12 μg/g Cr.

  7. Nitric oxide alleviated arsenic toxicity by modulation of antioxidants and thiol metabolism in rice (Oryza sativa L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is a gaseous signalling molecule and has a profound impact on plant growth and development. It is reported to serve as pro oxidant as well as antioxidant in plant system. In present study, we evaluated the protective role of nitric oxide against AsV toxicity in rice plants. Arsenate exposure has hampered the plant growth, reduced the chlorophyll content and enhanced the oxidative stress while the exogenous NO supplementation has reverted these symptoms. Nitric oxide supplementation has reduced the As accumulation in root as well as shoot. Nitric oxide supplementation to AsV exposed plants has reduced the gene expression level of OsLsi1 and OsLsi2. Arsenate stress significantly impacted thiol metabolism, it reduced GSH content and GSH/GSSG ratio and enhanced the level of PCs. Nitric oxide supplementation maintained the GSH/GSSG ratio and reduced the level of PCs. Nitric oxide supplementation reverted AsV induced iron deficiency in shoot and had significant impact of gene expression level of various iron transporters (OsYSL2, OsFRDL1, OsIRT1 and OsIRO2. Conclusively, exogenous application of nitric oxide could be advantageous against AsV toxicity and could confer the tolerance to AsV stress in rice.

  8. American Academy of Neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Meeting by October 24, 2016. SUBMIT NOW It’s Neurology Career Week, October 3–7 The AAN’s Neurology Career Week offers the best Online Job Fair ... AAN is fighting on behalf of neurologists and neurology. Updates on Zika Virus Stay up-to-date ...

  9. Bioaccessibility and degradation of naturally occurring arsenic species from food in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Capilla, Teresa; Beshai, Mona; Maher, William; Kelly, Tamsin; Foster, Simon

    2016-12-01

    Humans are exposed to organic arsenic species through their diet and therefore, are susceptible to arsenic toxicity. Investigating the transformations occurring in the gastrointestinal tract will influence which arsenic species to focus on when studying metabolism in cells. Using a physiologically based extraction test, the bioaccessibility of arsenic species was determined after the simulated gastrointestinal digestion of rice, seaweed and fish. Pure standards of the major arsenic species present in these foodstuffs (arsenic glutathione complexes, arsenosugars and short chain fatty acids) were also evaluated to assess the effect of the food matrix on bioaccessibility and transformation. Approximately 80% of arsenic is released from these foodstuffs, potentially becoming available. Hydrolysis and demethylation of arsenic glutathione complexes and arsenosugars standards was observed, but no transformations occurred to arsenosugars present in seaweed. Demethylation of MA and DMA from rice occurs increasing the amount of inorganic arsenic species available for metabolism. PMID:27374523

  10. Arsenic poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, D.G.

    1974-01-01

    The use of arsenic in ant poisons, herbicides, and insecticides affords the necessary contact with the poison by pets. The gastrointestinal tract appears to suffer the greatest though there may also be injury to the liver and kidneys. The treatments discussed were in relation to very early poisoning in which the owner had observed ingestion of the arsenic, and when the signs of the poisoning were evident. Early observation treatment included emptying the stomach before the arsenic passed in quantity into the intestine. If the signs of toxicity were already advanced, then the treatment consisted of the intramuscular administration of dimercaprol (BAL) at a dosage of 3 mg/lb of body weight three times a day until recovery. l reference.

  11. Factors Affecting Arsenic Methylation in Arsenic-Exposed Humans: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Shen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic arsenic exposure is a critical public health issue in many countries. The metabolism of arsenic in vivo is complicated because it can be influenced by many factors. In the present meta-analysis, two researchers independently searched electronic databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Springer, Embase, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, to analyze factors influencing arsenic methylation. The concentrations of the following arsenic metabolites increase (p< 0.000001 following arsenic exposure: inorganic arsenic (iAs, monomethyl arsenic (MMA, dimethyl arsenic (DMA, and total arsenic. Additionally, the percentages of iAs (standard mean difference (SMD: 1.00; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.60–1.40; p< 0.00001 and MMA (SMD: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.21–0.77; p = 0.0006 also increase, while the percentage of DMA (SMD: −0.57; 95% CI: −0.80–−0.31; p< 0.0001, primary methylation index (SMD: −0.57; 95% CI: −0.94–−0.20; p = 0.002, and secondary methylation index (SMD: −0.27; 95% CI: −0.46–−0.90; p = 0.004 decrease. Smoking, drinking, and older age can reduce arsenic methylation, and arsenic methylation is more efficient in women than in men. The results of this analysis may provide information regarding the role of arsenic oxidative methylation in the arsenic poisoning process.

  12. Aging, the metabolic syndrome, and ischemic stroke: redefining the approach for studying the blood-brain barrier in a complex neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Logsdon, Aric F; Turner, Ryan C; Rosen, Charles L; Huber, Jason D

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) has many important functions in maintaining the brain's immune-privileged status. Endothelial cells, astrocytes, and pericytes have important roles in preserving vasculature integrity. As we age, cell senescence can contribute to BBB compromise. The compromised BBB allows an influx of inflammatory cytokines to enter the brain. These cytokines lead to neuronal and glial damage. Ultimately, the functional changes within the brain can cause age-related disease. One of the most prominent age-related diseases is ischemic stroke. Stroke is the largest cause of disability and is third largest cause of mortality in the United States. The biggest risk factors for stroke, besides age, are results of the metabolic syndrome. The metabolic syndrome, if unchecked, quickly advances to outcomes that include diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. The contribution from these comorbidities to BBB compromise is great. Some of the common molecular pathways activated include: endoplasmic reticulum stress, reactive oxygen species formation, and glutamate excitotoxicity. In this chapter, we examine how age-related changes to cells within the central nervous system interact with comorbidities. We then look at how comorbidities lead to increased risk for stroke through BBB disruption. Finally, we discuss key molecular pathways of interest with a focus on therapeutic targets that warrant further investigation.

  13. Human Arsenic Poisoning Issues in Central-East Indian Locations: Biomarkers and Biochemical Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Piyush Kant; Yadav, Sushma; Pandey, Madhurima

    2007-01-01

    The study reports the use of three biomarkers i.e. total arsenic in hair and nails, total arsenic in blood, and total arsenic in urine to identify or quantify arsenic exposure and concomitant health effects. The main source of arsenic was inorganic exposure through drinking water. The arsenic levels and the health effects were analyzed closely in a family having maximum symptoms of arsenic. Based on the result of this study it is reported that there exist a correlation between the clinically observable symptoms, the blood and urine arsenic level, and the arsenic intake through drinking water. An intensive study on the urinary arsenic levels was carried out in which the urine levels of arsenic and the urine sufficiency tests were performed. A composite picture of body burden of arsenic has been obtained by carrying out a complete biochemical analysis of a maximum affected family. This confirms pronounced chronic exposure of the arsenic to these people. A combined correlation study on the arsenic levels measured in whole blood, urine, hair, nails and age present a remarkable outcome. Accordingly, the arsenic levels in blood are negatively correlated with the urine arsenic levels, which indicate either the inadequacy of the renal system in cleaning the blood arsenic or a continuous recirculation of the accumulated arsenic. This is an important conclusion about arsenical metabolism in humans. The study also raises the issues of the prospects of complete elimination of the accumulated arsenic and the reversibility of the health effects. Based on the work in Kourikasa village we report that there are very remote chances of complete purging of arsenic and thus reversibility of the health effects owing to various factors. The paper also discusses the various issues concerning the chronic arsenic poisoning management in the affected locations. PMID:17431310

  14. Human arsenic poisoning issues in central-east Indian locations: biomarkers and biochemical monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Piyush Kant; Yadav, Sushma; Pandey, Madhurima

    2007-03-01

    The study reports the use of three biomarkers i.e. total arsenic in hair and nails, total arsenic in blood, and total arsenic in urine to identify or quantify arsenic exposure and concomitant health effects. The main source of arsenic was inorganic exposure through drinking water. The arsenic levels and the health effects were analyzed closely in a family having maximum symptoms of arsenic. Based on the result of this study it is reported that there exist a correlation between the clinically observable symptoms, the blood and urine arsenic level, and the arsenic intake through drinking water. An intensive study on the urinary arsenic levels was carried out in which the urine levels of arsenic and the urine sufficiency tests were performed. A composite picture of body burden of arsenic has been obtained by carrying out a complete biochemical analysis of a maximum affected family. This confirms pronounced chronic exposure of the arsenic to these people. A combined correlation study on the arsenic levels measured in whole blood, urine, hair, nails and age present a remarkable outcome. Accordingly, the arsenic levels in blood are negatively correlated with the urine arsenic levels, which indicate either the inadequacy of the renal system in cleaning the blood arsenic or a continuous recirculation of the accumulated arsenic. This is an important conclusion about arsenical metabolism in humans. The study also raises the issues of the prospects of complete elimination of the accumulated arsenic and the reversibility of the health effects. Based on the work in Kourikasa village we report that there are very remote chances of complete purging of arsenic and thus reversibility of the health effects owing to various factors. The paper also discusses the various issues concerning the chronic arsenic poisoning management in the affected locations.

  15. Human Arsenic Poisoning Issues in Central-East Indian Locations: Biomarkers and Biochemical Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhurima Pandey

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The study reports the use of three biomarkers i.e. total arsenic in hair and nails, total arsenic in blood, and total arsenic in urine to identify or quantify arsenic exposure and concomitant health effects. The main source of arsenic was inorganic exposure through drinking water. The arsenic levels and the health effects were analyzed closely in a family having maximum symptoms of arsenic. Based on the result of this study it is reported that there exist a correlation between the clinically observable symptoms, the blood and urine arsenic level, and the arsenic intake through drinking water. An intensive study on the urinary arsenic levels was carried out in which the urine levels of arsenic and the urine sufficiency tests were performed. A composite picture of body burden of arsenic has been obtained by carrying out a complete biochemical analysis of a maximum affected family. This confirms pronounced chronic exposure of the arsenic to these people. A combined correlation study on the arsenic levels measured in whole blood, urine, hair, nails and age present a remarkable outcome. Accordingly, the arsenic levels in blood are negatively correlated with the urine arsenic levels, which indicate either the inadequacy of the renal system in cleaning the blood arsenic or a continuous recirculation of the accumulated arsenic. This is an important conclusion about arsenical metabolism in humans. The study also raises the issues of the prospects of complete elimination of the accumulated arsenic and the reversibility of the health effects. Based on the work in Kourikasa village we report that there are very remote chances of complete purging of arsenic and thus reversibility of the health effects owing to various factors. The paper also discusses the various issues concerning the chronic arsenic poisoning management in the affected locations.

  16. A novel arsenic methyltransferase gene of Westerdykella aurantiaca isolated from arsenic contaminated soil: phylogenetic, physiological, and biochemical studies and its role in arsenic bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shikha; Verma, Pankaj Kumar; Meher, Alok Kumar; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Bansiwal, Amit Kumar; Pande, Veena; Srivastava, Pankaj Kumar; Verma, Praveen Chandra; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2016-03-01

    Elevated arsenic concentration in the environment and agricultural soil is a serious concern to crop production and human health. Among different detoxification mechanisms, the methylation of arsenic is a widespread phenomenon in nature. A number of microorganisms are able to methylate arsenic, but less is known about the arsenic metabolism in fungi. We identified a novel arsenic methyltransferase (WaarsM) gene from a soil fungus, Westerdykella aurantiaca. WaarsM showed sequence homology with all known arsenic methyltransferases having three conserved SAM binding motifs. The expression of WaarsM enhanced arsenic resistance in E. coli (Δars) and S. cerevisiae (Δacr2) strains by biomethylation and required endogenous reductants, preferably GSH, for methyltransferase activity. The purified WaarsM catalyzes the production of methylated arsenicals from both AsIII and AsV, and also displays AsV reductase activity. It displayed higher methyltransferase activity and lower KM 0.1945 ± 0.021 mM and KM 0.4034 ± 0.078 mM for AsIII and AsV, respectively. S. cerevisiae (Δacr2) cells expressing WaarsM produced 2.2 ppm volatile arsenic and 0.64 ppm DMA(v) with 0.58 ppm volatile arsenicals when exposed to 20 ppm AsV and 2 ppm AsIII, respectively. Arsenic tolerance in rice after co-culture with genetically engineered yeast suggested its potential role in arsenic bioremediation. Thus, characterization of WaarsM provides a potential strategy to reduce arsenic concentration in soil with reduced arsenic accumulation in crops grown in arsenic contaminated areas, and thereby alleviating human health risks. PMID:26776948

  17. 无机砷在植物体内的吸收和代谢机制%Absorption and metabolism mechanisms of inorganic arsenic in plants: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘艳丽; 徐莹; 杜克兵; 涂炳坤

    2012-01-01

    砷污染已成为全球非常突出且急需解决的环境问题,严重威胁人类健康和环境安全.在自然环境和土壤系统中,砷的存在形态相当复杂,但植物砷毒害主要源于As(Ⅴ)和As(Ⅲ)暴露.As(Ⅴ)通过Pi的吸收通道被植物根系吸收,并在还原酶(AR)作用下被快速还原为As(Ⅲ).As(Ⅲ)通过NIP蛋白通道进入植物体内,在砷甲基转移酶(ArsM)的作用下转化为甲基化砷或与谷胱甘肽(GSH)、植物螯合肽(PC)等多肽的巯基螯合封存在根部液泡或转运到地上部分,从而起到砷解毒的作用.同时,植物吸收的一部分砷也可外排到外部介质.本文以农作物尤其是水稻为主线,详述了As(Ⅴ)和As(Ⅲ)吸收、外排及As(Ⅴ)还原、As(Ⅲ)甲基化、螯合作用的最新研究进展,并提出了今后的研究重点.%Arsenic pollution seriously threatens human health and environment safety, being a very prominent environmental issue to be urgently solved in the world. In natural environment and soil systems, arsenic exists in complicated forms, but the plant arsenic poisoning is mainly from As ( Ⅴ) and As( Ⅲ) exposure. As(Ⅴ) can be absorbed by plant roots through Pi channel, and reduced rapidly to As( Ⅲ ) by arsenate reductase. As( Ⅲ ) can be transported into plants through NIP channel , and subsequently either transformed into methylated arsenic by arsenic methyltransferase or chelated with the thiol of GSH and PCs. These arsenic compounds can be sequestrated in root cell vacuoles or transported to plant aerial parts. Meanwhile, a part of absorbed arsenic can be discharged to external media. All of these can help to detoxify the arsenic in plants. This paper reviewed the latest research progress on the arsenic- resistance of crops, especially rice, with the focus on the mechanisms of As( Ⅴ) and As( Ⅲ ) absorption and excretion, As( Ⅴ) reduction, and As( Ⅲ) methylation and chelation. The major topics of future research on arsenic toxicity

  18. Neurological complications of chickenpox

    OpenAIRE

    Girija A.; Rafeeque M; Abdurehman K

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To assess the neurological complications of chickenpox with prognosis. Background: The neurological complications occur in 0.03% of persons who get chickenpox. There is no universal vaccination against chicken pox in India. Most patients prefer alternate modalities of treatment. Hence these complications of chickenpox are likely to continue to occur. Study Design: A prospective study was conducted for 2 years (from March 2002) on the admitted cases with neurological complicat...

  19. Biosensors for Inorganic and Organic Arsenicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed and is strongly associated with human health problems, including cancer, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. To date, a number of biosensors for the detection of arsenic involving the coupling of biological engineering and electrochemical techniques has been developed. The properties of whole-cell bacterial or cell-free biosensors are summarized in the present review with emphasis on their sensitivity and selectivity. Their limitations and future challenges are highlighted.

  20. Health effects of arsenic in drinking water: Research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowle, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Research needed to resolve the uncertainties of cancer risk from ingestion of arsenic in drinking water is described. The recommendations fall into two categories reflecting the areas of greatest uncertainty regarding the assessment of arsenic risk: research on the mechanism of cancer, and research on the metabolism and detoxification of arsenic. The recommendations are discussed in light of risk assessment and risk management issues, stressing the need for scientists to interpret research findings for decision managers.

  1. Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a particular food provides to the body. A chocolate bar has more calories than an apple, so ... More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood ...

  2. PLASMID DNA DAMAGE CAUSED BY METHYLATED ARSENICALS, ASCORBIC ACID AND HUMAN LIVER FERRITIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasmid DNA damage caused by methylated arsenicals, ascorbic acid and human liver ferritin. Arsenic causes cancer in human skin, urinary bladder, lung, liver and kidney and is a significant world-wide public health problem. Although the metabolism of inorganic arsenic is ...

  3. Impact of arsenic on nucleotide excision repair : XPC function, protein level, and gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nollen, Maike; Ebert, Franziska; Moser, Jill; Mullenders, Leon H. F.; Hartwig, Andrea; Schwerdtle, Tanja

    2009-01-01

    The ubiquitous Occurrence of the human carcinogen arsenic results ill Multiple exposure possibilities to humans. The human diet, especially drinking water, is the primary source of inorganic arsenic intake in the general population. The ingested arsenic is metabolized to methylated derivatives; some

  4. The Neurologic Manifestations of Mitochondrial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sumit

    2010-01-01

    The nervous system contains some of the body's most metabolically demanding cells that are highly dependent on ATP produced via mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, the neurological system is consistently involved in patients with mitochondrial disease. Symptoms differ depending on the part of the nervous system affected. Although almost…

  5. Neurology and international organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Mateen, Farrah J.

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of international stakeholders are engaged with neurologic diseases. This article provides a brief overview of important international stakeholders in the practice of neurology, including global disease-specific programs, United Nations agencies, governmental agencies with international influence, nongovernmental organizations, international professional organizations, large private donors, private–public partnerships, commercial interests, armed forces, and universities and c...

  6. The Case for Visual Analytics of Arsenic Concentrations in Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omotayo R. Awofolu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a naturally occurring toxic metal and its presence in food could be a potential risk to the health of both humans and animals. Prolonged ingestion of arsenic contaminated water may result in manifestations of toxicity in all systems of the body. Visual Analytics is a multidisciplinary field that is defined as the science of analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces. The concentrations of arsenic vary in foods making it impractical and impossible to provide regulatory limit for each food. This review article presents a case for the use of visual analytics approaches to provide comparative assessment of arsenic in various foods. The topics covered include (i metabolism of arsenic in the human body; (ii arsenic concentrations in various foods; (ii factors affecting arsenic uptake in plants; (ii introduction to visual analytics; and (iv benefits of visual analytics for comparative assessment of arsenic concentration in foods. Visual analytics can provide an information superstructure of arsenic in various foods to permit insightful comparative risk assessment of the diverse and continually expanding data on arsenic in food groups in the context of country of study or origin, year of study, method of analysis and arsenic species.

  7. ASSESSING ARSENIC EXPOSURE AND SKIN HYPERKERATOSIS IN INNER MONGOLIA, CHINA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic is a known human carcinogen. The inorganic forms, especially arsenite (As+3), are believed to be the most toxic species. Methylation is often considered to be thedetoxification pathway for the metabolism of inorganic arsenic. The ground water in Ba Men, Inner Mo...

  8. Effect of glutathione and sodium selenite on the metabolism of arsenic in mice exposed to arsenic through drinking water%谷胱甘肽与亚硒酸钠对饮水砷暴露小鼠体内砷代谢的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于霄云; 钟媛; 牛玉红; 曲春清; 李革新; 吕秀强; 孙贵范; 金亚平

    2008-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of glutathione(GSH)and sodium selenite on the metabolism of arsenic in the liver,kidney and blood of mice exposed to iAsⅢ through drinking water.Methods The mice were randomly divided into control,arsenic,GSH and sodium selenite group,respectively.And each group had eight mice and the mice were exposed to 50 mg/L arsenite by drinking water for 4 weeks.Mice were intraperitoneally injected with GSH(600 mg/kg)and sodium selenite (1 mg/kg)for seven days from the beginning of the fourth week.At the end of the fourth week,liver,kidney and blood were samplod to assess the concentrations of inorganic arsenic(iAs),monomethylarsenic acid(MMA),dimethylarsenic acid(DMA)by hydride generation trapping by ultra-hypothermia coupled with atomic absorption spectrometry.Results The liver DMA(233.76±60.63 ng/g)concentration in GSH group was significantly higher than the arsenic group(218.36±42.71 ng/g).The concentration of DMA (88.52±30.86 ng/g)and total arenic(Tas)(162.32±49.45 ng/g)in blood of GSH group was significantly higher than those[(45.32±12.19 ng/g),(108.51±18.00 ng/g),respectively]of arsenic groups(q values were 3.06,6.40,10.72 respectively,P<0.05).The primary methylated index(PMI)(0.65±0.050)and secondary methyhted index(SMI)(0.55±0.050)in liver sample of GSH group were significantly higher than those(0.58±0.056,0.44±0.093)in arsenic group.In blood samples,the PMI (0.85±0.066)in GSH group was significantly higher than that(0.54±0.113)in arsenic group(q values were 3.75,5.26,4.21 respectively,P<0.05).However,no significant difference was identified between sodium selenite and arsenic groups in liver,kidney or blood samples.And no significant difference was detected in kidney samples among all arsenic exposing groups.Conclusion Exogenous GSH could promote the methylated metabolism of iAsⅢ,but sodium selenite showed no significant effects.%目的 探讨给予外源性谷胱甘肽(GSH)和亚硒酸钠(sodium selenite)对饮

  9. Enfermedades metabólicas en el periodo neonatal con presentación neurológica Inborn errors of metabolism with neurological manifestations in the neonatal period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Campistol

    2007-01-01

    mejorar la precocidad diagnóstica y terapéutica, especialmente con cofactores para reducir la morbimortalidad.Congenital metabolic diseases are considered as rare diseases because of their low incidence and their clinical symptoms at onset. Sometimes they can just begin in the neonatal period. Their progressive knowledge and the availability of specific and sensitive biochemical procedures allow us to diagnose many congenital metabolic diseases, which were not recognized some years ago. We reviewed the 52 patients with congenital metabolic diseases diagnosed during the last 25 years in our centre, evaluating the clinical presentation, neurological symptoms, complementary exams and clinical evolution. The mean age at onset of symptoms was 5 days and the mean age at diagnosis was 88 days of age. We considered a first group of 36 patients with inborn errors of intermediary metabolism, in whom hypotonia, weight loss and seizures are the main symptoms. The second group was composed of 8 patients with defective energy metabolism, who showed abnormal respiratory rhythm and hypotonia. Finally, we considered 8 patients with diseases of the complex molecules, who presented with hypotonia and cataracts as common symptoms at onset. The more common neurological symptoms in this period were hypotonia (60%, sensorial deficit (35% and refractory seizures (23%. The complementary laboratory tests in the first phases of the diseases allowed us to suspect a congenital metabolic disease especially among intermediary and energy defects. EEG and CSF samples were important to diagnose some inborn errors of intermediary metabolism. In the first steps, the neuroimaging was less orientative, even if it allow the exclusion of other diseases. More than half of the patients with inborn errors of metabolism with onset in the neonatal period died within the first two years of life. It is really important to suspect these diseases in the neonatal period so as to achieve an early diagnosis and prompt

  10. [Palliative care in neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provinciali, Leandro; Tarquini, Daniela; De Falco, Fabrizio A; Carlini, Giulia; Zappia, Mario; Toni, Danilo

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care in neurology is characterized by the need of taking into account some distinguishing features which supplement and often differ from the general palliative approach to cancer or to severe organ failures. Such position is emphasized by a new concept of palliative assistance which is not limited to the "end of life" stage, as it was the traditional one, but is applied along the entire course of progressive, life-limiting, and disabling conditions. There are various reasons accounting for a differentiation of palliative care in neurology and for the development of specific expertise; the long duration of the advanced stages of many neurological diseases and the distinguishing features of some clinical problems (cognitive disorders, psychic disorders, etc.), in addition to the deterioration of some general aspects (nutrition, etc.), make the general criteria adopted for cancer, severe respiratory, hepatic or renal failures and heart failure inadequate. The neurological diseases which could benefit from the development of a specific palliative approach are dementia, cerebrovascular diseases, movement disorders, neuromuscular diseases, severe traumatic brain injury, brain cancers and multiple sclerosis, as well as less frequent conditions. The growing literature on palliative care in neurology provides evidence of the neurological community's increasing interest in taking care of the advanced and terminal stages of nervous system diseases, thus encouraging research, training and updating in such direction. This document aims to underline the specific neurological requirements concerning the palliative assistance. PMID:26228722

  11. Earth Abides Arsenic Biotransformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong-Guan; Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-05-01

    Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic element and causes health problems throughout the world. The toxicity, mobility, and fate of arsenic in the environment are largely determined by its speciation, and arsenic speciation changes are driven, at least to some extent, by biological processes. In this article, biotransformation of arsenic is reviewed from the perspective of the formation of Earth and the evolution of life, and the connection between arsenic geochemistry and biology is described. The article provides a comprehensive overview of molecular mechanisms of arsenic redox and methylation cycles as well as other arsenic biotransformations. It also discusses the implications of arsenic biotransformation in environmental remediation and food safety, with particular emphasis on groundwater arsenic contamination and arsenic accumulation in rice.

  12. Neurological Complications of AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS Neurological Complications of AIDS Fact Sheet Feature Federal domestic HIV/AIDS information ... Where can I get more information? What is AIDS? AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is a condition ...

  13. Congress of Neurological Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the Month September 2016 32-Year-Old Female with Numbness How would you treat this month's ... All Events Corporate Partners Learn More About Our Industry Allies Council Partners Congress of Neurological Surgeons 10 ...

  14. Haematology and neurology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Steven; Cohen, Hannah; Losseff, Nick

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to update the reader on advances in the understanding of haematological conditions that may arise in neurological practice. Thrombophilia, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, sickle cell and clonal disorders associated with neuropathy are discussed. PMID:17369588

  15. Neurologic emergencies in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, J O

    1991-06-01

    Any one neurologic emergency is rare during pregnancy. As a group, neurologic disorders are a major cause of maternal mortality. Optimal management requires a multidisciplinary approach and ready access to the collective experience of other clinicians. This article discusses the management of status epilepticus, eclamptic hypertensive encephalopathy, stroke, including subarachnoid hemorrhage, myasthenic crisis, porphyric crisis, acute Guillain-Barré syndrome, autonomic hyperreflexia, malignant hyperthermia, chorea gravidarum, and Wernicke's encephalopathy. PMID:1945251

  16. Post dengue neurological complication

    OpenAIRE

    Hasliza, AH; Tohid, H; Loh, KY; Santhi, P

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is highly endemic in many tropical countries including Malaysia. However, neurological complications arising from dengue infection is not common; Gullain–Barre syndrome (GBS) is one of these infrequent complications. In this paper, we have reported a case in which a 39-year-old woman presented with a neurological complication of dengue infection without typical symptoms and signs of dengue fever. She had a history of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) followed by an upper respirator...

  17. Neurology in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chong-Tin

    2015-02-10

    Asia is important as it accounts for more than half of the world population. The majority of Asian countries fall into the middle income category. As for cultural traditions, Asia is highly varied, with many languages spoken. The pattern of neurologic diseases in Asia is largely similar to the West, with some disease features being specific to Asia. Whereas Asia constitutes 60% of the world's population, it contains only 20% of the world's neurologists. This disparity is particularly evident in South and South East Asia. As for neurologic care, it is highly variable depending on whether it is an urban or rural setting, the level of economic development, and the system of health care financing. To help remedy the shortage of neurologists, most counties with larger populations have established training programs in neurology. These programs are diverse, with many areas of concern. There are regional organizations serving as a vehicle for networking in neurology and various subspecialties, as well as an official journal (Neurology Asia). The Asian Epilepsy Academy, with its emphasis on workshops in various locations, EEG certification examination, and fellowships, may provide a template of effective regional networking for improving neurology care in the region.

  18. Wikipedia and neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Nardone, Raffaele; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Otte, Willem M

    2015-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate Wikipedia page visits in relation to the most common neurological disorders by determining which factors are related to peaks in Wikipedia searches for these conditions. Millions of people worldwide use the internet daily as a source of health information. Wikipedia is a popular free online encyclopedia used by patients and physicians to search for health-related information. The following Wikipedia articles were considered: Alzheimer's disease; Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; Dementia; Epilepsy; Epileptic seizure; Migraine; Multiple sclerosis; Parkinson's disease; Stroke; Traumatic brain injury. We analyzed information regarding the total article views for 90 days and the rank of these articles among all those available in Wikipedia. We determined the highest search volume peaks to identify possible relation with online news headlines. No relation between incidence or prevalence of neurological disorders and the search volume for the related articles was found. Seven out of 10 neurological conditions showed relations in search volume peaks and news headlines. Six out of these seven peaks were related to news about famous people suffering from neurological disorders, especially those from showbusiness. Identification of discrepancies between disease burden and health seeking behavior on Wikipedia is useful in the planning of public health campaigns. Celebrities who publicly announce their neurological diagnosis might effectively promote awareness programs, increase public knowledge and reduce stigma related to diagnoses of neurological disorders. PMID:25890773

  19. Massive acute arsenic poisonings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Teresa; Trela, Franciszek

    2005-07-16

    Arsenic poisonings are still important in the field of toxicology, though they are not as frequent as about 20-30 years ago. In this paper, the arsenic concentrations in ante- and post-mortem materials, and also forensic and anatomo-pathological aspects in three cases of massive acute poisoning with arsenic(III) oxide (two of them with unexplained criminalistic background, in which arsenic was taken for amphetamine and one suicide), are presented. Ante-mortem blood and urine arsenic concentrations ranged from 2.3 to 6.7 microg/ml, respectively. Post-mortem tissue total arsenic concentrations were also detected in large concentrations. In case 3, the contents of the duodenum contained as much as 30.1% arsenic(III) oxide. The high concentrations of arsenic detected in blood and tissues in all presented cases are particularly noteworthy in that they are very rarely detected at these concentrations in fatal arsenic poisonings. PMID:15939162

  20. Rett syndrome: Neurologic and metabolic aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Poll-The, B.T.; Duran, M; Koelman, J. H. T. M.; Hagebeuk, E.E.O.

    2013-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that occurs almost exclusively in females. It was described in 1954 by Andreas Rett, an Australian neuropediatrician. After a period of apparently normal development, affected patients experience loss of speech and purposeful handuse, stereotypic hand movements, and gait abnormalities. Additional findings include deceleration of head growth, autistic features, breathing abnormalities, and seizures. In the majority of patients, Rett syndrome...

  1. Rett syndrome: Neurologic and metabolic aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.E.O. Hagebeuk

    2013-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that occurs almost exclusively in females. It was described in 1954 by Andreas Rett, an Australian neuropediatrician. After a period of apparently normal development, affected patients experience loss of speech and purposeful handuse, stereotypic

  2. Mathematical model insights into arsenic detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nijhout H Frederik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic in drinking water, a major health hazard to millions of people in South and East Asia and in other parts of the world, is ingested primarily as trivalent inorganic arsenic (iAs, which then undergoes hepatic methylation to methylarsonic acid (MMAs and a second methylation to dimethylarsinic acid (DMAs. Although MMAs and DMAs are also known to be toxic, DMAs is more easily excreted in the urine and therefore methylation has generally been considered a detoxification pathway. A collaborative modeling project between epidemiologists, biologists, and mathematicians has the purpose of explaining existing data on methylation in human studies in Bangladesh and also testing, by mathematical modeling, effects of nutritional supplements that could increase As methylation. Methods We develop a whole body mathematical model of arsenic metabolism including arsenic absorption, storage, methylation, and excretion. The parameters for arsenic methylation in the liver were taken from the biochemical literature. The transport parameters between compartments are largely unknown, so we adjust them so that the model accurately predicts the urine excretion rates of time for the iAs, MMAs, and DMAs in single dose experiments on human subjects. Results We test the model by showing that, with no changes in parameters, it predicts accurately the time courses of urinary excretion in mutiple dose experiments conducted on human subjects. Our main purpose is to use the model to study and interpret the data on the effects of folate supplementation on arsenic methylation and excretion in clinical trials in Bangladesh. Folate supplementation of folate-deficient individuals resulted in a 14% decrease in arsenicals in the blood. This is confirmed by the model and the model predicts that arsenicals in the liver will decrease by 19% and arsenicals in other body stores by 26% in these same individuals. In addition, the model predicts that arsenic

  3. Genomics in Neurological Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangchun Han; Jiya Sun; Jiajia Wang; Zhouxian Bai; Fuhai Song; Hongxing Lei

    2014-01-01

    Neurological disorders comprise a variety of complex diseases in the central nervous system, which can be roughly classified as neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. The basic and translational research of neurological disorders has been hindered by the difficulty in accessing the pathological center (i.e., the brain) in live patients. The rapid advancement of sequencing and array technologies has made it possible to investigate the disease mechanism and biomarkers from a systems perspective. In this review, recent progresses in the discovery of novel risk genes, treatment targets and peripheral biomarkers employing genomic technologies will be dis-cussed. Our major focus will be on two of the most heavily investigated neurological disorders, namely Alzheimer’s disease and autism spectrum disorder.

  4. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje;

    2014-01-01

    was performed. MRI assessment included age-related white matter changes (ARWMC) grading (mild, moderate, severe according to the Fazekas' scale), count of lacunar and non-lacunar infarcts, and global atrophy rating. Of the 633 (out of the 639 enrolled) patients with follow-up information (mean age 74.1 ± 5......, presence and number of neurological examination abnormalities predicted global functional decline independent of MRI lesions typical of the aging brain and other determinants of disability in the elderly. Systematically checking for neurological examination abnormalities in older patients may be cost...

  5. Creativity and neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Lealani Mae Y

    2014-08-01

    Although humans have long valued creativity, the generation of such innovation is still incompletely understood. Looking at the healthy brain, researchers have localized certain parts for a basic understanding of these mechanisms. By researching the brain affected by neurological disease, scientists have observed unique manifestations of creativity, such as in frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and parkinsonian spectrum disorders, and stroke, which help clarify these creative underpinnings. Incorporating both healthy and disease models of cerebral functioning, neurological and neuroscientific research from recent years has built on established theories and expanded current knowledge. PMID:24938215

  6. Dengue: a new challenge for neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Puccioni-Sohler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue infection is a leading cause of illness and death in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Forty percent of the world’s population currently lives in these areas. The clinical picture resulting from dengue infection can range from relatively minor to catastrophic hemorrhagic fever. Recently, reports have increased of neurological manifestations. Neuropathogenesis seems to be related to direct nervous system viral invasion, autoimmune reaction, metabolic and hemorrhagic disturbance. Neurological manifestations include encephalitis, encephalopathy, meningitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, myelitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, polyneuropathy, mononeuropathy, and cerebromeningeal hemorrhage. The development of neurological symptoms in patients with positive Immunoglobulin M (IgM dengue serology suggests a means of diagnosing the neurological complications associated with dengue. Viral antigens, specific IgM antibodies, and the intrathecal synthesis of dengue antibodies have been successfully detected in cerebrospinal fluid. However, despite diagnostic advancements, the treatment of neurological dengue is problematic. The launch of a dengue vaccine is expected to be beneficial.

  7. Arsenic Trioxide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic trioxide is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL; a type of cancer in which there ... worsened following treatment with other types of chemotherapy. Arsenic trioxide is in a class of medications called ...

  8. Cryptic exposure to arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossy, Kathleen M; Janusz, Christopher A; Schwartz, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Arsenic is an odorless, colorless and tasteless element long linked with effects on the skin and viscera. Exposure to it may be cryptic. Although human intake can occur from four forms, elemental, inorganic (trivalent and pentavalent arsenic) and organic arsenic, the trivalent inorganic arsenicals constitute the major human hazard. Arsenic usually reaches the skin from occupational, therapeutic, or environmental exposure, although it still may be employed as a poison. Occupations involving new technologies are not exempt from arsenic exposure. Its acute and chronic effects are noteworthy. Treatment options exist for arsenic-induced pathology, but prevention of toxicity remains the main focus. Vitamin and mineral supplementation may play a role in the treatment of arsenic toxicity.

  9. Cryptic exposure to arsenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossy Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is an odorless, colorless and tasteless element long linked with effects on the skin and viscera. Exposure to it may be cryptic. Although human intake can occur from four forms, elemental, inorganic (trivalent and pentavalent arsenic and organic arsenic, the trivalent inorganic arsenicals constitute the major human hazard. Arsenic usually reaches the skin from occupational, therapeutic, or environmental exposure, although it still may be employed as a poison. Occupations involving new technologies are not exempt from arsenic exposure. Its acute and chronic effects are noteworthy. Treatment options exist for arsenic-induced pathology, but prevention of toxicity remains the main focus. Vitamin and mineral supplementation may play a role in the treatment of arsenic toxicity.

  10. Arsenic: the forgotten poison?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, E N; Gilbert, D T; Raju, K; Morgan, O S

    1992-03-01

    Chronic arsenic poisoning is an uncommon cause of peripheral neuropathy in Jamaica. A patient with this disorder is described. The insidious nature of chronic arsenic poisoning, with its disabling complications, is emphasised.

  11. Bioaccessibility and excretion of arsenic in Niu Huang Jie Du Pian pills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) often contain significant levels of potentially toxic elements, including arsenic. Niu Huang Jie Du Pian pills were analyzed to determine the concentration, bioaccessibility (arsenic fraction soluble in the human gastrointestinal system) and chemical form (speciation) of arsenic. Arsenic excretion in urine (including speciation) and facial hair were studied after a one-time ingestion. The pills contained arsenic in the form of realgar, and although the total arsenic that was present in a single pill was high (28 mg), the low bioaccessibility of this form of arsenic predicted that only 4% of it was available for absorption into the bloodstream (1 mg of arsenic per pill). The species of arsenic that were solubilized were inorganic arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) but DMAA and MMAA were detected in urine. Two urinary arsenic excretion peaks were observed: an initial peak several (4-8) hours after ingestion corresponding to the excretion of predominantly As(III), and a larger peak at 14 h corresponding predominantly to DMAA and MMAA. No methylated As(III) species were observed. Facial hair analysis revealed that arsenic concentrations did not increase significantly as a result of the ingestion. Arsenic is incompletely soluble under human gastrointestinal conditions, and is metabolized from the inorganic to organic forms found in urine. Bioaccessible arsenic is comparable to the quantity excreted. Facial hair as a bio-indicator should be further tested

  12. Rapid biotransformation of arsenic by a model protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin Xixiang [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); State Key Lab of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhang Yongyu; Yang Jun [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Zhu Yongguan, E-mail: ygzhu@rcees.ac.cn [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); State Key Lab of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Arsenic biomethylation and biovolatilization are thought to be two important metabolic pathways in aquatic and soil environments. Tetrahymena thermophila is a genus of free-living ciliated protozoan that is widely distributed in freshwater environments around the world. In this study, we studied arsenic accumulation, speciation, efflux, methylation and volatilization in this unicellular eukaryote exposed to various concentrations of arsenate. Our results show that T. thermophila accumulated 187 mg.kg{sup -1} dry weight of arsenic when exposed to 40 {mu}M for 48 h, with MMAs(V) (monomethylarsenate) and DMAs(V) (dimethylarsenate) as the dominant species, accounting for 66% of the total arsenic. Meanwhile, arsenate, arsenite, MMAs(V) and DMAs(V) were detected in the culture medium; the last three were released by the cells. The production of volatile arsenic increased with increasing external As(V) concentrations and exposure time. To our knowledge, this is the first study on arsenic metabolism, particularly biomethylation and biovolatilization, in protozoa. - Tetrahymena thermophila can rapidly methylate arsenic, and produce volatile arsenicals.

  13. Dengue: a new challenge for neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Marzia Puccioni-Sohler; Marco Orsini; Cristiane N. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Dengue infection is a leading cause of illness and death in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Forty percent of the world’s population currently lives in these areas. The clinical picture resulting from dengue infection can range from relatively minor to catastrophic hemorrhagic fever. Recently, reports have increased of neurological manifestations. Neuropathogenesis seems to be related to direct nervous system viral invasion, autoimmune reaction, metabolic and hemorrhagic disturb...

  14. Arsenic pollution sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garelick, Hemda; Jones, Huw; Dybowska, Agnieszka; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic is a widely dispersed element in the Earth's crust and exists at an average concentration of approximately 5 mg/kg. There are many possible routes of human exposure to arsenic from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Arsenic occurs as a constituent in more than 200 minerals, although it primarily exists as arsenopyrite and as a constituent in several other sulfide minerals. The introduction of arsenic into drinking water can occur as a result of its natural geological presence in local bedrock. Arsenic-containing bedrock formations of this sort are known in Bangladesh, West Bengal (India), and regions of China, and many cases of endemic contamination by arsenic with serious consequences to human health are known from these areas. Significant natural contamination of surface waters and soil can arise when arsenic-rich geothermal fluids come into contact with surface waters. When humans are implicated in causing or exacerbating arsenic pollution, the cause can almost always be traced to mining or mining-related activities. Arsenic exists in many oxidation states, with arsenic (III) and (V) being the most common forms. Similar to many metalloids, the prevalence of particular species of arsenic depends greatly on the pH and redox conditions of the matrix in which it exists. Speciation is also important in determining the toxicity of arsenic. Arsenic minerals exist in the environment principally as sulfides, oxides, and phosphates. In igneous rocks, only those of volcanic origin are implicated in high aqueous arsenic concentrations. Sedimentary rocks tend not to bear high arsenic loads, and common matrices such as sands and sandstones contain lower concentrations owing to the dominance of quartz and feldspars. Groundwater contamination by arsenic arises from sources of arsenopyrite, base metal sulfides, realgar and orpiment, arsenic-rich pyrite, and iron oxyhydroxide. Mechanisms by which arsenic is released from minerals are varied and are accounted for by

  15. Urinary arsenic speciation profile in ethnic group of the Atacama desert (Chile) exposed to variable arsenic levels in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez, Jorge; Mansilla, Héctor D; Santander, I Paola; Fierro, Vladimir; Cornejo, Lorena; Barnes, Ramón M; Amarasiriwardena, Dulasiri

    2015-01-01

    Ethnic groups from the Atacama Desert (known as Atacameños) have been exposed to natural arsenic pollution for over 5000 years. This work presents an integral study that characterizes arsenic species in water used for human consumption. It also describes the metabolism and arsenic elimination through urine in a chronically exposed population in northern Chile. In this region, water contained total arsenic concentrations up to 1250 μg L(-1), which was almost exclusively As(V). It is also important that this water was ingested directly from natural water sources without any treatment. The ingested arsenic was extensively methylated. In urine 93% of the arsenic was found as methylated arsenic species, such as monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)]. The original ingested inorganic species [As(V)], represent less than 1% of the total urinary arsenic. Methylation activity among individuals can be assessed by measuring primary [inorganic As/methylated As] and secondary methylation [MMA/DMA] indexes. Both methylation indexes were 0.06, indicating a high biological converting capability of As(V) into MMA and then MMA into DMA, compared with the control population and other arsenic exposed populations previously reported.

  16. 吸烟与饮酒对不同浓度饮水型砷暴露人群尿砷代谢模式的影响%Effects of smoking and alcohol drinking on arsenic metabolism of people exposed to different concentrations of arsenic in drinking water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘博莹; 王达; 张强; 郑全美; 孙贵范

    2012-01-01

    浓度砷暴露的情况下,吸烟饮酒人群对砷的甲基化能力低于非吸烟饮酒人群.%Objective To explore the effects of smoking and alcohol drinking on arsenic metabolism of people exposed to different concentrations of arsenic in drinking water.Methods Residents in Shanxi exposed to different concentrations of arsenic in drinking water and age ≥ 18 years old adults were chosen as the subjects for this study in 2008,the subjects were divided into three groups according to the concentrations of arsenic in drinking water: high-arsenic exposure group (more than 0.05 mg/L),low-arsenic exposure group (between 0.01 and 0.05 mg/L) and control group(less than 0.01 mg/L),excluded recently had eaten seafood and had poisoning symptoms of chronic arsenic in drinking water in the crowd.Smoking and alcohol drinking habits were investigated by questionnaire.Arsenic species in the urine samples were detected with hydride generation atomic absorption spectroscopy.Total arsenic(tAs) was the sum of iAs%,MMA% and DMA%.iAs%,MMA% and DMA% were calculated as iAs/tAs,MMA/tAs and DMA/tAs,respectively.The first methylation ratio(FMR) and the secondary methylation ratio(SMR) were calculated as (MMA + DMA)/tAs and DMA/(MMA + DMA),respectively.Results Three hundred and ninety-five adults were chosen in this study.In the high exposure group the alcohol drinking and smoking subjects had higher MMA%(16.24%) but lower SMR(82.19% ) than the non-drinking and non-smoking subjects (12.16% and 86.13%,respectively).The differences of both MMA% and SMR were significant(P < 0.05 ).No significant difference was observed between the non-smoking/non-drinking subjects and the smoking or the drinking subjects(all P > 0.05 ).In the low exposure group there were higher MMA%( 13.86%,13.99%) lower DMA%(72.87%,77.76%)and lower SMR (83.48%,83.90% ) in those with smoking or drinking/smoking compared with the non-drinking and non-smoking subjects (11.83%,80

  17. Arsenic compounds toxic to rice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epps, E.A.; Sturgis, M.B.

    1939-01-01

    A study has been made of the kinds of arsenic compounds that may be toxic to rice and of means for correcting the toxicity. Some of the arsenic compounds in flooded soils are reduced, with consequent increase in soluble arsenic content of the soil and decrease in total arsenic content due to liberation of gaseous compounds of arsenic. It was demonstrated that some of the arsenic was lost as arsine. Many of the naturally-occurring compounds of arsenic are not attacked by the micro-organisms and do not become more soluble. Additions of sulfur to soils containing toxic amounts of arsenic decreased the amount of soluble arsenic in the soil.

  18. Arsenic cardiotoxicity: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamolhodaei, Nafiseh Sadat; Shirani, Kobra; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic, a naturally ubiquitous element, is found in foods and environment. Cardiac dysfunction is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. Arsenic exposure is associated with various cardiopathologic effects including ischemia, arrhythmia and heart failure. Possible mechanisms of arsenic cardiotoxicity include oxidative stress, DNA fragmentation, apoptosis and functional changes of ion channels. Several evidences have shown that mitochondrial disruption, caspase activation, MAPK signaling and p53 are the pathways for arsenic induced apoptosis. Arsenic trioxide is an effective and potent antitumor agent used in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia and produces dramatic remissions. As2O3 administration has major limitations such as T wave changes, QT prolongation and sudden death in humans. In this review, we discuss the underlying pathobiology of arsenic cardiotoxicity and provide information about cardiac health effects associated with some medicinal plants in arsenic toxicity.

  19. Arsenic removal from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robert C.; Anderson, D. Richard

    2007-07-24

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  20. Neurological crisis mimicking acute pancreatitis in tyrosinemia type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkanoğlu, H S; Coşkun, T

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia results from an inborn error in the final step of tyrosine metabolism. Neurological manifestations have been reported in nearly half of patients during illness to have characteristics of altered consciousness, weakness, anorexia, vomiting, and pain in the extremities and abdomen. His physical findings and laboratory results pointed out acute pancreatitis. There have been some reports of acute and chronic pancreatitis in patients with metabolic diseases; however, this is the first case with tyrosinemia type I who exhibited clinical and biochemical findings of acute pancreatitis during neurological crisis. The presented case suggests the possibility that the pancreas is affected in neurological crisis. The determination of amylase concentration both in serum and urine samples of further cases will clarity the association between pancreatitis and neurological crisis. PMID:10770119

  1. Vaccination and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Gkampeta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active immunization of children has been proven very effective in elimination of life threatening complications of many infectious diseases in developed countries. However, as vaccination-preventable infectious diseases and their complications have become rare, the interest focuses on immunization-related adverse reactions. Unfortunately, fear of vaccination-related adverse effects can led to decreased vaccination coverage and subsequent epidemics of infectious diseases. This review includes reports about possible side effects following vaccinations in children with neurological disorders and also published recommendations about vaccinating children with neurological disorders. From all international published data anyone can conclude that vaccines are safer than ever before, but the challenge remains to convey this message to society.

  2. The Neurology of Proverbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Van Lancker

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Although proverb tests are commonly used in the mental status examination surprisingly little is known about either normal comprehension or the interpretation of proverbial expressions. Current proverbs tests have conceptual and linguistic shortcomings, and few studies have been done to investigate the specific effects of neurological and psychiatric disorders on the interpretation of proverbs. Although frontal lobes have traditionally been impugned in patients who are “concrete”, recent studies targeting deficient comprehension of non literal language (e.g. proverbs, idioms, speech formulas, and indirect requests point to an important role of the right hemisphere (RH. Research describing responses of psychiatrically and neurologically classified groups to tests of proverb and idiom usage is needed to clarify details of aberrant processing of nonliteral meanings. Meanwhile, the proverb test, drawing on diverse cognitive skills, is a nonspecific but sensitive probe of mental status.

  3. Post dengue neurological complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasliza, A H; Tohid, H; Loh, K Y; Santhi, P

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is highly endemic in many tropical countries including Malaysia. However, neurological complications arising from dengue infection is not common; Gullain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is one of these infrequent complications. In this paper, we have reported a case in which a 39-year-old woman presented with a neurological complication of dengue infection without typical symptoms and signs of dengue fever. She had a history of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) followed by an upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) weeks prior to her presentation rendering GBS secondary to the post viral URTI and AGE as the most likely diagnosis. Presence of thrombocytopenia was the only clue for dengue in this case. PMID:27099661

  4. Neurology and detective writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempster, Peter A; Lees, Andrew J

    2013-12-01

    When searching for clues to reach a diagnosis, neurologists often empathise with the detective who is trying to solve a case. The premise of this article is that detective stories have been part of the fabric of neurology ever since the time that it evolved into a discrete medical speciality. We will examine how this form of narrative has found expression in detective mystery fiction and popular science publications created by 20th century neurologist physician-writers. We will also investigate the power of the neurologist's alter ego, Sherlock Holmes: his relationship to founders of clinical neuroscience such as Jean-Martin Charcot, William Gowers and Sigmund Freud, and his influences on neurological practice and its literary traditions. PMID:24006370

  5. Neurological legal disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishna H

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurological disorders with a prolonged course, either remediable or otherwise are being seen increasingly in clinical practice and many such patients are young and are part of some organization or other wherein their services are needed if they were healthy and fit. The neurologists who are on the panel of these organizations are asked to certify whether these subjects are fit to work or how long they should be given leave. These certificates may be produced in the court of law and may be subjected to verification by another neurologist or a medical board. At present there are no standard guidelines in our country to effect such certification unlike in orthopedic specialty or in ophthalmology. The following is a beginning, based on which the neurologist can certify the neurological disability of such subjects and convey the same meaning to all neurologists across the country.

  6. Welcome to Neurology: Genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Pulst, Stefan M.

    2015-01-01

    The powers of human genetics and genetic technologies have transformed the complexities of neurology and neuroscience at the basic, translational, and now also the clinical level. We have left an era of black and white views of causative genetic variation and are entering a period of more than 50 shades of grey, fascinated with DNA variants that increase or decrease risk, epigenetic modification, and an unexpectedly large number of variants of unknown or potentially pathogenic significance. L...

  7. Hither neurology: research.

    OpenAIRE

    Warlow, C P

    1992-01-01

    Neurological disability may be prevented, or it may be alleviated if prevention is impossible or ineffective. Research into prevention and alleviation can be "laboratory" or "clinical", the latter being no less scientific than the former. All proposed treatments must be properly evaluated to ensure that effective interventions are widely adopted and ineffective ones abandoned. Unless an intervention has a major effect on outcome (which most do not), the most efficient assessment is by random ...

  8. Astroglia in neurological diseases

    OpenAIRE

    VERKHRATSKY, ALEXEI; Rodríguez, José J.; Parpura, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Astroglia encompass a subset of versatile glial cells that fulfill a major homeostatic role in the mammalian brain. Since any brain disease results from failure in brain homeostasis, astroglial cells are involved in many, if not all, aspects of neurological and/or psychiatric disorders. In this article, the roles of astrocytes as homeostatic cells in healthy and diseased brains are surveyed. These cells can mount the defence response to the insult of the brain, astrogliosis, when and where th...

  9. Feline neurology. Diagnostic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The definitive diagnosis of neurologic conditions in cats, as well as other species, has been greatly facilitated by rapid development of new techniques. In some cases, these developments have involved refinements of existing methods, whereas in others, essentially new techniques have evolved. Diagnostic tests developed in earlier years also continue to be of value. The application of many of these techniques is illustrated throughout this text. In this chapter, attention is focused on certain particularly valuable tests

  10. 砷化合物致人表皮癌A431细胞的毒性及氧化应激和砷代谢研究%Cytotoxicity,oxidative stress and arsenic metabolism in human skin basal cell carcinoma cell (A431) induced by different speciations of arsenic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆景坤; 田艳; 俞腾飞; 陈朝军; 王一博; 尹若熙

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress and arsenic metabolism induced by different speciations of arsenic in human skin basal carcinoma cell (A431). Methods Cultured A431 cells were exposed to 0.05—50.0 μmol/L methylarsonous acid (MMAⅢ), 0.05-200.0 μmol/L arsenic trioxide (As2O3,As3+) , 0.5-500.0 μmol/L disodium hydrogen arsenate(As5+) or sodium dimethylarsonate(DMAⅤ) for 24 h, respectively. MTT assay were used to evaluate the cell viability, the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and the activity of the superoxide dismutase (SOU) in HaCaT were detected respectively. The intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected with flow cytometry and the atomic fluorescence were used to analyze intracellular or extracellular levels of different speciations of arsenic. Results When the dose was in a certain range, MMAⅢ (≥0.5μmol/L), As2O3 (≥200.0 μmol/L), disodium hydrogen arsenate (0.5, ≥200.0 μmol/L)and sodium dimethylarsonate (500.0 μmoL/L) could all decrease the cell viability (P50.0 μmol/L As2O3> 100.0 μmol/L disodium hydrogen arsenate > 100.0 μmol/L sodium dimethylarsonate. As for As2O3 and disodium hydrogen arsenate, the methylation ratios in low—dose groups were higher than the high—dose ones' , and the ratios in As2O3 groups was higher than those in As5+ groups. Conclusion Arsenides may inhibit A431 cells proliferation in higher exposure levels and promote proliferation in lower exposure levels, the mechanism probably relates to oxidative stress and arsenic metabolism in A431 cells induced by different speciations of arsenide with various concentrations.%目的 探讨不同砷化合物致人表皮癌细胞(A431)的细胞毒性及氧化应激和砷代谢的情况.方法 培养的A431细胞分别暴露于0.05~50.0 μmol/L一甲基亚胂酸(MMAⅢ),0.05~200.0 μmol/L三氧化二砷(As2O3,As3+),0.5~500.0μmol/L砷酸氢二纳(As5+)和二甲基胂酸钠(DMAV)24 h,应用四甲基偶氮唑盐(MTT)法测定细

  11. Neurology check list. 5. rev. and enl. ed.; Checkliste Neurologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grehl, Holger [Evangelisches und Johanniter Klinikum, Duisburg (Germany). Neurologische Klinik; Reinhardt, Frank

    2013-02-01

    The neurology check list covers the following issues, organized in four parts: Grey part - diagnostic fundamentals, therapeutic principles: clinical neurological examination, liquor puncture, specific laboratory diagnostics, neurophysical diagnostics, imaging techniques, therapeutic principles, legal aspects, neurological assessment. Green Part - leading syndromes and leading symptoms. Blue part - neurological disease appearance: pains in head and face, pain syndrome, congenital and development disturbances, liquor circulation disturbances, ZNS hemorrhages, tumors and neoplasm, paraneoplastic syndromes, inflammatory diseases of the nervous system, dementia diseases, metabolic and other encephalopathy, cerebellum diseases and system surmounting processes, movement degeneration, basal ganglion diseases, epilepsy, non-epileptic attacks, medulla diseases, brain nerve diseases, plexus lesions, radicular lesions, peripheric neuropathy, neuromuscular transfer disturbances, muscular diseases. Red part: neurological intensive medicine.

  12. Simulation in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micieli, Giuseppe; Cavallini, Anna; Santalucia, Paola; Gensini, Gianfranco

    2015-10-01

    Simulation is a frontier for disseminating knowledge in almost all the fields of medicine and it is attracting growing interest because it offers a means of developing new teaching and training models, as well as of verifying what has been learned in a critical setting that simulates clinical practice. The role of simulation in neurology, until now limited by the obvious physical limitations of the dummies used to train students and learners, is now increasing since, today, it allows anamnestic data to be related to the instrumental evidence necessary for diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making, i.e., to the findings of neurophysiological investigations (EEG, carotid and vertebral echography and transcranial Doppler, for example) and neuroradiological investigations (CT, MRI imaging), as well as vital parameter monitoring (ECG, saturimetry, blood pressure, respiratory frequency, etc.). Simulation, by providing learners with opportunities to discuss, with experts, different profiles of biological parameters (both during the simulation itself and in the subsequent debriefing session), is becoming an increasingly important tool for training those involved in evaluation of critical neurological patients (stroke, Guillan Barrè syndrome, myasthenia, status epilepticus, headache, vertigo, confusional status, etc.) and complex cases. In this SIMMED (Italian Society for Simulation in Medicine) position paper, the applications (present and, possibly, future) of simulation in neurology are reported.

  13. Arsenic neurotoxicity--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahidnia, A; van der Voet, G B; de Wolff, F A

    2007-10-01

    Arsenic (As) is one of the oldest poisons known to men. Its applications throughout history are wide and varied: murder, make-up, paint and even as a pesticide. Chronic As toxicity is a global environmental health problem, affecting millions of people in the USA and Germany to Bangladesh and Taiwan. Worldwide, As is released into the environment by smelting of various metals, combustion of fossil fuels, as herbicides and fungicides in agricultural products. The drinking water in many countries, which is tapped from natural geological resources, is also contaminated as a result of the high level of As in groundwater. The environmental fate of As is contamination of surface and groundwater with a contaminant level higher than 10 particle per billion (ppb) as set by World Health Organization (WHO). Arsenic exists in both organic and inorganic species and either form can also exist in a trivalent or pentavalent oxidation state. Long-term health effects of exposure to these As metabolites are severe and highly variable: skin and lung cancer, neurological effects, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Neurological effects of As may develop within a few hours after ingestion, but usually are seen in 2-8 weeks after exposure. It is usually a symmetrical sensorimotor neuropathy, often resembling the Guillain-Barré syndrome. The predominant clinical features of neuropathy are paresthesias, numbness and pain, particularly in the soles of the feet. Electrophysiological studies performed on patients with As neuropathy have revealed a reduced nerve conduction velocity, typical of those seen in axonal degeneration. Most of the adverse effects of As, are caused by inactivated enzymes in the cellular energy pathway, whereby As reacts with the thiol groups of proteins and enzymes and inhibits their catalytic activity. Furthermore, As-induced neurotoxicity, like many other neurodegenerative diseases, causes changes in cytoskeletal protein composition and hyperphosphorylation

  14. Child Neurology Services in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Wilmshurst, Jo M.; Badoe, Eben; Wammanda, Robinson D.; Mallewa, Macpherson; Kakooza-Mwesige, Angelina; Venter, Andre; Charles R. Newton

    2011-01-01

    The first African Child Neurology Association meeting identified key challenges that the continent faces to improve the health of children with neurology disorders. The capacity to diagnose common neurologic conditions and rare disorders is lacking. The burden of neurologic disease on the continent is not known, and this lack of knowledge limits the ability to lobby for better health care provision. Inability to practice in resource-limited settings has led to the migration of skilled profess...

  15. Inhibitory mechanism of dimercaptopropanesulfonic acid (DMPS) in the cellular biomethylation of arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuping; Shi, Nan; Geng, Zhirong; Li, Xiangli; Hu, Xin; Wang, Zhilin

    2014-11-01

    Dimercaptopropanesulfonic acid (DMPS) has been approved for the treatment of arsenic poisoning through promoting arsenic excretion and modulating arsenic species. To clarify how DMPS regulates the excretion of arsenic species, we investigated the effects of DMPS on the biomethylation of arsenite (As(3+)) in HepG2 cells. In the experiments, we found that DMPS at low concentrations dramatically decreased the content of arsenic in HepG2 cells and inhibited the cellular methylation of As(3+). Three aspects, the expression of human arsenic (III) methyltransferase (hAS3MT), the accumulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the in vitro enzymatic methylation of arsenic, were considered to explain the reasons for the inhibition of DMPS in arsenic metabolism. The results suggested that DMPS competitively coordinated with As(3+) and monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(3+)) to inhibit the up-regulation of arsenic on the expression of hAS3MT and block arsenic involving in the enzymatic methylation. Moreover, DMPS eliminated arsenic-induced accumulation of ROS, which might contribute to the antidotal effects of DMPS on arsenic posing.

  16. Neurologic Complications of Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with celiac disease (CD [n=l 11] and controls (n=211 were questioned regarding neurologic disorders, their charts were reviewed, and they received neurologic evaluations, including brain imaging or EEG if indicated, in a study of neurologic complications of CD at Carmel Medical Center, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

  17. Neurological Impairment: Nomenclature and Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Catherine E.; Weber, Robert E.

    Neurological impairment as discussed includes a range of disabilities referred to as neurological impairment: minimal brain dysfunction/damage, developmental disability, perceptual handicap, learning disability, hyperkinetic behavioral syndrome, and others. Defined are causes of neurological impairment and methods of diagnosis. Symptoms…

  18. Arsenic Biotransformation as a Cancer Promoting Factor by Inducing DNA Damage and Disruption of Repair Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor D. Martinez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water poses a major global health concern. Populations exposed to high concentrations of arsenic-contaminated drinking water suffer serious health consequences, including alarming cancer incidence and death rates. Arsenic is biotransformed through sequential addition of methyl groups, acquired from s-adenosylmethionine (SAM. Metabolism of arsenic generates a variety of genotoxic and cytotoxic species, damaging DNA directly and indirectly, through the generation of reactive oxidative species and induction of DNA adducts, strand breaks and cross links, and inhibition of the DNA repair process itself. Since SAM is the methyl group donor used by DNA methyltransferases to maintain normal epigenetic patterns in all human cells, arsenic is also postulated to affect maintenance of normal DNA methylation patterns, chromatin structure, and genomic stability. The biological processes underlying the cancer promoting factors of arsenic metabolism, related to DNA damage and repair, will be discussed here.

  19. Arsenic metabolites in humans after ingestion of wakame seaweed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hata A.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Seaweed contains large amounts of various arsenic compounds such as arsenosugars (AsSugs, but their relative toxicities have not yet been fully evaluated. A risk evaluation of dietary arsenic would be necessary. After developing an arsenic speciation analysis of wakame seaweed (Undaria pinnatifida, we conducted a wakame ingestion experiment using volunteers. Five volunteers ingested 300 g of commercial wakame after refraining from seafood for 5 days. Arsenic metabolites in the urine were monitored over a 5-day period after ingestion. Total arsenic concentration of the wakame seaweed was 34.3 ± 2.1 mg arsenic/kg (dry weight, n = 3. Two AsSugs, 3-[5′-deoxy-5′-(dimethyl-arsinoyl-β-ribofuranosyloxy]-propylene glycol (AsSug328 and 3-[5′-deoxy-5′-(dimethyl-arsinoyl-β- ribofuranosyl-oxy]-2-hydroxypropyl-2,3-dihydroxy-propyl phosphate (AsSug482 were detected, but arsenobetaine, dimethylarsinic acid (DMA, monomethylarsonic acid, and inorganic arsenics (iAs were not detected. The major peak was AsSug328, which comprised 89% of the total arsenic. Approximately 30% of the total arsenic ingested was excreted in the urine during the 5-day observation. Five arsenic compounds were detected in the urine after ingestion, the major one being DMA, which comprised 58.1 ± 5.0% of the total urinary arsenic excreted over the 5 days. DMA was believed to be metabolized not from iAs but from AsSugs, and its biological half-time was approximately 13 h.

  20. Investigating groundwater arsenic contamination using aquifer push-pull test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, A. R.; Jin, Q.

    2009-12-01

    The groundwater of the Southern Willamette Basin, OR is contaminated with arsenic at concentrations as high as several ppm. A single-well push-pull test was conducted to investigate how microbial metabolisms control arsenic occurrence and levels in the bedrock aquifer of the area. During the experiments, a test solution containing ethanol was first injected into the aquifer. As the experiment progressed, dissolved gasses, groundwater, and sediment were sampled to monitor the variations in the chemical parameters, including the speciation of iron, sulfur, and arsenic, in the aquifer. Ethanol amendment stimulated a series of microbial metabolisms, including arsenate reduction, iron reduction, and sulfate reduction. Iron reduction released arsenic sorbed onto the aquifer sediments, increasing groundwater arsenic levels. Arsenate reduction converted arsenate to arsenite and, as a result, most arsenic occurred as arsenite in the groundwater. Results of the experiments demonstrate how different microbial functional groups influenced arsenic contamination in the area. These results also shed new light on potential bioremediation strategies in the area.

  1. Arsenic, GSTO2 Asp142 polymorphism, health and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Masoudi, Mohammad; Saadat, Mostafa

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic is a natural metallic element found in low concentrations in virtually every part of the environment, including waters and foods. The ingestion of arsenic by humans can cause a variety of disorders. Glutathione S-transferase omega (GSTO) is a member of phase II xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. GSTO2 (a member of GST omega) participates in detoxification of inorganic arsenic. In human, the A>G transition at nucleotide position 424 of GSTO2 was reported. This variation causes an Asn142A...

  2. Environmental Source of Arsenic Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Jin-Yong; Yu, Seung-Do; Hong, Young-Seoub

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring metalloid that may be a significant risk factor for cancer after exposure to contaminated drinking water, cigarettes, foods, industry, occupational environment, and air. Among the various routes of arsenic exposure, drinking water is the largest source of arsenic poisoning worldwide. Arsenic exposure from ingested foods usually comes from food crops grown in arsenic-contaminated soil and/or irrigated with arsenic-contaminated water. According to a ...

  3. Oceanic arsenic detoxication: the path of arsenic in marine food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenate appears to be readily metabolized by all marine algae. Its metabolism and mechanisms for biodegradation of the accumulated arsenolipids was investigated. The objective was to acquire sufficient understanding of the paths of arsenic in marine food chains to be able to evaluate the problems it might present to marine organisms and their effective productivity and the hazards its intermediates might present in marine products for human nutrition

  4. History of Neurology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xinde

    2000-01-01

    @@In 1921, the first independent department of neurology was established in Beijing. Before 1949, all over China only 12 professional doctors lectured neurology in medical colleges. Only 30 medically trained personnel were engaged in the neurological departments. The neurological departments contained roughly 200 beds. The thesis on stroke was written by Zhang Shanlei and published in 1922. Author discussed the cerebral stroke on basis of Chinese traditional medicine and European medicine. The first Textbook of Neurology in China was written by Professor Cheng Yu-lin and was published in 1939. In 1952, the Chinese Society of Neurology and Psychiatry of Chinese Medical Association was established. In 1955, the first issue of the Chinese Journal of Neurology and Psychiatry was published.

  5. Welcome to Neurology: Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulst, Stefan M

    2015-06-01

    The powers of human genetics and genetic technologies have transformed the complexities of neurology and neuroscience at the basic, translational, and now also the clinical level. We have left an era of black and white views of causative genetic variation and are entering a period of more than 50 shades of grey, fascinated with DNA variants that increase or decrease risk, epigenetic modification, and an unexpectedly large number of variants of unknown or potentially pathogenic significance. Loss-of-function alleles and even complete human gene knockouts for certain genes appear to be compatible with a normal phenotype. PMID:27066541

  6. Neurological complications of chickenpox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girija A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the neurological complications of chickenpox with prognosis. Background: The neurological complications occur in 0.03% of persons who get chickenpox. There is no universal vaccination against chicken pox in India. Most patients prefer alternate modalities of treatment. Hence these complications of chickenpox are likely to continue to occur. Study Design: A prospective study was conducted for 2 years (from March 2002 on the admitted cases with neurological complications after chickenpox (with rash or scar. Patients were investigated with CT/MRI, CSF study, EEG and nerve conduction studies and hematological workup. They were followed-up for 1 year and outcome assessed using modified Rankin scale. Results: The latency for the neurological complications was 4-32 days (mean: 16.32 days. There were 18 cases: 10 adults (64% and 8 children (36%. Cerebellar ataxia (normal CT/MRI was observed in 7 cases (32% (mean age: 6.85 years. One patient (6 years had acute right hemiparesis in the fifth week due to left capsular infarct. All these cases spontaneously recovered by 4 weeks. The age range of the adult patients was 13-47 years (mean: 27 years. The manifestations included cerebellar and pyramidal signs (n-4 with features of demyelination in MRI who recovered spontaneously or with methylprednisolone by 8 weeks. Patient with encephalitis recovered in 2 weeks with acyclovir. Guillain Barre syndrome of the demyelinating type (n-2 was treated with Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG and they had a slow recovery by a modified Rankin scale (mRs score of 3 and 2 at 6 months and 1 year, respectively. One case died after hemorrhage into the occipital infarct. There were two cases of asymmetrical neuropathy, one each of the seventh cranial and brachial neuritis. Conclusion: Spontaneous recovery occurs in post-chickenpox cerebellar ataxia. Rarely, serious complications can occur in adults. The demyelinating disorders, either of the central or peripheral

  7. Neurology of Volition

    OpenAIRE

    Kranick, Sarah M.; Hallett, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Neurological disorders of volition may be characterized by deficits in willing and/or agency. When we move our bodies through space, it is the sense that we intended to move (willing) and that our actions were a consequence of this intention (self-agency) that gives us the sense of voluntariness and a general feeling of being “in control.” While it is possible to have movements that share executive machinery ordinarily used for voluntary movement but lack a sense of voluntariness, such as psy...

  8. The neurology of sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Todd J

    2005-11-01

    Neurology, by virtue of its study of the brain, is the primary medical science for the elucidation of the anatomy, physiology, pathology and, ultimately, the function of sleep. There has been nothing short of a revolution in the science of sleep over the past 50 years. From the discovery of REM sleep to the identification of Hypocretin/Orexin the basic science and clinical field of sleep medicine has blossomed. This article will explore the anatomy, physiology, biochemistry and, to a limited extent, pathophysiology of the sleep/wake centers of the brain. The field of chronobiology will also be touched upon.

  9. A Systematic Review of Arsenic Exposure and Its Social and Mental Health Effects with Special Reference to Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kraemer

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Undergroundwater in many regions of the world is contaminated with high concentrations of arsenic and the resulting toxicity has created a major environmental and public health problem in the affected regions. Chronic arsenic exposure can cause many diseases, including various physical and psychological harms. Although the physical problems caused by arsenic toxicity are well reported in literature, unfortunately the consequences of arsenic exposure on mental health are not adequately studied. Therefore we conducted a review of the available literature focusing on the social consequences and detrimental effects of arsenic toxicity on mental health. Chronic arsenic exposures have serious implications for its victims (i.e. arsenicosis patients and their families including social instability, social discrimination, refusal of victims by community and families, and marriage-related problems. Some studies conducted in arsenic affected areas revealed that arsenic exposures are associated with various neurologic problems. Chronic arsenic exposure can lead to mental retardation and developmental disabilities such as physical, cognitive, psychological, sensory and speech impairments. As health is defined by the World Health Organization as “a state of complete physical, mental and social wellbeing”, the social dimensions have a large impact on individual’s mental health. Furthermore studies in China und Bangladesh have shown that mental health problems (e.g. depression are more common among the people affected by arsenic contamination. Our study indicates various neurological, mental and social consequences among arsenic affected victims. Further studies are recommended in arsenic-affected areas to understand the underlying mechanisms of poor mental health caused by arsenic exposure.

  10. Arsenic compounds and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, O

    1980-01-01

    Exposure to arsenic compounds has been epidemiologically associated with various types of cancers, particularly cancer of the lung among copper smelters and pesticide workers, whereas skin cancers and liver angiosarcomas have been associated with ingestion of arsenic for treatment of skin disorders, especially psoriasis. Attempts to reproduce cancer in animals have been mainly unsuccessful, however. Experimental evidence suggests that arsenic inhibits DNA repair; this might help to explain the somewhat conflicting observations from epidemiologic studies and animal experiments with regard to carcinogenicity, and perhaps also cardiovascular morbidity related to arsenic exposure. PMID:7463514

  11. Associations between toenail arsenic concentration and dietary factors in a New Hampshire population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber Joann F

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary factors such as folate, vitamin B12, protein, and methionine are important for the excretion of arsenic via one-carbon metabolism in undernourished populations exposed to high levels of arsenic via drinking water. However, the effects of dietary factors on toenail arsenic concentrations in well-nourished populations exposed to relatively low levels of water arsenic are unknown. Methods As part of a population-based case–control study of skin and bladder cancer from the USA, we evaluated relationships between consumption of dietary factors and arsenic concentrations in toenail clippings. Consumption of each dietary factor was determined from a validated food frequency questionnaire. We used general linear models to examine the associations between toenail arsenic and each dietary factor, taking into account potentially confounding effects. Results As expected, we found an inverse association between ln-transformed toenail arsenic and consumption of vitamin B12 (excluding supplements and animal protein. Unexpectedly, there were also inverse associations with numerous dietary lipids (e.g., total fat, total animal fat, total vegetable fat, total monounsaturated fat, total polyunsaturated fat, and total saturated fat. Finally, increased toenail arsenic concentrations were associated with increased consumption of long chain n-3 fatty acids. Conclusion In a relatively well-nourished population exposed to relatively low levels of arsenic via water, consumption of certain dietary lipids may decrease toenail arsenic concentration, while long chain n-3 fatty acids may increase toenail arsenic concentration, possibly due to their association with arsenolipids in fish tissue.

  12. Happiness and neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Yoram; Achiron, Anat

    2009-04-01

    Happiness is an emotional state reflecting positive feelings and satisfaction with life, which, as an outcome in disease states or as an end point in clinical trials, is a neglected concept in most therapeutic areas. In neurological disease, happiness is important as it can be diminished either as a direct result of damage to neuronal tissue or as a reaction to a poor prognosis. The monitoring and maintenance of happiness and wellbeing have historically been considered to be peripheral to medicine. However, as happiness interacts with the patient's physical health, it is an important parameter to assess alongside all aspects of any given disease. Happiness provides a reliable overview of the patient's general status over and above standard parameters for quality of life, and is more wide-ranging than the narrow measures of disease activity or treatment efficacy that are the focus of most clinical trials. In many studies, happiness has been associated with health and success in most areas of life, including performance at work, sporting achievement and social functioning. For approximately a decade, previously studied aspects of psychology have been grouped under the label of positive psychology (PoP). Principles of this discipline are now being used to guide some treatments in neurological and psychiatric diseases. PoP aims to define patient wellbeing in scientific terms and to increase understanding of happiness, meaning in life, resilience and character strengths, as well as to determine how this knowledge can be applied clinically to promote health. Some evidence has emerged recently suggesting that improvements in patient status can result from interventions to improve the patient's level of happiness in diseases, including epilepsy, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and stroke. Several effective approaches to increase happiness employ activities to engage and stimulate patients who might otherwise be unoccupied and isolated. In

  13. NEUROLOGIC MANIFESTATION OF ORGANIC ACADEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Hassan TONEKABONI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Inborn errors of organic acid metabolism are relatively recently recognized diseases with a wide spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms: ranging from asymptomatic, normal appearing children to death during first few days of life.In my presentation I will try to explain some of the most common clinical presentation of these disorder with stress on neurologic findings. Organic acidemia usually have three clinical manifestations Severe neonatal form, Intermittent late-onset form and chronic progressive form. Recurrent coma, The main feature of these disorders is due to accumulation of toxic metabolites in Central Nervous system with direct effect on the function, while chronic accumulation of these materials may interfere with CNS development or cerebral metabolism leading to developmental delay.Severe neonatal formsFollowing a symptom free interval of a few days from birth, poor sucking and difficult feeding appears in the newborn, followed by unexplained and progressive coma. Seizures may appear during the course of the disease and EEG may show a burst-suppression pattern. During this stage most infants have axial hypotonia with peripheral dystonia, choreoathetosis, episodic opisthotonus and some repetitive bicycling and boxing movements.Associated biochemical abnormalities including metabolic acidosis, ketonuria and hyperammonemia also is usually present. The overall short-term prognosis with recent advances in medical care is improving. But later in life acute intercurrent episodes triggered by a stress often occur, which can be occasionally fatal.bulging fontanelle and cerebral edema may mimic CNS infection in these babies.Intermittent late-onset formsRecurrent attacks of coma or lethargy with ataxia can occur in childhood or even in adolescence or adulthood. These episodes may be frequent, though in between these the child is entirely normal. These attacks are precipitated by conditions that enhance protein catabolism (trauma, infection etc

  14. [Neuropsychiatric disturbances and neuro-electrophysiological examination in patients with arsenic poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H Y; Li, H M; Dang, K Y

    1994-09-01

    Neuropsychiatric disturbances caused by arsenic poisoning in 28 patients were reported. The incidence was 32.2% of all the arsenic poisoning patients. The patients were classified into three types according to their clinical symptoms. The neurologic type constituted 46.4%, mental type 21.4% and mixed type 32.1% of the patient respectively. Various abnormalities were found in EEG, EMG, EP and EKG examination. EMG and EP were still abnormal in most of the patients after treatment for three months. The results showed that arsenic poisoning may cause neuropsychiatric disturbances. The symptoms in these patients are serious and the recovery is quite slow.

  15. History of neurologic examination books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Christopher J

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to create an annotated list of textbooks dedicated to teaching the neurologic examination. Monographs focused primarily on the complete neurologic examination published prior to 1960 were reviewed. This analysis was limited to books with the word "examination" in the title, with exceptions for the texts of Robert Wartenberg and Gordon Holmes. Ten manuals met the criteria. Works dedicated primarily to the neurologic examination without a major emphasis on disease description or treatment first appeared in the early 1900s. Georg Monrad-Krohn's "Blue Book of Neurology" ("Blue Bible") was the earliest success. These treatises served the important purpose of educating trainees on proper neurologic examination technique. They could make a reputation and be profitable for the author (Monrad-Krohn), highlight how neurology was practiced at individual institutions (McKendree, Denny-Brown, Holmes, DeJong, Mayo Clinic authors), and honor retiring mentors (Mayo Clinic authors).

  16. Consciousness: A Neurological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea E. Cavanna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness is a state so essentially entwined with human experience, yet so difficult to conceptually define and measure. In this article, we explore how a bidimensional model of consciousness involving both level of arousal and subjective awareness of the contents of consciousness can be used to differentiate a range of healthy and altered conscious states. These include the different sleep stages of healthy individuals and the altered states of consciousness associated with neurological conditions such as epilepsy, vegetative state and coma. In particular, we discuss how arousal and awareness are positively correlated in normal physiological states with the exception of REM sleep, while a disturbance in this relationship is characteristic of vegetative state, minimally conscious state, complex partial seizures and sleepwalking.

  17. Occupational Neurological Disorders in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eun-A; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide a literature review of occupational neurological disorders and related research in Korea, focusing on chemical hazards. We reviewed occupational neurological disorders investigated by the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute of Korean Occupational Safety and Health Agency between 1992 and 2009, categorizing them as neurological disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) or as neurodegenerative d...

  18. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Shrikant Mishra; Bhavesh Trikamji; Sandeep Singh; Parampreet Singh; Rajasekharan Nair

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C.) during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20 th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian med...

  19. Arsenic poisoning in cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagor, J.C.

    Reports of heavy metal intoxication submitted to the Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory indicate that arsenic is the most common heavy metal intoxicant in Texas. The most frequent sources of arsenic are compounds used as herbicides and cotton defoliants. The misuse of these compounds and subsequent intoxication of cattle is discussed in this paper. 8 references, 1 table.

  20. Arsenic in Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Food Home Food Foodborne Illness & Contaminants Metals Arsenic Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... and previous or current use of arsenic-containing pesticides. Are there ... compounds in water, food, air, and soil: organic and inorganic (these together ...

  1. [Acute arsenic poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelescaut, Etienne; Vermeersch, Véronique; Commandeur, Diane; Huynh, Sophie; Danguy des Deserts, Marc; Sapin, Jeanne; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Acute arsenic poisoning is a rare cause of suicide attempt. It causes a multiple organs failure caused by cardiogenic shock. We report the case of a patient admitted twelve hours after an ingestion of trioxide arsenic having survived thanks to a premature treatment.

  2. [Acute arsenic poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelescaut, Etienne; Vermeersch, Véronique; Commandeur, Diane; Huynh, Sophie; Danguy des Deserts, Marc; Sapin, Jeanne; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Acute arsenic poisoning is a rare cause of suicide attempt. It causes a multiple organs failure caused by cardiogenic shock. We report the case of a patient admitted twelve hours after an ingestion of trioxide arsenic having survived thanks to a premature treatment. PMID:25486670

  3. Cannabinoids in neurology – Brazilian Academy of Neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia M.D. Brucki; Norberto Anísio Frota; Pedro Schestatsky; Adélia Henriques Souza; Valentina Nicole Carvalho; Maria Luiza Giraldes de Manreza; Maria Fernanda Mendes; Elizabeth Comini-Frota; Cláudia Vasconcelos; Vitor Tumas; HENRIQUE B. FERRAZ; Egberto Barbosa; Mauro Eduardo Jurno

    2015-01-01

    The use of cannabidiol in some neurological conditions was allowed by Conselho Regional de Medicina de São Paulo and by Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária (ANVISA). Specialists on behalf of Academia Brasileira de Neurologia prepared a critical statement about use of cannabidiol and other cannabis derivatives in neurological diseases.

  4. Breast Cancer Presents with a Paraneoplastic Neurologic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Coelho Barata

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paraneoplastic neurologic syndromes (PNS pose quite an uncommon neurological complication, affecting less than 1% of patients with breast cancer. Nearly one third of these patients lack detectable onconeural antibodies (ONAs, and improvement in neurologic deficits with concomitant cancer treatments is achieved in less than 30% of cases. Case Presentation: A 42-year-old, premenopausal woman presented with facial paralysis on the central left side accompanied by a left tongue deviation, an upward vertical nystagmus, moderate spastic paraparesis, dystonic posturing of the left foot, lower limb hyperreflexia and bilateral extensor plantar reflex. After ruling out all other potential neurologic causes, PNS was suspected but no ONAs were found. A PET-CT scan detected increased metabolism in the right breast, as well as an ipsilateral thoracic interpectoral adenopathy. Core biopsy confirmed the presence of an infiltrating duct carcinoma. After breast surgery, the neurologic symptoms disappeared. One week later, the patient was readmitted to the hospital with a bilateral fatigable eyelid ptosis, and two weeks later, there was a noticeable improvement in eyelid ptosis, accompanied by a rapid and progressive development of lower spastic paraparesis. She started adjuvant treatment with chemotherapy with marked clinical and neurological improvement, and by the end of radiotherapy, there were no signs of neurologic impairment. Conclusion: This case study highlights the importance of a high level of vigilance for the detection of PNS, even when ONAs are not detected, as the rapid identification and treatment of the underlying tumor offers the best chance for a full recovery.

  5. Biomarker discovery in neurological diseases: a metabolomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afaf El-Ansary

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Afaf El-Ansary, Nouf Al-Afaleg, Yousra Al-YafaeeBiochemistry Department, Science College, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: Biomarkers are pharmacological and physiological measurements or specific biochemicals in the body that have a particular molecular feature that makes them useful for measuring the progress of disease or the effects of treatment. Due to the complexity of neurological disorders, it is very difficult to have perfect markers. Brain diseases require plenty of markers to reflect the metabolic impairment of different brain cells. The recent introduction of the metabolomic approach helps the study of neurological diseases based on profiling a multitude of biochemical components related to brain metabolism. This review is a trial to elucidate the possibility to use this approach to identify plasma metabolic markers related to neurological disorders. Previous trials using different metabolomic analyses including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry, liquid chromatography combined with mass spectrometry, and capillary electrophoresis will be traced.Keywords: metabolic biomarkers, neurological disorders. metabolome, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, chromatography

  6. [Neurological interpretation of dreams] .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, J A; Gil-Nagel, A

    2000-10-01

    Cerebral cortical activity is constant throughout the entire human life, but substantially changes during the different phases of the sleep-wake cycle (wakefulness, non-REM sleep and REM sleep), as well as in relation to available information. In particular, perception of the environment is closely linked to the wake-state, while during sleep perception turns to the internal domain or endogenous cerebral activity. External and internal information are mutually exclusive. During wakefulness a neuronal mechanism allows attention to focus on the environment whereas endogenous cortical activity is ignored. The opposite process is provided during sleep. The function external attention-internal attention is coupled with the two modes of brain function during wakefulness and during sleep, providing two possible cortical status: thinking and dreaming. Several neurological processes may influence the declaration of the three states of being or may modify their orderly oscillation through the sleep-wake cycle. In addition, endogenous information and its perception (dreams) may be modified. Disturbances of dreaming may configurate in different general clinical scenarios: lack of dreaming, excess of dreaming (epic dreaming), paroxysmal dreaming (epileptic), nightmares, violent dreaming, daytime-dreaming (hallucinations), and lucid dreaming. Sensorial deprivation, as well as the emergence of internal perception may be the underlying mechanism of hallucinations. The probable isomorphism between hallucinations and dreaming is postulated, analyzed and discussed.

  7. [Music and neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias Gómez, M

    2007-01-01

    Music perception and output are special functions of the human brain. Investigation in this field is growing with the support of modern neuroimaging techniques (functional magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography). Interest in the music phenomenon and the disorders regarding its processing has been limited. Music is not just an artistic activity but a language to communicate, evoke and reinforce several emotions. Although the subject is still under debate, processing of music is independent of common language and each one uses independent circuits. One may be seriously affected and the other practically unharmed. On the other hand, there may be separate channels within the processing of music for the temporary elements (rhythm), melodic elements (pitch, timbre, and melody), memory and emotional response. The study of subjects with absolute pitch, congenital and acquired amusias, musicogenic epilepsy and musical hallucinations has greatly contributed to the knowledge of how the brain processes music. Music training involves some changes in morphology and physiology of professional musicians' brains. Stress, chronic pain and professional dystonias constitute a special field of musicians' disturbances that concerns neurological practice. Listening to and playing music may have some educational and therapeutic benefits.

  8. Neurologic Itch Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şavk, Ekin

    2016-01-01

    Neurologic itch is defined as pruritus resulting from any dysfunction of the nervous system. Itch arising due to a neuroanatomic pathology is seen to be neuropathic. Causes of neuropathic itch range from localized entrapment of a peripheral nerve to generalized degeneration of small nerve fibers. Antipruritic medications commonly used for other types of itch such as antihistamines and corticosteroids lack efficacy in neuropathic itch. Currently there are no therapeutic options that offer relief in all types of neuropathic pruritus, and treatment strategies vary according to etiology. It is best to decide on the appropriate tests and procedures in collaboration with a neurologist during the initial work-up. Treatment of neuropathic itch includes general antipruritic measures, local or systemic pharmacotherapy, various physical modalities, and surgery. Surgical intervention is the obvious choice of therapy in cases of spinal or cerebral mass, abscess, or hemorrhagic stroke, and may provide decompression in entrapment neuropathies. Symptomatic treatment is needed in the vast majority of patients. General antipruritic measures should be encouraged. Local treatment agents with at least some antipruritic effect include capsaicin, local anesthetics, doxepin, tacrolimus, and botulinum toxin A. Current systemic therapy relies on anticonvulsants such as gabapentin and pregabalin. Phototherapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and physical therapy have also been of value in selected cases. Among the avenues to be explored are transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain, new topical cannabinoid receptor agonists, various modes of acupuncture, a holistic approach with healing touch, and cell transplantation to the spinal cord. PMID:27578080

  9. [Neurological interpretation of dreams] .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, J A; Gil-Nagel, A

    2000-10-01

    Cerebral cortical activity is constant throughout the entire human life, but substantially changes during the different phases of the sleep-wake cycle (wakefulness, non-REM sleep and REM sleep), as well as in relation to available information. In particular, perception of the environment is closely linked to the wake-state, while during sleep perception turns to the internal domain or endogenous cerebral activity. External and internal information are mutually exclusive. During wakefulness a neuronal mechanism allows attention to focus on the environment whereas endogenous cortical activity is ignored. The opposite process is provided during sleep. The function external attention-internal attention is coupled with the two modes of brain function during wakefulness and during sleep, providing two possible cortical status: thinking and dreaming. Several neurological processes may influence the declaration of the three states of being or may modify their orderly oscillation through the sleep-wake cycle. In addition, endogenous information and its perception (dreams) may be modified. Disturbances of dreaming may configurate in different general clinical scenarios: lack of dreaming, excess of dreaming (epic dreaming), paroxysmal dreaming (epileptic), nightmares, violent dreaming, daytime-dreaming (hallucinations), and lucid dreaming. Sensorial deprivation, as well as the emergence of internal perception may be the underlying mechanism of hallucinations. The probable isomorphism between hallucinations and dreaming is postulated, analyzed and discussed. PMID:11143502

  10. Neurological mitochondrial cytopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehndiratta M

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial cytopathies are genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous group of disorders caused by structural and functional abnormalities in mitochondria. To the best of our knowledge, there are very few studies published from India till date. Selected and confirmed fourteen cases of neurological mitochondrial cytopathies with different clinical syndromes admitted between 1997 and 2000 are being reported. There were 8 male and 6 female patients. The mean age was 24.42+/-11.18 years (range 4-40 years. Twelve patients could be categorized into well-defined syndromes, while two belonged to undefined group. In the defined syndrome categories, three patients had MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke like episodes, three had MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibre myopathy, three cases had KSS (Kearns-Sayre Syndrome and three were diagnosed to be suffering from mitochondrial myopathy. In the uncategorized group, one case presented with paroxysmal kinesogenic dystonia and the other manifested with generalized chorea alone. Serum lactic acid level was significantly increased in all the patients (fasting 28.96+/-4.59 mg%, post exercise 41.02+/-4.93 mg%. Muscle biopsy was done in all cases. Succinic dehydrogenase staining of muscle tissue showed subsarcolemmal accumulation of mitochondria in 12 cases. Mitochondrial DNA study could be performed in one case only and it did not reveal any mutation at nucleotides 3243 and 8344. MRI brain showed multiple infarcts in MELAS, hyperintensities in putaminal areas in chorea and bilateral cerebellar atrophy in MERRF.

  11. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge eLandgrave-Gómez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS and its regulation in diseases is one of the most interesting processes of contemporary neuroscience. In the last decade, a growing body of literature suggests that long-term changes in gene transcription associated with CNS´s regulation and neurological disorders are mediated via modulation of chromatin structure.Epigenetics, introduced for the first time by Waddington in the early 1940s, has been traditionally referred to a variety of mechanisms that allow heritable changes in gene expression even in the absence of DNA mutation. However, new definitions acknowledge that many of these mechanisms used to perpetuate epigenetic traits in dividing cells are used by neurons to control a variety of functions dependent on gene expression. Indeed, in the recent years these mechanisms have shown their importance in the maintenance of a healthy CNS. Moreover, environmental inputs that have shown effects in CNS diseases, such as nutrition, that can modulate the concentration of a variety of metabolites such as acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-coA, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ and beta hydroxybutyrate (β-HB, regulates some of these epigenetic modifications, linking in a precise way environment with gene expression.This manuscript will portray what is currently understood about the role of epigenetic mechanisms in the function and homeostasis of the CNS and their participation in a variety of neurological disorders. We will discuss how the machinery that controls these modifications plays an important role in processes involved in neurological disorders such as neurogenesis and cell growth. Moreover, we will discuss how environmental inputs modulate these modifications producing metabolic and physiological alterations that could exert beneficial effects on neurological diseases. Finally, we will highlight possible future directions in the field of

  12. Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey: Methodology and Estimated Arsenic Intake from Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, Jason; O’Rourke, Mary Kay; Meza-Montenegro, Maria Mercedes; Gutiérrez-Millán, Luis Enrique; Burgess, Jefferey L.; Harris, Robin B.

    2012-01-01

    The Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey (BAsES) was designed to evaluate probable arsenic exposures in selected areas of southern Arizona and northern Mexico, two regions with known elevated levels of arsenic in groundwater reserves. This paper describes the methodology of BAsES and the relationship between estimated arsenic intake from beverages and arsenic output in urine. Households from eight communities were selected for their varying groundwater arsenic concentrations in Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico. Adults responded to questionnaires and provided dietary information. A first morning urine void and water from all household drinking sources were collected. Associations between urinary arsenic concentration (total, organic, inorganic) and estimated level of arsenic consumed from water and other beverages were evaluated through crude associations and by random effects models. Median estimated total arsenic intake from beverages among participants from Arizona communities ranged from 1.7 to 14.1 µg/day compared to 0.6 to 3.4 µg/day among those from Mexico communities. In contrast, median urinary inorganic arsenic concentrations were greatest among participants from Hermosillo, Mexico (6.2 µg/L) whereas a high of 2.0 µg/L was found among participants from Ajo, Arizona. Estimated arsenic intake from drinking water was associated with urinary total arsenic concentration (p < 0.001), urinary inorganic arsenic concentration (p < 0.001), and urinary sum of species (p < 0.001). Urinary arsenic concentrations increased between 7% and 12% for each one percent increase in arsenic consumed from drinking water. Variability in arsenic intake from beverages and urinary arsenic output yielded counter intuitive results. Estimated intake of arsenic from all beverages was greatest among Arizonans yet participants in Mexico had higher urinary total and inorganic arsenic concentrations. Other contributors to urinary arsenic concentrations should be evaluated. PMID:22690182

  13. Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey: Methodology and Estimated Arsenic Intake from Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin B. Harris

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey (BAsES was designed to evaluate probable arsenic exposures in selected areas of southern Arizona and northern Mexico, two regions with known elevated levels of arsenic in groundwater reserves. This paper describes the methodology of BAsES and the relationship between estimated arsenic intake from beverages and arsenic output in urine. Households from eight communities were selected for their varying groundwater arsenic concentrations in Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico. Adults responded to questionnaires and provided dietary information. A first morning urine void and water from all household drinking sources were collected. Associations between urinary arsenic concentration (total, organic, inorganic and estimated level of arsenic consumed from water and other beverages were evaluated through crude associations and by random effects models. Median estimated total arsenic intake from beverages among participants from Arizona communities ranged from 1.7 to 14.1 µg/day compared to 0.6 to 3.4 µg/day among those from Mexico communities. In contrast, median urinary inorganic arsenic concentrations were greatest among participants from Hermosillo, Mexico (6.2 µg/L whereas a high of 2.0 µg/L was found among participants from Ajo, Arizona. Estimated arsenic intake from drinking water was associated with urinary total arsenic concentration (p < 0.001, urinary inorganic arsenic concentration (p < 0.001, and urinary sum of species (p < 0.001. Urinary arsenic concentrations increased between 7% and 12% for each one percent increase in arsenic consumed from drinking water. Variability in arsenic intake from beverages and urinary arsenic output yielded counter intuitive results. Estimated intake of arsenic from all beverages was greatest among Arizonans yet participants in Mexico had higher urinary total and inorganic arsenic concentrations. Other contributors to urinary arsenic concentrations should be evaluated.

  14. The contribution of microbial mats to the arsenic geochemistry of an ancient gold mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewniak, Lukasz; Maryan, Natalia; Lewandowski, Wiktor; Kaczanowski, Szymon; Sklodowska, Aleksandra

    2012-03-01

    The ancient Zloty Stok (SW Poland) gold mine is such an environment, where different microbial communities, able to utilize inorganic arsenic species As(III) and As(V), are found. The purpose of the present study was to (i) estimate prokaryotic diversity in the microbial mats in bottom sediments of this gold mine, (ii) identify microorganisms that can metabolize arsenic, and (iii) estimate their potential role in the arsenic geochemistry of the mine and in the environment. The oxidation/reduction experiments showed that the microbial mat community may significantly contribute to arsenic contamination in groundwater. The presence of both arsenite oxidizing and dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the mat was confirmed by the detection of arsenite oxidase and dissimilatory arsenate reductase genes, respectively. This work also demonstrated that microorganisms utilizing other compounds that naturally co-occur with arsenic are present within the microbial mat community and may contribute to the arsenic geochemistry in the environment. PMID:22243864

  15. Wilson's disease and other neurological copper disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandmann, Oliver; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Kaler, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    The copper metabolism disorder Wilson's disease was first defined in 1912. Wilson's disease can present with hepatic and neurological deficits, including dystonia and parkinsonism. Early-onset presentations in infancy and late-onset manifestations in adults older than 70 years of age are now well recognised. Direct genetic testing for ATP7B mutations are increasingly available to confirm the clinical diagnosis of Wilson's disease, and results from biochemical and genetic prevalence studies suggest that Wilson's disease might be much more common than previously estimated. Early diagnosis of Wilson's disease is crucial to ensure that patients can be started on adequate treatment, but uncertainty remains about the best possible choice of medication. Furthermore, Wilson's disease needs to be differentiated from other conditions that also present clinically with hepatolenticular degeneration or share biochemical abnormalities with Wilson's disease, such as reduced serum ceruloplasmin concentrations. Disordered copper metabolism is also associated with other neurological conditions, including a subtype of axonal neuropathy due to ATP7A mutations and the late-onset neurodegenerative disorders Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

  16. The impact of oscillating redox conditions: Arsenic immobilisation in contaminated calcareous floodplain soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic contamination of floodplain soils is extensive and additional fresh arsenic inputs to the pedosphere from human activities are ongoing. We investigate the cumulative effects of repetitive soil redox cycles, which occur naturally during flooding and draining, on a calcareous fluvisol, the native microbial community and arsenic mobility following a simulated contamination event. We show through bioreactor experiments, spectroscopic techniques and modelling that repetitive redox cycling can decrease arsenic mobility during reducing conditions by up to 45%. Phylogenetic and functional analyses of the microbial community indicate that iron cycling is a key driver of observed changes to solution chemistry. We discuss probable mechanisms responsible for the arsenic immobilisation observed in-situ. The proposed mechanisms include, decreased heterotrophic iron reduction due to the depletion of labile particulate organic matter (POM), increases to the proportion of co-precipitated vs. aqueous or sorbed arsenic with α-FeOOH/Fe(OH)3 and potential precipitation of amorphous ferric arsenate. Highlights: •Oscillating redox conditions and heterotrophic metabolism are implemented in PHREEQC. •Depletion of labile organic matter limits iron reduction and arsenic release. •Amorphous FeAsO4∙2H2O precipitation potentially limits arsenic mobility during redox cycling. •Water fluctuating zones may naturally attenuate arsenic liberation during flooding. -- We demonstrate through batch experiments, spectroscopy and modelling that repetitive cycles of oxidation and reduction decrease arsenic mobility in soils during subsequent reducing conditions

  17. Analytical artefacts in the speciation of arsenic in clinical samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slejkovec, Zdenka [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: zdenka.slejkovec@ijs.si; Falnoga, Ingrid [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Goessler, Walter [Institute of Chemistry - Analytical Chemistry, Karl-Franzens University Graz, Universitaetsplatz 1, Graz (Austria); Elteren, Johannes T. van [National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Raml, Reingard [Institute of Chemistry - Analytical Chemistry, Karl-Franzens University Graz, Universitaetsplatz 1, Graz (Austria); Podgornik, Helena; Cernelc, Peter [University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Zaloska 7, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-01-21

    Urine and blood samples of cancer patients, treated with high doses of arsenic trioxide were analysed for arsenic species using HPLC-HGAFS and, in some cases, HPLC-ICPMS. Total arsenic was determined with either flow injection-HGAFS in urine or radiochemical neutron activation analysis in blood fractions (in serum/plasma, blood cells). The total arsenic concentrations (during prolonged, daily/weekly arsenic trioxide therapy) were in the {mu}g mL{sup -1} range for urine and in the ng g{sup -1} range for blood fractions. The main arsenic species found in urine were As(III), MA and DMA and in blood As(V), MA and DMA. With proper sample preparation and storage of urine (no preservation agents/storage in liquid nitrogen) no analytical artefacts were observed and absence of significant amounts of alleged trivalent metabolites was proven. On the contrary, in blood samples a certain amount of arsenic can get lost in the speciation procedure what was especially noticeable for the blood cells although also plasma/serum gave rise to some disappearance of arsenic. The latter losses may be attributed to precipitation of As(III)-containing proteins/peptides during the methanol/water extraction procedure whereas the former losses were due to loss of specific As(III)-complexing proteins/peptides (e.g. cysteine, metallothionein, reduced GSH, ferritin) on the column (Hamilton PRP-X100) during the separation procedure. Contemporary analytical protocols are not able to completely avoid artefacts due to losses from the sampling to the detection stage so that it is recommended to be careful with the explanation of results, particularly regarding metabolic and pharmacokinetic interpretations, and always aim to compare the sum of species with the total arsenic concentration determined independently.

  18. Severe acute axonal neuropathy following treatment with arsenic trioxide for acute promyelocytic leukemia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Kuhn

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of arsenic toxicity. Symptoms are usually mild and reversible following discontinuation of treatment. A more severe chronic sensorimotor polyneuropathy characterized by distal axonal-loss neuropathy can be seen in chronic arsenic exposure. The clinical course of arsenic neurotoxicity in patients with coexistence of thiamine deficiency is only anecdotally known but this association may potentially lead to severe consequences. We describe a case of acute irreversible axonal neuropathy in a patient with hidden thiamine deficiency who was treated with a short course of arsenic trioxide for acute promyelocytic leukemia. Thiamine replacement therapy and arsenic trioxide discontinuation were not followed by neurological recovery and severe polyneuropathy persisted at 12-month follow-up. Thiamine plasma levels should be measured in patients who are candidate to arsenic trioxide therapy. Prophylactic administration of vitamin B1 may be advisable. The appearance of polyneuropathy signs early during the administration of arsenic trioxide should prompt electrodiagnostic testing to rule out a pattern of axonal neuropathy which would need immediate discontinuation of arsenic trioxide.

  19. Neurological examination in small animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Paluš

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This clinical review about the neurological examination in small animals describes the basics about the first steps of investigation when dealing with neurological patients. The knowledge of how to perform the neurological examination is important however more important is how to correctly interpret these performed tests. A step-by-step approach is mandatory and examiners should master the order and the style of performing these tests. Neurological conditions can be sometimes very distressing for owners and for pets that might not be the most cooperating. The role of a veterinary surgeon, as a professional, is therefore to collect the most relevant history, to examine a patient in a professional manner and to give to owners an educated opinion about the further treatment and prognosis. However neurological examinations might look challenging for many. But it is only the clinical application of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology to an every-day situation for practicing veterinarians and it does not require any specific in-to-depth knowledge. This clinical review is aimed not only to provide the information on how to perform the neurological examination but it is also aimed to appeal on veterinarians to challenge their daily routine and to start practicing on neurologically normal patients. This is the best and only way to differentiate between the normal and abnormal in a real situation.

  20. A broad view of arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, F T

    2007-01-01

    In the mind of the general public, the words "arsenic" and "poison" have become almost synonymous. Yet, As is a natural metallic element found in low concentrations in virtually every part of the environment, including foods. Mining and smelting activities are closely associated with As, and the largest occurrence of As contamination in the United States is near the gold mines of northern Nevada. Inhabitants of Bangladesh and surrounding areas have been exposed to water that is naturally and heavily contaminated with As, causing what the World Health Organization has described as the worst mass poisoning in history. Although readily absorbed by humans, most inorganic As (>90%) is rapidly cleared from the blood with a half-life of 1 to 2 h, and 40 to 70% of the As intake is absorbed, metabolized, and excreted within 48 h. Arsenic does not appreciably bioaccumulate, nor does it biomagnify in the food chain. The United States has for some time purchased more As than any other country in the world, but As usage is waning, and further reductions appear likely. Arsenic is used in a wide variety of industrial applications, from computers to fireworks. All feed additives used in US poultry feeds must meet the strict requirements of the US Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine (Rockville, MD) before use. Although some public health investigators have identified poultry products as a potentially significant source of total As exposure for Americans, studies consistently demonstrate that <1% of samples tested are above the 0.5 ppm limit established by the US Food and Drug Administration Center for Veterinary Medicine. Although laboratory studies have demonstrated the possibility that As in poultry litter could pollute ground waters, million of tons of litter have been applied to the land, and no link has been established between litter application and As contamination of ground water. Yet, the fact that <2% of the United States population is involved in

  1. Neurological findings of Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachner, A. R.; Steere, A. C.

    1984-01-01

    Neurologic involvement of Lyme disease typically consists of meningitis, cranial neuropathy, and radiculoneuritis, alone or in combination, lasting for months. From 1976 to 1983, we studied 38 patients with Lyme meningitis. Headache and mild neck stiffness, which fluctuated in intensity, and lymphocytic pleocytosis were the common findings. Half of the patients also had facial palsies, which were unilateral in 12 and bilateral in seven. In addition, 12 patients had motor and/or sensory radiculoneuropathies; asymmetric weakness of extremities was the most common finding. Although incomplete presentations of neurologic involvement of Lyme disease may be confused with other entities, the typical constellation of neurologic symptoms represents a unique clinical picture. PMID:6516450

  2. 氟砷致骨代谢损伤生物暴露限值基准剂量法分析%Determination of damage in bone metabolism caused by co-exposure to fluoride and arsenic using benchmark dose method in Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾奇兵; 刘云; 洪峰; 杨鋆; 喻仙

    2012-01-01

    目的 应用基准剂量法探讨燃煤氟砷污染致暴露人群骨代谢损伤的生物暴露限值,为预防氟砷暴露对人体健康的损害提供骨损害方面的参考依据.方法 应用BMDS Version 2.1.2软件计算氟砷暴露人群尿氟、尿砷的基准剂量(BMD)及其可信限下限(BMDL).结果 氟、砷混合暴露引起骨代谢损伤的尿氟BMD及BMDL分别为1.96mg/gCr、1.32 mg/gCr;尿砷BMD及BMDL分别为120.11 μg/gCr、94.83 μg/gCr.结论 建议氟、砷混合暴露引起暴露人群骨代谢损伤尿氟和尿砷的生物暴露限值分别为1.32 mg/gCr和94.83 μg/gCr.%Objective To explore the biological exposure limitation for bone metabolism injury with benchmark dose method for the determination of potential risk associated with chronic co-exposure to fluoride and arsenic in Chinese population. Methods The benchmark dose( BMD) and the lower confidence limitation for the benchmark dose(BMDL) of urinary fluorine and arsenic in the exposure population were calculated using BMDS Version 2. 1. 2. Results The BMD and BMDL of urinary fluorine were 1. % mg/g creatinine and 1. 32 mg/g creatinine. BMD and BMDL of urinary arsenic were 120.11 μg/g and 94. 83 μg/g creatinine. Conclusion The estimated biological exposure limitation of urinary fluoride and arsenic were 1. 32 mg/g creatinine and 94. 83 μg/g creatinine in chronic co-exposure to fluoride and arsenic, respectively.

  3. Medical Marijuana in Certain Neurological Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treating certain neurological disorders. The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is the world’s largest association of neurologists ... the table that follows. ©2014 American Academy of Neurology AAN.com Symptoms of MS The studies showed ...

  4. USEPA Arsenic Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation provides background information on the USEPA arsenic removal program. The summary includes information on the history of the program, sites and technology selected, and a summary of the data collected from two completed projects.

  5. [Neurological syndromes, encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tomotaka; Tsuji, Shoji

    2010-06-01

    The remote effects of malignant tumors in most cases of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes(PNS)are mediated by autoimmune processes against antigens shared by the tumor cells and the nervous tissue(onconeural antigens). Onconeural (or paraneoplastic)antibodies are broadly categorized into two groups according to the location of the corresponding onconeural antigens, inside or on the surface of neurons. Antibodies established as clinically relevant diagnostic markers for PNS are designated as well-characterized onconeural antibodies (or classical antibodies)that target intracellular antigens(Hu, Yo, Ri, CV2/CRMP5,Ma2, and amphiphysin). They also serve as useful markers in detecting primary tumors. Recent identification of new antibodies as markers of subtypes of limbic encephalitis has also expanded the concept of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. These autoantibodies are directed to neuronal cell-surface antigens including neurotransmitter receptors(NMDA, AMPA, and GABAB receptors)and ion channels(VGKC). They are less frequently associated with cancer, so that they cannot be used as specific markers for PNS. Autoimmune limbic encephalitis with anti-neuronal cell surface antobodies and paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with classical antibodies overlap in some clinical features but are pathophysiologically distinct. Classical antibodies are not simple tumor markers. They seem to be closely related to the disease mechanisms because specific intrathecal synthesis has been shown in PNS patients. However, attempts to produce an animal model of PNS by passive transfer of these antibodies have been unsuccessful, and there is no direct evidence demonstrating the pathogenic role of classical antibodies. Instead, some circumstantial evidence, including pathological studies showing extensive infiltrates of T cells in the CNS of the patients, supports the hypothesis that cytotoxic-T cell mechanisms cause irreversible neuronal damage. On the other hand, humoral immune

  6. Linear Scleroderma and Neurological Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Three patients with linear scleroderma en coup de sabre who presented with neurologic abnormalities before or concurrent with the dermatologic diagnosis are reported from the Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI.

  7. Neurological Diagnostic Tests and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neurological conditions including multiple sclerosis, brain tumor, acoustic neuroma (small tumors of the inner ear), and spinal ... auditory pathways in the brainstem, and detect acoustic neuromas. The patient sits in a soundproof room and ...

  8. EXAFS study on arsenic species and transformation in arsenic hyperaccumulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG; Zechun; CHEN; Tongbin; LEI; Mei; HU; Tiandou; HUANG

    2004-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation extended X-ray absorption fine structure (SR EXAFS) was employed to study the transformation of coordination environment and the redox speciation of arsenic in a newly discovered arsenic hyperaccumulator, Cretan brake (Pteris cretica L. var nervosa Thunb). It showed that the arsenic in the plant mainly coordinated with oxygen, except that some arsenic coordinated with S as As-GSH in root. The complexation of arsenic with GSH might not be the predominant detoxification mechanism in Cretan brake. Although some arsenic in root presented as As(V) in Na2HAsO4 treatments, most of arsenic in plant presented as As(III)-O in both treatments, indicating that As(V) tended to be reduced to As(III) after it was taken up into the root, and arsenic was kept as As(III) when it was transported to the above-ground tissues. The reduction of As(V) primarily proceeded in the root.

  9. Historical perspective of Indian neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To chronicle the history of medicine and neurology in India with a focus on its establishment and evolution. Background: The history of neurology in India is divided into two periods: ancient and modern. The ancient period dates back to the mid-second millennium Before Christ (B.C. during the creation of the Ayurvedic Indian system of Medicine, which detailed descriptions of neurological disorders called Vata Vyadhi. The early 20 th century witnessed the birth of modern Indian medicine with the onset of formal physician training at the nation′s first allopathic medical colleges located in Madras (1835, Calcutta (1835 and Mumbai (1848. Prior to India′s independence from Britain in 1947, only 25 medical schools existed in the entire country. Today, there are over 355. In 1951, physicians across the field of neurology and neurosurgery united to create the Neurological Society of India (NSI. Four decades later in 1991, neurologists branched out to establish a separate organization called the Indian Academy of Neurology (IAN. Design/Methods: Information was gathered through literature review using PubMed, MD Consult, OVID, primary texts and research at various academic institutions in India. Results: Neurological disorders were first described in ancient India under Ayurveda. The transition to modern medicine occurred more recently through formal training at medical schools beginning in the 1930′s. Early pioneers and founders of the NSI (1951 include Dr. Jacob Chandy, Dr. B Ramamurthi, Dr. S. T. Narasimhan and Dr. Baldev Singh. Later, Dr. J. S. Chopra, a prominent neurologist and visionary, recognized the need for primary centers of collaboration and subsequently established the IAN (1991. The future of Neurology in India is growing rapidly. Currently, there are 1100 practicing neurologists and more than 150 post-graduate trainees who join the ranks every year. As the number of neurologists rises across India, there is an increase in

  10. The neurology of gluten sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Pengiran Tengah, Dayangku Siti Nur Ashikin

    2013-01-01

    Classical coeliac disease (CD) is a well-defined syndrome of small bowel villous atrophy associated with abdominal pain, malabsorption, and weight loss as a result of gluten-sensitivity, reversed rapidly by gluten exclusion diet. Disease associations include dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), Addison’s disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus, autoimmune thyroid disease and a variety of neurological disorders. This thesis aims to investigate the hypothesis of the existence of a gluten sensitive neurolog...

  11. Hippocrates: the forefather of neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitenfeld, T; Jurasic, M J; Breitenfeld, D

    2014-09-01

    Hippocrates is one of the most influential medical doctors of all times. He started observing and experimenting in times of mysticism and magic. He carried a holistic and humanitarian approach to the patient with examination as the principal approach-inspection, palpation and auscultation are still the most important tools in diagnosing algorithms of today. He had immense experience with the human body most likely due to numerous wound treatments he had performed; some even believe he performed autopsies despite the negative trend at the time. Hippocrates identified the brain as the analyst of the outside world, the interpreter of consciousness and the center of intelligence and willpower. Interestingly, Hippocrates was aware of many valid concepts in neurology; his treatise On the Sacred Disease was the most important for understanding neurology and epilepsy. His other ideas pioneered modern day neurology mentioning neurological diseases like apoplexy, spondylitis, hemiplegia, and paraplegia. Today, 10 % of neurological Pubmed and 7 % of neuroscience Scopus reviews mention Corpus Hippocraticum as one of the sources. Therefore, Hippocrates may be considered as the forefather of neurology. PMID:25027011

  12. EFFECT OF DIETARY FOLATE DEFICIENCY ON ARSENIC GENOTOXICITY IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic, a human carcinogen found in drinking water supplies throughout the world, is clastogenic in human and rodent cells. An estimated ten percent of Americans are deficient in folate, a methyl donor necessary for normal nucleotide metabolism, DNA synthesis, and DNA methylatio...

  13. Elevated lactate dehydrogenase activity and increased cardiovascular mortality in the arsenic-endemic areas of southwestern Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic ingestion has been linked to increasing global prevalence of and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD); arsenic can be removed from drinking water to reduce related health effects. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is used for the evaluation of acute arsenic toxicity in vivo and in vitro, but it is not validated for the evaluation of long-term, chronic arsenic exposure. The present study examined the long-term effect of chronic arsenic exposure on CVD and serum LDH levels, after consideration of arsenic metabolism capacity. A total of 380 subjects from an arseniasis-endemic area and 303 from a non-endemic area of southwestern Taiwan were recruited in 2002. Various urinary arsenic species were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and hydride generation systems. Fasting serum was used for quantitative determination of the total LDH activity. A significant dose–response relationship was observed between arsenic exposure and LDH elevation, independent of urinary arsenic profiles (P < 0.001). Furthermore, abnormal LDH elevation was associated with CVD mortality after adjustment for Framingham risk scores for 10-year CVD and arsenic exposure (hazard ratio, 3.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–14.81). LDH was elevated in subjects with arsenic exposure in a dose-dependent manner. LDH is a marker of arsenic toxicity associated with CVD mortality. Results of this study have important implications for use in ascertaining long-term arsenic exposure risk of CVD. -- Highlights: ► We showed that arsenic exposure was correlated with LDH elevation. ► LDH elevation was related to arsenic methylation capacity. ► Abnormal LDH elevation can be a marker of susceptibility to CVD mortality.

  14. Elevated lactate dehydrogenase activity and increased cardiovascular mortality in the arsenic-endemic areas of southwestern Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Ya-Tang [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chien-Jen [Graduate Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taiwan (China); Li, Wan-Fen [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Ling-I [Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Li-Yu; Huang, Yeou-Lih [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan (China); Sun, Chien-Wen [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wei J., E-mail: wjchen@ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taiwan (China); Genetic Epidemiology Core Laboratory, National Taiwan University Center for Genomic Medicine, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shu-Li, E-mail: slwang@nhri.org.tw [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2012-08-01

    Arsenic ingestion has been linked to increasing global prevalence of and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD); arsenic can be removed from drinking water to reduce related health effects. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is used for the evaluation of acute arsenic toxicity in vivo and in vitro, but it is not validated for the evaluation of long-term, chronic arsenic exposure. The present study examined the long-term effect of chronic arsenic exposure on CVD and serum LDH levels, after consideration of arsenic metabolism capacity. A total of 380 subjects from an arseniasis-endemic area and 303 from a non-endemic area of southwestern Taiwan were recruited in 2002. Various urinary arsenic species were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and hydride generation systems. Fasting serum was used for quantitative determination of the total LDH activity. A significant dose–response relationship was observed between arsenic exposure and LDH elevation, independent of urinary arsenic profiles (P < 0.001). Furthermore, abnormal LDH elevation was associated with CVD mortality after adjustment for Framingham risk scores for 10-year CVD and arsenic exposure (hazard ratio, 3.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.07–14.81). LDH was elevated in subjects with arsenic exposure in a dose-dependent manner. LDH is a marker of arsenic toxicity associated with CVD mortality. Results of this study have important implications for use in ascertaining long-term arsenic exposure risk of CVD. -- Highlights: ► We showed that arsenic exposure was correlated with LDH elevation. ► LDH elevation was related to arsenic methylation capacity. ► Abnormal LDH elevation can be a marker of susceptibility to CVD mortality.

  15. Methylated Trivalent Arsenic-Glutathione Complexes are More Stable than their Arsenite Analog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Gailer

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The trivalent arsenic glutathione complexes arsenic triglutathione, methylarsonous diglutathione, and dimethylarsinous glutathione are key intermediates in the mammalian metabolism of arsenite and possibly represent the arsenic species that are transported from the liver to the kidney for urinary excretion. Despite this, the comparative stability of the arsenic-sulfur bonds in these complexes has not been investigated under physiological conditions resembling hepatocyte cytosol. Using size-exclusion chromatography and a glutathione-containing phosphate buffered saline mobile phase (5 or 10 mM glutathione, pH 7.4 in conjunction with an arsenic-specific detector, we chromatographed arsenite, monomethylarsonous acid, and dimethylarsinous acid. The on-column formation of the corresponding arsenic-glutathione complexes between 4 and 37∘C revealed that methylated arsenic-glutathione complexes are more stable than arsenic triglutathione. The relevance of these results with regard to the metabolic fate of arsenite in mammals is discussed.

  16. The contribution of microbial mats to the arsenic geochemistry of an ancient gold mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ancient Zloty Stok (SW Poland) gold mine is such an environment, where different microbial communities, able to utilize inorganic arsenic species As(III) and As(V), are found. The purpose of the present study was to (i) estimate prokaryotic diversity in the microbial mats in bottom sediments of this gold mine, (ii) identify microorganisms that can metabolize arsenic, and (iii) estimate their potential role in the arsenic geochemistry of the mine and in the environment. The oxidation/reduction experiments showed that the microbial mat community may significantly contribute to arsenic contamination in groundwater. The presence of both arsenite oxidizing and dissimilatory arsenate reducing bacteria in the mat was confirmed by the detection of arsenite oxidase and dissimilatory arsenate reductase genes, respectively. This work also demonstrated that microorganisms utilizing other compounds that naturally co-occur with arsenic are present within the microbial mat community and may contribute to the arsenic geochemistry in the environment. - Highlights: ► The microbial mats from this ancient gold mine are highly diverse community. ► As(III) oxidizing and As(V) reducing bacteria are present in the mats. ► As redox transformations are linked to the metabolism of microbial mats bacteria. ► Microbial mats play a crucial role in the As biogeochemical cycle within the mine. - The microbial mats from this ancient gold mine can mediate oxidation/reduction reaction of arsenic and in this way may significantly contribute to arsenic contamination in groundwater.

  17. Acute and chronic arsenic toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Ratnaike, R.

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic toxicity is a global health problem affecting many millions of people. Contamination is caused by arsenic from natural geological sources leaching into aquifers, contaminating drinking water and may also occur from mining and other industrial processes. Arsenic is present as a contaminant in many traditional remedies. Arsenic trioxide is now used to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia. Absorption occurs predominantly from ingestion from the small intestine, though minimal absorption o...

  18. Pentavalent methylated arsenicals are substrates of human AQP9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Joseph R; Jiang, Xuan; Beene, Lauren C; Rosen, Barry P; Liu, Zijuan

    2010-02-01

    Liver aquaglyceroporin AQP9 facilitates movement of trivalent inorganic arsenite (As(III)) and organic monomethylarsonous acid (MAs(III)). However, the transport pathway for the two major pentavalent arsenic cellular metabolites, MAs(V) and DMAs(V), remains unknown in mammals. These products of arsenic metabolism, in particular DMAs(V), are the major arsenicals excreted in the urine of mammals. In this study, we examined the uptake of the two pentavalent organic arsenicals by human AQP9 in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Xenopus laevis oocytes microinjected with AQP9 cRNA exhibited uptake of both MAs(V) and DMAs(V) in a pH-dependent manner. The rate of transport was much higher at acidic pH (pH5.5) than at neutral pH. Hg(II), an aquaporin inhibitor, inhibited transport of As(III), MAs(III), MAs(V) and DMAs(V) via AQP9. However, phloretin, which inhibits water and glycerol permeation via AQP9, can only inhibit transport of pentavalent MAs(V) and DMAs(V) but not trivalent As(III) and MAs(III), indicating the translocation mechanisms of these arsenic species are not exactly the same. Reagents such as FCCP, valinomycin and nigericin that dissipate transmembrane proton potential or change the transmemebrane pH gradient did not significantly inhibit all arsenic transport via AQP9, suggesting the transport of pentavalent arsenic is not proton coupled. The results suggest that in addition to the initial uptake of trivalent inorganic As(III) inside cells, AQP9 plays a dual role in the detoxification of arsenic metabolites by facilitating efflux from cells.

  19. [Urgent neurologic states: experience at the Neurology Clinic in Sarajevo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loncarević, Nedim; Dimitrijević, Jovan; Hrnjica, Mehmed; Hećo, Suad

    2004-01-01

    There is a quite good definition of medical care for patients suffering from chronicle neurological diseases. However the neurologist role in taking care of urgent cases is substantially less determined. This paper is analyzing one year efforts of the on duty neurological team in the Out Patient Department and Emergency Division of the Neurology Department in Sarajevo. During this period the on duty neurological team examined the total of 3939 patients, out of which 1022 patients where kept for treatment. The patients where most frequently assigned to the Emergency unit for following reasons: vascular incident of the Central Nervous System(1955 patients or 50%), cerebrovascular accident represented with 1290 or 33%, and TIA of the carotid and vertebrobasilar area 544 or 14% along with hypertensive encephalopathia, 118 or 3%. This is followed by the group of the short-term disturbance of consciousness (472 or 125), out of which the consciousness crises represented 257 or 7%, and epileptic crises 215 or 5%. Following are the lower percentages of the headaches (287 or 7%), radicular painful syndrome of cervical and lumbal area (209 or 5%), vertigo (183 or 5%), neurophatia (167 or 4%), etc. The more extensive number of patients admitted at the Emergency Division where suffering from brain stroke (800 or 78%), TIA was represented by a lower number (172 or 17%). Only 50 patients had other diagnosis. The ischemic stroke represented 674 or 81% with patients suffering from the brain stroke and the hemorrhagic stroke 153 or 19%. Today, the urgent neurological conditions represent a particular area of Neurology, not only neurologists need to know but also other medical doctors, to enable the patients to be forwarded on time to the appropriate care institution. PMID:15202312

  20. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the methylation of arsenicals in the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotransformation of inorganic arsenic (iAs) involves methylation catalyzed by arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (As3mt), yielding mono- , di- , and trimethylated arsenicals. To investigate the evolution of molecular mechanisms that mediate arsenic biotransformation,...

  1. Occupational neurological disorders in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-A; Kang, Seong-Kyu

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this article was to provide a literature review of occupational neurological disorders and related research in Korea, focusing on chemical hazards. We reviewed occupational neurological disorders investigated by the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute of Korean Occupational Safety and Health Agency between 1992 and 2009, categorizing them as neurological disorders of the central nervous system (CNS), of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) or as neurodegenerative disorders. We also examined peer-reviewed journal articles related to neurotoxicology, published from 1984 to 2009. Outbreaks of occupational neurological disorder of the CNS due to inorganic mercury and carbon disulfide poisoning had helped prompt the development of the occupational safety and health system of Korea. Other major neurological disorders of the CNS included methyl bromide intoxication and chronic toxic encephalopathy. Most of the PNS disorders were n-hexane-induced peripheral neuritis, reported from the electronics industry. Reports of manganese-induced Parkinsonism resulted in the introduction of neuroimaging techniques to occupational medicine. Since the late 1990s, the direction of research has been moving toward degenerative disorder and early effect of neurotoxicity. To understand the early effects of neurotoxic chemicals in the preclinical stage, more follow-up studies of a longer duration are necessary. PMID:21258587

  2. Arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris Vittata L. and its arsenic accumulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    An arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L. (Chinese brake) was first discovered in China by means of field survey and greenhouse cultivation. Field survey showed that Chinese brake had large accumulating capacity to arsenic; the orders of arsenic content in different parts of the fern were as follows: leaves>leafstalks>roots, which is totally different from that of ordinary plants; bioaccumulation coefficients of the above ground parts of the fern decreased as a power function of soil arsenic contents. In the control of pot trials with normal unpolluted soil containing 9 mg/kg of arsenic, the bioaccumulation coefficients of the above ground parts and rhizoids of Chinese brake were as high as 71 and 80 respectively. Greenhouse cultivation in the contaminated soil from mining areas has shown that more than 1 times greater arsenic can be accumulated in the leaves of the fern than that of field samples with the largest content of 5070 mg/kg As on a dry matter basis. During greenhouse cultivation, arsenic content in the leaves of the fern increased linearly with time prolonging. Not only has Chinese brake extraordinary tolerance and accumulation to arsenic, but it grew rapidly with great biomass, wide distribution and easy adaptation to different environmental conditions as well. Therefore, it has great potential in future remediation of arsenic contamination. It also demonstrates important value for studies of arsenic physiology and biochemistry such as arsenic absorption, translocation and detoxification mechanisms in plants.

  3. [Arsenic - Poison or medicine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik-Kupka, Karolina; Koszowska, Aneta; Brończyk-Puzoń, Anna; Nowak, Justyna; Gwizdek, Katarzyna; Zubelewicz-Szkodzińska, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) is commonly known as a poison. Only a few people know that As has also been widely used in medicine. In the past years As and its compounds were used as a medicine for the treatment of such diseases as diabetes, psoriasis, syphilis, skin ulcers and joint diseases. Nowadays As is also used especially in the treatment of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has recognized arsenic as an element with carcinogenic effect evidenced by epidemiological studies, but as previously mentioned it is also used in the treatment of neoplastic diseases. This underlines the specificity of the arsenic effects. Arsenic occurs widely in the natural environment, for example, it is present in soil and water, which contributes to its migration to food products. Long exposure to this element may lead to liver damages and also to changes in myocardium. Bearing in mind that such serious health problems can occur, monitoring of the As presence in the environmental media plays a very important role. In addition, the occupational risk of As exposure in the workplace should be identified and checked. Also the standards for As presence in food should be established. This paper presents a review of the 2015 publications based on the Medical database like PubMed and Polish Medical Bibliography. It includes the most important information about arsenic in both forms, poison and medicine.

  4. Chronic arsenic poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alan H

    2002-03-10

    Symptomatic arsenic poisoning is not often seen in occupational exposure settings. Attempted homicide and deliberate long-term poisoning have resulted in chronic toxicity. Skin pigmentation changes, palmar and plantar hyperkeratoses, gastrointestinal symptoms, anemia, and liver disease are common. Noncirrhotic portal hypertension with bleeding esophageal varices, splenomegaly, and hypersplenism may occur. A metallic taste, gastrointestinal disturbances, and Mee's lines may be seen. Bone marrow depression is common. 'Blackfoot disease' has been associated with arsenic-contaminated drinking water in Taiwan; Raynaud's phenomenon and acrocyanosis also may occur. Large numbers of persons in areas of India, Pakistan, and several other countries have been chronically poisoned from naturally occurring arsenic in ground water. Toxic delirium and encephalopathy can be present. CCA-treated wood (chromated copper arsenate) is not a health risk unless burned in fireplaces or woodstoves. Peripheral neuropathy may also occur. Workplace exposure or chronic ingestion of arsenic-contaminated water or arsenical medications is associated with development of skin, lung, and other cancers. Treatment may incklude the use of chelating agents such as dimercaprol (BAL), dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), and dimercaptopanesulfonic acid (DMPS).

  5. Arsenic Exposure through Drinking Water Is Associated with Longer Telomeres in Peripheral Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a strong carcinogen, possibly by interaction with the telomere length. The aim of the study was to evaluate how chronic arsenic exposure from drinking water as well as the arsenic metabolism efficiency affect the individual telomere length and the expression of telomere-related genes. Two hundred two women with a wide range in exposure to arsenic via drinking water (3.5–200 μg/L) were recruited. Concentrations of arsenic metabolites in urine [inorganic arsenic (iAs), methylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA)] were measured. The relative telomere length in blood was measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Genotyping (N = 172) for eight SNPs in AS3MT and gene expression of telomere-related genes (in blood; N = 90) were performed. Urinary arsenic (sum of metabolites) was positively associated with telomere length (β = 0.65 × 10–4, 95% CI = 0.031 × 10–4–1.3 × 10–4, adjusted for age and BMI). Individuals with above median fractions of iAs and MMA showed significantly longer telomeres by increasing urinary arsenic (β = 1.0 × 10–4, 95% CI = 0.21 × 10–4–1.8 × 10–4 at high % iAs; β = 0.88 × 10–4 95% CI = 0.12 × 10–4–1.6 × 10–4 at high % MMA) than those below the median (p = 0.80 and 0.44, respectively). Similarly, carriers of the slow and more toxic metabolizing AS3MT haplotype showed stronger positive associations between arsenic exposure and telomere length, as compared to noncarriers (interaction urinary arsenic and haplotype p = 0.025). Urinary arsenic was positively correlated with the expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT, Spearman r = 0.22, p = 0.037), but no association was found between TERT expression and telomere length. Arsenic in drinking water influences the telomere length, and this may be a mechanism for its carcinogenicity. A faster and less toxic arsenic metabolism diminishes arsenic-related telomere elongation. PMID:22917110

  6. Mealtimes in a neurological ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Malene; Martinsen, Bente; Poulsen, Ingrid;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To examine the environment surrounding hospital meals for patients with neurological diseases. BACKGROUND: A determined effort has been made to optimise the nutrition of hospitalised patients. However, the organisation of mealtimes and their relational and aesthetic aspects...... challenged by the design of the physical space and institutional structures. CONCLUSION: This study contributes to our understanding of the environment surrounding hospital meals for patients with neurological diseases. Based on this study, it can be concluded that meals were at a high risk of being served...... as a mindless task without the recognition that mealtimes are sensed with the whole body of the patient and not only by the mouth. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The importance of the mealtime environment must be acknowledged because it serves as a communicative aspect for neurological patients by letting them...

  7. Quality Metrics in Inpatient Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhand, Amar

    2015-12-01

    Quality of care in the context of inpatient neurology is the standard of performance by neurologists and the hospital system as measured against ideal models of care. There are growing regulatory pressures to define health care value through concrete quantifiable metrics linked to reimbursement. Theoretical models of quality acknowledge its multimodal character with quantitative and qualitative dimensions. For example, the Donabedian model distils quality as a phenomenon of three interconnected domains, structure-process-outcome, with each domain mutually influential. The actual measurement of quality may be implicit, as in peer review in morbidity and mortality rounds, or explicit, in which criteria are prespecified and systemized before assessment. As a practical contribution, in this article a set of candidate quality indicators for inpatient neurology based on an updated review of treatment guidelines is proposed. These quality indicators may serve as an initial blueprint for explicit quality metrics long overdue for inpatient neurology.

  8. Neurology of endemic skeletal fluorosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy D

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Endemic skeletal fluorosis is widely prevalent in India and is a major public health problem. The first ever report of endemic skeletal fluorosis and neurological manifestation was from Prakasam district in Andhra Pradesh in the year 1937. Epidemiological and experimental studies in the endemic areas suggest the role of temperate climate, hard physical labor, nutritional status, presence of abnormal concentrations of trace elements like strontium, uranium, silica in water supplies, high fluoride levels in foods and presence of kidney disease in the development of skeletal fluorosis. Neurological complications of endemic skeletal fluorosis, namely radiculopathy, myelopathy or both are mechanical in nature and till date the evidence for direct neurotoxicity of fluoride is lacking. Prevention of the disease should be the aim, knowing the pathogenesis of fluorosis. Surgery has a limited role in alleviating the neurological disability and should be tailored to the individual based on the imaging findings.

  9. Inorganic arsenic toxicosis in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riviere, J E; Boosinger, T R; Everson, R J

    1981-03-01

    In 4 occurrences of arsenic poisoning in cattle, the principal clinical sign was acute hemorrhagic diarrhea attributable to hemorrhagic gastroenteritis. Arsenic concentrations in the liver, kidney and rumen contents varied. In one occurrence, arsenic in the hair of affected survivors was assayed at 0.8-3.40 ppm, vs 0.09-0.10 ppm in randomly selected control samples of hair. Sudden death was the only clinical sign in another occurrence in which gastric contents contained arsenic at 671 ppm. In another occurrence, arsenic poisoning caused lesions similar to those of salmonellosis.

  10. Neurological manifestation of colonic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzair Chaudhary

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders are extremely rare in cancer patients and are most commonly associated with certain tumors, such as ovarian cancer, small cell lung cancer, and breast cancer. We report here a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome in a 53-year-old man with colonic adenocarcinoma with a solitary liver metastasis. His paraneoplastic syndrome was successfully treated by methylprednisolone and primary oncologic therapies including neoadjuvant chemotherapy and definitive surgery. This is also the first documented case of simultaneous manifestation of a sensory neuropathy and limbic encephalitis with colon cancer.

  11. Arsenic poisoning in cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLennan, M.W.; Dodson, M.E.

    1972-06-01

    A case of acute arsenic poisoning in cattle was reported. The losses occurred on a property in the south east of South Australia. The weather had been hot for two or three days before the death occurred. The tank supplying the water trough had almost run dry. The cattle then attempted to meet their water requirements by drinking from the sheep dipping vat. A sample of rumen contents and a sample of water from the dipping vat were checked for arsenic. The rumen sample contained 45 ppM As/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and the sample of dipping fluid contained 200 ppM As. The lesions observed were similar to earlier reported arsenic poisoning. 5 references.

  12. Liver transplantation for hepatic and neurological Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, I; Heinemann, K; Rohm, S; Hauss, J; Lamesch, P

    2003-06-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal-recessive inherited disorder of copper metabolism characterized by excessive deposition of copper throughout the body. If medical treatment fails in cases of fulminant hepatic failure and progressive hepatic dysfunction due to advanced cirrhosis, liver transplantation (OLTx) has been demonstrated to be a valuable treatment option. Between December 1993 and December 2002, 225 OLTxs in 198 patients were performed in our institution. In this consecutive series six patients (three females and three males) were liver grafted for WD. The follow-up ranged from 3 to 7 years. All patients are alive with well-functioning grafts at present. The ceruloplasmin levels increased after transplantation and remained normal. The Kayser-Fleischer ring disappeared in all patients, and urinary copper excretion normalized. The neurological manifestations in the two patients with severe neurological symptoms showed after 2 to 5 years a downward tendency; in one the ataxic movements disappeared completely. The psychiatric disorder in one patient disappeared as well the mild neurological symptoms in the patient with CHILD A cirrhosis. These two patients are fully recovered and returned to work. OLTx should be considered as a treatment option in patients with severe progressive neurological deficits even in cases with stable liver function since liver grafting definitely cures the underlying biochemical defect. In such cases an early decision for liver transplantation is justified because neurological deficits may become irreversible.

  13. [Features of neurologic semiotics at chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinenko, I V; Baranov, V L; Kolcheva, Iu A

    2011-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is actual pathology, when it forms the mixed hypoxemia. In the conditions of a chronic hypoxemia structures of organism with high level of metabolic processes, namely brain tissues, suffer. Character of defeat of the central nervous system at that pathology is insufficiently studied. In this article we studied and analysed the presence of such changes as depression, anxiety, cognitive impairment and features of neurologic semiotics at COPD in 50 patients.

  14. Proprioceptive reflexes and neurological disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Proprioceptive reflexes play an important role during the control of movement and posture. Disturbed modulation of proprioceptive reflexes is often suggested as the cause for the motoric features present in neurological disorders. In this thesis methods are developed and evaluated to quantify propri

  15. [Cerebrolysin in pediatric neurology practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrukhin, A S; Pylaeva, O A

    2014-01-01

    Мany aspects of сerebrolysin treatment in a wide range of nervous system disorders in children are described. High efficacy and well tolerated therapy are revealed. These findings expand the perspectives of using сerebrolysin in pediatric neurology. PMID:24637827

  16. Neurological Complications of Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may begin with flu-like symptoms such as fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, headaches, fatigue, muscle aches, and joint pain. Neurological complications most often occur in the second stage ... such as fever, stiff neck, and severe headache. Other problems, which ...

  17. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive; Luciano de Paola; Renato Puppi Munhoz

    2014-01-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  18. LASER THERAPY IN CHILD NEUROLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    D. A. Prityko

    2012-01-01

    The current review of studies devoted to efficacy and safety of laser therapy in the treatment of neurological diseases in children is proposed. The author discusses pathophysiological background of this method of therapy, general therapeutic approaches and definite schemes of therapy in different diseases.

  19. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  20. Edgar Allan Poe and neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teive, Hélio Afonso Ghizoni; Paola, Luciano de; Munhoz, Renato Puppi

    2014-06-01

    Edgar Allan Poe was one of the most celebrated writers of all time. He published several masterpieces, some of which include references to neurological diseases. Poe suffered from recurrent depression, suggesting a bipolar disorder, as well as alcohol and drug abuse, which in fact led to his death from complications related to alcoholism. Various hypotheses were put forward, including Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  1. Neurological Aspects of Reading Disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Louis R.

    The author, a neurologist, looks at the nature of reading disabilities. He suggests that many reading disabilities are the result of normal constitutional differences and that the term "minimal brain dysfunction" is rarely appropriate and does not help the remediation process. Noted are various theories which relate neurology and reading ability.…

  2. Acute and chronic arsenic toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnaike, R N

    2003-07-01

    Arsenic toxicity is a global health problem affecting many millions of people. Contamination is caused by arsenic from natural geological sources leaching into aquifers, contaminating drinking water and may also occur from mining and other industrial processes. Arsenic is present as a contaminant in many traditional remedies. Arsenic trioxide is now used to treat acute promyelocytic leukaemia. Absorption occurs predominantly from ingestion from the small intestine, though minimal absorption occurs from skin contact and inhalation. Arsenic exerts its toxicity by inactivating up to 200 enzymes, especially those involved in cellular energy pathways and DNA synthesis and repair. Acute arsenic poisoning is associated initially with nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and severe diarrhoea. Encephalopathy and peripheral neuropathy are reported. Chronic arsenic toxicity results in multisystem disease. Arsenic is a well documented human carcinogen affecting numerous organs. There are no evidence based treatment regimens to treat chronic arsenic poisoning but antioxidants have been advocated, though benefit is not proven. The focus of management is to reduce arsenic ingestion from drinking water and there is increasing emphasis on using alternative supplies of water.

  3. Arsenic and cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianchi F.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of epidemiologic, experimental and clinical evidence shows that arsenic may exert relevant cardiovascular effects with early damage such as endothelial dysfunction. Early biomarkers of cardiovascular damage together with markers of exposure, genetic and epigenetic effects, DNA damage, apoptosis, oxidative stress remain unexplored and a study is ongoing in Italy.

  4. Developmental and reproductive toxicity of inorganic arsenic: animal studies and human concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, M S; Macintosh, M S; Baumrind, N

    1998-01-01

    Information on the reproductive and developmental toxicity of inorganic arsenic is available primarily from studies in animals using arsenite and arsenate salts and arsenic trioxide. Inorganic arsenic has been extensively studied as a teratogen in animals. Data from animal studies demonstrate that arsenic can produce developmental toxicity, including malformation, death, and growth retardation, in four species (hamsters, mice, rats, rabbits). A characteristic pattern of malformations is produced, and the developmental toxicity effects are dependent on dose, route, and the day of gestation when exposure occurs. Studies with gavage and diet administration indicate that death and growth retardation are produced by oral arsenic exposure. Arsenic is readily transferred to the fetus and produces developmental toxicity in embryo culture. Animal studies have not identified an effect of arsenic on fertility in males or females. When females were dosed chronically for periods that included pregnancy, the primary effect of arsenic on reproduction was a dose-dependent increase in conceptus mortality and in postnatal growth retardation. Human data are limited to a few studies of populations exposed to arsenic from drinking water or from working at or living near smelters. Associations with spontaneous abortion and stillbirth have been reported in more than one of these studies, but interpretation of these studies is complicated because study populations were exposed to multiple chemicals. Thus, animal studies suggest that environmental arsenic exposures are primarily a risk to the developing fetus. In order to understand the implications for humans, attention must be given to comparative pharmacokinetics and metabolism, likely exposure scenarios, possible mechanisms of action, and the potential role of arsenic as an essential nutrient.

  5. Long-term arsenic monitoring with an Enterobacter cloacae microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Michelle; Minteer, Shelley D

    2015-12-01

    A microbial fuel cell was constructed with biofilms of Enterobacter cloacae grown on the anode. Bioelectrocatalysis was observed when the biofilm was grown in media containing sucrose as the carbon source and methylene blue as the mediator. The presence of arsenic caused a decrease in bioelectrocatalytic current. Biofilm growth in the presence of arsenic resulted in lower power outputs whereas addition of arsenic showed no immediate result in power output due to the short term arsenic resistance of the bacteria and slow transport of arsenic across cellular membranes to metabolic enzymes. Calibration curves plotted from the maximum current and maximum power of power curves after growth show that this system is able to quantify both arsenate and arsenate with low detection limits (46 μM for arsenate and 4.4 μM for arsenite). This system could be implemented as a method for long-term monitoring of arsenic concentration in environments where arsenic contamination could occur and alter the metabolism of the organisms resulting in a decrease in power output of the self-powered sensor.

  6. Dehydrogenase activity of liver parenchyma in mice exposed to arsenic in drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencko, V.; Rossner, P.; Mokry, M.

    1975-01-01

    The objective was to detect changes in dehydrogenase activity (DHA) of liver parenchyma in mice exposed to arsenic in drinking water (for 2, 4, 8, 16, 32 and 64 days). The concentrations used guaranteed threshold, above-threshold and toxic doses of arsenic. A concentration of 5 mg/l produced no significant difference (in comparison with control), a concentration of 250 mg/l caused a deep decline in DHA activity. A concentration of 50 mg/l reduced DHA solely in the first exposure interval. It was found that DHA activity was substantially less altered by arsenic than the metabolic consumption of oxygen under identical conditions.

  7. Cervical spinal canal narrowing and cervical neurologi-cal injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ling; Chen, Hai-Bin; Wang, Yi; ZHANG Li-ying; Liu, Jing-cheng; WANG Zheng-guo

    2012-01-01

    【Abstract】Cervical spinal canal narrowing can lead to injury of the spinal cord and neurological symptoms in-cluding neck pain, headache, weakness and parasthesisas. According to previous and recent clinical researches, we investigated the geometric parameters of normal cervical spinal canal including the sagittal and transverse diameters as well as Torg ratio. The mean sagittal diameter of cervical spinal canal at C 1 to C 7 ranges from 15.33 mm to 20.46 mm, ...

  8. Rural methods to mitigate arsenic contaminated water

    OpenAIRE

    Parajuli, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of arsenic contaminated water is one of the burning issues in the rural world. Poor public awareness program about health effects of drinking arsenic contaminated water and the rural methods to mitigate this problem poses a great threat of arsenic poisoning many people of the rural world. In this thesis, arsenic removal efficiency and the working mechanism of four rural and economical arsenic mitigation technologies i.e. solar oxidation and reduction of arsenic (SORAS), Bucket tr...

  9. Mechanism of erythrocyte death in human population exposed to arsenic through drinking water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water is one of the biggest natural calamities, which has become an imperative threat to human health throughout the world. Abbreviation of erythrocyte lifespan leading to the development of anemia is a common sequel in arsenic exposed population. This study was undertaken to explore the mechanism of cell death in human erythrocytes during chronic arsenic exposure. Results revealed transformation of smooth discoid red cells into evaginated echinocytic form in the exposed individuals. Further distortion converted reversible echinocytes to irreversible spheroechinocytes. Arsenic toxicity increased membrane microviscosity along with an elevation of cholesterol/phospholipid ratio, which hampered the flexibility of red cell membrane and made them less deformable. Significant increase in the binding of merocyanine 540 with erythrocyte membrane due to arsenic exposure indicated disruption of lipid packing in the outer leaflet of the cell membrane resulting from altered transbilayer phospholipid asymmetry. Arsenic induced eryptosis was characterized by cell shrinkage and exposure of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface. Furthermore, metabolic starvation with depletion of cellular ATP triggered apoptotic removal of erythrocytes from circulation. Significant decrease in reduced glutathione content indicating defective antioxidant capacity was coupled with enhancement of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels, which pointed to oxidative damage to erythrocyte membrane. Arsenic toxicity intervened into red cell membrane integrity eventually leading to membrane destabilization and hemoglobin release. The study depicted the involvement of both erythrophagocytosis and hemolysis in the destruction of human erythrocytes during chronic arsenic exposure

  10. Arsenic: it's extent of pollution and toxicosis: An animal perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapan Kumar Das

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic poisoning is now considered as one of the biggest environmental disaster and a major public health issue. Incidence of arsenicpoisoning has been reported from many parts of the world. While Bangladesh and West Bengal (India account for the most of the incidence, occasional reports from Mexico, Taiwan and mainland China have also appeared.It is a natural metalloid found in low concentrations in virtually every part of the environment as it is used in a wide variety of industrial applications, from computers to fireworks. Ground water arsenic is the major source of poisoning in animals and human. About 80% of ingested arsenic is absorbed and metabolized in liver and then excreted through urine and faeces while upon chronic exposure, it is deposited in liver, kidney and skin. Human populations are also being exposed to this poison by consuming the milk of affected animal.Inorganic forms of arsenic are more toxic compared to organic forms. Acute toxicity is rare in nature in comparison to chronic toxicity, which is prevalent in contaminated areas. Most non-ruminants are more susceptible to intoxication than ruminants. Chronic exposure of arsenic in animals and human beings causes severe adverse effects in the form of lowered immunity, diseases and production performances. [Vet World 2013; 6(1.000: 53-58

  11. Chronic arsenic poisoning from burning high-arsenic-containing coal in Guizhou, China.

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jie; Zheng, Baoshan; Aposhian, H. Vasken; Zhou, Yunshu; Chen, Ming-liang; Zhang, Aihua; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2002-01-01

    Arsenic is an environmental hazard and the reduction of drinking water arsenic levels is under consideration. People are exposed to arsenic not only through drinking water but also through arsenic-contaminated air and food. Here we report the health effects of arsenic exposure from burning high arsenic-containing coal in Guizhou, China. Coal in this region has undergone mineralization and thus produces high concentrations of arsenic. Coal is burned inside the home in open pits for daily cooki...

  12. METABOLIC CORRECTIONOFNEUROLOGICALCOMPLICATIONS OFDIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sof'ya Alekseevna Rumyantseva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of the metabolic and vascular mechanisms responsible for the occurrence and progression of neurological complications of diabetes mellitus are presented. The results of some investigations demonstrating the efficacy of actovegin in the treatment of diabetic polyneuropathy, encephalopathy, and diabetic foot syndrome are given.

  13. PET and SPECT in neurology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Vries, Erik F.J. de; Waarde, Aren van [Groningen University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging; Otte, Andreas (ed.) [Univ. of Applied Sciences Offenburg (Germany). Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology

    2014-07-01

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  14. Social networks and neurological illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhand, Amar; Luke, Douglas A; Lang, Catherine E; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2016-10-01

    Every patient is embedded in a social network of interpersonal connections that influence health outcomes. Neurologists routinely need to engage with a patient's family and friends due to the nature of the illness and its social sequelae. Social isolation is a potent determinant of poor health and neurobiological changes, and its effects can be comparable to those of traditional risk factors. It would seem reasonable, therefore, to map and follow the personal networks of neurology patients. This approach reveals influential people, their habits, and linkage patterns that could facilitate or limit health behaviours. Personal network information can be particularly valuable to enhance risk factor management, medication adherence, and functional recovery. Here, we propose an agenda for research and clinical practice that includes mapping the networks of patients with diverse neurological disorders, evaluating the impact of the networks on patient outcomes, and testing network interventions. PMID:27615420

  15. PET and SPECT in neurology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET and SPECT in Neurology highlights the combined expertise of renowned authors whose dedication to the investigation of neurological disorders through nuclear medicine technology has achieved international recognition. Classical neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as well as cerebrovascular disorders, brain tumors, epilepsy, head trauma, coma, sleeping disorders, and inflammatory and infectious diseases of the CNS. The latest results in nuclear brain imaging are detailed. Most chapters are written jointly by a clinical neurologist and a nuclear medicine specialist to ensure a multidisciplinary approach. This state-of-the-art compendium will be valuable to anybody in the field of neuroscience, from the neurologist and the radiologist/nuclear medicine specialist to the interested general practitioner and geriatrician. It is the second volume of a trilogy on PET and SPECT imaging in the neurosciences, the other volumes covering PET and SPECT in psychiatry and in neurobiological systems.

  16. Neurology of foreign language aptitude

    OpenAIRE

    Biedroń, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    This state-of-the art paper focuses on the poorly explored issue of foreign language aptitude, attempting to present the latest developments in this field and reconceptualizations of the construct from the perspective of neuroscience. In accordance with this goal, it first discusses general directions in neurolinguistic research on foreign language aptitude, starting with the earliest attempts to define the neurological substrate for talent, sources of difficulties in the neurolinguisti...

  17. Erythropoietin in the Neurology ICU

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, Claudia; Sadrameli, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is an approved drug that is used in the treatment of chronic anemia associated with chronic renal failure. In the Neuro ICU, there are two potential uses for treatment with EPO. Anemia is common in patients with acute neurological disorders and may be a cause of secondary insults. Studies of EPO to treat anemia associated with critical illness have not conclusively shown a beneficial risk/benefit ratio. The relatively small reduction in transfusion requirement with EPO in...

  18. Botulinum Toxin in Pediatric Neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Moawad, Eman M. I.; Abdallah, Enas Abdallah Ali

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are natural molecules produced by anaerobic spore-forming bacteria called Clostradium boltulinum. The toxin has a peculiar mechanism of action by preventing the release of acetylcholine from the presynaptic membrane. Consequently, it has been used in the treatment of various neurological conditions related to muscle hyperactivity and/or spasticity. Also, it has an impact on the autonomic nervous system by acting on smooth muscle, leading to its use in the management of p...

  19. Neuronanatomy, neurology and Bayesian networks

    OpenAIRE

    Bielza Lozoya, Maria Concepcion

    2014-01-01

    Bayesian networks are data mining models with clear semantics and a sound theoretical foundation. In this keynote talk we will pinpoint a number of neuroscience problems that can be addressed using Bayesian networks. In neuroanatomy, we will show computer simulation models of dendritic trees and classification of neuron types, both based on morphological features. In neurology, we will present the search for genetic biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease and the prediction of health-related qualit...

  20. Neurological Findings in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Paydas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN arise from genetic deficiencies at the level of pluripotent stem cells. Each of these neoplasms is a clonal stem cell disorder with specific phenotypic, genetic and clinical properties. Age is one of the most important factors in the development of symptoms and complications associated with MPNs.High white blood cell counts in chronic myelocytic leukemia also known as leukocytosis may lead to central nervous system findings. Tumors developing outside the bone marrow named as extramedullary myeloid tumors (EMMT could be detected at the initial diagnosis or during the prognosis of the disease, which may cause neurological symptoms due to pressure of leukemic cell mass on various tissues along with spinal cord. Central nervous system involvement and thrombocytopenic hemorrhage may lead to diverse neurological symptoms and findings.Transient ischemic attack and thrombotic stroke are the most common symptoms in polycythemia vera. Besides thrombosis and hemorrage, transformation to acute leukemia can cause neurological symptoms and findings. Transient ischemic attack, thrombotic stroke and specifically hemorrage can give rise to neurological symptoms similar to MPN in essential thrombocytosis.Extramedullary hematopoiesis refers to hematopoietic centers arise in organ/tissues other than bone marrow in myelofibrosis. Extramedullar hematopoietic centers may cause intracranial involvement, spinal cord compression, seizures and hydrocephalia. Though rare, extramedullary hematopoiesis can be detected in cranial/spinal meninges, paraspinal tissue and intracerebral regions. Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been reported in peripheral neurons, choroid plexus, pituitary, orbits, orbital and lacrimal fossa and in sphenoidal sinuses. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 157-169

  1. Moonshine-related arsenic poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, R E; Crecelius, E A; Hudson, J B

    1980-02-01

    Twelve sequential cases of arsenic poisoning were reviewed for possible sources of ingestion. Contaminated illicit whiskey (moonshine) appeared to be the source in approximately 50% of the patients. An analysis of.confiscated moonshine revealed that occasional specimens contained high levels of arsenic as a contaminant. Although arsenic poisoning occurs relatively infrequently, contaminated moonshine may be an important cause of the poisoning in some areas of the country.

  2. Neurological manifestations of filarial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Devender; Dumas, Michel; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Filarial infections cause a huge public health burden wherever they are endemic. These filaria may locate anywhere in the human body. Their manifestations and pathogenic mechanisms, except the most common ones, are rarely investigated systematically. Their neurological manifestations, however, are being increasingly recognized particularly with onchocerciasis or Loa loa infections, Wuchereria bancrofti, or Mansonella perstans. The risk of developing these manifestations may also increase in cases that harbor multiple filariasis or coinfections, for instance as with Plasmodium. The microfilaria of Onchocerca and Loa loa are seen in cerebrospinal fluid. The pathogenesis of neurological manifestations of these infections is complex; however, pathogenic reactions may be caused by mechanical disruption, e.g., degeneration often followed by granulomas, causing fibrosis or mass effects on other tissues, vascular lesions, e.g., vascular block of cerebral vessels, or disordered inflammatory responses resulting in meningitis, encephalitis or localized inflammatory responses. The chances of having neurological manifestations may also depend upon the frequency and"heaviness"of infection over a lifetime. Hence, this type of infection should no longer be considered a disease of the commonly affected areas but one that may produce systemic effects or other manifestations, and these should be considered in populations where they are endemic. PMID:23829914

  3. Current status of biomarker research in neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Polivka, Jiri; Krakorova, Kristyna; Peterka, Marek; Topolcan, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Neurology is one of the typical disciplines where personalized medicine has been recently becoming an important part of clinical practice. In this article, the brief overview and a number of examples of the use of biomarkers and personalized medicine in neurology are described. The various issues in neurology are described in relation to the personalized medicine and diagnostic, prognostic as well as predictive blood and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. Such neurological domains discussed in t...

  4. Arsenic poisoning of Bangladesh groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickson, Ross; McArthur, John; Burgess, William; Ahmed, Kazi Matin; Ravenscroft, Peter; Rahmanñ, Mizanur

    1998-09-01

    In Bangladesh and West Bengal, alluvial Ganges aquifers used for public water supply are polluted with naturally occurring arsenic, which adversely affects the health of millions of people. Here we show that the arsenic derives from the reductive dissolution of arsenic-rich iron oxyhydroxides, which in turn are derived from weathering of base-metal sulphides. This finding means it should now be possible, by sedimentological study of the Ganges alluvial sediments, to guide the placement of new water wells so they will be free of arsenic.

  5. Arsenic content of homeopathic medicines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, H.D.; Saryan, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to test the widely held assumption that homeopathic medicines contain negligible quantities of their major ingredients, six such medicines labeled in Latin as containing arsenic were purchased over the counter and by mail order and their arsenic contents measured. Values determined were similar to those expected from label information in only two of six and were markedly at variance in the remaining four. Arsenic was present in notable quantities in two preparations. Most sales personnel interviewed could not identify arsenic as being an ingredient in these preparations and were therefore incapable of warning the general public of possible dangers from ingestion. No such warnings appeared on the labels.

  6. Long-term consequences of arsenic poisoning during infancy due to contaminated milk powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakeishi, Miwako; Murata, Katsuyuki; Grandjean, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic toxicity is a global health problem affecting many millions of people. The main source of exposure is drinking water contaminated by natural geological sources. Current risk assessment is based on the recognized carcinogenicity of arsenic, but neurotoxic risks have been overlooked. In 1955, an outbreak of arsenic poisoning occurred among Japanese infants, with more than 100 deaths. The source was contaminated milk powder produced by the Morinaga company. Detailed accounts of the Morinaga dried milk poisoning were published in Japanese only, and an overview of this poisoning incident and its long-term consequences is therefore presented. From analyses available, the arsenic concentration in milk made from the Morinaga milk powder is calculated to be about 4–7 mg/L, corresponding to daily doses slightly above 500 μg/kg body weight. Lower exposures would result from using diluted milk. Clinical poisoning cases occurred after a few weeks of exposure, with a total dose of about 60 mg. This experience provides clear-cut evidence for hazard assessment of the developmental neurotoxicity. At the present time, more than 600 surviving victims, now in their 50s, have been reported to suffer from severe sequelae, such as mental retardation, neurological diseases, and other disabilities. Along with more recent epidemiological studies of children with environmental arsenic exposures, the data amply demonstrate the need to consider neurotoxicity as a key concern in risk assessment of inorganic arsenic exposure. PMID:17076881

  7. Acute arsenic poisoning treated by intravenous dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and combined extrarenal epuration techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantson, Philippe; Haufroid, Vincent; Buchet, Jean-Pierre; Mahieu, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Arsenic poisoning was diagnosed in a 26-year-old man who had been criminally intoxicated over the last two weeks preceding admission by the surreptitious oral administration of probably 10 g of arsenic trioxide (As2O3). The patient developed severe manifestations of toxic hepatitis and pancreatitis, and thereafter neurological disorders, respiratory distress, acute renal failure, and cardiovascular disturbances. In addition to supportive therapy, extrarenal elimination techniques and chelating agents were used. Dimercaprol (BAL) and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA or succimer) were used simultaneously as arsenic chelating agents for two days, and thereafter DMSA was used alone. DMSA was administered by intravenous (20 mg/kg/d for five days, then 10 mg/kg/d for six days) and intraperitoneal route. Intravenous DMSA infusion was well tolerated and resulted in an increase in arsenic blood concentration immediately after the infusion. Continuous venovenous hemofiltration combined with hemodialysis, and peritoneal dialysis were proposed to enhance arsenic elimination. It was calculated that over an 11-day period 14.5 mg arsenic were eliminated by the urine, 26.7 mg by hemodialysis, 17.8 mg by peritoneal dialysis, and 7.8 mg by continuous venovenous hemofiltration. These amounts appeared negligible with regard to the probable ingested dose. The patient died on day 26 from the consequences of multiple organ failure, with subarachnoid hemorrhage and generalized infection caused by Aspergillus fumigatus.

  8. Long-term consequences of arsenic poisoning during infancy due to contaminated milk powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grandjean Philippe

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Arsenic toxicity is a global health problem affecting many millions of people. The main source of exposure is drinking water contaminated by natural geological sources. Current risk assessment is based on the recognized carcinogenicity of arsenic, but neurotoxic risks have been overlooked. In 1955, an outbreak of arsenic poisoning occurred among Japanese infants, with more than 100 deaths. The source was contaminated milk powder produced by the Morinaga company. Detailed accounts of the Morinaga dried milk poisoning were published in Japanese only, and an overview of this poisoning incident and its long-term consequences is therefore presented. From analyses available, the arsenic concentration in milk made from the Morinaga milk powder is calculated to be about 4–7 mg/L, corresponding to daily doses slightly above 500 μg/kg body weight. Lower exposures would result from using diluted milk. Clinical poisoning cases occurred after a few weeks of exposure, with a total dose of about 60 mg. This experience provides clear-cut evidence for hazard assessment of the developmental neurotoxicity. At the present time, more than 600 surviving victims, now in their 50s, have been reported to suffer from severe sequelae, such as mental retardation, neurological diseases, and other disabilities. Along with more recent epidemiological studies of children with environmental arsenic exposures, the data amply demonstrate the need to consider neurotoxicity as a key concern in risk assessment of inorganic arsenic exposure.

  9. Italian neurology: past, present and future

    OpenAIRE

    Federico, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    This short history of the Italian Society of Neurology focuses on its founders and leading personalities. The article also considers the present and the future of Italian neurology, emphasising in particular the scientific impact of Italian neurological research on the main international journals and the activities undertaken to increase the role of neurologists.

  10. Arsenic methylation and lung and bladder cancer in a case-control study in northern Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melak, Dawit [Global Health Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ferreccio, Catterina [Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Kalman, David [School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Parra, Roxana [Hospital Regional de Antofagasta, Antofagasta (Chile); Acevedo, Johanna; Pérez, Liliana; Cortés, Sandra [Escuela de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Smith, Allan H.; Yuan, Yan; Liaw, Jane [Arsenic Health Effects Research Group, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Steinmaus, Craig, E-mail: craigs@berkeley.edu [Arsenic Health Effects Research Group, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency, Oakland, CA (United States)

    2014-01-15

    In humans, ingested inorganic arsenic is metabolized to monomethylarsenic (MMA) then to dimethylarsenic (DMA), although this process is not complete in most people. The trivalent form of MMA is highly toxic in vitro and previous studies have identified associations between the proportion of urinary arsenic as MMA (%MMA) and several arsenic-related diseases. To date, however, relatively little is known about its role in lung cancer, the most common cause of arsenic-related death, or about its impacts on people drinking water with lower arsenic concentrations (e.g., < 200 μg/L). In this study, urinary arsenic metabolites were measured in 94 lung and 117 bladder cancer cases and 347 population-based controls from areas in northern Chile with a wide range of drinking water arsenic concentrations. Lung cancer odds ratios adjusted for age, sex, and smoking by increasing tertiles of %MMA were 1.00, 1.91 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.99–3.67), and 3.26 (1.76–6.04) (p-trend < 0.001). Corresponding odds ratios for bladder cancer were 1.00, 1.81 (1.06–3.11), and 2.02 (1.15–3.54) (p-trend < 0.001). In analyses confined to subjects only with arsenic water concentrations < 200 μg/L (median = 60 μg/L), lung and bladder cancer odds ratios for subjects in the upper tertile of %MMA compared to subjects in the lower two tertiles were 2.48 (1.08–5.68) and 2.37 (1.01–5.57), respectively. Overall, these findings provide evidence that inter-individual differences in arsenic metabolism may be an important risk factor for arsenic-related lung cancer, and may play a role in cancer risks among people exposed to relatively low arsenic water concentrations. - Highlights: • Urine arsenic metabolites were measured in cancer cases and controls from Chile. • Higher urine %MMA values were associated with increased lung and bladder cancer. • %MMA-cancer associations were seen at drinking water arsenic levels < 200 μg/L.

  11. Interaction between arsenic exposure from drinking water and genetic susceptibility in carotid intima-media thickness in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fen; Jasmine, Farzana; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Liu, Mengling; Cheng, Xin; Parvez, Faruque; Paul-Brutus, Rachelle; Islam, Tariqul; Paul, Rina Rani; Sarwar, Golam; Ahmed, Alauddin; Jiang, Jieying; Islam, Tariqul; Slavkovich, Vesna; Rundek, Tatjana; Demmer, Ryan T.; Desvarieux, Moise; Ahsan, Habibul; Chen, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies that evaluated genetic susceptibility to the effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water on subclinical atherosclerosis are limited. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1,078 participants randomly selected from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Bangladesh to evaluate whether the association between arsenic exposure and carotid artery intima-medial thickness (cIMT) differs by 207 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 genes related to arsenic metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Although not statistically significant after correcting for multiple testing, nine SNPs in APOE, AS3MT, PNP, and TNF genes had a nominally statistically significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. For instance, the joint presence of a higher level of well-water arsenic (≥ 40.4 μg/L) and the GG genotype of AS3MT rs3740392 was associated with a difference of 40.9 μm (95% CI = 14.4, 67.5) in cIMT, much greater than the difference of cIMT associated with the genotype alone (β = -5.1 μm, 95% CI = -31.6, 21.3) or arsenic exposure alone (β = 7.2 μm, 95% CI = -3.1, 17.5). The pattern and magnitude of the interactions were similar when urinary arsenic was used as the exposure variable. Additionally, the at-risk genotypes of the AS3MT SNPs were positively related to proportion of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine, which is indicative of arsenic methylation capacity. The findings provide novel evidence that genetic variants related to arsenic metabolism may play an important role in arsenic-induced subclinical atherosclerosis. Future replication studies in diverse populations are needed to confirm the findings. PMID:24593923

  12. Genome-wide association mapping identifies a new arsenate reductase enzyme critical for limiting arsenic accumulation in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai-Yin Chao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic arsenic is a carcinogen, and its ingestion through foods such as rice presents a significant risk to human health. Plants chemically reduce arsenate to arsenite. Using genome-wide association (GWA mapping of loci controlling natural variation in arsenic accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana allowed us to identify the arsenate reductase required for this reduction, which we named High Arsenic Content 1 (HAC1. Complementation verified the identity of HAC1, and expression in Escherichia coli lacking a functional arsenate reductase confirmed the arsenate reductase activity of HAC1. The HAC1 protein accumulates in the epidermis, the outer cell layer of the root, and also in the pericycle cells surrounding the central vascular tissue. Plants lacking HAC1 lose their ability to efflux arsenite from roots, leading to both increased transport of arsenic into the central vascular tissue and on into the shoot. HAC1 therefore functions to reduce arsenate to arsenite in the outer cell layer of the root, facilitating efflux of arsenic as arsenite back into the soil to limit both its accumulation in the root and transport to the shoot. Arsenate reduction by HAC1 in the pericycle may play a role in limiting arsenic loading into the xylem. Loss of HAC1-encoded arsenic reduction leads to a significant increase in arsenic accumulation in shoots, causing an increased sensitivity to arsenate toxicity. We also confirmed the previous observation that the ACR2 arsenate reductase in A. thaliana plays no detectable role in arsenic metabolism. Furthermore, ACR2 does not interact epistatically with HAC1, since arsenic metabolism in the acr2 hac1 double mutant is disrupted in an identical manner to that described for the hac1 single mutant. Our identification of HAC1 and its associated natural variation provides an important new resource for the development of low arsenic-containing food such as rice.

  13. Interaction between arsenic exposure from drinking water and genetic susceptibility in carotid intima-media thickness in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fen; Jasmine, Farzana; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Liu, Mengling; Cheng, Xin; Parvez, Faruque; Paul-Brutus, Rachelle; Paul, Rina Rani; Sarwar, Golam; Ahmed, Alauddin; Jiang, Jieying; Islam, Tariqul; Slavkovich, Vesna; Rundek, Tatjana; Demmer, Ryan T; Desvarieux, Moise; Ahsan, Habibul; Chen, Yu

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies that evaluated genetic susceptibility for the effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water on subclinical atherosclerosis are limited. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1078 participants randomly selected from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Bangladesh to evaluate whether the association between arsenic exposure and carotid artery intima-media thickness (cIMT) differs by 207 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 genes related to arsenic metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Although not statistically significant after correcting for multiple testing, nine SNPs in APOE, AS3MT, PNP, and TNF genes had a nominally statistically significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. For instance, the joint presence of a higher level of well-water arsenic (≥ 40.4 μg/L) and the GG genotype of AS3MT rs3740392 was associated with a difference of 40.9 μm (95% CI = 14.4, 67.5) in cIMT, much greater than the difference of cIMT associated with the genotype alone (β = -5.1 μm, 95% CI = -31.6, 21.3) or arsenic exposure alone (β = 7.2 μm, 95% CI = -3.1, 17.5). The pattern and magnitude of the interactions were similar when urinary arsenic was used as the exposure variable. Additionally, the at-risk genotypes of the AS3MT SNPs were positively related to the proportion of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine, which is indicative of arsenic methylation capacity. The findings provide novel evidence that genetic variants related to arsenic metabolism may play an important role in arsenic-induced subclinical atherosclerosis. Future replication studies in diverse populations are needed to confirm the findings.

  14. Homicidal arsenic poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Andrew; Taylor, Andrew; Leese, Elizabeth; Allen, Sam; Morton, Jackie; McAdam, Julie

    2015-07-01

    The case of a 50-year-old man who died mysteriously after being admitted to hospital is reported. He had raised the possibility of being poisoned prior to his death. A Coroner's post-mortem did not reveal the cause of death but this was subsequently established by post-mortem trace element analysis of liver, urine, blood and hair all of which revealed very high arsenic concentrations.

  15. Effects of Carbon in Flooded Paddy Soils: Implications for Microbial Activity and Arsenic Mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avancha, S.; Boye, K.

    2014-12-01

    In the Mekong delta in Cambodia, naturally occurring arsenic (originating from erosion in the Himalaya Mountains) in paddy soils is mobilized during the seasonal flooding. As a consequence, rice grown on the flooded soils may take up arsenic and expose people eating the rice to this carcinogenic substance. Microbial activity will enhance or decrease the mobilization of arsenic depending on their metabolic pathways. Among the microbes naturally residing in the soil are denitrifying bacteria, sulfate reducers, metal reducers (Fe, Mn), arsenic reducers, methanogens, and fermenters, whose activity varies based on the presence of oxygen. The purpose of the experiment was to assess how different amendments affect the microbial activity and the arsenic mobilization during the transition from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism after flooding of naturally contaminated Cambodian soil. In a batch experiment, we investigated how the relative metabolic rate of naturally occurring microbes could vary with different types of organic carbon. The experiment was designed to measure the effects of various sources of carbon (dried rice straw, charred rice straw, manure, and glucose) on the microbial activity and arsenic release in an arsenic-contaminated paddy soil from Cambodia under flooded conditions. All amendments were added based on the carbon content in order to add 0.036 g of carbon per vial. The soil was flooded with a 10mM TRIS buffer solution at pH 7.04 in airtight 25mL serum vials and kept at 25 °C. We prepared 14 replicates per treatment to sample both gas and solution. On each sampling point, the solution replicates were sampled destructively. The gas replicates continued on and were sampled for both gas and solution on the final day of the experiment. We measured pH, total arsenic, methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide at 8 hours, 1.5 days, 3.33 days, and 6.33 days from the start of the experiment.

  16. A Phytoremediation Strategy for Arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meagher, Richard B.

    2005-06-01

    A Phytoremediation Strategy for Arsenic Progress Report May, 2005 Richard B. Meagher Principal Investigator Arsenic pollution affects the health of several hundred millions of people world wide, and an estimated 10 million Americans have unsafe levels of arsenic in their drinking water. However, few environmentally sound remedies for cleaning up arsenic contaminated soil and water have been proposed. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to extract and sequester environmental pollutants, is one new technology that offers an ecologically sound solution to a devastating problem. We propose that it is less disruptive to the environment to harvest and dispose of several thousand pounds per acre of contaminated aboveground plant material, than to excavate and dispose of 1 to 5 million pounds of contaminated soil per acre (assumes contamination runs 3 ft deep). Our objective is to develop a genetics-based phytoremediation strategy for arsenic removal that can be used in any plant species. This strategy requires the enhanced expression of several transgenes from diverse sources. Our working hypothesis is that organ-specific expression of several genes controlling the transport, electrochemical state, and binding of arsenic will result in the efficient extraction and hyperaccumulation of arsenic into aboveground plant tissues. This hypothesis is supported by theoretical arguments and strong preliminary data. We proposed six Specific Aims focused on testing and developing this arsenic phytoremediation strategy. During the first 18 months of the grant we made significant progress on five Specific Aims and began work on the sixth as summarized below. Specific Aim 1: Enhance plant arsenic resistance and greatly expand sinks for arsenite by expressing elevated levels of thiol-rich, arsenic-binding peptides. Hyperaccumulation of arsenic depends upon making plants that are both highly tolerant to arsenic and that have the capacity to store large amounts of arsenic aboveground

  17. Arsenic contamination of groundwater and its induced health effects in Shahpur block, Bhojpur district, Bihar state, India: risk evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborti, Dipankar; Rahman, Mohammad Mahmudur; Ahamed, Sad; Dutta, Rathindra Nath; Pati, Shyamapada; Mukherjee, Subhash Chandra

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the magnitude of groundwater arsenic contamination in Shahpur block of Bhojpur district, Bihar state, India and its health effects such as dermal, neurological, obstetric effects, and cancer risk. The School of Environmental Studies (SOES) collected 4704 tube-well water samples from all 88 villages of Shahpur, which were analyzed for arsenic. We found 40.3 and 21.1 % of the tube-wells had arsenic above 10 and 50 μg/l, respectively, with maximum concentration of 1805 μg/l. The study shows that 75,000, 39,000, and 10,000 people could be exposed to arsenic-contaminated water greater than 10, 50, and 300 μg/l, respectively. Our medical team examined 1422 villagers from Shahpur and registered 161 (prevalence rate, 11.3 %) with arsenical skin lesions. Arsenical skin lesions were also observed in 29 children of 525 screened. We analyzed 579 biological samples (hair, nail, and urine) from Shahpur and found that 82, 89, and 91 % of hair, nail, and urine, respectively, had arsenic above the normal levels, indicating many people in the study area are sub-clinically affected. Arsenical neuropathy was observed in 48 % of 102 arsenicosis patients. The study also found that arsenic exposed women with severe skin lesions had adversely affected their pregnancies. The carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks were also estimated based on the generated data. Safe drinking water supply is urgently required to combat arsenic situation in affected villages of Shahpur. PMID:26838039

  18. Identification of an S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) dependent arsenic methyltransferase in Danio rerio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamdi, Mohamad [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 48309 (United States); Yoshinaga, Masafumi; Packianathan, Charles; Qin, Jie [Department of Cellular Biology and Pharmacology, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, Florida International University, FL33199 (United States); Hallauer, Janell; McDermott, Joseph R. [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 48309 (United States); Yang, Hung-Chi [Department of Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Sciences, Chang-Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Kwei-San 333, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Kan-Jen [School of Medical Laboratory and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Liu, Zijuan, E-mail: liu2345@oakland.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 48309 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Arsenic methylation is an important cellular metabolic process that modulates arsenic toxicity and carcinogenicity. Biomethylation of arsenic produces a series of mono-, di- and tri-methylated arsenic metabolites that can be detected in tissues and excretions. Here we report that zebrafish exposed to arsenite (As{sup III}) produces organic arsenicals, including MMA{sup III}, MMA{sup V} and DMA{sup V} with characteristic tissue ratios, demonstrating that an arsenic methylation pathway exists in zebrafish. In mammals, cellular inorganic arsenic is methylated by a SAM-dependent arsenic methyltransferase, AS3MT. A zebrafish arsenic methyltransferase homolog, As3mt, was identified by sequence alignment. Western blotting analysis showed that As3mt was universally expressed in zebrafish tissues. Prominent expression in liver and intestine correlated with methylated arsenic metabolites detected in those tissues. As3mt was expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli for in vitro functional studies. Our results demonstrated that As3mt methylated As{sup III} to DMA{sup V} as an end product and produced MMA{sup III} and MMA{sup V} as intermediates. The activity of As3mt was inhibited by elevated concentrations of the substrate As{sup III} as well as the metalloid selenite, which is a well-known antagonistic micronutrient of arsenic toxicity. The activity As3mt was abolished by substitution of either Cys160 or Cys210, which corresponds to conserved cysteine residues in AS3MT homologs, suggesting that they are involved in catalysis. Expression in zebrafish of an enzyme that has a similar function to human and rodent orthologs in catalyzing intracellular arsenic biomethylation validates the applicability of zebrafish as a valuable vertebrate model for understanding arsenic-associated diseases in humans. -- Highlights: ► Zebrafish methylated As{sup III} to MMA{sup III}, MMA{sup V} and DMA{sup V}. ► A zebrafish arsenic methyltransferase (As3mt) was purified in E. coli.

  19. Nicotine and inflammatory neurological disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Hua PIAO; Denise CAMPAGNOLO; Carlos DAYAO; Ronald J LUKAS; Jie WU; Fu-Dong SHI

    2009-01-01

    Cigarette smoke is a major health risk factor which significantly increases the incidence of diseases including lung cancer and respiratory infections. However, there is increasing evidence that smokers have a lower incidence of some inflamma- tory and neurodegenerative diseases. Nicotine is the main immunosuppressive constituent of cigarette smoke, which inhib-its both the innate and adaptive immune responses. Unlike cigarette smoke, nicotine is not yet considered to be a carcino-gen and may, in fact, have therapeutic potential as a neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory agent. This review provides a synopsis summarizing the effects of nicotine on the immune system and its (nicotine) influences on various neurological diseases.

  20. Neurological manifestations in Fabry's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anette Torvin; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by a defect in the gene that encodes the lysosomal enzyme alpha-galactosidase A. Symptoms arise because of accumulation of globotriaosylceramide in multiple organs, resulting in severely reduced quality of life and premature death....... Neurological symptoms, such as burning sensations (occasionally accompanied by acroparesthesia) and stroke, are among the first to appear, and occur in both male and female patients. A delay in establishing the diagnosis of Fabry's disease can cause unnecessary problems, especially now that enzyme replacement......'s disease. The possible pathophysiological background will also be discussed....

  1. ARSENIC - SUSCEPTIBILITY & IN UTERO EFFECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic remains a serious public health problem at many locations worldwide. If has often been noted that prevalences of signs and symptoms of chronic arsenic poisoning differ among various populations. For example, skin lesions or peripheral vascular dis...

  2. Arsenic Mobility and Groundwater Extraction in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Charles F.; Swartz, Christopher H.; Badruzzaman, A. B. M.; Keon-Blute, Nicole; Yu, Winston; Ali, M. Ashraf; Jay, Jenny; Beckie, Roger; Niedan, Volker; Brabander, Daniel; Oates, Peter M.; Ashfaque, Khandaker N.; Islam, Shafiqul; Hemond, Harold F.; Ahmed, M. Feroze

    2002-11-01

    High levels of arsenic in well water are causing widespread poisoning in Bangladesh. In a typical aquifer in southern Bangladesh, chemical data imply that arsenic mobilization is associated with recent inflow of carbon. High concentrations of radiocarbon-young methane indicate that young carbon has driven recent biogeochemical processes, and irrigation pumping is sufficient to have drawn water to the depth where dissolved arsenic is at a maximum. The results of field injection of molasses, nitrate, and low-arsenic water show that organic carbon or its degradation products may quickly mobilize arsenic, oxidants may lower arsenic concentrations, and sorption of arsenic is limited by saturation of aquifer materials.

  3. Autoimmune neurologic disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ming; Gorman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune neurologic diseases are of major clinical importance in children. Antibody-mediated diseases of the central nervous system are now increasingly recognized in childhood, where the antibodies bind to cell surface epitopes on neuronal or glial proteins, and the patients demonstrate either focal or more generalized clinical signs depending on the extent of brain regions targeted by the antibodies. The antibodies are directed towards ion channels, receptors, and membrane proteins; and the diseases include limbic encephalitis and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-antibody encephalitis, among many others. Additionally there are conditions where the wider immune system is implicated. Neurologic features like seizures, movement disorders, autonomic dysfunction, and sleep disorders, with neuroimaging and electrophysiologic features, may indicate a specific antibody-mediated or immune disorder. Often, phenotypic overlap is observed between these conditions, and phenotypic variation seen in children with the same condition. Nevertheless, many patients benefit from immunotherapy with substantial improvement, although huge efforts are still required to optimize the outcome for many patients. In many patients no antibodies have yet been identified, even though they respond to immunotherapies. Here we describe the known antibodies and associated diseases, discuss conditions that are thought to be immune-mediated but have no known immunologic biomarker, and provide guidelines for the investigation and classification of these disorders. PMID:27112693

  4. Neurology and psychiatry in Babylon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Edward H; Wilson, James V Kinnier

    2014-09-01

    We here review Babylonian descriptions of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including epilepsy, stroke, psychoses, obsessive compulsive disorder, phobias, psychopathic behaviour, depression and anxiety. Most of these accounts date from the first Babylonian dynasty of the first half of the second millennium BC, within a millennium and a half of the origin of writing. The Babylonians were remarkably acute and objective observers of medical disorders and human behaviour. Their detailed descriptions are surprisingly similar to modern 19th and 20th century AD textbook accounts, with the exception of subjective thoughts and feelings which are more modern fields of enquiry. They had no knowledge of brain or psychological function. Some neuropsychiatric disorders, e.g. stroke or facial palsy, had a physical basis requiring the attention of a physician or asû, using a plant and mineral based pharmacology; some disorders such as epilepsy, psychoses, depression and anxiety were regarded as supernatural due to evil demons or spirits, or the anger of personal gods, and thus required the intervention of the priest or ašipu; other disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder and psychopathic behaviour were regarded as a mystery. The Babylonians were the first to describe the clinical foundations of neurology and psychiatry. We discuss these accounts in relation to subsequent and more modern clinical descriptions. PMID:25037816

  5. Characterization of arsenic resistant bacteria from arsenic rich groundwater of West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Angana; Kazy, Sufia K; Sar, Pinaki

    2013-03-01

    Sixty-four arsenic (As) resistant bacteria isolated from an arsenic rich groundwater sample of West Bengal were characterized to investigate their potential role in subsurface arsenic mobilization. Among the isolated strains predominance of genera Agrobacterium/Rhizobium, Ochrobactrum and Achromobacter which could grow chemolitrophically and utilize arsenic as electron donor were detected. Higher tolerance to As(3+) [maximum tolerable concentration (MTC): ≥10 mM], As(5+) (MTC: ≥100 mM) and other heavy metals like Cu(2+), Cr(2+), Ni(2+) etc. (MTC: ≥10 mM), presence of arsenate reductase and siderophore was frequently observed among the isolates. Ability to produce arsenite oxidase and phosphatase enzyme was detected in 50 and 34 % of the isolates, respectively. Although no direct correlation among taxonomic identity of bacterial strains and their metabolic abilities as mentioned above was apparent, several isolates affiliated to genera Ochrobactrum, Achromobacter and unclassified Rhizobiaceae members were found to be highly resistant to As(3+) and As(5+) and positive for all the test properties. Arsenate reductase activity was found to be conferred by arsC gene, which in many strains was coupled with arsenite efflux gene arsB as well. Phylogenetic incongruence between the 16S rRNA and ars genes lineages indicated possible incidence of horizontal gene transfer for ars genes. Based on the results we propose that under the prevailing low nutrient condition inhabitant bacteria capable of using inorganic electron donors play a synergistic role wherein siderophores and phosphatase activities facilitate the release of sediment bound As(5+), which is subsequently reduced by arsenate reductase resulting into the mobilization of As(3+) in groundwater. PMID:23238642

  6. Arsenic concentrations in Chinese coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The arsenic concentrations in 297 coal samples were collected from the main coal-mines of 26 provinces in China were determined by molybdenum blue coloration method. These samples were collected from coals that vary widely in coal rank and coal-forming periods from the five main coal-bearing regions in China. Arsenic content in Chinese coals range between 0.24 to 71 mg/kg. The mean of the concentration of Arsenic is 6.4 ± 0.5 mg/kg and the geometric mean is 4.0 ± 8.5 mg/kg. The level of arsenic in China is higher in northeastern and southern provinces, but lower in northwestern provinces. The relationship between arsenic content and coal-forming period, coal rank is studied. It was observed that the arsenic contents decreases with coal rank in the order: Tertiary > Early Jurassic > Late Triassic > Late Jurassic > Middle Jurassic > Late Permian > Early Carboniferous > Middle Carboniferous > Late Carboniferous > Early Permian; It was also noted that the arsenic contents decrease in the order: Subbituminous > Anthracite > Bituminous. However, compared with the geological characteristics of coal forming region, coal rank and coal-forming period have little effect on the concentration of arsenic in Chinese coal. The average arsenic concentration of Chinese coal is lower than that of the whole world. The health problems in China derived from in coal (arsenism) are due largely to poor local life-style practices in cooking and home heating with coal rather than to high arsenic contents in the coal

  7. Effect of organic matter amendment, arsenic amendment and water management regime on rice grain arsenic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic accumulation in rice grain has been identified as a major problem in some regions of Asia. A study was conducted to investigate the effect of increased organic matter in the soil on the release of arsenic into soil pore water and accumulation of arsenic species within rice grain. It was observed that high concentrations of soil arsenic and organic matter caused a reduction in plant growth and delayed flowering time. Total grain arsenic accumulation was higher in the plants grown in high soil arsenic in combination with high organic matter, with an increase in the percentage of organic arsenic species observed. The results indicate that the application of organic matter should be done with caution in paddy soils which have high soil arsenic, as this may lead to an increase in accumulation of arsenic within rice grains. Results also confirm that flooding conditions substantially increase grain arsenic. -- Highlights: ► High soil arsenic and organic matter caused a reduction in plant growth. ► A delayed flowering time was observed in high arsenic and organic matter soil. ► Total grain arsenic increased in high arsenic and organic matter soil. ► Percentage organic arsenic in the grain altered in arsenic and organic matter soil. -- The addition of high amounts of organic matter to soils led to an increase in total rice grain arsenic, as well as alteration in the percentage arsenic species in the rice grains

  8. Osteoresorptive arsenic intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Sergio Ulhoa

    2013-04-01

    A 47-year-old woman consulted her dermatologist complaining whole body dermatitis, urticaria and irritating bullous eruptions on the plantar and side surfaces of her feet. She had had multiple hypopigmented spots on her skin since her early adulthood. The patient was treated with topical medication without significant improvement of symptoms. One year later she suffered a myocardial infarction, accompanied by refractory anaemia. At the age of 49, a breast cancer was diagnosed and shortly thereafter her last menstruation occurred. At age 50years, upon complaint of weight loss despite normal food intake, Hashimoto thyroiditis with latent hyperthyroidism, vitamin D insufficiency with secondary hyperparathyroidism, and poikilocytic anaemia with anisochromia, hypochromia, anisocytosis, elliptocytes, drepanocytes, dacryocytes, acanthocytes, echinocytes, schizocytes, stomatocytes and target cells were diagnosed. The osteodensitometric and laboratory examinations revealed osteoporosis with sustained elevation of urinary Dipyridinolin-crosslinks (u-Dpd), and urinary arsenic (u-As) of 500μg/l (equivalent to 0.5 parts per million-ppm, 2.5μg/mg creatinine/dl, u-As: Phosphate of 26μg/mmol; the estimated bone As:P and As/kg body weight were 500μg/g and 11.3mg/kg, respectively). Thalassemia, immunoglobinopathy and iron deficiency were excluded. Supplementation with oral vitamin D and calcium, and antiresorptive therapy with intravenous zolendronate normalised the u-Dpd, significantly decreased the urinary arsenic concentration, and cured the anemia and the urticaria. A diagnosis of osteoresorptive arsenic intoxication (ORAI) was established. PMID:23337042

  9. Neurological problems of jazz legends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Phillip L

    2009-08-01

    A variety of neurological problems have affected the lives of giants in the jazz genre. Cole Porter courageously remained prolific after severe leg injuries secondary to an equestrian accident, until he succumbed to osteomyelitis, amputations, depression, and phantom limb pain. George Gershwin resisted explanations for uncinate seizures and personality change and herniated from a right temporal lobe brain tumor, which was a benign cystic glioma. Thelonious Monk had erratic moods, reflected in his pianism, and was ultimately mute and withdrawn, succumbing to cerebrovascular events. Charlie Parker dealt with mood lability and drug dependence, the latter emanating from analgesics following an accident, and ultimately lived as hard as he played his famous bebop saxophone lines and arpeggios. Charles Mingus hummed his last compositions into a tape recorder as he died with motor neuron disease. Bud Powell had severe posttraumatic headaches after being struck by a police stick defending Thelonious Monk during a Harlem club raid.

  10. Aphasia, Just a Neurological Disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ozdemir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto%u2019s encephalopathy (HE is a rare disorder associated with autoimmune thyroiditis. Etiology of HE is not completely understood. High levels of serum antithyroid antibodies are seen in HE. Presentation with otoimmune thyroiditis, cognitive impairment, psychiatric and neurologic symptoms and absence of bacterial or viral enfections are characteristics of HE. HE is a steroid responsive encephalopathy. 60 years old male patient admitted to hospital with forget fulness continuing for 9 months and speech loss starting 2 days ago. Strong positivity of antithyroid antibodies increases the odds for HE. Thyroid function tests showed severe hypothyroidism. Electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging results were compatible with HE. HE is diagnosed with differantial diagnosis and exclusion of other reasons. This uncommon disorder is not recognised enough. High titres of serum antithyroid antiboides are always needed for diagnosis. Correct diagnosis requires awareness of wide range of cognitive and clinical presentations of HE.

  11. Removing arsenic from drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathaway, S.W.; Rubel, R. (Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (USA))

    1987-08-01

    Pilot-plant tests of two treatment methods, activated alumina and ion exchange, for removing arsenic from drinking water were evaluated at the Fallon, Nevada, Naval Air Station (NAS). The arsenic concentration was 0.080-0.116 mg/liter, exceeding the 0.05 mg/liter maximum contaminant level. Although the valence of arsenic was not determined, in prechlorination process and test results suggest it was probably arsenic V. Chlorinated drinking water from the NAS was used for evaluating the efficacy of treatment under several different conditions. The activated alumina and ion exchange systems were operated through three different loading and regeneration cycles each. The major water quality factors affecting the removal of arsenic by these methods were pH of feedwater, arsenic concentration, sulfate concentration, and alkalinity. The major operational factors affecting removal were flow rate, down time, and media clogging. Capital and operating costs for arsenic removal are estimated for the activated alumina method at optimum pH (5.5) for each of the three small community systems drawing water from the same aquifer. In addition, several containers of the regeneration waste were used for a special study to characterize, dewater, and render the waste non-toxic for disposal in a sanitary landfill.

  12. Neurologic Manifestations of Childhood Rheumatic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Shiari, Reza

    2012-01-01

    How to Cite this Article: Shiari R. Neurologic Manifestations of Childhood Rheumatic Diseases.  Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012; 6(4): 1-7.Children with rheumatic disorders may have a wide variety of clinical features ranging from fever or a simple arthritis to complex multisystem autoimmune diseases. Information about the prevalence of neurological manifestations in children with rheumatologic disorders is limited. This review describes the neurologic complications of childhood Rheumatic dis...

  13. Neurological manifestations of dengue viral infection

    OpenAIRE

    Carod-Artal FJ

    2014-01-01

    Francisco Javier Carod-Artal1,21Neurology Department, Raigmore hospital, Inverness, UK; 2Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC), Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Dengue is the most common mosquito-borne viral infection worldwide. There is increased evidence for dengue virus neurotropism, and neurological manifestations could make part of the clinical picture of dengue virus infection in at least 0.5%–7.4% of symptomatic cases. Neurological complications have been classified into de...

  14. Challenges in neurological practice in developing countries

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay Pandey

    2012-01-01

    The burden of neurological illness is much higher in developing countries. Neurological disorders in these countries are mainly due to poverty and malnutrition. Spectrums of diseases are also different in comparison with developed countries. Lack of resources, ignorance, and overpopulation make it very difficult and challenging to tackle this problem. Majority of the patients are seen by general practitioners who have little knowledge about neurological illnesses. Most of the countries have v...

  15. Neurologic Diseases in Special Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Miriam R

    2016-07-01

    Neurologic diseases can have a major impact on functional capacity. Patients with neurologic disease require individualized management considerations depending on the extent of impairment and impact on functional capacity. This article reviews 4 of the more common and significant neurologic diseases (Alzheimer disease, cerebrovascular accident/stroke, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson disease) that are likely to present to a dental office and provides suggestions on the dental management of patients with these conditions.

  16. Neurology--the next 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Ralf; Ferriero, Donna M; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Bettegowda, Chetan; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Kessler, John A; Vezzani, Annamaria; Waxman, Stephen G; Jarius, Sven; Wildemann, Brigitte; Weller, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Since the launch of our journal as Nature Clinical Practice Neurology in 2005, we have seen remarkable progress in many areas of neurology research, but what does the future hold? Will advances in basic research be translated into effective disease-modifying therapies, and will personalized medicine finally become a reality? For this special Viewpoint article, we invited a panel of Advisory Board members and other journal contributors to outline their research priorities and predictions in neurology for the next 10 years.

  17. Endocrine disorders and the neurologic manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Jeesuk

    2014-01-01

    The nervous system and the endocrine system are closely interrelated and both involved intimately in maintaining homeostasis. Endocrine dysfunctions may lead to various neurologic manifestations such as headache, myopathy, and acute encephalopathy including coma. It is important to recognize the neurologic signs and symptoms caused by the endocrine disorders while managing endocrine disorders. This article provides an overview of the neurologic manifestations found in various endocrine disord...

  18. Neurology of Pregnancy: A Case-Oriented Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Mary Angela

    2016-08-01

    The anatomic and physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy are unique. A neurologist needs to be aware of normal pregnancy-induced physiologic changes in the cardiovascular, renal, hematologic, and autoimmune systems, and the local anatomic changes, which include alteration of body habitus and pelvic ligaments. These changes are clearly advantageous, but in certain circumstances may predispose to pathology. In addition, pregnancy effects treatment of chronic neurologic conditions as regards medication safety and metabolism. This case-oriented review discusses the important aspects of pregnancy physiology and an approach to treatment of common disorders encountered during pregnancy including stroke, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and compression neuropathies. PMID:27445250

  19. Hyponatremia in neurological diseases in ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lath Rahul

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyponatremia is the commonest electrolyte disturbance encountered in the neurological and neurosurgical intensive care units. It can present with signs and symptoms mimicking a neurological disease and can worsen the existing neurological deficits. Hyponatremia in neurological disorders is usually of the hypo-osmolar type caused either due to the Syndrome of Inappropriate Secretion of Anti Diuretic Hormone (SIADH or Cerebral Salt Wasting Syndrome (CSWS. It is important to distinguish between these two disorders, as the treatment of the two differ to a large extent. In SIADH, the fluid intake is restricted, whereas in CSWS the treatment involves fluid and salt replacement.

  20. Challenges in neurological practice in developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The burden of neurological illness is much higher in developing countries. Neurological disorders in these countries are mainly due to poverty and malnutrition. Spectrums of diseases are also different in comparison with developed countries. Lack of resources, ignorance, and overpopulation make it very difficult and challenging to tackle this problem. Majority of the patients are seen by general practitioners who have little knowledge about neurological illnesses. Most of the countries have very few or no neurologist. There is a greater need of taking neurological care at primary care level where majority of the patients struggle with epilepsy, stroke and neuroinfections.

  1. Bacterial respiration of arsenic and selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    1999-01-01

    Oxyanions of arsenic and selenium can be used in microbial anaerobic respiration as terminal electron acceptors. The detection of arsenate and selenate respiring bacteria in numerous pristine and contaminated environments and their rapid appearance in enrichment culture suggest that they are widespread and metabolically active in nature. Although the bacterial species that have been isolated and characterized are still few in number, they are scattered throughout the bacterial domain and include Gram- positive bacteria, beta, gamma and epsilon Proteobacteria and the sole member of a deeply branching lineage of the bacteria, Chrysiogenes arsenatus. The oxidation of a number of organic substrates (i.e. acetate, lactate, pyruvate, glycerol, ethanol) or hydrogen can be coupled to the reduction of arsenate and selenate, but the actual donor used varies from species to species. Both periplasmic and membrane-associated arsenate and selenate reductases have been characterized. Although the number of subunits and molecular masses differs, they all contain molybdenum. The extent of the environmental impact on the transformation and mobilization of arsenic and selenium by microbial dissimilatory processes is only now being fully appreciated.

  2. Interaction between arsenic exposure from drinking water and genetic susceptibility in carotid intima–media thickness in Bangladesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Fen [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Jasmine, Farzana; Kibriya, Muhammad G. [Department of Health Studies, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); The University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Liu, Mengling; Cheng, Xin [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Parvez, Faruque [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York City, NY (United States); Paul-Brutus, Rachelle [Department of Health Studies, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); The University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Islam, Tariqul; Paul, Rina Rani; Sarwar, Golam; Ahmed, Alauddin [U-Chicago Research Bangladesh, Ltd., Dhaka (Bangladesh); Jiang, Jieying [Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Islam, Tariqul [U-Chicago Research Bangladesh, Ltd., Dhaka (Bangladesh); Slavkovich, Vesna [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York City, NY (United States); Rundek, Tatjana [Department of Neurology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Department of Public Health Sciences, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Demmer, Ryan T.; Desvarieux, Moise [Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York City, NY (United States); and others

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies that evaluated genetic susceptibility for the effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water on subclinical atherosclerosis are limited. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1078 participants randomly selected from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Bangladesh to evaluate whether the association between arsenic exposure and carotid artery intima–media thickness (cIMT) differs by 207 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 genes related to arsenic metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Although not statistically significant after correcting for multiple testing, nine SNPs in APOE, AS3MT, PNP, and TNF genes had a nominally statistically significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. For instance, the joint presence of a higher level of well-water arsenic (≥ 40.4 μg/L) and the GG genotype of AS3MT rs3740392 was associated with a difference of 40.9 μm (95% CI = 14.4, 67.5) in cIMT, much greater than the difference of cIMT associated with the genotype alone (β = − 5.1 μm, 95% CI = − 31.6, 21.3) or arsenic exposure alone (β = 7.2 μm, 95% CI = − 3.1, 17.5). The pattern and magnitude of the interactions were similar when urinary arsenic was used as the exposure variable. Additionally, the at-risk genotypes of the AS3MT SNPs were positively related to the proportion of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine, which is indicative of arsenic methylation capacity. The findings provide novel evidence that genetic variants related to arsenic metabolism may play an important role in arsenic-induced subclinical atherosclerosis. Future replication studies in diverse populations are needed to confirm the findings. - Highlights: • Nine SNPs had a nominally significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. • Three SNPs in AS3MT showed nominally significant interactions with urinary arsenic. • cIMT was much higher among subjects with higher arsenic exposure and AS3MT

  3. Interaction between arsenic exposure from drinking water and genetic susceptibility in carotid intima–media thickness in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiologic studies that evaluated genetic susceptibility for the effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water on subclinical atherosclerosis are limited. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1078 participants randomly selected from the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Bangladesh to evaluate whether the association between arsenic exposure and carotid artery intima–media thickness (cIMT) differs by 207 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 genes related to arsenic metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Although not statistically significant after correcting for multiple testing, nine SNPs in APOE, AS3MT, PNP, and TNF genes had a nominally statistically significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. For instance, the joint presence of a higher level of well-water arsenic (≥ 40.4 μg/L) and the GG genotype of AS3MT rs3740392 was associated with a difference of 40.9 μm (95% CI = 14.4, 67.5) in cIMT, much greater than the difference of cIMT associated with the genotype alone (β = − 5.1 μm, 95% CI = − 31.6, 21.3) or arsenic exposure alone (β = 7.2 μm, 95% CI = − 3.1, 17.5). The pattern and magnitude of the interactions were similar when urinary arsenic was used as the exposure variable. Additionally, the at-risk genotypes of the AS3MT SNPs were positively related to the proportion of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) in urine, which is indicative of arsenic methylation capacity. The findings provide novel evidence that genetic variants related to arsenic metabolism may play an important role in arsenic-induced subclinical atherosclerosis. Future replication studies in diverse populations are needed to confirm the findings. - Highlights: • Nine SNPs had a nominally significant interaction with well-water arsenic in cIMT. • Three SNPs in AS3MT showed nominally significant interactions with urinary arsenic. • cIMT was much higher among subjects with higher arsenic exposure and AS3MT

  4. Arsenic-Induced Antioxidant Depletion, Oxidative DNA Breakage, and Tissue Damages are Prevented by the Combined Action of Folate and Vitamin B12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharyya, Nirmallya; Deb, Bimal; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Maiti, Smarajit

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic is a grade I human carcinogen. It acts by disrupting one-carbon (1C) metabolism and cellular methyl (-CH3) pool. The -CH3 group helps in arsenic disposition and detoxification of the biological systems. Vitamin B12 and folate, the key promoters of 1C metabolism were tested recently (daily 0.07 and 4.0 μg, respectively/100 g b.w. of rat for 28 days) to evaluate their combined efficacy in the protection from mutagenic DNA-breakage and tissue damages. The selected tissues like intestine (first-pass site), liver (major xenobiotic metabolizer) and lung (major arsenic accumulator) were collected from arsenic-ingested (0.6 ppm/same schedule) female rats. The hemo-toxicity and liver and kidney functions were monitored. Our earlier studies on arsenic-exposed humans can correlate carcinogenesis with DNA damage. Here, we demonstrate that the supplementation of physiological/therapeutic dose of vitamin B12 and folate protected the rodents significantly from arsenic-induced DNA damage (DNA fragmentation and comet assay) and hepatic and renal tissue degeneration (histo-architecture, HE staining). The level of arsenic-induced free-radical products (TBARS and conjugated diene) was significantly declined by the restored actions of several antioxidants viz. urate, thiol, catalase, xanthine oxidase, lactoperoxidase, and superoxide dismutase in the tissues of vitamin-supplemented group. The alkaline phosphatase, transaminases, urea and creatinine (hepatic and kidney toxicity marker), and lactate dehydrogenase (tissue degeneration marker) were significantly impaired in the arsenic-fed group. But a significant protection was evident in the vitamin-supplemented group. In conclusion, the combined action of folate and B12 results in the restitution in the 1C metabolic pathway and cellular methyl pool. The cumulative outcome from the enhanced arsenic methylation and antioxidative capacity was protective against arsenic induced mutagenic DNA breakages and tissue damages.

  5. Postnatal arsenic exposure and attention impairment in school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; Gil, Fernando; Hernández, Antonio F; Alguacil, Juan; Lorca, Andres; Mendoza, Ramón; Gómez, Inmaculada; Molina-Villalba, Isabel; González-Alzaga, Beatriz; Aguilar-Garduño, Clemente; Rohlman, Diane S; Lacasaña, Marina

    2016-01-01

    additional evidence that postnatal arsenic exposure impairs neurological function in children. PMID:25682472

  6. Postnatal arsenic exposure and attention impairment in school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; Gil, Fernando; Hernández, Antonio F; Alguacil, Juan; Lorca, Andres; Mendoza, Ramón; Gómez, Inmaculada; Molina-Villalba, Isabel; González-Alzaga, Beatriz; Aguilar-Garduño, Clemente; Rohlman, Diane S; Lacasaña, Marina

    2016-01-01

    additional evidence that postnatal arsenic exposure impairs neurological function in children.

  7. Diversity and Distribution of Arsenic-Related Genes Along a Pollution Gradient in a River Affected by Acid Mine Drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desoeuvre, Angélique; Casiot, Corinne; Héry, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Some microorganisms have the capacity to interact with arsenic through resistance or metabolic processes. Their activities contribute to the fate of arsenic in contaminated ecosystems. To investigate the genetic potential involved in these interactions in a zone of confluence between a pristine river and an arsenic-rich acid mine drainage, we explored the diversity of marker genes for arsenic resistance (arsB, acr3.1, acr3.2), methylation (arsM), and respiration (arrA) in waters characterized by contrasted concentrations of metallic elements (including arsenic) and pH. While arsB-carrying bacteria were representative of pristine waters, Acr3 proteins may confer to generalist bacteria the capacity to cope with an increase of contamination. arsM showed an unexpected wide distribution, suggesting biomethylation may impact arsenic fate in contaminated aquatic ecosystems. arrA gene survey suggested that only specialist microorganisms (adapted to moderately or extremely contaminated environments) have the capacity to respire arsenate. Their distribution, modulated by water chemistry, attested the specialist nature of the arsenate respirers. This is the first report of the impact of an acid mine drainage on the diversity and distribution of arsenic (As)-related genes in river waters. The fate of arsenic in this ecosystem is probably under the influence of the abundance and activity of specific microbial populations involved in different As biotransformations. PMID:26603631

  8. University students' perceptions of neurology and experiences of learning neurological physiotherapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    The education of healthcare professions students in the effective management of people experiencing neurological conditions is essential. If physiotherapy students’ are experiencing neurophobia, the fear of neurology (Jozefowicz 1994: 328) it is important to understand the underlying reasons, to inform future teaching practice. The purpose of this research was to explore physiotherapy students’ perceptions of neurology and their experiences of learning neurological physiotherapy in one UK Hig...

  9. Discovery of the Arsenic Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, A; Heim, M; Schuh, A; Thoennessen, M

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-nine arsenic isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  10. Neurologic complications of thyroid dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrjavcev, T

    1978-01-01

    Until such time as results of more rigorous studies are available, the morbidity rates for thyroid dysfunction cited here must suffice. The 1955 to 1956 outpatient "incidence" for England and Wales was 1.1 per 1,000 for thyrotoxicosis and 1.7 per 1,000 for myxedema (18). United States in-patient "incidence" for 1971 was 0.16 per 1,000 for thyrotoxicosis and 0.13 per 1,000 for myxedema (25). The 1935 to 1967 average annual incidence of Graves' disease for females in Olmsted County, Minnesota, was 30.5 per 100,000 (10). Well over 50% of hyperthyroid patients have clinical evidence of mild or moderate muscle weakness. Usually this weakness is proximal, and electro-myography and muscle biopsy confirm the existence of myopathic process (Table 11). Severe muscular weakness of acute onset is relatively rare and is encountered in approximately 1% of hyperthyroid patients (11,17,40). Ophthalmoplegia and psychosis are reported 4% and 2% of patients, respectively (17). Myasthenia gravis, although well publicized, is estimated to occur in less than 1% of patients (3,30). TPP is virtually nonexistent in the West; in the Orient it is reported in 2 to 8% of hyperthyroid patients and is 20 to 60 times more frequent in the hyperthyroid male than in the hyperthyroid female (Table 12). The neurologic symptomatology of myxedema is more extensive, and agreement among the various series is poor. The only unselected series addressing itself to neuromuscular manifestations of myxedema that is suitable for citation is that of Scarpalezos et al. (36). This comprehensive study was done without apparent patient selection, and it reported 2% of patients with definite carpal tunnel syndrome, 6% with myopathy, and 18% with polyneuropathy (Table 13). Reported percentages of hypothyroid patients found to have neurologic manifestations of cerebellar dysfunction are extremely diverse: ataxic gait was reported in 5 to 32% (6,7,12,27) of patients and dysdiadochokinesia in 6 to 52% (7,12,27). Psychosis

  11. Proton MRS in neurological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonavita, S.; Di Salle, F.; Tedeschi, G

    1999-05-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) permits the acquisition of the signal arising from several brain metabolites. At long echo-time (TE) {sup 1}H MRS can detect N-acetyl-aspartate containing compounds, choline containing compounds, creatine+phosphocreatine and lactate. At short TE, lipids, tryglicerides, alanine, glutamate, glutamine, GABA, scyllo-inositol, glucose, myo-inositol, carnosine and histydine are visible. {sup 1}H MRS can be performed with single-voxel, multivoxel, single slice and multislice techniques. With single voxel {sup 1}H MRS it is possible to measure metabolites relaxation time, which allows the measurement of metabolite concentrations. This technique can be useful in the study of focal lesions in the central nervous system (CNS) such as epilepsy (pre-surgical identification of epileptic focus), brain tumors (evaluation of recurrence and radiation necrosis), stroke, multiple sclerosis, etc. Single slice and multislice {sup 1}H MRS imaging ({sup 1}H MRSI) can be performed only at long TE and permits the mapping of the brain metabolites distribution which makes them particularly useful in studying diffuse diseases and heterogeneous lesions of the CNS. {sup 1}H MRS can also be useful in the evaluation of 'ischemic penumbra' of stroke; developmental (myelin and neuronal dysgenesis); head trauma (evaluation of cerebral damage not visible with MRI); degenerative disorders (identification of microscopic pathology not visible with MRI); and metabolic diseases (metabolic disturbances with specific metabolic patterns)

  12. Management of male neurologic patients with infertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Sønksen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Many aspects of fertility rely on intact neurologic function and thus neurologic diseases can result in infertility. While research into general female fertility and alterations in male semen quality is limited, we have an abundance of knowledge regarding ejaculatory dysfunction following nerve...

  13. THE NEUROLOGICAL FACE OF CELIAC DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat IŞIKAY

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSeveral neurological disorders have also been widely described in celiac disease patients.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to determine the incidence of accompanying different neurologic manifestations in children with celiac disease at the time of diagnosis and to discuss these manifestations in the light of the recent literature.MethodsThis prospective cross sectional study included 297 children diagnosed with celiac disease. The medical records of all patients were reviewed.ResultsIn neurological evaluation, totally 40 (13. 5% of the 297 celiac patients had a neurological finding including headache, epilepsy, migraine, mental retardation, breath holding spells, ataxia, cerebral palsy, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, Down syndrome and Turner syndrome in order of frequency. There was not any significant difference between the laboratory data of the patients with and without neurological manifestations. However; type 3a biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients without neurological manifestations, while type 3b biopsy was statistically significantly more common among patients with neurological manifestations.ConclusionIt is important to keep in mind that in clinical course of celiac disease different neurological manifestations may be reported.

  14. 14 CFR 67.109 - Neurologic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION First-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.109 Neurologic. Neurologic standards for a first-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or...

  15. 14 CFR 67.209 - Neurologic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Second-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.209 Neurologic. Neurologic standards for a second-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or...

  16. 14 CFR 67.309 - Neurologic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN MEDICAL STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION Third-Class Airman Medical Certificate § 67.309 Neurologic. Neurologic standards for a third-class airman medical certificate are: (a) No established medical history or...

  17. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Tibor; Schwarcz, Attila; Horváth, Réka A; Barsi, Péter; Janszky, József

    2008-01-30

    The present contribution discusses the clinical use of functional MRI (fMRI) and its role in the most common neurological diseases. FMRI was found a reliable and reproducible examination tool resulting in a wide distribution of fMRI methods in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy in determining the relationship of eloquent areas and the epileptic focus. Preliminary data suggest that fMRI using memory paradigms can predict the postoperative memory decline in epilepsy surgery by determining whether a reorganization of memory functions took place. Speech-activated fMRI became the most used tool in determining hemispheric dominance. Visual and sensory-motor cortex can also be routinely investigated by fMRI which helps in decision on epilepsy surgery. FMRI combined with EEG is a new diagnostic tool in epilepsy and sleep disorders. FMRI can identify the penumbra after stroke and can provide an additional information on metabolic state of the threatened brain tissue. FMRI has a predictive role in post-stroke recovery. In relapsing-remitting MS an adaptive reorganization can be demonstrated by fMRI affecting the visual, motor, and memory systems, despite preserved functional performance. Much more extensive reorganization can be demonstrated in secondary progressive MS. These findings suggest that the different stages of MS are related to different stages of the reorganization and MS becomes progressive when there is no more reserve capacity in the brain for reorganization. FMRI offers the capability of detecting early functional hemodynamic alterations in Alzheimer's disease before morphological changes. FMRI can be a valuable tool to test and monitor treatment efficacy in AD. FMRI can also provide information about the mechanisms of different therapeutic approaches in Parkinson disorder including drug treatment and deep brain stimulation.

  18. Emotional disorders in neurological rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Allan; Hosker, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Depression, anxiety, emotionalism, irritability, and apathy are common findings in the neurological rehabilitation setting and are associated with poorer outcomes. This chapter outlines the importance of detecting and attending to these disorders. The authors recommend the systematic use of self-report measures, tailored for those with cognitive or motor difficulties, in combination with interview-based assessments where suspicion of the presence of a disorder is aroused. A stepped care scheme for coordinating rehabilitation services is presented which highlights the importance of training all staff to be aware of the possibility of patients presenting with emotional disorders and the need to equip all staff with the skills to make emotional enquiries and to carry out brief interventions where indicated. Interventions should be based upon a combination of watchful waiting and optimization of clinical care followed by evidence-based brief therapies such as problem solving, motivational interviewing, and behavioral activation. Antidepressant prescribing should be reserved for the more severe cases and protocols should involve a system for reviewing and time-limiting prescriptions. This chapter aims to aid those designing services to produce simple and widely understood programs that meet the needs of this inherently heterogeneous client base.

  19. Gluten sensitivity and neurological manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Berio

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors report on six cases of gluten-sensitivity, also defined non-celiac gluten sensitivity, characterized by abdominal features (diarrhea, bloating, pain, genetic positivity for predisposition to celiac disease (DQB1* 02 in all cases; DQA1*05 in three; DQA1*02 in two, DQB1*03 in two, negative anti-t-Transglutaminase antibodies, normal mucosa on biopsy in four cases, type 1 of Marsh in one case. The subjects presented frequent central nervous system (CNS symptoms: headache in three patients, somnolence in one, electroencephalogram aspecific alterations in three (in two of them with previous seizures, leptomeningeal cyst in one, intracranial calcification in one, cerebral gliosis in two. After a gluten-free diet, all intestinal and clinical CNS features remitted, but re-appeared after gluten reintroduction. On the basis of the neurological signs, the authors stress the relevance of immune innate system in the pathogenesis of these cases with possible subsequent evolution on immune adaptive system involvement.

  20. Neurology of acute organophosphate poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Gagandeep

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute organophosphate (OP poisoning is one of the most common poisonings in emergency medicine and toxicological practice in some of the less-developed nations in South Asia. Traditionally, OP poisoning comes under the domain of emergency physicians, internists, intensivists, and toxicologists. However, some of the complications following OP poisoning are neurological and involve neurologists. The pathophysiological basis for the clinical manifestations of OP poisoning is inactivation of the enzyme, acetylcholinesterase at the peripheral nicotinic and muscarinic and central nervous system (CNS nerve terminals and junctions. Nicotinic manifestations occur in severe cases and late in the course; these comprise of fasciculations and neuromuscular paralysis. There is a good correlation between the electrophysiological abnormalities and the severity of the clinical manifestations. Neurophysiological abnormalities characteristic of nicotinic junctions (mainly neuromuscular junction dysfunction include: (1 single, supramaximal electrical-stimulus-induced repetitive response/s, (2 decrement-increment response to high frequency (30 Hz repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS, and (3 decremental response to high frequency (30 Hz RNS. Atropine ameliorates muscarinic manifestations. Therapeutic agents that can ameliorate nicotinic manifestations, mainly neuromuscular, are oximes. However, the evidence for this effect is inconclusive. This may be due to the fact that there are several factors that determine the therapeutic effect of oximes. These factors include: The OP compound responsible for poisoning, duration of poisoning, severity of poisoning, and route of exposure. There is also a need to study the effect of oximes on the neurophysiological abnormalities.

  1. Addressing neurological disorders with neuromodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Rezai, Ali R

    2011-07-01

    Neurological disorders are becoming increasingly common in developed countries as a result of the aging population. In spite of medications, these disorders can result in progressive loss of function as well as chronic physical, cognitive, and emotional disability that ultimately places enormous emotional and economic on the patient, caretakers, and the society in general. Neuromodulation is emerging as a therapeutic option in these patients. Neuromodulation is a field, which involves implantable devices that allow for the reversible adjustable application of electrical, chemical, or biological agents to the central or peripheral nervous system with the objective of altering its functioning with the objective of achieving a therapeutic or clinically beneficial effect. It is a rapidly evolving field that brings together many different specialties in the fields of medicine, materials science, computer science and technology, biomedical, and neural engineering as well as the surgical or interventional specialties. It has multiple current and emerging indications, and an enormous potential for growth. The main challenges before it are in the need for effective collaboration between engineers, basic scientists, and clinicians to develop innovations that address specific problems resulting in new devices and clinical applications.

  2. Telemedicine in neurology: underutilized potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, U K; Kalita, J; Mishra, S K; Yadav, R K

    2005-03-01

    Advances in telecommunication which started with telephone lines, FAX, integrated service digital network (ISDN) lines and now internet have provided an unprecedented opportunity for transfer of knowledge and sharing of information. The information can be used for overlapping applications in patient care, teaching and research. In medicine there is increasing utilization of telemedicine; radiology and pathology being regarded as mature specialties and emergency medicine as maturing specialties compared to other evolving specialties which include psychiatry, dermatology, cardiology and ophthalmology. Of the emergencies, status epilepticus and stroke have high potential for improving patient management. Administration of tPA was more frequent when carried out under telemedicine guidance. Telemedicine has great potential for medical education. The principles of education are in congruence with those of telemedicine and can be closely integrated in the existing medical education system. Our experience of telemedicine as a medical education tool is based on video conferencing with SCB Medical College, Cuttack. We had 30 sessions during 2001 to 2004 in which 2-3 cases were discussed in each session. The patients' details, radiological and neurophysiological findings could be successfully transmitted. These conferences improved the knowledge of participants, provided an opportunity for a second opinion as well as modified the treatment decisions in some cases. The advances in telemedicine should be utilized more extensively in neurology, especially in emergency management, epilepsy and stroke patients as well, as it may have a role in neurophysiology and movement disorders. PMID:15805651

  3. Telemedicine in neurology: Underutilized potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra U

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in telecommunication which started with telephone lines, FAX, integrated service digital network (ISDN lines and now internet have provided an unprecedented opportunity for transfer of knowledge and sharing of information. The information can be used for overlapping applications in patient care, teaching and research. In medicine there is increasing utilization of telemedicine; radiology and pathology being regarded as mature specialties and emergency medicine as maturing specialties compared to other evolving specialties which include psychiatry, dermatology, cardiology and ophthalmology. Of the emergencies, status epilepticus and stroke have high potential for improving patient management. Administration of tPA was more frequent when carried out under telemedicine guidance. Telemedicine has great potential for medical education. The principles of education are in congruence with those of telemedicine and can be closely integrated in the existing medical education system. Our experience of telemedicine as a medical education tool is based on video conferencing with SCB Medical College, Cuttack. We had 30 sessions during 2001 to 2004 in which 2-3 cases were discussed in each session. The patients′ details, radiological and neurophysiological findings could be successfully transmitted. These conferences improved the knowledge of participants, provided an opportunity for a second opinion as well as modified the treatment decisions in some cases. The advances in telemedicine should be utilized more extensively in neurology, especially in emergency management, epilepsy and stroke patients as well, as it may have a role in neurophysiology and movement disorders.

  4. Arsenic removal by lime softening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaosol, T.; Suksaroj, C.; Bregnhøj, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    This paper focuses on the study of arsenic removal for drinking water by lime softening. The initial arsenic (V) concentration was 500 and 1,000 ug/L in synthetic groundwater. The experiments were performed as batch tests with varying lime dosages and mixing time. For the synthetic groundwater......, arsenic (V) removal increased with increasing lime dosage and mixing time, as well as with the resulting pH. The residual arsenic (V) in all cases was lower than the WHO guideline of 10 ug/L at pH higher than 11.5. Kinetic of arsenic (V) removal can be described by a first-order equation as C1 = C0*e......^-k*t. The relation between the constant (k value) and increasing lime dosage was found to be linear, described by k = 0.0034 (Dlime). The results support a theory from the literature that the arsenic (V) was removed by precipitation af Ca3(AsO4)2. The results obtained in the present study suggest that lime...

  5. Arsenic-resistant bacteria solubilized arsenic in the growth media and increased growth of arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Piyasa; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Ma, Lena Q

    2011-10-01

    The role of arsenic-resistant bacteria (ARB) in arsenic solubilization from growth media and growth enhancement of arsenic-hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L. was examined. Seven ARB (tolerant to 10 mM arsenate) were isolated from the P. vittata rhizosphere and identified by 16S rRNA sequencing as Pseudomonas sp., Comamonas sp. and Stenotrophomonas sp. During 7-d hydroponic experiments, these bacteria effectively solubilized arsenic from the growth media spiked with insoluble FeAsO₄ and AlAsO₄ minerals (from organic C) by P. vittata may be responsible for As solubilization. Increase in P. vittata root biomass from 1.5-2.2 to 3.4-4.2 g/plant dw by ARB and by arsenic was associated with arsenic-induced plant P uptake. Arsenic resistant bacteria may have potential to enhance phytoremediation of arsenic-contaminated soils by P. vittata. PMID:21840210

  6. Approaches to Increase Arsenic Awareness in Bangladesh: An Evaluation of an Arsenic Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Christine Marie; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Khan, Khalid; Islam, Tariqul; Singha, Ashit; Moon-Howard, Joyce; van Geen, Alexander; Graziano, Joseph H.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a household-level arsenic education and well water arsenic testing intervention to increase arsenic awareness in Bangladesh. The authors randomly selected 1,000 study respondents located in 20 villages in Singair, Bangladesh. The main outcome was the change in knowledge of arsenic from…

  7. Genomic analysis of stress response against arsenic in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Surasri N; Lewis, Jada; Patel, Isha; Bozdag, Serdar; Lee, Jeong H; Sprando, Robert; Cinar, Hediye Nese

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic, a known human carcinogen, is widely distributed around the world and found in particularly high concentrations in certain regions including Southwestern US, Eastern Europe, India, China, Taiwan and Mexico. Chronic arsenic poisoning affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with increased risk of many diseases including arthrosclerosis, diabetes and cancer. In this study, we explored genome level global responses to high and low levels of arsenic exposure in Caenorhabditis elegans using Affymetrix expression microarrays. This experimental design allows us to do microarray analysis of dose-response relationships of global gene expression patterns. High dose (0.03%) exposure caused stronger global gene expression changes in comparison with low dose (0.003%) exposure, suggesting a positive dose-response correlation. Biological processes such as oxidative stress, and iron metabolism, which were previously reported to be involved in arsenic toxicity studies using cultured cells, experimental animals, and humans, were found to be affected in C. elegans. We performed genome-wide gene expression comparisons between our microarray data and publicly available C. elegans microarray datasets of cadmium, and sediment exposure samples of German rivers Rhine and Elbe. Bioinformatics analysis of arsenic-responsive regulatory networks were done using FastMEDUSA program. FastMEDUSA analysis identified cancer-related genes, particularly genes associated with leukemia, such as dnj-11, which encodes a protein orthologous to the mammalian ZRF1/MIDA1/MPP11/DNAJC2 family of ribosome-associated molecular chaperones. We analyzed the protective functions of several of the identified genes using RNAi. Our study indicates that C. elegans could be a substitute model to study the mechanism of metal toxicity using high-throughput expression data and bioinformatics tools such as FastMEDUSA. PMID:23894281

  8. Genomic analysis of stress response against arsenic in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Surasri N; Lewis, Jada; Patel, Isha; Bozdag, Serdar; Lee, Jeong H; Sprando, Robert; Cinar, Hediye Nese

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic, a known human carcinogen, is widely distributed around the world and found in particularly high concentrations in certain regions including Southwestern US, Eastern Europe, India, China, Taiwan and Mexico. Chronic arsenic poisoning affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with increased risk of many diseases including arthrosclerosis, diabetes and cancer. In this study, we explored genome level global responses to high and low levels of arsenic exposure in Caenorhabditis elegans using Affymetrix expression microarrays. This experimental design allows us to do microarray analysis of dose-response relationships of global gene expression patterns. High dose (0.03%) exposure caused stronger global gene expression changes in comparison with low dose (0.003%) exposure, suggesting a positive dose-response correlation. Biological processes such as oxidative stress, and iron metabolism, which were previously reported to be involved in arsenic toxicity studies using cultured cells, experimental animals, and humans, were found to be affected in C. elegans. We performed genome-wide gene expression comparisons between our microarray data and publicly available C. elegans microarray datasets of cadmium, and sediment exposure samples of German rivers Rhine and Elbe. Bioinformatics analysis of arsenic-responsive regulatory networks were done using FastMEDUSA program. FastMEDUSA analysis identified cancer-related genes, particularly genes associated with leukemia, such as dnj-11, which encodes a protein orthologous to the mammalian ZRF1/MIDA1/MPP11/DNAJC2 family of ribosome-associated molecular chaperones. We analyzed the protective functions of several of the identified genes using RNAi. Our study indicates that C. elegans could be a substitute model to study the mechanism of metal toxicity using high-throughput expression data and bioinformatics tools such as FastMEDUSA.

  9. Genomic analysis of stress response against arsenic in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surasri N Sahu

    Full Text Available Arsenic, a known human carcinogen, is widely distributed around the world and found in particularly high concentrations in certain regions including Southwestern US, Eastern Europe, India, China, Taiwan and Mexico. Chronic arsenic poisoning affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with increased risk of many diseases including arthrosclerosis, diabetes and cancer. In this study, we explored genome level global responses to high and low levels of arsenic exposure in Caenorhabditis elegans using Affymetrix expression microarrays. This experimental design allows us to do microarray analysis of dose-response relationships of global gene expression patterns. High dose (0.03% exposure caused stronger global gene expression changes in comparison with low dose (0.003% exposure, suggesting a positive dose-response correlation. Biological processes such as oxidative stress, and iron metabolism, which were previously reported to be involved in arsenic toxicity studies using cultured cells, experimental animals, and humans, were found to be affected in C. elegans. We performed genome-wide gene expression comparisons between our microarray data and publicly available C. elegans microarray datasets of cadmium, and sediment exposure samples of German rivers Rhine and Elbe. Bioinformatics analysis of arsenic-responsive regulatory networks were done using FastMEDUSA program. FastMEDUSA analysis identified cancer-related genes, particularly genes associated with leukemia, such as dnj-11, which encodes a protein orthologous to the mammalian ZRF1/MIDA1/MPP11/DNAJC2 family of ribosome-associated molecular chaperones. We analyzed the protective functions of several of the identified genes using RNAi. Our study indicates that C. elegans could be a substitute model to study the mechanism of metal toxicity using high-throughput expression data and bioinformatics tools such as FastMEDUSA.

  10. The global perspective on neurology training: the World Federation of Neurology survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steck, Andreas; Struhal, Walter; Sergay, Stephen M; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2013-11-15

    This World Federation of Neurology (WFN) study aimed to characterize the status quo of post-graduate neurology training throughout the world and enable a better orientation on global training in neurology. Basic data on training curricula and working conditions of neurology residents and neurologists in 39 countries worldwide were evaluated. Our data show considerable differences in manpower and training, but a continuous improvement within the last 10 years of observation. Worldwide a spread of interim evaluations and final examinations of different types are used. Online resources will undoubtedly profoundly change skill and knowledge acquisition and training practices in Neurology in the coming years.

  11. Metabolomic Characterizations of Liver Injury Caused by Acute Arsenic Toxicity in Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Li

    Full Text Available Arsenic is one of the most common metalloid contaminants in groundwater and it has both acute and chronic toxicity affecting multiple organs. Details of the mechanism of arsenic toxicity are still lacking and profile studies at metabolic level are very limited. Using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy (GC/MS, we first generated metabolomic profiles from the livers of arsenic-treated zebrafish and identified 34 significantly altered metabolite peaks as potential markers, including four prominent ones: cholic acid, glycylglycine, glycine and hypotaurine. Combined results from GC/MS, histological examination and pathway analyses suggested a series of alterations, including apoptosis, glycogenolysis, changes in amino acid metabolism and fatty acid composition, accumulation of bile acids and fats, and disturbance in glycolysis related energy metabolism. The alterations in glycolysis partially resemble Warburg effect commonly observed in many cancer cells. However, cellular damages were not reflected in two conventional liver function tests performed, Bilirubin assay and alanine aminotransferase (ALT assay, probably because the short arsenate exposure was insufficient to induce detectable damage. This study demonstrated that metabolic changes could reflect mild liver impairments induced by arsenic exposure, which underscored their potential in reporting early liver injury.

  12. Toxic and Metabolic Myelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Joana; Nunes, Renato Hoffmann; da Rocha, Antonio José; Castillo, Mauricio

    2016-10-01

    Myelopathy describes any neurologic deficit related to the spinal cord. It is most commonly caused by its compression by neoplasms, degenerative disc disease, trauma, or infection. Less common causes of myelopathy include spinal cord tumors, infection, inflammatory, neurodegenerative, vascular, toxic, and metabolic disorders. Conditions affecting the spinal cord must be recognized as early as possible to prevent progression that may lead to permanent disability. Biopsy is rarely performed, thus the diagnosis and management rely on patient׳s history, physical examination, laboratory results, and imaging findings. Here we review the clinical presentations, pathophysiological mechanisms, and magnetic resonance imaging findings of myelopathies related to metabolic or toxic etiologies. PMID:27616316

  13. Effect of organic matter amendment, arsenic amendment and water management regime on rice grain arsenic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Gareth J; Adomako, Eureka E; Deacon, Claire M; Carey, Anne-Marie; Price, Adam H; Meharg, Andrew A

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic accumulation in rice grain has been identified as a major problem in some regions of Asia. A study was conducted to investigate the effect of increased organic matter in the soil on the release of arsenic into soil pore water and accumulation of arsenic species within rice grain. It was observed that high concentrations of soil arsenic and organic matter caused a reduction in plant growth and delayed flowering time. Total grain arsenic accumulation was higher in the plants grown in high soil arsenic in combination with high organic matter, with an increase in the percentage of organic arsenic species observed. The results indicate that the application of organic matter should be done with caution in paddy soils which have high soil arsenic, as this may lead to an increase in accumulation of arsenic within rice grains. Results also confirm that flooding conditions substantially increase grain arsenic.

  14. Phytoextraction by arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L. from six arsenic-contaminated soils: Repeated harvests and arsenic redistribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzaga, Maria I.S.; Santos, Jorge A.G. [Department of Soil Chemistry, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Cruz das Almas, 44380000 (Brazil); Ma, Lena Q. [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, 2169 McCarty Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611-0290 (United States)], E-mail: lqma@ifas.ufl.edu

    2008-07-15

    This greenhouse experiment evaluated arsenic removal by Pteris vittata and its effects on arsenic redistribution in soils. P. vittata grew in six arsenic-contaminated soils and its fronds were harvested and analyzed for arsenic in October, 2003, April, 2004, and October, 2004. The soil arsenic was separated into five fractions via sequential extraction. The ferns grew well and took up arsenic from all soils. Fern biomass ranged from 24.8 to 33.5 g plant{sup -1} after 4 months of growth but was reduced in the subsequent harvests. The frond arsenic concentrations ranged from 66 to 6,151 mg kg{sup -1}, 110 to 3,056 mg kg{sup -1}, and 162 to 2,139 mg kg{sup -1} from the first, second and third harvest, respectively. P. vittata reduced soil arsenic by 6.4-13% after three harvests. Arsenic in the soils was primarily associated with amorphous hydrous oxides (40-59%), which contributed the most to arsenic taken up by P. vittata (45-72%). It is possible to use P. vittata to remediate arsenic-contaminated soils by repeatedly harvesting its fronds. - Pteris vittata was effective in continuously removing arsenic from contaminated soils after three repeated harvests.

  15. RARE CASE REPORT OF CHRONIC ARSENIC POISONING

    OpenAIRE

    Mundle; Neelima; Sushrut; Yogesh; Shukan; Shalik; Siddharth

    2014-01-01

    Today, arsenic is primarily used in the produc tion of glass and semiconductors., Arsenic may be found as a water or food contaminant, particularly in shellfish and other seafood, and often contaminates fruits and vegetables, particularly rice

  16. Inorganic arsenic poisoning in pastured feeder lambs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, H.A.; Crane, M.R.; Tomson, K.

    1971-01-01

    Clinical signs and necropsy findings in a group of feeder lambs were suggestive of inorganic arsenic poisoning. Source of exposure was established and toxic concentrations of arsenic were detected in the tissues. 13 references, 1 table.

  17. Airborne exposure and estimated bioavailability of arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yager, J.W. [Electric Power Research Inst., Madison, WI (United States); Clewell, H.J. III [ICF Consulting, Fairfax, VA (United States); Hicks, J. [Geomatrix, (United States)

    2000-07-01

    A pilot group of workers were used in a study to determine the relationship between exposure to arsenic present in fly ash particles and urinary excretion of inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites. Arsenic was measured in the breathing zone of workers during full shift work schedules and daily urine samples were collected to determine the concentration of arsenic and its metabolites. Airborne particle size distribution samples were collected on six-stage personal cascade impactors. Previous studies of airborne exposure to arsenic in copper smelters predict urinary values nearly three times higher than those seen in exposure to arsenic in fly ash. The results suggest that differences in biological uptake of airborne arsenic probably depend on characteristics such as solubility, particle size and distribution and matrix composition of the arsenic compounds.

  18. RARE CASE REPORT OF CHRONIC ARSENIC POISONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mundle

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, arsenic is primarily used in the produc tion of glass and semiconductors., Arsenic may be found as a water or food contaminant, particularly in shellfish and other seafood, and often contaminates fruits and vegetables, particularly rice

  19. Metabolic neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorders. In: Aminoff MJ, Josephson SA, eds. Aminoff's Neurology and General Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ... disorders. In: Aminoff MJ, Josephson SA, eds. Aminoff's Neurology and General Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  20. Review of arsenic contamination and human exposure through water food in rural areas in Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Celia

    2016-05-01

    The Red River Delta in Vietnam is one of the regions whose quaternary aquifers are polluted by arsenic. Chronic toxification by arsenic can cause severe illnesses such as cancer, skin lesions, developmental defects, cardiovascular and neurological diseases, and diabetes. In this study, a food processing craft village in the Red River Delta was investigated regarding the potential risk faced by the population due to arsenic. The potential sources of arsenic are the groundwater, the crops grown in the surroundings, and animal products from local husbandry. However, the occurrence of arsenic in nature is variable, and its bioavailability and toxicity depend very much on its specification: trivalent compounds are more toxic and often more mobile than pentavalent compounds, while inorganic species are generally more toxic than organic ones. Local conditions, such as the redox potential, strongly influence its specification and thus potential bioavailability. The introduction to this work elucidates the key factors which potentially cause human exposure to arsenic: the geological setting of the study area, land and water use patterns, and the current state of research regarding the mobilization, bioavailability and plant uptake of arsenic. Although the study area is located in a region where the groundwater is known to be moderately contaminated by arsenic, the level of arsenic in the groundwater in the village had not previously been determined. In this study, water use in the village was examined by a survey among the farmers and by water analyses, which are presented in the following chapters. Four main water sources (rain, river, tube well and a public municipal waterworks) are used for the different daily activities; the highest risk to human health was found to be the bore well water, which is pumped from the shallow Holocene aquifer. The water from the bore wells is commonly used for cleaning and washing as well as to feed the animals and for food processing

  1. Review of arsenic contamination and human exposure through water food in rural areas in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Red River Delta in Vietnam is one of the regions whose quaternary aquifers are polluted by arsenic. Chronic toxification by arsenic can cause severe illnesses such as cancer, skin lesions, developmental defects, cardiovascular and neurological diseases, and diabetes. In this study, a food processing craft village in the Red River Delta was investigated regarding the potential risk faced by the population due to arsenic. The potential sources of arsenic are the groundwater, the crops grown in the surroundings, and animal products from local husbandry. However, the occurrence of arsenic in nature is variable, and its bioavailability and toxicity depend very much on its specification: trivalent compounds are more toxic and often more mobile than pentavalent compounds, while inorganic species are generally more toxic than organic ones. Local conditions, such as the redox potential, strongly influence its specification and thus potential bioavailability. The introduction to this work elucidates the key factors which potentially cause human exposure to arsenic: the geological setting of the study area, land and water use patterns, and the current state of research regarding the mobilization, bioavailability and plant uptake of arsenic. Although the study area is located in a region where the groundwater is known to be moderately contaminated by arsenic, the level of arsenic in the groundwater in the village had not previously been determined. In this study, water use in the village was examined by a survey among the farmers and by water analyses, which are presented in the following chapters. Four main water sources (rain, river, tube well and a public municipal waterworks) are used for the different daily activities; the highest risk to human health was found to be the bore well water, which is pumped from the shallow Holocene aquifer. The water from the bore wells is commonly used for cleaning and washing as well as to feed the animals and for food processing

  2. [Charles Miller Fisher: a giant of neurology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Jorge

    2013-08-01

    C. Miller Fisher MD, one of the great neurologists in the 20th century, died in April 2012. Born in Canada, he studied medicine at the University of Toronto. As a Canadian Navy medical doctor he participated in World War II and was a war prisoner from 1941 to 1944. He did a residency in neurology at the Montreal Neurological Institute between 1946 and 1948, and later on was a Fellow in Neurology and Neuropathology at the Boston City Hospital. In 1954 he entered the Massachusetts General Hospital as a neurologist and neuropathologist, where he remained until his retirement, in 2005. His academic career ended as Professor Emeritus at Harvard University. His area of special interest in neurology was cerebrovascular disease (CVD). In 1954 he created the first Vascular Neurology service in the world and trained many leading neurologists on this field. His scientific contributions are present in more than 250 publications, as journal articles and book chapters. Many of his articles, certainly not restricted to CVD, were seminal in neurology. Several concepts and terms that he coined are currently used in daily clinical practice. The chapters on CVD, in seven consecutive editions of Harrison's Internal Medicine textbook, are among his highlights. His death was deeply felt by the neurological community.

  3. Arsenic in contaminated soil and river sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bombach, G. (Freiberg Univ. of Mining and Technology, Inst. of Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Ore Deposits, Freiberg (Germany)); Pierra, A. (Freiberg Univ. of Mining and Technology, Inst. of Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Ore Deposits, Freiberg (Germany)); Klemm, W. (Freiberg Univ. of Mining and Technology, Inst. of Mineralogy, Geochemistry and Ore Deposits, Freiberg (Germany))

    1994-09-01

    Different areas in the Erzgebirge mountains are contaminated by high arsenic concentration which is caused by the occurrence of ore and industrial sources. The study showed clearly a high concentration of arsenic in the surface and under soil (A and B horizons) in the Freiberg district. The distribution of the arsenic concentration in the area, the content of water soluble arsenic, the several oxidation states (As[sup 3+], As[sup 5+]) and the bonding types have been analyzed. (orig.)

  4. Standardized patient outcomes trial (SPOT in neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph E. Safdieh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The neurologic examination is a challenging component of the physical examination for medical students. In response, primarily based on expert consensus, medical schools have supplemented their curricula with standardized patient (SP sessions that are focused on the neurologic examination. Hypothesis-driven quantitative data are needed to justify the further use of this resource-intensive educational modality, specifically regarding whether using SPs to teach the neurological examination effects a long-term benefit on the application of neurological examination skills. Methods: This study is a cross-sectional analysis of prospectively collected data from medical students at Weill Cornell Medical College. The control group (n=129 received the standard curriculum. The intervention group (n=58 received the standard curriculum and an additional SP session focused on the neurologic examination during the second year of medical school. Student performance on the neurologic examination was assessed in the control and intervention groups via an OSCE administered during the fourth year of medical school. A Neurologic Physical Exam (NPE score of 0.0 to 6.0 was calculated for each student based on a neurologic examination checklist completed by the SPs during the OSCE. Composite NPE scores in the control and intervention groups were compared with the unpaired t-test. Results: In the fourth year OSCE, composite NPE scores in the intervention group (3.5±1.1 were statistically significantly greater than those in the control group (2.2±1.1 (p<0.0001. Conclusions: SP sessions are an effective tool for teaching the neurologic examination. We determined that a single, structured SP session conducted as an adjunct to our traditional lectures and small groups is associated with a statistically significant improvement in student performance measured 2 years after the session.

  5. Identification of the major arsenic-binding protein in rat plasma as the ternary dimethylarsinous-hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranmandura, Hua; Suzuki, Kazuo T

    2008-03-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic causes a wide range of diseases such as hyperkeratosis, cardiovascular diseases, and skin, lung, and bladder cancers, and millions of people are chronically exposed to arsenic worldwide. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying these toxic actions. The metabolism of arsenic is essential for understanding the toxic actions. Here, we identified the major arsenic-binding protein (As-BP) in the plasma of rats after oral administration of arsenite by the use of two different HPLC columns, gel filtration and anion exchange ones, coupled with an inductively coupled argon plasma mass spectrometer (ICP MS). The molecular mass of the As-BP was estimated to be 90 kDa based on results using the former column, and arsenic bound to this protein only in the form of dimethylarsinous acid (DMA (III)) in the plasma in vivo. In addition, the purified As-BP was shown to consist of two different proteins, haptoglobin (Hp) of 37 kDa (three bands) and the hemoglobin (Hb) alpha chain of 14 kDa (single band), using sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), respectively, suggesting that the As-BP was the ternary DMA (III)-Hb-Hp complex. To confirm the present observations, an arsenic-binding assay was carried out in vitro . Although DMA (III) bound directly to fresh rat plasma proteins, they were different from that identified in vivo. However, when a DMA (III)-exposed rat RBC lysate (DMA (III) binds to Hb in rat RBCs) was added to control rat plasma, a new arsenic peak increased at the expense of the arsenic-Hb one. Furthermore, this new arsenic peak was consistent with the As-BP identified in the plasma in vivo, suggesting that arsenic bound to Hb further binds to haptoglobin (Hp), forming the ternary As-Hb-Hp complex. PMID:18247522

  6. Arsenic - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arsenic URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arsenic.html Other topics A-Z A B C ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Arsenic - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  7. 21 CFR 556.60 - Arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arsenic. 556.60 Section 556.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND... New Animal Drugs § 556.60 Arsenic. Tolerances for total residues of combined arsenic (calculated as...

  8. 29 CFR 1910.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... container in the change-room which prevents dispersion of inorganic arsenic outside the container. (vi) The... readily through the skin. Because inorganic arsenic is a poison, you should wash your hands thoroughly... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1910.1018 Section 1910.1018...

  9. Chloride sublimation of gold-arsenic concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present article is devoted to chloride sublimation of gold-arsenic concentrates. The results of studies of chloride sublimation of gold-arsenic comprising concentrates of Chore deposit of Tajikistan are considered. It is found that by application sodium chloride for gold-arsenic comprising concentrates it is possible to extract gold and silver from flotation concentrates.

  10. Arsenic intoxication associated with tubulointerstitial nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, G V; Rossi, N F

    1995-08-01

    Arsenic poisoning is an often unrecognized cause of renal insufficiency. We report a case of tubulointerstitial nephritis associated with an elevated urinary arsenic concentration. Removal of the putative source of arsenic resulted in symptomatic improvement, resolution of abnormal abdominal radiographs, and stabilization of renal function. This case emphasizes the importance of heavy metal screening in patients with multisystem complaints and tubulointerstitial nephritis.

  11. Neurological examination: pioneering authors and their books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péricles Maranhão-Filho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to highlight some of the most important pioneering books specifically focused on the neurological examination and their authors. During the XIX Century, Alexander Hammond, William Gowers and Charles Mills pioneered the neurological literature, followed in the XX Century by Aloysio de Castro, Monrad-Krohn, Derek Denny-Brown, Robert Wartenberg, Gordon Holmes, and Russel DeJong. With determination and a marked sense of observation and research, they competently developed and spread the technique and art of the neurological exam.

  12. Genetic variation in Glutathione S-Transferase Omega-1, Arsenic Methyltransferase and Methylene-tetrahydrofolate Reductase, arsenic exposure and bladder cancer: a case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beebe-Dimmer Jennifer L

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ingestion of groundwater with high concentrations of inorganic arsenic has been linked to adverse health outcomes, including bladder cancer, however studies have not consistently observed any elevation in risk at lower concentrations. Genetic variability in the metabolism and clearance of arsenic is an important consideration in any investigation of its potential health risks. Therefore, we examined the association between genes thought to play a role in the metabolism of arsenic and bladder cancer. Methods Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in GSTO-1, As3MT and MTHFR were genotyped using DNA from 219 bladder cancer cases and 273 controls participating in a case–control study in Southeastern Michigan and exposed to low to moderate ( Results While no single SNP in As3MT was significantly associated with bladder cancer overall, several SNPs were associated with bladder cancer among those exposed to higher arsenic levels. Individuals with one or more copies of the C allele in rs11191439 (the Met287Thr polymorphism had an elevated risk of bladder cancer (OR = 1.17; 95% CI = 1.04-1.32 per 1 μg/L increase in average exposure. However, no association was observed between average arsenic exposure and bladder cancer among TT homozygotes in the same SNP. Bladder cancer cases were also 60% less likely to be homozygotes for the A allele in rs1476413 in MTHFR compared to controls (OR = 0.40; 95% CI = 0.18-0.88. Conclusions Variation in As3MT and MTHFR is associated with bladder cancer among those exposed to relatively low concentrations of inorganic arsenic. Further investigation is warranted to confirm these findings.

  13. Arsenic – Poison or medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Kulik-Kupka

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic (As is commonly known as a poison. Only a few people know that As has also been widely used in medicine. In the past years As and its compounds were used as a medicine for the treatment of such diseases as diabetes, psoriasis, syphilis, skin ulcers and joint diseases. Nowadays As is also used especially in the treatment of patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC has recognized arsenic as an element with carcinogenic effect evidenced by epidemiological studies, but as previously mentioned it is also used in the treatment of neoplastic diseases. This underlines the specificity of the arsenic effects. Arsenic occurs widely in the natural environment, for example, it is present in soil and water, which contributes to its migration to food products. Long exposure to this element may lead to liver damages and also to changes in myocardium. Bearing in mind that such serious health problems can occur, monitoring of the As presence in the environmental media plays a very important role. In addition, the occupational risk of As exposure in the workplace should be identified and checked. Also the standards for As presence in food should be established. This paper presents a review of the 2015 publications based on the Medical database like PubMed and Polish Medical Bibliography. It includes the most important information about arsenic in both forms, poison and medicine. Med Pr 2016;67(1:89–96

  14. Studies on arsenic transforming groundwater bacteria and their role in arsenic release from subsurface sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Angana; Kazy, Sufia K; Sar, Pinaki

    2014-01-01

    Ten different Gram-negative arsenic (As)-resistant and As-transforming bacteria isolated from As-rich groundwater of West Bengal were characterized to assess their role in As mobilization. 16S rRNA gene analysis confirmed the affiliation of these bacteria to genera Achromobacter, Brevundimonas, Rhizobium, Ochrobactrum, and Pseudoxanthomonas. Along with superior As-resistance and As-transformation abilities, the isolates showed broad metabolic capacity in terms of utilizing a variety of electron donors and acceptors (including As) under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively. Arsenic transformation studies performed under various conditions indicated highly efficient As(3+) oxidation or As(5+) reduction kinetics. Genes encoding As(3+) oxidase (aioA), cytosolic As(5+) reductase (arsC), and As(3+) efflux pump (arsB and acr3) were detected within the test isolates. Sequence analyses suggested that As homeostasis genes (particularly arsC, arsB, and acr3) were acquired by most of the bacteria through horizontal gene transfer. A strong correlation between As resistance phenotype and the presence of As(3+) transporter genes was observed. Microcosm study showed that bacterial strain having cytosolic As(5+) reductase property could play important role in mobilizing As (as As(3+)) from subsurface sediment. PMID:24764001

  15. Arsenic-induced morphogenic response in roots of arsenic hyperaccumulator fern Pteris vittata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forino, Laura Maria Costantina; Ruffini Castiglione, Monica; Bartoli, Giacomo; Balestri, Mirko; Andreucci, Andrea; Tagliasacchi, Anna Maria

    2012-10-15

    On the assumption that arsenic induces stress morphogenetic responses involved in As tolerance and hyperaccumulation in the Pteris vittata fern, we analyzed the root system of young sporophytes grown in 250, 334, and 500 μM As for five days and for 14 days. Anatomical and histological analyses were performed in plants grown for five days to evaluate the number, position, length and differentiation pattern of root hairs. AgNOR staining, employed to study nucleolus behavior in root apices, showed that arsenic influences nucleolar activity (evaluated by nucleolus size, number and absorbance) in the root meristem. In plants treated with 250 and 334 μM As an acropetal shift of root hair development and an increase in hair length and density were observed, linked to an ectopic pattern of differentiation. The opposite trend was recorded in plants treated with 500 μM As. It is worth noting the presence of living border-like cells, not yet observed in ferns, and their increase following As treatments. Analysis and vitality of border-like cells were surveyed after 14 days of treatments. In conclusion As treatments elicited a stress-induced morphogenic response which, by modifying the differentiation pattern, number and length of root hairs, modulating nucleolar activity and interacting with the rhizosphere by inducing border-like cell production, may adjust the rate of root uptake and its metabolic activity.

  16. Sporadic hemiplegic migraine with permanent neurological deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwedt, Todd J; Zhou, Jiying; Dodick, David W

    2014-01-01

    By definition, the neurologic impairments of hemiplegic migraine are reversible. However, a few cases of permanent neurologic deficits associated with hemiplegic migraine have been reported. Herein, we present the case of a patient with permanent impairments because of hemiplegic migraine despite normalization of associated brain magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities. Cases like these suggest the need to consider aggressive prophylactic therapy for patients with recurrent hemiplegic migraine attacks.

  17. Emerging Subspecialties in Neurology: Neuropalliative care

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Maisha T.; Barrett, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Palliative medicine, as defined by World Health Organization, is the specialty that recognizes and attempts to prevent or alleviate physical, social, psychological, and spiritual suffering.1 Understanding the principles of palliative care should be an essential component of neurologic training, as the trajectory of many neurologic illnesses is progressive and incurable.2 Given the delicate nature of many of the conversations that neurologists have with patients at the time of diagnosis or dur...

  18. Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A in Neurology: Update

    OpenAIRE

    Orsini, Marco; Leite, Marco Antonio Araujo; Chung, Tae Mo; Bocca, Wladimir; de Souza, Jano Alves; de Souza, Olivia Gameiro; Moreira, Rayele Priscila; Bastos, Victor Hugo; Teixeira, Silmar; Oliveira, Acary Bulle; Moraes, Bruno da Silva; Matta, André Palma; Jacinto, Luis Jorge

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the current and most neurological (central nervous system, CNS) uses of the botulinum neurotoxin type A. The effect of these toxins at neuromuscular junction lends themselves to neurological diseases of muscle overactivity, particularly abnormalities of muscle control. There are seven serotypes of the toxin, each with a specific activity at the molecular level. Currently, serotypes A (in two preparations) and B are available for clinical purpose, and they have proved to be ...

  19. Telemedicine in Leading US Neurology Departments

    OpenAIRE

    George, Benjamin P.; Scoglio, Nicholas J.; Reminick, Jason I.; Rajan, Balaraman; Beck, Christopher A.; Seidmann, Abraham; Biglan, Kevin M.; Dorsey, E. Ray

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the current practice and plans for telemedicine at leading US neurology departments. Design and Setting: An electronic survey was sent to department chairs, administrators, or faculty involved in telemedicine at 47 neurology departments representing the top 50 hospitals as ranked by U.S. News and World Report. Main Outcome Measures: Current use, size, scope, reimbursement, and perceived quality of telemedicine services. Results: A total of 32 individuals from 30 depart...

  20. Nuclear Medicine Imaging in Pediatric Neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Ümit Özgür Akdemir; Lütfiye Özlem; Atay Kapucu

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging can provide important complementary information in the management of pediatric patients with neurological diseases. Pre-surgical localization of the epileptogenic focus in medically refractory epilepsy patients is the most common indication for nuclear medicine imaging in pediatric neurology. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, nuclear medicine imaging is particularly useful when magnetic resonance imaging findings are normal or its findings are discordant with e...

  1. The neurology of autism spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Jeste, SS

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review: Neurological comorbidities in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are not only common, but they are also associated with more clinical severity. This review highlights the most recent literature on three of autism's most prevalent neurological comorbidities: motor impairment, sleep disorders and epilepsy. Recent findings: Motor impairment in ASDs manifests as both delays and deficits, with delays found in gross and fine motor domains and deficits found in praxis, coordination ...

  2. Modeling the Growth of Neurology Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Hadagali, Gururaj S.; Anandhalli, Gavisiddappa

    2015-01-01

    The word ‘growth’ represents an increase in actual size, implying a change of state. In science and technology, growth may imply an increase in number of institutions, scientists, or publications, etc. The present study demonstrates the growth of neurology literature for the period 1961-2010. A total of 291,702 records were extracted from the Science Direct Database for fifty years. The Relative Growth Rate (RGR) and Doubling Time (Dt.) of neurology literature have been calculat...

  3. Neurology-the next 10 years

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Ralf; Ferriero, D. M.; Frisoni, G. B.; Bettegowda, C; Gokaslan, Z L; Kessler, J A; Vezzani, A.; Waxman, S G; Jarius, S.; Wildemann, B.; Weller, M.

    2015-01-01

    Since the launch of our journal as Nature Clinical Practice Neurology in 2005, we have seen remarkable progress in many areas of neurology research, but what does the future hold? Will advances in basic research be translated into effective disease-modifying therapies, and will personalized medicine finally become a reality? For this special Viewpoint article, we invited a panel of Advisory Board members and other journal contributors to outline their research priorities and predictions in ne...

  4. Mineral resource of the month: arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, William E.

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic has a long and varied history: Although it was not isolated as an element until the 13th century, it was known to the ancient Chinese, Egyptians and Greeks in compound form in the minerals arsenopyrite, realgar and orpiment. In the 1400s, “Scheele’s Green” was first used as an arsenic pigment in wallpaper, and leached arsenic from wallpaper may have contributed to Napoleon’s death in 1821. The 1940s play and later movie, Arsenic and Old Lace, dramatizes the metal’s more sinister role. Arsenic continues to be an important mineral commodity with many modern applications.

  5. Neurological Disorders in Adult Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh J Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease may initially present as a neurological disorder. Alternatively, celiac disease may be complicated by neurological changes. With impaired nutrient absorption, different deficiency syndromes may occur and these may be manifested clinically with neurological changes. However, in patients with deficiency syndromes, extensive involvement of the small intestine with celiac disease is often evident. There are a number of reports of celiac disease associated with neuropathy, ataxia, dementia and seizure disorder. In these reports, there is no clear relationship with nutrient deficiency and a precise mechanism for the neurological changes has not been defined. A small number of patients have been reported to have responded to vitamin E administration, but most do not. In some, gluten antibodies have also been described, especially in those with ataxia, but a consistent response to a gluten-free diet has not been defined. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with unexplained neurological disorders, including ataxia and dementia. Further studies are needed, however, to determine if a gluten-free diet will lead to improvement in the associated neurological disorder.

  6. Arsenic contamination in food-chain: transfer of arsenic into food materials through groundwater irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huq, S M Imamul; Joardar, J C; Parvin, S; Correll, Ray; Naidu, Ravi

    2006-09-01

    Arsenic contamination in groundwater in Bangladesh has become an additional concern vis-à-vis its use for irrigation purposes. Even if arsenic-safe drinking-water is assured, the question of irrigating soils with arsenic-laden groundwater will continue for years to come. Immediate attention should be given to assess the possibility of accumulating arsenic in soils through irrigation-water and its subsequent entry into the food-chain through various food crops and fodders. With this possibility in mind, arsenic content of 2,500 water, soil and vegetable samples from arsenic-affected and arsenic-unaffected areas were analyzed during 1999-2004. Other sources of foods and fodders were also analyzed. Irrigating a rice field with groundwater containing 0.55 mg/L of arsenic with a water requirement of 1,000 mm results in an estimated addition of 5.5 kg of arsenic per ha per annum. Concentration of arsenic as high as 80 mg per kg of soil was found in an area receiving arsenic-contaminated irrigation. A comparison of results from affected and unaffected areas revealed that some commonly-grown vegetables, which would usually be suitable as good sources of nourishment, accumulate substantially-elevated amounts of arsenic. For example, more than 150 mg/kg of arsenic has been found to be accumulated in arum (kochu) vegetable. Implications of arsenic ingested in vegetables and other food materials are discussed in the paper. PMID:17366772

  7. Arsenic-cadmium interaction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Barriga, F; Llamas, E; Mejía, J J; Carrizales, L; Santoyo, M E; Vega-Vega, L; Yáñez, L

    1990-11-01

    Simultaneous exposure to cadmium and arsenic is highly probable in the urban area of San Luis Potosi, Mexico due to common localization of copper and zinc smelters. Therefore, in this work, rats were intraperitoneally exposed either to cadmium or arsenic alone, or simultaneously to both metals. The effects of these treatments on three different toxicological parameters were studied. Cadmium modified the LD50 of arsenic and conversely arsenic modified the LD50 for cadmium. At the histopathological level, arsenic appeared to protect against the cadmium effects, especially on testes. This protective effect seemed to be related to the glutathione levels found in this tissue: rats exposed to both arsenic and cadmium, presented glutathione values intermediate to those observed after exposure to either metal alone; arsenic had the highest value and cadmium the lowest. In liver, rats exposed to arsenic, cadmium or arsenic and cadmium, presented glutathione values below those in the saline group, with the lowest value corresponding to the arsenic and cadmium treatment. The results appear to support the proposed interaction between arsenic and cadmium and coexposure to both metals seems to alter certain effects produced by either metal alone. PMID:2219140

  8. Arsenic occurrence in New Hampshire drinking water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, S.C.; Blum, J.D.; Klaue, B. [Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Karagas, M.R. [Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Community and Family Medicine

    1999-05-01

    Arsenic concentrations were measured in 992 drinking water samples collected from New Hampshire households using online hydride generation ICP-MS. These randomly selected household water samples contain much less arsenic than those voluntarily submitted for analysis to the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES). Extrapolation of the voluntarily submitted sample set to all New Hampshire residents significantly overestimates arsenic exposure. In randomly selected households, concentrations ranged from <0.0003 to 180 {micro}g/L, with water from domestic wells containing significantly more arsenic than water from municipal sources. Water samples from drilled bedrock wells had the highest arsenic concentrations, while samples from surficial wells had the lowest arsenic concentrations. The authors suggest that much of the groundwater arsenic in New Hampshire is derived from weathering of bedrock materials and not from anthropogenic contamination. The spatial distribution of elevated arsenic concentrations correlates with Late-Devonian Concord-type granitic bedrock. Field observations in the region exhibiting the highest groundwater arsenic concentrations revealed abundant pegmatite dikes associated with nearby granites. Analysis of rock digests indicates arsenic concentrations up to 60 mg/kg in pegmatites, with much lower values in surrounding schists and granites. Weak acid leaches show that approximately half of the total arsenic in the pegmatites is labile and therefore can be mobilized during rock-water interaction.

  9. Linking Microbial Activity with Arsenic Fate during Cow Dung Disposal of Arsenic-Bearing Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, T. M.; Reddy, R.; Tan, J.; Hayes, K. F.; Raskin, L.

    2014-12-01

    To address widespread arsenic contamination of drinking water sources numerous technologies have been developed to remove arsenic. All technologies result in the production of an arsenic-bearing waste that must be evaluated and disposed in a manner to limit the potential for environmental release and human exposure. One disposal option that is commonly recommended for areas without access to landfills is the mixing of arsenic-bearing wastes with cow dung. These recommendations are made based on the ability of microorganisms to create volatile arsenic species (including mono-, di-, and tri-methylarsine gases) to be diluted in the atmosphere. However, most studies of environmental microbial communities have found only a small fraction (arsenic present in soils or rice paddies is released via volatilization. Additionally, past studies often have not monitored arsenic release in the aqueous phase. Two main pathways for microbial arsenic volatilization are known and include methylation of arsenic during methanogenesis and methylation by arsenite S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase. In this study, we compare the roles of these two pathways in arsenic volatilization and aqueous mobilization through mesocosm experiments with cow dung and arsenic-bearing wastes produced during drinking water treatment in West Bengal, India. Arsenic in gaseous, aqueous, and solid phases was measured. Consistent with previous reports, less than 0.02% of the total arsenic present was volatilized. A much higher amount (~5%) of the total arsenic was mobilized into the liquid phase. Through the application of molecular tools, including 16S rRNA sequencing and quantification of gene transcripts involved in methanogenesis, this study links microbial community activity with arsenic fate in potential disposal environments. These results illustrate that disposal of arsenic-bearing wastes by mixing with cow dung does not achieve its end goal of promoting arsenic volatilization but rather appears to

  10. Neurology in a globalizing world: World Congress of Neurology, Vienna, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachinski, Vladimir

    2013-06-11

    The World Congress of Neurology (figure 1) theme "Neurology in a Globalizing World" acknowledges that science and increasingly medicine and neurology are becoming globalized. The best way to manage change is to shape it. It is becoming increasingly clear that brain diseases, particularly stroke and dementia, are projected to rise at a rate that could overwhelm our clinics and hospitals. Hence a new emphasis on prevention and the need to work across disciplines beyond our traditional roles. Neurologists are the guardians of the brain and need to take the lead role in advancing new approaches in stemming the tide of neurologic diseases.

  11. Arsenic biotransformation and release by bacteria indigenous to arsenic contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dhiraj; Kazy, Sufia K; Banerjee, Tirtha Das; Gupta, Ashok K; Pal, Taraknath; Sar, Pinaki

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) biotransformation and release by indigenous bacteria from As rich groundwater was investigated. Metabolic landscape of 173 bacterial isolates indicated broad catabolic repertoire including abundance of As(5+) reductase activity and abilities in utilizing wide ranges of organic and inorganic respiratory substrates. Abundance of As homeostasis genes and utilization of hydrocarbon as carbon/electron donor and As(5+) as electron acceptor were noted within the isolates. Sediment microcosm study (for 300 days) showed a pivotal role of metal reducing facultative anaerobic bacteria in toxic As(3+) release in aqueous phase. Inhabitant bacteria catalyze As transformation and facilitate its release through a cascade of reactions including mineral bioweathering and As(5+) and/or Fe(3+) reduction activities. Compared to anaerobic incubation with As(5+) reducing strains, oxic state and/or incubation with As(3+) oxidizing bacteria resulted in reduced As release, thus indicating a strong role of such condition or biocatalytic mechanism in controlling in situ As contamination. PMID:25782634

  12. Managing hazardous pollutants in Chile: arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancha, Ana María; O'Ryan, Raul

    2008-01-01

    Chile is one of the few countries that faces the environmental challenge posed by extensive arsenic pollution, which exists in the northern part of the country. Chile has worked through various options to appropriately address the environmental challenge of arsenic pollution of water and air. Because of cost and other reasons, copying standards used elsewhere in the world was not an option for Chile. Approximately 1.8 million people, representing about 12% of the total population of the country, live in arsenic-contaminated areas. In these regions, air, water, and soil are contaminated with arsenic from both natural and anthropogenic sources. For long periods, water consumed by the population contained arsenic levels that exceeded values recommended by the World Health Organization. Exposure to airborne arsenic also occurred near several large cities, as a consequence of both natural contamination and the intensive mining activity carried out in those areas. In rural areas, indigenous populations, who lack access to treated water, were also exposed to arsenic by consuming foods grown locally in arsenic-contaminated soils. Health effects in children and adults from arsenic exposure first appeared in the 1950s. Such effects included vascular, respiratory, and skin lesions from intake of high arsenic levels in drinking water. Methods to remove arsenic from water were evaluated, developed, and implemented that allowed significant reductions in exposure at a relatively low cost. Construction and operation of treatment plants to remove arsenic from water first began in the 1970s. Beginning in the 1990s, epidemiological studies showed that the rate of lung and bladder cancer in the arsenic-polluted area was considerably higher than mean cancer rates for the country. Cancer incidence was directly related to arsenic exposure. During the 1990s, international pressure and concern by Chile's Health Ministry prompted action to regulate arsenic emissions from copper smelters. A

  13. Speciation analysis of arsenic in groundwater from Inner Mongolia with an emphasis on acid-leachable particulate arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Zhilong [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, 10-102 Clinical Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alta., T6G 2G3 (Canada); Lu Xiufen [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, 10-102 Clinical Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alta., T6G 2G3 (Canada); Watt, Corinna [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, 10-102 Clinical Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alta., T6G 2G3 (Canada); Wen Bei [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, 10-102 Clinical Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alta., T6G 2G3 (Canada); He Bin [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, 10-102 Clinical Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alta., T6G 2G3 (Canada); Mumford, Judy [National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Environmental Protection Agency, Human Studies Division, Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Ning Zhixiong [Ba Men Anti-Epidemic Station, Lin He, Inner Mongolia (China); Xia Yajuan [Inner Mongolia Center for Endemic Disease Control and Research, Huhhot, Inner Mongolia (China); Le, X. Chris [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Alberta, 10-102 Clinical Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alta., T6G 2G3 (Canada)]. E-mail: xc.le@ualberta.ca

    2006-01-05

    Arsenic in drinking water affects millions of people around the world. While soluble arsenic is commonly measured, the amount of particulate arsenic in drinking water has often been overlooked. We report here determination of the acid-leachable particulate arsenic and soluble arsenicals in well water from an arsenic-poisoning endemic area in Inner Mongolia, China. Water samples (583) were collected from 120 wells in Ba Men, Inner Mongolia, where well water was the primary drinking water source. Two methods were demonstrated for the determination of soluble arsenic species (primarily inorganic arsenate and arsenite) and total particulate arsenic. The first method used solid phase extraction cartridges and membrane filters to separate arsenic species on-site, followed by analysis of the individual arsenic species eluted from the cartridges and filters. The other method uses liquid chromatography separation with hydride generation atomic fluorescence detection to determine soluble arsenic species. Analysis of acidified water samples using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry provided the total arsenic concentration. Arsenic concentrations in water samples from the 120 wells ranged from <1 to {approx}1000 {mu}g L{sup -1}. On average, particulate arsenic accounted for 39 {+-} 38% (median 36%) of the total arsenic. In some wells, particulate arsenic was six times higher than the soluble arsenic concentration. Particulate arsenic can be effectively removed using membrane filtration. The information on particulate and soluble arsenic in water is useful for optimizing treatment options and for understanding the geochemical behavior of arsenic in groundwater.

  14. Arsenic exposure induces the Warburg effect in cultured human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Fei; Severson, Paul; Pacheco, Samantha; Futscher, Bernard W.; Klimecki, Walter T., E-mail: klimecki@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2013-08-15

    Understanding how arsenic exacts its diverse, global disease burden is hampered by a limited understanding of the particular biological pathways that are disrupted by arsenic and underlie pathogenesis. A reductionist view would predict that a small number of basic pathways are generally perturbed by arsenic, and manifest as diverse diseases. Following an initial observation that arsenite-exposed cells in culture acidify their media more rapidly than control cells, the report here shows that low level exposure to arsenite (75 ppb) is sufficient to induce aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) as a generalized phenomenon in cultured human primary cells and cell lines. Expanded studies in one such cell line, the non-malignant pulmonary epithelial line, BEAS-2B, established that the arsenite-induced Warburg effect was associated with increased accumulation of intracellular and extracellular lactate, an increased rate of extracellular acidification, and inhibition by the non-metabolized glucose analog, 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Associated with the induction of aerobic glycolysis was a pathway-wide induction of glycolysis gene expression, as well as protein accumulation of an established glycolysis master-regulator, hypoxia-inducible factor 1A. Arsenite-induced alteration of energy production in human cells represents the type of fundamental perturbation that could extend to many tissue targets and diseases. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenite exposure induces aerobic glycolysis, dubbed the “Warburg effect”. • Arsenite-induced Warburg effect is a general phenomenon in cultured human cells. • HIF-1A may mediate arsenite induced Warburg effect.

  15. Arsenic exposure induces the Warburg effect in cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding how arsenic exacts its diverse, global disease burden is hampered by a limited understanding of the particular biological pathways that are disrupted by arsenic and underlie pathogenesis. A reductionist view would predict that a small number of basic pathways are generally perturbed by arsenic, and manifest as diverse diseases. Following an initial observation that arsenite-exposed cells in culture acidify their media more rapidly than control cells, the report here shows that low level exposure to arsenite (75 ppb) is sufficient to induce aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) as a generalized phenomenon in cultured human primary cells and cell lines. Expanded studies in one such cell line, the non-malignant pulmonary epithelial line, BEAS-2B, established that the arsenite-induced Warburg effect was associated with increased accumulation of intracellular and extracellular lactate, an increased rate of extracellular acidification, and inhibition by the non-metabolized glucose analog, 2-deoxy-D-glucose. Associated with the induction of aerobic glycolysis was a pathway-wide induction of glycolysis gene expression, as well as protein accumulation of an established glycolysis master-regulator, hypoxia-inducible factor 1A. Arsenite-induced alteration of energy production in human cells represents the type of fundamental perturbation that could extend to many tissue targets and diseases. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenite exposure induces aerobic glycolysis, dubbed the “Warburg effect”. • Arsenite-induced Warburg effect is a general phenomenon in cultured human cells. • HIF-1A may mediate arsenite induced Warburg effect

  16. Effects of plant arsenic uptake and heavy metals on arsenic distribution in an arsenic-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayiga, Abioye O. [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0290 (United States); Ma, Lena Q. [Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0290 (United States) and Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)]. E-mail: lqma@ifas.ufl.edu; Zhou Qixing [Key Laboratory of Terrestrial Ecological Process, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2007-06-15

    This study examined the effects of heavy metals and plant arsenic uptake on soil arsenic distribution. Chemical fractionation of an arsenic-contaminated soil spiked with 50 or 200 mg kg{sup -1} Ni, Zn, Cd or Pb was performed before and after growing the arsenic hyperaccumulator Pteris vittata L for 8 weeks using NH{sub 4}Cl (water-soluble plus exchangeable, WE-As), NH{sub 4}F (Al-As), NaOH (Fe-As), and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (Ca-As). Arsenic in the soil was present primarily as the recalcitrant forms with Ca-As being the dominant fraction (45%). Arsenic taken up by P. vittata was from all fractions though Ca-As contributed the most (51-71% reduction). After 8 weeks of plant growth, the Al-As and Fe-As fractions were significantly (p < 0.01) greater in the metal-spiked soils than the control, with changes in the WE-As fraction being significantly (p = 0.007) correlated with plant arsenic removal. The plant's ability to solubilize soil arsenic from recalcitrant fractions may have enhanced its ability to hyperaccumulate arsenic. - Arsenic taken up by P. vittata was from all fractions with most from the Ca-fraction.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of iron deposition in neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brass, Steven D; Chen, Nan-kuei; Mulkern, Robert V; Bakshi, Rohit

    2006-02-01

    Deposition of iron in the brain is proposed to play a role in the pathophysiology of the normal aging process and neurodegenerative diseases. Whereas iron is required for normal neuronal metabolism, excessive levels can contribute to the formation of free radicals, leading to lipid peroxidation and neurotoxicity. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful tool to detect excessive iron in the brain and longitudinally monitor changes in iron levels. Iron deposition is associated with a reduction in the T2 relaxation time, leading to hypointensity on spin-echo and gradient-echo T2-weighted images. The MRI changes associated with iron deposition have been observed both in normal aging and in various chronic neurological diseases, including multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and Parkinson disease. Magnetic resonance imaging metrics providing information about iron concentrations include R2, R2', and R2*. The purpose of this review is to discuss the role of iron and its detection by MRI in various neurological disorders. We will review the basic biochemical properties of iron and its influence on MRI signal. We will also summarize the sensitivity and specificity of MRI techniques in detecting iron. The MRI and pathological findings pertaining to brain iron will be reviewed with respect to normal aging and a variety of neurological disorders. Finally, the biochemistry and pathophysiology surrounding iron, oxidative stress, free radicals, and lipid peroxidation in the brain will be discussed, including therapeutic implications. The potential role of iron deposition and its assessment by MRI provides exciting potential applications to the diagnosis, longitudinal monitoring, and therapeutic development for disorders of the brain.

  18. Arsenite medicinal use, metabolism, pharmacokinetics and monitoring in human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolis, I; Curis, E; Deschamps, P; Bénazeth, S

    2009-10-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) is a distinctive subtype of acute myeloid leukaemias. Even through this human disease can be treated by the intravenous administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), 25% of patients typically relapse after the first treatment. In this context, the intravenous administration of APL patients with an aqueous solution of arsenic trioxide has also been demonstrated to be successful despite the established mammalian toxicity of this arsenic compound. Accordingly, the administration of a therapeutic dose of arsenic trioxide has resulted in an improved patient survival in both relapsing as well newly diagnosed APL patients. We present here a mini-review of the medicinal use of arsenite, its mammalian metabolism (with an emphasis on biomethylation pathways), its elimination and pharmacokinetics and the novel application of hair analysis as a biomonitoring material. This mini-review also introduces our own results on the analysis of hair of patients receiving arsenic trioxide therapy. In this work, instead of quantifying arsenic content in bulk hair, we performed longitudinal analysis in order to use hair as a marker of arsenic exposure correlated to a time scale. Taking into account the hair growth rate, the longitudinal analysis of hair is demonstrated to provide a chronological record of the treatment of patients with arsenic trioxide. The small quantity of material to be analysed required the use of Synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) spectroscopy. The hair arsenic content was well correlated with the clinical background of patients and reflected the intake of arsenic trioxide. In particular, the onset of arsenic trioxide therapy and interruptions during therapy were reflected by total arsenic content, which suggested rapid elimination. Another type of experiment, micro-XRF cartography on thin hair slices, allowed us to obtain distribution maps of arsenic, which demonstrated that arsenic is located at the

  19. The influence of salinity on toxicological effects of arsenic in digestive gland of clam Ruditapes philippinarum using metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chenglong; Wu, Huifeng; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhao, Jianmin; Yu, Junbao; Yin, Xiuli

    2013-03-01

    Ruditapes philippinarum, a clam that thrives in intertidal zones of various salinities, is a useful biomonitor to marine contaminants. We investigated the influence of dilution to 75% and 50% of normal seawater salinity (31.1) on the responses of the digestive gland of R. philippinarum to arsenic exposure (20 μg/L), using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics. After acute arsenic exposure for 48 h, salinity-dependent differential metabolic responses were detected. In normal seawater, arsenic exposure increased the concentrations of branched-chain amino acids, and of threonine, proline, phosphocholine and adenosine, and it decreased the levels of alanine, hypotaurine, glucose, glycogen and ATP in the digestive glands. Differential changes in metabolic biomarkers observed at lower salinity (˜23.3) included elevation of succinate, taurine and ATP, and depletion of branched-chain amino acids, threonine and glutamine. Unique effects of arsenic at the lowest salinity (˜15.6) included down-regulation of glutamate, succinate and ADP, and up-regulation of phosphocholine. We conclude that salinity influences the metabolic responses of this clam to arsenic.

  20. The influence of salinity on toxicological effects of arsenic in digestive gland of clam Ruditapes philippinarum using metabolomics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Chenglong; WU Huifeng; LIU Xiaoli; ZHAO Jianmin; YU Junbao; YIN Xiuli

    2013-01-01

    Ruditapes philippinarum,a clam that thrives in intertidal zones of various salinities,is a useful biomonitor to marine contaminants.We investigated the influence of dilution to 75% and 50% of normal seawater salinity (31.1) on the responses of the digestive gland of R.philippinarum to arsenic exposure (20 μg/L),using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics.After acute arsenic exposure for 48 h,salinity-dependent differential metabolic responses were detected.In normal seawater,arsenic exposure increased the concentrations of branched-chain amino acids,and of threonine,proline,phosphocholine and adenosine,and it decreased the levels of alanine,hypotaurine,glucose,glycogen and ATP in the digestive glands.Differential changes in metabolic biomarkers observed at lower salinity (~23.3)included elevation of succinate,taurine and ATP,and depletion of branched-chain amino acids,threonine and glutamine.Unique effects of arsenic at the lowest salinity (~15.6) included down-regulation of glutamate,succinate and ADP,and up-regulation of phosphocholine.We conclude that salinity influences the metabolic responses of this clam to arsenic.

  1. Differential metabolic consequences of fumarate hydratase and respiratory chain defects

    OpenAIRE

    Raimundo, Nuno; Ahtinen, Jouni; Fumić, Ksenija; Barić, Ivo; Remes, Anne M.; Renkonen, Risto; Lapatto, Risto; Suomalainen, Anu

    2008-01-01

    Differential metabolic consequences of fumarate hydratase and respiratory chain defects correspondance: Corresponding author. Research Program of Molecular Neurology, Biomedicum-Helsinki, room c523a, Haartmaninkatu 8, Helsinki University; 00290 Helsinki, Finland. Tel.: +358 9 47171 965; fax: +358 9 47171 964. (Suomalainen, Anu) (Suomalainen, Anu) Program of Molecular Neurology--> , Biomedicum-Helsinki--> ...

  2. Chronic arsenic poisoning from burning high-arsenic-containing coal in Guizhou, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J.; Zheng, B.S.; Aposhian, H.V.; Zhou, Y.S.; Chen, M.L.; Zhang, A.H.; Waalkes, M.P. [NIEHS, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA)

    2002-07-01

    Arsenic is an environmental hazard and the reduction of drinking water arsenic levels is under consideration. People are exposed to arsenic not only through drinking water but also through arsenic-contaminated air and food. Here the health effects of arsenic exposure from burning high arsenic-containing coal in Guizhou, China was investigated. Coal is burned inside the home in open pits for daily cooking and crop drying, producing a high concentration of arsenic in indoor air. Arsenic in the air coats and permeates food being dried producing high concentrations in food; however, arsenic concentrations in the drinking water are in the normal range. The estimated sources of total arsenic exposure in this area are from arsenic-contaminated food (50-80%), air (10-20%), water (1-5%), and direct contact in coal-mining workers (1%). At least 3,000 patients with arsenic poisoning were found in the Southwest Prefecture of Guizhou, and approximately 200,000 people are at risk for such over exposures. Skin lesions are common, including keratosis of the hands and feet, pigmentation on the trunk, skin ulceration, and skin cancers. Toxicities to internal organs, including lung dysfunction, neuropathy, and nephrotoxicity, are clinically evident. The prevalence of hepatomegaly was 20%, and cirrhosis, ascites, and liver cancer are the most serious outcomes of arsenic poisoning. The Chinese government and international organizations are attempting to improve the house conditions and the coal source, and thereby protect human health in this area.

  3. Linking Microbial Activity with Arsenic Fate during Cow Dung Disposal of Arsenic-Bearing Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, T. M.; Reddy, R.; Tan, J.; Hayes, K. F.; Raskin, L.

    2014-12-01

    To address widespread arsenic contamination of drinking water sources numerous technologies have been developed to remove arsenic. All technologies result in the production of an arsenic-bearing waste that must be evaluated and disposed in a manner to limit the potential for environmental release and human exposure. One disposal option that is commonly recommended for areas without access to landfills is the mixing of arsenic-bearing wastes with cow dung. These recommendations are made based on the ability of microorganisms to create volatile arsenic species (including mono-, di-, and tri-methylarsine gases) to be diluted in the atmosphere. However, most studies of environmental microbial communities have found only a small fraction (cow dung and arsenic-bearing wastes produced during drinking water treatment in West Bengal, India. Arsenic in gaseous, aqueous, and solid phases was measured. Consistent with previous reports, less than 0.02% of the total arsenic present was volatilized. A much higher amount (~5%) of the total arsenic was mobilized into the liquid phase. Through the application of molecular tools, including 16S rRNA sequencing and quantification of gene transcripts involved in methanogenesis, this study links microbial community activity with arsenic fate in potential disposal environments. These results illustrate that disposal of arsenic-bearing wastes by mixing with cow dung does not achieve its end goal of promoting arsenic volatilization but rather appears to increase arsenic mobilization in the aqueous phase, raising concerns with this approach.

  4. Standards in Neurological Rehabilitation, June 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Barnes

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS Scientific Panel on Neurorehabilitation established a Task Force on standards in neurological rehabilitation in June 1996. The remit for the Task Force was to: (1 produce a report on the state of neurological rehabilitation across Europe; and (2 recommend standards for the provision of neurological services for disabled people. The main conclusions of the Task Force were as follows: (1 A questionnaire circulated to each European member country has indicated a significant lack of adequate neurological rehabilitation facilities across Europe. Very few countries have any established network of neurological rehabilitation centres. Few countries have adequately trained neurological rehabilitation physicians, therapists or nurses. Such poor facilities should be seen in the context of the large numbers and increasing prevalence of people with neurological disabilities. (2 The Task Force has summarized the significant benefits that can follow from the establishment of a dedicated and cost effective neurological rehabilitation service including functional improvement, reduction of unnecessary complications, better coordination and use of limited resources, improved opportunities for education, training and research and a clear point of contact for the disabled person. (3 The Task Force recommends minimum standards for the prevention of neurological disability including access to health education, genetic counselling and emergency resources. The Task Force also encourages governments to invest in improved legislation for accident prevention. (4 The Task Force has outlined some minimum standards for the staffing of a neurological rehabilitation service including improved training both for neurologists and rehabilitation physicians. Such training could include a cross-national training programme both for physicians and other health care staff. (5 The Task Force supports a two-tier system of

  5. Genomic evidence reveals the extreme diversity and wide distribution of the arsenic-related genes in Burkholderiales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangyang; Zhang, Linshuang; Wang, Gejiao

    2014-01-01

    So far, numerous genes have been found to associate with various strategies to resist and transform the toxic metalloid arsenic (here, we denote these genes as "arsenic-related genes"). However, our knowledge of the distribution, redundancies and organization of these genes in bacteria is still limited. In this study, we analyzed the 188 Burkholderiales genomes and found that 95% genomes harbored arsenic-related genes, with an average of 6.6 genes per genome. The results indicated: a) compared to a low frequency of distribution for aio (arsenite oxidase) (12 strains), arr (arsenate respiratory reductase) (1 strain) and arsM (arsenite methytransferase)-like genes (4 strains), the ars (arsenic resistance system)-like genes were identified in 174 strains including 1,051 genes; b) 2/3 ars-like genes were clustered as ars operon and displayed a high diversity of gene organizations (68 forms) which may suggest the rapid movement and evolution for ars-like genes in bacterial genomes; c) the arsenite efflux system was dominant with ACR3 form rather than ArsB in Burkholderiales; d) only a few numbers of arsM and arrAB are found indicating neither As III biomethylation nor AsV respiration is the primary mechanism in Burkholderiales members; (e) the aio-like gene is mostly flanked with ars-like genes and phosphate transport system, implying the close functional relatedness between arsenic and phosphorus metabolisms. On average, the number of arsenic-related genes per genome of strains isolated from arsenic-rich environments is more than four times higher than the strains from other environments. Compared with human, plant and animal pathogens, the environmental strains possess a larger average number of arsenic-related genes, which indicates that habitat is likely a key driver for bacterial arsenic resistance. PMID:24632831

  6. Genomic evidence reveals the extreme diversity and wide distribution of the arsenic-related genes in Burkholderiales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyang Li

    Full Text Available So far, numerous genes have been found to associate with various strategies to resist and transform the toxic metalloid arsenic (here, we denote these genes as "arsenic-related genes". However, our knowledge of the distribution, redundancies and organization of these genes in bacteria is still limited. In this study, we analyzed the 188 Burkholderiales genomes and found that 95% genomes harbored arsenic-related genes, with an average of 6.6 genes per genome. The results indicated: a compared to a low frequency of distribution for aio (arsenite oxidase (12 strains, arr (arsenate respiratory reductase (1 strain and arsM (arsenite methytransferase-like genes (4 strains, the ars (arsenic resistance system-like genes were identified in 174 strains including 1,051 genes; b 2/3 ars-like genes were clustered as ars operon and displayed a high diversity of gene organizations (68 forms which may suggest the rapid movement and evolution for ars-like genes in bacterial genomes; c the arsenite efflux system was dominant with ACR3 form rather than ArsB in Burkholderiales; d only a few numbers of arsM and arrAB are found indicating neither As III biomethylation nor AsV respiration is the primary mechanism in Burkholderiales members; (e the aio-like gene is mostly flanked with ars-like genes and phosphate transport system, implying the close functional relatedness between arsenic and phosphorus metabolisms. On average, the number of arsenic-related genes per genome of strains isolated from arsenic-rich environments is more than four times higher than the strains from other environments. Compared with human, plant and animal pathogens, the environmental strains possess a larger average number of arsenic-related genes, which indicates that habitat is likely a key driver for bacterial arsenic resistance.

  7. Neurology referrals to a liaison psychiatry service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzgerald, P

    2012-02-03

    The objective of the present study was to assess the activity of the Liaison Psychiatry service of Cork University Hospital in relation to all in-patient neurology referrals over a 12-month period. Of 1685 neurology admissions, 106 (6%) were referred to liaison psychiatry for assessment. 91 referrals (86%) met criteria for a psychiatric disorder according to DSM-IV, the commonest being major depression (24%) and somatoform disorder (23%). Patients with multiple sclerosis or epilepsy comprised nearly half of all referrals (48 cases; 45%). Approximately 20% of M.S. in-patients (21 cases) were referred for psychiatric assessment, with the corresponding figure in epilepsy being 25% (18 cases). Although only 106 (6%) neurology in-patients were referred to liaison psychiatry, psychiatric diagnoses were documented in 327 (20%) discharge forms, presumably reflecting previous diagnosis. The above findings indicate that psychiatric illness is common among neurology inpatients screened by liaison psychiatry yet referral rates are relatively low in terms of the overall number of neurology in-patients. Psychiatric disorders were diagnosed in 86% of referrals indicating high concordance between neurologists and liaison psychiatry regarding the presence of a psychiatric disorder.

  8. Acute arsenic poisoning: absence of polyneuropathy after treatment with 2,3-dimercaptopropanesulphonate (DMPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D F; O'Callaghan, C A; Berlyne, G; Ogg, C S; Davies, H A; House, I M; Henry, J A

    1994-01-01

    Two men aged 19 and 21 years ingested 1 g and 4 g respectively from 3 kg of a white crystalline powder that they thought was a substance of abuse. It was later identified as almost pure arsenic trioxide. Both had nausea and vomiting and one developed acute renal failure. Each was treated with 2,3-dimercaptopropanesulphonate (DMPS), and made a full recovery with no evidence of prolonged renal or neurological impairment. The DMPS-arsenic complex is probably associated with lower penetration into the CNS and as a consequence treatment with DMPS may result in lower acute and chronic neurotoxicity than treatment with the currently standard recommended chelating agent dimercaprol (British Anti-Lewisite; BAL). PMID:8089687

  9. Arsenic in Drinking Water-A Global Environmental Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Joanna Shaofen; Wai, Chien M.

    2004-01-01

    Information on the worldwide occurrence of groundwater pollution by arsenic, the ensuing health hazards, and the debatable government regulations of arsenic in drinking water, is presented. Diagnostic identification of arsenic, and methods to eliminate it from water are also discussed.

  10. Poisoning of bees by industrial arsenic emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaroslav, S.

    1962-01-01

    Massive poisoning of bees by industrial arsenic emissions in Czechoslovakia are reviewed. Arsenic emissions from an ore processing plant in Tesin were responsible for massive bee deaths after World War I. Massive death of bees was observed in 1938 in the Krompach region around a copper ore smelting plant which emitted arsenic. Other accidents were reported in 1954 and 1957 in areas around industrial plants and power plants using arsenopyrite-containing low-grade coal or lignite. Arsenic was emitted bound in fly-ash in the form of arsenic trioxide or, in the case of coals containing alkaline chlorides, in the form of arsenic trichloride. The arsenic contamination extended to areas within a radius of 3 to 7 km. Settled fly-ash contained 0.0004 to 0.75 percent arsenic, which was soluble in a citrate-hydrochloric acid solution of pH 3.9, which corresponds to the gastric acid of bees. The arsenic uptake by the bees from pollen was calculated to amount to 1 microgram daily, against a toxic dose of 0.37 microgram. The toxic effect of arsenic on bees can be abated by adding colloidal iron hydroxide to the sugar solution which they are fed.

  11. Poisoning of bees by industrial arsenic emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svoboda, J.

    1962-01-01

    Massive poisoning of bees by industrial arsenic emissions in Czechoslovakia are reviewed. Arsenic emissions from an ore processing plant in Tesin were responsible for massive bee deaths after World War I. Massive death of bees was observed in 1938 in the Krompach region around a copper ore smelting plant which emitted arsenic. Other accidents were reported in 1954 and 1957 in areas around industrial plants and power plants using arsenopyrite-containing low-grade coal or lignite. Arsenic was emitted bound in fly-ash in the form of arsenic trioxide or, in the case of coals containing alkaline chlorides, in the form of arsenic trichloride. The arsenic contamination extended to areas within a radius of 3-7 km. Settled fly-ash contained 0.0004-0.75% arsenic, which was soluble in a citrate-hydrochloric acid solution of pH 3.9, which corresponds to the gastric acid of bees. The arsenic uptake by the bees from pollen was calculated to amount to 1 microgram daily, against a toxic dose of 0.37 microgram. The toxic effect of arsenic on bees can be abated by adding colloidal iron hydroxide to the sugar solution which they are fed. 5 references.

  12. Epidemiologic evidence of diabetogenic effect of arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chin-Hsiao; Tseng, Ching-Ping; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Hsueh, Yu-Mei; Chong, Choon-Khim; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2002-07-01

    It is well documented that arsenic can lead to skin lesions, atherosclerotic diseases and cancers. The association between arsenic exposure and diabetes mellitus is a relatively new finding. Up to now, there are six epidemiologic reports linking diabetes mellitus with arsenic exposure from environmental and occupational sources. Two reports in Taiwan carried out in the blackfoot disease-hyperendemic villages, one cross-sectional and one prospective follow-up of the same cohort, indicate that arsenic exposure from drinking artesian well water is associated with prevalence and incidence of diabetes mellitus in a dose-responsive pattern. The observation of the relation between arsenic exposure and diabetes mellitus is further supported by studies carried out in Sweden and Bangladesh. In Sweden, case-control analyses of death records of copper smelters and glass workers revealed a trend of increasing diabetes mellitus with increasing arsenic exposure from inhalation. In Bangladesh, prevalence of diabetes mellitus among arsenic-exposed subjects with keratosis was about five times higher than unexposed subjects. Increasing trends of diabetes mellitus with indices of arsenic exposure in drinking water seems to be independent of the presence of skin lesions associated with arsenic exposure. Although these studies consistently show an association between arsenic exposure and diabetes mellitus, the weak study designs of cross-sectional or case-control, the use of glucosuria or diabetes death as diagnostic criteria and the lack of adjustment for possible confounders in some studies, are major limitations that may reduce the strength of the evidence. PMID:12076511

  13. Sequestration of arsenic in ombrotrophic peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, James; Hudson-Edwards, Karen; Taylor, Kevin; Polya, David; Evans, Martin; Allott, Tim

    2014-05-01

    Peatlands can be important stores of arsenic but we are lacking spectroscopic evidence of the sequestration pathways of this toxic metalloid in peatland environments. This study reports on the solid-phase speciation of anthropogenically-derived arsenic in atmospherically contaminated peat from the Peak District National Park (UK). Surface and sub-surface peat samples were analysed by synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy on B18 beamline at Diamond Light Source (UK). The results suggest that there are contrasting arsenic sequestration mechanisms in the peat. The bulk arsenic speciation results, in combination with strong arsenic-iron correlations at the surface, suggest that iron (hydr)oxides are key phases for the immobilisation of arsenic at the peat surface. In contrast, the deeper peat samples are dominated by arsenic sulphides (arsenopyrite, realgar and orpiment). Given that these peats receive inputs solely from the atmosphere, the presence of these sulphide phases suggests an in-situ authigenic formation. Redox oscillations in the peat due to a fluctuating water table and an abundant store of legacy sulphur from historic acid rain inputs may favour the precipitation of arsenic sequestering sulphides in sub-surface horizons. Oxidation-induced loss of these arsenic sequestering sulphur species by water table drawdown has important implications for the mobility of arsenic and the quality of waters draining peatlands.

  14. Arsenic removal from drinking water during coagulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, J.G. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Chen, P.Y. [Industrial Technology Research Inst., Chutung Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China); Wilkie, J.A.; Elimelech, M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1997-08-01

    The efficiency of arsenic removal from source waters and artificial freshwaters during coagulation with ferric chloride and alum was examined in bench-scale studies. Arsenic(V) removal by either ferric chloride or alum was relatively insensitive to variations in source water composition below pH 8. At pH 8 and 9, the efficiency of arsenic(V) removal by ferric chloride was decreased in the presence of natural organic matter. The pH range for arsenic(V) removal with alum was more restricted than with ferric chloride. For source waters spiked with 20 {micro}g/L arsenic(V), final dissolved arsenic(V) concentrations in the product water of less than 2 {micro}g/L were achieved with both coagulants at neutral pH. Removal of arsenic(III) from source waters by ferric chloride was both less efficient and more strongly influenced by source water composition than removal of arsenic(V). The presence of sulfate (at pH 4 and 5) and natural organic matter (at pH 4 through 9) adversely affected the efficiency of arsenic(III) removal by ferric chloride. Arsenic(III) could not be removed from source waters by coagulation with alum.

  15. Acute arsenic poisoning diagnosed late.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumy, Farzana; Anam, Ahmad Mursel; Kamruzzaman, A K M; Amin, Md Robed; Chowdhury, M A Jalil

    2016-04-01

    Acute arsenicosis, although having a 'historical' background, is not common in our times. This report describes a case of acute arsenic poisoning, missed initially due to its gastroenteritis-like presentation, but suspected and confirmed much later, when the patient sought medical help for delayed complications after about 2 months.

  16. Acute arsenic poisoning diagnosed late.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumy, Farzana; Anam, Ahmad Mursel; Kamruzzaman, A K M; Amin, Md Robed; Chowdhury, M A Jalil

    2016-04-01

    Acute arsenicosis, although having a 'historical' background, is not common in our times. This report describes a case of acute arsenic poisoning, missed initially due to its gastroenteritis-like presentation, but suspected and confirmed much later, when the patient sought medical help for delayed complications after about 2 months. PMID:26508422

  17. Bimetallic nanoparticles for arsenic detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, Nafiseh; Mohapatra, Mamata; Leung, Kam Tong

    2015-06-01

    Effective and sensitive monitoring of heavy metal ions, particularly arsenic, in drinking water is very important to risk management of public health. Arsenic is one of the most serious natural pollutants in soil and water in more than 70 countries in the world. The need for very sensitive sensors to detect ultralow amounts of arsenic has attracted great research interest. Here, bimetallic FePt, FeAu, FePd, and AuPt nanoparticles (NPs) are electrochemically deposited on the Si(100) substrate, and their electrochemical properties are studied for As(III) detection. We show that trace amounts of As(III) in neutral pH could be determined by using anodic stripping voltammetry. The synergistic effect of alloying with Fe leads to better performance for Fe-noble metal NPs (Au, Pt, and Pd) than pristine noble metal NPs (without Fe alloying). Limit of detection and linear range are obtained for FePt, FeAu, and FePd NPs. The best performance is found for FePt NPs with a limit of detection of 0.8 ppb and a sensitivity of 0.42 μA ppb(-1). The selectivity of the sensor has also been tested in the presence of a large amount of Cu(II), as the most detrimental interferer ion for As detection. The bimetallic NPs therefore promise to be an effective, high-performance electrochemical sensor for the detection of ultratrace quantities of arsenic. PMID:25938763

  18. Arsenic chemistry in soils and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendorf, S.; Nico, P.; Kocar, B.D.; Masue, Y.; Tufano, K.J.

    2009-10-15

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring trace element that poses a threat to human and ecosystem health, particularly when incorporated into food or water supplies. The greatest risk imposed by arsenic to human health results from contamination of drinking water, for which the World Health Organization recommends a maximum limit of 10 {micro}g L{sup -1}. Continued ingestion of drinking water having hazardous levels of arsenic can lead to arsenicosis and cancers of the bladder, skin, lungs and kidneys. Unfortunately, arsenic tainted drinking waters are a global threat and presently having a devastating impact on human health within Asia. Nearly 100 million people, for example, are presently consuming drinking water having arsenic concentrations exceeding the World Health Organization's recommended limit (Ahmed et al., 2006). Arsenic contamination of the environment often results from human activities such as mining or pesticide application, but recently natural sources of arsenic have demonstrated a devastating impact on water quality. Arsenic becomes problematic from a health perspective principally when it partitions into the aqueous rather than the solid phase. Dissolved concentrations, and the resulting mobility, of arsenic within soils and sediments are the combined result of biogeochemical processes linked to hydrologic factors. Processes favoring the partitioning of As into the aqueous phase, potentially leading to hazardous concentrations, vary extensively but can broadly be grouped into four categories: (1) ion displacement, (2) desorption (or limited sorption) at pH values > 8.5, (3) reduction of arsenate to arsenite, and (4) mineral dissolution, particularly reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides. Although various processes may liberate arsenic from solids, a transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, and commensurate arsenic and iron/manganese reduction, appears to be a dominant, but not exclusive, means by which high concentrations of

  19. Community of thermoacidophilic and arsenic resistant microorganisms isolated from a deep profile of mine heaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas-Flores, S; Gómez-Rodríguez, E Y; García-Meza, J V

    2015-12-01

    Soluble arsenic (As) in acidic feed solution may inhibit the copper (Cu) bioleaching process within mine heaps. To clarify the effect of soluble arsenic on the live biomass and bioxidative activity in heaps, toxicological assays were performed using a synthetic feed solution given by a mine company. The microorganisms had previously been isolated from two heap samples at up to 66 m depth, and cultured using specific media for chemolithotrophic acidophiles (pH 1-2) and moderate thermophiles (48°C), for arsenic tolerance assay. The four media with the highest biomass were selected to assay As-resistance; one culture (Q63h) was chosen to assay biooxidative activity, using a heap sample that contained chalcopyrite and covellite. We found that 0.5 g/L of As does not affect living biomass or biooxidative activity on Cu sulfides, but it dissolves Cu, while As precipitates as arsenic acid (H3AsO4·½H2O). The arsenic tolerant community, as identified by 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis, was composed of three main metabolic groups: chemolithotrophs (Leptospirillum, Sulfobacillus); chemolithoheterotrophs and organoheterotrophs as Acidovorax temperans, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, P. mendocina and Sphingomonas spp. Leptospirillum spp. and S. thermosulfidooxidans were the dominant taxa in the Q63-66 cultures from the deepest sample of the oldest, highest-temperature heap. The results indicated arsenic resistance in the microbial community, therefore specific primers were used to amplify ars (arsenic resistance system), aio (arsenite oxidase), or arr (arsenate respiratory reduction) genes from total sample DNA. Presence of arsB genes in S. thermosulfidooxidans in the Q63-66 cultures permits H3AsO4-As(V) detoxification and strengthens the community's response to As. PMID:26283066

  20. Recent trends in Molecular Imaging : PET/CT in Neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R P Tripathi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available PET/CT is an important molecular imaging technique for the assessment ofneurological disorders. The most widely used radiopharmaceutical for both clinical and research purposes is [18F] 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG. It is extensively used owing to its favourable physical characteristics. It enables depiction of cerebral glucose metabolism, and has thus been used to study various pathological states. Despite this, FDG has its own limitations. This is owing to its limited specificity and high cortical uptake. This has paved the way for the development of several non-FDG PET radiopharmaceuticals. We present the insights gained at our institution, using these radiotracers in the assessment of neurological disease. Our study shows that the use of FDG and non-FDG novel PET radiopharmaceuticals facilitates the early diagnosis, delineation of extent, prognostication and monitoring of therapeutic response in several neuropathological states.PET/CT is an important molecular imaging technique for the assessment ofneurological disorders. The most widely used radiopharmaceutical for both clinicaland research purposes is [18F] 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG. It is extensivelyused owing to its favourable physical characteristics. It enables depiction of cerebralglucose metabolism, and has thus been used to study various pathological states.Despite this, FDG has its own limitations. This is owing to its limited specificity andhigh cortical uptake. This has paved the way for the development of several non-FDGPET radiopharmaceuticals. We present the insights gained at our institution, usingthese radiotracers in the assessment of neurological disease. Our study shows that theuse of FDG and non-FDG novel PET radiopharmaceuticals facilitates the earlydiagnosis, delineation of extent, prognostication and monitoring of therapeuticresponse in several neuropathological states.

  1. Association between Chronic Arsenic Exposure and Nutritional Status among the Women of Child Bearing Age: A Case-Control Study in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abul H. Milton

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of nutritional factors in arsenic metabolism and toxicity is yet to be fully elucidated. A low protein diet results in decreased excretion of DMA and increased tissue retention of arsenic in experimental studies. Malnourished women carry a higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Chronic exposure to high arsenic (>50 µg/L through drinking water also increases the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. The synergistic effects (if any of malnutrition and chronic arsenic exposure may worsen the adverse pregnancy outcomes. This population based case control study reports the association between chronic arsenic exposure and nutritional status among the rural women in Bangladesh. 348 cases (BMI < 18.5 and 360 controls (BMI 18.5–24.99 were recruited from a baseline survey conducted among 2,341 women. An excess risk for malnutrition was observed among the participants chronically exposed to higher concentrations of arsenic in drinking water after adjusting for potential confounders such as participant’s age, religion, education, monthly household income and history of oral contraceptive pills. Women exposed to arsenic >50 µg/L were at 1.9 times (Odds Ratio = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.1–3.6 increased risk of malnutrition compared to unexposed. The findings of this study suggest that chronic arsenic exposure is likely to contribute to poor nutritional status among women of 20–45 years.

  2. [Neurologic and psychiatric manifestations of Lyme disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, F

    2007-01-01

    The neurological and psychiatric manifestations of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato are so numerous that Borrelia is also called the "new great imitator". Thus knowing about the multiple clinical aspects of neuroborreliosis is necessary for the clinician. We reviewed literature for "classical" neuroborreliosis such as acute meningoradiculitis or chronicle encephalomyelitis, but also for encephalitis, myelitis, polyneuritis, radiculitis and more controversial disorders such as chronic neurological disorders, ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, and motor neuron disease. We specified every time on which basis each disorder was attributed to Lyme disease, particularly if European or American criteria were met. Every part of the nervous system can be involved: from central to peripheral nervous system, and even muscles. In endemic areas, Lyme serology must be assessed in case of unexplained neurological or psychiatric disorder. In case of positive serology, CSF assessment with intrathecal anti-Borrelia antibody index will be more efficient to prove the diagnosis. PMID:17350199

  3. A national neurological excellence centers network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzi, S; Cristiani, P; Cavallini, A

    1998-02-01

    The most relevant problems related to the management of neurological disorders are (i) the frequent hospitalization in nonspecialist departments, with the need for neurological consultation, and (ii) the frequent requests of GPs for highly specialized investigations that are very expensive and of little value in arriving at a correct diagnosis. In 1996, the Consorzio di Bioingegneria e Informatica Medica in Italy realized the CISNet project (in collaboration with the Consorzio Istituti Scientifici Neuroscienze e Tecnologie Biomediche and funded by the Centro Studi of the National Public Health Council) for the implementation of a national neurological excellence centers network (CISNet). In the CISNet project, neurologists will be able to give on-line interactive consultation and off-line consulting services identifying correct diagnostic/therapeutic procedures, evaluating the need for both examination in specialist centers and admission to specialized centers, and identifying the most appropriate ones.

  4. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaieski, David F; Nathan, Barnett R; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis and viral encephalitis, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis, are severe neurological infections that, if not treated promptly and effectively, lead to poor neurological outcome or death. Because treatment is more effective if given early, the topic of meningitis and encephalitis was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. This protocol provides a practical approach to recognition and urgent treatment of bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Appropriate imaging, spinal fluid analysis, and early empiric treatment is discussed. Though uncommon in its full form, the typical clinical triad of headache, fever, and neck stiffness should alert the clinical practitioner to the possibility of a central nervous system infection. Early attention to the airway and maintaining normotension is crucial in treatment of these patients, as is rapid treatment with anti-infectives and, in some cases, corticosteroids.

  5. Neurological manifestations of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew T

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS is more identified for its cutaneous features but its neurological manifestations have not received the focused attention. Four patients of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS with neurological manifestations were evaluated for phenotypic data. These four men were from three families and two had consanguineous parentage. The mean age at onset and presentation of neurological symptoms were 10.5 years and 19 years respectively. Patient 1 presented with bilateral optic atrophy, sensorineural deafness, cerebellar ataxia and neuropathy. Patient 2 had marfanoid habitus, chorea and cerebellar ataxia. Patient 3 had action and percussion myotonia, wasting and weakness of sternocleidomastoid and distal limb muscles. Patient 4 had action myotonia, mirror movements of both hands and neuropathy. MRI of brain showed right parietal polymicrogyria. Neuroaxis involvement at multiple levels in EDS may have prognostic significance.

  6. What is the essential neurological examination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. Lima

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine which aspects would be essential to the neurological examination (NE in a given specific situation (a patient referred with a potential neurological complaint, but the history suggests that a neurological problem is unlikely, we presented the same questionnaire used by Moore and Chalk in Canada to 19 neurologists in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We considered significant aspects of NE, whose average responses were greater than or equal to 3.5: visual fields, fundoscopy, pursuit eye movements, facial muscle power testing, gait, pronator drift or rapid arm movement in upper limbs, finger-nose, tone in arms and legs, five tendon reflexes, and plantar responses. We concluded that, despite geographical and economical differences between Brazil and Canada, neurologists from both countries agree about the essential NE in the proposed scenario.

  7. Arsenic Contamination in Food-chain: Transfer of Arsenic into Food Materials through Groundwater Irrigation

    OpenAIRE

    Huq, S.M. Imamul; Joardar, J.C.; Parvin, S.; Correll, Ray; Naidu, Ravi

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic contamination in groundwater in Bangladesh has become an additional concern vis-à-vis its use for irrigation purposes. Even if arsenic-safe drinking-water is assured, the question of irrigating soils with arsenic-laden groundwater will continue for years to come. Immediate attention should be given to assess the possibility of accumulating arsenic in soils through irrigation-water and its subsequent entry into the food-chain through various food crops and fodders. With this possibilit...

  8. Arsenic adsorption of lateritic soil, limestone powder, lime and fly ash on arsenic-contaminated soil

    OpenAIRE

    Wuthiphun, L.; Towatana, P.; Arrykul, S.; V. Chongsuvivatwong

    2007-01-01

    Arsenic adsorption efficiency of soil covering materials (lateritic soil, limestone powder, lime and fly ash) on arsenic-contaminated soil obtained from Ronpiboon District, Nakhon Sri Thammarat Province tosolve arsenic air pollution problem was investigated using batch experiments. The four types of the aforementioned soil covering materials were examined to determine their arsenic adsorption efficiency, equilibriumtime as well as adsorption isotherms.The results revealed that among soil cove...

  9. Distribution and excretion of arsenic in cynomolgus monkey following repeated administration of diphenylarsinic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Yayoi [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Environmental Health Sciences Division, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Negishi, Takayuki [Aoyama Gakuin University, Department of Chemistry and Biological Science, Tokyo (Japan); Mizumura, Ayano; Watanabe, Takayuki [Chiba University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Hirano, Seishiro [Chiba University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba (Japan); National Institute for Environmental Studies, Research Center for Environmental Risk, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2008-08-15

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA), a possible product of degradation of arsenic-containing chemical weapons, was detected in well water in Kamisu City, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan, in 2003. Although some individuals in this area have been affected by drinking DPAA-containing water, toxicological findings on DPAA are limited. To elucidate the mechanism of its toxicity, it is necessary to determine the metabolic behavior of DPAA in the body. In this study, pregnant cynomolgus monkeys at the 50th day of pregnancy were used. The monkeys were treated daily with 1.0 mg DPAA/kg body weight using a nasogastric tube, and the distribution and excretion of arsenic were examined after the repeated administration and 198-237 days after the last administration of DPAA. Fecal excretion was higher than urinary excretion (ca. 3:2 ratio), and arsenic accumulated in the hair and erythrocytes. Distribution of DAPP to plasma and hemolyzed erythrocytes was also examined by high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled argon plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP MS). Two peaks were found in the elution profile of arsenic, due to free and probably protein-bound DPAA. The protein-bound arsenic compounds were presumably trivalent diphenylarsenic compounds, since free DPAA was recovered after treatment of heat-denatured samples with hydrogen peroxide. (orig.)

  10. Differences in Urinary Arsenic Metabolites between Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Subjects in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamie Nakajima

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ingestion of inorganic arsenic (iAs is considered to be related to the development of diabetes mellitus. In order to clarify the possible differences in the metabolism in diabetics, we measured urinary iAs metabolites in diabetic cases and non-diabetic control subjects in Faridpur, an arsenic-contaminated area in Bangladesh. Physician-diagnosed type 2 diabetic cases (140 persons and non-diabetic controls (180 persons were recruited. Drinking water and spot urine samples were collected. Mean concentrations of total arsenic in drinking water did not differ between cases (85.1 μg/L and controls (85.8 μg/L. The percentage of urinary iAs (iAs% was significantly lower in cases (8.6% than in controls (10.4%, while that of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA% was higher in cases (82.6% than in controls (79.9%. This may have been due to the higher secondary methylation index (SMI in the former (11.6 rather than the latter (10.0. Adjusting for matching factors (sex and unions, and the additional other covariates (age and water arsenic significantly attenuated the differences in iAs%, SMI, and DMA%, respectively, though the difference in monomethylarsonic acid% was newly significant in the latter adjustment. Our study did not suggest any significant differences in urinary arsenic metabolites between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects.

  11. Drinking Water Arsenic Contamination, Skin Lesions, and Malignancies: A Systematic Review of the Global Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagas, Margaret R.; Gossai, Anala; Pierce, Brandon; Ahsan, Habibul

    2015-01-01

    Skin lesions and cancer are known manifestations of chronic exposure to arsenic contaminated drinking water. Epidemiologic data primarily comes from regions with exposures 1–2 orders of magnitude above the current World Health Organization (WHO)’s guidelines of 10 μg/L. Emerging evidence indicates that more common exposures may also be related to both non-cancerous and cancerous changes to the skin. In this review, we focus on the body of epidemiologic literature that encompasses exposures within the WHO guidelines, excluding studies that lacked individual exposure estimates and case reports. For skin lesions and skin cancers, 15 and 10 studies were identified that met our criteria, respectively. For skin lesions, a consistent dose-response relationship with water arsenic has been observed, with increased risk evident at low- to moderate-dose exposure. Of the larger studies of specific histologic types of skin cancers, although with differing exposure definitions, there was evidence of dose-related relationships with both basal cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas. The effect of arsenic exposure on skin lesion risk is likely modified by genetic variants that influence arsenic metabolism. Accumulating evidence suggests that arsenic may increase risk of skin lesions and skin cancers at levels not previously considered harmful, and that genetic factors may influence risk. PMID:26231242

  12. ARSENIC INDUCES SUSTAINED IMPAIRMENT OF SKELETAL MUSCLE AND MUSCLE PROGENITOR CELL ULTRASTRUCTURE AND BIOENERGETICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrisia, Ambrosio; Elke, Brown; Donna, Stolz; Ricardo, Ferrari; Bret, Goodpaster; Bridget, Deasy; Giovanna, Distefano; Alexandra, Roperti; Amin, Cheikhi; Yesica, Garciafigueroa; Aaron, Barchowsky

    2014-01-01

    Over 4 million individuals in the US, and over 140 million individuals worldwide, are exposed daily to arsenic-contaminated drinking water. Human exposures can range from below the current limit of 10 µg/L to over 1 mg/L, with 100 µg/L promoting disease in a large portion of those exposed. Although increased attention has recently been paid to myopathy following arsenic exposure, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying clinical symptoms remain poorly understood. This study tested the hypothesis that arsenic induces lasting muscle mitochondrial dysfunction and impairs metabolism. When compared to non-exposed controls, mice exposed to drinking water containing 100µg/L arsenite for 5 weeks demonstrated impaired muscle function, mitochondrial myopathy, and altered oxygen consumption that were concomitant with increased mitochondrial fusion gene transcription. There was no difference in levels of inorganic arsenic or its mononomethyl- and dimethyl- metabolites between controls and exposed muscles, confirming that arsenic does not accumulate in muscle. Nevertheless, muscle progenitor cells isolated from exposed mice recapitulated the aberrant myofiber phenotype and were more resistant to oxidative stress, generated more reactive oxygen species, and displayed autophagic mitochondrial morphology, as compared to cells isolated from non-exposed mice. These pathological changes from a possible maladaptive oxidative stress response provide insight into declines in muscle functioning caused by exposure to this common environmental contaminant. PMID:24960579

  13. Arsenic toxicity to cladocerans isolated and associated with iron: implications for aquatic environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUELLEN C.M. SALES

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Arsenic is an ametal ubiquitous in nature and known by its high toxicity. Many studies have tried to elucidate the arsenic metabolism in the cell and its impact to plants, animals and human health. In aqueous phase, inorganic arsenic is more common and its oxidation state (As III and As V depends on physical and chemical environmental conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate toxicity of arsenic to Daphnia similis and Ceriodaphnia silvestrii, isolated and associated with iron. The results showed differences in toxicity of As III and As V to both species. Effective concentration (EC50 mean values were 0.45 mg L-1 (As III and 0.54 mg L-1 (As V for D. similis, and 0.44 mg L-1 (As III and 0.69 mg L-1 (As V for C. silvestrii. However, As V IC25 mean value was 0.59 mg L-1, indicating that C. silvestrii has mechanisms to reduce arsenic toxicity. On the other hand, when associated with iron at 0.02 and 2.00 mg L-1, EC50 values decreased for D. similis (0.34 and 0.38 mg L-1 as well as C. silvestrii (0.37 and 0.37 mg L-1, showing synergistic effect of these substances.

  14. Stem-cell therapy for neurologic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of research on stem cell therapy for various diseases, an important need was felt in the field of neurological diseases. While congenital lesion may not be amenable to stem cell therapy completely, there is a scope of partial improvement in the lesions and halt in further progression. Neuro degenerative lesions like Parkinson′s disease, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis have shown improvement with stem cell therapy. This article reviews the available literature and summarizes the current evidence in the various neurologic diseases amenable to stem cell therapy, the plausible mechanism of action, ethical concerns with insights into the future of stem cell therapy.

  15. Neurology Case Reporting: a call for all

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rison Richard A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract From antiquity to present day, the act of recording and publishing our observations with patients remains essential to the art of medicine and the care of patients. Neurology is rich with case reports over the centuries. They contribute to our understanding and knowledge of disease entities, and are a cornerstone of our professional development as physicians and the care of our patients. This editorial seeks to enthuse and invigorate house staff and practicing physicians everywhere to continue the long and time-honored tradition of neurology case reporting.

  16. How to write a neurology case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rison, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Neurology case reports have a long history of transmitting important medical information across many generations for the improvement of patient care. Case reports contribute much to the physician's knowledge base from which treatment hypotheses and ideas form. Elements of a modern case report, as presented in the CARE (CAse REport) guidelines, include the abstract, introduction, case presentation, discussion, conclusion, patient's perspective, and consent statement. The sections are described here, as well as the application of CARE guidelines to a published neuromuscular case report. Writing case reports offer an ideal opportunity for neurologists to publish interesting case findings and carry on the tradition of neurologic case reporting. PMID:27048575

  17. Hereditary and metabolic myelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedera, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary and metabolic myelopathies are a heterogeneous group of neurologic disorders characterized by clinical signs suggesting spinal cord dysfunction. Spastic weakness, limb ataxia without additional cerebellar signs, impaired vibration, and positional sensation are hallmark phenotypic features of these disorders. Hereditary, and to some extent, metabolic myelopathies are now recognized as more widespread systemic processes with axonal loss and demyelination. However, the concept of predominantly spinal cord disorders remains clinically helpful to differentiate these disorders from other neurodegenerative conditions. Furthermore, metabolic myelopathies are potentially treatable and an earlier diagnosis increases the likelihood of a good clinical recovery. This chapter reviews major types of degenerative myelopathies, hereditary spastic paraplegia, motor neuron disorders, spastic ataxias, and metabolic disorders, including leukodystrophies and nutritionally induced myelopathies, such as vitamin B12, E, and copper deficiencies. Neuroimaging studies usually detect a nonspecific spinal cord atrophy or demyelination of the corticospinal tracts and dorsal columns. Brain imaging can be also helpful in myelopathies caused by generalized neurodegeneration. Given the nonspecific nature of neuroimaging findings, we also review metabolic or genetic assays needed for the specific diagnosis of hereditary and metabolic myelopathies. PMID:27430441

  18. Outbreak of arsenic and toxaphene poisoning in Kenyan cattle. [Arsenic was detected in cattle dips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maitai, C.K.; Kamau, J.A.; Gacuhi, D.M.; Njoroge, S.

    1975-02-15

    In a case of poisoning involving 70 cattle analysis of specimens obtained during post mortem examination showed that the toxic substances were arsenic and toxaphene. This was consistent with both the clinical and post mortem findings. Arsenic was detected in water from an abandoned cattle dip in the farm. Soil samples collected in the vicinity of the dip contained both arsenic and toxaphene.

  19. Method of arsenic removal from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

    2010-10-26

    A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

  20. Arsenic--state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrigan, P J

    1981-01-01

    Approximately 1.5 million workers in the United States are exposed to arsenic. Occupational exposure is primarily by inhalation. NIOSH recommends that time-integrated exposure to arsenic in air not exceed 2 micrograms/m3. Recent exposure is accurately measured by urine assay; urine arsenic concentrations above 50 micrograms/liter indicate increased absorption. Hair assay is a semiquantitative index of past exposure. Toxicity is associated primarily with the trivalent (3+) form of arsenic. Acute poisoning is caused most commonly by contaminated food or drink; it is rarely occupational. Chronic intoxication is characterized by dermatitis, hyperpigmentation, keratoses, peripheral neuropathy (primarily sensory), irritation of the upper and lower respiratory tract, and occasionally by hepatic toxicity and peripheral vasculopathy (blackfoot disease). Arsenic is not carcinogenic in animal species, but is mutagenic in Syrian hamster cells. In man, arsenic is known definitely to cause cancer of skin, lung, and liver (angiosarcoma) and possibly to cause lymphoma.

  1. Arsenic stress after the Proterozoic glaciations

    OpenAIRE

    Ernest Chi Fru; Emma Arvestål; Nolwenn Callac; Abderrazak El Albani; Stephanos Kilias; Ariadne Argyraki; Martin Jakobsson

    2015-01-01

    Protection against arsenic damage in organisms positioned deep in the tree of life points to early evolutionary sensitization. Here, marine sedimentary records reveal a Proterozoic arsenic concentration patterned to glacial-interglacial ages. The low glacial and high interglacial sedimentary arsenic concentrations, suggest deteriorating habitable marine conditions may have coincided with atmospheric oxygen decline after ~2.1 billion years ago. A similar intensification of near continental mar...

  2. Presence of Arsenic in Commercial Beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Roberge

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study’s goal was to assess the arsenic concentration of various beverages and broths purchased from a local chain supermarket. A source of chronic arsenic exposure occurs via food and beverage consumption. Groundwater levels of total arsenic are regulated (-1 by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA but few studies have examined arsenic concentrations in common beverages. Approach: In the initial analysis of 19 items, total arsenic concentration was assessed from a variety of fruit juices, sports drinks, sodas and broths. Items found to contain levels of total arsenic ≥5.0 µg L-1 were further evaluated. Additional analysis included purchasing multiple brands of items ≥5.0 µg L-1and analyzing them for total arsenic and chemical species of arsenic. Results: Among the beverages in the initial analysis, apple juice (10.79 µg L-1 and grape juice (49.87 µg L-1 contained the highest levels of total arsenic. Upon examination of items with As concentrations above 5.0 µg L-1, varying concentrations of total arsenic were found in apple cider (range: 5.41-15.27 µg L-1, apple juice (range: 10.67-22.35 µg L-1, baby fruit juice (range: 13.91-16.51 µg L-1 and grape juice (range: 17.69-47.59 µg L-1. Conclusion: Many commercially available juices contained concentrations of arsenic that were higher than the standard for total arsenic allowed in groundwater as set forth by the EPA. The concentration of As in these juices varied between and within brands. In general, those consuming apple and grape juices are the young and elderly and it is these populations that may be more vulnerable to over exposure of heavy metals.

  3. Exposure to Inorganic Arsenic Is Associated with Increased Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Longer Telomere Length in Peripheral Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameer, Syeda S.; Xu, YiYi; Engström, Karin; Li, Huiqi; Tallving, Pia; Nermell, Barbro; Boemo, Analia; Parada, Luis A.; Peñaloza, Lidia G.; Concha, Gabriela; Harari, Florencia; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) through drinking water causes cancer. Alterations in mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) and telomere length in blood have been associated with cancer risk. We elucidated if arsenic exposure alters mtDNAcn and telomere length in individuals with different arsenic metabolizing capacity. Methods: We studied two groups in the Salta province, Argentina, one in the Puna area of the Andes (N = 264, 89% females) and one in Chaco (N = 169, 75% females). We assessed arsenic exposure as the sum of arsenic metabolites [iAs, methylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA)] in urine (U-As) using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with hydride generation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Efficiency of arsenic metabolism was expressed as percentage of urinary metabolites. MtDNAcn and telomere length were determined in blood by real-time PCR. Results: Median U-As was 196 (5–95 percentile: 21–537) μg/L in Andes and 80 (5–95 percentile: 15–1637) μg/L in Chaco. The latter study group had less-efficient metabolism, with higher %iAs and %MMA in urine compared with the Andean group. U-As was significantly associated with increased mtDNAcn (log2 transformed to improve linearity) in Chaco (β = 0.027 per 100 μg/L, p = 0.0085; adjusted for age and sex), but not in Andes (β = 0.025, p = 0.24). U-As was also associated with longer telomere length in Chaco (β = 0.016, p = 0.0066) and Andes (β = 0.0075, p = 0.029). In both populations, individuals with above median %iAs showed significantly higher mtDNAcn and telomere length compared with individuals with below median %iAs. Conclusions: Arsenic was associated with increased mtDNAcn and telomere length, particularly in individuals with less-efficient arsenic metabolism, a group who may have increased risk for arsenic-related cancer. PMID:27597942

  4. Arsenic toxicity in mammals and aquatic animals: a comparative biochemical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Lima, Juliane; Bogo, Maurício Reis; Monserrat, José M

    2011-03-01

    Arsenic (As) is a widespread pollutant in the world and its toxicity is related to its chemical form, with inorganic forms being considered more toxic than the organic form, and huge differences in effects and processes of metabolism. This paper reviews the potential biochemical mechanisms of uptake of arsenic by aquaporins, capacity for metabolism and cellular efflux of As. It is known that As can affect signaling pathways since it can activate proteins such as ERK2, p38 and JNK, as shown in mammals. A comparison between phosphorylation sites of these proteins is presented in order to determine whether the same effect triggered by As in mammals might be observed in aquatic animals. The toxicity resulting from As exposure is considered to be linked to an imbalance between pro-oxidant and antioxidant homeostasis that results in oxidative stress. So, present review analyzes examples of oxidative stress generation by arsenic. Biotransformation of As is a process where firstly the arsenate is converted into arsenite and then transformed into mono-, di-, and trimethylated products. In the methylation process, the role of the omega isoform of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) is discussed. In addition, a phylogenetic tree was constructed for aquaporin proteins of different species, including aquatic animals, taking into account their importance in trivalent arsenic uptake.

  5. Certain cases of poisoning by arsenic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristol, P.; Fourcade, J.; Ravoire, J.; Bezenech, C.

    1939-05-01

    Cases of acute and chronic poisoning by arsenic are reported. Diffuse pains, angor, edema of the limbs and genitals, complicated by heptic insufficiency and chronic bronchitis were determined in a subject having lived near an industrial plant processing arseniferous ores for several years. The plant emitted several hundred kg of finely dispersed arsenic oxide daily which settled on forage and vegetables. Symptoms of poisoning by arsenic were also detected in cattle in the same area. The installation of Cottrell type dust separators has helped to suppress the arsenic oxide emissions.

  6. Arsenic-bound excitons in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barjon, J.; Jomard, F.; Morata, S.

    2014-01-01

    A set of new excitonic recombinations is observed in arsenic-implanted diamond. It is composed of two groups of emissions at 5.355/5.361 eV and at 5.215/5.220/5.227 eV. They are respectively attributed to the no-phonon and transverse-optical phonon-assisted recombinations of excitons bound to neutral arsenic donors. From the Haynes rule, an ionization energy of 0.41 eV is deduced for arsenic in diamond, which shows that arsenic is a shallower donor than phosphorus (0.6 eV), in agreement with theory.

  7. Industrial contributions of arsenic to the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, K W

    1977-08-01

    Arsenic is present in all copper, lead, and zinc sulfide ores and is carried along with those metals in the mining, milling and concentrating process. Separation, final concentration and refining of by-product arsenic as the trioxide is achieved at smelters. Arsenic is the essential consistent element of many compounds important and widely used in agriculture and wood preservation. Lesser amounts are used in metal alloys, glass-making, and feed additives. There is no significant recycling. Current levels of arsenic emissions to the atmosphere from smelters and power plants and ambient air concentrations are given as data of greatest environmental interest. PMID:908308

  8. Arsenic and antimony transporters in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciaszczyk-Dziubinska, Ewa; Wawrzycka, Donata; Wysocki, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic and antimony are toxic metalloids, naturally present in the environment and all organisms have developed pathways for their detoxification. The most effective metalloid tolerance systems in eukaryotes include downregulation of metalloid uptake, efflux out of the cell, and complexation with phytochelatin or glutathione followed by sequestration into the vacuole. Understanding of arsenic and antimony transport system is of high importance due to the increasing usage of arsenic-based drugs in the treatment of certain types of cancer and diseases caused by protozoan parasites as well as for the development of bio- and phytoremediation strategies for metalloid polluted areas. However, in contrast to prokaryotes, the knowledge about specific transporters of arsenic and antimony and the mechanisms of metalloid transport in eukaryotes has been very limited for a long time. Here, we review the recent advances in understanding of arsenic and antimony transport pathways in eukaryotes, including a dual role of aquaglyceroporins in uptake and efflux of metalloids, elucidation of arsenic transport mechanism by the yeast Acr3 transporter and its role in arsenic hyperaccumulation in ferns, identification of vacuolar transporters of arsenic-phytochelatin complexes in plants and forms of arsenic substrates recognized by mammalian ABC transporters.

  9. Acute arsenic poisoning in two siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Melisa W; Boyer, Edward W; Kleinman, Monica E; Rodig, Nancy M; Ewald, Michele Burns

    2005-07-01

    We report a case series of acute arsenic poisoning of 2 siblings, a 4-month-old male infant and his 2-year-old sister. Each child ingested solubilized inorganic arsenic from an outdated pesticide that was misidentified as spring water. The 4-month-old child ingested a dose of arsenic that was lethal despite extraordinary attempts at arsenic removal, including chelation therapy, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, exchange transfusion, and hemodialysis. The 2-year-old fared well with conventional therapy. PMID:15995066

  10. XAS Studies of Arsenic in the Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic is present in low concentrations in much of the Earth's crust and changes in its speciation are vital to understanding its transport and toxicity in the environment. We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to investigate the coordination sites of arsenic in a wide variety of samples, including soil and earthworm tissues from arsenic-contaminated land, and human hair and nail samples from people exposed to arsenic in Cambodia. Our results confirm the effectiveness of using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to determine speciation changes in environmental samples

  11. Arsenic in the soils of Zimapan, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsenic concentrations of 73 soil samples collected in the semi-arid Zimapan Valley range from 4 to 14 700 mg As kg-1. Soil arsenic concentrations decrease with distance from mines and tailings and slag heaps and exceed 400 mg kg-1 only within 500 m of these arsenic sources. Soil arsenic concentrations correlate positively with Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrations, suggesting a strong association with ore minerals known to exist in the region. Some As was associated with Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides, this association is less for contaminated than for uncontaminated samples. Very little As was found in the mobile water-soluble or exchangeable fractions. The soils are not arsenic contaminated at depths greater than 100 cm below the surface. Although much of the arsenic in the soils is associated with relatively immobile solid phases, this represents a long-term source of arsenic to the environment. -- Much of the arsenic is relatively immobile but presents long-term source of arsenic

  12. Urgent discectomy: Clinical features and neurological outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Albert

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Motor deficits, sensory deficits, and cauda equina dysfunction were significantly improved immediately after urgent surgery. After 6 weeks, motor and sensory deficits were also significantly improved compared to the neurological status at discharge. Thus, we advocate immediate surgery of disc herniation in patients with acute onset of motor deficits, perineal numbness, or bladder or bowel dysfunction indicative of cauda equina syndrome.

  13. 21 CFR 882.1480 - Neurological endoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Neurological endoscope. 882.1480 Section 882.1480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... ventricles of the brain. (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  14. Astrocytes : a central element in neurological diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pekny, Milos; Pekna, Marcela; Messing, Albee; Steinhäuser, Christian; Lee, Jin Moo; Parpura, Vladimir; Hol, Elly M.; Sofroniew, Michael V.; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-01-01

    The neurone-centred view of the past disregarded or downplayed the role of astroglia as a primary component in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. As this concept is changing, so is also the perceived role of astrocytes in the healthy and diseased brain and spinal cord. We have started to unr

  15. The neurology of rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata

    OpenAIRE

    Bams-Mengerink, Annemieke M; Koelman, Johannes HTM; Waterham, Hans; Barth, Peter G; Poll-The, Bwee Tien

    2013-01-01

    Background To describe the neurologic profiles of Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP); a peroxisomal disorder clinically characterized by skeletal abnormalities, congenital cataracts, severe growth and developmental impairments and immobility of joints. Defective plasmalogen biosynthesis is the main biochemical feature. Methods Observational study including review of clinical and biochemical abnormalities, genotype, presence of seizures and neurophysiological studies of a cohort of 16...

  16. Neuroprotective and neurological properties of Melissa officinalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Víctor; Martín, Sara; Gómez-Serranillos, Maria Pilar;

    2009-01-01

    Melissa officinalis has traditionally been used due to its effects on nervous system. Both methanolic and aqueous extracts were tested for protective effects on the PC12 cell line, free radical scavenging properties and neurological activities (inhibition of MAO-A and acetylcholinesterase enzymes...

  17. Cutaneous Adverse Effects of Neurologic Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Eman; Nunneley, Chloe E; Hsu, Sylvia; Kass, Joseph S

    2016-03-01

    Life-threatening and benign drug reactions occur frequently in the skin, affecting 8 % of the general population and 2-3 % of all hospitalized patients, emphasizing the need for physicians to effectively recognize and manage patients with drug-induced eruptions. Neurologic medications represent a vast array of drug classes with cutaneous side effects. Approximately 7 % of the United States (US) adult population is affected by adult-onset neurological disorders, reflecting a large number of patients on neurologic drug therapies. This review elucidates the cutaneous reactions associated with medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat the following neurologic pathologies: Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, epilepsy, Huntington disease, migraine, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson disease, and pseudobulbar affect. A search of the literature was performed using the specific FDA-approved drug or drug classes in combination with the terms 'dermatologic,' 'cutaneous,' 'skin,' or 'rash.' Both PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were utilized, with side effects ranging from those cited in randomized controlled trials to case reports. It behooves neurologists, dermatologists, and primary care physicians to be aware of the recorded cutaneous adverse reactions and their severity for proper management and potential need to withdraw the offending medication. PMID:26914914

  18. Astrocytes: a central element in neurological diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pekny; M. Pekna; A. Messing; C. Steinhäuser; J.M. Lee; V. Parpura; E.M. Hol; M.V. Sofroniew; A. Verkhratsky

    2016-01-01

    The neurone-centred view of the past disregarded or downplayed the role of astroglia as a primary component in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. As this concept is changing, so is also the perceived role of astrocytes in the healthy and diseased brain and spinal cord. We have started to unr

  19. Neurological Vision Rehabilitation: Description and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, John; Katsaros, Jennifer; Vu, Yurika; Goodrich, Gregory L.

    2010-01-01

    The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have been notable for the high rates of traumatic brain injury (TBI) that have been incurred by the troops. Visual impairments often occur following TBI and present new challenges for rehabilitation. We describe a neurological vision rehabilitation therapy that addresses the unique needs of patients with vision…

  20. Child neurology: Past, present, and future: part 1: history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millichap, John J; Millichap, J Gordon

    2009-08-18

    The founding period of child neurology occurred in 3 phases: 1) early individual contributory phase, 2) organized training phase, and 3) expansion phase. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, individuals in pediatrics, neurology, and psychiatry established clinics and made important contributions to the literature on childhood epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and pediatric neurology. The latter half of the 20th century saw the organization of training programs in pediatric neurology, with fellowships supported by the NIH. This development was followed by a rapid expansion in the number of trainees certified in child neurology and their appointment to divisions of neurology in children's hospitals. In recent years, referrals of children with neurologic disorders have increased, and disorders previously managed by pediatricians are often seen in neurology clinics. The era of subspecialization is embraced by the practicing physician. The present day status of pediatric neurology and suggestions for the future development of the specialty are subjects for further discussion.

  1. Dermatology referrals in a neurological set up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeptara Pathak Thapa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dermatology is a specialty, which not only deals with dermatological problems with outpatient but also inpatients referrals. The importances of Dermatologist in hospital setting are rising due to changing condition of medical care. Since no peer-reviewed articles are available for dermatological problems in a neurological set up, we conducted this study to know about pattern of skin disorders in neurological patients. Material and Methods: The present study was a prospective study in a neurological setup, which included data from hospital dermatology consultation request forms over a period of one year. The data included demographic profile of the patient investigation where needed, neurological diagnosis and final dermatological diagnosis. The data was analyzed using SPSS. Results: A total of 285 patients who were requested for consultation were included in the study. Face was the commonest site of involvement (19.6%. Laboratory examination of referred patients revealed abnormal blood counts in 2% cases, renal function tests in 0.7% and urine in 0.4% cases. CT scan showed abnormal findings in 65.6% patients. The most common drug used in these patients was phenytoin (29.1%. The most common dermatological diagnosis was Infection and Infestation (34.7% followed by eczema (46.6%. Drug rash was seen in 3.9% cases. Out of which one had phenytoin induced Steven Johnson syndrome. Skin biopsy was done in 5 patients. Topicals was advised in 80%. Upon discharge 10% of inpatients didn’t require any follow-up. The patients who were followed up after 4 weeks, about 48% had their symptoms resolved with topicals and oral treatment as required. About 38% required more than two follow ups due to chronic course of the diseases. Conclusions: This present study discussed about various manifestations of skin disorders in a neurological set up and emphasizes the role of dermatologist in treating skin problems both in outpatient as well as inpatient

  2. [Tracing for arsenic exposure--a differentiation of arsenic compounds is essential for the health assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weistenhöfer, Wobbeke; Ochsmann, Elke; Drexler, Hans; Göen, Thomas; Klotz, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic is ubiquitous and harmful to health in occupation and environment. Arsenic exposure is measured through analysis of arsenic compounds in urine. The identification of several arsenic species is necessary to understand the hazardous potential of the arsenic compounds which differ highly in their toxicity. To estimate the extent of an occupational exposure to arsenic, arsenic species were evaluated for the first time by the working group "Setting of Threshold Limit Values in Biological Material" of the DFG Commission for the Investigation of Health Hazards of Chemical Compounds in the Work Area and Biologische Arbeitsstoffreferenzwerte (BAR) of 0.5 μg / L urine for arsenic (III), 0.5 μg / L urine for arsenic (V), 2 μg / L urine for monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and 10 μg / L urine for dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) were set. If the reference value for total arsenic is exceeded, a further differentiation of arsenic species now enables to estimate the individual health risks taking into account special influences such as seafood consumption.

  3. Arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and the inorganic arsenic methylation phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inorganic arsenic is enzymatically methylated; hence, its ingestion results in exposure to the parent compound and various methylated arsenicals. Both experimental and epidemiological evidences suggest that some of the adverse health effects associated with chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic may be mediated by these methylated metabolites. If i As methylation is an activation process, then the phenotype for inorganic arsenic methylation may determine risk associated with exposure to this metalloid. We examined inorganic arsenic methylation phenotypes and arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase genotypes in four species: three that methylate inorganic arsenic (human (Homo sapiens), rat (Rattus norwegicus), and mouse (Mus musculus)) and one that does not methylate inorganic arsenic (chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes). The predicted protein products from arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase are similar in size for rat (369 amino acid residues), mouse (376 residues), and human (375 residues). By comparison, a 275-nucleotide deletion beginning at nucleotide 612 in the chimpanzee gene sequence causes a frameshift that leads to a nonsense mutation for a premature stop codon after amino acid 205. The null phenotype for inorganic arsenic methylation in the chimpanzee is likely due to the deletion in the gene for arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase that yields an inactive truncated protein. This lineage-specific loss of function caused by the deletion event must have occurred in the Pan lineage after Homo-Pan divergence about 5 million years ago

  4. Contemporary Teaching of Neurology. Teaching Neurological Behavior to General Practitioners: A Fresh Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derouesne, C.; Salamon, R.

    1977-01-01

    Ways in which teaching neurology can be simplified for the nonspecialist practitioner are addressed in this assessment of the state-of-the-art in France. The hypothesis implies simplifying both the diagnoses and symptomatology. (LBH)

  5. Urinary Trivalent Methylated Arsenic Species in a Population Chronically Exposed to Inorganic Arsenic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Olga L.; Borja-Aburto, Victor H.; Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo G.; Cruz-Gonzalez, Martha B.; Garcia-Montalvo, Eliud A.; Calderon-Aranda, Emma S.; Del Razo, Luz M.

    2005-01-01

    Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) has been associated with increased risk of various forms of cancer and of noncancerous diseases. Metabolic conversions of iAs that yield highly toxic and genotoxic methylarsonite (MAsIII) and dimethylarsinite (DMAsIII) may play a significant role in determining the extent and character of toxic and cancer-promoting effects of iAs exposure. In this study we examined the relationship between urinary profiles of MAsIII and DMAsIII and skin lesion markers of iAs toxicity in individuals exposed to iAs in drinking water. The study subjects were recruited among the residents of an endemic region of central Mexico. Drinking-water reservoirs in this region are heavily contaminated with iAs. Previous studies carried out in the local populations have found an increased incidence of pathologies, primarily skin lesions, that are characteristic of arseniasis. The goal of this study was to investigate the urinary profiles for the trivalent and pentavalent As metabolites in both high- and low-iAs–exposed subjects. Notably, methylated trivalent arsenicals were detected in 98% of analyzed urine samples. On average, the major metabolite, DMAsIII, represented 49% of total urinary As, followed by DMAsV (23.7%), iAsV (8.6%), iAsIII (8.5%), MAsIII (7.4%), and MAsV (2.8%). More important, the average MAsIII concentration was significantly higher in the urine of exposed individuals with skin lesions compared with those who drank iAs-contaminated water but had no skin lesions. These data suggest that urinary levels of MAsIII, the most toxic species among identified metabolites of iAs, may serve as an indicator to identify individuals with increased susceptibility to toxic and cancer-promoting effects of arseniasis. PMID:15743710

  6. Interactions between arsenic species and marine algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    The arsenic concentration and speciation of marine algae varies widely, from 0.4 to 23 ng.mg/sup -1/, with significant differences in both total arsenic content and arsenic speciation occurring between algal classes. The Phaeophyceae contain more arsenic than other algal classes, and a greater proportion of the arsenic is organic. The concentration of inorganic arsenic is fairly constant in macro-algae, and may indicate a maximum level, with the excess being reduced and methylated. Phytoplankton take up As(V) readily, and incorporate a small percentage of it into the cell. The majority of the As(V) is reduced, methylated, and released to the surrounding media. The arsenic speciation in phytoplankton and Valonia also changes when As(V) is added to cultures. Arsenate and phosphate compete for uptake by algal cells. Arsenate inhibits primary production at concentrations as low as 5 ..mu..g.1/sup -1/ when the phosphate concentration is low. The inhibition is competitive. A phosphate enrichment of > 0.3 ..mu..M alleviates this inhibition; however, the As(V) stress causes an increase in the cell's phosphorus requirement. Arsenite is also toxic to phytoplankton at similar concentrations. Methylated arsenic species did not affect cell productivity, even at concentrations of 25 ..mu..g.1/sup -1/. Thus, the methylation of As(V) by the cell produces a stable, non-reactive compound which is nontoxic. The uptake and subsequent reduction and methylation of As(V) is a significant factor in determining the arsenic biogeochemistry of productive systems, and also the effect that the arsenic may have on algal productivity. Therefore, the role of marine algae in determining the arsenic speciation of marine systems cannot be ignored. (ERB)

  7. Arsenic mobilization and immobilization in paddy soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappler, A.; Hohmann, C.; Zhu, Y. G.; Morin, G.

    2010-05-01

    Arsenic is oftentimes of geogenic origin and in many cases bound to iron(III) minerals. Iron(III)-reducing bacteria can harvest energy by coupling the oxidation of organic or inorganic electron donors to the reduction of Fe(III). This process leads either to dissolution of Fe(III)-containing minerals and thus to a release of the arsenic into the environment or to secondary Fe-mineral formation and immobilisation of arsenic. Additionally, aerobic and anaerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria have the potential to co-precipitate or sorb arsenic during iron(II) oxidation at neutral pH that is usually followed by iron(III) mineral precipitation. We are currently investigating arsenic immobilization by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria and arsenic co-precipitation and immobilization by anaerobic iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria in batch, microcosm and rice pot experiments. Co-precipitation batch experiments with pure cultures of nitrate-dependent Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are used to quantify the amount of arsenic that can be immobilized during microbial iron mineral precipitation, to identify the minerals formed and to analyze the arsenic binding environment in the precipitates. Microcosm and rice pot experiments are set-up with arsenic-contaminated rice paddy soil. The microorganisms (either the native microbial population or the soil amended with the nitrate-dependent iron(II)-oxidizing Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1) are stimulated either with iron(II), nitrate, or oxygen. Dissolved and solid-phase arsenic and iron are quantified. Iron and arsenic speciation and redox state in batch and microcosm experiments are determined by LC-ICP-MS and synchrotron-based methods (EXAFS, XANES).

  8. Arsenic Adsorption Onto Iron Oxides Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aredes, S.; Klein, B.; Pawlik, M.

    2004-12-01

    The predominant form of arsenic in water is as an inorganic ion. Under different redox conditions arsenic in water is stable in the +5 and +3 oxidation states. Arsenic oxidation state governs its toxicity, chemical form and solubility in natural and disturbed environments. As (III) is found in anoxic environments such as ground water , it is toxic and the common species is the neutral form, H3AsO3. As (V) is found in aerobic conditions such as surface water, it is less toxic and the common species in water are: H2AsO4 - and HAsO4 {- 2}. The water pH determines the predominant arsenate or arsenite species, however, both forms of arsenic can be detected in natural water systems. Iron oxides minerals often form in natural waters and sediments at oxic-anoxic boundaries. Over time they undergo transformation to crystalline forms, such as goethite or hematite. Both As(V) and As(III) sorbs strongly to iron oxides, however the sorption behavior of arsenic is dependent on its oxidation state and the mineralogy of the iron oxides. Competition between arsenic and others ions, such fluoride, sulphate and phosphate also play a role. On the other hand, calcium may increase arsenic adsorption onto iron oxides. Electrokinetic studies and adsorption experiments were carried out in order to determine which conditions favour arsenic adsorption. Hematite, goethite and magnetite as iron based sorbents were used. Test were also conducted with a laterite soil rich in iron minerals. The focus of this study is to evaluate physical and chemical conditions which favour arsenic adsorption onto iron oxides minerals, the results contribute to an understanding of arsenic behaviour in natural and disturbed environments. Furthermore, results could contribute in developing an appropriate remediation technology for arsenic removal in water using iron oxides minerals.

  9. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  10. ARSENIC REMOVAL AND ECOLOGICALLY SAFE CONTAINMENT OF ARSENIC-WASTE: A SUSTAINABLE SOLUTION FOR ARSENIC CRISIS IN CAMBODIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    An appalling degree of arsenic contamination in groundwater has affected more than a million people in wide region of Mekong delta flood plain in Cambodia. Arsenic is by far the most toxic species of all naturally occurring groundwater contaminants and disposal of removed arse...

  11. Molecular Targets of Cannabidiol in Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibeas Bih, Clementino; Chen, Tong; Nunn, Alistair V W; Bazelot, Michaël; Dallas, Mark; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2015-10-01

    Cannabis has a long history of anecdotal medicinal use and limited licensed medicinal use. Until recently, alleged clinical effects from anecdotal reports and the use of licensed cannabinoid medicines are most likely mediated by tetrahydrocannabinol by virtue of: 1) this cannabinoid being present in the most significant quantities in these preparations; and b) the proportion:potency relationship between tetrahydrocannabinol and other plant cannabinoids derived from cannabis. However, there has recently been considerable interest in the therapeutic potential for the plant cannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), in neurological disorders but the current evidence suggests that CBD does not directly interact with the endocannabinoid system except in vitro at supraphysiological concentrations. Thus, as further evidence for CBD's beneficial effects in neurological disease emerges, there remains an urgent need to establish the molecular targets through which it exerts its therapeutic effects. Here, we conducted a systematic search of the extant literature for original articles describing the molecular pharmacology of CBD. We critically appraised the results for the validity of the molecular targets proposed. Thereafter, we considered whether the molecular targets of CBD identified hold therapeutic potential in relevant neurological diseases. The molecular targets identified include numerous classical ion channels, receptors, transporters, and enzymes. Some CBD effects at these targets in in vitro assays only manifest at high concentrations, which may be difficult to achieve in vivo, particularly given CBD's relatively poor bioavailability. Moreover, several targets were asserted through experimental designs that demonstrate only correlation with a given target rather than a causal proof. When the molecular targets of CBD that were physiologically plausible were considered for their potential for exploitation in neurological therapeutics, the results were variable. In some cases

  12. Arsenic Removal by Liquid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Marino

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Water contamination with harmful arsenic compounds represents one of the most serious calamities of the last two centuries. Natural occurrence of the toxic metal has been revealed recently for 21 countries worldwide; the risk of arsenic intoxication is particularly high in Bangladesh and India but recently also Europe is facing similar problem. Liquid membranes (LMs look like a promising alternative to the existing removal processes, showing numerous advantages in terms of energy consumption, efficiency, selectivity, and operational costs. The development of different LM configurations has been a matter of investigation by several researching groups, especially for the removal of As(III and As(V from aqueous solutions. Most of these LM systems are based on the use of phosphine oxides as carriers, when the metal removal is from sulfuric acid media. Particularly promising for water treatment is the hollow fiber supported liquid membrane (HFSLM configuration, which offers high selectivity, easy transport of the targeted metal ions, large surface area, and non-stop flow process. The choice of organic extractant(s plays an essential role in the efficiency of the arsenic removal. Emulsion liquid membrane (ELM systems have not been extensively investigated so far, although encouraging results have started to appear in the literature. For such LM configuration, the most relevant step toward efficiency is the choice of the surfactant type and its concentration.

  13. Arsenic Metabolites, Including N-Acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic Acid, in Chicken Litter from a Roxarsone-Feeding Study Involving 1600 Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zonglin; Peng, Hanyong; Lu, Xiufen; Liu, Qingqing; Huang, Rongfu; Hu, Bin; Kachanoski, Gary; Zuidhof, Martin J; Le, X Chris

    2016-07-01

    The poultry industry has used organoarsenicals, such as 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (Roxarsone, ROX), to prevent disease and to promote growth. Although previous studies have analyzed arsenic species in chicken litter after composting or after application to agricultural lands, it is not clear what arsenic species were excreted by chickens before biotransformation of arsenic species during composting. We describe here the identification and quantitation of arsenic species in chicken litter repeatedly collected on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 of a Roxarsone-feeding study involving 1600 chickens of two strains. High performance liquid chromatography separation with simultaneous detection by both inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry provided complementary information necessary for the identification and quantitation of arsenic species. A new metabolite, N-acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic acid (N-AHAA), was identified, and it accounted for 3-12% of total arsenic. Speciation analyses of litter samples collected from ROX-fed chickens on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 showed the presence of N-AHAA, 3-amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (3-AHPAA), inorganic arsenite (As(III)), arsenate (As(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), and ROX. 3-AHPAA accounted for 3-19% of the total arsenic. Inorganic arsenicals (the sum of As(III) and As(V)) comprised 2-6% (mean 3.5%) of total arsenic. Our results on the detection of inorganic arsenicals, methylarsenicals, 3-AHPAA, and N-AHAA in the chicken litter support recent findings that ROX is actually metabolized by the chicken or its gut microbiome. The presence of the toxic metabolites in chicken litter is environmentally relevant as chicken litter is commonly used as fertilizer.

  14. Arsenic Metabolites, Including N-Acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic Acid, in Chicken Litter from a Roxarsone-Feeding Study Involving 1600 Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zonglin; Peng, Hanyong; Lu, Xiufen; Liu, Qingqing; Huang, Rongfu; Hu, Bin; Kachanoski, Gary; Zuidhof, Martin J; Le, X Chris

    2016-07-01

    The poultry industry has used organoarsenicals, such as 3-nitro-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (Roxarsone, ROX), to prevent disease and to promote growth. Although previous studies have analyzed arsenic species in chicken litter after composting or after application to agricultural lands, it is not clear what arsenic species were excreted by chickens before biotransformation of arsenic species during composting. We describe here the identification and quantitation of arsenic species in chicken litter repeatedly collected on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 of a Roxarsone-feeding study involving 1600 chickens of two strains. High performance liquid chromatography separation with simultaneous detection by both inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry provided complementary information necessary for the identification and quantitation of arsenic species. A new metabolite, N-acetyl-4-hydroxy-m-arsanilic acid (N-AHAA), was identified, and it accounted for 3-12% of total arsenic. Speciation analyses of litter samples collected from ROX-fed chickens on days 14, 24, 28, 30, and 35 showed the presence of N-AHAA, 3-amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (3-AHPAA), inorganic arsenite (As(III)), arsenate (As(V)), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA(V)), and ROX. 3-AHPAA accounted for 3-19% of the total arsenic. Inorganic arsenicals (the sum of As(III) and As(V)) comprised 2-6% (mean 3.5%) of total arsenic. Our results on the detection of inorganic arsenicals, methylarsenicals, 3-AHPAA, and N-AHAA in the chicken litter support recent findings that ROX is actually metabolized by the chicken or its gut microbiome. The presence of the toxic metabolites in chicken litter is environmentally relevant as chicken litter is commonly used as fertilizer. PMID:26876684

  15. Chronic arsenic poisoning from burning high-arsenic-containing coal in Guizhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Zheng, Baoshan; Aposhian, H Vasken; Zhou, Yunshu; Chen, Ming-Liang; Zhang, Aihua; Waalkes, Michael P

    2002-02-01

    Arsenic is an environmental hazard and the reduction of drinking water arsenic levels is under consideration. People are exposed to arsenic not only through drinking water but also through arsenic-contaminated air and food. Here we report the health effects of arsenic exposure from burning high arsenic-containing coal in Guizhou, China. Coal in this region has undergone mineralization and thus produces high concentrations of arsenic. Coal is burned inside the home in open pits for daily cooking and crop drying, producing a high concentration of arsenic in indoor air. Arsenic in the air coats and permeates food being dried producing high concentrations in food; however, arsenic concentrations in the drinking water are in the normal range. The estimated sources of total arsenic exposure in this area are from arsenic-contaminated food (50-80%), air (10-20%), water (1-5%), and direct contact in coal-mining workers (1%). At least 3,000 patients with arsenic poisoning were found in the Southwest Prefecture of Guizhou, and approximately 200,000 people are at risk for such overexposures. Skin lesions are common, including keratosis of the hands and feet, pigmentation on the trunk, skin ulceration, and skin cancers. Toxicities to internal organs, including lung dysfunction, neuropathy, and nephrotoxicity, are clinically evident. The prevalence of hepatomegaly was 20%, and cirrhosis, ascites, and liver cancer are the most serious outcomes of arsenic poisoning. The Chinese government and international organizations are attempting to improve the house conditions and the coal source, and thereby protect human health in this area.

  16. THE KETOGENIC DIET AS A TREATMENT PARADIGM FOR DIVERSE NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Min Rho

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Dietary and metabolic therapies have been attempted in a wide variety of neurological diseases, including epilepsy, headache, neurotrauma, Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, sleep disorders, brain cancer, autism, pain, and multiple sclerosis. The impetus for using various diets to treat – or at least ameliorate symptoms of – these disorders stems from both a lack of effectiveness of pharmacological therapies, and also the intrinsic appeal of implementing a more natural treatment. The enormous spectrum of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the aforementioned diseases would suggest a degree of complexity that cannot be impacted universally by any single dietary treatment. Yet, it is conceivable that alterations in certain dietary constituents could affect the course and impact the outcome of these brain disorders. Further, it is possible that a final common neurometabolic pathway might be influenced by a variety of dietary interventions. The most notable example of a dietary treatment with proven efficacy against a neurological condition is the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD used in patients with medically intractable epilepsy. While the mechanisms through which the KD works remain unclear, there is now compelling evidence that its efficacy is likely related to the normalization of aberrant energy metabolism. The concept that many neurological conditions are linked pathophysiologically to energy dysregulation could well provide a common research and experimental therapeutics platform, from which the course of several neurological diseases could be favorably influenced by dietary means. Here we provide an overview of studies using the KD in a wide panoply of neurologic disorders in which neuroprotection is an essential component.

  17. Neurology as career option among postgraduate medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namit B Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the context of inadequacy of neurology workforce in India, it is important to understand factors that post-graduate medical students consider for and against choosing neurology as their career option. Understanding these factors will help in planning strategies to encourage students to pursue a career in neurology. At present, there is a paucity of studies addressing this issue in India. Aims and Objectives: (1 To analyze factors, which post-graduate students consider for and against choosing neurology as a career specialty. (2 To access the level and quality of neurology exposure in the current MBBS and MD curricula. Materials and Methods: Statewide questionnaire based study was conducted in the state of Maharashtra for students eligible to take DM neurology entrance examination (MD Medicine and MD Pediatrics. Results: In this survey, 243 students were enrolled. Factors bringing students to neurology were - intellectual challenge and logical reasoning (72%, inspired by role model teachers (63%, better quality-of-life (51% and scope for independent practice without expensive infrastructure (48%. Factors preventing students from taking neurology were - perception that most neurological diseases are degenerative (78%, neurology is mainly an academic specialty (40%, neurophobia (43% and lack of procedures (57%. Inadequate exposure and resultant lack of self-confidence were common (31%, 70-80%. 84% of the students felt the need for a short term certification course in neurology after MD. Conclusions: To attract more students to neurology, "role model" teachers of neurology could interact and teach students extensively. Neurologists′ efforts to shed their diagnostician′s image and to shift their focus to therapeutics will help change the image of neurology. Out-patient neurology clinics should be incorporated early in the student′s career. Procedures attract students; hence, they should be made conversant with procedures and

  18. Bioaccumulation of Arsenic by Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademola O. Adeyemi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Arsenic is a known toxic element and its presence and toxicity in nature is a worldwide environmental problem. The use of microorganisms in bioremediation is a potential method to reduce as concentration in contaminated areas. Approach: In order to explore the possible bioremediation of this element, three filamentous fungi-Aspergillus niger, Serpula himantioides and Trametes versicolor were investigated for their potential abilities to accumulate (and possibly solubilize arsenic from an agar environment consisting of non buffered mineral salts media amended with 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8% (w/v arsenopyrite (FeAsS. Growth rates, dry weights, arsenic accumulation and oxalate production by the fungi as well as the pH of the growth media were all assessed during this study. Results: There was no visible solubilization of FeAsS particles underneath any of the growing fungal colonies or elsewhere in the respective agar plates. No specific patterns of growth changes were observed from the growth ratios of the fungi on agar amended with different amounts of FeAsS although growth of all fungi was stimulated by the incorporation of varying amounts of FeAsS into the agar with the exception of A. niger on 0.4% (w/v amended agar and T. versicolor on 0.8% (w/v amended agar. The amounts of dry weights obtained for all three fungi also did not follow any specific patterns with different amounts of FeAsS and the quantities obtained were in the order A. niger > S. himantioides > T. versicolor. All fungi accumulated as in their biomasses with all amounts of FeAsS although to varying levels and T. versicolor was the most effective with all amounts of FeAsS while A. niger was the least effective. Conclusion: The accumulation of arsenic in the biomasses of the test fungi as shown in this study may suggested a role for fungi through their bioaccumulating capabilities as agents in the possible bioremediation of arsenic contaminated environments.

  19. Hijacking membrane transporters for arsenic phytoextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Melissa S; McKinney, Elizabeth C; Meagher, Richard B; Smith, Aaron P

    2013-01-10

    Arsenic is a toxic metalloid and recognized carcinogen. Arsenate and arsenite are the most common arsenic species available for uptake by plants. As an inorganic phosphate (Pi) analog, arsenate is acquired by plant roots through endogenous Pi transport systems. Inside the cell, arsenate is reduced to the thiol-reactive form arsenite. Glutathione (GSH)-conjugates of arsenite may be extruded from the cell or sequestered in vacuoles by members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transporters. In the present study we sought to enhance both plant arsenic uptake through Pi transporter overexpression, and plant arsenic tolerance through ABC transporter overexpression. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing the high-affinity Pi transporter family members, AtPht1;1 or AtPht1;7, are hypersensitive to arsenate due to increased arsenate uptake. These plants do not exhibit increased sensitivity to arsenite. Co-overexpression of the yeast ABC transporter YCF1 in combination with AtPht1;1 or AtPht1;7 suppresses the arsenate-sensitive phenotype while further enhancing arsenic uptake. Taken together, our results support an arsenic transport mechanism in which arsenate uptake is increased through Pi transporter overexpression, and arsenic tolerance is enhanced through YCF1-mediated vacuolar sequestration. This work substantiates the viability of coupling enhanced uptake and vacuolar sequestration as a means for developing a prototypical engineered arsenic hyperaccumulator.

  20. 29 CFR 1915.1018 - Inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic arsenic. 1915.1018 Section 1915.1018 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... § 1915.1018 Inorganic arsenic. Note: The requirements applicable to shipyard employment under...